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Sample records for aftershock focal depths

  1. Focal Depth of the WenChuan Earthquake Aftershocks from modeling of Seismic Depth Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zeng, X.; Chong, J.; Ni, S.; Chen, Y.

    2008-12-01

    After the 05/12/2008 great WenChuan earthquake in Sichuan Province of China, tens of thousands earthquakes occurred with hundreds of them stronger than M4. Those aftershocks provide valuable information about seismotectonics and rupture processes for the mainshock, particularly accurate spatial distribution of aftershocks is very informational for determining rupture fault planes. However focal depth can not be well resolved just with first arrivals recorded by relatively sparse network in Sichuan Province, therefore 3D seismicity distribution is difficult to obtain though horizontal location can be located with accuracy of 5km. Instead local/regional depth phases such as sPmP, sPn, sPL and teleseismic pP,sP are very sensitive to depth, and be readily modeled to determine depth with accuracy of 2km. With reference 1D velocity structure resolved from receiver functions and seismic refraction studies, local/regional depth phases such as sPmP, sPn and sPL are identified by comparing observed waveform with synthetic seismograms by generalized ray theory and reflectivity methods. For teleseismic depth phases well observed for M5.5 and stronger events, we developed an algorithm in inverting both depth and focal mechanism from P and SH waveforms. Also we employed the Cut and Paste (CAP) method developed by Zhao and Helmberger in modeling mechanism and depth with local waveforms, which constrains depth by fitting Pnl waveforms and the relative weight between surface wave and Pnl. After modeling all the depth phases for hundreds of events , we find that most of the M4 earthquakes occur between 2-18km depth, with aftershocks depth ranging 4-12km in the southern half of Longmenshan fault while aftershocks in the northern half featuring large depth range up to 18km. Therefore seismogenic zone in the northern segment is deeper as compared to the southern segment. All the aftershocks occur in upper crust, given that the Moho is deeper than 40km, or even 60km west of the

  2. Evolution of aftershock statistics with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narteau, C.; Shebalin, P.; Holschneider, M.

    2013-12-01

    The deviatoric stress varies with depth and may strongly affect earthquake statistics. Nevertheless, if the Anderson faulting theory may be used to define the relative stress magnitudes, it remains extremely difficult to observe significant variations of earthquake properties from the top to the bottom of the seismogenic layer. Here, we concentrate on aftershock sequences in normal, strike-slip and reverse faulting regimes to isolate specific temporal properties of this major relaxation process with respect to depth. More exactly, we use Bayesian statistics of the Modified Omori Law to characterize the exponent p of the power-law aftershock decay rate and the duration c of the early stage of aftershock activity that does not fit with this power-law regime. Preliminary results show that the c-value decreases with depth without any significant variation of the p-value. Then, we infer the duration of a non power-law aftershock decay rate over short times can be related to the level of stress in the seismogenic crust.

  3. Aftershocks of the 2014 M6 South Napa Earthquake: Detection, Location, and Focal Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebeck, J.; Shelly, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The aftershock sequence of the South Napa earthquake is notable both for its low productivity and for its geometric complexity. The aftershocks do not clearly define a fault plane consistent with the NNW-striking vertical plane implied by the mainshock moment tensor and the mapped surface rupture, but instead seem to delineate multiple secondary structures at depth. We investigate this unusual sequence by identifying additional aftershocks that do not appear in the network catalog, relocating the combined aftershock catalog using waveform cross-correlation arrival times and double-difference techniques, and determining focal mechanisms for individual events and event clusters. Additional aftershocks are detected by applying a matched filter approach to the continuous seismic data at nearby stations, with the catalog earthquakes serving as the waveform templates. In tandem with new event detections, we measure precise differential arrival times between events, which we then use in double-difference event location. We detect about 4 times as many well-located aftershocks as in the network catalog. We relocate the events using double-difference in both a 1D and a 3D velocity model. Most of the aftershocks occur between 8 and 11 km depth, similar depth to the mainshock hypocenter and deeper than most of the slip imaged seismically and geodetically. The aftershocks form a diffuse NNW-trending structure, primarily to the north of the mainshock hypocenter and on the west side of the main surface rupture. Within this diffuse trend there are clusters of aftershocks, some suggesting a N-S strike, and some that appear to dip to the east or west. Preliminary single-event and composite focal mechanisms also imply N-S striking strike-slip structures. The mainshock hypocenter and many of the aftershocks occur near the intersection of a sharply defined NE-dipping seismicity structure and the probable location of the West Napa fault, suggesting that stress is concentrated at a

  4. Exploring aftershock properties with depth using Bayesian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narteau, Clement; Shebalin, Peter; Holschneider, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Stress magnitudes and frictional faulting properties vary with depth and may strongly affect earthquake statistics. Nevertheless, if the Anderson faulting theory may be used to define the relative stress magnitudes, it remains extremely difficult to observe significant variations of earthquake properties from the top to the bottom of the seismogenic layer. Here, we concentrate on aftershock sequences in normal, strike-slip and reverse faulting regimes to isolate specific temporal properties of this major relaxation process with respect to depth. More exactly, we use Bayesian statistics of the Modified Omori Law to characterize the exponent p of the power-law aftershock decay rate and the duration c of the early stage of aftershock activity that does not fit with this power-law regime. Preliminary results show that the c-value decreases with depth without any significant variation of the p-value. Then, we infer the duration of a non power-law aftershock decay rate over short times can be related to the level of stress in the seismogenic crust.

  5. High-Resolution Locations and Focal Mechanisms of Aftershocks of the September 5, 2012 Mw=7.6 Nicoya, Costa Rica Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laure, Duboeuf; Susan, Schwartz

    2015-04-01

    Subduction beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica generates the largest underthrusting earthquakes in the country with a recurrence interval of about 50 years. The most recent of these events occurred on September 5th 2012 (Mw 7.6). A vigorous aftershock sequence of more than 6400 earthquakes was recorded by a local seismic network within the first 4 months of the mainshock. We identify those aftershocks occurring on the mainshock fault plane and compare their locations to the 2012 mainshock slip distribution, the location of past interplate seismicity, and slow slip phenomena to better understand the mechanical behavior of this plate interface. Our focal mechanism determination includes all aftershocks occurring within the first nine days after the mainshock and aftershocks with magnitude greater than four occurring through the end of December 2012. We use the HASH (Hardebeck and Shearer, 2002) software package, based on first motion polarities, to obtain aftershock focal mechanisms. We are able to determine reliable focal mechanisms for 583 of the aftershocks and identify 264 of them as occurring on the plate interface. All of these are relocated using HypoDD (Waldhauser and Ellsworth, 2000) and their locations are compared with other plate boundary activity. We find no significant seismicity patterns as a function of time or magnitude, but confirm that deeper underthrusting events occur in the north compared to the south as revealed by previous studies (Newman et al., 2002). Most of the aftershocks occur in and around the updip part of the coseismic rupture zone. This suggests that the Nicoya mainshock released all of the accumulated strain in the deeper part of the plate interface, leaving none to occur as aftershocks. Previous interface seismicity in this region reveals a similar distribution to the aftershocks, however it extends to deeper depth and defines the entire seismogenic zone. The coseismic slip occurs even deeper than the background interface

  6. How ubiquitous are aftershock sequences driven by high pressure fluids at depth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Strong evidence suggests that two earthquake-aftershock episodes, the 2004 Niigata (Japan) sequence and the 1997 Umbria-Marche (Italy) sequence, were driven by high pressure fluids at depth. Since Niigata was in a compressional environment and Umbria-Marche in extension, a question arises about whether such a mechanism is more general than just these two cases. Although it is not clear by what mechanism fluids of sufficient volume can be trapped in the lower crust, if such pockets of high pressure fluids exist, then they must necessarily be expelled when a large earthquake provides the hydraulic connection to the hydrostatically pressured free surface. In this talk, aftershock data is analyzed for a number of different earthquakes in a variety of tectonic settings, including 1992 Landers, 1994 Northridge, and the 2001 Bhuj earthquakes. Comparisons are made between model results of the evolved fluid pressure state from a high pressure source at depth, and the spatio-temporal distributions of aftershocks. The data is further analyzed and compared with model results for differences in the rate of aftershocks (p-value in Omori's Law) and their dependence on the orientation of the mainshock relative to the prevailing regional stress field.

  7. The impact of static stress change, dynamic stress change, and the background stress on aftershock focal mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2014-01-01

    The focal mechanisms of earthquakes in Southern California before and after four M ≥ 6.7 main shocks provide insight into how fault systems respond to stress and changes in stress. The main shock static stress changes have two observed impacts on the seismicity: changing the focal mechanisms in a given location to favor those aligned with the static stress change and changing the spatial distribution of seismicity to favor locations where the static stress change aligns with the background stress. The aftershock focal mechanisms are significantly aligned with the static stress changes for absolute stress changes of ≥ 0.02 MPa, for up to ~20 years following the main shock. The dynamic stress changes have similar, although smaller, effects on the local focal mechanisms and the spatial seismicity distribution. Dynamic stress effects are best observed at long periods (30–60 s) and for metrics based on repeated stress cycling in the same direction. This implies that dynamic triggering operates, at least in part, through cyclic shear stress loading in the direction of fault slip. The background stress also strongly controls both the preshock and aftershock mechanisms. While most aftershock mechanisms are well oriented in the background stress field, 10% of aftershocks are identified as poorly oriented outliers, which may indicate limited heterogeneity in the postmain shock stress field. The fault plane orientations of the outliers are well oriented in the background stress, while their slip directions are not, implying that the background stress restricts the distribution of available fault planes.

  8. Aftershock activity of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake determined using the Kathmandu strong motion seismographic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyanagi, Masayoshi; Takai, Nobuo; Shigefuji, Michiko; Bijukchhen, Subeg; Sasatani, Tsutomu; Rajaure, Sudhir; Dhital, Megh Raj; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics of aftershock activity of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake (Mw 7.8) were evaluated. The mainshock and aftershocks were recorded continuously by the international Kathmandu strong motion seismographic array operated by Hokkaido University and Tribhuvan University. Full waveform data without saturation for all events enabled us to clarify aftershock locations and decay characteristics. The aftershock distribution was determined using the estimated local velocity structure. The hypocenter distribution in the Kathmandu metropolitan region was well determined and indicated earthquakes located shallower than 12 km depth, suggesting that aftershocks occurred at depths shallower than the Himalayan main thrust fault. Although numerical investigation suggested less resolution for the depth component, the regional aftershock epicentral distribution of the entire focal region clearly indicated earthquakes concentrated in the eastern margin of the major slip region of the mainshock. The calculated modified Omori law's p value of 1.35 suggests rapid aftershock decay and a possible high temperature structure in the aftershock region.

  9. Focal depth measurement of scanning helium ion microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongxuan; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Han; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-07-14

    When facing the challenges of critical dimension measurement of complicated nanostructures, such as of the three dimension integrated circuit, characterization of the focal depth of microscopes is important. In this Letter, we developed a method for characterizing the focal depth of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) by using an atomic force microscope tip characterizer (ATC). The ATC was tilted in a sample chamber at an angle to the scanning plan. Secondary electron images (SEIs) were obtained at different positions of the ATC. The edge resolution of the SEIs shows the nominal diameters of the helium ion beam at different focal levels. With this method, the nominal shapes of the helium ion beams were obtained with different apertures. Our results show that a small aperture is necessary to get a high spatial resolution and high depth of field images with HIM. This work provides a method for characterizing and improving the performance of HIM.

  10. Routine estimate of focal depths for moderate and small earthquakes by modelling regional depth phase sPmP in eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Peci, V.; Adams, J.; McCormack, D.

    2003-04-01

    from sP-P arrival times and/or depths of aftershocks for moderate earthquakes in western Quebec (WQU), and (2) to depths from Pg, Sg arrival times for earthquakes in Charlevoix (CHV) which lies under a dense network and has a reasonable crustal model. In all cases the differences are 2 km or less. We conclude that if sPmP and reference phase Pg or PmP are correctly recognized, and a reasonable crustal model is available, the error in focal depth is around 2 km. As the focal depth estimate is model-dependent, the better the crustal model is, the more accurate the focal depth. The focal mechanism used to calculate synthetics does not cause large errors in focal depth, as it does not severely change arrival times. To date, we have roughly analyzed the sPmP phases for about 80 earthquakes from 1995 to 2002 with mN >= 2.8 in WQU and for about 10 in CHV. Estimated focal depths range from about 5 km to over 30 km.

  11. Seismic amplitude measurements suggest foreshocks have different focal mechanisms than aftershocks.

    PubMed

    Lindh, A; Fuis, G; Mantis, C

    1978-07-01

    The ratio of the amplitudes of P and S waves from the foreshocks and aftershocks to three recent California earthquakes show a characteristic change at the time of the main events. As this ratio is extremely sensitive to small changes in the orientation of the fault plane, a small systematic change in stress or fault configuration in the source region may be inferred. These results suggest an approach to the recognition of foreshocks based on simple measurements of the amplitudes of seismic waves. PMID:17777756

  12. Efficient subwavelength focusing of light with a long focal depth.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Li, Qing; Fu, Jian; Wu, James; Lin, Feng; Wu, Xingkun

    2015-10-21

    We demonstrate an efficient method for far-field subwavelength focusing by a novel two-component axicon structure. Annular beams generated by a fiber axicon are focused using a micro-cone reflector, creating a quasi-Bessel beam with a high convergence angle of up to 40°. A center focal spot diameter of 0.41λ was achieved at a power efficiency of over 40%, with a focal depth of 9λ and a working distance as long as 35 μm. We further demonstrate that experimental knife-edge measurements mapping the beam focal intensity agree with numerical simulations of the structure. This method shows demonstrable promise in overcoming the optical focusing limit of single-element axicons and great potential for use in high tolerance, high-resolution applications in optical systems. PMID:26395150

  13. Increasing lengths of aftershock zones with depths of moderate-size earthquakes on the San Jacinto Fault suggests triggering of deep creep in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Recent geodetic studies along the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California revealed a shallower locking depth than the seismogenic depth outlined by microseismicity. This disagreement leads to speculations that creeping episodes drive seismicity in the lower part of the seismogenic zone. Whether deep creep occurs along the SJF holds key information on how fault slips during earthquake cycle and potential seismic hazard imposed to southern California. Here we apply a matched filter technique to 10 M > 4 earthquake sequences along the SJF since 2000 and obtain more complete earthquake catalogues. We then systematic investigate spatio-temporal evolutions of these aftershock sequences. We find anomalously large aftershock zones for earthquakes occurred below the geodetically inferred locking depth (i.e. 11-12 km), while aftershock zones of shallower main shocks are close to expectations from standard scaling relationships. Although we do not observe clear migration of aftershocks, most aftershock zones do expand systematically with logarithmic time since the main shock. All the evidences suggest that aftershocks near or below the locking depth are likely driven by deep creep following the main shock. The presence of a creeping zone below 11-12 km may have significant implications on the maximum sizes of events in this region.

  14. Improving Focal Depth Estimates: Studies of Depth Phase Detection at Regional Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A.; Reiter, D. T.; Shumway, R. H.

    2006-12-01

    The accurate estimation of the depth of small, regionally recorded events continues to be an important and difficult explosion monitoring research problem. Depth phases (free surface reflections) are the primary tool that seismologists use to constrain the depth of a seismic event. When depth phases from an event are detected, an accurate source depth is easily found by using the delay times of the depth phases relative to the P wave and a velocity profile near the source. Cepstral techniques, including cepstral F-statistics, represent a class of methods designed for the depth-phase detection and identification; however, they offer only a moderate level of success at epicentral distances less than 15°. This is due to complexities in the Pn coda, which can lead to numerous false detections in addition to the true phase detection. Therefore, cepstral methods cannot be used independently to reliably identify depth phases. Other evidence, such as apparent velocities, amplitudes and frequency content, must be used to confirm whether the phase is truly a depth phase. In this study we used a variety of array methods to estimate apparent phase velocities and arrival azimuths, including beam-forming, semblance analysis, MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) (e.g., Schmidt, 1979), and cross-correlation (e.g., Cansi, 1995; Tibuleac and Herrin, 1997). To facilitate the processing and comparison of results, we developed a MATLAB-based processing tool, which allows application of all of these techniques (i.e., augmented cepstral processing) in a single environment. The main objective of this research was to combine the results of three focal-depth estimation techniques and their associated standard errors into a statistically valid unified depth estimate. The three techniques include: 1. Direct focal depth estimate from the depth-phase arrival times picked via augmented cepstral processing. 2. Hypocenter location from direct and surface-reflected arrivals observed on sparse

  15. The 7.9 Denali Fault, Alaska Earthquake of November 3, 2002: Aftershock Locations, Moment Tensors and Focal Mechanisms from the Regional Seismic Network Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratchkovski, N. A.; Hansen, R. A.; Kore, K. R.

    2003-04-01

    The largest earthquake ever recorded on the Denali fault system (magnitude 7.9) struck central Alaska on November 3, 2002. It was preceded by a magnitude 6.7 earthquake on October 23. This earlier earthquake and its zone of aftershocks were located ~20 km to the west of the 7.9 quake. Aftershock locations and surface slip observations from the 7.9 quake indicate that the rupture was predominately unilateral in the eastward direction. The geologists mapped a ~300-km-long rupture and measured maximum offsets of 8.8 meters. The 7.9 event ruptured three different faults. The rupture began on the northeast trending Susitna Glacier Thrust fault, a splay fault south of the Denali fault. Then the rupture transferred to the Denali fault and propagated eastward for 220 km. At about 143W the rupture moved onto the adjacent southeast-trending Totschunda fault and propagated for another 55 km. The cumulative length of the 6.7 and 7.9 aftershock zones along the Denali and Totschunda faults is about 380 km. The earthquakes were recorded and processed by the Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC). The AEIC acquires and processes data from the Alaska Seismic Network, consisting of over 350 seismograph stations. Nearly 40 of these sites are equipped with the broad-band sensors, some of which also have strong motion sensors. The rest of the stations are either 1 or 3-component short-period instruments. The data from these stations are collected, processed and archived at the AEIC. The AEIC staff installed a temporary seismic network of 6 instruments following the 6.7 earthquake and an additional 20 stations following the 7.9 earthquake. Prior to the 7.9 Denali Fault event, the AEIC was locating 35 to 50 events per day. After the event, the processing load increased to over 300 events per day during the first week following the event. In this presentation, we will present and interpret the aftershock location patterns, first motion focal mechanism solutions, and regional seismic

  16. Application example: Preliminary Results of ISOLA use to find moment tensor solutions and centroid depth applied to aftershocks of Mw=8.8 February 27 2010, Maule Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacif, S. V.; Sanchez, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    We selected seven aftershocks from Maule earthquake between 33.5°S to 35°S from May to September to find single source inversion. The data were provided by XY Chile Ramp Experiment* which was deployed after great Maule earthquake. Waveform data are from 13 broad band stations chosen from the 58 broad band stations deployed by IRIS-PASCAL from April to September 2010. Stations are placed above the normal subduction section south of ~33.5°S. Events were located with an iterative software called Hypocenter using one dimensional local model, obtained above for the forearc region between 33°S to 35°S. We used ISOLA which is a fortran code with a Matlab interface to obtain moment tensors solutions, optimum position and time of the subevents. Values depth obtained by a grid search of centroid position show range values which are compatibles with the interplate seismogenic zone. Double-Couple focal mechanism solutions (Figure 1) show 4 thrust events which can be associated with that zone. However, only one of them has strike, dip and rake of 358°, 27° and 101 respectively, appropriate to be expected for interplate seismogenic zone. On the other hand, the other 3 events show strike and normal double-couple focal mechanism solutions (Figure 1). This last topic makes association to those events to the contact of the Nazca and South American plate difficult. Nevertheless, in a first stage, their depths may allow possibility of an origin there. * The facilities of the IRIS Data Management System, and specifically the IRIS Data Management Center, were used for access to waveform, metadata or products required in this study. The IRIS DMS is funded through the National Science Foundation and specifically the GEO Directorate through the Instrumentation and Facilities Program of the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement EAR-0552316. Some activities of are supported by the National Science Foundation EarthScope Program under Cooperative Agreement EAR-0733069

  17. Depth-fused multi-focal plane displays enable accurate depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Hong; Liu, Sheng

    2010-11-01

    Many different approaches to three-dimensional (3-D) displays have been explored, most of which are considered to be stereoscopic-type. The stereoscopic-type displays create depth perception by presenting two perspective images, one for each eye, of a 3D scene from two slightly different viewing positions. They have been the dominant technology adopted for many applications, spanning the fields of flight simulation, scientific visualization, medicine, engineering design, education and training, and entertainment systems. Existing stereoscopic displays, however, lack the ability to produce accurate focus cues, which have been suggested to contribute to various visual artifacts such as visual fatigue. This paper will review some recent work on vari- and multi-focal plane display technologies that are capable of rendering nearly correct focus cues for 3D objects and these technologies have great promise of enabling more accurate depth perception for 3D tasks.

  18. Analysis of the 2012 Oct 27 Haida Gwaii Aftershock Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, T.; Brillon, C.; Bentkowski, W.; White, M.; Rosenberger, A.; Rogers, G. C.; Vernon, F.; Kao, H.

    2013-12-01

    The magnitude 7.7 thrust earthquake that occurred on 2012 Oct 28 offshore of Haida Gwaii (formerly the Queen Charlotte Islands), in British Columbia, Canada, produced a rich and on-going aftershock sequence. Ten months of aftershock events are determined from analyst reviewed solutions and automatic detectors and locators. For automated solutions, rotating the waveforms and running P and S wave filters (Rosenberger, 2010) over them produced phase arrivals for an improved catalogue of aftershocks compared to using a traditional signal to noise ratio detector on standard vertical and horizontal component seismograms. The automated aftershock locations from the rotated waveforms are compared to the automated locations from the standard vertical and horizontal waveforms and to analyst locations (which are generally M>2.5). The best of the automated solutions are comparable in quality to analyst solutions and much more numerous making this a viable method of processing extensive aftershock sequences. They outline a region approximately 50 km wide and 100 km long, with the aftershocks in two parallel bands. Most of the aftershocks are not on the rupture surface but are in the overlying or underlying plates. It is thought that this earthquake represents the Pacific plate thrusting underneath the North America plate with the rupture surface lying beneath the sedimentary Queen Charlotte terrace and terminating to the east in the vicinity of the Queen Charlotte fault. Due to the one-sided station distribution on land, depth trades off with distance offshore, resulting in poor depth determinations. However, using ocean bottom seismometers deployed early in the aftershock sequence, depth resolution was significantly improved. First motion focal North America plate with the rupture surface lying beneath the sedimentary Queen Charlotte terrace and terminating to the east in the vicinity of the Queen Charlotte fault.mechanisms for a portion of the aftershock sequence are compared

  19. Relocation of Early and Late Aftershocks of the 2001 Bhuj Earthquake Using Joint Hypocentral Determination (JHD) Technique: Implication toward the Continued Aftershock Activity for more than Four Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik; Narsaiah, R.; Sairam, B.; Satyamurty, C.; Raju, I. P.

    2006-08-01

    We employed layered model joint hypocentral determination (JHD) with station corrections to improve location identification for the 26 January, 2001 Mw 7.7 Bhuj early and late aftershock sequence. We relocated 999 early aftershocks using the data from a close combined network (National Geophysical Research Institute, India and Center for Earthquake Research Institute, USA) of 8 18 digital seismographs during 12 28 February, 2001. Additionally, 350 late aftershocks were also relocated using the data from 4 10 digital seismographs/accelerographs during August 2002 to December 2004. These precisely relocated aftershocks (error in the epicentral location<30 meter, error in the focal depth estimation < 50 meter) delineate an east-west trending blind thrust (North Wagad Fault, NWF) dipping (~ 45°) southward, about 25 km north of Kachchh main land fault (KMF), as the causative fault for the 2001 Bhuj earthquake. The aftershock zone is confined to a 60-km long and 40-km wide region lying between the KMF to the south and NWF to the north, extending from 2 to 45 km depth. Estimated focal depths suggest that the aftershock zone became deeper with the passage of time. The P- and S-wave station corrections determined from the JHD technique indicate that the larger values (both +ve and -ve) characterize the central aftershock zone, which is surrounded by the zones of smaller values. The station corrections vary from -0.9 to +1.1 sec for the P waves and from -0.7 to +1.4 sec for the S waves. The b-value and p-value of the whole aftershock (2001 2004) sequences of Mw ≥ 3 are estimated to be 0.77 ± 0.02 and 0.99 ± 0.02, respectively. The p-value indicates a smaller value than the global median of 1.1, suggesting a relatively slow decay of aftershocks, whereas, the relatively lower b-value (less than the average b-value of 1.0 for stable continental region earthquakes of India) suggests a relatively higher probability for larger earthquakes in Kachchh in comparison to other

  20. Nanometric depth resolution from multi-focal images in microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dalgarno, Heather I. C.; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Dada, Adetunmise C.; Towers, Catherine E.; Gibson, Gavin J.; Parton, Richard M.; Davis, Ilan; Warburton, Richard J.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for tracking the position of small features in three dimensions from images recorded on a standard microscope with an inexpensive attachment between the microscope and the camera. The depth-measurement accuracy of this method is tested experimentally on a wide-field, inverted microscope and is shown to give approximately 8 nm depth resolution, over a specimen depth of approximately 6 µm, when using a 12-bit charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and very bright but unresolved particles. To assess low-flux limitations a theoretical model is used to derive an analytical expression for the minimum variance bound. The approximations used in the analytical treatment are tested using numerical simulations. It is concluded that approximately 14 nm depth resolution is achievable with flux levels available when tracking fluorescent sources in three dimensions in live-cell biology and that the method is suitable for three-dimensional photo-activated localization microscopy resolution. Sub-nanometre resolution could be achieved with photon-counting techniques at high flux levels. PMID:21247948

  1. Estimates of velocity structure and source depth using multiple P waves from aftershocks of the 1987 Elmore Ranch and Superstition Hills, California, earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mori, J.

    1991-01-01

    Event record sections, which are constructed by plotting seismograms from many closely spaced earthquakes recorded on a few stations, show multiple free-surface reflections (PP, PPP, PPPP) of the P wave in the Imperial Valley. The relative timing of these arrivals is used to estimate the strength of the P-wave velocity gradient within the upper 5 km of the sediment layer. Consistent with previous studies, a velocity model with a value of 1.8 km/sec at the surface increasing linearly to 5.8 km/sec at a depth of 5.5 km fits the data well. The relative amplitudes of the P and PP arrivals are used to estimate the source depth for the aftershock distributions of the Elmore Ranch and Superstition Hills main shocks. Although the depth determination has large uncertainties, both the Elmore Ranch and Superstition Hills aftershock sequencs appear to have similar depth distribution in the range of 4 to 10 km. -Author

  2. The use of waveform shapes to automatically determine earthquake focal depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sipkin, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    Earthquake focal depth is an important parameter for rapidly determining probable damage caused by a large earthquake. In addition, it is significant both for discriminating between natural events and explosions and for discriminating between tsunamigenic and nontsunamigenic earthquakes. For the purpose of notifying emergency management and disaster relief organizations as well as issuing tsunami warnings, potential time delays in determining source parameters are particularly detrimental. We present a method for determining earthquake focal depth that is well suited for implementation in an automated system that utilizes the wealth of broadband teleseismic data that is now available in real time from the global seismograph networks. This method uses waveform shapes to determine focal depth and is demonstrated to be valid for events with magnitudes as low as approximately 5.5.

  3. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  4. Thermal Structure and its Relationship to Focal Depth in the Crust Beneath the Japanese Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2001-12-01

    The thickness of the seismogenic crustal layer correlates with surface heat flow in most intraplate seismic areas of the world [e.g., Sibson 1982]. It has been realized, however there should be variability of the focal depths among different tectonic settings. Comparisons of the heat flow [Yamano et al., 1997], thermal gradient [Tanaka et al., 1999] and earthquake [Japan Meteorological Agency, JMA] databases for Japanese Islands may provide detailed geologic and geophysical information about the earthquake process of island arc. Each data set is distributed uneven geographically; some are dense, other sparse. All data sets were interpolated onto regular grids of points. The grid is at latitude and longitude with a spacing of 0.25° x 0.25° . Using the JMA data, the earthquake focal depths are evaluated the depth above which 90 % of earthquakes occur, D90 [e.g., Doser and Kanamori, 1986]. D90 ranges from about 10 km to 30 km. This suggests that our analysis cannot catch a locally shallow focal depth. Heat flow and thermal gradient is correlated and the inverse relationship between heat flow or thermal gradient and D90 is obvious. We calculated temperatures in the crust using the steady-state, one-dimensional, heat conductive transport model with heat generation. The evaluated temperatures for D90 range between 200° C and 500° C except for heat flow data more than 130 m W m-2 and thermal gradient data more than 50 K km-1. These very high heat flow and thermal gradient values may not affect the thermal structure in the crust. The consistency of temperature for D90 over a large depth interval almost all over the Japanese Islands supports that the temperature is the dominant factor governing the focal depth in the crust. A comparison of our results with other tectonic regions could provide evidence for variations in temperatures for D90.

  5. Depth-encoded synthetic aperture optical coherence tomography of biological tissues with extended focal depth.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jianhua; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-23

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be able to provide three-dimensional (3D) volumetric images of scattering biological tissues for in vivo medical diagnostics. Unlike conventional optical microscopy, its depth-resolving ability (axial resolution) is exclusively determined by the laser source and therefore invariant over the full imaging depth. In contrast, its transverse resolution is determined by the objective's numerical aperture and the wavelength which is only approximately maintained over twice the Rayleigh range. However, the prevailing laser sources for OCT allow image depths of more than 5 mm which is considerably longer than the Rayleigh range. This limits high transverse resolution imaging with OCT. Previously, we reported a novel method to extend the depth-of-focus (DOF) of OCT imaging in Mo et al.Opt. Express 21, 10048 (2013)]. The approach is to create three different optical apertures via pupil segmentation with an annular phase plate. These three optical apertures produce three OCT images from the same sample, which are encoded to different depth positions in a single OCT B-scan. This allows for correcting the defocus-induced curvature of wave front in the pupil so as to improve the focus. As a consequence, the three images originating from those three optical apertures can be used to reconstruct a new image with an extended DOF. In this study, we successfully applied this method for the first time to both an artificial phantom and biological tissues over a four times larger depth range. The results demonstrate a significant DOF improvement, paving the way for 3D high resolution OCT imaging beyond the conventional Rayleigh range. PMID:25836528

  6. Analysis of Mw 7.2 2014 Molucca Sea earthquake and its aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wiyono, Samsul Hadi; Wandono, Wandono

    2016-05-01

    A Mw 7.2 earthquake struck an area in the Molucca Sea region on November 15, 2014, and was followed by more than 300 aftershocks until the end of December 2014. This earthquake was the second largest event in the Molucca Sea during the last decade and was well recorded by local networks. Although the seismicity rate of the aftershocks was declining at the end of 2014, several significant earthquakes with magnitude (Mw) larger than five still occurred from January to May 2015 within the vicinity of the mainshock location. In this study, we investigated the earthquake process and its relation to the increasing seismicity in the Molucca Sea within six months after the earthquake. We utilized teleseismic double-difference hypocenter relocation method using local, regional, and teleseismic direct body-wave arrival times of 514 earthquakes from the time of mainshock occurrence to May 2015. Furthermore, we analyzed the focal mechanism solutions from the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), Japan. From our results, we observed that aftershocks propagated along the NNE-SSW direction within a 100 km fault segment length of the Mayu Ridge. The highest number of the aftershocks was located in the SSW direction of the main event. The aftershocks were terminated at around 60 km depth, which may represent the location of the top of the Molucca Sea Plate (MSP). Between January and May 2015, several significant earthquakes propagated westward and were extended to the Molucca Sea slab. From focal mechanism catalog, we found that the mainshock mechanism was reverse with strike 192o and dip 55o. While most of the large aftershock mechanisms were consistent with the main event, several aftershocks had reverse, oblique mechanisms. Stress inversion result from focal mechanism data revealed that the maximum stress direction was SE and was not perpendicular with fault direction. We suggest that the non-perpendicular maximum stress caused several

  7. Aftershocks of the june 20, 1978, Greece earthquake: A multimode faulting sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carver, D.; Bollinger, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    A 10-station portable seismograph network was deployed in northern Greece to study aftershocks of the magnitude (mb) 6.4 earthquake of June 20, 1978. The main shock occurred (in a graben) about 25 km northeast of the city of Thessaloniki and caused an east-west zone of surface rupturing 14 km long that splayed to 7 km wide at the west end. The hypocenters for 116 aftershocks in the magnitude range from 2.5 to 4.5 were determined. The epicenters for these events cover an area 30 km (east-west) by 18 km (north-south), and focal depths ranges from 4 to 12 km. Most of the aftershocks in the east half of the aftershock zone are north of the surface rupture and north of the graben. Those in the west half are located within the boundaries of the graben. Composite focalmechanism solutions for selected aftershocks indicate reactivation of geologically mapped normal faults in the area. Also, strike-slip and dip-slip faults that splay off the western end of the zone of surface ruptures may have been activated. The epicenters for four large (M ??? 4.8) foreshocks and the main shock were relocated using the method of joint epicenter determination. Collectively, those five epicenters form an arcuate pattern convex southward, that is north of and 5 km distant from the surface rupturing. The 5-km separation, along with a focal depth of 8 km (average aftershock depth) or 16 km (NEIS main-shock depth), implies that the fault plane dips northward 58?? or 73??, respectively. A preferred nodal-plane dip of 36?? was determined by B.C. Papazachos and his colleagues in 1979 from a focal-mechanism solution for the main shock. If this dip is valid for the causal fault and that fault projects to the zone of surface rupturing, a decrease of dip with depth is required. ?? 1981.

  8. Temperature distribution and focal depth in the crust of the northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Ishikawa, Yuzo

    2002-11-01

    The thickness of seismogenic crust layer correlates with surface heat flow in most interplate seismic areas of the world (e.g., Sibson, 1982). Although the inverse relationship between heat flow and the base of seismogenic zone is obvious, the quantitative relationships are less certain and there should be variability of the focal depths among different tectonic settings. Comparisons of the heat flow (Yamano et al., 1997), thermal gradient (Tanaka et al., 1999) and earthquake (Japan Meteorological Agency, JMA) databases for the northeastern Japan provide detailed geologic and geophysical information about the earthquake process of island arc. Temperatures in the crust were calculated using a steady-state, one-dimensional, heat conductive transport model with heat generation as a function of heat flow and thermal gradient. The evaluated temperatures for D90, the depth above which 90% of earthquakes occur, range between 200°C and 500°C except for high heat flow and thermal gradient data. The consistency of temperature for D90 over a large depth interval supports that the temperature is the dominant factor governing the focal depth in the crust.

  9. Double peacock eye optical element for extended focal depth imaging with ophthalmic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Lenny A.; Millán, María S.; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2012-04-01

    The aged human eye is commonly affected by presbyopia, and therefore, it gradually loses its capability to form images of objects placed at different distances. Extended depth of focus (EDOF) imaging elements can overcome this inability, despite the introduction of a certain amount of aberration. This paper evaluates the EDOF imaging performance of the so-called peacock eye phase diffractive element, which focuses an incident plane wave into a segment of the optical axis and explores the element's potential use for ophthalmic presbyopia compensation optics. Two designs of the element are analyzed: the single peacock eye, which produces one focal segment along the axis, and the double peacock eye, which is a spatially multiplexed element that produces two focal segments with partial overlapping along the axis. The performances of the peacock eye elements are compared with those of multifocal lenses through numerical simulations as well as optical experiments in the image space. The results demonstrate that the peacock eye elements form sharper images along the focal segment than the multifocal lenses and, therefore, are more suitable for presbyopia compensation. The extreme points of the depth of field in the object space, which represent the remote and the near object points, have been experimentally obtained for both the single and the double peacock eye optical elements. The double peacock eye element has better imaging quality for relatively short and intermediate distances than the single peacock eye, whereas the latter seems better for far distance vision.

  10. Focal Depths and Mechanisms of Earthquakes in the Himalayan-Tibetan Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, L.; Li, G.; Khan, N.; Zhao, J.; Lin, D.

    2015-12-01

    The complexity of the Himalayan-Tibetan lithospheric deformation is evident from extensive seismicity and diverse focal mechanism solutions. Here we investigate the focal depths and fault plane solutions of moderate earthquakes in the Himalayan-Tibetan region by teleseismic waveform modeling and a multi-scale double-difference earthquake relocation method. Shallow earthquakes are widespread across the whole study region. In the central Tibet, earthquakes are restricted to the upper crust and originate dominantly by strike-slip faulting, in agreement with low velocity layers observed previously in the lower crust and strong S-wave attenuation zones observed in the uppermost mantle. In the northern and southern Tibet, where the Asian and Indian plate subduct beneath the central Tibet, earthquakes appear to be distributed throughout the thickness of the crust and exhibit dominantly reverse faulting (Bai et al., 2015a). Intermediate-depth earthquakes are mostly located at the eastern and western Himalayan syntaxes, which reflect the ongoing deformation along the plate interface. The continental slab beneath the Indian-Eurasian collision zone deforms in a more complex manner than the oceanic slab subduction, combining tension, shearing and oblique convergence with plate subduction (Bai et al., 2015b). References Bai, L., Li, G., Khan, N.G., Zhao, J., and Ding, L., 2015a. Focal depths and mechanisms of shallow earthquakes in the Himalayan-Tibetan region, Gondwana Research, accepted. Bai, L., and Zhang, T., 2015b. Complex deformation pattern of the Pamir-Hindu Kush region inferred from multi-scale double-difference earthquake relocations, Tectonophysics, 638: 177-184, doi:10.1016/j.tecto.2014.11.006.

  11. Microseismicity and focal mechanisms of the intermediate-depth Bucaramanga nest, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; Pennington, W.D.; Meyer, R.P.

    1987-12-10

    The Bucaramanga nest of intermediate-depth seismicity in northern Colombia was investigated from microearthquakes (m/sub b/less than or equal to4.3) recorded from June 20 to July 6, 1979, by a local array of 12 digital three-component seismographs. Of 161 events studied, 142 are from the nest and 19 define a thin Wadati-Benioff (W-B) zone, mainly from 110 to 190 km depth. The W-B zone, part of the Bucaramanga segment, strikes N10/sup 0/ E with a dip increasing wtih depth from 30/sup 0/ E to near-vertical beneath the nest. The 89 best located events from within the nest define a volume of about 8 km (NW) by 4 km (NE) by 4 km (depth) centered at 161 km depth, with relative location accuracies of +- 0.5 to +- 1.0 km. Double-couple fault plane solutions of 59 events were determined from an objective procedure using P wave polarities and S/P amplitude ratios. There is no dominant trend in focal mechanisms nor any reasonable correlation with regional stress patterns or previously determined mechanisms from teleseismic data. The subduction and assimilation of a linear feature (such as an island arc undergoing a phase transformation) may explain the existence of the Bucaramanga nest. However, the extraordinarily high rate of seismicity suggests that the nest may be moving rate several orders of magnitude faster than the rate of relative plate motion alone. The intense seismicity and variation in focal mechanisms suggest that the nest represents some aspect of stress release associated with the ascent of fluids, perhaps brine or magma, that will ultimately result in the initiation of volcanic activity over this recently emplaced W-B zone. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  12. Aftershock seismicity of the 2010 Maule Mw=8.8 Chile, earthquake: Correlation between co-seismic slip models and aftershock distribution?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I.; Hayes, G.; Haberland, C.; Comte, D.; Roecker, S.

    2012-01-01

    The 27 February 2010 Maule, Chile (Mw=8.8) earthquake is one of the best instrumentally observed subduction zone megathrust events. Here we present locations, magnitudes and cumulative equivalent moment of the first -2 months of aftershocks, recorded on a temporary network deployed within 2 weeks of the occurrence of the mainshock. Using automatically-determined onset times and a back projection approach for event association, we are able to detect over 30,000 events in the time period analyzed. To further increase the location accuracy, we systematically searched for potential S-wave arrivals and events were located in a regional 2D velocity model. Additionally, we calculated regional moment tensors to gain insight into the deformation history of the aftershock sequence. We find that the aftershock seismicity is concentrated between 40 and 140 km distance from the trench over a depth range of 10 to 35 km. Focal mechanisms indicate a predominance of thrust faulting, with occasional normal faulting events. Increased activity is seen in the outer-rise region of the Nazca plate, predominantly in the northern part of the rupture area. Further down-dip, a second band of clustered seismicity, showing mainly thrust motion, is located at depths of 40–45 km. By comparing recent published mainshock source inversions with our aftershock distribution, we discriminate slip models based on the assumption that aftershocks occur in areas of rapid transition between high and low slip, surrounding high-slip regions of the mainshock.

  13. Hypocentral Relocations of the 2008 Mt. Carmel, Illinois Aftershock Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, K.; Hamburger, M. W.; Pavlis, G. L.; Horton, S. P.; Withers, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    On April 18, 2008, a moderate sized earthquake (Mw 5.2, hypocentral depth of 16 km) occurred near the Indiana-Illinois state border within 3 km of the Mt. Carmel-New Harmony fault at the northern termination of the Wabash Valley Fault System. A total of 257 aftershocks were recorded over the next month by a fourteen-station temporary network deployed by Indiana University and University of Memphis/Center of Earthquake Research and Information (CERI). The number of recorded aftershocks is greater than aftershocks recorded from previous earthquakes in the WVFS of similar magnitude within the last 50 years. The number and density of local stations allowed the generation of precise hypocentral relocations with the combination of waveform cross-correlation and joint hypocentral techniques. The relocated hypocenters indicate a well-defined near-vertical fault plane striking east-west. The fault orientation is consistent with the focal mechanism of the main shock and nearly orthogonal with respect to the trace of the neighboring Mt. Carmel-New Harmony fault. The interpreted ruptured fault orientation suggests the aftershock sequence occurred on a transfer structure at the fault termination. The structure may be related to the change in deformation styles suggested by the transition from the northeast-trending WVFS to the northwest-trending La Salle anticlinorium.

  14. High-resolution relocation and mechanism of aftershocks of the 2007 Tocopilla (Chile) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenzalida, A.; Schurr, B.; Lancieri, M.; Sobiesiak, M.; Madariaga, R.

    2013-08-01

    event. We also studied the focal mechanisms of the aftershocks, most of them were thrust events like the mainshock. As the aftershock activity was significantly reduced, on 2007 December 13, an ML 6.1 event occurred offshore of the Mejillones peninsula reactivating the seismicity. Three days later the Michilla intraslab earthquake of Mw 6.8 ruptured an almost vertical fault with slab-push mechanism. The aftershocks locations of this event define a planar zone about 11 km in depth, situated right bellow the subduction interface.

  15. Internal tectonic structure of the Central American Wadati-Benioff zone based on analysis of aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špičák, Aleš; Hanuš, Václav; Vaněk, Jiří; Běhounková, Marie

    2007-09-01

    Relocated Engdahl et al. (1998) global seismological data for 10 aftershock sequences were used to analyze the internal tectonic structure of the Central American subduction zone; the main shocks of several of these were the most destructive and often referenced earthquakes in the region (e.g., the 1970 Chiapas, 1983 Osa, 1992 Nicaragua, 1999 Quepos, 2001 El Salvador earthquakes). The spatial analysis of aftershock foci distribution was performed in a rotated Cartesian coordinate system (x, y, z) related to the Wadati-Benioff zone, and not in a standard coordinate system ($\\varphi$, λ, h are latitude, longitude, focal depth, respectively). Available fault plane solutions were also transformed into the plane approximating the Wadati-Benioff zone. The spatial distribution of earthquakes in each aftershock sequence was modeled as either a plane fit using a least squares approximation or a volume fit with a minimum thickness rectangular box. The analysis points to a quasi-planar distribution of earthquake foci in all aftershock sequences, manifesting the appurtenance of aftershocks to fracture zones. Geometrical parameters of fracture zones (strike, dip, and dimensions) hosting individual sequences were calculated and compared with the seafloor morphology of the Cocos Plate. The smooth character of the seafloor correlates with the aftershock fracture zones oriented parallel to the trench and commonly subparallel to the subducting slab, whereas subduction of the Cocos Ridge and seamounts around the Quepos Plateau coincides with steeply dipping fracture zones. Transformed focal mechanisms are almost exclusively (>90%) of normal character.

  16. Internal tectonic structure of the Central American Wadati-Benioff zone based on analysis of aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å PičáK, Aleš; Hanuš, VáClav; VaněK, JiřÃ.­; BěHounková, Marie

    2007-09-01

    Relocated Engdahl et al. (1998) global seismological data for 10 aftershock sequences were used to analyze the internal tectonic structure of the Central American subduction zone; the main shocks of several of these were the most destructive and often referenced earthquakes in the region (e.g., the 1970 Chiapas, 1983 Osa, 1992 Nicaragua, 1999 Quepos, 2001 El Salvador earthquakes). The spatial analysis of aftershock foci distribution was performed in a rotated Cartesian coordinate system (x, y, z) related to the Wadati-Benioff zone, and not in a standard coordinate system (ϕ, λ, h are latitude, longitude, focal depth, respectively). Available fault plane solutions were also transformed into the plane approximating the Wadati-Benioff zone. The spatial distribution of earthquakes in each aftershock sequence was modeled as either a plane fit using a least squares approximation or a volume fit with a minimum thickness rectangular box. The analysis points to a quasi-planar distribution of earthquake foci in all aftershock sequences, manifesting the appurtenance of aftershocks to fracture zones. Geometrical parameters of fracture zones (strike, dip, and dimensions) hosting individual sequences were calculated and compared with the seafloor morphology of the Cocos Plate. The smooth character of the seafloor correlates with the aftershock fracture zones oriented parallel to the trench and commonly subparallel to the subducting slab, whereas subduction of the Cocos Ridge and seamounts around the Quepos Plateau coincides with steeply dipping fracture zones. Transformed focal mechanisms are almost exclusively (>90%) of normal character.

  17. Aftershocks of the western Argentina (Caucete) earthquake of 23 November 1977: some tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, C.J.; Bollinger, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    An aftershock survey, using a network of eight portable and two permanent seismographs, was conducted for the western Argentina (Caucete) earthquake (MS 7.3) of November 23, 1977. Monitoring began December 6, almost 2 weeks after the main shock and continued for 11 days. The data set includes 185 aftershock hypocenters that range in the depth from near surface to more than 30 km. The spatial distribution of those events occupied a volume of about 100 km long ??50 km wide ??30 km thick. The volumnar nature of the aftershock distribution is interpreted to be a result of a bimodal distribution of foci that define east- and west-dipping planar zones. Efforts to select which of those zones was associated with the causal faulting include special attention to the determination of the mainshock focal depth and dislocation theory modeling of the coseismic surface deformation in the epicentral region. Our focal depth (25-35 km) and modeling studies lead us to prefer an east-dipping plane as causal. A previous interpretation by other investigators used a shallower focal depth (17 km) and similar modeling calculations in choosing a west-dipping plane. Our selection of the east-dipping plane is physically more appealing because it places fault initiation at the base of the crustal seismogenic layer (rather than in the middle of that layer) which requires fault propagation to be updip (rather than downdip). ?? 1988.

  18. Focal mechanisms and depths of earthquakes in central Pakistan: A tectonic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quittmeyer, Richard C.; Kafka, Alan L.; Armbruster, John G.

    1984-04-01

    Focal mechanisms and depths for seven earthquakes in central Pakistan were determined from an analysis of Rayleigh waves of 20-to 50-s periods. In east-central Pakistan, the nodal planes for some solutions strike obliquely to the grain of surface structures. This observation supports the contention of other workers that a thin surficial unit, decoupled from the basement along a surface of decollement, characterizes this region. In west-central Pakistan, relative movement between the Indian and Eurasian plates is at least partially accommodated by seismic slip along the Chaman fault. Other faults, which are situated to the east of and lie subparallel to the Chaman fault, may also take up some of the relative plate motion. Observed activity within the zone of convergent-type structure in central Pakistan may be a result of the greater component of convergence across the Indian-Eurasian plate boundary north of Quetta, Pakistan. Appendix is available with entire article on microfiche. Order from American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20009. Document B83-010; $2.50. Payment must accompany order.

  19. Stress evolution following the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake: Consequences for afterslip, relaxation, aftershocks and departures from Omori decay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chan, C.-H.; Stein, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    We explore how Coulomb stress transfer and viscoelastic relaxation control afterslip and aftershocks in a continental thrust fault system. The 1999 September 21 Mw = 7.6 Chi-Chi shock is typical of continental ramp-d??collement systems throughout the world, and so inferences drawn from this uniquely well-recorded event may be widely applicable. First, we find that the spatial and depth distribution of aftershocks and their focal mechanisms are consistent with the calculated Coulomb stress changes imparted by the coseismic rupture. Some 61 per cent of the M ??? 2 aftershocks and 83 per cent of the M ??? 4 aftershocks lie in regions for which the Coulomb stress increased by ???0.1 bars, and there is a 11-12 per cent gain in the percentage of aftershocks nodal planes on which the shear stress increased over the pre-Chi Chi control period. Second, we find that afterslip occurred where the calculated coseismic stress increased on the fault ramp and d??collement, subject to the condition that friction is high on the ramp and low on the d??collement. Third, viscoelastic relaxation is evident from the fit of the post-seismic GPS data on the footwall. Fourth, we find that the rate of seismicity began to increase during the post-seismic period in an annulus extending east of the main rupture. The spatial extent of the seismicity annulus resembles the calculated ???0.05-bar Coulomb stress increase caused by viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip, and we find a 9-12 per cent gain in the percentage of focal mechanisms with >0.01-bar shear stress increases imparted by the post-seismic afterslip and relaxation in comparison to the control period. Thus, we argue that post-seismic stress changes can for the first time be shown to alter the production of aftershocks, as judged by their rate, spatial distribution, and focal mechanisms. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.

  20. Detection of Postseismic Crustal Movement of an Earthquake with Focal Depth Exceeding 650 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.; Mitsui, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Although a deep-focus earthquake often causes strong ground shaking due to low attenuation of seismic waves propagating through the subducting slab, it never leaves permanent deformation of the surface detectable with GPS. Here we report that a deep earthquake on August 14, 2012 (Mw 7.7, focal depth 654 km) beneath Sakhalin has been causing postseismic crustal movements in Hokkaido exceeding a centimeter by a hitherto unknown mechanism. Heki and Mitsui (EPSL 2013) found landward movements of GPS stations to have accelerated on segments adjacent to those ruptured in the 2003 Tokachi-Oki (Mw8.0) and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki (Mw9.0) earthquakes in NE Japan. Sea floor GPS measurements by Japan Coast Guard also revealed post-2011 landward movement of MYG1 as fast as ~30 cm per year. From these observations, we inferred that the subduction of the Pacific Plate slab was significantly accelerated (1.5 and 3 times) after the two interplate earthquakes. During interseismic periods, the balance between the up-dip (viscous resistance and interplate coupling) and down-dip (slab pull and ridge push) forces realizes constant subduction rate. A megathrust event reduces interplate coupling, and let down-dip force temporarily exceed the other one, resulting in the accelerated subduction under the new balance attained by increased viscous resistance. Accelerated regime would be temporary and the geological rate will resume as interplate coupling recovers. We newly found that the landward movements of GPS stations in the eastern Hokkaido have undergone small but distinct acceleration of up to 1 cm/year in conjunction with the 2012 August deep-focus earthquake. Within-slab seismicity of down-dip compression mechanisms is activated in the deep part of subducting slabs after megathrust events (Lay et al., PEPI 1989), due possibly to the increased edge resistance caused by the slab acceleration. The 2012 deep earthquake occurred close to the down-dip end of the straight part of the Pacific

  1. The 2012 August 11 MW 6.5, 6.4 Ahar-Varzghan earthquakes, NW Iran: aftershock sequence analysis and evidence for activity migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezapour, Mehdi

    2016-02-01

    The Ahar-Varzghan doublet earthquakes with magnitudes MW 6.5 and 6.4 occurred on 2012 August 11 in northwest Iran and were followed by many aftershocks. In this paper, we analyse ˜5 months of aftershocks of these events. The Ahar-Varzghan earthquakes occurred along complex faults and provide a new constraint on the earthquake hazard in northwest Iran. The general pattern of relocated aftershocks defines a complex seismic zone covering an area of approximately 25 × 10 km2. The Ahar-Varzghan aftershock sequence shows a secondary activity which started on November 7, approximately 3 months after the main shocks, with a significant increase in activity, regarding both number of events and their magnitude. This stage was characterized by a seismic zone that propagated to the west of the main shocks. The catalogue of aftershocks for the doublet earthquake has a magnitude completeness of Mc 2.0. A below-average b-value for the Ahar-Varzghan sequence indicates a structural heterogeneity in the fault plane and the compressive stress state of the region. Relocated aftershocks occupy a broad zone clustering east-west with near-vertical dip which we interpret as the fault plane of the first of the doublet main shocks (MW 6.5). The dominant depth range of the aftershocks is from 3 to about 20 km, and the focal depths decrease toward the western part of the fault. The aftershock activity has its highest concentration in the eastern and middle parts of the active fault, and tapers off toward the western part of the active fault segment, indicating mainly a unilateral rupture toward west.

  2. The Mw 5.8 Virginia Earthquake of August 23, 2011 and its Aftershocks: A Shallow High Stress Drop Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, W. L.; Imanishi, K.; Luetgert, J. H.; Kruger, J.; Hamilton, J.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze the hypocentral distribution and source parameters of the aftershocks of the Virginia Earthquake of August 23, 2011 using a temporary array of telemetered instruments deployed within 20 km of the main shock. Our data come from four USGS NetQuakes accelerometers and seven IRIS/PASSCAL seismometers that were established within a few days of the earthquake. Aftershock seismograms at these near-source stations are characterized by impulsive, high-frequency P and S phases at most sites. In addition, we use the five closest permanent stations (60 - 310 km distance) to analyze the main shock. Hypocenters, crustal velocity model and station corrections were determined using the program VELEST (Kissling, et al, 1994). The aftershocks define a 10-km-long, N 30 degree E striking, 45 degree ESE dipping fault. This fault plane agrees well with the USGS moment tensor solutions for the main shock. Aftershock depths range from 2.5 to 8 km, placing the sequence in the Cambrian metamorphic rocks of the Eastern Piedmont thrust sheet. We relocated the main shock relative to a well-located Mw 3.5 aftershock using the P-wave arrival times at the five permanent stations. The main shock epicenter lies in the middle of the aftershock zone. Its focal depth, although not well constrained, is similar to the aftershocks. A crustal-scale seismic reflection profile was acquired by the USGS in 1981 along I-64 just 4 km southwest of the nearest aftershocks. This profile runs nearly parallel to the dip direction of the aftershock zone and has been interpreted to contain many ESE-dipping reverse faults in the allochthonous upper crust (Harris et al., 1986; Pratt, et al., 1988). When projected onto the reflection profile the aftershocks locate within a relatively non-reflective zone bounded above and below by prominent bands of more shallowly dipping reflectors reported by Pratt et al. (1988) raising the question whether or not the earthquake reactivated a pre-existing fault. Seismic

  3. Mechanical origin of aftershocks.

    PubMed

    Lippiello, E; Giacco, F; Marzocchi, W; Godano, C; de Arcangelis, L

    2015-01-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering. PMID:26497720

  4. Mechanical origin of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippiello, E.; Giacco, F.; Marzocchi, W.; Godano, C.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2015-10-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering.

  5. Mechanical origin of aftershocks

    PubMed Central

    Lippiello, E.; Giacco, F.; Marzocchi, W.; Godano, C.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering. PMID:26497720

  6. Seismological aspects of the 27 June 2015 Gulf of Aqaba earthquake and its sequence of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd el-aal, Abd el-aziz Khairy; Badreldin, Hazem

    2016-04-01

    On 27 June 2015, a moderate earthquake with magnitude Mb 5.2 struck the Gulf of Aqaba near Nuweiba City. This event was instrumentally recorded by the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) and many other international seismological centres. The event was felt in all the cities on the Gulf of Aqaba, as well as Suez City, Hurghada City, the greater Cairo Metropolitan Area, Israel, Jordan and the north-western part of Saudi Arabia. No casualties were reported, however. Approximately 95 aftershocks with magnitudes ranging from 0.7 to 4.2 were recorded by the ENSN following the mainshock. In the present study, the source characteristics of both the mainshock and the aftershocks were estimated using the near-source waveform data recorded by the very broadband stations of the ENSN, and these were validated by the P-wave polarity data from short period stations. Our analysis reveals that an estimated seismic moment of 0.762 × 1017 Nm was released, corresponding to a magnitude of Mw 5.2, a focal depth of 14 km, a fault radius of 0.72 km and a rupture area of approximately 1.65 km2. Monitoring the sequence of aftershocks reveals that they form a cluster around the mainshock and migrated downwards in focal depth towards the west. We compared the results we obtained with the published results from the international seismological centres. Our results are more realistic and accurate, in particular with respect to the epicenteral location, magnitude and fault plane solution which are in accordance with the hypocentre distribution of the aftershocks.

  7. Seismological aspects of the 27 June 2015 Gulf of Aqaba earthquake and its sequence of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd el-aal, Abd el-aziz Khairy; Badreldin, Hazem

    2016-07-01

    On 27 June 2015, a moderate earthquake with magnitude Mb 5.2 struck the Gulf of Aqaba near Nuweiba City. This event was instrumentally recorded by the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) and many other international seismological centres. The event was felt in all the cities on the Gulf of Aqaba, as well as Suez City, Hurghada City, the greater Cairo Metropolitan Area, Israel, Jordan and the north-western part of Saudi Arabia. No casualties were reported, however. Approximately 95 aftershocks with magnitudes ranging from 0.7 to 4.2 were recorded by the ENSN following the mainshock. In the present study, the source characteristics of both the mainshock and the aftershocks were estimated using the near-source waveform data recorded by the very broadband stations of the ENSN, and these were validated by the P-wave polarity data from short period stations. Our analysis reveals that an estimated seismic moment of 0.762 × 1017 Nm was released, corresponding to a magnitude of Mw 5.2, a focal depth of 14 km, a fault radius of 0.72 km and a rupture area of approximately 1.65 km2. Monitoring the sequence of aftershocks reveals that they form a cluster around the mainshock and migrated downwards in focal depth towards the west. We compared the results we obtained with the published results from the international seismological centres. Our results are more realistic and accurate, in particular with respect to the epicenteral location, magnitude and fault plane solution which are in accordance with the hypocentre distribution of the aftershocks.

  8. Earthquake forecasting test for Kanto district: Analysis of an earthquake catalog considering focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, S.; Tsuruoka, H.; Hirata, N.

    2013-12-01

    We started a research for constructing a 3-dimensional (3D) earthquake forecasting model for the Kanto district in Japan under the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters. Because seismicity in this area ranges from shallower part to a depth of 80 km due to subducting Philippine Sea plate and Pacific plate, we need to study effect of earthquake depth distribution. We are developing forecasting models based on the results of 2D modeling. In the first step of the study, we defined the 3D - forecasting region in Kanto with a grid of horizontal 0.1° x 0.1° and every 10 km in a depth from 0 km to 100 km. Then, it was confirmed that RI model showed a good performance in the 3D-forecasting model compared with a 2D model which is non-divided column from 0 km to100 km in a depth. RI model (Nanjo, 2011) learned past seismicity from JMA catalog for 10 years from 1998 to 2009 to estimate probabilities of earthquakes from November 2009 to January 2010. Because we aim to improve forecasting performance of a model of a large earthquake, we need a longer period of earthquake data than current studies. In this study, we analyzed completeness magnitude (Mc) of JMA catalog from 1970 to 2007 with 3 depth ranges, 0 - 30km, 30 - 60km and 60 - 100km by the Maximum curvature method (Wiemer and Wyss, 2000) to assess a quality of the catalog considering a depth of hypocenters. This method tended to estimate Mc smaller than visual inspection method. Time sequence of the Mc from 1970 to 1997 decreased independent of a depth, which means that detection limit of the hypocenter is homogeneous in a depth, and quality of the catalog improved with a time. On the other hand, Mc from 1997 to 2007 showed heterogeneous distribution with a depth. In this presentation, we discuss how use the heterogeneous catalog to develop a 3D forecasting model in Japan. The authors thank the Japan Meteorological Agency for the earthquake catalog. This work is sponsored by the

  9. Static stress triggering explains the empirical aftershock distance decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, Sebastian; Moradpour, Javad; Davidsen, Jörn

    2014-12-01

    The shape of the spatial aftershock decay is sensitive to the triggering mechanism and thus particularly useful for discriminating between static and dynamic stress triggering. For California seismicity, it has been recently recognized that its form is more complicated than typically assumed consisting of three different regimes with transitions at the scale of the rupture length and the thickness of the crust. The intermediate distance range is characterized by a relative small decay exponent of 1.35 previously declared to relate to dynamic stress triggering. We perform comprehensive simulations of a simple clock-advance model, in which the number of aftershocks is just proportional to the Coulomb-stress change, to test whether the empirical result can be explained by static stress triggering. Similarly to the observations, the results show three scaling regimes. For simulations adapted to the depths and focal mechanisms observed in California, we find a remarkable agreement with the observation over the whole distance range for a fault distribution with fractal dimension of 1.8, which is shown to be in good agreement with an independent analysis of California seismicity.

  10. Focal Mechanisms and Stress Environment of the 12 May 2008 Wenchuan, China, Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Luo, Y.; Ni, S.

    2012-12-01

    The 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw=7.9) was the largest earthquake in China ever recorded by modern seismic instruments. It generated numerous moderate sized aftershocks that were well recorded by both permanent stations as well as portable instruments deployed after the mainshock. These waveform records yield high-quality data for the determination of focal mechanisms of aftershocks, which in turn provide important information for the investigation of regional stress field and the seismogenic environment in the Wenchuan earthquake source region. In this study, we determine the focal mechanisms, depths and moment magnitudes of moderate-sized (Mw ≥ 4.0) Wenchuan aftershocks using broadband waveform records. The focal mechanism results are then used to obtain the orientation and ratio of the principle stresses by the damped linear stress inversion method of Hardebeck & Michael (2006). Our results show that the majority of the moderate aftershocks occur at a depth range of 10-20 km and outside of the major rupture zones of the mainshock. The Wenchuan source region remains under a nearly horizontal compression with mostly thrust and occasional strike-slip faulting, especially towards the two ends of the rupture of the main shock. There is also clearly local variations in the orientation of the principle stresses.

  11. Comparison of Early Aftershocks for the 2004 Mid-Niigata and 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquakes in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J.; Kano, Y.; Enescu, B.

    2007-12-01

    We compared the aftershock sequences of the similar 2004 Mid-Niigata (Mw6.6) and 2007 Noto Hanto (Mw6.7) earthquakes in central Japan. Although the two mainshocks had similar size, depth, and focal mechanisms, the numbers of aftershocks were quite different, with the Niigata mainshock producing a much stronger sequence. We examined the continuously recorded data from nearby Hi-Net stations operated by the National Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), to identify the early aftershocks following both mainshocks. A 5 hz high-pass filter was chosen to facilitate identification of the high-frequency arrivals from individual aftershocks. We used 6 stations distributed at distances within about 30 km. Aftershocks were identified by looking at large printouts of the continuous records for the six stations and peak amplitudes were measured to calculate the magnitude. The magnitude determination using these high-pass filtered records was calibrated by using a set of 30 earthquakes that were also listed in the catalog of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). We estimate that the completeness level of small aftershocks is about Mj3.5. The event counts show that the aftershock sequences of the two earthquakes were quite similar for about the first 7 minutes. Following that time, the Niigata aftershocks clearly continue at a much higher rate which is about 3 times the rate of the Noto earthquake. The time where the rates diverge corresponds to the occurrence of a Mj6.3 earthquake in the Niigata sequence. This pattern can be seen in both the plots for the Mj¡Ý3.5 and Mj¡Ý4.0 events. Since there are more earthquakes for the Mj¡Ý3.5 data set, the time resolution is better. These results show an enhanced triggering of aftershocks for the Niigata sequence several minutes after the mainshock. The Niigata region is an area of hydrocarbon production with regions of high pressure fluids, and Sibson (2007) proposes that the swarm-like behavior is due to

  12. Comparison of the non-proliferation event aftershocks with other Nevada Test Site events

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.; Goldstein, P.; Zucca, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to develop technology for on-site inspection of ambiguous underground seismic events, we have been working to identify phenomenology of aftershock seismicity which would be useful for discriminating between nuclear explosions, chemical explosions, earthquakes or other seismic events. Phenomenology we have investigated includes; the spatial distribution of aftershocks, the number of aftershocks as a function of time after the main event, the size of the aftershocks, and waveform frequency content. Our major conclusions are: (1) Depending on local geologic conditions, aftershock production rate two weeks after zero time ranges from 1 to 100 per day. (2) Aftershocks of concentrated chemical explosions such as the NPE are indistinguishable from aftershocks of nuclear explosions. (3) Earthquake and explosion aftershock sequences may be differentiated on the basis of depth, magnitude, and in some cases, frequency content of seismic signals.

  13. Thermal Regime Inferred from Magnetic Anomaly Data in the Crust beneath the Japanese Islands, and its Relationship to Focal Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2003-12-01

    One of the indicators of lithospheric strength is the focal depth distribution of earthquakes. Temperature has long been regarded as an important variable in determining the seismogenic portion of the lithosphere. The thickness of seismogenic crust layer correlates with surface heat flow in most interplate seismic areas of the world [e.g., Sibson, 1982]. However, heat flow measurements are often widely spaced, requiring an extrapolation of the data to estimate the thermal structure in the crust in some regions. The uncertainties associated with these extrapolations preclude improving on the general correlation between heat flow and depth of seismicity. We used another approach to estimate the thermal structure in the crust. The bottom of the magnetized crust determined from the spectral analysis of residual magnetic anomalies is generally interpreted as the level of the Curie point isotherm. We estimate the bottom of the magnetized crust, Zb, of squares of 2.125o subregions using the magnetic anomaly map of the Japanese Islands [Makino et al., 1992]. At the same region, the thickness of seismogrnic crust is estimated as the depth above which 90 percent of the earthquakes occur, D90, using good quality hypocenters by JMA (Japan Meteorological Agency) data. Zb and D90 range from about 11 to 32 km and 12 km to 28 km, respectively. This suggests that our analysis cannot catch a locally shallow depth. And it is consistent with the expected inverse relation between Zb and the minimum heat flow values [Yamano et al., 1997] within the subregions. The inverse relation between Zb and D90 suggests that this analysis is useful to estimate the regional thermal structure.

  14. Aftershock relocation and frequency-size distribution, stress inversion and seismotectonic setting of the 7 August 2013 M = 5.4 earthquake in Kallidromon Mountain, central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, Athanassios; Karastathis, Vassilios; Moshou, Alexandra; Valkaniotis, Sotirios; Mouzakiotis, Evangelos; Papathanassiou, George

    2014-03-01

    On August 7, 2013 a moderate earthquake (NOA ML = 5.1, NOA Mw = 5.4) occurred in central Kallidromon Mountain, in the Pthiotis region of central Greece. 2270 aftershocks were relocated using a modified 1-D velocity model for this area. The b-value of the aftershock sequence was b = 0.85 for a completeness magnitude of Mc = 1.7. The rate of aftershock decay was determined at p = 0.63. The spatial distribution of the aftershock sequence points towards the reactivation of a N70° ± 10°E striking normal fault at crustal depths between 8 and 13 km. A NNW-SSE cross-section imaged the activation of a steep, south dipping normal fault. A stress inversion analysis of 12 focal mechanisms showed that the minimum horizontal stress is extensional at N173°E. No primary surface ruptures were observed in the field; however, the earthquake caused severe damage in the villages of the Kallidromon area. The imaged fault strike and the orientation of the long-axis of the aftershock sequence distribution are both at a high-angle to the strike of known active faults in this area of central Greece. We interpret the Kallidromon seismic sequence as release of extensional seismic strain on secondary, steep faults inside the Fokida-Viotia crustal block.

  15. Relocation of aftershocks of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake: A new insight into seismotectonics of the Kachchh seismic zone, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik; Pandey, O. P.

    2010-05-01

    In view of an anomalous crust-mantle structure beneath the 2001 Bhuj earthquake region, double-difference relocations of 1402 aftershocks of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake were determined, using an improved 1D velocity model constructed from 3D velocity tomograms based on data from 10 to 58 three-component seismograph stations. This clearly delineated four major tectonic features: (i) south-dipping north Wagad fault (NWF), (ii and iii) south-dipping south Wagad faults 1 and 2 (SWF 1, SWF 2), and (iv) a northeast dipping transverse fault (ITF), which is a new find. The relocated aftershocks correlate satisfactorily with the geologically mapped and inferred faults in the epicentral region. The relocated focal depths delineate a marked variation to the tune of 12 km in the brittle-ductile transition depths beneath the central aftershock zone that could be attributed to a lateral variation in crustal composition (more or less mafic) or in the level of fracturing across the fault zone. A fault intersection between the NWF and ITF has been clearly mapped in the 10-20 km depth range beneath the central aftershock zone. It is inferred that large intraplate stresses associated with the fault intersection, deepening of the brittle-ductile transition to a depth of 34 km due to the presence of mafic/ultramafic material in the crust-mantle transition zone, and the presence of aqueous fluids (released during the metamorphic process of eclogitisation of lower crustal olivine-rich rocks) and volatile CO 2 at the hypocentral depths, might have resulted in generating the 2001 Bhuj earthquake sequence covering the entire lower crust.

  16. Aftershocks triggered by fluid intrusion: Evidence for the aftershock sequence occurred 2014 in West Bohemia/Vogtland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, S.; Fischer, T.; Čermáková, H.; Bachura, M.; Vlček, J.

    2016-04-01

    The West Bohemia/Vogtland region, central Europe, is well known for its repeating swarm activity. However, the latest activity in 2014, although spatially overlapping with previous swarm activity, consisted of three classical aftershock sequences triggered by ML3.5, 4.4, and 3.5 events. To decode the apparent system change from swarm-type to mainshock-aftershock characteristics, we have analyzed the details of the major ML4.4 sequence based on focal mechanisms and relocated earthquake data. Our analysis shows that the mainshock occurred with rotated mechanism in a step over region of the fault plane, unfavorably oriented to the regional stress field. Most of its intense aftershock activity occurred in-plane with classical characteristics such as (i) the maximum magnitude of the aftershocks is significantly less than the mainshock magnitude and (ii) the decay can be well fitted by the Omori-Utsu law. However, the absolute number of aftershocks and the fitted Omori-Utsu c and p parameters are much larger than for typical sequences. By means of the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model, we show that an additional aseismic source with an exponentially decaying strength triggered a large fraction of the aftershocks. Corresponding pore pressure simulations with an exponentially decreasing flow rate of the fluid source show a good agreement with the observed spatial migration front of the aftershocks extending approximately with log(t). Thus, we conclude that the mainshock opened fluid pathways from a finite fluid source into the fault plane explaining the unusual high rate of aftershocks, the migration patterns, and the exponential decrease of the aseismic signal.

  17. Implications of mainshock-aftershocks interactions during the 2013 Ebreichsdorf sequence, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tary, Jean-Baptiste; Apoloner, Maria-Theresia; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-04-01

    The Vienna basin is a pull-apart basin located at the contact between the Alpine arc and the Eurasian plate, with the Eastern Alps to the West, the Western Carpathian to the East, the Bohemian massif to the North, and the Pannonian basin to the South. The southern border of this basin, called the Vienna Basin Fault System (VBFS), is accommodating part of the extrusion of the Pannonian basin (~1-2 mm/yr) due to the convergence between the Adriatic microplate and the Eurasian plate. The VBFS is a sinistral strike-slip fault and one of the most active fault in Austria. Along the VBFS, the seismicity is mainly concentrated in separate clusters with a spacing of approximately 20 km. In 2000 and 2013, two sequences constituted by two main shocks and 20-30 aftershocks occurred in one of these clusters located close to Ebreichsdorf, approximately 30 km south of Vienna. We focus here on the sequence of 2013 whose earthquakes were relocated using the double-difference method. The two main shocks, with local magnitudes of 4.2 and very similar focal mechanisms (N63, sinistral strike-slip), seem to be almost collocated. The aftershocks are located mainly to the northwest and at shallower depths compared with the main shocks. In order to better understand the relationships between the two main shocks and their aftershocks, we use two simple models of Coulomb failure stress to investigate possible coseismic static stress transfer between the main shocks and the aftershocks: the constant apparent friction model and the isotropic poroelastic model. The Coulomb failure stress change at the location of most aftershocks is positive but under 0.01 MPa. Aftershock triggering due to coseismic static stress is then unlikely. On the other hand, two other mechanisms could drive this sequence i.e., rapid non-linear pore pressure diffusion along the fault plane or aseismic slip. Given inter-event distances and times of ~0.5-1 km and hours to days, respectively, a high hydraulic diffusivity of

  18. Early aftershock statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narteau, C.; Shebalin, P.; Holschneider, M.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2009-04-01

    In the Limited Power Law model (LPL) we consider that after a triggering event - the so-called mainshock - rocks subject to sufficiently large differential stress can fail spontaneously by static fatigue. Then, earlier aftershocks occur in zones of highest stress and the c-value, i.e. the delay before the onset of the power-law aftershock decay rate, depends on the amplitude of the stress perturbation in the aftershock zone. If we assume that this stress perturbation is proportional to the absolute level of stress in the area, the model also predicts that shorter delay occur in zones of higher stress. Here, we present two analyses that support such a prediction. In these analyses, we use only aftershocks of 2.5 < M < 4.5 earthquakes to avoid well-known artifacts resulting from overlapping records. First, we analyze the c-value across different types of faulting in southern California to compare with the differential shear stress predicted by a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. As expected, we find that the c-value is on average shorter for thrust earthquakes (high stress) than for normal ones (low stress), taking intermediate values for strike-slip earthquakes (intermediate stress). Second, we test the hypothesis that large earthquakes occur in zones where the level of stress is abnormally high. Instead of the c-value we use the < t >-value, the geometric average of early aftershock times. One more time, we observed that M > 5 earthquakes occur where and when the < t >-value is small. This effect is even stronger for M > 6 earthquakes.

  19. Influence of depth, focal mechanism, and tectonic setting on the shape and duration of earthquake source time functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Heidi

    2001-06-01

    Source time functions of 255 moderate to great earthquakes obtained from inversions of teleseismic body waves by Tanioka and Ruff [1997] and coworkers were compared in a systematic way. They were scaled to remove the effect of moment and to allow the direct comparison and averaging of time function shape as well as duration. Time function durations picked by Tanioka and Ruff [1997] are proportional to the cube root of seismic moment if moments from the Harvard centroid moment tensor catalog are used. The average duration of scaled time functions is shorter and the average shape has a more abrupt termination for deeper events than shallower ones, with a distinct change occurring at ˜40 km depth. The complexity of the time functions, as quantified by the number of subevents, appears to decrease below ˜40 km depth. Furthermore, among events shallower than 40 km, the average duration of scaled time functions is shorter, and their average shape has a more abrupt termination (1) for events with strike-slip focal mechanisms compared to thrust events and (2) for the few thrust events associated with an intraplate setting compared to the majority associated with an interplate (subduction) boundary. In each of these cases, events in more technically and seismically active settings have a longer duration and a more gradual termination. This can be interpreted in terms of lower stress drops and/or slower rupture velocities at active plate boundaries, suggesting that fault rheology depends on slip rate and may evolve as total fault slip accumulates. Furthermore, differences in average time function shape and duration associated with different subduction zones suggest that differences exist in the rheology on the plate boundaries at the various subduction zones. Supporting data table is available via Web browser or via Anonymous FTP from ftp://kosmos.agu.org, directory "append" (Username = "anonymous", Password = "guest"); subdirectories in the ftp site are arranged by paper

  20. Earthquake Rupture at Focal Depth, Part I: Structure and Rupture of the Pretorius Fault, TauTona Mine, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesakkers, V.; Murphy, S.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    oblique-normal slip. The mechanical analysis of this rupture-zone is presented in Part II (H eesakkers et al., Earthquake Rupture at Focal Depth, Part II: Mechanics of the 2004 M2.2 Earthquake Along the Pretorius Fault, TauTona mine, South Africa 2011, this volume).

  1. Aftershock Triggering and Estimation of the Coulomb Stress Changes with Approach of Optimally Oriented Fault Planes: Examples of Some Contemporary Earthquakes in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Alper

    2013-04-01

    The Coulomb Stress changes due to the some moderate and large earthquakes are shaped according to the orientations of reciever faults or weakness zones along the corresponding seismogenic zones. In some cases, the determination of the fault plane parameters (e.g. length, width, strike, dip) of the receiver faults are more difficult due to the tectonical complexity of the region. Therefore, in order to understand the aftershock distrubition in such areas Coulomb stress changes can be calculated under the assumption of optimally oriented fault planes which increases the spatial correlation between stress changes and aftershock distribution. In the scope of the present sutdy, aftershock distrubiton of some contemporary earthquakes in Turkey (Simav (Mw 5.8), May 2011; Van (Mw 7.0), Oct 2011 and Gulf of Fethiye (Mw 6.1), June 2012) and their coulomb stress changes were correlated. Fault plane parameters of these earthquakes which suggest three different types of focal mechanism were calculated using moment tensor inversion technique and aftershock location data in a period of 30 days for each corresponding events were taken from Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) catalog. The focal mechanisms of the selected earthquakes represent normal, strike slip and thrust faulting for the earthquakes of Simav, Gulf of Fethite and Van, respectively. Coulomb Stress Changes were calculated using the open source Matlab based (Coulomb 3.3) codes. The calculations were performed by assuming Poisson's ratio and apparent friction coefficient to be 0.25 and 0.4, respectively. The coulomb stress variations were calculated at fixed depths for each event and aftershocks were selected as ±4 km for corresponding depths. Keeping in mind that the increase of static stress more than 0.5 bar can cause the triggered events in an area, the accordance rates of Coulomb stress changes and aftershock distribution under different tectonic regimes were disscussed. The accordance

  2. The 24 May 2014 Mw 6.9 Gokceada, North Aegean Sea Earthquake and Its Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydar Gorgun, B.; Gorgun, E.

    2014-12-01

    On 2014 May 24, the Gokceada Island in northern Aegean Sea region was hit by an Mw = 6.9 earthquake. The Gokceada earthquake occurred 43 km SW of Gokceada Island. Centroid moment tensors for 42 events with Mw between 3.5 and 6.9 are computed by applying a waveform inversion method. The time span of data covers the period between 2014 May 24 - June 26. The mainshock is a shallow focus strike-slip event at a depth of 15 km. Focal depths of aftershocks range from 5 to 25 km. The seismic moment (M0) of the mainshock is estimated 2.53 × 1019 Nm. The focal mechanisms of the aftershocks are mainly strike-slip faulting with a variable and sometimes significant normal component. This geometry indicates a strike-slip faulting regime with NE-SW trending direction of T-axis in the entire activated region. A Stress tensor inversion of focal mechanism data is performed to obtain a more accurate picture of the Gokceada earthquake stress field. The stress tensor inversion results show a predominant strike-slip stress regime with a NW-SE to NNE-SSW oriented maximum horizontal compressive stress (SH). The secondary fault system striking mostly E-W is activated generally with normal faulting in the east of the mainshock. This difference in mechanism suggests that towards the east, a different fault system is activated with respect to the NE-SW trending strike-slip faults beneath Gokceada Island and more to the west. Thus, to first order, the Gokceada Island earthquake region is characterized by a homogeneous intraplate stress field.

  3. Depth

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space—a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  4. Source Parameters of the Bhuj Mainshock and Larger Aftershocks from Modeling of Broadband Teleseismic and Regional Waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, V.; Maggi, A.; Priestley, K.; Rai, S.; Davuluri, S.

    2001-12-01

    The January 26, 2001 mb 6.9 Bhuj mainshock was well recorded at both teleseismic and regional distances. Many of the larger aftershocks were also well recorded at regional distances by digital broadband seismographs operated by the National Geophysical Research Institute of India, the University of Cambridge and the Indian Meteorological Office. We have modeled the teleseismic P- and SH-waveforms to retrieve the mechanism and focal depth of the mainshock and find a thrust faulting mechanism with a fault strike 281 degrees, dip 42 degrees, rake 107 degrees, a seismic moment of 2.31*E20 Nm and a centroid focal depth of 20 km. The long-period source time function shows a relatively simple source of about 15 seconds duration. We use the source parameters for the mainshock derived from the teleseismic inversion and the records for the mainshock at the regional stations mentioned above to calibrate the 1-D propagation characteristics for these regional paths. Using the calibrated regional propagation paths, we invert the complete regional broadband waveforms (P-wave through the surface wave-train) for the source parameters of the larger aftershocks (M0 1015 to 1017 Nm) which are too small to derive from teleseismic recordings. We model the broadband waveforms using the time-domain, linear moment-tensor inversion code of Randall et al, 1995.

  5. Aftershocks of the 2014 South Napa, California, Earthquake: Complex faulting on secondary faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.; Shelly, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the aftershock sequence of the 2014 MW6.0 South Napa, California, earthquake. Low-magnitude aftershocks missing from the network catalog are detected by applying a matched-filter approach to continuous seismic data, with the catalog earthquakes serving as the waveform templates. We measure precise differential arrival times between events, which we use for double-difference event relocation in a 3D seismic velocity model. Most aftershocks are deeper than the mainshock slip, and most occur west of the mapped surface rupture. While the mainshock coseismic and postseismic slip appears to have occurred on the near-vertical, strike-slip West Napa fault, many of the aftershocks occur in a complex zone of secondary faulting. Earthquake locations in the main aftershock zone, near the mainshock hypocenter, delineate multiple dipping secondary faults. Composite focal mechanisms indicate strike-slip and oblique-reverse faulting on the secondary features. The secondary faults were moved towards failure by Coulomb stress changes from the mainshock slip. Clusters of aftershocks north and south of the main aftershock zone exhibit vertical strike-slip faulting more consistent with the West Napa Fault. The northern aftershocks correspond to the area of largest mainshock coseismic slip, while the main aftershock zone is adjacent to the fault area that has primarily slipped postseismically. Unlike most creeping faults, the zone of postseismic slip does not appear to contain embedded stick-slip patches that would have produced on-fault aftershocks. The lack of stick-slip patches along this portion of the fault may contribute to the low productivity of the South Napa aftershock sequence.

  6. Some characteristics of the complex El Mayor-Cucapah, MW7.2, April 4, 2010, Baja California, Mexico, earthquake, from well-located aftershock data from local and regional networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frez, J.; Nava Pichardo, F. A.; Acosta, J.; Munguia, L.; Carlos, J.; García, R.

    2015-12-01

    Aftershocks from the El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC), MW7.2, April 4, 2010, Baja California, Mexico, earthquake, were recorded over two months by a 31 station local array (Reftek RT130 seismographs loaned from IRIS-PASSCAL), complemented by regional data from SCSN, and CICESE. The resulting data base includes 518 aftershocks with ML ≥ 3.0, plus 181 smaller events. Reliable hypocenters were determined using HYPODD and a velocity structure determined from refraction data for a mesa located to the west of the Mexicali-Imperial Valley. Aftershock hypocenters show that the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake was a multiple event comprising two or three different ruptures of which the last one constituted the main event. The main event rupture, which extends in a roughly N45°W direction, is complex with well-defined segments having different characteristics. The main event central segment, located close to the first event epicenter is roughly vertical, the northwest segment dips ~68°NE, while the two southeast segments dip ~60°SW and ~52°SW, respectively, which agrees with results of previous studies based on teleseismic long periods and on GPS-INSAR. All main rupture aftershock hypocenters have depths above 10-11km and, except for the central segment, they delineate the edges of zones with largest coseismic displacement. The two southern segments show seismicity concentrated below 5km and 3.5km, respectively; the paucity of shallow seismicity may be caused by the thick layer of non-consolidated sediments in this region. The ruptures delineated by aftershocks in the southern regions correspond to the Indiviso fault, unidentified until the occurrence of the EMC earthquake. The first event was relocated together with the aftershocks; the epicenter lies slightly westwards of published locations, but it definitely does not lie on, or close to, the main rupture. The focal mechanism of the first event, based on first arrival polarities, is predominantly strike-slip; the focal plane

  7. Accurate Focal Depth Determination of Oceanic Earthquakes Using Water-column Reverberation and Some Implications for the Shrinking Plate Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F.; Huang, J.; Gordon, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Investigation of oceanic earthquakes can play an important role in constraining the lateral and depth variations of the stress and strain-rate fields in oceanic lithosphere and of the thickness of the seismogenic layer as a function of lithosphere age, thereby providing us with critical insight into thermal and dynamic processes associated with the cooling and evolution of oceanic lithosphere. With the goal of estimating hypocentral depths more accurately, we observe clear water reverberations after the direct P wave on teleseismic records of oceanic earthquakes and develop a technique to estimate earthquake depths by using these reverberations. The Z-H grid search method allows the simultaneous determination of the sea floor depth (H) and earthquake depth (Z) with an uncertainty less than 1 km, which compares favorably with alternative approaches. We apply this method to two closely located earthquakes beneath the eastern Pacific. These earthquakes occur in ≈25 Ma-old lithosphere and were previously estimated to have very similar depths of ≈10-12 km. We find that the two events actually occurred at dissimilar depths of 2.5 km and 16.8 km beneath the seafloor, respectively within the oceanic crust and lithospheric mantle. The shallow and deep events are determined to be a thrust and normal earthquake, respectively, indicating that the stress field within the oceanic lithosphere changes from horizontal compression to horizontal extension as depth increases, which is consistent with the prediction of the lithospheric cooling model. Furthermore, we show that the P-axis of the newly investigated thrust-faulting earthquake is roughly perpendicular to that of the previously studied thrust event, consistent with the predictions of the shrinking-plate hypothesis.

  8. Accurate focal depth determination of oceanic earthquakes using water-column reverberation and some implications for the shrinking plate hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianping; Niu, Fenglin; Gordon, Richard G.; Cui, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Investigation of oceanic earthquakes is useful for constraining the lateral and depth variations of the stress and strain-rate fields in oceanic lithosphere, and the thickness of the seismogenic layer as a function of lithosphere age, thereby providing us with critical insight into thermal and dynamic processes associated with the cooling and evolution of oceanic lithosphere. With the goal of estimating hypocentral depths more accurately, we observe clear water reverberations after the direct P wave on teleseismic records of oceanic earthquakes and develop a technique to estimate earthquake depths by using these reverberations. The Z-H grid search method allows the simultaneous determination of the sea floor depth (H) and earthquake depth (Z) with an uncertainty less than 1 km, which compares favorably with alternative approaches. We apply this method to two closely located earthquakes beneath the eastern Pacific. These earthquakes occurred in ∼25 Ma-old lithosphere and were previously estimated to have similar depths of ∼10-12 km. We find that the two events actually occurred at dissimilar depths of 2.5 km and 16.8 km beneath the seafloor, respectively, within the oceanic crust and lithospheric mantle. The shallow and deep events are determined to be a thrust and normal earthquake, respectively, indicating that the stress field within the oceanic lithosphere changes from horizontal deviatoric compression to horizontal deviatoric tension as depth increases, which is consistent with the prediction of lithospheric cooling models. Furthermore, we show that the P-axis of the newly investigated thrust-faulting earthquake is perpendicular to that of the previously studied thrust event, consistent with the predictions of the shrinking-plate hypothesis.

  9. The 2011 October 23 Mw 7.2 Van-Erciş, Turkey, earthquake and its aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görgün, Ethem

    2013-11-01

    On 2011 October 23, the Lake Van region in eastern Anatolia was hit by an Mw = 7.2 earthquake. The Van-Erciş earthquake (EQ) occurred 20 km east of Lake Van. Centroid moment tensors (CMT) for 108 events with Mw between 4.0 and 7.2 are computed by applying a waveform inversion method on data from the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) broad-band seismic network. The time span of data covers the period between 2011 October 23 and 2012 February 24. The main shock is a shallow focus thrust event at a depth of 15 km. Focal depths of aftershocks range from 12 to 25 km. The seismic moment (M0) of the main shock is estimated to be 0.75 × 1020 Nm. The focal mechanisms of the aftershocks are mainly thrust faulting with a variable and sometimes significant strike-slip component. This geometry indicates a thrust faulting regime with NE-SW trending direction of T-axis in the entire activated region. A stress tensor inversion of focal mechanism data is performed to obtain a more accurate picture of the Van-Erciş EQ stress field. The stress tensor inversion results show a predominant thrust stress regime with a NW-SE to NNE-SSW oriented maximum horizontal compressive stress (SH). The secondary fault system striking mostly ENE-WSW is activated generally with right-lateral strike-slip in the east of the main shock. This difference in mechanism suggest that towards the east, a different fault system is activated with respect to the NE-SW trending thrust faults beneath Van-Erciş region and more to the west. Thus, to first order, the Lake Van region is characterized by a homogeneous intraplate stress field.

  10. April 7, 2009, Mw 5.5 aftershock of the L'Aquila earthquake: seismogenic fault geometry and its implication for the central Apennines active extensional tectonics (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, Guido Maria; Lavecchia, Giusy; De Matteis, Raffaella; Nardis Rita, De; Francesco, Brozzetti; Federica, Ferrarini; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    On April 6, 2009 (at 01:32 UTC) a Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the town of L'Aquila (central Italy) and surrounding villages causing fatalities and severe damage in the area. After few days, a nearly 40-km-long extensional fault system was activated generating both northward and southward seismicity migration along the NW-SE trending sector of central Apennines. During the intense aftershocks sequence, different sesmogenic sources with a distinct geometry, size and the degree of involvement were reactivated. Among the relevant aftershocks with Mw 5.0 to 5.5, the largest one occurred on April 7 (at 17:47 UTC), 9 km SE-ward of the mainshock involving a source seated at much greater depths (~14 km). Despite the enormous number of studies of the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, mainly focused on the various geological and seismological aspects of the main Paganica source, the April 7 strongest aftershock (Mw 5.5) has not yet been deeply investigated. Consistent geometric and kinematic correlations between the geological and seismological data about this seismogenic source are missing. There are still open questions concerning its unresolved geometry and the unknown style of the central Apennines structure activated at greater depths during the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence. Furthermore, some authors (Lavecchia et al., 2012) have supposed that the April 7, 2009 aftershock (Mw 5.5) occurred onto an high dip segment (~50°) of an east-dipping extensional basal detachment with a potential surface expression outcropping in the area of the eastern Sabina-Simbruini Mts. In this work we propose a seismological analysis of the April 7, 2009 aftershock (Mw 5.5) rupture process. In order to define the unresolved source geometry, we computed the focal mechanism through the time domain, moment tensor full waveform inversion (Dreger and Helmberger, 1993). Also, we estimated the apparent source time functions (ASTFs) by deconvolution of the impulse response of the medium from the recorded data

  11. Analyzing the characteristics of focal mechanism solutions of Wenchuan earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, X.; Hu, X.; Xie, F.; Yu, C.; Wang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We firstly read out initial P wave polarity from the digital wave form data given by Chinese national seismic networks, regional seismic networks, temporary seismic networks as well as some IRIS stations. Then employing improved grid point test method we obtain focal mechanism solutions of the strong aftershocks (M≥4.0) and composite fault plane solutions of the moderate and small aftershocks of Wenchuan earthquake sequence. In order to improve the reliability of focal mechanism solutions, we precisely locate the hypocenter location of aftershocks during the determining of focal mechanism solutions. Most of the aftershocks are thrust faulting or strike slip faulting except few ones. Thrust and predominately thrust aftershocks are distributed along the whole rapture zone except the southwest section, while strike slip aftershocks are distributed mainly in the southwest and the northeast sections. In the section from Beichuan to Pingwu, there are hardly any strike slip aftershocks but thrust and predominately thrust aftershocks. In terms of the azimuths of P axes of the focal mechanism solutions of the aftershocks, we find that the ones of the aftershocks with magnitude above 5.0 show good homogeneity, mainly concentrate on the orientation of NWW-SEE, which is consistent with that of Wenchuan mainshock, while as for aftershocks with magnitude below 4.9, they have two dominant distributions of NWW-SEE (azimuth 280°-310°) and NE-SW (azimuth 40°-70°). It shows that the focal mechanism solutions and their distribution characteristics of Wenchuan earthquake sequence are both complex. From the types and the azimuths of P axes of the focal mechanism solutions of the aftershocks, we can obtain the characteristics of segmentation, which is important to realize the dynamic mechanism of the Wenchuan earthquake sequence.

  12. Aftershock process of Chu earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, Alexey; Leskova, Ekaterina; Emanov, Aleksandr; Kolesnikov, Yury; Fateyev, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    Chu earthquake of 27.09.2003, Ms =7.3 occurred in joint zone of Chagan-Uzun raised block with North-Chu ridge. Epicentral zone cover a series of contrast geological structures of Mountain Altai (two hollows: Chu and Kurai, devided by Chagan-Uzun block, and mountain range, franking them,: Nort-Chu, Kurai, South-Chu, Aigulak). The seismic process occurred in zone of expressive block structure, and this is embodied in its space-time structure. The high accuracy of hypocental construction in epicenral zone of Chu earthquake is provided by local network of seismological stations (fifteen stations) and experiments with temporary station network in this zone (20-50 stations). The first stage of aftershock process formation is connected with Chagan-Uzun block. The second large aftershock of 01.10.2003 changes cardinally spatial pattern of aftershock process. Instead of round area an elongate aftershock area is formed along boundary of Kurai hollow with North-Chu ridge. In the following process spread out in north-west angle of Chu hollow. Linear elongate aftershock area is subdivided into four elements. The north-west element has form of horse tail, starting as a line in area of outlet of Aktru River in Kurai hollow, and ramifies short of settlement Chibit. Slope of plane of aftershocks for this element is determined from hollow under North-Chu ridge. The seismic process is going not along boundary hollow-mountain ridge, but displaced in hollow side. The central part of element - this are mainly horizontal shift faults, and outlying districts have pronounced vertical components of displacements. The second element stretches from Aktru River to Chagan-Uzun block. Earthquake epicenters in plane make two curved parallel lines. In the angle of Chagan-Uzun block are ceiling amount of uplifts. The third element is the boundary of Chagan-Uzun block with North-Chu ridge. The forth element is formed by aftershocks, leaving in range of Chu hollow. Areal dispersal of earthquakes is

  13. Forecasting magnitude, time, and location of aftershocks for aftershock hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Tsai, Y.; Huang, M.; Chang, W.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we investigate the spatial and temporal seismicity parameters of the aftershock sequence accompanying the 17:47 20 September 1999 (UTC) 7.45 Chi-Chi earthquake Taiwan. Dividing the epicentral zone into north of the epicenter, at the epicenter, and south of the epicenter, it is found that immediately after the earthquake the area close by the epicenter had a lower value than both the northern and southern sections. This pattern suggests that at the time of the Chi-Chi earthquake, the area close by the epicenter remained prone to large magnitude aftershocks and strong shaking. However, with time the value increases. An increasing value indicates a reduced likelihood of large magnitude aftershocks. The study also shows that the value is higher at the southern section of the epicentral zone, indicating a faster rate of decay in this section. The primary purpose of this paper is to design a predictive model for forecasting the magnitude, time, and location of aftershocks to large earthquakes. The developed model is presented and applied to the 17:47 20 September 1999 7.45 Chi-Chi earthquake Taiwan, and the 09:32 5 November 2009 (UTC) Nantou 6.19, and 00:18 4 March 2010 (UTC) Jiashian 6.49 earthquake sequences. In addition, peak ground acceleration trends for the Nantou and Jiashian aftershock sequences are predicted and compared to actual trends. The results of the estimated peak ground acceleration are remarkably similar to calculations from recorded magnitudes in both trend and level. To improve the predictive skill of the model for occurrence time, we use an empirical relation to forecast the time of aftershocks. The empirical relation improves time prediction over that of random processes. The results will be of interest to seismic mitigation specialists and rescue crews. We apply also the parameters and empirical relation from Chi-Chi aftershocks of Taiwan to forecast aftershocks with magnitude M > 6.0 of 05:46 11 March 2011 (UTC) Tohoku 9

  14. Earthquake rupture at focal depth, part II: mechanics of the 2004 M2.2 earthquake along the Pretorius Fault, TauTona Mine, South Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heesakkers, V.; Murphy, S.; Lockner, D.A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze here the rupture mechanics of the 2004, M2.2 earthquake based on our observations and measurements at focal depth (Part I). This event ruptured the Archean Pretorius fault that has been inactive for at least 2 Ga, and was reactivated due to mining operations down to a depth of 3.6 km depth. Thus, it was expected that the Pretorius fault zone will fail similarly to an intact rock body independently of its ancient healed structure. Our analysis reveals a few puzzling features of the M2.2 rupture-zone: (1) the earthquake ruptured four, non-parallel, cataclasite bearing segments of the ancient Pretorius fault-zone; (2) slip occurred almost exclusively along the cataclasite-host rock contacts of the slipping segments; (3) the local in-situ stress field is not favorable to slip along any of these four segments; and (4) the Archean cataclasite is pervasively sintered and cemented to become brittle and strong. To resolve these observations, we conducted rock mechanics experiments on the fault-rocks and host-rocks and found a strong mechanical contrast between the quartzitic cataclasite zones, with elastic-brittle rheology, and the host quartzites, with damage, elastic–plastic rheology. The finite-element modeling of a heterogeneous fault-zone with the measured mechanical contrast indicates that the slip is likely to reactivate the ancient cataclasite-bearing segments, as observed, due to the strong mechanical contrast between the cataclasite and the host quartzitic rock.

  15. Earthquake Rupture at Focal Depth, Part II: Mechanics of the 2004 M2.2 Earthquake Along the Pretorius Fault, TauTona Mine, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesakkers, V.; Murphy, S.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze here the rupture mechanics of the 2004, M2.2 earthquake based on our observations and measurements at focal depth (Part I). This event ruptured the Archean Pretorius fault that has been inactive for at least 2 Ga, and was reactivated due to mining operations down to a depth of 3.6 km depth. Thus, it was expected that the Pretorius fault zone will fail similarly to an intact rock body independently of its ancient healed structure. Our analysis reveals a few puzzling features of the M2.2 rupture-zone: (1) the earthquake ruptured four, non-parallel, cataclasite bearing segments of the ancient Pretorius fault-zone; (2) slip occurred almost exclusively along the cataclasite-host rock contacts of the slipping segments; (3) the local in-situ stress field is not favorable to slip along any of these four segments; and (4) the Archean cataclasite is pervasively sintered and cemented to become brittle and strong. To resolve these observations, we conducted rock mechanics experiments on the fault-rocks and host-rocks and found a strong mechanical contrast between the quartzitic cataclasite zones, with elastic-brittle rheology, and the host quartzites, with damage, elastic-plastic rheology. The finite-element modeling of a heterogeneous fault-zone with the measured mechanical contrast indicates that the slip is likely to reactivate the ancient cataclasite-bearing segments, as observed, due to the strong mechanical contrast between the cataclasite and the host quartzitic rock.

  16. New techniques for the analysis of earthquake sources from local array data with an application to the 1993 Scotts Mills, Oregon, aftershock sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, Bernd; Nábělek, John

    1999-06-01

    We analysed aftershocks recorded by a temporary digital seismic network following the moderate M_w =5.5 1993, Scotts Mills, Oregon, earthquake. A technique to retrieve source moment tensors from local waveforms was developed, tested, and applied to 41 small earthquakes (M_w ranging from 1.6 to 3.2). The derived focal mechanisms, although well resolved, are highly variable and do not share a common nodal plane. In contrast, the majority of the events, relocated with a joint hypocentre determination algorithm, collapse to a well-focused plane. The incompatibility of the nodal planes of most events with the plane defined by their locations suggests that the aftershocks did not occur on the fault plane, but tightly around it, outlining the rupture area rather than defining it. Furthermore, the moment tensors reveal stable P-axes, whereas T-axes plunges are highly dispersed. We detect a rotation of average T-axis plunge with depth, indicating a change from shallower, predominantly dip-slip mechanisms to deeper strike-slip mechanisms. These characteristics are difficult to explain by remnant stress concentrations on the main-shock rupture plane or asperity- and barrier-type models. We suggest that the aftershocks occurred under the ambient regional stress, triggered by a sudden weakening of the region surrounding the main-shock slip, rather than from a shear stress increase due to the main shock.

  17. Implications of spatial and temporal development of the aftershock sequence for the Mw 8.3 June 9, 1994 Deep Bolivian Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Stephen C.; Wallace, Terry C.; Beck, Susan L.; Silver, Paul G.; Zandt, George; Vandecar, John; Minaya, Estela

    On June 9, 1994 the Mw 8.3 Bolivia earthquake (636 km depth) occurred in a region which had not experienced significant, deep seismicity for at least 30 years. The mainshock and aftershocks were recorded in Bolivia on the BANJO and SEDA broadband seismic arrays and on the San Calixto Network. We used the joint hypocenter determination method to determine the relative location of the aftershocks. We have identified no foreshocks and 89 aftershocks (m > 2.2) for the 20-day period following the mainshock. The frequency of aftershock occurrence decreased rapidly, with only one or two aftershocks per day occuring after day two. The temporal decay of aftershock activity is similar to shallow aftershock sequences, but the number of aftershocks is two orders of magnitude less. Additionally, a mb ∼6, apparently triggered earthquake occurred just 10 minutes after the mainshock about 330 km east-southeast of the mainshock at a depth of 671 km. The aftershock sequence occurred north and east of the mainshock and extends to a depth of 665 km. The aftershocks define a slab striking N68°W and dipping 45°NE. The strike, dip, and location of the aftershock zone are consistent with this seismicity being confined within the downward extension of the subducted Nazca plate. The location and orientation of the aftershock sequence indicate that the subducted Nazca plate bends between the NNW striking zone of deep seismicity in western Brazil and the N-S striking zone of seismicity in central Bolivia. A tear in the deep slab is not necessitated by the data. A subset of the aftershock hypocenters cluster along a subhorizontal plane near the depth of the mainshock, favoring a horizontal fault plane. The horizontal dimensions of the mainshock [Beck et al., this issue; Silver et al., 1995] and slab defined by the aftershocks are approximately equal, indicating that the mainshock ruptured through the slab.

  18. Implications of Secondary Aftershocks for Failure Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, S. J.

    2001-12-01

    When a seismic sequence with more than one mainshock or an unusually large aftershock occurs, there is a compound aftershock sequence. The secondary aftershocks need not have exactly the same decay as the primary sequence, with the differences having implications for the failure process. When the stress step from the secondary mainshock is positive but not large enough to cause immediate failure of all the remaining primary aftershocks, failure processes which involve accelerating slip will produce secondary aftershocks that decay more rapidly than primary aftershocks. This is because the primary aftershocks are an accelerated version of the background seismicity, and secondary aftershocks are an accelerated version of the primary aftershocks. Real stress perturbations may be negative, and heterogeneities in mainshock stress fields mean that the real world situation is quite complicated. I will first describe and verify my picture of secondary aftershock decay with reference to a simple numerical model of slipping faults which obeys rate and state dependent friction and lacks stress heterogeneity. With such a model, it is possible to generate secondary aftershock sequences with perturbed decay patterns, quantify those patterns, and develop an analysis technique capable of correcting for the effect in real data. The secondary aftershocks are defined in terms of frequency linearized time s(T), which is equal to the number of primary aftershocks expected by a time T, $ s ≡ ∫ t=0T n(t) dt, where the start time t=0 is the time of the primary aftershock, and the primary aftershock decay function n(t) is extrapolated forward to the times of the secondary aftershocks. In the absence of secondary sequences the function s(T)$ re-scales the time so that approximately one event occurs per new time unit; the aftershock sequence is gone. If this rescaling is applied in the presence of a secondary sequence, the secondary sequence is shaped like a primary aftershock sequence

  19. Spatial stress variations in the aftershock sequence following the 2008 M6 earthquake doublet in the South Iceland Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensch, M.; Árnadóttir, Th.; Lund, B.; Brandsdóttir, B.

    2012-04-01

    The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is an approximately 80 km wide E-W transform zone, bridging the offset between the Eastern Volcanic Zone and the Hengill triple junction to the west. The plate motion is accommodated in the brittle crust by faulting on many N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults of 2-5 km separation. Major sequences of large earthquakes (M>6) has occurred repeatedly in the SISZ since the settlement in Iceland more than thousand years ago. On 29th May 2008, two M6 earthquakes hit the western part of the SISZ on two adjacent N-S faults within a few seconds. The intense aftershock sequence was recorded by the permanent Icelandic SIL network and a promptly installed temporary network of 11 portable seismometers in the source region. The network located thousands of aftershocks during the following days, illuminating a 12-17 km long region along both major fault ruptures as well as several smaller parallel faults along a diffuse E-W trending region west of the mainshock area without any preceding main rupture. This episode is suggested to be the continuation of an earthquake sequence which started with two M6.5 and several M5-6 events in June 2000. The time delay between the 2000 and 2008 events could be due to an inflation episode in Hengill during 1993-1998, that potentially locked N-S strike slip faults in the western part of the SISZ. Around 300 focal solutions for aftershocks have been derived by analyzing P-wave polarities, showing predominantly strike-slip movements with occasional normal faulting components (unstable P-axis direction), which suggests an extensional stress regime as their driving force. A subsequent stress inversion of four different aftershock clusters reveals slight variations of the directions of the average σ3 axes. While for both southern clusters, including the E-W cluster, the σ3 axes are rather elongated perpendicular to the overall plate spreading axis, they are more northerly trending for shallower clusters

  20. Stress Triggering of Conjugate Normal Faulting: Late Aftershocks of the 1983 M 7.3 Borah Peak, Idaho Earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Suzette J. Payne; James Zollweg; David Rodgers

    2004-06-01

    The 1984 Devil Canyon sequence was a late aftershock sequence of the 28 October 1983 Ms 7.3 Borah Peak, Idaho, earthquake. The sequence began on 22 August 1984 with the ML 5.8 Devil Canyon earthquake, which nucleated at a depth of 12.8 ± 0.7 km between the surface traces of two normal faults, the Challis segment of the Lost River fault and the Lone Pine fault. Two hundred thirty-seven aftershocks were recorded by a temporary array during a 3-week period. Their focal mechanisms and hypocenter distribution define a cross-sectional "V" pattern whose base corresponds to the ML 5.8 event, whose tips correspond to the exposed fault traces, and whose sides define two planar fault zones oriented N25°W, 75°SW (Challis fault segment) and N39°W, 58°NE (Lone Pine fault). This pattern describes a graben bounded by conjugate normal faults. Temporal aspects of the Devil Canyon sequence provide strong evidence that slip on conjugate normal faults occurs sequentially. Aftershocks occurred primarily along the Challis segment until the occurrence of the 8 September 1984 ML 5.0 earthquake along the Lone Pine fault, after which aftershocks primarily occurred along this fault. These observations are consistent with worldwide seismologic and geologic observations and with physical and numerical models of conjugate normal faulting. Aftershocks of the Devil Canyon sequence occurred immediately northwest of the ML 5.8 Devils Canyon earthquake, which itself was immediately northwest of the Thousand Springs segment of the Lost River fault (the fault that slipped in association with the Ms 7.3 Borah Peak earthquake). Coulomb failure stress analysis indicates that stress increases resulting from both the Borah Peak mainshock and Devil Canyon ML 5.8 earthquake were sufficient to induce failure on the Lone Pine fault. These space–time patterns suggest that conjugate normal faults may transfer stress or accommodate stress changes at the terminations of major normal faults in the Basin and

  1. Shape of the plate interface near the Mejillones Peninsula in Northern Chile inferred from high resolution relocation of Tocopilla aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenzalida, A.; Schurr, B.; Lancieri, M.; Madariaga, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    computed by cross-correlation. The relocated events situated inland, under the TF network collapse into a very thin layer of less than a km width. These events are located mainly in the deep interplate zone in the northern area of the 2007 rupture (30-55km) but become shallower as we approach the Mejillones Peninsula in the South (15-55km). We find clear evidence for a "kink" or plate interface discontinuity at around 30 km depth. Events off-shore are less well-located, but we find clear evidence that some of these aftershocks occurred on active splay faults within the continental plate wedge. We are currently working to confirm this observation using waveform data. Finally we show that the rupture of the main plate interface can produce secondary rupture of the Nazca plate below the plate interface.Focal mechanisms of 452 aftershocks were essentially thrust events due to the subduction process. On other hand,the aftershocks of Michilla earthquake all have the slab- push mechanism of this event and are aligned along a thin vertical zone inside the Nazca plate.

  2. Larger aftershocks happen farther away: Nonseparability of magnitude and spatial distributions of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elst, Nicholas J.; Shaw, Bruce E.

    2015-07-01

    Aftershocks may be driven by stress concentrations left by the main shock rupture or by elastic stress transfer to adjacent fault sections or strands. Aftershocks that occur within the initial rupture may be limited in size, because the scale of the stress concentrations should be smaller than the primary rupture itself. On the other hand, aftershocks that occur on adjacent fault segments outside the primary rupture may have no such size limitation. Here we use high-precision double-difference relocated earthquake catalogs to demonstrate that larger aftershocks occur farther away than smaller aftershocks, when measured from the centroid of early aftershock activity—a proxy for the initial rupture. Aftershocks as large as or larger than the initiating event nucleate almost exclusively in the outer regions of the aftershock zone. This observation is interpreted as a signature of elastic rebound in the earthquake catalog and can be used to improve forecasting of large aftershocks.

  3. Thrust-faulting earthquake induced many normal-faulting aftershocks, in northeastern Chiba Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.; Kato, A.; Hirata, N.; Nakagawa, S.; Kasahara, K.; Sato, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Nanjo, K.; Panayotopoulos, Y.; Obara, K.; Aketagawa, T.; Kimura, H.

    2010-12-01

    A thrust faulting type earthquake of a local body wave magnitude (MJMA) of 4.9 occurred near the upper interface of the subducting Philippine Sea Plate (PHS) in northeastern Chiba Prefecture on July 22, 2010. We have been developing a dense seismic net work call the MeSO-net in the Tokyo Metropolitan area. So far, 249 stations are available for the study of a large felt earthquakes and small event as low as M=1.5. We also deployed a temporary seismic array 24 of which were used for the analysis of the aftershocks. We locate the July 22 earthquake(MJMA=4.9) and its 19 aftershocks (M>1.5) by the double difference location algorithm. We also determine focal mechanisms for the main- and after-shocks. The locations of the main shock and three aftershocks are closely distributed near the upper interface of PHS, which is consistent with the idea that the event occurred on the plate interface. However, most aftershocks whose focal mechanism is normal-fault type with a T-axis directing NE-SW are located off the upper interface indicating that intra-slab events are also generated by the event. Acknowledgement: The present study is supported by Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  4. Performance of aftershock forecasts: problem and formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Wu, Z.; Li, L.

    2010-12-01

    WFSD project deals with the problems of earthquake physics, in which one of the important designed aims is the forecast of the on-going aftershock activity of the Wenchuan earthquake, taking the advantage of the fast response to great earthquakes. Correlation between fluid measurements and aftershocks provided heuristic clues to the forecast of aftershocks, invoking the discussion on the performance of such ‘precursory anomalies’, even if in a retrospective perspective. In statistical seismology, one of the critical issues is how to test the statistical significance of an earthquake forecast scheme against real seismic activity. Due to the special characteristics of aftershock series and the feature of aftershock forecasts that it deals with a limited spatial range and specific temporal duration, the test of the performance of aftershock forecasts has to be different from the standard tests for main shock series. In this presentation we address and discuss the possible schemes for testing the performance of aftershock forecasts - a seemingly simple but practically important issue in statistical seismology. As a simple and preliminary approach, we use an alternative form of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) test, as well as other similar tests, considering the properties of aftershock series by using Omori law, ETAS model, and/or CFS calculation. We also discussed the lessons and experiences of the Wenchuan aftershock forecasts, exploring how to make full use of the present knowledge of the regularity of aftershocks to serve the earthquake rescue and relief endeavor as well as the post-earthquake reconstruction.

  5. Self-similar aftershock rates.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise-an intermittent avalanchelike relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes-the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is particularly true for the case of seismicity, and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high-resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing particularly clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved framework for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting. PMID:27627324

  6. Extended depth-of-field 3D endoscopy with synthetic aperture integral imaging using an electrically tunable focal-length liquid-crystal lens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jen; Shen, Xin; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional synthetic-aperture integral imaging uses a lens array to sense the three-dimensional (3D) object or scene that can then be reconstructed digitally or optically. However, integral imaging generally suffers from a fixed and limited range of depth of field (DOF). In this Letter, we experimentally demonstrate a 3D integral-imaging endoscopy with tunable DOF by using a single large-aperture focal-length-tunable liquid crystal (LC) lens. The proposed system can provide high spatial resolution and an extended DOF in synthetic-aperture integral imaging 3D endoscope. In our experiments, the image plane in the integral imaging pickup process can be tuned from 18 to 38 mm continuously using a large-aperture LC lens, and the total DOF is extended from 12 to 51 mm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on synthetic aperture integral imaging 3D endoscopy with a large-aperture LC lens that can provide high spatial resolution 3D imaging with an extend DOF. PMID:26258358

  7. Aftershocks illuninate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  8. Source Process of the Mw 5.0 Au Sable Forks, New York, Earthquake Sequence from Local Aftershock Monitoring Network Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J. G.

    2002-12-01

    On April 20, 2002, a Mw 5 earthquake occurred near the town of Au Sable Forks, northeastern Adirondacks, New York. The quake caused moderate damage (MMI VII) around the epicentral area and it is well recorded by over 50 broadband stations in the distance ranges of 70 to 2000 km in the Eastern North America. Regional broadband waveform data are used to determine source mechanism and focal depth using moment tensor inversion technique. Source mechanism indicates predominantly thrust faulting along 45° dipping fault plane striking due South. The mainshock is followed by at least three strong aftershocks with local magnitude (ML) greater than 3 and about 70 aftershocks are detected and located in the first three months by a 12-station portable seismographic network. The aftershock distribution clearly delineate the mainshock rupture to the westerly dipping fault plane at a depth of 11 to 12 km. Preliminary analysis of the aftershock waveform data indicates that orientation of the P-axis rotated 90° from that of the mainshock, suggesting a complex source process of the earthquake sequence. We achieved an important milestone in monitoring earthquakes and evaluating their hazards through rapid cross-border (Canada-US) and cross-regional (Central US-Northeastern US) collaborative efforts. Hence, staff at Instrument Software Technology, Inc. near the epicentral area joined Lamont-Doherty staff and deployed the first portable station in the epicentral area; CERI dispatched two of their technical staff to the epicentral area with four accelerometers and a broadband seismograph; the IRIS/PASSCAL facility shipped three digital seismographs and ancillary equipment within one day of the request; the POLARIS Consortium, Canada sent a field crew of three with a near real-time, satellite telemetry based earthquake monitoring system. The Polaris station, KSVO, powered by a solar panel and batteries, was already transmitting data to the central Hub in London, Ontario, Canada within

  9. Investigation of the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Chilean earthquake integrating aftershock analysis, back-projection imaging and cGPS results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clévédé, E.; Satriano, C.; Bukchin, B.; Lancieri, M.; Fuenzalida, A.; Vilotte, J.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Vigny, C.; Socquet, A.; Aranda, C.; Campos, J. A.; Scientific Team of the Lia Montessus de Ballore (Cnrs-Insu, U. Chile)

    2010-12-01

    The Mw 8.8 earthquake in central Chile ruptured more than 400 km along the subduction bound between the Nazca and the South American plates. The aftershock distribution clearly shows that this earthquake filled a well-known seismic gap, corresponding to rupture extension of the 1835 earthquake. The triggered post-seismic activity extends farther north of the gap, partially overlapping the 1985 and the 1960 Valparaiso earthquakes. However, the analysis of continuous GPS (cGPS) recordings, and back projection imaging of teleseismic body wave energy, indicate that the rupture stopped south of Valparaiso, around -33.5 degrees of latitude. An important question is how far the rupture actually extended to the north and the potential relation between the northernmost aftershock activity and remaining asperities within the ruptured zone of the previous Valparaiso earthquakes. The extension of the rupture offshore, towards west, also deserves further investigation. The aftershock distribution and the back propagation analysis support the hypothesis that, in the northern part, the rupture may have reached the surface at the trench. In this work, we performed a CMT and depth location study for more than 10 of the immediate largest aftershocks using teleseismic surface wave analysis constrained by P-wave polarity. In parallel, a detailed analysis of aftershocks in the northern part of the rupture, between 2010-03-11 and 2010-05-13, have been performed using the data from the station of the Chilean Servicio Sismológico Nacional (SSN), and of the post-seismic network, deployed by the French CNRS-INSU, GFZ, IRIS, and Caltech. We accurately hand-picked 153 larger events, which have been located using a non-linear probabilistic code, with improved depth location. Focal mechanisms have been computed for the larger events. Those results have been integrated with the analysis of cGPS and teleseismic back projection, and the overall kinematic of the Maule earthquake is discussed as

  10. Studies of the South Napa Earthquake Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Shcherbakov, R.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present studies of the aftershock sequence of the 24 August, 2014, M = 6.0 South Napa earthquake. We give the cumulative frequency-magnitude distributions of the aftershocks for several time intervals following the main shock. We give the magnitude of the largest aftershock (Bath's law) as well as the largest aftershock obtained from a Gutenberg-Richter fit to the frequency-magnitude data (modified form of Bath's law). The latter is a measure of the aftershock productivity. We also give the rates of occurrence of aftershocks as a function of time after the main shock for several magnitude ranges. The fit of this data to Omori's law is discussed. We compare the results of our study of the South Napa earthquake with our previous study of the aftershock statistics of the 28 September, 2004, M = 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. Specifically we will discuss any difference that can be attributed to the large difference in recurrence intervals for the two earthquakes. We also present studies of the three dimensional distribution of aftershock locations as a function of time and their association with the surface rupture. Aftershocks at large distances from the rupture zone will be discussed particularly those in the Geysers geothermal area.

  11. Triggering cascades and statistical properties of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Davidsen, J.

    2011-12-01

    Applying a recently introduced general statistical procedure for identifying aftershocks based on complex network theory, we investigate the statistical properties of aftershocks for a high-resolution earthquake catalog covering Southern California. In comparison with earlier studies of aftershock sequences, we show that many features depend sensitively on how one defines aftershocks and whether one includes only first-generation of aftershocks or one also takes all indirectly triggered aftershocks into account. This includes the temporal variation in the rate of aftershocks for mainshocks of small magnitude, for example, as well as the variation in the rate of aftershocks for short to intermediate times after a mainshock. Other features are, however, robust indicating that they truly characterize aftershock sequences. These include the p-values in the Omori-Utsu law for large mainshocks, B{aa}th's law and the productivity law with an exponent smaller than the b-value in the Gutenberg-Richter law. We also find that, for large mainshocks, the dependence of the parameters in the Omori-Utsu law on the lower magnitude cut-off are in excellent agreement with a recent proposition based on B{aa}th's law and the Gutenberg-Richter law, giving rise to a generalized Omori-Utsu law. Our analysis also provides evidence that the exponent p in the Omori-Utsu law does not vary significantly with mainshock magnitude.

  12. The Importance of Small Aftershocks for Earthquake Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, Jochen; Meier, Men-Andrin; Werner, Max; Wiemer, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Earthquakes occur in response to changes in the crust's stress state, however, the full picture of the causative process for earthquake triggering remains unclear. Many researchers have employed Coulomb stress change theory, which quantifies the changes in static Coulomb stress from nearby ruptures. This theory seems to at least partly explain the spatial patterns of triggered earthquakes, in particular during aftershock sequences and along faults. Several assumptions are needed to facilitate the calculation of stress changes. Here, we challenge the typical neglect of stress changes induced by the small but numerous and strongly clustered aftershocks during the evolution of the sequence. Both empirical observations and a simple scaling law suggest that this neglect may not be justified. We estimate the evolution of Coulomb stress changes during the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake sequence by including the effect of the detected aftershocks using the focal mechanisms from the recently updated Southern California catalog. This estimation is hampered by that only 62% of located events from our study window have a focal mechanism, by the neglect of events that are too small to be detected and by the unreliability of near-field stress change estimations. As a consequence, we are limited to analyzing only a part of the full stress change signal imparted by small events. Despite these shortcomings, our calculations suggest that small to moderate events strongly dominate static stress redistribution in dense secondary aftershock clusters. However, their relative importance varies over space and is, on average, smaller than the main shock contribution. Furthermore, we find that aftershocks - with their reported relative orientations and positions - impose more often positive than negative stress changes, which is what would be expected if they were actively involved in triggering processes. However, this effect appears to be limited to event pairs with inter-event distances

  13. Foreshocks and aftershocks of Pisagua 2014 earthquake: time and space evolution of megathrust event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenzalida Velasco, Amaya; Rietbrock, Andreas; Wollam, Jack; Thomas, Reece; de Lima Neto, Oscar; Tavera, Hernando; Garth, Thomas; Ruiz, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    The 2014 Pisagua earthquake of magnitude 8.2 is the first case in Chile where a foreshock sequence was clearly recorded by a local network, as well all the complete sequence including the mainshock and its aftershocks. The seismicity of the last year before the mainshock include numerous clusters close to the epicentral zone (Ruiz et al; 2014) but it was on 16th March that this activity became stronger with the Mw 6.7 precursory event taking place in front of Iquique coast at 12 km depth. The Pisagua earthquake arrived on 1st April 2015 breaking almost 120 km N-S and two days after a 7.6 aftershock occurred in the south of the rupture, enlarging the zone affected by this sequence. In this work, we analyse the foreshocks and aftershock sequence of Pisagua earthquake, from the spatial and time evolution for a total of 15.764 events that were recorded from the 1st March to 31th May 2015. This event catalogue was obtained from the automatic analyse of seismic raw data of more than 50 stations installed in the north of Chile and the south of Peru. We used the STA/LTA algorithm for the detection of P and S arrival times on the vertical components and then a method of back propagation in a 1D velocity model for the event association and preliminary location of its hypocenters following the algorithm outlined by Rietbrock et al. (2012). These results were then improved by locating with NonLinLoc software using a regional velocity model. We selected the larger events to analyse its moment tensor solution by a full waveform inversion using ISOLA software. In order to understand the process of nucleation and propagation of the Pisagua earthquake, we also analysed the evolution in time of the seismicity of the three months of data. The zone where the precursory events took place was strongly activated two weeks before the mainshock and remained very active until the end of the analysed period with an important quantity of the seismicity located in the upper plate and having

  14. When and where the aftershock activity was depressed: Contrasting decay patterns of the proximate large earthquakes in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogata, Y.; Jones, L.M.; Toda, S.

    2003-01-01

    Seismic quiescence has attracted attention as a possible precursor to a large earthquake. However, sensitive detection of quiescence requires accurate modeling of normal aftershock activity. We apply the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model that is a natural extension of the modified Omori formula for aftershock decay, allowing further clusters (secondary aftershocks) within an aftershock sequence. The Hector Mine aftershock activity has been normal, relative to the decay predicted by the ETAS model during the 14 months of available data. In contrast, although the aftershock sequence of the 1992 Landers earthquake (M = 7.3), including the 1992 Big Bear earthquake (M = 6.4) and its aftershocks, fits very well to the ETAS up until about 6 months after the main shock, the activity showed clear lowering relative to the modeled rate (relative quiescence) and lasted nearly 7 years, leading up to the Hector Mine earthquake (M = 7.1) in 1999. Specifically, the relative quiescence occurred only in the shallow aftershock activity, down to depths of 5-6 km. The sequence of deeper events showed clear, normal aftershock activity well fitted to the ETAS throughout the whole period. We argue several physical explanations for these results. Among them, we strongly suspect aseismic slips within the Hector Mine rupture source that could inhibit the crustal relaxation process within "shadow zones" of the Coulomb's failure stress change. Furthermore, the aftershock activity of the 1992 Joshua Tree earthquake (M = 6.1) sharply lowered in the same day of the main shock, which can be explained by a similar scenario.

  15. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  16. Spectral scaling of the aftershocks of the Tocopilla 2007 earthquake in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancieri, M.; Madariaga, R.; Bonilla, F.

    2012-04-01

    We study the scaling of spectral properties of a set of 68 aftershocks of the 2007 November 14 Tocopilla (M 7.8) earthquake in northern Chile. These are all subduction events with similar reverse faulting focal mechanism that were recorded by a homogenous network of continuously recording strong motion instruments. The seismic moment and the corner frequency are obtained assuming that the aftershocks satisfy an inverse omega-square spectral decay; radiated energy is computed integrating the square velocity spectrum corrected for attenuation at high frequencies and for the finite bandwidth effect. Using a graphical approach, we test the scaling of seismic spectrum, and the scale invariance of the apparent stress drop with the earthquake size. To test whether the Tocopilla aftershocks scale with a single parameter, we introduce a non-dimensional number, ?, that should be constant if earthquakes are self-similar. For the Tocopilla aftershocks, Cr varies by a factor of 2. More interestingly, Cr for the aftershocks is close to 2, the value that is expected for events that are approximately modelled by a circular crack. Thus, in spite of obvious differences in waveforms, the aftershocks of the Tocopilla earthquake are self-similar. The main shock is different because its records contain large near-field waves. Finally, we investigate the scaling of energy release rate, Gc, with the slip. We estimated Gc from our previous estimates of the source parameters, assuming a simple circular crack model. We find that Gc values scale with the slip, and are in good agreement with those found by Abercrombie and Rice for the Northridge aftershocks.

  17. On the origin of diverse aftershock mechanisms following the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilb, Debi; Ellis, M.; Gomberg, J.; Davis, S.

    1997-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the origin of the diverse suite of aftershock mechanisms following the 1989 M 7.1 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake is related to the post-main-shock static stress field. We use a 3-D boundary-element algorithm to calculate static stresses, combined with a Coulomb failure criterion to calculate conjugate failure planes at aftershock locations. The post-main-shock static stress field is taken as the sum of a pre-existing stress field and changes in stress due to the heterogeneous slip across the Loma Prieta rupture plane. The background stress field is assumed to be either a simple shear parallel to the regional trend of the San Andreas fault or approximately fault-normal compression. A suite of synthetic aftershock mechanisms from the conjugate failure planes is generated and quantitatively compared (allowing for uncertainties in both mechanism parameters and earthquake locations) to well-constrained mechanisms reported in the US Geological Survey Northern California Seismic Network catalogue. We also compare calculated rakes with those observed by resolving the calculated stress tensor onto observed focal mechanism nodal planes, assuming either plane to be a likely rupture plane. Various permutations of the assumed background stress field, frictional coefficients of aftershock fault planes, methods of comparisons, etc. explain between 52 and 92 per cent of the aftershock mechanisms. We can explain a similar proportion of mechanisms however by comparing a randomly reordered catalogue with the various suites of synthetic aftershocks. The inability to duplicate aftershock mechanisms reliably on a one-to-one basis is probably a function of the combined uncertainties in models of main-shock slip distribution, the background stress field, and aftershock locations. In particular we show theoretically that any specific main-shock slip distribution and a reasonable background stress field are able to generate a highly variable suite of failure

  18. The dynamic implication of focal mechanism solutions of Wenchuan earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Cui, X.; Chen, L.

    2010-12-01

    At 14:28 CST on May 12, 2008, the disastrous MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake took place in Sichuan province of China, followed by tens of thousands of aftershocks. It occurred on the Longmenshan fault zone which is a high-angle inland over-thrust fault. What is the corresponding tectonic implication behind the focal mechanism is an important issue to realize the dynamic mechanism of Wenchuan earthquake sequence. In order to reveal it, our research as following is carried out. 1) We extensively collected digital waveform records, seriously and strictly read out P wave first motion, used more accurate locating results, employed the improved grid point test method, computed the focal mechanism solutions of Wenchuan earthquake sequence, and gave out 125 reliable focal mechanism solutions (M≥4.0,including a M3.9 earthquake result). The result shows that most of the earthquakes are thrust or strike-slip. The focal mechanism solutions have characteristic of subsection distribution. The P axis mainly distribute in direction of E-W within a certain range. 2) According to the main faults information and fine medium parameters, using ANSYS software, we established a three-dimensional elastic finite element model of the Longmenshan fault zone and its surrounding areas. According to Global Position System observations, considering three representative patterns of tectonic deformation velocity varying with depth, we loaded three different boundary conditions and got each numerical simulation result of the tectonic stress field in this region. The simulation results of the three patterns consistently show that the orientation of the principal compressive stress is almost E-W in Longmenshan fault zone and its surrounding area. And from north to south, there is a clockwise rotation within a narrow range. The result is consistent with the previous research in these areas. 3) Based on the numerical simulation results of tectonic stress field of three structural deformation patterns

  19. Large intermediate-depth earthquakes and the subduction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astiz, Luciana; Lay, Thorne; Kanamori, Hiroo

    1988-12-01

    This study provides an overview of intermediate-depth earthquake phenomena, placing emphasis on the larger, tectonically significant events, and exploring the relation of intermediate-depth earthquakes to shallower seismicity. Especially, we examine whether intermediate-depth events reflect the state of interplate coupling at subduction zones, and whether this activity exhibits temporal changes associated with the occurrence of large underthrusting earthquakes. Historic record of large intraplate earthquakes ( mB ≥ 7.0) in this century shows that the New Hebrides and Tonga subduction zones have the largest number of large intraplate events. Regions associated with bends in the subducted lithosphere also have many large events (e.g. Altiplano and New Ireland). We compiled a catalog of focal mechanisms for events that occurred between 1960 and 1984 with M > 6 and depth between 40 and 200 km. The final catalog includes 335 events with 47 new focal mechanisms, and is probably complete for earthquakes with mB ≥ 6.5. For events with M ≥ 6.5, nearly 48% of the events had no aftershocks and only 15% of the events had more than five aftershocks within one week of the mainshock. Events with more than ten aftershocks are located in regions associated with bends in the subducted slab. Focal mechanism solutions for intermediate-depth earthquakes with M > 6.8 can be grouped into four categories: (1) Normal-fault events (44%), and (2) reverse-fault events (33%), both with a strike nearly parallel to the trench axis. (3) Normal or reverse-fault events with a strike significantly oblique to the trench axis (10%), and (4) tear-faulting events (13%). The focal mechanisms of type 1 events occur mainly along strongly or moderately coupled subduction zones where a down-dip extensional stress prevails in a gently dipping plate. In contrast, along decoupled subduction zones great normal-fault earthquakes occur at shallow depths (e.g., the 1977 Sumbawa earthquake in Indonesia). Type

  20. Aftershocks are well aligned with the background stress field, contradicting the hypothesis of highly-heterogeneous crustal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that the crustal stress field contains small-length-scale heterogeneity of much larger amplitude than the uniform background stress. This model predicts that earthquake focal mechanisms should reflect the loading stress rather than the uniform background stress. So, if the heterogeneous stress hypothesis is correct, focal mechanisms before and after a large earthquake should align with the tectonic loading and the earthquake-induced static stress perturbation, respectively. However, I show that the off-fault triggered aftershocks of the 1992 M7.3 Landers, California, earthquake align with the same stress field as the pre-Landers mechanisms. The aftershocks occurred on faults that were well oriented for failure in the pre-Landers stress field and then loaded by the Landers-induced static stress change. Aftershocks in regions experiencing a 0.05 to 5 MPa coseismic differential stress change align with the modeled Landers-induced static stress change, implying that they were triggered by the stress perturbation. Contrary to the heterogeneous stress hypothesis, these triggered aftershocks are also well aligned with the pre-Landers stress field obtained from inverting the pre-Landers focal mechanisms. Therefore, the inverted pre-Landers stress must represent the persistent background stress field. Earthquake focal mechanisms provide an unbiased sample of the spatially coherent background stress field, which is large relative to any small-scale stress heterogeneity. The counterexample provided by the Landers earthquake is strong evidence that the heterogeneous stress model is not widely applicable.

  1. Seismic source study of the Racha-Dzhava (Georgia) earthquake from aftershocks and broad-band teleseismic body-wave records: An example of active nappe tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuenzalida, H.; Rivera, L.; Haessler, H.; Legrand, D.; Philip, H.; Dorbath, L.; McCormack, D.; Arefiev, S.; Langer, C.; Cisternas, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Racha-Dzhava earthquake (Ms = 7.0) that occurred on 1991 April 29 at 09:12:48.1 GMT in the southern border of the Great Caucasus is the biggest event ever recorded in the region, stronger than the Spitak earthquake (Ms = 6.9) of 1988. A field expedition to the epicentral area was organised and a temporary seismic network of 37 stations was deployed to record the aftershock activity. A very precise image of the aftershock distribution is obtained, showing an elongated cloud oriented N105??, with one branch trending N310?? in the western part. The southernmost part extends over 80 km, with the depth ranging from 0 to 15 km, and dips north. The northern branch, which is about 30 km long, shows activity that ranges in depth from 5 to 15 km. The complex thrust dips northwards. A stress-tensor inversion from P-wave first-motion polarities shows a state of triaxial compression, with the major principal axis oriented roughly N-S, the minor principal axis being vertical. Body-waveform inversion of teleseismic seismograms was performed for the main shock, which can be divided into four subevents with a total rupture-time duration of 22 s. The most important part of the seismic moment was released by a gentle northerly dipping thrust. The model is consistent with the compressive tectonics of the region and is in agreement with the aftershock distribution and the stress tensor deduced from the aftershocks. The focal mechanisms of the three largest aftershocks were also inverted from body-wave records. The April 29th (Ms = 6.1) and May 5th (Ms = 5.4) aftershocks have thrust mechanisms on roughly E-W-oriented planes, similar to the main shock. Surprisingly, the June 15th (Ms = 6.2) aftershock shows a thrust fault striking N-S. This mechanism is explained by the structural control of the rupture along the east-dipping geometry of the Dzirula Massif close to the Borzhomi-Kazbeg strike-slip fault. In fact, the orientation and shape of the stress tensor produce a thrust on a N

  2. Full waveform modelling of aftershock seismicity in the Chilean subduction zone using the VERCE platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Hicks, S. P.; Fuenzalida Velasco, A. J.; Casarotti, E.; Spinuso, A.; Rietbrock, A.

    2014-12-01

    The VERCE platform allows high resolution waveforms to be simulated through an interactive web-based portal. The platform runs on a variety of HPC clusters, and waveforms are calculated using SPECFEM3D. We use the full waveform modelling techniques supported on the VERCE platform to test the validity of a number of subduction zone velocity models from the Chilean subduction zone. Waveforms are calculated for aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule (central Chile) and the Mw 8.1 2014 Pisagua (Northern Chile) earthquakes. For the Maule region, we use a 2D tomographic model of the rupture area (Hicks et al., 2012), and the focal mechanisms of Agurto et al., (2012). For the Pisagua earthquake, we use a 2.5D composite velocity model based on tomographic studies of the region (e.g. Husen et al., 2000, Contreras-Reyes et al., 2012) and Slab1.0 (Hayes et al., 2012). Focal mechanisms for the Pisagua aftershock sequence are produced from waveforms recorded on the IPOC network using the program ISOLA (Sokos and Zahradnik, 2008). We also test a number of synthetic velocity models. The simulated waveforms are directly compared to waveforms recorded on the temporary deployment for the Maule earthquake aftershocks, and waveforms recorded on the IPOC network for the Pisagua earthquake aftershocks. The waveforms produced by the 3D full waveform simulations are also compared to the waveforms produced by the focal mechanism inversion, which assume a 1D velocity model. The VERCE platform allows waveforms from the full 3D model to be produced easily, and allows us to quantifiably assess the validity of both the velocity model and the source mechanisms. In particular the dependence of the dip of the focal mechanism on the velocity model used is explored, in order to assess the reliability of current models of the plate interface geometry in the Chilean subduction zone.

  3. Aftershock patterns and main shock faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendoza, C.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    We have compared aftershock patterns following several moderate to large earthquakes with the corresponding distributions of coseismic slip obtained from previous analyses of the recorded strong ground motion and teleseismic waveforms. Our results are consistent with a hypothesis of aftershock occurrence that requires a secondary redistribution of stress following primary failure on the earthquake fault. Aftershocks followng earthquakes examined in this study occur mostly outside of or near the edges of the source areas indicated by the patterns of main shock slip. The spatial distribution of aftershocks reflects either a continuation of slip in the outer regions of the areas of maximum coseismic displacement or the activation of subsidiary faults within the volume surrounding the boundaries of main shock rupture. -from Authors

  4. Foreshock activity related to enhanced aftershock production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsan, D.; Helmstetter, A.; Bouchon, M.; Dublanchet, P.

    2014-10-01

    Foreshock activity sometimes precedes the occurrence of large earthquakes, but the nature of this seismicity is still debated, and whether it marks transient deformation and/or slip nucleation is still unclear. We here study at the worldwide scale how foreshock occurrence affects the postseismic phase and find a significant positive correlation between foreshock and aftershock activities: earthquakes preceded by accelerating seismicity rates produce 40% more aftershocks on average, and the length of the aftershock zone after 20 days is 20% larger. These observations cannot be reproduced by standard earthquake clustering models that predict the accelerating pattern of foreshock occurrence but not its impact on aftershock activity. This strongly suggests that slow deformation transients, possibly related to episodic creep, could initiate prior to the main shock and extend past the coseismic phase, resulting in compound ruptures that include a very long period (up to tens of days) component.

  5. Offshore observations of aftershocks following the January 5th 2013 Mw 7.5 Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault earthquake, southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; Gulick, S. P.; Levoir, M. A.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We present initial results from a rapid-response ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployment that recorded aftershock activity on the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather (QC-F) fault following the Mw 7.5 earthquake on January 5th 2013 near Craig, Alaska. This earthquake was the second of two Mw > 7 events on this fault system in a 3 month time period; the Craig earthquake followed a Mw 7.8 thrust event that occurred in October 2012, west of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia. Although the QC-F is a major plate boundary fault, little is known about the regional fault structure, interseismic coupling, and rheological controls on the depth distribution of seismic slip along the continent-ocean transform. The majority of the QC-F fault system extends offshore western British Columbia and southeast Alaska, making it difficult to characterize earthquakes and fault deformation with land-based seismic and geodetic instruments. This experiment is the first ever offshore seismometer deployment to record earthquake activity along this northern segment of the QC-F system, and was set in motion with help from the US Coast Guard, who provided a vessel and crew to deploy and recover the OBS array on short notice. The seismic array utilized 6 GeoPro short period OBS from the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, which recorded approximately 3 weeks of aftershock activity in April-May of 2013. Combining high-quality local OBS recordings with land-based seismic observations from Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) stations to the east, we present more precise aftershock locations and depths that help to better characterize fault zone architecture along the northern section of the QC-F. Although moment tensor solutions indicate that the January 5th mainshock sustained slip consistent with Pacific-North America plate motions, aftershock focal mechanisms indicate some interaction with neighboring faults, such as the Chatham Straight fault. This new OBS dataset will also help to

  6. The Aftershock Risk Index - quantification of aftershock impacts during ongoing strong-seismic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Khazai, Bijan; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and impact of strong earthquakes often triggers the long-lasting impact of a seismic sequence. Strong earthquakes are generally followed by many aftershocks or even strong subsequently triggered ruptures. The Nepal 2015 earthquake sequence is one of the most recent examples where aftershocks significantly contributed to human and economic losses. In addition, rumours about upcoming mega-earthquakes, false predictions and on-going cycles of aftershocks induced a psychological burden on the society, which caused panic, additional casualties and prevented people from returning to normal life. This study shows the current phase of development of an operationalised aftershock intensity index, which will contribute to the mitigation of aftershock hazard. Hereby, various methods of earthquake forecasting and seismic risk assessments are utilised and an integration of the inherent aftershock intensity is performed. A spatio-temporal analysis of past earthquake clustering provides first-hand data about the nature of aftershock occurrence. Epidemic methods can additionally provide time-dependent variation indices of the cascading effects of aftershock generation. The aftershock hazard is often combined with the potential for significant losses through the vulnerability of structural systems and population. A historical database of aftershock socioeconomic effects from CATDAT has been used in order to calibrate the index based on observed impacts of historical events and their aftershocks. In addition, analytical analysis of cyclic behaviour and fragility functions of various building typologies are explored. The integration of many different probabilistic computation methods will provide a combined index parameter which can then be transformed into an easy-to-read spatio-temporal intensity index. The index provides daily updated information about the probability of the inherent seismic risk of aftershocks by providing a scalable scheme fordifferent aftershock

  7. Aftershock Imaging with Dense Arrays (AIDA): Results and lessons learned from the dense deployment of EarthScope portable instruments following the August 23, 2011, Mw 5.8, Virginia Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. D.; Davenport, K.; Quiros, D. A.; Hole, J. A.; Han, L.; Horowitz, F. G.; Chen, C.; Mooney, W. D.; Barnhart, W. D.; Lohman, R.; Bastien, P.; Fennig, N.; Ferguson, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Mw 5.8 Virginia earthquake of August 23, 2011, provided an opportunity to explore the feasibility of deploying large numbers of portable seismographs at close spacing to record aftershocks and the value of their recordings for improved characterization of the rupture process and structure in the hypocentral region. The main event, which occurred in the previously recognized "Central Virginia Seismic Zone", had a NE-striking reverse focal mechanism, hypocentral depth of 6 km (USGS). As this event passes with ca. 15 km of a NW-SE oriented deep seismic reflection profile contracted in 1981 by the USGS, there exists a rare opportunity for the eastern U.S. to link seismicity. The preliminary hypocentral estimate suggests that the earthquake occurred within a complex zone of east-dipping reflections that define an imbricated Paleozoic thrust sheet of the central Appalachian Piedmont that is underlain by Grenville basement at a depth of ca. 9 km. On August 27, 2011, four days after the main shock, we deployed 103 portable "Texan" one component, short-period recorders along two linear profiles over the hypocentral zone. An additional 105 "Texan" instruments were added six days later to extend the array more directly over the aftershock zone and along a regional NE-SW profile. The latter employed three component sensors to quantify regional attenuation characteristics of both P and S waves. Our initial analyses has focused on the contribution of the dense arrays to a) lowering the threshold for detecting/locating aftershocks b) improving hypocentral locations , c) computing more detailed velocity models (e.g. via tomography), and d) imaging crustal structure within and below the hypocenters using reflection P and S phases. Of particular interest was evaluating the usefulness of interferometric techniques by treating the aftershocks as a distributed "ambient noise" source. In addition to confirming our original expectations regarding improved event detection

  8. Aftershock locations and rupture characteristics of the 2006 May 27, Yogyakarta-Indonesia earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, M.; Ando, M.; Kimata, F.; Tadokoro, K.; Nakamichi, H.; Muto, D.; Okuda, T.; Hasanuddin, A.; Mipi A., K.; Setyadji, B.; Andreas, H.; Gamal, M.; Arif, R.

    2006-12-01

    A strong earthquake (M6.3) rocked the Bantul district, south of Yogyakarta Special Province (DIY) on the morningof May 27, 2006. We installed a temporary array of 6 seismographs to record aftershocks of the earthquake. The area of aftershocks, which may be interpreted as mainshock ruptured area has dimensions of about 25 km length and 20 km width, in the N48E direction. At depth the seismicity mainly concentrated between 5 to 15 km. The distribution of aftershock does not appear to come very close to the surface. There is no obvious surface evidence of causative fault in this area, though we find many crack and fissures that seem to have produced by the strong ground motion. We used the orientation and size of the fault determined from our aftershock results to carry out an inversion of teleseismic data for the slip distribution. We used broad- band seismograms of the IRIS network with epicentral distances between 30 and 90 degrees. We assume a single fault plane, strike 48 degree and dip 80 degree, which is inferred from the aftershock distribution. The total seismic moment is 0.369 x 10(19) Nm with maximum slip 0.4 meters. The asperity is located about 5 km away southwest of USGS estimated epicenter. Although the distances from the seismic source to heavily damaged areas Bantul and Klaten are 10 to 50 km, soft sedimentary soil likely to have generated very damaging motions within the area.

  9. Aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake revealcomplex faulting in the Yuha Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroll, K.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Richards-Dinger, K.; Sumy, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    We detect and precisely locate over 9500 aftershocks that occurred in the Yuha Desert region during a 2 month period following the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake. Events are relocated using a series of absolute and relative relocation procedures that include Hypoinverse, Velest, and hypoDD. Location errors are reduced to ~40 m horizontally and ~120 m vertically.Aftershock locations reveal a complex pattern of faulting with en echelon fault segments trending toward the northwest, approximately parallel to the North American-Pacific plate boundary and en echelon, conjugate features trending to the northeast. The relocated seismicity is highly correlated with published surface mapping of faults that experienced triggered surface slip in response to the EMC main shock. Aftershocks occurred between 2 km and 11 km depths, consistent with previous studies of seismogenic thickness in the region. Three-dimensional analysis reveals individual and intersecting fault planes that are limited in their along-strike length. These fault planes remain distinct structures at depth, indicative of conjugate faulting, and do not appear to coalesce onto a throughgoing fault segment. We observe a complex spatiotemporal migration of aftershocks, with seismicity that jumps between individual fault segments that are active for only a few days to weeks. Aftershock rates are roughly consistent with the expected earthquake production rates of Dieterich (1994). The conjugate pattern of faulting and nonuniform aftershock migration patterns suggest that strain in the Yuha Desert is being accommodated in a complex manner.

  10. Aftershock seismicity and tectonic setting of the 16 September 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dietrich; Geersen, Jacob; Barrientos, Sergio; Moreno, Marcos; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Kopp, Heidrun

    2016-06-01

    Powerful subduction zone earthquakes rupture thousands of square kilometers along continental margins but at certain locations earthquake rupture terminates. To date detailed knowledge of the parameters that govern seismic rupture and aftershocks is still incomplete. On 16 September 2015 the Mw. 8.3 Illapel earthquake ruptured a 200 km long stretch of the Central Chilean subduction zone, triggering a tsunami and causing significant damage. Here we analyze the temporal and spatial pattern of the co-seismic rupture and aftershocks in relation to the tectonic setting in the earthquake area. Aftershocks cluster around the area of maximum coseismic slip, in particular in lateral and downdip direction. During the first 24 hours after the mainshock, aftershocks migrated in both lateral directions with velocities of approximately 2.5 and 5 km/h. At the southern rupture boundary aftershocks cluster around individual subducted seamounts that are related to the downthrusting Juan Fernández Ridge. In the northern part of the rupture area aftershocks separate into an upper cluster (above 25 km depth) and a lower cluster (below 35 km depth). This dual seismic-aseismic transition in downdip direction is also observed in the interseismic period suggesting that it may represent a persistent feature for the Central Chilean subduction zone.

  11. Aftershock seismicity and tectonic setting of the 2015 September 16 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dietrich; Geersen, Jacob; Barrientos, Sergio; Moreno, Marcos; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Kopp, Heidrun

    2016-08-01

    Powerful subduction zone earthquakes rupture thousands of square kilometres along continental margins but at certain locations earthquake rupture terminates. To date, detailed knowledge of the parameters that govern seismic rupture and aftershocks is still incomplete. On 2015 September 16, the Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake ruptured a 200 km long stretch of the Central Chilean subduction zone, triggering a tsunami and causing significant damage. Here, we analyse the temporal and spatial pattern of the coseismic rupture and aftershocks in relation to the tectonic setting in the earthquake area. Aftershocks cluster around the area of maximum coseismic slip, in particular in lateral and downdip direction. During the first 24 hr after the main shock, aftershocks migrated in both lateral directions with velocities of approximately 2.5 and 5 km hr-1. At the southern rupture boundary, aftershocks cluster around individual subducted seamounts that are related to the downthrusting Juan Fernández Ridge. In the northern part of the rupture area, aftershocks separate into an upper cluster (above 25 km depth) and a lower cluster (below 35 km depth). This dual seismic-aseismic transition in downdip direction is also observed in the interseismic period suggesting that it may represent a persistent feature for the Central Chilean subduction zone.

  12. Detailed source process of the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake and its main aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrat, S.; Madariaga, R.; Buforn, E.; Meneses, G.; Campos, J.; Favreau, P.; Bernard, P.; Vilotte, J.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the detail rupture process of the Tocopilla earthquake (Mw 7.7) of the 14 November 2007 and of the main aftershocks that occurred in the southern part of the North Chile seismic gap using teleseismic broadband and strong motion data. The earthquake happen in the middle of the permanent broad band and strong motion network IPOC newly installed by GFZ and IPGP-CNRS, and of a digital strong- motion network operated by the University of Chile. The Tocopilla earthquake is the last large thrust subduction earthquake since the major Iquique 1877 earthquake which produced a destructive tsunami. The Arequipa (2001) and Antofagasta (1995) earthquakes already ruptured the northern and southern parts of the gap, and the intraplate intermediate depth Tarapaca earthquake (2005) may have changed the tectonic loading of this part of the Peru-Chile subduction zone. The Tocopilla earthquake raises some disturbing questions: why this earthquake didn't extent further north ; what has been the role of the Mejillones peninsula in the south which seems to act as a barrier? We studied the detailed source process using the strong motion data available. The strong-motion data show clearly two S-waves arrivals, allowing the localization of two sources. The main shock started north of the segment close to Tocopilla. The rupture propagated southward. The second source was identified to start about 20 seconds later and located 50 km south from the hypocenter. The earthquake ruptured the interplate seismic zone over more than 150 km and generated several large aftershocks, mainly located south of the rupture area with the same focal mechanism, except for the largest one that took place on the 16 December. This event is a down-dip compressional event (slab push) placed down dip of the main interplate coupling zone at the southern end of the main event rupture zone. Finally in order to understand whether the northern gap has actually been reduced or not by the occurrence of the

  13. Aftershock production rate of driven viscoelastic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagla, E. A.

    2014-10-01

    We study analytically and by numerical simulations the statistics of the aftershocks generated after large avalanches in models of interface depinning that include viscoelastic relaxation effects. We find in all the analyzed cases that the decay law of aftershocks with time can be understood by considering the typical roughness of the interface and its evolution due to relaxation. In models where there is a single viscoelastic relaxation time there is an exponential decay of the number of aftershocks with time. In models in which viscoelastic relaxation is wave-vector dependent we typically find a power-law dependence of the decay rate that is compatible with the Omori law. The factors that determine the value of the decay exponent are analyzed.

  14. Aftershock production rate of driven viscoelastic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jagla, E A

    2014-10-01

    We study analytically and by numerical simulations the statistics of the aftershocks generated after large avalanches in models of interface depinning that include viscoelastic relaxation effects. We find in all the analyzed cases that the decay law of aftershocks with time can be understood by considering the typical roughness of the interface and its evolution due to relaxation. In models where there is a single viscoelastic relaxation time there is an exponential decay of the number of aftershocks with time. In models in which viscoelastic relaxation is wave-vector dependent we typically find a power-law dependence of the decay rate that is compatible with the Omori law. The factors that determine the value of the decay exponent are analyzed. PMID:25375460

  15. Triggering of Aftershocks by Free Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, C. G.; Varnes, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    Periodicities observed in aftershock sequences may result from earthquake triggering by free oscillations of the Earth produced by the main shock. Using an algorithm we developed to compute spectra of inter-event times, we examine inter-event intervals of teleseismically recorded aftershock sequences from large (M>7.5) main shocks that occurred during 1980-2001. Observed periodicities may result from triggering at intervals that are multiples of normal mode periods. We have focussed our analysis of inter-event times on identification of triggering by free oscillations at periods in the range 6-60 minutes. In this paper we describe our most commonly observed aftershock inter-event times and the free oscillation modes most likely to be the triggers. Because of their separation, the longer period modes are easiest to identify in the aftershock data (0S2 at 53.9 minutes, 0S3 at 35.6 minutes, 0S4 at 25.8 minutes, and 0T2 at 43.9 minutes). Evidence of triggering by 0S2 and 0T2 was also found in the aftershocks of the 1989 Loma Prieta, CA (M 7) earthquake (Kamal and Mansinha, 1996). Because of the plethora of higher modes, shorter inter-event periods are more difficult to identify with a particular mode. Preliminary analysis of the 2001 Bhuj, India (M 7.7) earthquake sequence tentatively identifies a contribution to triggering of the first four large aftershocks by multiples of 0S12 (8.37 minutes).

  16. Spatial and temporal analysis of the Mw 7.7, 2007, Tocopilla aftershock sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Silke; Sobiesiak, Monika

    2010-05-01

    On 14 November 2007, 15:40:51 UTC a large Mw 7.7 earthquake occurred in the region of Tocopilla in Northern Chile. The epicenter is located at 22.30°S, 69.89°W, ~ 35 km south east of the city of Tocopilla and 160 km north of Antofagasta (earthquake location by GEOFON network). The earthquake took place in the southern part of the Northern Chile seismic gap which is supposed to be at the end of its seismic cycle. Currently, the gap is spanning the rupture area of the Mw=9 1877 Iquique event, a region which is now unbroken for almost 150 years. Therefore, the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake is the first large event that occurred inside the Northern Chile seismic gap since 1877. We present a study of the spatial and temporal distribution of the aftershock activity following the 2007 Tocopilla event using the frequency-magnitude distribution and other parameters. Studying this aftershock sequence will provide closer insight into the fault dimension of this subduction zone earthquake and the tectonic setting of the region. The distribution of aftershocks into depth shows that the majority of the hypocenters are located along the subduction interface, reaching down to ~ 50 km depth. In the western part, the aftershock sequence splits into two branches, one heading towards the trench, the other bending into the crust in front of the Mejillones Peninsula. In the epicentral horizontal, we observe a concentration of aftershocks around the northern part of the Mejillones Peninsula and along the coast up to the Río Loa. This leads to the conclusion that the shallow part in the north west did probably not break during the event. The spatial density of aftershocks shows two offshore patches north-east of the peninsula. Analyzing the spatio-temporal distribution of our aftershock data set, we can see that the fault rupture propagated towards the south west with a fault plane of about 150 km length. These observations are consistent with first results by other studies. Our

  17. How Long is an Aftershock Sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Cataldo; Tramelli, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of a mainschok is always followed by aftershocks spatially distributed within the fault area. The aftershocks rate decay with time is described by the empirical Omori law which was inferred by catalogues analysis. The sequences discrimination within catalogues is not a straightforward operation, especially for low-magnitude mainshocks. Here, we describe the rate decay of the Omori law obtained using different sequence discrimination tools and we discover that, when the background seismicity is excluded, the sequences tend to last for the temporal extension of the catalogue.

  18. Processing Aftershock Sequences Using Waveform Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resor, M. E.; Procopio, M. J.; Young, C. J.; Carr, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    For most event monitoring systems, the objective is to keep up with the flow of incoming data, producing a bulletin with some modest, relatively constant, time delay after present time, often a period of a few hours or less. Because the association problem scales exponentially and not linearly with the number of detections, a dramatic increase in seismicity due to an aftershock sequence can easily cause the bulletin delay time to increase dramatically. In some cases, the production of a bulletin may cease altogether, until the automatic system can catch up. For a nuclear monitoring system, the implications of such a delay could be dire. Given the expected similarity between a mainshock and aftershocks, it has been proposed that waveform correlation may provide a powerful means to simultaneously increase the efficiency of processing aftershock sequences, while also lowering the detection threshold and improving the quality of the event solutions. However, many questions remain unanswered. What are the key parameters for achieving the best correlations between waveforms (window length, filtering, etc.), and are they sequence-dependent? What is the overall percentage of similar events in an aftershock sequence, i.e. what is the maximum level of efficiency that a waveform correlation could be expected to achieve? Finally, how does this percentage of events vary among sequences? Using data from the aftershock sequence for the December 26, 2004 Mw 9.1 Sumatra event, we investigate these issues by building and testing a prototype waveform correlation event detection system that automatically expands its library of known events as new signatures are indentified in the aftershock sequence (by traditional signal detection and event processing). Our system tests all incoming data against this dynamic library, thereby identify any similar events before traditional processing takes place. In the region surrounding the Sumatra event, the NEIC EDR contains 4997 events in the 9

  19. How Long is an Aftershock Sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Cataldo; Tramelli, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence of a mainschok is always followed by aftershocks spatially distributed within the fault area. The aftershocks rate decay with time is described by the empirical Omori law which was inferred by catalogues analysis. The sequences discrimination within catalogues is not a straightforward operation, especially for low-magnitude mainshocks. Here, we describe the rate decay of the Omori law obtained using different sequence discrimination tools and we discover that, when the background seismicity is excluded, the sequences tend to last for the temporal extension of the catalogue.

  20. A re-assessment of focal depth distributions in southern Iran, the Tien Shan and northern India: do earthquakes really occur in the continental mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, A.; Jackson, J. A.; Priestley, K.; Baker, C.

    2000-12-01

    We investigate the depth distribution of earthquakes within the continental lithosphere of southern Iran, the Tien Shan and northern India by using synthetic seismograms to analyse P and SH body waveforms. In the Zagros mountains of southern Iran, earthquakes are apparently restricted to the upper crust (depths of <20km), whereas in the Tien Shan and northern India they occur throughout the thickness of the continental crust, to depths of ~40-45km. We find no convincing evidence for earthquakes in the continental mantle of these regions, in spite of previous suggestions to the contrary, and question whether seismicity in the continental mantle is important in any part of the world. In some regions, such as Iran, the Aegean, Tibet and California, seismicity is virtually restricted to the upper continental crust, whereas in others, including parts of East Africa, the Tien Shan and northern India, the lower crust is also seismically active, although usually less so than the upper crust. Such variations cannot reliably be demonstrated from published catalogue or bulletin locations, even from ones in which depth resolution is generally improved. In contrast to the oceanic mantle lithosphere, in which earthquakes certainly occur, the continental mantle lithosphere is, we suggest, virtually aseismic and may not be significantly stronger than the lower continental crust. These variations in continental seismogenic thickness are broadly correlated with variations in effective elastic thickness, suggesting that the strength of the continental lithosphere resides in the crust, and require some modification to prevalent views of lithosphere rheology.

  1. Full waveform modelling using the VERCE platform - application to aftershock seismicity in the Chile subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, Thomas; Rietbrock, Andreas; Hicks, Steve; Fuenzalida Velasco, Amaya; Casarotti, Emanuele; Spinuso, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    The VERCE platform is an online portal that allows full waveform simulations to be run for any region where a suitable velocity model exists. We use this facility to simulate the waveforms from aftershock earthquakes from the 2014 Pisagua earthquake, and 2010 Maule earthquake that occurred at the subduction zone mega thrust in Northern and Central Chile respectively. Simulations are performed using focal mechanisms from both global earthquake catalogues, and regional earthquake catalogues. The VERCE platform supports specFEM Cartesian, and simulations are run using meshes produced by CUBIT. The full waveform modelling techniques supported on the VERCE platform are used to test the validity of a number of subduction zone velocity models from the Chilean subduction zone. For the Maule earthquake we use a 2D and 3D travel time tomography model of the rupture area (Hicks et al. 2011; 2014). For the Pisagua earthquake we test a 2D/3D composite velocity model based on tomographic studies of the region (e.g. Husen et al. 2000, Contreyes-Reyes et al. 2012) and slab1.0 (Hayes et al. 2012). Focal mechanisms from the cGMT catalogue and local focal mechanisms calculated using ISOLA (e.g. Agurto et al. 2012) are used in the simulations. The waveforms produced are directly compared to waveforms recorded on the temporary deployment for the Maule earthquake aftershocks, and waveforms recorded on the IPOC network for the Pisagua earthquake aftershocks. This work demonstrates how the VERCE platform allows waveforms from the full 3D simulations to be easily produced, allowing us to quantify the validity of both the velocity model and the source mechanisms. These simulations therefore provide an independent test of the velocity models produced synthetically and by travel time tomography studies. Initial results show that the waveform is reasonably well reproduced in the 0.05 - 0.25 frequency band using a refined 3D travel time tomography, and locally calculated focal mechanisms.

  2. Aftershocks of the December 7, 2012 intraplate doublet near the Japan Trench axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Sato, Takeshi; Fujie, Gou; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Yojiro

    2014-12-01

    On December 7, 2012, a pair of large Mw 7.2 intraplate earthquakes occurred near the Japan Trench axis off Miyagi, northeast Japan. This doublet consisted of a deep reverse-faulting event followed by a shallow normal-faulting event. Aftershock observations using conventional and newly developed ultra-deep ocean bottom seismographs in the trench axis area showed that the shallow normal-faulting event occurred in the subducting Pacific plate just landward of the trench axis. The shallow normal-faulting aftershock activity indicated that in-plate tension in the incoming/subducting Pacific plate extends to a depth of at least 30 km, which is deeper than before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, whereas in-plate compression occurs at depths of more than 50 km. Hence, we concluded that the neutral plane of the in-plate stress is located between depths of 30 and 50 km near the trench axis.

  3. High frequencies are a critical component of aftershock triggering at <100-150 km (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felzer, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    Triggered earthquakes at large distances from the mainshock have been observed to closely follow the arrival of ~0.03-0.6 Hz surface waves (Hill, 2008). Triggering by body waves at these distances is generally not observed. At distances closer than 50-100 km, however, surface waves are not well developed and have minimal amplitude. Thus triggering at these distances is presumably accomplished by static stress change and/or by body waves via a mechanism that does not work at further distances. Pollitz (2006) demonstrated that slow slip events on the San Andreas fault do not trigger many aftershocks, suggesting that static stresses alone are not effective triggers, while Felzer and Brodsky (2006) demonstrated that dynamic stresses alone do appear to trigger aftershocks at least in the 10--50 km range. Yet Parsons and Velasco (2009) found that underground nuclear tests, which are essentially dynamic-only sources, do not produce aftershocks at regional distances. Here we demonstrate that Southern California quarry blasts also fail to produce aftershocks. Both nuclear tests and quarry blasts are depleted in high frequency energy in comparison to tectonic earthquakes (Su et al. 1991; Allman et al. 2008). Therefore the observation that both slow slip events and blasts fail to trigger many aftershocks suggests that the missing ingredient of high frequency body wave energy plays a critical role in the triggering process. Quarry blast spectra data and scaling considerations allow the critical triggering frequency to be constrained to > 20-60 Hz. Energy in this frequency band may be expected to persist at depth at least out to 100 km (Leary, 1995). Huc and Main (2003) found that aftershock triggering by global earthquakes follows a continuous decay curve out to ~150 km, suggesting that triggering by high frequency body waves might extend this far. At much further distances the high frequencies are likely attenuated, explaining why only low frequency surface wave triggering

  4. The regional moment tensor of the 5 May 2014 Chiang Rai earthquake (Mw = 6.5), Northern Thailand, with its aftershocks and its implication to the stress and the instability of the Phayao Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noisagool, Sutthipong; Boonchaisuk, Songkhun; Pornsopin, Patinya; Siripunvaraporn, Weerachai

    2016-09-01

    On 5 May 2014, the largest earthquake in Thailand modern history occurred in Northern Thailand with over a thousand aftershocks. Most of the epicenters are located within the transition area of the Mae Lao segment (north) and Pan segment (central) of the Phayao Fault Zone (PFZ). Good quality data from all events (ML > 4) are only available for the seismic stations closer to the epicenters (<500 km). The regional moment tensor (RMT) inversion was applied to derive a sequence of thirty focal mechanisms, moment magnitudes and source depths generated along the PFZ. Our studies reveal that 24 events are strike - slip with normal (transtensional), four are strike - slip with thrust (transpressional), and two are reverse. The main shock has an Mw of 6.5, slightly larger than previously estimated (ML 6.3) while Mw of the aftershocks is mostly lower than ML. This suggests that a regional magnitude calibration is necessary. The hypocenter depths of most events are around 11 km, not as shallow as estimated earlier. In addition, a stress inversion was applied to these 30 focal mechanisms to determine the stresses of the region, the Mohr's diagram, and the principal fault planes. The retrieved maximum stress direction (N18E) is in agreement with other studies. One of the derived principal fault plane with a strike of N48E is in good agreement with that of the Mae Lao segment. Both estimated shape ratio and plunges led us to conclude that this area has a uniaxial horizontal compression in NNE-SSW with small WNW-ESE extension, similar to the interpretation of Tingay et al. (2010). Based on the Mohr's diagram of fault plane solutions, we provide geophysical evidence which reveals that the high shear stress Mae Lao segment is likely to slip first producing the main shock on 5 May 2014. The energy transfer between the segments has then led to many aftershocks with mixed mechanisms. At the end, we re-visited the analysis of the former largest earthquake in Northern Thailand in the

  5. Seismotectonic model of the MITIDJA basin using gravity data and aftershock sequence of the BOUMERDES (may 21, 2003; ALGERIA) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Merzouk; Idres, Mouloud; Salah Boughacha, Mohame; Bourmatte, Amar; Samai, Saddek

    2010-05-01

    The present study relates to the interpretation of gravity and seismological data in the Boumerdes area (Eastern part of the Mitidja Basin, Algeria), in relation to the earthquake of May 21, 2003 (Mw=6.8). The residual anomaly and the horizontal gradient maps made it possible to obtain the basement shape and gravity discontinuities. The seismological data processing of the aftershock sequence recorded by 16 tri-component seismological stations allowed the location of 1987 events during the period of May 23 to June 30, 2003. A seismotectonic model obtained from the aftershocks distribution and gravity data is proposed. This model consists of three active faults; one lying offshore and two other onshore faults highlighted in this study. The offshore fault striking NE-SW is consistent with the USGS focal mechanism of the main event; the onshore faults strike NW-SE. This configuration emphasizes the failure mode complexity during the main shock. The geometry and location of the onshore faults are obtained from the spatial distribution of seismicity and focal solutions, supported by the results of gravity, but also by the coastal uplift and the Algiers canyon close to one of these faults. The topography of the basement obtained by 3D gravity inversion shows that all the aftershocks located onshore occurred in the basement. The 3D model of the basement also shows that the area between the two onshore faults was raised by their movement. Keywords: Aftershock sequence, Algeria, Basement, Boumerdes earthquake, Gravity

  6. Optical elements with extended depth of focus and arbitrary distribution of intensity along the focal segment obtained by angular modulation of the optical power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakarenko, K.; Ducin, I.; Jaroszewicz, Z.; Kołodziejczyk, A.; Petelczyc, K.; Stompor, A.; Sypek, M.

    2015-04-01

    Light Sword Lens (LSL), i.e., an optical element with extended depth of focus (EDOF) characterized by angular modulation of the optical power in its conventional form is characterized by a linear relationship between the optical power and the angular coordinate of the corresponding angular lens sector. This dependence may be manipulated in function of the required design needs. In the present communicate this additional degree of freedom of design is used for elimination of the LSL shape discontinuity.

  7. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes ( M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the Wells and Coppersmith (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the Burkhard and Grünthal (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  8. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes (M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of uc(Gardner) and uc(Knopoff) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the uc(Wells) and uc(Coppersmith) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the uc(Burkhard) and uc(Grünthal) (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of uc(Gardner) and uc(Knopoff) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  9. The Pegasus Bay aftershock sequence of the Mw 7.1 Darfield (Canterbury), New Zealand earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristau, John; Holden, Caroline; Kaiser, Anna; Williams, Charles; Bannister, Stephen; Fry, Bill

    2013-10-01

    The Pegasus Bay aftershock sequence is the most recent aftershock sequence of the 2010 September 3 UTC moment magnitude (Mw) 7.1 Darfield earthquake in the Canterbury region of New Zealand. The Pegasus Bay aftershock sequence began on 2011 December 23 UTC with three events of Mw 5.4-5.9 located in the offshore region of Pegasus Bay, east of Christchurch city. We present a summary of key aspects of the sequence derived using various geophysical methods. Relocations carried out using double-difference tomography show a well-defined NNE-SSW to NE-SW series of aftershocks with most of the activity occurring at depths >5 km and an average depth of ˜10 km. Regional moment tensor solutions calculated for the Pegasus Bay sequence indicate that the vast majority (45 of 53 events) are reverse-faulting events with an average P-axis azimuth of 125°. Strong-motion data inversion favours a SE-dipping fault plane for the largest event (Mw 5.9) with a slip patch of 18 km × 15 km and a maximum slip of 0.8 m at 3.5 km depth. Peak ground accelerations ranging up to 0.98 g on the vertical component were recorded during the sequence, and the largest event produced horizontal accelerations of 0.2-0.4 g in the Christchurch central business district. Apparent stress estimates for the two largest events are 1.1 MPa (Mw 5.9) and 0.2 MPa (Mw 5.8), which are compatible with global averages, although lower than other large events in the Canterbury aftershock sequence. Coulomb stress analysis indicates that previous large earthquakes in the Canterbury sequence generate Coulomb stress increases for the two events only at relatively shallow depths (3-5 km). At greater depths, Coulomb stress decreases are predicted at the locations of the two events. The trend of the aftershocks is similar to mapped reverse faults north of Christchurch, and the high number of reverse-faulting mechanisms suggests that similar reverse-faulting structures are present in the offshore region east of Christchurch.

  10. Aftershock Characteristics as a Means of Discriminating Explosions from Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2009-05-20

    The behavior of aftershock sequences around the Nevada Test Site in the southern Great Basin is characterized as a potential discriminant between explosions and earthquakes. The aftershock model designed by Reasenberg and Jones (1989, 1994) allows for a probabilistic statement of earthquake-like aftershock behavior at any time after the mainshock. We use this model to define two types of aftershock discriminants. The first defines M{sub X}, or the minimum magnitude of an aftershock expected within a given duration after the mainshock with probability X. Of the 67 earthquakes with M > 4 in the study region, 63 of them produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 99} within the first seven days after a mainshock. This is contrasted with only six of 93 explosions with M > 4 that produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 99} for the same period. If the aftershock magnitude threshold is lowered and the M{sub 90} criteria is used, then no explosions produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 90} for durations that end more than 17 days after the mainshock. The other discriminant defines N{sub X}, or the minimum cumulative number of aftershocks expected for given time after the mainshock with probability X. Similar to the aftershock magnitude discriminant, five earthquakes do not produce more aftershocks than N{sub 99} within 7 days after the mainshock. However, within the same period all but one explosion produce less aftershocks then N{sub 99}. One explosion is added if the duration is shortened to two days after than mainshock. The cumulative number aftershock discriminant is more reliable, especially at short durations, but requires a low magnitude of completeness for the given earthquake catalog. These results at NTS are quite promising and should be evaluated at other nuclear test sites to understand the effects of differences in the geologic setting and nuclear testing practices on its performance.

  11. Three Dimensional P Wave Velocity Model for the Crust Containing Aftershocks of the Bhuj, India Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Vlahovic, G.; Bodin, P.; Horton, S.

    2001-12-01

    A three-dimensional P wave velocity model has been constructed for the crust in the vicinity of the Mw=7.7 January 26th Bhuj, India earthquake using aftershock data obtained by CERI away teams. Aftershocks were recorded by 8 portable, digital K2 seismographs (the MAEC/ISTAR network) and by a continuously recording Guralp CMG40TD broad-band seismometer. Station spacing is roughly 30 km. The network was in place for 18 days and recorded ground motions from about 2000 aftershocks located within about 100 km of all stations. The 3-D velocity model is based upon an initial subset of 461 earthquakes with 2848 P wave arrivals. The initial 1-D velocity model was determined using VELEST and the 3-D model was determined using the nonlinear travel time tomography method of Benz et al. [1996]. Block size was set at 2 by 2 by 2 km. A 45% reduction in RMS travel time residuals was obtained after 10 iterations holding hypocenters fixed. We imaged velocity anomalies in the range -2 to 4%. Low velocities were found in the upper 6 km and the anomalies follow surface features such as the Rann of Kutch. High velocity features were imaged at depth and are associated with the aftershock hypocenters. High crustal velocities are present at depths exceeding 20 km with the exception of the crust below the Rann of Kutch. The imaged velocity anomaly pattern does not change when different starting models are used and when hypocenters are relocated using P wave arrivals only. The analysis will be extended to an expanded data set of 941 aftershocks.

  12. Aftershock seismicity and Tectonic Setting of the 16 September 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dietrich; Geersen, Jacob; Barrientos, Sergio; Moreno, Marcos; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Kopp, Heidrun

    2016-04-01

    Powerful subduction zone earthquakes rupture thousands of square kilometers along continental margins but at certain locations earthquake rupture terminates. On 16 September 2015 the Mw. 8.3 Illapel earthquake ruptured a 200 km long stretch of the Central Chilean subduction zone, triggering a tsunami and causing significant damage. Here we analyze the spatial pattern of coseismic rupture and the temporal and spatial pattern of local seismicity for aftershocks and foreshocks in relation to the tectonic setting in the earthquake area. Aftershock seismicity surrounds the rupture area in lateral and downdip direction. For the first 24 hours following the mainshock we observe aftershock migration to both lateral directions with velocities of approximately 2.5 and 5 km/h. At the southern earthquake boundary aftershocks cluster around individual subducted seamounts located on the prolongation of the downthrusting Juan Fernández Ridge indicating stress transfer from the main rupture area. In the northern part of the rupture area a deeper band of local seismicity is observed indicating an alternation of seismic to aseismic behavior of the plate interface in downdip direction. This aseismic region at ~30 km depth that is also observed before the Illapel 2015 earthquake is likely controlled by the intersection of the continental Moho with the subducting slab.

  13. The aftershock signature of supershear earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Bouchon, Michel; Karabulut, Hayrullah

    2008-06-01

    Recent studies show that earthquake faults may rupture at speeds exceeding the shear wave velocity of rocks. This supershear rupture produces in the ground a seismic shock wave similar to the sonic boom produced by a supersonic airplane. This shock wave may increase the destruction caused by the earthquake. We report that supershear earthquakes are characterized by a specific pattern of aftershocks: The fault plane itself is remarkably quiet whereas aftershocks cluster off the fault, on secondary structures that are activated by the supershear rupture. The post-earthquake quiescence of the fault shows that friction is relatively uniform over supershear segments, whereas the activation of off-fault structures is explained by the shock wave radiation, which produces high stresses over a wide zone surrounding the fault. PMID:18535239

  14. Aftershocks in a frictional earthquake model.

    PubMed

    Braun, O M; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-09-01

    Inspired by spring-block models, we elaborate a "minimal" physical model of earthquakes which reproduces two main empirical seismological laws, the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Omori aftershock law. Our point is to demonstrate that the simultaneous incorporation of aging of contacts in the sliding interface and of elasticity of the sliding plates constitutes the minimal ingredients to account for both laws within the same frictional model. PMID:25314453

  15. Investigating Fault Zone Damage Processes Using Waveform Relocated Seismicity and High Precision Focal Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Yang, W.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze waveform relocated seismicity and focal mechanisms located near the principal slip zones (PSZs) of the late Quaternary fault zones in southern California to address questions such as: 1) Do mainshocks, aftershocks, and interseismic seismicity occur in the same place? 2) Is there evidence for fault normal compression along strike-slip faults? 3) Does seismicity in the near-field (±2km) of PSZs respond strongly to stress changes from nearby large earthquakes? 4) Is there other evidence for weak faults? We show that major earthquakes that can slip more than several meters, aftershocks, and near-fault relocated background seismicity mostly rupture different surfaces within late Quaternary fault zones. Major earthquakes rupture along the mapped traces of the late Quaternary faults, called the PSZs. Aftershocks illuminate damage zones in the immediate vicinity of the PSZs, typically ±2 km wide. In contrast, the near-fault background seismicity is mostly accommodated on a secondary heterogeneous network of small slip surfaces, and forms spatially decaying distributions extending out to distances of ±10 km away from the PSZs. As part of our efforts to address these questions, we have completed waveform relocations of more than 500,000 earthquakes. We have also determined a new focal mechanism catalog of more than 150,000 events, applying the latest techniques that include using S/P amplitude ratios for additional constraints, and taking advantage of the new waveform based relocations. We use the data set of focal mechanisms to analyze the style of faulting and the stress field next to PSZs of major faults. For detailed analysis we select all the events located within ±10 km of major PSZs as defined in the SCEC Community Fault Model. There is a difference in the depth distribution as well as in the rake distribution on each side of the PSZs. The events may be deeper on one side of the PSZ as compared to the other. Further, the focal mechanisms often have a

  16. Do aftershock probabilities decay with time?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    So, do aftershock probabilities decay with time? Consider a thought experiment in which we are at the time of the mainshock and ask how many aftershocks will occur a day, week, month, year, or even a century from now. First we must decide how large a window to use around each point in time. Let's assume that, as we go further into the future, we are asking a less precise question. Perhaps a day from now means 1 day 10% of a day, a week from now means 1 week 10% of a week, and so on. If we ignore c because it is a small fraction of a day (e.g., Reasenberg and Jones, 1989, hereafter RJ89), and set p = 1 because it is usually close to 1 (its value in the original Omori law), then the rate of earthquakes (K=t) decays at 1=t. If the length of the windows being considered increases proportionally to t, then the number of earthquakes at any time from now is the same because the rate decrease is canceled by the increase in the window duration. Under these conditions we should never think "It's a bit late for this to be an aftershock."

  17. Triggering of earthquake aftershocks by dynamic stresses.

    PubMed

    Kilb, D; Gomberg, J; Bodin, P

    2000-11-30

    It is thought that small 'static' stress changes due to permanent fault displacement can alter the likelihood of, or trigger, earthquakes on nearby faults. Many studies of triggering in the near-field, particularly of aftershocks, rely on these static changes as the triggering agent and consider them only in terms of equivalent changes in the applied load on the fault. Here we report a comparison of the aftershock pattern of the moment magnitude Mw = 7.3 Landers earthquake, not only with static stress changes but also with transient, oscillatory stress changes transmitted as seismic waves (that is, 'dynamic' stresses). Dynamic stresses do not permanently change the applied load and thus can trigger earthquakes only by altering the mechanical state or properties of the fault zone. These dynamically weakened faults may fail after the seismic waves have passed by, and might even cause earthquakes that would not otherwise have occurred. We find similar asymmetries in the aftershock and dynamic stress patterns, the latter being due to rupture propagation, whereas the static stress changes lack this asymmetry. Previous studies have shown that dynamic stresses can promote failure at remote distances, but here we show that they can also do so nearby. PMID:11117741

  18. The Mw 8.1 2014 Iquique, Chile, seismic sequence: a tale of foreshocks and aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesca, S.; Grigoli, F.; Heimann, S.; Dahm, T.; Kriegerowski, M.; Sobiesiak, M.; Tassara, C.; Olcay, M.

    2016-03-01

    The 2014 April 1, Mw 8.1 Iquique (Chile) earthquake struck in the Northern Chile seismic gap. With a rupture length of less than 200 km, it left unbroken large segments of the former gap. Early studies were able to model the main rupture features but results are ambiguous with respect to the role of aseismic slip and left open questions on the remaining hazard at the Northern Chile gap. A striking observation of the 2014 earthquake has been its extensive preparation phase, with more than 1300 events with magnitude above ML 3, occurring during the 15 months preceding the main shock. Increasing seismicity rates and observed peak magnitudes accompanied the last three weeks before the main shock. Thanks to the large data sets of regional recordings, we assess the precursor activity, compare foreshocks and aftershocks and model rupture preparation and rupture effects. To tackle inversion challenges for moderate events with an asymmetric network geometry, we use full waveforms techniques to locate events, map the seismicity rate and derive source parameters, obtaining moment tensors for more than 300 events (magnitudes Mw 4.0-8.1) in the period 2013 January 1-2014 April 30. This unique data set of fore- and aftershocks is investigated to distinguish rupture process models and models of strain and stress rotation during an earthquake. Results indicate that the spatial distributions of foreshocks delineated the shallower part of the rupture areas of the main shock and its largest aftershock, well matching the spatial extension of the aftershocks cloud. Most moment tensors correspond to almost pure double couple thrust mechanisms, consistent with the slab orientation. Whereas no significant differences are observed among thrust mechanisms in different areas, nor among thrust foreshocks and aftershocks, the early aftershock sequence is characterized by the presence of normal fault mechanisms, striking parallel to the trench but dipping westward. These events likely occurred

  19. Forecasting large aftershocks within one day after the main shock

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Takahiro; Ogata, Yosihiko; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting the aftershock probability has been performed by the authorities to mitigate hazards in the disaster area after a main shock. However, despite the fact that most of large aftershocks occur within a day from the main shock, the operational forecasting has been very difficult during this time-period due to incomplete recording of early aftershocks. Here we propose a real-time method for efficiently forecasting the occurrence rates of potential aftershocks using systematically incomplete observations that are available in a few hours after the main shocks. We demonstrate the method's utility by retrospective early forecasting of the aftershock activity of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake of M9.0 in Japan. Furthermore, we compare the results by the real-time data with the compiled preliminary data to examine robustness of the present method for the aftershocks of a recent inland earthquake in Japan. PMID:23860594

  20. Improved understanding of aftershock triggering by waveform detection of aftershocks with GPU computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Meng, X.; Hong, B.; Yu, X.

    2012-12-01

    Large shallow earthquakes are generally followed by increased seismic activities around the mainshock rupture zone, known as "aftershocks". Whether static or dynamic triggering is responsible for triggering aftershocks is still in debate. However, aftershocks listed in standard earthquake catalogs are generally incomplete immediately after the mainshock, which may result in inaccurate estimation of seismic rate changes. Recent studies have used waveforms of existing earthquakes as templates to scan through continuous waveforms to detect potential missing aftershocks, which is termed 'matched filter technique'. However, this kind of data mining is computationally intensive, which raises new challenges when applying to large data sets with tens of thousands of templates, hundreds of seismic stations and years of continuous waveforms. The waveform matched filter technique exhibits parallelism at multiple levels, which allows us to use GPU-based computation to achieve significant acceleration. By dividing the procedure into several routines and processing them in parallel, we have achieved ~40 times speedup for one Nvidia GPU card compared to sequential CPU code, and further scaled the code to multiple GPUs. We apply this paralleled code to detect potential missing aftershocks around the 2003 Mw 6.5 San Simeon and 2004 Mw6.0 Parkfield earthquakes in Central California, and around the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in southern California. In all these cases, we can detect several tens of times more earthquakes immediately after the mainshocks as compared with those listed in the catalogs. These newly identified earthquakes are revealing new information about the physical mechanisms responsible for triggering aftershocks in the near field. We plan to improve our code so that it can be executed in large-scale GPU clusters. Our work has the long-term goal of developing scalable methods for seismic data analysis in the context of "Big Data" challenges.

  1. Model for the Distribution of Aftershock Interoccurrence Times

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Robert; Yakovlev, Gleb; Rundle, John B.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2005-11-18

    In this work the distribution of interoccurrence times between earthquakes in aftershock sequences is analyzed and a model based on a nonhomogeneous Poisson (NHP) process is proposed to quantify the observed scaling. In this model the generalized Omori's law for the decay of aftershocks is used as a time-dependent rate in the NHP process. The analytically derived distribution of interoccurrence times is applied to several major aftershock sequences in California to confirm the validity of the proposed hypothesis.

  2. Identification of a major segment boundary between two megathrust subduction zone earthquakes from aftershock seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Victor, P.; Eggert, S.

    2009-04-01

    Aftershock seismicity is commonly used to characterize the extent of rupture planes of megathrust earthquakes. From unique datasets, covering the two adjacent fault planes of the Mw 8.0, 1995, Antofagasta and the Mw 7.7, 2007, Tocopilla earthquakes, we were able to identify a segment boundary (SB), located beneath Mejillones Peninsula. This segment boundary hosted the onset of the Antofagasta rupture and constituted the end of the Tocopilla rupture plane. The data recorded during the mission of the German Task Force for Earthquakes after the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake is supporting our observations regarding the northern part of the SB. 34 seismological stations registered the aftershocks from November 2007 until May 2008. First hypocenter determinations show that the aftershock sequences of both events meet along this E-W oriented segment boundary. The segment boundary is furthermore conformed by the historic record of megathrust events. Evidence for long term persistency of this SB comes from geological observations as differential uplift rates across the boundary and different fault patterns. Geomorpholocical analysis defines a topographic anomaly ~ 20 km wide and oriented along strike the SB..The main shock hypocenter determinations (NEIC, local network, ISC) which are related to the start of the rupture are all located in this zone. The SB is further characterized by intermediate b-values derived from a spatial b-value study of the Antofagasta fault plane and hosts several elongated clusters of aftershock seismicity. A detailed study of the focal mechanism solutions in one of these clusters showed a number of aligned strike slip events with one E-W striking nodal plane having a strike angle which is similar to the angle of subduction obliquity of the oceanic Nazca plate in this area. In further investigations we will search for detailed information on the nature and dynamics of processes along such a segment boundary, their meaning for the initiation of large

  3. The October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta, California, earthquake and its aftershocks: Geometry of the sequence from high-resolution locations

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, L.D.; Ellsworth, W.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Hypocenters of the Loma Prieta sequence form a dipping zone that rises from the mainshock hypocenter and is parallel to the mainshock nodal plane. Most aftershocks cluster around the perimeter of the zone, surrounding a relatively aseismic center which approximates the region of mainshock rupture. At its southeastern end, the dipping aftershock zone warps into a vertical surface that corresponds to the San Andreas fault. In the central and northwestern parts of the zone at depths above {approximately}10 km, the aftershocks define numerous disjoint fault structures. The large component of reverse-slip observed in this event agrees with a simple model for slip on a dipping plane within a compressional fault bend. The authors do not believe that the Loma Prieta earthquake occurred on the Sargent fault. However, they are unable to conclude whether it ruptured the principal plate boundary fault or a less frequently active fault.

  4. High resolution earthquake source mechanisms in a subduction zone: 3-D waveform simulations of aftershocks from the 2010 Mw 8.8 Chile rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    for the region as well as robust earthquake locations (Hicks et al., 2014) ensure that our 3-D simulations are robust. We perform regional moment tensor inversion using the ISOLA software package (Sokos & Zahradnik, 2008), incorporating 3-D Green's functions from the forward simulations. With this approach, we are able to test the resolving capability of traditional 1-D strategies. We find that focal mechanism dip and source depth are the parameters that are most biased parameters in 1-D RMT inversions, particularly for events that are located far offshore. We also describe and interpret observations of normal faulting earthquakes along the plate interface. This finding may have important implications for post-seismic fluid release.

  5. Source Fault of the Dec.26, 2003 Bam Earthquake (Mw6.5) in Southeastern Iran Inferred From Aftershock Observation Data by Temporal High-Sensitive-Seismograph Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Matsushima, T.; Ito, Y.; Hosseini, S. K.; Nakamura, T.; Arash, J.; Sadeghi, H.; Maleki, M.; Aghda, F.

    2004-05-01

    The Bam earthquake occurred in southeastern Iran at 05:26 A.M.(local time) on December 26, 2003 (epicenter: 29.010N, 58.266E, Mo=6.6x10**18Nm, Mw=6.5; ref.1). The earthquake had strike-slip mechanism (strike=175, dip=85, slip=153; ref.2) and source parameters (focal depth=4km, fault dimension=20kmx15km, Dmax=1.0m, stress drop=3.7MPa; ref.2). The earthquake struck the ancient city of Bam and killed more than 40,000 people. It shows that one third of about 120,000 in population in and around Bam city were killed. The main reason of such a big damage may be caused by weak adobe and brick houses; even so, the damage was too much big. We, therefore, are researching other cause of such a big damage. Taking instruments from Japan for this aim we installed 9 high sensitive seismographs and one accelerograph in and around Bam city on February 6-8, 2004. And we observed aftershocks and continue during one month. Reading P and S arriving times of about 100 aftershocks occurring from February 6 to 10, we determined those preliminary hypocenters and magnitudes. Those epicenters (errors<500m) distribute mainly from northeastern Bam city to south direction with about 20km length. It means that the fault of the main shock passed just under eastern half of Bam city where most of houses and buildings were heavily damaged. This fault is about 4 km away west from Bam fault which is presented in geological map (ref.3). A north-south vertical cross-section of the hypocentral distribution (maybe errors < 1km) shows that most of their depths are shallower than 14km and a seismic gap exists in the laterally middle part of their distribution and shallower than 6 km in depth. The shallow seismic gap may correspond to a main fracture zone as shown in the slip distribution figure proposed by Yamanaka (ref.2). This main fracture occurring shallower than about 6 km in depth must be one of causes of the big damage in Bam. (Reference) ref1:USGS,http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/FM/, ref 2: ERI, U. Tokyo

  6. Bayesian Predictive Distribution for the Magnitude of the Largest Aftershock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock sequences, which follow large earthquakes, last hundreds of days and are characterized by well defined frequency-magnitude and spatio-temporal distributions. The largest aftershocks in a sequence constitute significant hazard and can inflict additional damage to infrastructure. Therefore, the estimation of the magnitude of possible largest aftershocks in a sequence is of high importance. In this work, we propose a statistical model based on Bayesian analysis and extreme value statistics to describe the distribution of magnitudes of the largest aftershocks in a sequence. We derive an analytical expression for a Bayesian predictive distribution function for the magnitude of the largest expected aftershock and compute the corresponding confidence intervals. We assume that the occurrence of aftershocks can be modeled, to a good approximation, by a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a temporal event rate given by the modified Omori law. We also assume that the frequency-magnitude statistics of aftershocks can be approximated by Gutenberg-Richter scaling. We apply our analysis to 19 prominent aftershock sequences, which occurred in the last 30 years, in order to compute the Bayesian predictive distributions and the corresponding confidence intervals. In the analysis, we use the information of the early aftershocks in the sequences (in the first 1, 10, and 30 days after the main shock) to estimate retrospectively the confidence intervals for the magnitude of the expected largest aftershocks. We demonstrate by analysing 19 past sequences that in many cases we are able to constrain the magnitudes of the largest aftershocks. For example, this includes the analysis of the Darfield (Christchurch) aftershock sequence. The proposed analysis can be used for the earthquake hazard assessment and forecasting associated with the occurrence of large aftershocks. The improvement in instrumental data associated with early aftershocks can greatly enhance the analysis and

  7. Tomographic velocity model for the aftershock region of the 2001 Gujarat, India earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, H.; Kumar, S.; Mori, J. J.; Sato, T.; Bodin, P.; Rastogi, B.

    2002-12-01

    A tomographic inversion was applied to the aftershock data collected after the January 26, 2001 Bhuj earthquake (Ms 7.9, Mw 7.7), which occurred on a south dipping (~50 degrees) reverse fault in the state of Gujarat in western India. We used high quality arrivals from 8,374 P and 7,994 S waves of 1404 aftershocks recorded on 27 digital stations from temporary seismic arrays setup by the India-Japan team; NGRI, India; and CERI, Memphis Univ., USA, following the Bhuj main shock. First, we used the Joint Hypocenters Determination Method for obtaining relocated hypocenters and a one-dimensional Vp and Vs velocity model, and then the resultant hypocenters and 1-D velocity model were used as the initial parameters for a 3-D tomographic inversion. The tomography technique is based on a grid-modeling method by Zhao et al. . Vp, Vs and hypocenters are determined simultaneously. We tried to use the Cross-Validation Technique for determining an optimum model in the seismic tomography. This approach has been applied to other tomographic studies to investigate the quantitative fluctuation range of velocity perturbations . Significant variations in the velocity (up to 6%) and Poisson's ratio (up to 8%) are revealed in the aftershock area. It seems that the aftershock distribution corresponds to the boundary between high and low velocity heterogeneities. Small values of Vp/Vs are generally found at depths of 10 to 35 km, i.e. the depth range of aftershock distribution. However, the deeper region below the hypocenter of the mainshock, at depths of 35 to 45 km, is characterized by relatively high values of Vp/Vs and low values of Vs. This anomaly may be due to a weak fractured and fluid filled rock matrix, which might have contributed to triggering this earthquake. This earthquake occurred on a relatively deep and steeply dipping fault with a large stress drop . Theoretically it is difficult to slip steep faults, especially in the lower crust. Our tomographic investigation provides

  8. Local near instantaneously dynamically triggered aftershocks of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenyuan; Shearer, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Aftershocks are often triggered by static- and/or dynamic-stress changes caused by mainshocks. The relative importance of the two triggering mechanisms is controversial at near-to-intermediate distances. We detected and located 48 previously unidentified large early aftershocks triggered by earthquakes with magnitudes between ≥7 and 8 within a few fault lengths (approximately 300 kilometers), during times that high-amplitude surface waves arrive from the mainshock (less than 200 seconds). The observations indicate that near-to-intermediate-field dynamic triggering commonly exists and fundamentally promotes aftershock occurrence. The mainshocks and their nearby early aftershocks are located at major subduction zones and continental boundaries, and mainshocks with all types of faulting-mechanisms (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) can trigger early aftershocks. PMID:27609887

  9. Analysis of rupture area of aftershocks caused by twin earthquakes (Case study: 11 April 2012 earthquakes of Aceh-North Sumatra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diansari, Angga Vertika; Purwana, Ibnu; Subakti, Hendri

    2015-04-01

    The 11 April 2012 earthquakes off-shore Aceh-North Sumatra are unique events for the history of Indonesian earthquake. It is unique because that they have similar magnitude, 8.5 Mw and 8.1 Mw; close to epicenter distance, similar strike-slip focal mechanism, and occuring in outer rise area. The purposes of this research are: (1) comparing area of earthquakes base on models and that of calculation, (2) fitting the shape and the area of earthquake rupture zones, (3) analyzing the relationship between rupture area and magnitude of the earthquakes. Rupture area of the earthquake fault are determined by using 4 different formulas, i.e. Utsu and Seki (1954), Wells and Coppersmith (1994), Ellsworth (2003), and Christophersen and Smith (2000). The earthquakes aftershock parameters are taken from PGN (PusatGempabumiNasional or National Earthquake Information Center) of BMKG (Indonesia Agency Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics). The aftershock epicenters are plotted by GMT's software. After that, ellipse and rectangular models of aftershock spreading are made. The results show that: (1) rupture areas were calculated using magnitude relationship which are larger than the the aftershock distributions model, (2) the best fitting model for that earthquake aftershock distribution is rectangular associated with Utsu and Seki (1954) formula, (3) the larger the magnitude of the earthquake, the larger area of the fault.

  10. Analysis of rupture area of aftershocks caused by twin earthquakes (Case study: 11 April 2012 earthquakes of Aceh-North Sumatra)

    SciTech Connect

    Diansari, Angga Vertika Purwana, Ibnu; Subakti, Hendri

    2015-04-24

    The 11 April 2012 earthquakes off-shore Aceh-North Sumatra are unique events for the history of Indonesian earthquake. It is unique because that they have similar magnitude, 8.5 Mw and 8.1 Mw; close to epicenter distance, similar strike-slip focal mechanism, and occuring in outer rise area. The purposes of this research are: (1) comparing area of earthquakes base on models and that of calculation, (2) fitting the shape and the area of earthquake rupture zones, (3) analyzing the relationship between rupture area and magnitude of the earthquakes. Rupture area of the earthquake fault are determined by using 4 different formulas, i.e. Utsu and Seki (1954), Wells and Coppersmith (1994), Ellsworth (2003), and Christophersen and Smith (2000). The earthquakes aftershock parameters are taken from PGN (PusatGempabumiNasional or National Earthquake Information Center) of BMKG (Indonesia Agency Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics). The aftershock epicenters are plotted by GMT’s software. After that, ellipse and rectangular models of aftershock spreading are made. The results show that: (1) rupture areas were calculated using magnitude relationship which are larger than the the aftershock distributions model, (2) the best fitting model for that earthquake aftershock distribution is rectangular associated with Utsu and Seki (1954) formula, (3) the larger the magnitude of the earthquake, the larger area of the fault.

  11. High-Resolution Uitra Low Power, Intergrated Aftershock and Microzonation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passmore, P.; Zimakov, L. G.

    2012-12-01

    Rapid Aftershock Mobilization plays an essential role in the understanding of both focal mechanism and rupture propagation caused by strong earthquakes. A quick assessment of the data provides a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of the entire earthquake process in-situ. Aftershock study also provides practical information for local authorities regarding the post earthquake activity, which is very important in order to conduct the necessary actions for public safety in the area affected by the strong earthquake. Refraction Technology, Inc. has developed a self-contained, fully integrated Aftershock System, model 160-03, providing the customer simple and quick deployment during aftershock emergency mobilization and microzonation studies. The 160-03 has no external cables or peripheral equipment for command/control and operation in the field. The 160-03 contains three major components integrated in one case: a) 24-bit resolution state-of-the art low power ADC with CPU and Lid interconnect boards; b) power source; and c) three component 2 Hz sensors (two horizontals and one vertical), and built-in ±4g accelerometer. Optionally, the 1 Hz sensors can be built-in the 160-03 system at the customer's request. The self-contained rechargeable battery pack provides power autonomy up to 7 days during data acquisition at 200 sps on continuous three weak motion and triggered three strong motion recording channels. For longer power autonomy, the 160-03 Aftershock System battery pack can be charged from an external source (solar power system). The data in the field is recorded to a built-in swappable USB flash drive. The 160-03 configuration is fixed based on a configuration file stored on the system, so no external command/control interface is required for parameter setup in the field. For visual control of the system performance in the field, the 160-03 has a built-in LED display which indicates the systems recording status as well as a hot swappable USB drive and battery

  12. Teleseismic Body Wave Analysis for the 27 September 2003 Altai, Earthquake (Mw7.4) and Large Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, J. M.; Mellors, R.

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the kinematics of the rupture process for the September 27, 2003, Mw7.3, Altai earthquake and its associated large aftershocks. This is the largest earthquake striking the Altai mountains within the last 50 years, which provides important constraints on the ongoing tectonics. The fault plane solution obtained by teleseismic body waveform modeling indicated a predominantly strike-slip event (strike=130, dip=75, rake 170), Scalar moment for the main shock ranges from 0.688 to 1.196E+20 N m, a source duration of about 20 to 42 s, and an average centroid depth of 10 km. Source duration would indicate a fault length of about 130 - 270 km. The main shock was followed closely by two aftershocks (Mw5.7, Mw6.4) occurred the same day, another aftershock (Mw6.7) occurred on 1 October , 2003. We also modeled the second aftershock (Mw6.4) to asses geometric similarities during their respective rupture process. This aftershock occurred spatially very close to the mainshock and possesses a similar fault plane solution (strike=128, dip=71, rake=154), and centroid depth (13 km). Several local conditions, such as the crustal model and fault geometry, affect the correct estimation of some source parameters. We perfume a sensitivity evaluation of several parameters, including centroid depth, scalar moment and source duration, based on a point and finite source modeling. The point source approximation results are the departure parameters for the finite source exploration. We evaluate the different reported parameters to discard poor constrained models. In addition, deformation data acquired by InSAR are also included in the analysis.

  13. A Fluid-driven Earthquake Cycle, Omori's Law, and Fluid-driven Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Few models exist that predict the Omori's Law of aftershock rate decay, with rate-state friction the only physically-based model. ETAS is a probabilistic model of cascading failures, and is sometimes used to infer rate-state frictional properties. However, the (perhaps dominant) role of fluids in the earthquake process is being increasingly realised, so a fluid-based physical model for Omori's Law should be available. In this talk, I present an hypothesis for a fluid-driven earthquake cycle where dehydration and decarbonization at depth provides continuous sources of buoyant high pressure fluids that must eventually make their way back to the surface. The natural pathway for fluid escape is along plate boundaries, where in the ductile regime high pressure fluids likely play an integral role in episodic tremor and slow slip earthquakes. At shallower levels, high pressure fluids pool at the base of seismogenic zones, with the reservoir expanding in scale through the earthquake cycle. Late in the cycle, these fluids can invade and degrade the strength of the brittle crust and contribute to earthquake nucleation. The mainshock opens permeable networks that provide escape pathways for high pressure fluids and generate aftershocks along these flow paths, while creating new pathways by the aftershocks themselves. Thermally activated precipitation then seals up these pathways, returning the system to a low-permeability environment and effective seal during the subsequent tectonic stress buildup. I find that the multiplicative effect of an exponential dependence of permeability on the effective normal stress coupled with an Arrhenius-type, thermally activated exponential reduction in permeability results in Omori's Law. I simulate this scenario using a very simple model that combines non-linear diffusion and a step-wise increase in permeability when a Mohr Coulomb failure condition is met, and allow permeability to decrease as an exponential function in time. I show very

  14. Attempt to identify seismic sources in the eastern Mitidja basin using gravity data and aftershock sequence of the Boumerdes (May 21, 2003; Algeria) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Merzouk; Idres, Mouloud; Bourmatte, Amar; Boughacha, Mohamed Salah; Samai, Sadek; Yelles, Abdelkrim; Haned, Abderrahmene; Aidi, Chafik

    2011-04-01

    In order to try to identify the seismogenic sources in the epicentral area, we interpreted data collected from gravity and aftershocks in the eastern part of the Mitidja basin after the occurrence of the 21 May 2003 Boumerdes earthquake (Mw = 6.8). The residual gravity anomaly and the horizontal gradient maps revealed the basement shape and density discontinuities. A seismotectonic model obtained from the aftershocks distribution and gravity data is proposed. This model highlights three active faults: one offshore and two onshore. The offshore reverse fault striking NE-SW, parallel to the coast, is consistent with the USGS focal mechanism of the main event, which is assumed to have the most moment release. The two onshore dipping blind active faults are postulated at crossing angles near the SW tip of the main fault. The interpretation is based mainly on the re-location and distribution of aftershocks, and their focal solutions. It is also supported by the basin structures obtained from the inversion and interpretation of residual gravity anomalies, as well as by additional compiled information such as the pattern of coastal co-seismic uplift. This configuration puts forward the failure mode complexity during the main shock. The topography of the basement obtained from 3D gravity inversion shows that all the onshore located aftershocks occurred in the basement, and the area between the two onshore faults rose as a consequence of their sliding.

  15. Geophysical data reveal the crustal structure of the Alaska Range orogen within the aftershock zone of the Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Pellerin, L.; Glen, J.M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Geophysical information, including deep-crustal seismic reflection, magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, and magnetic data, cross the aftershock zone of the 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake. These data and aftershock seismicity, jointly interpreted, reveal the crustal structure of the right-lateral-slip Denali fault and the eastern Alaska Range orogen, as well as the relationship between this structure and seismicity. North of the Denali fault, strong seismic reflections from within the Alaska Range orogen show features that dip as steeply as 25?? north and extend downward to depths between 20 and 25 km. These reflections reveal crustal structures, probably ductile shear zones, that most likely formed during the Late Cretaceous, but these structures appear to be inactive, having produced little seismicity during the past 20 years. Furthermore, seismic reflections mainly dip north, whereas alignments in aftershock hypocenters dip south. The Denali fault is nonreflective, but modeling of MT, gravity, and magnetic data suggests that the Denali fault dips steeply to vertically. However, in an alternative structural model, the Denali fault is defined by one of the reflection bands that dips to the north and flattens into the middle crust of the Alaska Range orogen. Modeling of MT data indicates a rock body, having low electrical resistivity (>10 ??-m), that lies mainly at depths greater than 10 km, directly beneath aftershocks of the Denali fault earthquake. The maximum depth of aftershocks along the Denali fault is 10 km. This shallow depth may arise from a higher-than-normal geothermal gradient. Alternatively, the low electrical resistivity of deep rocks along the Denali fault may be associated with fluids that have weakened the lower crust and helped determine the depth extent of the after-shock zone.

  16. 3D imaging of crustal structure under the Piedmont province in central Virginia, from reflection RVSP processing of aftershock recordings from the August 23, 2011 Virginia earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, D. A.; Brown, L. D.; Cabolova, A.; Davenport, K. K.; Hole, J. A.; Mooney, W. D.

    2013-12-01

    Aftershocks from the magnitude Mw 5.8 August 23, 2011, central Virginia earthquake were recorded using an unusually dense array of seismometers in what has been termed an AIDA (Aftershock Imaging with Dense Arrays) deployment. Over 200 stations were deployed in the epicentral region of this event to a) more precisely determine hypocentral locations, b) more accurately define velocity structure in the aftershock zone, c) characterize propagation characteristics of the crust in the area, and d) image geologic structures in the hypocentral volume with reflection techniques using aftershocks as sources. The AIDA-Virginia experiment successfully recorded a large number of aftershocks from which local tomographic velocity estimates and accurate hypocentral locations were obtained. These results facilitated the use of aftershocks as sources for reflection imaging. In this study we demonstrate how earthquake sources recorded by surface arrays can be treated using the imaging techniques associated with Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), in particular a variant known as Reverse VSP (RVSP). The central VSP processing algorithms used for this study are VSP normal moveout (VSPnmo) and VSP-to-Common Reflection Point (CRP). Applying these techniques to individual aftershocks from the Virginia experiment results in 3D reflection images of structural complexity in the immediate vicinity of the aftershocks. The most prominent feature observed on these 3D images is a strong moderately east-dipping reflector at a depth of approximately 6 to 8 km that directly underlies, and is continuous beneath, the more steeply dipping aftershock zone. We interpret this reflector as part of a complex imbricate thrust sequence associated with Paleozoic convergence during the Appalachian orogeny. Its apparent continuity beneath the fault zone implied by the aftershock's hypocenters suggests that this inferred fault zone has little or no cumulative offset, supporting the speculation that this event

  17. FAST TRACK PAPER: Observational analysis of correlations between aftershock productivities and regional conditions in the context of a damage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzheng; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2009-05-01

    Aftershock sequences are commonly observed but their properties vary from region to region. Ben-Zion and Lyakhovsky developed a solution for aftershocks decay in a damage rheology model. The solution indicates that the productivity of aftershocks decreases with increasing value of a non-dimensional material parameter R, given by the ratio of timescale for brittle deformation to timescale for viscous relaxation. The parameter R is inversely proportional to the degree of seismic coupling and is expected to increase primarily with increasing temperature and also with existence of sedimentary rocks at seismogenic depth. To test these predictions, we use aftershock sequences from several southern California regions. We first analyse properties of individual aftershock sequences generated by the 1992 Landers and 1987 Superstition Hills earthquakes. The results show that the ratio of aftershock productivities in these sequences spanning four orders of event magnitudes is similar to the ratio of the average heat flow in the two regions. To perform stronger statistical tests, we systematically analyse the average properties of stacked aftershock sequences in five regions. In each region, we consider events with magnitudes between 4.0 and 6.0 to be main shocks. For each main shock, we consider events to be aftershocks if they occur in the subsequent 50 d, within a circular region that scales with the magnitude of the main shock and in the magnitude range between that of the main shock and 2 units lower. This procedure produces 28-196 aftershock sequences in each of the five regions. We stack the aftershock sequences in each region and analyse the properties of the stacked data. The results indicate that the productivities of the stacked sequences are inversely correlated with the heat flow and existence of deep sedimentary covers, in agreement with the damage model predictions. Using the observed ratios of aftershock productivities, along with simple expressions based on the

  18. Aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Bonin Islands normal-faulting earthquake: Implication for deformation of the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; No, T.; Kaiho, Y.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Sato, T.; Noguchi, N.; Nakamura, T.

    2011-12-01

    A Mw 7.4 normal-faulting earthquake occurred 150 km east of Chichi-jima Island, Bonin Islands, Japan on December 21, 2010 (UTC). This is an earthquake occurred within the Pacific plate beneath the outer trench-slope region along the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. According to Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), the associated tsunami was observed over a wide area along the Pacific coast of Japan. Normal faulting earthquakes in outer trench-slope region are a result of the bending of the incoming/subducting oceanic plates. The bending-related normal faults cutting the oceanic plate are likely associated with hydration of the oceanic plate prior to subduction [e.g., Ranero et al., 2003]. The normal faulting earthquakes can be a key to understand deformation and resulting hydration of the oceanic plate. That is also important for consideration of tsunami generation in shallow outer trench-slope region. Aftershock observation of the 2010 Bonin Islands earthquake were conducted by R/V Kairei of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs). First OBS was deployed in the source area on December 25, 2010 and retrieved on January 7, 2011. Other 4 OBSs were deployed on January 6 and 7 and retrieved on March 11 and 12, 2011. Overall aftershocks distributed in a 130 km long area extended in a NW-SE direction although Izu-Bonin trench extends N-S direction in this area. Most of the aftershocks were located at depths shallower than 30 km, corresponding to the oceanic crust and the uppermost mantle of the Pacific plate. The aftershocks show a complicated distribution. In the central part of the aftershock area, aftershocks formed three subparallel lines with roughly 15 km intervals oriented NW-SE direction. In the southeastern part of the aftershock area away from the trench, the aftershocks distributed along ESE-WNW direction. We estimated aftershock

  19. Reduced Aftershock Productivity in Regions with Known Slow Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G.; Mina, A.; Richardson, E.; McGuire, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced aftershock activity has been observed in areas with high rates of aseismic slip, such as transform fault zones and some subduction zones. Fault conditions that could explain both of these observations include a low effective normal stress regime and/or a high temperature, semi-brittle/plastic rheology. To further investigate the possible connection between areas of aseismic slip and reduced aftershock productivity, we compared the mainshock-aftershock sequences in subduction zones where aseismic slip transients have been observed to those of adjacent (along-strike) regions where no slow slip events have been detected. Using the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) catalog, we counted aftershocks that occurred within 100 km and 14 days of 112 M>=5.0 slab earthquake mainshocks from January 1980 - July 2013, including 90 since January 2000, inside observed regions of detected slow slip: south central Alaska, Cascadia, the Nicoya Peninsula (Costa Rica), Guerrero (Mexico), and the North Island of New Zealand. We also compiled aftershock counts from 97 mainshocks from areas adjacent to each of these regions using the same criteria and over the same time interval. Preliminary analysis of these two datasets shows an aftershock triggering exponent (alpha in the ETAS model) of approximately 0.8, consistent with previous studies of aftershocks in a variety of tectonic settings. Aftershock productivity for both datasets is less than that of continental earthquakes. Contrasting the two datasets, aftershock productivity inside slow slip regions is lower than in adjacent areas along the same subduction zone and is comparable to that of mid-ocean ridge transform faults.

  20. Aftershocks in coherent-noise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, C.; Altmeyer, S.; Martinetz, T.

    1998-09-01

    The decay pattern of aftershocks in the so-called ‘coherent-noise’ models [M.E.J. Newman, K. Sneppen, Phys. Rev. E 54 (1996) 6226] is studied in detail. Analytical and numerical results show that the probability to find a large event at time t after an initial major event decreases as t- τ for small t, with the exponent τ ranging from 0 to values well above 1. This is in contrast to Sneppen and Newman, who stated that the exponent is about 1, independent of the microscopic details of the simulation. Numerical simulations of an extended model [C. Wilke, T. Martinetz, Phys. Rev. E 56 (1997) 7128] show that the power-law is only a generic feature of the original dynamics and does not necessarily appear in a more general context. Finally, the implications of the results to the modelling of earthquakes are discussed.

  1. Aftershock triggering by complete Coulomb stress changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilb, Debi; Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the correlation between seismicity rate change following the 1992, M7.3, Landers, California, earthquake and characteristics of the complete Coulomb failure stress (CFS) changes (??CFS(t)) that this earthquake generated. At close distances the time-varying "dynamic" portion of the stress change depends on how the rupture develops temporally and spatially and arises from radiated seismic waves and from permanent coseismic fault displacement. The permanent "static" portion (??CFS) depends only on the final coseismic displacement. ??CFS diminishes much more rapidly with distance than the transient, dynamic stress changes. A common interpretation of the strong correlation between ??CFS and aftershocks is that load changes can advance or delay failure. Stress changes may also promote failure by physically altering properties of the fault or its environs. Because it is transient, ??CFS(t) can alter the failure rate only by the latter means. We calculate both ??CFS and the maximum positive value of ??CFS(t) (peak ??CFS(t)) using a reflectivity program. Input parameters are constrained by modeling Landers displacement seismograms. We quantify the correlation between maps of seismicity rate changes and maps of modeled ??CFS and peak ??CFS(t) and find agreement for both models. However, rupture directivity, which does not affect ??CFS, creates larger peak ??CFS(t) values northwest of the main shock. This asymmetry is also observed in seismicity rate changes but not in ??CFS. This result implies that dynamic stress changes are as effective as static stress changes in triggering aftershocks and may trigger earthquakes long after the waves have passed.

  2. Tsunami potential assessment based on rupture zones, focal mechanisms and repeat times of strong earthquakes in the major Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agalos, Apostolos; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.; Kijko, Andrzej; Papageorgiou, Antonia; Smit, Ansie; Triantafyllou, Ioanna

    2016-04-01

    In the major Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone, extended from Azores islands in the west to the easternmost Mediterranean Sea in the east, including the Marmara and Black Seas, a number of 22 tsunamigenic zones have been determined from historical and instrumental tsunami documentation. Although some tsunamis were produced by volcanic activity or landslides, the majority of them was generated by strong earthquakes. Since the generation of seismic tsunamis depends on several factors, like the earthquake size, focal depth and focal mechanism, the study of such parameters is of particular importance for the assessment of the potential for the generation of future tsunamis. However, one may not rule out the possibility for tsunami generation in areas outside of the 22 zones determined so far. For the Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone we have compiled a catalogue of strong, potentially tsunamigenic (focal depth less than 100 km) historical earthquakes from various data bases and other sources. The lateral areas of rupture zones of these earthquakes were determined. Rupture zone is the area where the strain after the earthquake has dropped substantially with respect the strain before the earthquake. Aftershock areas were assumed to determine areas of rupture zones for instrumental earthquakes. For historical earthquakes macroseismic criteria were used such as spots of higher-degree seismic intensity and of important ground failures. For the period of instrumental seismicity, focal mechanism solutions from CMT, EMMA and other data bases were selected for strong earthquakes. From the geographical distribution of seismic rupture zones and the corresponding focal mechanisms in the entire Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone we determined potentially tsunamigenic zones regardless they are known to have produced seismic tsunamis in the past or not. An attempt has been made to calculate in each one of such zones the repeat times of strong

  3. Friction coefficient of faults inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, Alfio; Ranalli, Giorgio; Andreis, Daniele; Martin, Silvana; Rigon, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    In earthquake mechanics and structural geology the static friction coefficient is usually assumed to have the laboratory value (μ = 0.6-0.8) according to the Coulomb-Byerlee's law. Estimates from deep boreholes and/or natural faults generally confirm this hypothesis but in some cases friction coefficients can be significantly lower, suggesting the existence of weak faults able to be activated by lower effective stress than theoretically expected. We apply a modified version of the method proposed by Yin and Ranalli (1995, Journal of Structural Geology, vol. 17, pp. 1327-1335), where the average friction coefficient of a set of n faults is estimated. This method is based on minimization of the sum of squares of the misfit ratios, where the misfit ratio of each fault is given dividing the misfit stress difference (i.e. the misfit between normalized stress difference and average normalized stress difference) by the average normalized stress difference. The normalized stress difference is defined as the critical stress difference divided by the effective overburden pressure, while the average stress difference is obtained considering the entire fault dataset. Input data are (i) the orientation of faults, (ii) the stress field orientation, and (iii) the stress ratio. The latter two must be independently estimated. A uniform stress field and a similar normalized critical stress difference for the fault dataset are assumed. The procedure has been extended to apply to fault plane solutions by considering both nodal planes of a set of n focal mechanisms and estimating the range of acceptable average friction coefficients from all possible combination of planes (2n number of combinations). The amount of calculation can be considerably reduced if independent information makes it possible to select which one of the nodal planes of each focal mechanism is the true fault plane (for example when aftershocks delineate the fault geometry at depth), resulting in only n combinations

  4. Investigations of Periodic Disturbances on Seismic Aftershock Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Knoop, Jan-Frederik; Altmann, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) runs the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect possible violations of the treaty. The seismic sensors of the IMS are set up to detect every underground explosion with a yield of 1 kT TNT equivalent or even better everywhere on the world. Under consideration of all IMS data the hypocentre of a large underground explosion is located within an area of about 1000 sq km. To verify if it was a violation of the Test-Ban Treaty the CTBTO (after CTBT entry into force) is allowed to carry out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the area of suspicion. During an OSI the hypocentre is to be located much more precisely; for this a local seismic aftershock monitoring system (SAMS) can be installed to detect small seismic events caused as a consequence of the explosion, such as relaxation of the rock around the cavity. However the magnitude of these aftershock signals is extremely weak. Other difficulties arise from other seismic signals in the inspection area, for example caused by vehicles of the inspectors, from coupling of airborne signals to the ground, or even by intended attempts to disturb the OSI. While the aftershock signals have a pulsed shape, man-made seismic signals (primarily created by engines) usually show periodic characteristics and thus are representable as a sum of sine functions and their harmonics. A mathematical expression for the Hann-windowed discrete Fourier transform of the underlying sine is used to characterise every such disturbance by the amplitude, frequency and phase. The contributions of these sines are computed and subtracted from the complex spectrum sequentially. Synthetic sines superposed to real signals, orders of magnitude stronger than the latter, can be removed successfully. Removal of periodic content from the signals of a helicopter overflight reduces the amplitude by a factor 3.3 when the frequencies are approximately constant. To reduce or prevent disturbing seismic

  5. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Shantha S. N.; Umino, Norihito; Hasegawa, Akira; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2009-07-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ~30° at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  6. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, S.S.N.; Umino, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ???30?? at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  7. Distribution of similar earthquakes in aftershocks of inland earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Aftershock Observations Of 2007 Noto Hanto, G.

    2010-12-01

    Frictional properties control the slip behavior on a fault surface such as seismic slip and aseismic slip. Asperity, as a seismic slip area, is characterized by a strong coupling in the interseismic period and large coseismic slip. On the other hand, steady slip or afterslip occurs in an aseismic slip area around the asperity. If an afterslip area includes small asperities, a repeating rupture of single asperity can generate similar earthquakes due to the stress accumulation caused by the afterslip. We here investigate a detail distribution of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks of the 2007 Noto Hanto earthquake (Mjma 6.9) and the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake (Mjma 7.3), inland large earthquakes in Japan. We use the data obtained by the group for the aftershock observations of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake and by the group for the aftershock observations of the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake. First, we select pairs of aftershocks whose cross correlation coefficients in 10 s time window of band-pass filtered waveforms of 1~4 Hz are greater than 0.95 at more than 5 stations and divide those into groups by a link of the cross correlation coefficients. Second, we reexamine the arrival times of P and S waves and the maximum amplitude for earthquakes of each group and apply the double-difference method (Waldhouser and Ellsworth, 2000) to relocate them. As a result of the analysis, we find 24 groups of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks on the source fault of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake and 86 groups of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks on the source fault of the 2000 Western Tottori Earthquake. Most of them are distributed around or outside the asperity of the main shock. Geodetic studies reported that postseismic deformation was detected for the both earthquakes (Sagiya et al., 2002; Hashimoto et al., 2008). The source area of similar earthquakes seems to correspond to the afterslip area. These features suggest that the similar earthquakes observed

  8. Waveform analysis of aftershocks of the June 29, 1992 Little Skull Mountain, Nevada, earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, A.F.; Zeng, Y.; Smith, K.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Following the 29 June 1992 magnitude 5.6 Little Skull Mountain, Nevada, earthquake, twelve portable three-component digital seismometers were deployed in the region surrounding Little Skull Mountain and Yucca Mountain by researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno, Seismological Laboratory. These stations complemented the 55 permanent analog stations of the Southern Great Basin Seismic Network, and portable deployments of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), Golden, Colorado, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. The mainshock of the Little Skull Mountain earthquake occurred approximately 20 km southeast of the site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, that is being characterized as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. The pattern of Little Skull Mountain aftershocks defines an L' shape at the southern boundary of the Nevada Test Site. The authors use a full waveform inversion method to study source properties of aftershocks in the epicentral area recorded on the digital stations. They compute the synthetic seismograms in a layered elastic media using the generalized reflection and transmission coefficient technique. The authors future plans include automation of these techniques for use in routine monitoring of seismic activity in the region. Parameters obtained in this study include focal mechanism, stress drop, rupture duration, and seismic moment. These results will allow them to place constraints on the geometry and style of subsurface faulting in the region and aid in the assessment of seismic hazard in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain.

  9. Foreshock and aftershocks in simple earthquake models.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, J; Tiampo, K F; Klein, W; Dominguez, R

    2015-02-27

    Many models of earthquake faults have been introduced that connect Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling to triggering processes. However, natural earthquake fault systems are composed of a variety of different geometries and materials and the associated heterogeneity in physical properties can cause a variety of spatial and temporal behaviors. This raises the question of how the triggering process and the structure interact to produce the observed phenomena. Here we present a simple earthquake fault model based on the Olami-Feder-Christensen and Rundle-Jackson-Brown cellular automata models with long-range interactions that incorporates a fixed percentage of stronger sites, or asperity cells, into the lattice. These asperity cells are significantly stronger than the surrounding lattice sites but eventually rupture when the applied stress reaches their higher threshold stress. The introduction of these spatial heterogeneities results in temporal clustering in the model that mimics that seen in natural fault systems along with GR scaling. In addition, we observe sequences of activity that start with a gradually accelerating number of larger events (foreshocks) prior to a main shock that is followed by a tail of decreasing activity (aftershocks). This work provides further evidence that the spatial and temporal patterns observed in natural seismicity are strongly influenced by the underlying physical properties and are not solely the result of a simple cascade mechanism. PMID:25768785

  10. Foreshock and Aftershocks in Simple Earthquake Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemian, J.; Tiampo, K. F.; Klein, W.; Dominguez, R.

    2015-02-01

    Many models of earthquake faults have been introduced that connect Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling to triggering processes. However, natural earthquake fault systems are composed of a variety of different geometries and materials and the associated heterogeneity in physical properties can cause a variety of spatial and temporal behaviors. This raises the question of how the triggering process and the structure interact to produce the observed phenomena. Here we present a simple earthquake fault model based on the Olami-Feder-Christensen and Rundle-Jackson-Brown cellular automata models with long-range interactions that incorporates a fixed percentage of stronger sites, or asperity cells, into the lattice. These asperity cells are significantly stronger than the surrounding lattice sites but eventually rupture when the applied stress reaches their higher threshold stress. The introduction of these spatial heterogeneities results in temporal clustering in the model that mimics that seen in natural fault systems along with GR scaling. In addition, we observe sequences of activity that start with a gradually accelerating number of larger events (foreshocks) prior to a main shock that is followed by a tail of decreasing activity (aftershocks). This work provides further evidence that the spatial and temporal patterns observed in natural seismicity are strongly influenced by the underlying physical properties and are not solely the result of a simple cascade mechanism.

  11. On the adaptive daily forecasting of seismic aftershock hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, Hossein; Jalayer, Fatemeh; Asprone, Domenico; Lombardi, Anna Maria; Marzocchi, Warner; Prota, Andrea; Manfredi, Gaetano

    2013-04-01

    Post-earthquake ground motion hazard assessment is a fundamental initial step towards time-dependent seismic risk assessment for buildings in a post main-shock environment. Therefore, operative forecasting of seismic aftershock hazard forms a viable support basis for decision-making regarding search and rescue, inspection, repair, and re-occupation in a post main-shock environment. Arguably, an adaptive procedure for integrating the aftershock occurrence rate together with suitable ground motion prediction relations is key to Probabilistic Seismic Aftershock Hazard Assessment (PSAHA). In the short-term, the seismic hazard may vary significantly (Jordan et al., 2011), particularly after the occurrence of a high magnitude earthquake. Hence, PSAHA requires a reliable model that is able to track the time evolution of the earthquake occurrence rates together with suitable ground motion prediction relations. This work focuses on providing adaptive daily forecasts of the mean daily rate of exceeding various spectral acceleration values (the aftershock hazard). Two well-established earthquake occurrence models suitable for daily seismicity forecasts associated with the evolution of an aftershock sequence, namely, the modified Omori's aftershock model and the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) are adopted. The parameters of the modified Omori model are updated on a daily basis using Bayesian updating and based on the data provided by the ongoing aftershock sequence based on the methodology originally proposed by Jalayer et al. (2011). The Bayesian updating is used also to provide sequence-based parameter estimates for a given ground motion prediction model, i.e. the aftershock events in an ongoing sequence are exploited in order to update in an adaptive manner the parameters of an existing ground motion prediction model. As a numerical example, the mean daily rates of exceeding specific spectral acceleration values are estimated adaptively for the L'Aquila 2009

  12. Double-difference Relocation of the Aftershocks of the Tecomán, Colima, Mexico Earthquake of 22 January 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Vanessa; Stock, Joann; Ramírez Vázquez, Carlos Ariel; Reyes-Dávila, Gabriel

    2011-08-01

    On 22 January 2003, the M w = 7.6 Tecomán earthquake struck offshore of the state of Colima, Mexico, near the diffuse triple junction between the Cocos, Rivera, and North American plates. Three-hundred and fifty aftershocks of the Tecomán earthquake with magnitudes between 2.6 and 5.8, each recorded by at least 7 stations, are relocated using the double difference method. Initial locations are determined using P and S readings from the Red Sismológica Telemétrica del Estado de Colima (RESCO) and a 1-D velocity model. Because only eight RESCO stations were operating immediately following the Tecomán earthquake, uncertainties in the initial locations and depths are fairly large, with average uncertainties of 8.0 km in depth and 1.4 km in the north-south and east-west directions. Events occurring between 24 January and 31 January were located using not only RESCO phase readings but also additional P and S readings from 11 temporary stations. Average uncertainties decrease to 0.8 km in depth, 0.3 km in the east-west direction, and 0.7 km in the north-south direction for events occurring while the temporary stations were deployed. While some preliminary studies of the early aftershocks suggested that they were dominated by shallow events above the plate interface, our results place the majority of aftershocks along the plate interface, for a slab dipping between approximately 20° and 30°. This is consistent with the slab positions inferred from geodetic studies. We do see some upper plate aftershocks that may correspond to forearc fault zones, and faults inland in the upper plate, particularly among events occurring more than 3 months after the mainshock.

  13. Diversity of the 2014 Iquique's foreshocks and aftershocks: clues about the complex rupture process of a Mw 8.1 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León-Ríos, Sergio; Ruiz, Sergio; Maksymowicz, Andrei; Leyton, Felipe; Fuenzalida, Amaya; Madariaga, Raúl

    2016-03-01

    We study the foreshocks and aftershocks of the 1 April 2014 Iquique earthquake of Mw 8.1. Most of these events were recorded by a large digital seismic network that included the Northern Chile permanent network and up to 26 temporary broadband digital stations. We relocated and computed moment tensors for 151 events of magnitude Mw ≥ 4.5. Most of the foreshocks and aftershocks of the Iquique earthquake are distributed to the southwest of the rupture zone. These events are located in a band of about 50 km from the trench, an area where few earthquakes occur elsewhere in Chile. Another important group of aftershocks is located above the plate interface, similar to those observed during the foreshock sequence. The depths of these events were constrained by regional moment tensor (RMT) solutions obtained using the records of the dense broad band network. The majority of the foreshocks and aftershocks were associated to the interplate contact, with dip and strike angles in good agreement with the characteristics of horst and graben structures (>2000 m offset) typical of the oceanic Nazca Plate at the trench and in the outer rise region. We propose that the spatial distribution of foreshocks and aftershocks, and its seismological characteristics were strongly controlled by the rheological and tectonics conditions of the extreme erosive margin of Northern Chile.

  14. The Mw 5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake of August 2011 and aftershock sequence: constraints on earthquake source parameters and fault geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, H.M.; Herrmann, Robert B.; Bergman, Eric A.; Earle, Paul; Meltzer, Anne; Withers, Mitch; Chapman, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Mw 5.8 earthquake of 23 August 2011 (17:51:04 UTC) (moment, M0 5.7×1017  N·m) occurred near Mineral, Virginia, within the central Virginia seismic zone and was felt by more people than any other earthquake in United States history. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received 148,638 felt reports from 31 states and 4 Canadian provinces. The USGS PAGER system estimates as many as 120,000 people were exposed to shaking intensity levels of IV and greater, with approximately 10,000 exposed to shaking as high as intensity VIII. Both regional and teleseismic moment tensor solutions characterize the earthquake as a northeast‐striking reverse fault that nucleated at a depth of approximately 7±2  km. The distribution of reported macroseismic intensities is roughly ten times the area of a similarly sized earthquake in the western United States (Horton and Williams, 2012). Near‐source and far‐field damage reports, which extend as far away as Washington, D.C., (135 km away) and Baltimore, Maryland, (200 km away) are consistent with an earthquake of this size and depth in the eastern United States (EUS). Within the first few days following the earthquake, several government and academic institutions installed 36 portable seismograph stations in the epicentral region, making this among the best‐recorded aftershock sequences in the EUS. Based on modeling of these data, we provide a detailed description of the source parameters of the mainshock and analysis of the subsequent aftershock sequence for defining the fault geometry, area of rupture, and observations of the aftershock sequence magnitude–frequency and temporal distribution. The observed slope of the magnitude–frequency curve or b‐value for the aftershock sequence is consistent with previous EUS studies (b=0.75), suggesting that most of the accumulated strain was released by the mainshock. The aftershocks define a rupture that extends between approximately 2–8 km in depth and 8–10 km along

  15. Crustal stress state inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms: Recognition of a non-uniform stress state, slip plane selection criteria, and implications for the mechanics of faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Marian Eileen

    Populations of earthquake focal mechanisms that are characterized by diverse styles of faulting require some degree of heterogeneity in the causative stress field or variable fault strength. Methods for finding a stress tensor compatible with a set of focal mechanisms are based on methods which determine paleostress tensors from fault slip data. Although slip on any specific fault plane places a different constraint on the causative stress tensor, this is only directly measured for fault slip data. The actual slip plane and direction are rarely known for most earthquakes. The capability of published methods to determine the degree of heterogeneity required by inversion of diverse earthquake focal mechanisms is examined through a comparison of several fault plane selection criteria on synthetic focal mechanisms where the fault planes are constrained to be in agreement with specific stress tensors. My approach is to use a modified published stress inversion method to quantify the range of allowable model stress tensors, then the likelihood and degree of stress heterogeneity. To examine the fault strength variability requires that the earthquakes have occurred in a region characterized by a uniform stress field and that fault planes be identified. A new stress inversion method is developed which uses the P-wave first motion polarity readings that constrain focal mechanisms to select probable fault planes and constrain the stress tensor for a population of earthquakes. This method is applied to two problematic data sets: small earthquakes in the New Madrid seismic zone and aftershocks to the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. A uniform reverse faulting stress state can be constrained using the observed polarities for most of the New Madrid area, but not for the entire seismic zone due to errors in velocity structure. A uniform reverse faulting tensor with an SsbHmax direction that acts approximately normal to the mainshock plane is well constrained by the P-wave polarity

  16. Aftershocks and triggered events of the Great 1906 California earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meltzner, A.J.; Wald, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is the longest fault in California and one of the longest strike-slip faults in the world, yet little is known about the aftershocks following the most recent great event on the San Andreas, the Mw 7.8 San Francisco earthquake on 18 April 1906. We conducted a study to locate and to estimate magnitudes for the largest aftershocks and triggered events of this earthquake. We examined existing catalogs and historical documents for the period April 1906 to December 1907, compiling data on the first 20 months of the aftershock sequence. We grouped felt reports temporally and assigned modified Mercalli intensities for the larger events based on the descriptions judged to be the most reliable. For onshore and near-shore events, a grid-search algorithm (derived from empirical analysis of modern earthquakes) was used to find the epicentral location and magnitude most consistent with the assigned intensities. For one event identified as far offshore, the event's intensity distribution was compared with those of modern events, in order to contrain the event's location and magnitude. The largest aftershock within the study period, an M ???6.7 event, occurred ???100 km west of Eureka on 23 April 1906. Although not within our study period, another M ???6.7 aftershock occurred near Cape Mendocino on 28 October 1909. Other significant aftershocks included an M ???5.6 event near San Juan Bautista on 17 May 1906 and an M ???6.3 event near Shelter Cove on 11 August 1907. An M ???4.9 aftershock occurred on the creeping segment of the San Andreas fault (southeast of the mainshock rupture) on 6 July 1906. The 1906 San Francisco earthquake also triggered events in southern California (including separate events in or near the Imperial Valley, the Pomona Valley, and Santa Monica Bay), in western Nevada, in southern central Oregon, and in western Arizona, all within 2 days of the mainshock. Of these trigerred events, the largest were an M ???6.1 earthquake near Brawley

  17. International Aftershock Forecasting: Lessons from the Gorkha Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, A. J.; Blanpied, M. L.; Brady, S. R.; van der Elst, N.; Hardebeck, J.; Mayberry, G. C.; Page, M. T.; Smoczyk, G. M.; Wein, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Following the M7.8 Gorhka, Nepal, earthquake of April 25, 2015 the USGS issued a series of aftershock forecasts. The initial impetus for these forecasts was a request from the USAID Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance to support their Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) which coordinated US Government disaster response, including search and rescue, with the Government of Nepal. Because of the possible utility of the forecasts to people in the region and other response teams, the USGS released these forecasts publicly through the USGS Earthquake Program web site. The initial forecast used the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) model with generic parameters developed for active deep continental regions based on the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regionalization. These were then updated to reflect a lower productivity and higher decay rate based on the observed aftershocks, although relying on teleseismic observations, with a high magnitude-of-completeness, limited the amount of data. After the 12 May M7.3 aftershock, the forecasts used an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model to better characterize the multiple sources of earthquake clustering. This model provided better estimates of aftershock uncertainty. These forecast messages were crafted based on lessons learned from the Christchurch earthquake along with input from the U.S. Embassy staff in Kathmandu. Challenges included how to balance simple messaging with forecasts over a variety of time periods (week, month, and year), whether to characterize probabilities with words such as those suggested by the IPCC (IPCC, 2010), how to word the messages in a way that would translate accurately into Nepali and not alarm the public, and how to present the probabilities of unlikely but possible large and potentially damaging aftershocks, such as the M7.3 event, which had an estimated probability of only 1-in-200 for the week in which it occurred.

  18. Statistical signatures of aftershock sequences generated by supershear mainshocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Shcherbakov, R.; Tiampo, K. F.; Mansinha, L.

    2010-12-01

    The rupture process during supershear earthquakes generates a seismic shock wave redistributing stress away from the fault resembling a sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft. This leads to a relative quiescence in aftershock activity along the supershear segment of the rupture. The occurrence of supershear ruptures is also generally associated with a region of local high pre-stress and an unusually smooth friction profile over the supershear segment, leading to a conspicuous absence of high frequency ground motions. We have considered the aftershock sequences of five well-known supershear earthquakes from around the world (1979 Imperial Valley, 1992 Landers, 1999 Izmit and Duzce and 2002 Denali earthquakes) to test whether the aftershock statistics around the supershear rupture are different from the statistics in the rest of the region due to the aforementioned stress conditions and redistributions. Specifically, we have looked at the frequency-magnitude distribution in order to study the variation of the b value for each of the sequences and observe statistically significant variations. In particular, we have determined that the b value is always higher in the zone surrounding a supershear segment than in the rest of the aftershock region. The Omori Law, however, does not show such clear trends. We also looked at the average difference in magnitude between the mainshock and the largest aftershock and found it is larger than that predicted by Bath's law. The results certainly point towards a relationship between aftershock statistics and the mainshock rupture process and might facilitate a physical process based understanding of the empirical laws of earthquake statistics.

  19. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Stress Transfer As a Possible Aftershock Triggering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    The earthquake dynamics can be modelled by employing the spring-block system [Burridge and Knopoff, 1967]. In this approach the earthquake fault is modelled by an array of blocks coupling the loading plate and the lower plate. The dynamics of the system is governed by the system of equations of motion for each block. It is possible to map this system into a cellular automata model, where the stress acting on each block is increased in each time step, and the failing process (frictional slip) is described by stress transfer rules [Olami et al, 1992]. The OFC model produces a power-law distribution for avalanche statistics but it is not capable of producing robust aftershock sequences which follow Omori's law.We propose a nonlinear viscoelastic stress transfer mechanism in the aftershock triggering. In a basic spring-block model setting, we introduce the nonlinear viscoelastic stress transfer between neighbouring blocks, as well as between blocks and the top loading plate. The shear stress of the viscous component is a power-law function of the velocity gradient with an exponent smaller or greater than 1 for the nonlinear viscoelasticity, or 1 for the linear case. The stress transfer function of this nonlinear viscoelastic model has a power-law time-dependent form. It features an instantaneous stress transmission triggering an instantaneous avalanche, which is the same as the original spring-block model; and a power-law relaxation term, which could trigger further aftershocks. We incorporate this nonlinear viscoelasticity mechanism in a lattice cellular automata model. The model could exhibit both the Gutenberg-Richter scaling for the frequency-magnitude distribution and a power-law time decay of aftershocks, which is in accordance with Omori's law. Our study suggests that the stress transfer function may play an important role in the aftershock triggering. We have found that the time decay curve of aftershocks is affected by the shape of the stress transfer function

  20. Simulating Aftershocks for an On Site Inspection (OSI) Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J. J.; Ford, S. R.

    2015-10-05

    The experience of IFE14 emphasizes the need for a better way to simulate aftershocks during an OSI exercise. The obvious approach is to develop a digital model of aftershocks that can be used either for a real field exercise or for a computer simulation that can be done in an office, for training for example. However, this approach involves consideration of several aspects, such as how and when to introduce waveforms in a way that maximizes the realism of the data and that will be convincing to a savvy, experienced seismic analyst. The purpose of this report is to outline a plan for how this approach can be implemented.

  1. Insights on earthquake triggering processes from early aftershocks of repeating microearthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, O.; Ampuero, J.-P.

    2015-10-01

    Characterizing the evolution of seismicity rate of early aftershocks can yield important information about earthquake nucleation and triggering. However, this task is challenging because early aftershock seismic signals are obscured by those of the mainshock. Previous studies of early aftershocks employed high-pass filtering and template matching but had limited performance and completeness at very short times. Here we take advantage of repeating events previously identified on the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield and apply empirical Green's function deconvolution techniques. Both Landweber and sparse deconvolution methods reveal the occurrence of aftershocks as early as few tenths of a second after the mainshock. These events occur close to their mainshock, within one to two rupture lengths away. The aftershock rate derived from this enhanced catalog is consistent with Omori's law, with no flattening of the aftershock rate down to the shortest resolvable timescale ˜0.3 s. The early aftershock rate decay determined here matches seamlessly the decay at later times derived from the original earthquake catalog, yielding a continuous aftershock decay over timescales spanning nearly 8 orders of magnitude. Aftershocks of repeating microearthquakes may hence be governed by the same mechanisms from the earliest time resolved here, up to the end of the aftershock sequence. Our results suggest that these early aftershocks are triggered by relatively large stress perturbations, possibly induced by aseismic afterslip with very short characteristic time. Consistent with previous observations on bimaterial faults, the relative location of early aftershocks shows asymmetry along strike, persistent over long periods.

  2. Geophysical investigation of the Denali fault and Alaska Range orogen within the aftershock zone of the October-November 2002, M = 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Pellerin, L.; Glen, J.M.; Brocher, T.M.; Booker, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aftershock zone of the 3 November 2002, M = 7.9 earthquake that ruptured along the right-slip Denali fault in south-central Alaska has been investigated by using gravity and magnetic, magnetotelluric, and deep-crustal, seismic reflection data as well as outcrop geology and earthquake seismology. Strong seismic reflections from within the Alaska Range orogen north of the Denali fault dip as steeply as 25°N and extend to depths as great as 20 km. These reflections outline a relict crustal architecture that in the past 20 yr has produced little seismicity. The Denali fault is nonreflective, probably because this fault dips steeply to vertical. The most intriguing finding from geophysical data is that earthquake aftershocks occurred above a rock body, with low electrical resistivity (>10 Ω·m), that is at depths below ∼10 km. Aftershocks of the Denali fault earthquake have mainly occurred shallower than 10 km. A high geothermal gradient may cause the shallow seismicity. Another possibility is that the low resistivity results from fluids, which could have played a role in locating the aftershock zone by reducing rock friction within the middle and lower crust.

  3. Changes of static stress and aftershocks distribution for the strike-slip earthquakes in the West Pilippine Sea Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Lin, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last few decades, several strike-slip type earthquakes have been observed within the West Philippine Sea Plate (WPSP), to the east of the Gagua Ridge area. Nearly all of these earthquakes possessed a similar focal mechanism pattern with one fault plane sub-parallel to approximately N35°E. Based on bathymetric and magnetic anomaly data, several obvious NE-SW ancient fracture zones have been identified in the WPSP and considered to be the main rupture plane of these strike-slip earthquakes. However, the aftershocks distributions of these strike-slip earthquakes show NW-SE trending pattern, which is almost in orthogonal with the fracture zones orientation. Thus, the real rupture plane of these events is still undetermined. Otherwise, many researches have provided evidence that stress increase promotes seismicity: the increase of static Coulomb stress is generally correlated to the high occurrence of aftershocks. In our study, we chose three large earthquakes occurred in the WPSP to analyze the relationship between static Coulomb stress changes and seismicity rate changes, in the aim of determining an appropriate rupture plane for these strike-slip events. In our analysis, two fault planes have been used to estimate the static Coulomb stress change. Then, we compared the aftershocks distribution with the Coulomb stress distribution pattern. Our results shows that when the fault plane is trending NW-SE direction, the aftershocks occurred in the region with positive Coulomb stress changes, while the seismicity was decreased in the region of negative Coulomb stress changes. Otherwise, the other fault plane could not at all explain the observed aftershocks distribution. Consequently, the NW-SE fault plane is the preferred rupture plane for the strike-slip events occurred in the WPSP. The 11 April 2012, Mw 8.6 and Mw 8.2 earthquakes occurred off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, are also strike-slip fault events within the Indo-Australia plate. These

  4. Constraints on recent earthquake source parameters, fault geometry and aftershock characteristics in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H.; Herrmann, R. B.; Bergman, E. A.; McMahon, N. D.; Aster, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In late 2009, the seismicity of Oklahoma increased dramatically. The largest of these earthquakes was a series of three damaging events (Mw 4.8, 5.6, 4.8) that occurred over a span of four days in November 2011 near the town of Prague in central Oklahoma. Studies suggest that these earthquakes were induced by reactivation of the Wilzetta fault due to the disposal of waste water from hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") and other oil and gas activities. The Wilzetta fault is a northeast trending vertical strike-slip fault that is a well known structural trap for oil and gas. Since the November 2011 Prague sequence, thousands of small to moderate (M2-M4) earthquakes have occurred throughout central Oklahoma. The most active regions are located near the towns of Stillwater and Medford in north-central Oklahoma, and Guthrie, Langston and Jones near Oklahoma City. The USGS, in collaboration with the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma, has responded by deploying numerous temporary seismic stations in the region in order to record the vigorous aftershock sequences. In this study we use data from the temporary seismic stations to re-locate all Oklahoma earthquakes in the USGS National Earthquake Information Center catalog using a multiple-event approach known as hypo-centroidal decomposition that locates earthquakes with decreased uncertainty relative to one another. Modeling from this study allows us to constrain the detailed geometry of the reactivated faults, as well as source parameters (focal mechanisms, stress drop, rupture length) for the larger earthquakes. Preliminary results from the November 2011 Prague sequence suggest that subsurface rupture lengths of the largest earthquakes are anomalously long with very low stress drop. We also observe very high Q (~1000 at 1 Hz) that explains the large felt areas and we find relatively low b-value and a rapid decay of aftershocks.

  5. A Crustal Structure Study of the Southern Ryukyu Subduction Zone by Using the Aftershock Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y.; Lin, J.; Lee, C.

    2011-12-01

    The region along the Ryukyu subduction zone is known as a tsunami disaster zone. The biggest tsunami (85 m) of Japan history was recorded in the Ishigaki Island, Ryukyu, in 1771. The paleo-tsunami events show that it has a frequency of about 150 years. This thread makes the Ryukyu subduction zone as a concerned field for the earthquake studies. However, due to the long distance from the east coast of Taiwan, this is an area out of the effective earthquake detection zone from the Central Weather Bureau network. A main shock of M = 6.9 occurred near the Ishigaki Island in 2009 August 17. After this event, we quickly deployed the OBS and found many aftershocks with the magnitude greater than 5.0. The main shock was 240 km, NE direction from the Hualien city, Taiwan. If a tsunami occurred, it took only less than 15 minutes to arrive the coast. From the recorded data, we picked the P- and S-wave using the 1-D module (iasp91). There were 1500 recorded events during those time range, and most of the earthquakes were located around the Nanao Basin. Based on this, we study the southern Ryukyu subduction zone structure by using the results from focal mechanism solution. From the earthquake relocation it shows that two main groups of aftershocks. They tend in northwest - southeast with a left-lateral strike-slip fault. The left-lateral strike-slip fault is the main structures that link with the splay faults at the southern Ryukyu Trench. The stability and extension of the splay faults are one of the major concerns for the occurrence of mega earthquake. More than 500-km long of the splay fault, such as that in the Indonesia, Chile and Japan subduction zones, has attacked by mega earthquakes in the recent years. The second group of those aftershocks was located in the Gagua Ridge near the Ryukyu Trench. This group may represent the ridge structure relate to the Taitung canyon fault. The front of Ryukyu Trench was being as a locked subduction zone where it is easily to

  6. The 2007 Tocopilla earthquake and its aftershock sequence - A subduction zone earthquake at the edge of the northern Chile seimic gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, S.; Sobiesiak, M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2010-12-01

    On 14 November 2007 a large Mw 7.7 earthquake occurred in the region of Tocopilla in Northern Chile. The earthquake took place in the southern end of the Northern Chile seismic gap which is supposed to be at the end of its seismic cycle. Studying the event and its aftershock sequence will provide closer insight into the behavior of a subduction zone earthquake at the edge of a subduction zone segment. We present a comprehensive study of the rupture area combining seismic and geodetic data. The aftershock sequence following the earthquake was very well recorded by a local seismic network of 34 short period and broad band stations. The spatial distribution of the aftershock sequence shows a concentration of aftershocks around the north-western part of the Mejillones Peninsula and along the coast up to the Río Loa. The distribution into depth shows that the majority of the hypocenters are located along the subduction interface, reaching down to ~ 50 km depth. In the western part, the aftershock sequence splits into two branches, one heading towards the trench, the other bending into the crust in front of the Mejillones Peninsula. These seismic observations lead to the conclusion that the fault rupture propagated towards the south-west with a fault plane of about 150 km length leaving the shallow part in the north west probably unbroken. To better understand the behavior of the aftershock distribution we model the Coulomb stress transfer along the fault plane. The results show that stresses are increased in the southern part of the rupture area where we find a high concentration of aftershocks. This is consistent with the calculated energy release that shows two main patches along the plate interface rupturing from north to south. The 2007 Tocopilla earthquake is the first large event that occurred inside the Northern Chile seismic gap since the 1877 Iquique event. The rupture process stopped underneath the Mejillones Peninsula, a proposed segment boundary along the

  7. Analysis of the Petatlan aftershocks: Numbers, energy release, and asperities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ValdéS, Carlos; Meyer, Robert P.; ZuñIga, Ramón; Havskov, Jens; Singh, Shri K.

    1982-10-01

    The Petatlan earthquake of March 14, 1979 (Ms = 7.6), occurred between the Middle America trench and the Mexican coast, 15 km southwest of Petatlan, Guerrero, Mexico. From seismograms recorded on smoked paper, FM, and digital tapes, we have identified 255 aftershocks with coda lengths greater than 60 s that occurred 11 hours to 36 days after the main shock. Based on these events, the aftershock epicentral area defined during the period between 11 and 60 hours was about 2000 km2; between 11 hours and 6 days it was about 2400 km2. Although the area grew to 6060 km2 in 36 days, most of the activity was still confined within the area defined after 6 days. This suggests that the smaller aftershock area might represent an asperity. The distribution of events and energy release per unit area confirm the existence of heterogeneity in the aftershock area. Thus our data support the concept of an inhomogeneous rupture area that includes an asperity, as suggested by Chael and Stewart (1982) to account for the differences they computed for the body and surface wave moments from WWSSN data. However, the combination of the moments Reichle et al. (1982) report for body and surface waves from IDA data and the rupture areas reported in this paper results in a solution that is most physically realizable in terms of stress drop and slip. We calculate stress drops of 5 and 15 bars, the former for the average over the entire area, the latter for the asperity, and an average slip of 60 cm for the entire area and 120 cm for the asperity. These values for slip are 30% and 60%, respectively, of the convergence of the Cocos plate relative to the North America plate during the 36-year period between the last two major earthquakes in the Petatlan area. Hypocenters of the aftershocks define a zone about 25 km thick, dipping 15° with an azimuth of N20°E, which is perpendicular to the Middle America trench. Most aftershocks are below the main shock. The b value estimated for aftershocks in the

  8. Complex faulting associated with the 22 December 2003 Mw 6.5 San Simeon California, earthquake, aftershocks and postseismic surface deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaren, M.K.; Hardebeck, J.L.; van der Elst, N.; Unruh, J.R.; Bawden, G.W.; Blair, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    We use data from two seismic networks and satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery to characterize the 22 December 2003 Mw 6.5 San Simeon earthquake sequence. Absolute locations for the mainshock and nearly 10,000 aftershocks were determined using a new three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity model; relative locations were obtained using double difference. The mainshock location found using the 3D velocity model is 35.704?? N, 121.096?? W at a depth of 9.7 ?? 0.7 km. The aftershocks concentrate at the northwest and southeast parts of the aftershock zone, between the mapped traces of the Oceanic and Nacimiento fault zones. The northwest end of the mainshock rupture, as defined by the aftershocks, projects from the mainshock hypocenter to the surface a few kilometers west of the mapped trace of the Oceanic fault, near the Santa Lucia Range front and the > 5 mm postseismic InSAR imagery contour. The Oceanic fault in this area, as mapped by Hall (1991), is therefore probably a second-order synthetic thrust or reverse fault that splays upward from the main seismogenic fault at depth. The southeast end of the rupture projects closer to the mapped Oceanic fault trace, suggesting much of the slip was along this fault, or at a minimum is accommodating much of the postseismic deformation. InSAR imagery shows ???72 mm of postseismic uplift in the vicinity of maximum coseismic slip in the central section of the rupture, and ???48 and ???45 mm at the northwest and southeast end of the aftershock zone, respectively. From these observations, we model a ???30-km-long northwest-trending northeast-dipping mainshock rupture surface - called the mainthrust - which is likely the Oceanic fault at depth, a ???10-km-long southwest-dipping backthrust parallel to the mainthrust near the hypocenter, several smaller southwest-dipping structures in the southeast, and perhaps additional northeast-dipping or subvertical structures southeast of the mainshock plane

  9. Statistical earthquake focal mechanism forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.; Jackson, David D.

    2014-04-01

    Forecasts of the focal mechanisms of future shallow (depth 0-70 km) earthquakes are important for seismic hazard estimates and Coulomb stress, and other models of earthquake occurrence. Here we report on a high-resolution global forecast of earthquake rate density as a function of location, magnitude and focal mechanism. In previous publications we reported forecasts of 0.5° spatial resolution, covering the latitude range from -75° to +75°, based on the Global Central Moment Tensor earthquake catalogue. In the new forecasts we have improved the spatial resolution to 0.1° and the latitude range from pole to pole. Our focal mechanism estimates require distance-weighted combinations of observed focal mechanisms within 1000 km of each gridpoint. Simultaneously, we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms, using the method of Kagan & Jackson proposed in 1994. This average angle reveals the level of tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The procedure becomes problematical where longitude lines are not approximately parallel, and where shallow earthquakes are so sparse that an adequate sample spans very large distances. North or south of 75°, the azimuths of points 1000 km away may vary by about 35°. We solved this problem by calculating focal mechanisms on a plane tangent to the Earth's surface at each forecast point, correcting for the rotation of the longitude lines at the locations of earthquakes included in the averaging. The corrections are negligible between -30° and +30° latitude, but outside that band uncorrected rotations can be significantly off. Improved forecasts at 0.5° and 0.1° resolution are posted at http://eq.ess.ucla.edu/kagan/glob_gcmt_index.html.

  10. Using aftershocks to Image the Subducting Pacific Plate in a Region of Deep Slow Slip, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K. M.; Hirschberg, H.; Louie, J. N.; Savage, M. K.; Bannister, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present seismic migrations using aftershocks of two M>6 earthquakes as sources. The Southern Cook Strait earthquake sequence, beginning on 19 July 2013, included the 21 July M=6.5 and 16 August M=6.6 2013 earthquakes, which were the largest shallow earthquakes to strike the Wellington region since 1942. Following the two largest earthquakes we began the Seddon Earthquake Aftershock Structural Investigation (SEASI) and deployed a line of 21 seismometers stretching approximately 400 km along the strike of the Hikurangi subduction zone in order to use aftershocks to illuminate the structure of the subducted Pacific slab. The SEASI line ties into the SAHKE line, which was an array of up to 900 seismometers that recorded air gun and explosion shots in deployments from 2009-2011. The SAHKE project characterized the structures perpendicular to the strike of the subduction zone. Our results use the SAHKE line as a starting point and look for strike-parallel variations in the depth of the Moho and other structures. Previous studies have suggested potential changes along strike in this region, and deep slow slip events (> 35 km) are also observed north of Wellington, further indicating that variation in properties exists along slab strike. We have used 246 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from September 2013 through January 2014 to create common receiver gathers. Multicomponent prestack depth migration of these receiver gathers, with operator antialiasing control and prestack coherency filtering, produces reflectivity sections using a 1-D velocity model derived from the SAHKE project. Relocation of aftershocks of the Seddon earthquakes using the deployment of a temporary array by New Zealand GeoNet facilitates the migration. An initial P-P migration shows a north-dipping reflector at 15-25 km depth under the earthquake sequence, and suggests the Moho at 20-25 km depth. From Wellington, a reflector dips very gently south from 25-35 km depth, which is probably the slab

  11. Characterization of the time-dependent strain field at seismogenic depths using first-motion focal mechanisms: Observations of large-scale decadal variations in stress along the San Andrea fault system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sipkin, S.A.; Silver, P.G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for summing moment tensors derived from first-motion focal mechanisms to study temporal dependence in features of the subsurface regional strain field. Time-dependent processes are inferred by comparing mechanisms summed over differing time periods. We apply this methodology to seismogenic zones in central and southern California using focal mechanisms produced by the Northern and Southern California Seismograph Networks for events during 1980-1999. We find a consistent pattern in both the style of deformation (strike-slip versus compressional) and seismicity rate across the entire region. If these temporal variations are causally related, it suggests a temporal change in the regional-scale stress field. One change consistent with the observations is a rotation in the regional maximum horizontal compressive stress direction, followed by a reversal to the original direction. Depending upon the dominant style of deformation locally, this change in orientation of the regional stress will tend to either enhance or hinder deformation. The mode of enhanced deformation can range from increased microseismicity and creep to major earthquakes. We hypothesize that these temporal changes in the regional stress field are the result of subtle changes in apparent relative plate motion between the Pacific and North American plates, perhaps due to long-range postseismic stress diffusion. Others have hypothesized that small changes in plate motion over thousands of years, and/or over decades, are responsible for changes in the style of deformation in southern California. We propose that such changes, over the course of just a few years, also affect the style of deformation.

  12. Triggering of aftershocks in viscoelastic spring-block models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying the mechanisms of the aftershock generation is an important part in the comprehensive theory of earthquake physics. The mechanism of the aftershock generation remains controversial, and models that yield robust aftershock statistics are still in search. The dynamics of earthquake faults can be modelled by a spring-block system, as first proposed by Burridge and Knopoff (1967). However, the quantitative difference between the spring-block model dynamics and the realistic seismicity may be due to the oversimplified setup of the spring-block model, which might not capture effectively the essential physical mechanisms of earthquake dynamics. In particular, the interactions of the spring-block system are purely elastic. The rheology of the fault zone, which plays an important rule in the earthquake dynamics, is thus neglected. In this work, several possible models are studied in order to reproduce the scaling relations of the aftershocks, especially the Omori's law. We adopt the basic picture of the spring-block model, and introduce the crustal relaxation process during the stress redistribution and the global loading. This is implemented by incorporating viscoelastic interactions in the system: the viscoelastic transmission and the viscoelastic driving. The viscoelastic transmission mechanism features an instantaneous response of the stress transmission, which immediately leads to an avalanche followed by the relaxation. The viscoelastic driving mechanism features an instantaneous stress drop, which is later partly restored by the crustal relaxation. We combine the two mechanisms, and find that the dynamics of the system is determined by three parameters, the elastic transmission parameter α, the relaxation time of the viscoelastic driving τ_L , and the relaxation time of the viscoelastic transmission τ. Different with the elastic spring-block model, avalanches can be triggered either by the global loading or by the relaxation in this combined

  13. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE AFTERSHOCK SEQUENCE OF THE BORAH PEAK, IDAHO, EARTHQUAKE DETERMINED FROM DIGITAL RECORDINGS OF THE EVENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, John

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, deployed and maintained a network of twelve digital instruments over the 2 weeks following the October 28, 1983, Borah Peak, Idaho, earthquake. The network recorded 45 events with M greater than equivalent to 3. 0, and 6 events with M less than equivalent to 4. 0. The seismic moments of the aftershocks increase with increasing hypocentral depth below 12 km. The dynamic stress drops of the events do not show any systematic variation with depth, however. Most of the events with large stress drops are clustered in the northwest limb of the aftershock distribution; the average stress drop of the southern events is 31 plus or minus 16 bars, while the average stress drop of the events in the northwest limb is 77 plus or minus 52 bars. This clustering of events with large stress drops marks an apparent stress concentration, possibly associated with the arrest of the main shock rupture propagation by a fracture barrier at depth.

  14. Spatial correlation of aftershock locations and on-fault main shock properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Wiemer, S.; Mai, P. M.

    2006-08-01

    We quantify the correlation between spatial patterns of aftershock hypocenter locations and the distribution of coseismic slip and stress drop on a main shock fault plane using two nonstandard statistical tests. Test T1 evaluates if aftershock hypocenters are located in low-slip regions (hypothesis H1), test T2 evaluates if aftershock hypocenters occur in regions of increased shear stress (hypothesis H2). In the tests, we seek to reject the null hypotheses H0: Aftershock hypocenters are not correlated with (1) low-slip regions or (2) regions of increased shear stress, respectively. We tested the hypotheses on four strike-slip events for which multiple earthquake catalogs and multiple finite fault source models of varying accuracy exist. Because we want to retain earthquake clustering as the fundamental feature of aftershock seismicity, we generate slip distributions using a random spatial field model and derive the stress drop distributions instead of generating seismicity catalogs. We account for uncertainties in the aftershock locations by simulating them within their location error bounds. Our findings imply that aftershocks are preferentially located in regions of low-slip (u ≤ ?umax) and of increased shear stress (Δσ < 0). In particular, the correlation is more significant for relocated than for general network aftershock catalogs. However, the results show that stress drop patterns provide less information content on aftershock locations. This implies that static shear stress change of the main shock may not be the governing process for aftershock genesis.

  15. Decay of aftershock density with distance indicates triggering by dynamic stress.

    PubMed

    Felzer, K R; Brodsky, E E

    2006-06-01

    The majority of earthquakes are aftershocks, yet aftershock physics is not well understood. Many studies suggest that static stress changes trigger aftershocks, but recent work suggests that shaking (dynamic stresses) may also play a role. Here we measure the decay of aftershocks as a function of distance from magnitude 2-6 mainshocks in order to clarify the aftershock triggering process. We find that for short times after the mainshock, when low background seismicity rates allow for good aftershock detection, the decay is well fitted by a single inverse power law over distances of 0.2-50 km. The consistency of the trend indicates that the same triggering mechanism is working over the entire range. As static stress changes at the more distant aftershocks are negligible, this suggests that dynamic stresses may be triggering all of these aftershocks. We infer that the observed aftershock density is consistent with the probability of triggering aftershocks being nearly proportional to seismic wave amplitude. The data are not fitted well by models that combine static stress change with the evolution of frictionally locked faults. PMID:16760974

  16. Decay of aftershock density with distance indicates triggering by dynamic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felzer, K.R.; Brodsky, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    The majority of earthquakes are aftershocks, yet aftershock physics is not well understood. Many studies suggest that static stress changes trigger aftershocks, but recent work suggests that shaking (dynamic stresses) may also play a role. Here we measure the decay of aftershocks as a function of distance from magnitude 2-6 mainshocks in order to clarify the aftershock triggering process. We find that for short times after the mainshock, when low background seismicity rates allow for good aftershock detection, the decay is well fitted by a single inverse power law over distances of 0.2-50 km. The consistency of the trend indicates that the same triggering mechanism is working over the entire range. As static stress changes at the more distant aftershocks are negligible, this suggests that dynamic stresses may be triggering all of these aftershocks. We infer that the observed aftershock density is consistent with the probability of triggering aftershocks being nearly proportional to seismic wave amplitude. The data are not fitted well by models that combine static stress change with the evolution of frictionally locked faults. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  18. Disease aftershocks - The health effects of natural disasters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, S.C.

    2001-01-01

    While the initial activity of a natural disaster event may directly injure or kill a number of people, it is possible that a significant number of individuals will be affected by disease outbreaks that occur after the first effects of the disaster have passed. Coupling the epidemiologist's knowledge of disease outbreaks with geographic information systems and remote sensing technology could help natural disaster relief workers to prevent additional victims from disease aftershocks.

  19. Iterative Strategies for Aftershock Classification in Automatic Seismic Processing Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.; Kværna, Tormod; Harris, David B.; Dodge, Douglas A.

    2016-04-01

    Aftershock sequences following very large earthquakes present enormous challenges to near-realtime generation of seismic bulletins. The increase in analyst resources needed to relocate an inflated number of events is compounded by failures of phase association algorithms and a significant deterioration in the quality of underlying fully automatic event bulletins. Current processing pipelines were designed a generation ago and, due to computational limitations of the time, are usually limited to single passes over the raw data. With current processing capability, multiple passes over the data are feasible. Processing the raw data at each station currently generates parametric data streams which are then scanned by a phase association algorithm to form event hypotheses. We consider the scenario where a large earthquake has occurred and propose to define a region of likely aftershock activity in which events are detected and accurately located using a separate specially targeted semi-automatic process. This effort may focus on so-called pattern detectors, but here we demonstrate a more general grid search algorithm which may cover wider source regions without requiring waveform similarity. Given many well-located aftershocks within our source region, we may remove all associated phases from the original detection lists prior to a new iteration of the phase association algorithm. We provide a proof-of-concept example for the 2015 Gorkha sequence, Nepal, recorded on seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System. Even with very conservative conditions for defining event hypotheses within the aftershock source region, we can automatically remove over half of the original detections which could have been generated by Nepal earthquakes and reduce the likelihood of false associations and spurious event hypotheses. Further reductions in the number of detections in the parametric data streams are likely using correlation and subspace detectors and/or empirical matched

  20. Triggered Swarms and Induced Aftershock Sequences in Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural geothermal systems, which are used for energy generation, are usually associated with high seismic activity. This can be related to the large-scale injection and extraction of fluids to enhance geothermal recovery. This results in the changes of the pore pressure and pore-elastic stress field and can stimulate the occurrence of earthquakes. These systems are also prone to triggering of seismicity by the passage of seismic waves generated by large distant main shocks. In this study, we analyze clustering and triggering of seismicity at several geothermal fields in California. Particularly, we consider the seismicity at the Geysers, Coso, and Salton Sea geothermal fields. We analyze aftershock sequences generated by local large events with magnitudes greater than 4.0 and earthquake swarms generated by several significant long distant main shocks. We show that the rate of the aftershock sequences generated by the local large events in the two days before and two days after the reference event can be modelled reasonably well by the time dependent Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. On the other hand, the swarms of activity triggered by large distant earthquakes cannot be described by the ETAS model. To model the increase in the rate of seismicity associated with triggering by large distant main shocks we introduce an additional time-dependent triggering mechanism into the ETAS model. In almost all cases the frequency-magnitude statistics of triggered sequences follow Gutenberg-Richter scaling to a good approximation. The analysis indicates that the seismicity triggered by relatively large local events can initiate sequences similar to regular aftershock sequences. In contrast, the distant main shocks trigger swarm like activity with faster decaying rates.

  1. High-Resolution Low Power, Intergrated Aftershock and Microzonation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, L.; Passmore, P.

    2012-04-01

    Refraction Technology, Inc. has developed a self-contained, fully integrated Aftershock System, model 160-03, providing the customer simple and quick deployment during aftershock emergency mobilization and microzonation studies. The 160-03 has no external cables or peripheral equipment for command/control and operation in the field. The 160-03 contains three major components integrated in one case: a) 24-bit resolution state-of-the art low power ADC with CPU and Lid interconnect boards; b) power source; and c) three component 2 Hz sensors (two horizontals and one vertical), and built-in ±4g accelerometer. Optionally, the 1 Hz sensors can be built-in the 160-03 system at the customer's request. The self-contained rechargeable battery pack provides power autonomy up to 7 days during data acquisition at 200 sps on continuous three weak motion and triggered three strong motion recording channels. For longer power autonomy, the 160-03 Aftershock System battery pack can be charged from an external source (solar power system). The data in the field is recorded to a built-in swappable USB flash drive. The 160-03 configuration is fixed based on a configuration file stored on the system. The detailed specifications and performance are presented and discussed

  2. Fault Simulator with Dilatant Effects Used to Investigate Statistics of Foreshocks/Aftershocks, Including Magnitude Dependent Seismic Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. E.; Sacks, S. I.; Rydelek, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    We add dilatant effects to a fault simulator to include physics consistent with observations of seismic quiescence. Using this simulator, we examine precursory and aftershock statistics of major events, changes in b-value, correlations between slip and static stress changes, changes in the in-plane focal mechanisms, and temporal decay of aftershocks. Seismic quiescence has been observed for a number major events including, 1982 Urakawa-Oki earthquake [Taylor et al., 1992], 1994 Hokkaido-Toho-Oki earthquake [Takanami et al., 1996], 1994 Northridge earthquake [Smith and Sacks, 2011], 1995 Kobe earthquake [Enescu et al., 2011], 1988 Spitak earthquake [Wysse and Martirosyan, 1998], and 2011 Tohoku earthquake [Katsumata, in press, 2011]. The physics of dilatancy theory [Nur, 1972; Whitcomb et al., 1973; Scholz et al., 1973], which we include in the simulator, is proposed as an explanation for seismic quiescence [Takanami et al., 1996; Scholz, 2000]. As the fault is loaded toward failure and the stress increases, if the stress is sufficiently high, the rock can begin to dilate. As dilation causes an increase in the rock volume, the pore pressure decreases, the effective normal stress increases, and the fault core strengthens [Rice, 1975]. Because the fault core supports more of the stress, the seismicity of the surrounding region will decrease as is observed. Over time (~2-20 years) the water will percolate back into the fault core from the surrounding region. The pore pressure in the fault core increases again, the normal stress decreases, and failure is encouraged. This dilatant effect on the fault core foreshocks, surrounding quiescence zone, and the aftershocks, can be studied by modifying the fault simulator of Sacks and Rydelek [1995]; Rydelek and Sacks [1996]. Based on simple physics: discrete patches, Coulomb failure, and redistribution of stresses on a specified fault geometry, this simulator (without dilatancy) has already been shown to reproduce Gutenberg

  3. Inversions for earthquake focal mechanisms and regional stress in the Kachchh Rift Basin, western India: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. P.; Zhao, L.; Kumar, Santsoh; Mishra, Smita

    2016-03-01

    More than a decade after the 2001 MW 7.7 Bhuj earthquake in western India, aftershocks up to MW 5.0 are still continuing around the rupture zone in the Kachchh Rift Basin. Over the years, some surrounding faults in the region have been activated, and a transverse fault generated an MW 5.1 earthquake in 2012. Most of the earthquakes occur in the lower crust at depths between 15 and 35 km. We have determined focal mechanism solutions of 47 earthquakes (MW 3.2-5.1) that were recorded by a 60-station broadband network during 2007-2014 within an area of 50 km radius of the 2001 main shock. South dipping nodal planes in most of the solutions correlate well with the active faults. The earthquakes near the epicenter of the 2001 main shock primarily show reverse-faulting mechanisms. The surrounding earthquakes in the area, however, show predominantly strike-slip mechanisms. The P axes of the earthquakes mostly oriented in north-south, and the T axes in east-west. However, the orientations of the P and T axes exhibit more complexity near the source area of the main shock. Stress field inversion of the solutions yields a dominant north-south compression, which is consistent with the ambient tectonic stress field owing to the northward movement of the Indian Plate with respect to the Eurasian Plate. The geodetic measurements are in reasonable agreement with our results.

  4. Aftershock and induced seismic activity of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake in the northern part of Tohoku district, NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuga, M.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the seismic activity around the northern neighbor of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw 9.0) with special attention to a potential large aftershock in the area. We obtained a combined data set by adding our manually-picked locations to the catalog locations by the Japan Meteorological Agency. The hypocenter distribution delineates active and inactive bands of seismicity. The band of low seismicity corresponds to a zone of a large seismic slip, indicating that aftershocks occurred in peripheral neighbors of the mainshock asperity. The broad band of active seismicity along the coast corresponds to the zone of a large postseismic slip, suggesting the enhancement of the aftershock activity by the slip. Although the northern neighbor of the mainshock fault is a favored region of increased seismicity, as shown from a Coulomb stress calculation, no significant seismic activity is observed within the potential source area except along the Japan Trench and the SW corner. This implies that the zone of interplate moment release by previous large earthquakes and the subsequent slow slip acted as a barrier to the migration of both the mainshock rupture and aftershock activity. However, an aftershock area in the zone may reflect inhomogeneous moment release by past seismic and aseismic sequences. Induced inland seismicity is quite high in the Akita Prefecture on the Japan Sea side apart more than 100 km from the mainshock fault. There are some active clusters including moderate earthquakes with magnitude greater than 5. They are newly formed clusters after the mainshock, while the seismicity of previously active areas decreased significantly. Focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes in the new clusters show the types of strike-slip with consistently NW-SE trending T-axes. The predominant type of focal mechanisms in the Akita area before the mainshock was E-W compressional reverse faulting. Thus the stress field in the area has changed

  5. Deterministic model of earthquake clustering shows reduced stress drops for nearby aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Bruce E.; Richards-Dinger, Keith; Dieterich, James H.

    2015-11-01

    While a number of viable physical mechanisms have been offered to explain the temporal clustering of aftershocks, the spatial clustering of aftershocks, in particular the concentrated productivity of aftershocks very near the mainshock rupture area, has been difficult to reproduce with physical models. Here we present a new deterministic physical model capable of reproducing both the spatial and temporal clustering. We apply this new model to a longstanding puzzling question raised by ground motion observations, which suggest that nearby aftershocks show reduced ground motions relative to similar magnitude mainshocks. In the model, the physical basis for these observations is reduced stress drops for nearby aftershocks compared to similar magnitude mainshocks. These reduced stress drops are due to nearby aftershocks rerupturing incompletely healed parts of the fault which ruptured in the mainshock.

  6. Preliminary Double-Difference Relocations of Bhuj Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, A. J.; Bodin, P.; Horton, S.; Gomberg, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Mw=7.7 Bhuj earthquake of 26 January, 2001 in Gujarat, India, was a scientifically important earthquake that took place in a rather poorly instrumented region. Lack of nearby mainshock recordings and lack of surface rupture preclude the calculation of a high-resolution picture of the mainshock rupture processes like those presented for other recent large, better instrumented earthquakes. This is particularly vexing because, given its history of infrequent moderate-to-large earthquakes and its setting within a continental plate interior, the Bhuj earthquake might provide important insights for other high-consequence-but-low-occurrence-rate regions such as the central US. Fortunately we do have excellent recordings of numerous aftershocks on a temporary network of 8 portable seismographs. In order to constrain rupture complexity, we are computing high-resolution relative relocations of aftershocks using HypoDD, the double-difference algorithm of Waldhauser and Ellsworth \\(BSSA, 2000\\) to look for aftershock patterns that may reflect rupture characteristics. We are currently using a subset of all of the aftershocks that have been analyzed \\(P and S phases recorded on at least 4 stations\\) which consists of nearly 1000 events. This subset is less than half of all the data, and more events are being added as they are analyzed. Our preliminary results show concentrated patches of relocated aftershocks that dip to the south between 6 and 37 km deep. Strong clusters appear to illuminate the lateral edges of a rupture, with a NE trending cluster at the eastern side and a NW trending cluster at the western side, both plunging southward. The central part of the apparent rupture, which coincides with teleseismic estimates of maximum slip, appears to be relatively quiescent. We have not up to this point used waveform cross-correlation to provide relative arrival timing, but feel this may be appropriate for subsets of the overall data set. We also note the presence of

  7. Absolute site effects in Kachchh, India, determined from aftershocks of the 2002 Bhuj earthquake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagnini, L.; Mayeda, K.; Bodin, P.; Akinci, A.

    2004-12-01

    What can be learned about absolute site effects on ground motions from recordings of aftershocks at ten temporary seismic stations, none of which could be considered a "reference" (hard rock) site, and for which no geotechnical information is available? This challenge motivated our current study of Bhuj aftershocks; and our answer, briefly put, is: quite a bit. We started by constraining the regional attenuation and geometric spreading: this was the result of an earlier study [Bodin et al., BSSA 2004], the goal of which was to be able to reproduce the general character of the observations with a constrained set of stochastic synthetic ground motions. Our present work is based on the same aftershock data we used in the prior study. We first produced stable and reliable, unbiased source moment-rate spectra using the technique described by Mayeda et al., [BSSA, 2003]. With these known "absolute" source spectra, and the propagation terms we quantified in the previous study we inverted for the site response using only the largest ~200 earthquakes (M>2.8) in each of two depth ranges (0-25 km, and 20-40 km), to yield the "absolute" site terms for horizontal and vertical ground motions. We were able to obtain stable results in the 1-14 hz frequency band. The results reveal that the site terms generally share a common character: small amplifications (near unity) at the longer-period end of the pass-band, and decreases (perhaps due to attenuation or near-site scattering) at the higher frequency end. This character is evident in a similar study of earthquake ground motions in the Alps at sites on hard rock [Malagnini et al., BSSA 2004]. In contrast to Alpine hard rock sites, however, the vertical site terms at our sediment and soft-rock sites are generally rather flat and featureless. We observe differences in site response between stations which appeared to be on similar geologic conditions, and vice versa. For sites that appear to be on deep unconsolidated soils

  8. Incorporating fault mechanics into inversions of aftershock data for the regional remote stress, with application to the 1992 Landers, California earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerten, Frantz; Madden, Elizabeth H.; Pollard, David D.; Maerten, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    We present a new stress inversion algorithm that accounts for the physics relating the remote stress, slip along complex faults, and aftershock focal mechanisms, in a linear-elastic, heterogeneous, isotropic whole- or half-space. For each new remote stress, the solution of the simulation is obtained by the superposition of three pre-calculated solutions, leading to a constant time evaluation. Consequently, the full three-dimensional boundary element method model need not be recomputed and is independent of the structural complexity of the underlying model. Using a synthetic model, we evaluate several different measures of fit, or cost functions, between aftershocks and model results. Cost functions that account for aftershock slip direction provide good constraint on the remote stress, while functions that evaluate only nodal plane orientations do not. Inversion results are stable for values of friction ≤ 0.5 on mainshock faults. We demonstrate the technique by recovering the remote stress regime at the time of the 1992 M 7.3 Landers, California earthquake from its aftershocks and find that the algorithm performs well relative to methods that invert earthquakes occurring prior to the Landers mainshock. In the mechanical inversion, incorporating fault structures is necessary, but small differences in fault geometries do not impact these inversion results. Each inversion provides a complete solution for an earthquake as output, including fault slip and the stress and deformation fields around the fault(s). This allows for many additional datasets to be used as input, including fault surface slip, GPS data, InSAR data, and/or secondary fracture orientations.

  9. The Constantine (northeast Algeria) earthquake of October 27, 1985: surface ruptures and aftershock study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounif, A.; Haessler, H.; Meghraoui, M.

    1987-10-01

    An earthquake of magnitude Ms = 6.0 (CSEM, Strasbourg) occurred at Constantine (Algeria) on 27 October 1985. This seismic event is the strongest felt in the Tellian Atlas since the El Asnam seismic crisis of October 10, 1980. A team from the Centre de Recherche d'Astronomie, d'Astrophysique et de Géophysique (CRAAG, Algeria), utilising 8 portable stations, registered the activity a few days after the main shock. The aftershocks follow a N045° direction, and show the existence of three ruptured segments. Cross sections display a remarkable vertical fault plane and suggest asperities in the rupture process. Surface breaks were found affecting Quaternary deposits. The principal segment is about 3.8 km long showing “enéchelon” cracks with left-lateral displacement while the main direction of the rupture is N055°. Although the vertical motion is small, the northwestern block shows a normal component of the main surface faulting, while the left-lateral displacement is about 10 cm. The strike-slip focal mechanism solution determined from the global seismic network and field observations are in good agreement.

  10. Leading aftershocks and cascades: two possible stress release processes after a main shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monterrubio, Marisol; Martinez, Maria-Dolors; Lana, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Three series of aftershocks in Southern California, associated with the main shocks of Landers (1992), Northridge (1994) and Hector Mine (1999), are interpreted as the superposition of a lasting relaxation stress process and numerous short episodes of sudden stress release. The set of aftershocks belonging to the lasting process are designed as leading aftershocks and its rate decays with time, fitting well to the classical Omori's law. The remaining aftershocks are assigned to the different episodes characterised by sudden release of stresses, each of them being designed as a cascade. Cascades are characterised by four basic properties. First, the number of aftershocks belonging to a cascade is submitted to remarkable time fluctuations. Nevertheless, it is observed a positive trend in the number of aftershocks with respect to the elapsed time measured since the origin time of the main event. Second, the rate for aftershocks belonging to a cascade can be assumed constant. Third, a power law quantifies the rate for every cascade, with the elapsed time since the main event to the beginning of the cascade being the argument of this power law. Fourth, the validity of the Gutemberg-Richter law is preserved both for the set of leading aftershocks as for the set of tremors associated to cascades. Given that the number of available aftershocks for the three seismic crisis is very high (exceeding 10,000 tremors), a detailed analysis of cascades is available.

  11. Focal neurological deficits

    MedlinePlus

    A focal neurologic deficit is a problem with nerve, spinal cord, or brain function. It affects a specific ... of the back, neck, or head Electromyogram (EMG)/ nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap

  12. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 67. ...

  13. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  14. Focal vibration in neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Murillo, N; Valls-Sole, J; Vidal, J; Opisso, E; Medina, J; Kumru, H

    2014-04-01

    During the last decade, many studies have been carried out to understand the effects of focal vibratory stimuli at various levels of the central nervous system and to study pathophysiological mechanisms of neurological disorders as well as the therapeutic effects of focal vibration in neurorehabilitation. This review aimed to describe the effects of focal vibratory stimuli in neurorehabilitation including the neurological diseases or disorders like stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's' disease and dystonia. In conclusion, focal vibration stimulation is well tolerated, effective and easy to use, and it could be used to reduce spasticity, to promote motor activity and motor learning within a functional activity, even in gait training, independent from etiology of neurological pathology. Further studies are needed in the future well-designed trials with bigger sample size to determine the most effective frequency, amplitude and duration of vibration application in the neurorehabilitation. PMID:24842220

  15. Estimating the similarity of earthquake focal mechanisms from waveform cross-correlation in regions of minimal local azimuthal station coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D. L.; Martynov, V.; Bowen, J.; Vernon, F.; Eakins, J.

    2002-12-01

    In the Xinjiang province of China, ~2000 earthquakes were recorded by the Tien Shan network during 1997-1999 that exhibit a clear spatial progression of seismicity. This progression, which is confined to a 50 km diameter region, is undetectable in other data catalogs, both global (e.g., REB, PDE, CMT) and local (KIS). The two largest earthquakes in this sequence were the M6.1 August 2, 1998, and the M6.2 August 27, 1998, earthquakes. According to the Harvard moment tensor solutions, both events ruptured faults that trend parallel to the geologic structures in the region (~N55W). However, the August 27 event was a vertical strike slip event while the August 2 event ruptured a dipping fault and had a normal component of slip. These slip directions are counter to what we expect for this fold-and-thrust-belt, which typically has earthquakes with thrust mechanisms. Often seismological researchers make the assumption that aftershocks have the same focal mechanism as their associated mainshocks and/or assume all aftershock fault planes are similarly oriented. We test this assumption by examining the similarity of aftershock mechanisms from the August 2nd and 27th mainshocks. It is difficult to determine focal mechanisms from inversions of full seismic waveforms because the velocity model in the Tien Shan region is so complicated a 3D velocity model would be required. Also, the azimuthal station coverage is poor. Alternative, it impossible to determine accurate focal mechanisms from first motion data because the closest seismic stations have weak and complicated first arrivals. Our approach more easily determines the similarity of earthquake focal mechanisms using waveform cross-correlation. In this way information from the full waveform is utilized, and there is no need to make estimates of the complicated velocity structure. In general, we find there is minimal correlation between pairs of event waveforms (filter 1-8 Hz) within each aftershock sequence. For example, at

  16. Real-time focal stack compositing for handheld mobile cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solh, Mashhour

    2013-03-01

    Extending the depth of field using a single lens camera on a mobile device can be achieved by capturing a set of images each focused at a different depth or focal stack then combine these samples of the focal stack to form a single all-in-focus image or an image refocused at a desired depth of field. Focal stack compositing in real time for a handheld mobile camera has many challenges including capturing, processing power, handshaking, rolling shutter artifacts, occlusion, and lens zoom effect. In this paper, we describe a system for a real time focal stack compositing system for handheld mobile device with an alignment and compositing algorithms. We will also show all-in-focus images captured and processed by a cell phone camera running on Android OS.

  17. Hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations.

    PubMed

    Soma, Ryoko; Moriyama, Muka; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations (FCEs). Four eyes of four patients with a FCE were studied. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and multi-focal electroretinography (mfERG) were performed to investigate the choroidal hemodynamics and the morphological and functional changes. The mean depth of the FCE determined by OCT was 222.5 ± 49.5 μm with a range of 164-272 μm. In one case, subretinal fluid was observed in the excavation, and in three cases, subretinal fluid was not observed. ICGA showed hypofluorescence, and laser flowgraphy (LSFG) showed decreased choroidal blood flow at the excavation in all cases. Three cases were symptomatic, and the amplitudes of the mfERGs were reduced. FCEs cause a decrease of choroidal blood flow. In three of four cases, the mfERGs were depressed over the FCEs leading to symptoms. PMID:25626897

  18. Source depth dependence of micro-tsunamis recorded with ocean-bottom pressure gauges: The January 28, 2000 Mw 6.8 earthquake off Nemuro Peninsula, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirata, K.; Takahashi, H.; Geist, E.; Satake, K.; Tanioka, Y.; Sugioka, H.; Mikada, H.

    2003-01-01

    Micro-tsunami waves with a maximum amplitude of 4-6 mm were detected with the ocean-bottom pressure gauges on a cabled deep seafloor observatory south of Hokkaido, Japan, following the January 28, 2000 earthquake (Mw 6.8) in the southern Kuril subduction zone. We model the observed micro-tsunami and estimate the focal depth and other source parameters such as fault length and amount of slip using grid searching with the least-squares method. The source depth and stress drop for the January 2000 earthquake are estimated to be 50 km and 7 MPa, respectively, with possible ranges of 45-55 km and 4-13 MPa. Focal depth of typical inter-plate earthquakes in this region ranges from 10 to 20 km and stress drop of inter-plate earthquakes generally is around 3 MPa. The source depth and stress drop estimates suggest that the earthquake was an intra-slab event in the subducting Pacific plate, rather than an inter-plate event. In addition, for a prescribed fault width of 30 km, the fault length is estimated to be 15 km, with possible ranges of 10-20 km, which is the same as the previously determined aftershock distribution. The corresponding estimate for seismic moment is 2.7??1019 Nm with possible ranges of 2.3??1019-3.2??1019Nm. Standard tide gauges along the nearby coast did not record any tsunami signal. High-precision ocean-bottom pressure measurements offshore thus make it possible to determine fault parameters of moderate-sized earthquakes in subduction zones using open-ocean tsunami waveforms. Published by Elsevier Science B. V.

  19. Damped regional-scale stress inversions: Methodology and examples for southern California and the Coalinga aftershock sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, J.L.; Michael, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new focal mechanism stress inversion technique to produce regional-scale models of stress orientation containing the minimum complexity necessary to fit the data. Current practice is to divide a region into small subareas and to independently fit a stress tensor to the focal mechanisms of each subarea. This procedure may lead to apparent spatial variability that is actually an artifact of overfitting noisy data or nonuniquely fitting data that does not completely constrain the stress tensor. To remove these artifacts while retaining any stress variations that are strongly required by the data, we devise a damped inversion method to simultaneously invert for stress in all subareas while minimizing the difference in stress between adjacent subareas. This method is conceptually similar to other geophysical inverse techniques that incorporate damping, such as seismic tomography. In checkerboard tests, the damped inversion removes the stress rotation artifacts exhibited by an undamped inversion, while resolving sharper true stress rotations than a simple smoothed model or a moving-window inversion. We show an example of a spatially damped stress field for southern California. The methodology can also be used to study temporal stress changes, and an example for the Coalinga, California, aftershock sequence is shown. We recommend use of the damped inversion technique for any study examining spatial or temporal variations in the stress field.

  20. Largest Aftershocks of Megathrust Earthquakes in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, J.; Tsuzuki, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake of Mw9.0 induced the earthquake activity in high level all over Japan. It included not only earthquakes near active faults but also volcanic earthquakes. Although we have observed tens of thousands of aftershocks, yet we do not know which is the largest aftershock of the 2011 megathrust. There occurred several megathrust earthquakes worldwide in the last one hundred years, which are almost the same size or larger than the 2011 megathrust. We have studied their largest aftershocks based on our new hypothesis of along-dip double segmentation (ADDS) and along-strike single segmentation (ASSS). ADDS in the Tohoku-oki region along the Japan trench is characterized by the apparent absence of earthquakes in the trench-ward segments as opposed to the Japan Island-ward segments that have repeated small earthquakes of up to Mw8 class. In contrast, the 1960 Chile and the 2010 Maule megathrusts are characterized by ASSS with the weak seismic activity before the main event everywhere in the subduction zone. The difference between these two types of seismic segmentations would be that strongly coupled areas of trench-ward segments give rise to ADDS, whereas almost 100% coupled areas of shallow-parts of subduction zones give rise to ASSS. In other words, the phenomenon of a seismic gap can be identified for an ASSS megathrust, where as a doughnut pattern of seismic activity appears prior to a main ADDS event. In summary, most of the largest aftershocks of ADDS megathrusts are earthquakes of outer-rise(outer trench-slope) normal faultings, where there occur two types, dip-slip and strike-slip, depending on the structure of subducting oceanic plates. The 1933 Sanriku-oki Mw8.6 (the 1896 Meiji-Sanriku M~8.5) and the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw7.7 (the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw9.0) are the former and the 1987 Off Alaska Mw7.8 (the 1964 Alaska Mw9.2) and the 2012 Sumatra Mw8.6 (the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Mw9.3) are the latter. Those of ASSS megathrusts occurred

  1. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  2. Relocations and 3-D Velocity Structure for Aftershocks of the 2000 W. Tottori (Japan) Earthquake and 2001 Gujarat (India) Earthquake, Using Waveform Cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enescu, B.; Mori, J.

    2004-12-01

    The newly developed double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber,2003) makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times to produce an improved velocity model and highly accurate hypocenter locations. By using this technique, we relocate the aftershocks of the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake (Mw 6.7) and 2001 Gujarat (Mw 7.7) earthquake and obtain a 3D-velocity model of the aftershock region. The first data set consists of 1035 aftershocks recorded at 62 stations during a period of about a month following the mainshock (Shibutani et al.,2002). In order to get the best arrival times a cross-correlation analysis was used to align the waveforms. The epicentral distribution of the relocated events reveals clear earthquake lineations, some of them close to the mainshock, and an increased clustering. The aftershocks' depth distribution shows a mean shift of the hypocenters' centroid of about 580m; a clear upper cutoff of the seismic activity and some clustering can be also seen. The final P-wave velocity model shows higher-value anomalies in the vicinity of the mainshock's hypocenter, in good agreement with the results of Shibutani et al.(2004). The second data set consists of about 1300 earthquakes, recorded during one week of observations by a Japanese-Indian research team in the aftershock region of the Gujarat earthquake (Sato et al.,2001). Using the double-difference algorithm and waveform cross-correlations, we were able to identify a more clear alignment of hypocenters that define the mainshock's fault and an area of relatively few aftershocks in the region of the mainshock's hypocenter. Both studies demonstrate that the cross-correlation techniques applied for events with inter-event distances as large as 10km and cross correlation coefficients as low as 50% can produce more accurate locations than those determined from catalog phase data. We are going to discuss briefly the critical role of frequency filtering and of the time window used for cross

  3. The M w6.7 12 October 2013 western Hellenic Arc main shock and its aftershock sequence: implications for the slab properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Karakostas, Vassilis; Mesimeri, Maria; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2016-01-01

    The 12 October 2013 M w6.7 earthquake offshore Crete Island is one of the few strong earthquakes to have occurred in the last few decades in the southwestern part of the Hellenic subduction zone (HSZ), providing the opportunity to evaluate characteristics of the descending slab. The HSZ has experienced several strong (M ≥ 7.0) earthquakes in historical times with the largest one being the 365 AD, M w = 8.4 earthquake, the largest known ever occurred in the Mediterranean region. The 2013 main shock occurred in close proximity with the 365 event, on an interplate thrust fault at a depth of 26 km, onto the coupled part of the overriding and descending plates. GCMT solution shows a slightly oblique (rake = 130°) thrust faulting with downdip compression on a nearly horizontal (dip = 3°) northeast-dipping fault plane with strike (340°) parallel to the subduction front, with the compression axis being oriented in the direction of plate convergence. The subduction interface can be more clearly resolved with the integration of aftershock locations and CMT solution. For this scope, the aftershocks were relocated after obtaining a v p/v s ratio equal to 1.76, a one-dimensional velocity model and time delays that approximate the velocity structure of the study area, and the employment of double-difference technique for both phase pick data and cross-correlation differential times. The first-day relocated seismicity, alike aftershocks in the first 2 months, shows activation of an area at the upper part of the descending slab, with most activity being concentrated between 13 and 27 km, where the main shock is also encompassed. Aftershocks are rare near to the main shock, implying homogeneous slip on a large patch of the rupture plane. Based on the aftershock distribution, the size of the activated area estimated is about 24 km long and 17 km wide. Coulomb stress changes resolved for transpressive motion reveal negligible off-fault aftershock triggering, evidencing a

  4. Cumulative Coulomb Stress Triggering as an Explanation for the Canterbury (New Zealand) Aftershock Sequence: Initial Conditions Are Everything?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark; Harte, David; Williams, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Using 2 years of aftershock data and three fault-plane solutions for each of the initial M7.1 Darfield earthquake and the larger (M >6) aftershocks, we conduct a detailed examination of Coulomb stress transfer in the Canterbury 2010-2011 earthquake sequence. Moment tensor solutions exist for 283 of the events with M ≥ 3.6, while 713 other events of M ≥ 3.6 have only hypocentre and magnitude information available. We look at various methods for deciding between the two possible mechanisms for the 283 events with moment tensor solutions, including conformation to observed surface faulting, and maximum ΔCFF transfer from the Darfield main shock. For the remaining events, imputation methods for the mechanism including nearest-neighbour, kernel smoothing, and optimal plane methods are considered. Fault length, width, and depth are arrived at via a suite of scaling relations. A large (50-70 %) proportion of the faults considered were calculated to have initial loading in excess of the final stress drop. The majority of faults that accumulated positive ΔCFF during the sequence were `encouraged' by the main shock failure, but, on the other hand, of the faults that failed during the sequence, more than 50 % of faults appeared to have accumulated a negative ΔCFF from all preceding failures during the sequence. These results were qualitatively insensitive to any of the factors considered. We conclude that there is much unknown about how Coulomb stress triggering works in practice.

  5. A preliminary study of the Santa Barbara, California, earthquake of August 13, 1978, and its major aftershocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, William Hung Kan; Johnson, C.E.; Henyey, T.L.; Yerkes, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The ML5.1 Santa Barbara earthquake of August 13, 1978 occurred at lat 34 ? 22.2'N., long 119 ? 43.0' 4 km south of Santa Barbara, Calif. at a depth of 12.5 km in the northeast Santa Barbara Channel, part of the western Transverse Ranges geomorphic-structural province. This part of the province is characterized by seismically active, east-trending reverse faults and rates of coastal uplift that have averaged up to about 10 m/1000 years over the last 45,000 years. No surface rupture was detected onshore. Subsurface rupture propagated northwest from the main shock toward Goleta, 15 km west of Santa Barbara, where a maximum acceleration of 0.44 g was measured at ground level and extensive minor damage occurred; only minor injuries were reported. A fairly well-constrained fault-plane solution of the main shock and distribution of the aftershocks indicate that left-reverse-oblique slip occurred on west-northwest-trending, north-dipping reverse faults; inadequate dip control precludes good correlation with any one of several mapped faults. Had the earthquake been larger and rupture propagated to the southeast or a greater distance to the northwest, it could have posed a hazard to oilfield operations. The fault-plane solution and aftershock pattern closely fit the model of regional deformation and the solution closely resembles those of five previously mapped events located within a 15-km radius.

  6. Simultaneous imaging of multiple focal planes using a two-photon scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, W.; Carriles, R.; Hoover, E. E.; Planchon, T. A.; Durfee, C. G.; Squier, J. A.

    2007-06-01

    Despite all the advances in nonlinear microscopy, all existing instruments are constrained to obtain images of one focal plane at a time. In this Letter we demonstrate a two-photon absorption fluorescence scanning microscope capable of imaging two focal planes simultaneously. This is accomplished by temporally demultiplexing the signal coming from two focal volumes at different sample depths. The scheme can be extended to three or more focal planes.

  7. What Controls the Duration of Aftershocks, and Why It Matters for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. S.; Toda, S.

    2014-12-01

    A fundamental problem confronting hazard modelers in slowly deforming regions such as the central and eastern United States, Australia, and inner Honshu, is whether the current seismicity represents the steady state earthquake potential, or is instead a decaying potential associated with past mainshocks. If the current seismicity were composed of long-lived aftershock sequences, it might then be anti-correlated with the next large earthquakes. While aftershock productivity is known to be a property of the mainshock magnitude, aftershock duration (the time until the aftershock rate decays to the pre-mainshock rate) should, according to rate/state friction theory of Dieterich[1994], be inversely proportional to the fault stressing rate. If so, slowly deforming regions would be expected to sustain long aftershock sequences. Most tests have supported the Dieterich hypothesis, but use ambiguous proxies for the fault stressing rate, such as the mainshock recurrence interval. Here we test the hypothesis by examining off-fault aftershocks of the 2011 M=9 Tohoku-oki rupture up to 250 km from the source, as well as near-fault aftershocks of six large Japanese mainshocks, sampling a range of receiver faults, from thrusts slipping 80 mm/yr, to normal faults slipping 0.1 mm/yr. We find that aftershock sequences lasted a month on the fastest-slipping faults, have durations of 10-100 years on faults slipping 1-10 mm/yr, and are projected to persist for at least 200 years on the slowest faults. Although the Omori decay exponent for short and long sequences is similar, the very different background rates account for the duration differences. If the stressing rate is generally proportional to fault slip rate, then aftershock durations indeed support the Dieterich hypothesis. The test means that the hazard associated with aftershocks depends on local tectonic conditions rather than on the mainshock magnitude alone. Because declustering approaches do not remove such long

  8. Recent Experiences in Aftershock Hazard Modelling in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstenberger, M.; Rhoades, D. A.; McVerry, G.; Christophersen, A.; Bannister, S. C.; Fry, B.; Potter, S.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of several sequences of earthquakes in New Zealand in the last few years has meant that GNS Science has gained significant recent experience in aftershock hazard and forecasting. First was the Canterbury sequence of events which began in 2010 and included the destructive Christchurch earthquake of February, 2011. This sequence is occurring in what was a moderate-to-low hazard region of the National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM): the model on which the building design standards are based. With the expectation that the sequence would produce a 50-year hazard estimate in exceedance of the existing building standard, we developed a time-dependent model that combined short-term (STEP & ETAS) and longer-term (EEPAS) clustering with time-independent models. This forecast was combined with the NSHM to produce a forecast of the hazard for the next 50 years. This has been used to revise building design standards for the region and has contributed to planning of the rebuilding of Christchurch in multiple aspects. An important contribution to this model comes from the inclusion of EEPAS, which allows for clustering on the scale of decades. EEPAS is based on three empirical regressions that relate the magnitudes, times of occurrence, and locations of major earthquakes to regional precursory scale increases in the magnitude and rate of occurrence of minor earthquakes. A second important contribution comes from the long-term rate to which seismicity is expected to return in 50-years. With little seismicity in the region in historical times, a controlling factor in the rate is whether-or-not it is based on a declustered catalog. This epistemic uncertainty in the model was allowed for by using forecasts from both declustered and non-declustered catalogs. With two additional moderate sequences in the capital region of New Zealand in the last year, we have continued to refine our forecasting techniques, including the use of potential scenarios based on the aftershock

  9. Statistical estimation of the duration of aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, S.; Christophersen, A.; Rhoades, D.; Harte, D.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that large earthquakes generally trigger aftershock sequences. However, the duration of those sequences is unclear due to the gradual power-law decay with time. The triggering time is assumed to be infinite in the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model, a widely used statistical model to describe clustering phenomena in observed earthquake catalogues. This assumption leads to the constraint that the power-law exponent p of the Omori-Utsu decay has to be larger than one to avoid supercritical conditions with accelerating seismic activity on long timescales. In contrast, seismicity models based on rate- and state-dependent friction observed in laboratory experiments predict p ≤ 1 and a finite triggering time scaling inversely to the tectonic stressing rate. To investigate this conflict, we analyse an ETAS model with finite triggering times, which allow smaller values of p. We use synthetic earthquake sequences to show that the assumption of infinite triggering times can lead to a significant bias in the maximum likelihood estimates of the ETAS parameters. Furthermore, it is shown that the triggering time can be reasonably estimated using real earthquake catalogue data, although the uncertainties are large. The analysis of real earthquake catalogues indicates mainly finite triggering times in the order of 100 days to 10 years with a weak negative correlation to the background rate, in agreement with expectations of the rate- and state-friction model. The triggering time is not the same as the apparent duration, which is the time period in which aftershocks dominate the seismicity. The apparent duration is shown to be strongly dependent on the mainshock magnitude and the level of background activity. It can be much shorter than the triggering time. Finally, we perform forward simulations to estimate the effective forecasting period, which is the time period following a mainshock, in which ETAS simulations can improve rate estimates after the

  10. The Use of Explosion Aftershock Probabilities for Planning and Deployment of Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System for an On-site Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labak, P.; Ford, S. R.; Sweeney, J. J.; Smith, A. T.; Spivak, A.

    2011-12-01

    One of four elements of CTBT verification regime is On-site inspection (OSI). Since the sole purpose of an OSI shall be to clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out, inspection activities can be conducted and techniques used in order to collect facts to support findings provided in inspection reports. Passive seismological monitoring, realized by the seismic aftershock monitoring (SAMS) is one of the treaty allowed techniques during an OSI. Effective planning and deployment of SAMS during the early stages of an OSI is required due to the nature of possible events recorded and due to the treaty related constrains on size of inspection area, size of inspection team and length of an inspection. A method, which may help in planning the SAMS deployment is presented. An estimate of aftershock activity due to a theoretical underground nuclear explosion is produced using a simple aftershock rate model (Ford and Walter, 2010). The model is developed with data from the Nevada Test Site and Semipalatinsk Test Site, which we take to represent soft- and hard-rock testing environments, respectively. Estimates of expected magnitude and number of aftershocks are calculated using the models for different testing and inspection scenarios. These estimates can help to plan the SAMS deployment for an OSI by giving a probabilistic assessment of potential aftershocks in the Inspection Area (IA). The aftershock assessment combined with an estimate of the background seismicity in the IA and an empirically-derived map of threshold magnitude for the SAMS network could aid the OSI team in reporting. We tested the hard-rock model to a scenario similar to the 2008 Integrated Field Exercise 2008 deployment in Kazakhstan and produce an estimate of possible recorded aftershock activity.

  11. Aftershock Statistics of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan Earthquake and the Concept of Omori Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ya-Ting; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we consider the statistics of the aftershock sequence of the m = 7.65 20 September 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake. We first consider the frequency-magnitude statistics. We find good agreement with Gutenberg-Richter scaling but find that the aftershock level is anomalously high. This level is quantified using the difference in magnitude between the main shock and the largest inferred aftershock {{Updelta}}m^{ *}. Typically, {{Updelta}}m^{ *} is in the range 0.8-1.5, but for the Chi-Chi earthquake the value is {{Updelta}}m^{ *} = 0.03. We suggest that this may be due to an aseismic slow-earthquake component of rupture. We next consider the decay rate of aftershock activity following the earthquake. The rates are well approximated by the modified Omori's law. We show that the distribution of interoccurrence times between aftershocks follow a nonhomogeneous Poisson process. We introduce the concept of Omori times to study the merging of the aftershock activity with the background seismicity. The Omori time is defined to be the mean interoccurrence time over a fixed number of aftershocks.

  12. Subduction earthquake deformation associated with 14 November 2007, Mw 7.8 Tocopilla earthquake in Chile: Results from InSAR and aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motagh, Mahdi; Schurr, Bernd; Anderssohn, Jan; Cailleau, Beatrice; Walter, Thomas R.; Wang, Rongjiang; Villotte, Jean-Pierre

    2010-07-01

    On 14 November 2007, a subduction thrust earthquake, magnitude Mw = 7.8, occurred in the coastal region of northern Chile, causing substantial damage to the city of Tocopilla. We investigate the source fault of the earthquake, slip distribution and fault interaction by integrating aftershock locations, satellite interferometry data and stress model simulations. Aftershock measurements allow us to locate the area and geometry of the rupture plane in the coastal region between the cities of Tocopilla and Antofagasta. Combining two satellite viewing geometries, acquired in Envisat's Wide Swath and Image modes, we observe decimetre-scale coseismic deformation. The maximum line-of-sight displacement is found to be about 40 cm, located at the Mejillones Peninsula. Slip inversions using elastic half-space models with geometry constrained by aftershocks suggest rupturing of an area of ˜ 160 km by ˜50 km along the Nazca -South America convergent margin between latitudes 22°S and 23.5°S. The main slip is concentrated on two asperities, the largest being located in the southern part of the rupture area at a depth of approximately 30-50 km with a magnitude of about 2.5 m. Because aftershock distribution may also suggest a region of shallow crustal deformation activity located offshore, we investigate whether the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake also involved shallow crustal fault slip offshore. Although we find that the latter assumption is supported by Coulomb stress modelling and geologic inferences, our geodetic and seismic data provide insufficient constraints to resolve the exact geometry and kinematics of dislocation on this structure.

  13. Early vision and focal attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julesz, Bela

    1991-07-01

    At the thirty-year anniversary of the introduction of the technique of computer-generated random-dot stereograms and random-dot cinematograms into psychology, the impact of the technique on brain research and on the study of artificial intelligence is reviewed. The main finding-that stereoscopic depth perception (stereopsis), motion perception, and preattentive texture discrimination are basically bottom-up processes, which occur without the help of the top-down processes of cognition and semantic memory-greatly simplifies the study of these processes of early vision and permits the linking of human perception with monkey neurophysiology. Particularly interesting are the unexpected findings that stereopsis (assumed to be local) is a global process, while texture discrimination (assumed to be a global process, governed by statistics) is local, based on some conspicuous local features (textons). It is shown that the top-down process of "shape (depth) from shading" does not affect stereopsis, and some of the models of machine vision are evaluated. The asymmetry effect of human texture discrimination is discussed, together with recent nonlinear spatial filter models and a novel extension of the texton theory that can cope with the asymmetry problem. This didactic review attempts to introduce the physicist to the field of psychobiology and its problems-including metascientific problems of brain research, problems of scientific creativity, the state of artificial intelligence research (including connectionist neural networks) aimed at modeling brain activity, and the fundamental role of focal attention in mental events.

  14. Maximal radius of the aftershock zone in earthquake networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, A. Yu.; Hayakawa, M.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, several seismoactive regions were investigated (Japan, Southern California and two tectonically distinct Japanese subregions) and structural seismic constants were estimated for each region. Using the method for seismic clustering detection proposed by Baiesi and Paczuski [M. Baiesi, M. Paczuski, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 066106; M. Baiesi, M. Paczuski, Nonlin. Proc. Geophys. (2005) 1607-7946], we obtained the equation of the aftershock zone (AZ). It was shown that the consideration of a finite velocity of seismic signal leads to the natural appearance of maximal possible radius of the AZ. We obtained the equation of maximal radius of the AZ as a function of the magnitude of the main event and estimated its values for each region.

  15. A random effects epidemic-type aftershock sequence model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Chang

    2011-04-01

    We consider an extension of the temporal epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model with random effects as a special case of a well-known doubly stochastic self-exciting point process. The new model arises from a deterministic function that is randomly scaled by a nonnegative random variable, which is unobservable but assumed to follow either positive stable or one-parameter gamma distribution with unit mean. Both random effects models are of interest although the one-parameter gamma random effects model is more popular when modeling associated survival times. Our estimation is based on the maximum likelihood approach with marginalized intensity. The methods are shown to perform well in simulation experiments. When applied to an earthquake sequence on the east coast of Taiwan, the extended model with positive stable random effects provides a better model fit, compared to the original ETAS model and the extended model with one-parameter gamma random effects. PMID:24039322

  16. Temporal Variations in Depth of Seismicity During the Earthquake Cycle and Changes of the Brittle-Ductile Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, F.; Nadeau, R. M.; Freed, A. M.; Bürgmann, R.

    2002-12-01

    The maximum depth of seismogenic faulting can be interpreted either as the transition from brittle faulting to plastic deformation or as the transition from unstable to stable sliding. The maximum depth at which crustal earthquakes occur depends on four main factors: rock composition, temperature, strain rate, and fluid pressure. We focus on how the maximum depth of seismogenic faulting varies locally with time during the earthquake cycle in order to constrain the strain-rate dependent depth of the brittle-ductile transition. We investigate the time-dependent depth distribution of aftershocks following moderate to large earthquakes on strike-slip faults in southern California. We use the catalogs of Richards-Dinger and Shearer (2000) and Hauksson (2000) and we apply the double difference method of Waldhauser and Ellsworth (2000) to further improve event locations. We initially focus on the time-dependent depth distribution of aftershocks in the Superstition Hills area and in the Mojave desert. The different catalogs and our own relocation results show large variations in the hypocentral depths which seem mainly related to the choice of the velocity model for the upper crust. However, a persistent feature of the depth distribution of aftershocks is that in the immediate postseismic period the aftershocks are deeper than the background seismicity and the deepest aftershocks become shallower with time. We use numerical finite-element models to relate these observations to the mechanical evolution of strike-slip faults and to infer fault slip and the rheology near the base of seismogenic faults. We compare the seismological observations and calculations of postseismic stress in a power law rheology below a strike-slip rupture as a function of time. Our objective is to relate the time-dependent depth distribution of seismicity during the earthquake cycle to the evolution of the brittle-ductile transition and thus place constraints on strain rate at depth and on the

  17. A New Hybrid STEP/Coulomb model for Aftershock Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steacy, S.; Jimenez, A.; Gerstenberger, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock forecasting models tend to fall into two classes - purely statistical approaches based on clustering, b-value, and the Omori-Utsu law; and Coulomb rate-state models which relate the forecast increase in rate to the magnitude of the Coulomb stress change. Recently, hybrid models combining physical and statistical forecasts have begun to be developed, for example by Bach and Hainzl (2012) and Steacy et al. (2013). The latter approach combined Coulomb stress patterns with the STEP (short-term earthquake probability) model by redistributing expected rate from areas with decreased stress to regions where the stress had increased. The chosen 'Coulomb Redistribution Parameter' (CRP) was 0.93, based on California earthquakes, which meant that 93% of the total rate was expected to occur where the stress had increased. The model was tested against the Canterbury sequence and the main result was that the new model performed at least as well as, and often better than, STEP when tested against retrospective data but that STEP was generally better in pseudo-prospective tests that involved data actually available within the first 10 days of each event of interest. The authors suggested that the major reason for this discrepancy was uncertainty in the slip models and, particularly, in the geometries of the faults involved in each complex major event. Here we develop a variant of the STEP/Coulomb model in which the CRP varies based on the percentage of aftershocks that occur in the positively stressed areas during the forecast learning period. We find that this variant significantly outperforms both STEP and the previous hybrid model in almost all cases, even when the input Coulomb model is quite poor. Our results suggest that this approach might be more useful than Coulomb rate-state when the underlying slip model is not well constrained due to the dependence of that method on the magnitude of the Coulomb stress change.

  18. A Quantitative Test for the Spatial Relationship Between Aftershock Distributions and Mainshock Rupture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, J.; Ripperger, J.; Mai, M. P.; Wiemer, S.

    2004-12-01

    Correlating the properties of the mainshock rupture with the location of corresponding aftershocks may provide insight into the relationship between mainshock-induced static stress changes and aftershock occurrence. In this study, we develop a rigorous statistical test to quantify the spatial pattern of aftershock locations with the corresponding distributions of coseismic slip and stress-drop. Well-located aftershock hypocenters are projected onto the mainshock fault plane and coseismic slip and stress drop values are interpolated to their respective location. The null hypothesis H0 for the applied test statistic is: Aftershock hypocenters are randomly distributed on the mainshock fault plane and are not correlated with mainshock properties. Because we want to maintain spatial earthquake clustering as one of the important observed features of seismicity, we synthesize slip distributions using a random spatial field model from which we then compute the respective stress-drop distributions. For each simulation of earthquake slip, we compute the test statistic for the slip and stress-drop distribution, testing whether or not an apparent correlation between mainshock properties and aftershock locations exists. Uncertainties in the aftershock locations are accounted for by simulating a thousand catalogues for which we randomize the location of the aftershocks within their given location error bounds. We then determine the number of aftershocks in low-slip or negative stress-drop regions for simulated slip distributions, and compare those to the measurements obtained for finite-source slip inversions. We apply the test to crustal earthquakes in California and Japan. If possible, we use different source models and earthquake catalogues with varying accuracy to investigate the dependence of the test results on, for example, the location uncertainties of aftershocks. Contrary to the visual impression, we find that for some strike-slip earthquakes or segments of the

  19. Hydroacoustic Observations of the Western India Earthquake of Jan. 26, 2001 and It's Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulli, J. J.; Upton, Z. M.

    2001-05-01

    The magnitude 7.7 Mw earthquake that devastated the Gujarat area of western India on January 26, 2001 was recorded not only by seismometers around the world but also by a new hydroacoustic array in the Indian Ocean. This array, located 3280 km south of the epicentral area, consists of two tripartite hydrophone arrays surrounding the atoll of Diego Garcia at the southern end of the Chagos Plateau. Installed as part of the hydroacoustic monitoring system for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty's International Monitoring System, the array came online in the summer of 2000 and has since been recording the acoustic signals generated by numerous earthquakes below the Indian Ocean. Since the Gujarat earthquake was located near the coast of India at a crustal depth of only 20-km, upgoing seismic energy was able to couple to acoustic energy along the continental slope and reach the SOFAR channel to produce T-waves that were recorded at Diego Garcia. Additionally, the teleseismic P-wave arriving below the array was also of sufficient energy to couple acoustic energy into the water column. Spectral energy of the waterborne T-waves at Diego reaches 50 Hz, with most of the energy in the 2-10 Hz band. The teleseismically coupled acoustic energy reaches only about 5 Hz. Using the time delays between array components at Diego, we are able to calculate back azimuths of the hydroacoustic and seismic arrivals and separate direct arrivals from the source area with those of the aftershocks and reflected signals produced by bathymetric features in the Indian Ocean. Travel times also provide some constraint on the location of the area where seismic energy couples into T-waves along the continental slope. Numerous aftershocks of the 7.7 earthquake were also recorded by the Diego Garcia array and hence provide a means of testing the scaling relationship between seismic and hydroacoustic energy. From this data, we estimate that an earthquake as small as magnitude 3 in the Gujarat epicentral

  20. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  1. Apparent Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a well-known optical refraction problem where the depth of an object in a liquid is determined. Proposes that many texts incorrectly solve the problem. Provides theory, equations, and diagrams. (MVL)

  2. Complex source description of focal regions.

    PubMed

    Monzon, Cesar; Forester, Donald W; Moore, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Closed-form solutions of the two-dimensional homogeneous wave equation are presented that provide focal-region descriptions corresponding to a converging bundle of rays. The solutions do have evanescent wave content and can be described as a source-sink pair or particle-antiparticle pair, collocated in complex space, with the complex location being critical in the determination of beam shape and focal region size. The wave solutions are not plagued by singularities, have a finite energy, and have a limitation on how small the focal size can get, with a penalty for limiting small spot sizes in the form of impractically high associated reactive energy. The electric-field-defined spot-size limiting value is 0.35lambda x 0.35lambda, which is about 38% of the Poynting-vector-defined minimum spot size (0.8lambda x 0.4lambda) and corresponds to a condition related to the maximum possible beam angle. A multiple set of solutions is introduced, and the elementary solutions are used to produce new solutions via superposition, resulting in fields with chiral character or with increased depth of focus. We do not claim generality, as the size of focal regions exhibited by the closed-form solutions has a lower bound and hence is not able to account for Pendry's "ideal lens" scenario. PMID:16604758

  3. The great 1933 Sanriku-oki earthquake: reappraisal of the mainshock and its aftershocks and implications for its tsunami using regional tsunami and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Naoki; Kirby, Stephen; Umino, Norihito; Hino, Ryota; Kazakami, Tomoe

    2016-06-01

    The aftershock distribution of the 1933 Sanriku-oki outer-trench earthquake is estimated by using modern relocation methods and a newly developed velocity structure to examine the spatial extent of the source-fault and the possibility of a triggered interplate seismicity. In this study, we first examined the regional data quality of the 1933 earthquake based on smoked paper records and then relocated the earthquakes by using the 3-D velocity structure and double-difference method. The improvements of hypocenter locations using these methods were confirmed by the examination of recent earthquakes that are accurately located based on OBS data. The results show that the 1933 aftershocks occurred under both the outer- and inner-trench-slope regions. In the outer-trench-slope region, aftershock are distributed in a ˜280-km-long area and their depths are shallower than 50 km. Although we could not constrain the fault geometry from the hypocenter distribution, the depth distribution suggests the whole lithosphere is probably not under deviatoric tension at the time of the 1933 earthquake. The occurrence of aftershocks under the inner trench slope was also confirmed by an investigation of waveform frequency difference between outer and inner trench earthquakes as recorded at Mizusawa. The earthquakes under the inner trench slope were shallow (depth ≦ 30 km) and the waveforms show a low-frequency character similar to the waveforms of recent, precisely located earthquakes in the same area. They are also located where recent activity of interplate thrust earthquakes is high. These suggests the 1933 outer-trench-slope mainshock triggered interplate earthquakes which is an unusual case in the order of occurrence in contrast with the more common pairing of a large initial interplate shock with subsequent outer-slope earthquakes. The off-trench earthquakes are distributed about 80 km width in the trench perpendicular direction. This wide width cannot be explained from a single

  4. Forecasting Aftershocks from Multiple Earthquakes: Lessons from the Mw=7.3 2015 Nepal Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Abigail; NicBhloscaidh, Mairéad; McCloskey, John

    2016-04-01

    The Omori decay of aftershocks is often perturbed by large secondary events which present particular, but not uncommon, challenges to aftershock forecasting. The Mw = 7.8, 25 April 2015, Gorkha, Nepal earthquake was followed on 12 May by the Mw = 7.3 Kodari earthquake, superimposed its own aftershocks on the Gorkha sequence, immediately invalidating forecasts made by single-mainshock forecasting methods. The complexity of the Gorkha rupture process, where the hypocentre and moment centroid were separated by some 75 km, provided an insurmountable challenge for other standard forecasting methods. Here, we report several modifications of existing algorithms, which were developed in response to the complexity of this sequence and which appear to provide a more general framework for the robust and dependable forecasting of aftershock probabilities. We suggest that these methods may be operationalised to provide a scientific underpinning for an evidence-based management system for post-earthquake crises.

  5. Faulting structure above the Main Himalayan Thrust as shown by relocated aftershocks of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ling; Liu, Hongbing; Ritsema, Jeroen; Mori, James; Zhang, Tianzhong; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Li, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    The 25 April 2015, Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake ruptured a shallow section of the Indian-Eurasian plate boundary by reverse faulting with NNE-SSW compression, consistent with the direction of current Indian-Eurasian continental collision. The Gorkha main shock and aftershocks were recorded by permanent global and regional arrays and by a temporary local broadband array near the China-Nepal border deployed prior to the Gorkha main shock. We relocate 272 earthquakes with Mw>3.5 by applying a multiscale double-difference earthquake relocation technique to arrival times of direct and depth phases recorded globally and locally. We determine a well-constrained depth of 18.5 km for the main shock hypocenter which places it on the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). Many of the aftershocks at shallower depths illuminate faulting structure in the hanging wall with dip angles that are steeper than the MHT. This system of thrust faults of the Lesser Himalaya may accommodate most of the elastic strain of the Himalayan orogeny.

  6. Three Ingredients for Improved Global Aftershock Forecasts: Tectonic Region, Time-Dependent Catalog Incompleteness, and Inter-Sequence Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hardebeck, J.; Felzer, K. R.; Michael, A. J.; van der Elst, N.

    2015-12-01

    Following a large earthquake, seismic hazard can be orders of magnitude higher than the long-term average as a result of aftershock triggering. Due to this heightened hazard, there is a demand from emergency managers and the public for rapid, authoritative, and reliable aftershock forecasts. In the past, USGS aftershock forecasts following large, global earthquakes have been released on an ad-hoc basis with inconsistent methods, and in some cases, aftershock parameters adapted from California. To remedy this, we are currently developing an automated aftershock product that will generate more accurate forecasts based on the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) method. To better capture spatial variations in aftershock productivity and decay, we estimate regional aftershock parameters for sequences within the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regions. We find that regional variations for mean aftershock productivity exceed a factor of 10. The Reasenberg and Jones method combines modified-Omori aftershock decay, Utsu productivity scaling, and the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We additionally account for a time-dependent magnitude of completeness following large events in the catalog. We generalize the Helmstetter et al. (2005) equation for short-term aftershock incompleteness and solve for incompleteness levels in the global NEIC catalog following large mainshocks. In addition to estimating average sequence parameters within regions, we quantify the inter-sequence parameter variability. This allows for a more complete quantification of the forecast uncertainties and Bayesian updating of the forecast as sequence-specific information becomes available.

  7. Quantifying Early Aftershock Activity of the 2004 Mid Niigata Prefecture Earthquake (Mw6.6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enescu, B.; Mori, J.; Miyazawa, M.

    2006-12-01

    We analyse the early aftershock activity of the 2004 Mid Niigata earthquake, using both earthquake catalog data and continuous waveform recordings. The frequency-magnitude distribution analysis of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) catalog shows that the magnitude of completeness of the aftershocks changes from values around 5.0, immediately after the mainshock, to about 1.8, twelve hours later. Such a large incompleteness of early events can bias significantly the estimation of aftershock rates. To better determine the temporal pattern of aftershocks in the first minutes after the Niigata earthquake, we analyse the continuous seismograms recorded at six Hi-Net (High Sensitivity Seismograph Network) stations located close to the aftershock distribution. Clear aftershocks can be seen from about 35 sec. after the mainshock. We use events which are both identified on the filtered waveforms and are listed in the JMA catalogue, to calibrate an amplitude-magnitude relation. We estimate that the events picked on the waveforms recorded at two seismic stations (NGOH and YNTH), situated on opposite sides of the aftershock distribution, are complete above a threshold magnitude of 3.4. The c-value determined by taking these events into account is about 0.003 days (4.3 min). Statistical tests demonstrate that a small, but non-zero, c-value is a reliable result. We also analyse the decay with time of the moment release rates of the aftershocks in the JMA catalog, since these rates should be much less influenced by the missing small events. The moment rates follow a power-law time dependence from a few minutes to months after the mainshock. We finally show that the rate-and-state dependent friction law or stress corrosion could explain well our findings.

  8. Correlating Aftershock Hypocenters With On-fault Main Shock Properties: Introducing Non-standard Statistical Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Wiemer, S.; Mai, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Quantitatively correlating properties of finite-fault source models with hypocenters of aftershocks may provide new insight in the relationship between either slip or static stress change distributions and aftershock occurrence. We present advanced non-standard statistical test approaches to evaluate the test hypotheses (1) if aftershocks are preferentially located in areas of low slip and (2) if aftershocks are located in increased shear stress against the null hypothesis: aftershocks are located randomly on the fault plane. By using multiple test approaches, we investigate possible pitfalls and the information content of statistical testing. To perform the tests, we use earthquakes for which multiple finite-fault source models and earthquake catalogs of varying accuracy exist. The aftershock hypocenters are projected onto the main-shock rupture plane and uncertainties are accounted for by simulating hypocenter locations in the given error bounds. For the statistical tests, we retain the spatial clustering of earthquakes as the most important observed features of seismicity and synthesize random slip distributions with different approaches: first, using standard statistical methods that randomize the obtained finite-fault source model values and second, using a random spatial field model. We then determine the number of aftershocks in low-slip or increased shear-stress regions for simulated slip distributions, and compare those to the measurements obtained for finite-source slip inversions. We apply the tests to prominent earthquakes in California and Japan and find statistical significant evidence that aftershocks are preferentially located in low-slip regions. The tests, however, show a lower significance for the correlation with the shear-stress distribution, but are in general agreement with the expectations of the asperity model. Tests using the hypocenters of relocated catalogs show higher significances.

  9. An Explosion Aftershock Model with Application to On-Site Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Sean R.; Labak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    An estimate of aftershock activity due to a theoretical underground nuclear explosion is produced using an aftershock rate model. The model is developed with data from the Nevada National Security Site, formerly known as the Nevada Test Site, and the Semipalatinsk Test Site, which we take to represent soft-rock and hard-rock testing environments, respectively. Estimates of expected magnitude and number of aftershocks are calculated using the models for different testing and inspection scenarios. These estimates can help inform the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) deployment in a potential Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspection (OSI), by giving the OSI team a probabilistic assessment of potential aftershocks in the Inspection Area (IA). The aftershock assessment, combined with an estimate of the background seismicity in the IA and an empirically derived map of threshold magnitude for the SAMS network, could aid the OSI team in reporting. We apply the hard-rock model to a M5 event and combine it with the very sensitive detection threshold for OSI sensors to show that tens of events per day are expected up to a month after an explosion measured several kilometers away.

  10. Forecasting aftershock activity: 1. Adaptive estimates based on the Omori and Gutenberg-Richter laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, S. V.; Shebalin, P. N.

    2016-05-01

    The method for forecasting the intensity of the aftershock processes after strong earthquakes in different magnitude intervals is considered. The method is based on the joint use of the time model of the aftershock process and the Gutenberg-Richter law. The time model serves for estimating the intensity of the aftershock flow with a magnitude larger than or equal to the magnitude of completeness. The Gutenberg-Richter law is used for magnitude scaling. The suggested approach implements successive refinement of the parameters of both components of the method, which is the main novelty distinguishing it from the previous ones. This approach, to a significant extent, takes into account the variations in the parameters of the frequency-magnitude distribution, which often show themselves by the decreasing fraction of stronger aftershocks with time. Testing the method on eight aftershock sequences in the regions with different patterns of seismicity demonstrates the high probability of successful forecasts. The suggested technique can be employed in seismological monitoring centers for forecasting the aftershock activity of a strong earthquake based on the results of operational processing.

  11. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  12. Comparative Study Of Focal Mechanisms In South Central Chile Before And After The 2010 Maule Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto, H.; Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I. M.; Haberland, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    On 27 February 2010, a Mw=8.8 earthquake occurred off the coast of south central Chile rupturing nearly 500 km of the subduction zone plate interface. The earthquake also generated a tsunami and caused more than 500 fatalities. The largest earthquakes recorded have taken place along subduction margins (e.g. Chile 1960, 2010, Andaman-Sumatra 2004, Japan 2011) and understanding their rupture mechanisms and deformation regimes is therefore of vital importance. From November 2004 to October 2005, the TIPTEQ project ("From The Incoming Plate to megaThrust EarthQuake"; Rietbrock et al., 2007; Haberland et al., 2009) maintained a network of 120 seismic stations inland and 10 stations at sea between 37 and 39° lat. S., continuously-recording and monitoring the seismicity occurring in the area before the 2010 Maule earthquake. By using first motion polarities and moment tensor inversion we have computed and analyzed focal mechanisms for a subset of data from these records. We found thrust faulting along the subduction interface down to a depth of ~30 km, followed by a gap in the seismicity and then deeper earthquakes showing diverse faulting mechanisms more sparsely distributed within the subducting plate. We also see strike-slip crustal faulting occurring down to ~12 km depth within the area of the Lanalhue fault. The most striking observation is the presence of deep (40 km) normal faulting seismicity in the fore-arc, close to the trench. We have now started to analyze the International Maule Aftershocks Dataset (IMAD) of the 2010 earthquake in the southern rupture region. Again we observe thrust faulting in the subduction interface and a seismic gap between an upper and lower zone of seismicity along the interface. By comparison of the pre- and post-earthquake datasets we are investigating whether the Maule earthquake caused any changes in the style of deformation in this part of Chile. References Haberland, C., A. Rietbrock, D. Lange, K. Bataille, and T. Dahm (2009

  13. Investigation of the high-frequency attenuation parameter, κ (kappa), from aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neighbors, Corrie; Liao, E. J.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Funning, G. J.; Chung, A. I.; Lawrence, J. F.; Christensen, C. M.; Miller, M.; Belmonte, A.; Sepulveda, H. H. Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The Bío Bío region of Chile experienced a vigorous aftershock sequence following the 2010 February 27 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake. The immediate aftershock sequence was captured by two temporary seismic deployments: the Quake Catcher Network Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (QCN RAMP) and the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology CHile Aftershock Mobilization Program (IRIS CHAMP). Here, we use moderate to large aftershocks (ML ≥ 4.0) occurring between 2010 March 1 and June 30 recorded by QCN RAMP and IRIS CHAMP stations to determine the spectral decay parameter, kappa (κ). First, we compare waveforms and κ estimates from the lower-resolution QCN stations to the IRIS CHAMP stations to ensure the QCN data are of sufficient quality. We find that QCN stations provide reasonable estimates of κ in comparison to traditional seismic sensors and provide valuable additional observations of local ground motion variation. Using data from both deployments, we investigate the variation in κ for the region to determine if κ is influenced primarily by local geological structure, path attenuation, or source properties (e.g. magnitude, mechanism and depth). Estimates of κ for the Bío Bío region range from 0.0022 to 0.0704 s with a mean of 0.0295 s and are in good agreement with κ values previously reported for similar tectonic environments. κ correlates with epicentral distance and, to a lesser degree, with source magnitude. We find little to no correlation between the site kappa, κ0, and mapped geology, although we were only able to compare the data to a low-resolution map of surficial geology. These results support an increasing number of studies that suggest κobservations can be attributed to a combination of source, path and site properties; additionally, measured κ are often highly scattered making it difficult to separate the contribution from each of these factors. Thus, our results suggest that contributions from the site

  14. Investigation of the high-frequency attenuation parameter, κ (kappa), from aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neighbors, C.; Liao, E. J.; Cochran, E. S.; Funning, G. J.; Chung, A. I.; Lawrence, J. F.; Christensen, C.; Miller, M.; Belmonte, A.; Andrés Sepulveda, H. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Bío Bío region of Chile experienced a vigorous aftershock sequence following the 2010 February 27 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake. The immediate aftershock sequence was captured by two temporary seismic deployments: the Quake Catcher Network Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (QCN RAMP) and the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology CHile Aftershock Mobilization Program (IRIS CHAMP). Here, we use moderate to large aftershocks (ML ≥ 4.0) occurring between 2010 March 1 and June 30 recorded by QCN RAMP and IRIS CHAMP stations to determine the spectral decay parameter, kappa (κ). First, we compare waveforms and κ estimates from the lower-resolution QCN stations to the IRIS CHAMP stations to ensure the QCN data are of sufficient quality. We find that QCN stations provide reasonable estimates of κ in comparison to traditional seismic sensors and provide valuable additional observations of local ground motion variation. Using data from both deployments, we investigate the variation in κ for the region to determine if κ is influenced primarily by local geological structure, path attenuation, or source properties (e.g. magnitude, mechanism and depth). Estimates of κ for the Bío Bío region range from 0.0022 to 0.0704 s with a mean of 0.0295 s and are in good agreement with κ values previously reported for similar tectonic environments. κ correlates with epicentral distance and, to a lesser degree, with source magnitude. We find little to no correlation between the site kappa, κ0, and mapped geology, although we were only able to compare the data to a low-resolution map of surficial geology. These results support an increasing number of studies that suggest κ observations can be attributed to a combination of source, path and site properties; additionally, measured κ are often highly scattered making it difficult to separate the contribution from each of these factors. Thus, our results suggest that contributions from the site, path and source

  15. The 2009 L'Aquila sequence (Central Italy): fault system anatomy by aftershock distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2010-05-01

    find unclear evidence of surface faulting for a length of about 6 km along the mapped Paganica fault. The ruptures location coincides with the geometry of the main fault imaged by aftershocks distribution. However, in this area, the on-fault seismicity is anti-correlated with the modeled largest slip patches. To the north, we observe a minor segment (Campotosto fault) defined by seismicity distribution in the 6 to 12 km depth range. This fault slightly overlaps the L'Aquila structure. The larger event occurred on the 9th of April is MW 5.22. Together with other events with magnitudes around 5, they extended the system for another 12-14 km in length. Here we detect a peculiar geometry: the fault dip (40°) decrees with depth mimicking a listric geometry. The main characteristic of this dip variation with depth is that we observe two almost planar segments and the nucleation of the large events exactly where change is detected. Minor sub-parallel segments are active in the main fault footwall, towards the overlapping zone. We also illustrate some possible examples for inversion tectonics: re-activation of inherited compressional structure.

  16. Aftershock Records in the Kathmandu Valley of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigefuji, M.; Takai, N.; Sasatani, T.; Bijukchhen, S.; Ichiyanagi, M.; Rajaure, S.; Dhital, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The devastating earthquake, named the Gorkha Earthquake, was followed by a series of aftershocks: more than 350 of them greater than M 4 and four aftershock greater than M 6. The rupture of main shock originating 80 km NW of capital Kathmandu propagated towards east. The ensuing aftershock activities are concentrated in the eastern part of the rupture area. The aftershock of Mw 6.6 occurred about half an hour later at epicentre near to that of the main shock. The other three large aftershocks however, were originated in the eastern extreme of the rupture zone. The aftershock of Mw 7.3 that occurred on 12th May 2015 brought about more damages to infrastructures already vulnerable due to the main shock. To understand the site effect of the Kathmandu valley structure, we installed continuous recording accelerometers in four different parts of the valley. Four stations were installed along a west-to-east profile of the valley at KTP (Kirtipur; hill top), TVU (Kirtipur; hill side), PTN (Patan) and THM (Thimi). The surface S-wave velocity of the KTP site was over 700 cm s-1, but for each of the other three sites it was less than 200 cm s-1. These velocities are consistent with the geological formations; KTP is above hard rock, and TVU, PTN and THM are over the lake sediment of the valley. It is normal for the amplitude of earthquake motion to be larger in areas lying above sedimentary soil than in areas above hard rock, and these motions can be amplified further by certain deep underground structures. To know deep underground structure using with aftershock records, we installed more four instruments in the Kathmandu basin after main shock. We analysed the strong-motion data of these five aftershocks recorded in the eight strong-motion accelerometers. The station of KTP is considered as reference site to compare the effect of sediments on the earthquake waves. The large aftershocks all have highest Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) at TVU and the station of KTP showed the least

  17. Precise Relocation of the Northern Extent of the Aftershock Sequence Following the 4 April 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake Kayla A. Kroll (UCR) and Elizabeth S. Cochran (UCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, K.; Cochran, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Following the 4 April 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, teams from UC Riverside, UC Santa Barbara, and San Diego State University installed an array of 8 temporary seismometers in the Yuha Desert area north of the Mexican border. This temporary array complemented the existing network stations and continuously recorded data from the aftershock sequence from 6 April through 14 June 2010. SCSN and the temporary aftershock array data will be used to study several aspects of fault structure and behavior, including precise relocation of the aftershock sequence. While the mainshock sequence ruptured multiple fault strands west of the Cerro Prieto fault, and south of the Sierra Cucapah Range, the aftershocks are densely clustered in three areas. The largest cluster is located to the northwest of the mainshock, in an area with no previously mapped faults. By relocating aftershocks, we hope to illuminate the network of faults that extend from the Laguna Salada fault in Mexico to its northern extension towards the Elsinore and San Jacinto faults. Right-lateral displacements up to 2 cm were identified on several right- and left-lateral fault segments by the USGS/CGS geologists in the area south of Hwy 98, and into the Pinto Wash (Treiman et al., personal communication, 2010). We relocate aftershocks within a 20 km by 14 km region containing 1 network and 8 temporary stations. Within this region over 4,000 aftershocks are in the SCEDC catalog from 6 April to 14 June 2010, during the time the temporary network was installed. The P and S wave arrival times for both the network and temporary stations were manually picked for each of these events. We compute the double difference hypocenter locations using the picked phase arrivals and waveform cross-correlations in the hypocenter relocation program, hypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth 2000). In the event relocation, we used the velocity profile for the Imperial Valley from the SCEC Unified Velocity Model (Version 4). Future work

  18. Kinect Technology Game Play to Mimic Quake Catcher Network (QCN) Sensor Deployment During a Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D. L.; Yang, A.; Rohrlick, D.; Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J.; Chung, A. I.; Neighbors, C.; Choo, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Kinect technology allows for hands-free game play, greatly increasing the accessibility of gaming for those uncomfortable using controllers. How it works is the Kinect camera transmits invisible near-infrared light and measures its "time of flight" to reflect off an object, allowing it to distinguish objects within 1 centimeter in depth and 3 mm in height and width. The middleware can also respond to body gestures and voice commands. Here, we use the Kinect Windows SDK software to create a game that mimics how scientists deploy seismic instruments following a large earthquake. The educational goal of the game is to allow the players to explore 3D space as they learn about the Quake Catcher Network's (QCN) Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP). Many of the scenarios within the game are taken from factual RAMP experiences. To date, only the PC platform (or a Mac running PC emulator software) is available for use, but we hope to move to other platforms (e.g., Xbox 360, iPad, iPhone) as they become available. The game is written in programming language C# using Microsoft XNA and Visual Studio 2010, graphic shading is added using High Level Shader Language (HLSL), and rendering is produced using XNA's graphics libraries. Key elements of the game include selecting sensor locations, adequately installing the sensor, and monitoring the incoming data. During game play aftershocks can occur unexpectedly, as can other problems that require attention (e.g., power outages, equipment failure, and theft). The player accrues points for quickly deploying the first sensor (recording as many initial aftershocks as possible), correctly installing the sensors (orientation with respect to north, properly securing, and testing), distributing the sensors adequately in the region, and troubleshooting problems. One can also net points for efficient use of game play time. Setting up for game play in your local environment requires: (1) the Kinect hardware ( $145); (2) a computer

  19. Aftershock communication during the Canterbury Earthquakes, New Zealand: implications for response and recovery in the built environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julia Becker; Wein, Anne; Sally Potter; Emma Doyle; Ratliff, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    On 4 September 2010, a Mw7.1 earthquake occurred in Canterbury, New Zealand. Following the initial earthquake, an aftershock sequence was initiated, with the most significant aftershock being a Mw6.3 earthquake occurring on 22 February 2011. This aftershock caused severe damage to the city of Christchurch and building failures that killed 185 people. During the aftershock sequence it became evident that effective communication of aftershock information (e.g., history and forecasts) was imperative to assist with decision making during the response and recovery phases of the disaster, as well as preparedness for future aftershock events. As a consequence, a joint JCDR-USGS research project was initiated to investigate: • How aftershock information was communicated to organisations and to the public; • How people interpreted that information; • What people did in response to receiving that information; • What information people did and did not need; and • What decision-making challenges were encountered relating to aftershocks. Research was conducted by undertaking focus group meetings and interviews with a range of information providers and users, including scientists and science advisors, emergency managers and responders, engineers, communication officers, businesses, critical infrastructure operators, elected officials, and the public. The interviews and focus group meetings were recorded and transcribed, and key themes were identified. This paper focuses on the aftershock information needs for decision-making about the built environment post-earthquake, including those involved in response (e.g., for building assessment and management), recovery/reduction (e.g., the development of new building standards), and readiness (e.g. between aftershocks). The research has found that the communication of aftershock information varies with time, is contextual, and is affected by interactions among roles, by other information, and by decision objectives. A number

  20. Empirical Green's functions from small earthquakes: A waveform study of locally recorded aftershocks of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.; Wu, F. )

    1990-02-10

    Seismograms from 52 aftershocks of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake recorded at 25 stations distributed across the San Fernando Valley are examined to identify empirical Green's functions, and characterize the dependence of their waveforms on moment, focal mechanism, source and recording site spatial variations, recording site geology, and recorded frequency band. Recording distances ranged from 3.0 to 33.0 km, hypocentral separations ranged from 0.22 to 28.4 km, and recording site separations ranged from 0.185 to 24.2 km. The recording site geologies are diorite gneiss, marine and nonmarine sediments, and alluvium of varying thicknesses. Waveforms of events with moment below about 1.5 {times} 10{sup 21} dyn cm are independent of the source-time function and are termed empirical Green's functions. Waveforms recorded at a particular station from events located within 1.0 to 3.0 km of each other, depending upon site geology, with very similar focal mechanism solutions are nearly identical for frequencies up to 10 Hz. There is no correlation to waveforms between recording sites at least 1.2 km apart, and waveforms are clearly distinctive for two sites 0.185 km apart. The geologic conditions of the recording site dominate the character of empirical Green's functions. Even for source separations of up to 20.0 km, the empirical Green's functions at a particular site are consistent in frequency content, amplification, and energy distribution. Therefore, it is shown that empirical Green's functions can be used to obtain site response functions. The observations of empirical Green's functions are used as a basis for developing the theory for using empirical Green's functions in deconvolution for source pulses and synthesis of seismograms of larger earthquakes.

  1. Delayed Triggering of Early Aftershocks by Multiple Waves Circling the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, B.; Peng, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that direct surface waves of large earthquakes are capable of triggering shallow earthquakes and deep tremor at long-range distances. Recent studies have shown that multiple surface waves circling the earth could also remotely trigger microearthquakes [Peng et al., 2011]. However, it is still not clear whether multiple surface waves returning back to the mainshock epicenters could also trigger/modulate aftershock activities. Here we conduct a study to search for evidence of such triggering by systematically examining aftershock activities of 20 magnitude-8-or-higher earthquakes since 1990 that are capable of producing surface waves circling the globe repeatedly. We compute the magnitude of completeness for each sequence, and stack all the sequences together to compute the seismicity and moment rates by sliding data windows. The sequences are also shuffled randomly and these rates are compared to the actual data as well as synthetic aftershock sequences to estimate the statistical significance of the results. We also compare them with varying stacks of magnitude 7-8 earthquakes to better understand the possible biases that could be introduced by our rate calculation method. Our preliminary results suggest that there is some moderate increase of early aftershock activity after a few hours when the surface waves return to the epicentral region. However, we could not completely rule out the possibility that such an increase is purely due to random fluctuations of aftershocks or caused by missing aftershocks in the first few hours after the mainshock. We plan to examine continuous waveform data of selected sequences to obtain a better understanding of the multiple surface waves and aftershock activity.

  2. Statistical monitoring of aftershock sequences: a case study of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Yosihiko; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Early forecasting of aftershocks has become realistic and practical because of real-time detection of hypocenters. This study illustrates a statistical procedure for monitoring aftershock sequences to detect anomalies to increase the probability gain of a significantly large aftershock or even an earthquake larger than the main shock. In particular, a significant lowering (relative quiescence) in aftershock activity below the level predicted by the Omori-Utsu formula or the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model is sometimes followed by a large earthquake in a neighboring region. As an example, we detected significant lowering relative to the modeled rate after approximately 1.7 days after the main shock in the aftershock sequence of the Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake of April 25, 2015. The relative quiescence lasted until the May 12, 2015, M7.3 Kodari earthquake that occurred at the eastern end of the primary aftershock zone. Space-time plots including the transformed time can indicate the local places where aftershock activity lowers (the seismicity shadow). Thus, the relative quiescence can be hypothesized to be related to stress shadowing caused by probable slow slips. In addition, the aftershock productivity of the M7.3 Kodari earthquake is approximately twice as large as that of the M7.8 main shock.

  3. Stereo depth distortions in teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Vonsydow, Marika

    1988-01-01

    In teleoperation, a typical application of stereo vision is to view a work space located short distances (1 to 3m) in front of the cameras. The work presented here treats converged camera placement and studies the effects of intercamera distance, camera-to-object viewing distance, and focal length of the camera lenses on both stereo depth resolution and stereo depth distortion. While viewing the fronto-parallel plane 1.4 m in front of the cameras, depth errors are measured on the order of 2cm. A geometric analysis was made of the distortion of the fronto-parallel plane of divergence for stereo TV viewing. The results of the analysis were then verified experimentally. The objective was to determine the optimal camera configuration which gave high stereo depth resolution while minimizing stereo depth distortion. It is found that for converged cameras at a fixed camera-to-object viewing distance, larger intercamera distances allow higher depth resolutions, but cause greater depth distortions. Thus with larger intercamera distances, operators will make greater depth errors (because of the greater distortions), but will be more certain that they are not errors (because of the higher resolution).

  4. Tests of remote aftershock triggering by small mainshocks using Taiwan's earthquake catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W.; Toda, S.

    2014-12-01

    To understand earthquake interaction and forecast time-dependent seismic hazard, it is essential to evaluate which stress transfer, static or dynamic, plays a major role to trigger aftershocks and subsequent mainshocks. Felzer and Brodsky focused on small mainshocks (2≤M<3) and their aftershocks, and then argued that only dynamic stress change brings earthquake-to-earthquake triggering, whereas Richards-Dingers et al. (2010) claimed that those selected small mainshock-aftershock pairs were not earthquake-to-earthquake triggering but simultaneous occurrence of independent aftershocks following a larger earthquake or during a significant swarm sequence. We test those hypotheses using Taiwan's earthquake catalog by taking the advantage of lacking any larger event and the absence of significant seismic swarm typically seen with active volcano. Using Felzer and Brodsky's method and their standard parameters, we only found 14 mainshock-aftershock pairs occurred within 20 km distance in Taiwan's catalog from 1994 to 2010. Although Taiwan's catalog has similar number of earthquakes as California's, the number of pairs is about 10% of the California catalog. It may indicate the effect of no large earthquakes and no significant seismic swarm in the catalog. To fully understand the properties in the Taiwan's catalog, we loosened the screening parameters to earn more pairs and then found a linear aftershock density with a power law decay of -1.12±0.38 that is very similar to the one in Felzer and Brodsky. However, none of those mainshock-aftershock pairs were associated with a M7 rupture event or M6 events. To find what mechanism controlled the aftershock density triggered by small mainshocks in Taiwan, we randomized earthquake magnitude and location. We then found that those density decay in a short time period is more like a randomized behavior than mainshock-aftershock triggering. Moreover, 5 out of 6 pairs were found in a swarm-like temporal seismicity rate increase

  5. Discrete characteristics of the aftershock sequence of the 2011 Van earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toker, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    An intraplate earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.2 occurred on a NE-SW trending blind oblique thrust fault in accretionary orogen, the Van region of Eastern Anatolia on October 23, 2011. The aftershock seismicity in the Van earthquake was not continuous but, rather, highly discrete. This shed light on the chaotic nonuniformity of the event distribution and played key roles in determining the seismic coupling between the rupturing process and seismogeneity. I analyzed the discrete statistical mechanics of the 2011 Van mainshock-aftershock sequence with an estimation of the non-dimensional tuning parameters consisting of; temporal clusters (C) and the random (RN) distribution of aftershocks, range of size scales (ROSS), strength change (εD), temperature (T), P-value of temporal decay, material parameter R-value, seismic coupling χ, and Q-value of aftershock distribution. I also investigated the frequency-size (FS), temporal (T) statistics and the sequential characteristics of aftershock dynamics using discrete approach and examined the discrete evolutionary periods of the Van earthquake Gutenberg-Richter (GR) distribution. My study revealed that the FS and T statistical properties of aftershock sequence represent the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) distribution, clustered (C) in time and random (RN) Poisson distribution, respectively. The overall statistical behavior of the aftershock sequence shows that the Van earthquake originated in a discrete structural framework with high seismic coupling under highly variable faulting conditions. My analyses relate this larger dip-slip event to a discrete seismogenesis with two main components of complex fracturing and branching framework of the ruptured fault and dynamic strengthening and hardening behavior of the earthquake. The results indicate two dynamic cases. The first is associated with aperiodic nature of aftershock distribution, indicating a time-independent Poissonian event. The second is associated with variable slip model

  6. Aftershock triggering by postseismic stresses: A study based on Coulomb rate-and-state models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattania, Camilla; Hainzl, Sebastian; Wang, Lifeng; Enescu, Bogdan; Roth, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The spatiotemporal clustering of earthquakes is a feature of medium- and short-term seismicity, indicating that earthquakes interact. However, controversy exists about the physical mechanism behind aftershock triggering: static stress transfer and reloading by postseismic processes have been proposed as explanations. In this work, we use a Coulomb rate-and-state model to study the role of coseismic and postseismic stress changes on aftershocks and focus on two processes: creep on the main shock fault plane (afterslip) and secondary aftershock triggering by previous aftershocks. We model the seismic response to Coulomb stress changes using the Dieterich constitutive law and focus on two events: the Parkfield, Mw = 6.0, and the Tohoku, Mw = 9.0, earthquakes. We find that modeling secondary triggering systematically improves the maximum log likelihood fit of the sequences. The effect of afterslip is more subtle and difficult to assess for near-fault events, where model errors are largest. More robust conclusions can be drawn for off-fault aftershocks: following the Tohoku earthquake, afterslip promotes shallow crustal seismicity in the Fukushima region. Simple geometrical considerations indicate that afterslip-induced stress changes may have been significant on trench parallel crustal fault systems following several of the largest recorded subduction earthquakes. Moreover, the time dependence of afterslip strongly enhances its triggering potential: seismicity triggered by an instantaneous stress change decays more quickly than seismicity triggered by gradual loading, and as a result we find afterslip to be particularly important between few weeks and few months after the main shock.

  7. Generalized Omori-Utsu law for aftershock sequences in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, J.; Gu, C.; Baiesi, M.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the validity of a proposed generalized Omori-Utsu law for the aftershock sequences for the Landers, Hector Mine, Northridge and Superstition Hills earthquakes, the four largest events in the southern California catalogue we analyse. This law unifies three of the most prominent empirical laws of statistical seismology-the Gutenberg-Richter law, the Omori-Utsu law, and a generalized version of Båth's law-in a formula casting the parameters in the Omori-Utsu law as a function of the lower magnitude cutoff mc for the aftershocks considered. By applying a recently established general procedure for identifying aftershocks, we confirm that the generalized Omori-Utsu law provides a good approximation for the observed rates overall. In particular, we provide convincing evidence that the characteristic time c is not constant but a genuine function of mc, which cannot be attributed to short-term aftershock incompleteness. However, the estimation of the specific parameters is somewhat sensitive to the aftershock selection method used. This includes c(mc), which has important implications for inferring the underlying stress field.

  8. Analysing the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes with recent instrumentally recorded aftershocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, K.; Hough, S.E.; Bilham, R.

    2004-01-01

    Although dynamic stress changes associated with the passage of seismic waves are thought to trigger earthquakes at great distances, more than 60 per cent of all aftershocks appear to be triggered by static stress changes within two rupture lengths of a mainshock. The observed distribution of aftershocks may thus be used to infer details of mainshock rupture geometry. Aftershocks following large mid-continental earthquakes, where background stressing rates are low, are known to persist for centuries, and models based on rate-and-state friction laws provide theoretical support for this inference. Most past studies of the New Madrid earthquake sequence have indeed assumed ongoing microseismicity to be a continuing aftershock sequence. Here we use instrumentally recorded aftershock locations and models of elastic stress change to develop a kinematically consistent rupture scenario for three of the four largest earthquakes of the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence. Our results suggest that these three events occurred on two contiguous faults, producing lobes of increased stress near fault intersections and end points, in areas where present-day microearthquakes have been hitherto interpreted as evidence of primary mainshock rupture. We infer that the remaining New Madrid mainshock may have occurred more than 200 km north of this region in the Wabash Valley of southern Indiana and Illinois-an area that contains abundant modern microseismicity, and where substantial liquefaction was documented by historic accounts. Our results suggest that future large midplate earthquake sequences may extend over a much broader region than previously suspected.

  9. Analysing the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes with recent instrumentally recorded aftershocks.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Karl; Hough, Susan E; Bilham, Roger

    2004-05-20

    Although dynamic stress changes associated with the passage of seismic waves are thought to trigger earthquakes at great distances, more than 60 per cent of all aftershocks appear to be triggered by static stress changes within two rupture lengths of a mainshock. The observed distribution of aftershocks may thus be used to infer details of mainshock rupture geometry. Aftershocks following large mid-continental earthquakes, where background stressing rates are low, are known to persist for centuries, and models based on rate-and-state friction laws provide theoretical support for this inference. Most past studies of the New Madrid earthquake sequence have indeed assumed ongoing microseismicity to be a continuing aftershock sequence. Here we use instrumentally recorded aftershock locations and models of elastic stress change to develop a kinematically consistent rupture scenario for three of the four largest earthquakes of the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence. Our results suggest that these three events occurred on two contiguous faults, producing lobes of increased stress near fault intersections and end points, in areas where present-day microearthquakes have been hitherto interpreted as evidence of primary mainshock rupture. We infer that the remaining New Madrid mainshock may have occurred more than 200 km north of this region in the Wabash Valley of southern Indiana and Illinois--an area that contains abundant modern microseismicity, and where substantial liquefaction was documented by historic accounts. Our results suggest that future large mid-plate earthquake sequences may extend over a much broader region than previously suspected. PMID:15152249

  10. Aftershocks in a time-to-failure slider-block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, J. D.; Rundle, J. B.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Several earthquake models have been used to study the mechanisms that lead to a Gutenberg-Richter distribution of earthquake magnitudes. One such model is the cellular automaton (CA) slider-block model. Events (earthquakes) in this model are initiated by a loader plate increasing stress uniformly on all blocks until a single block reaches a static friction failure threshold which can trigger a cascade of failures of blocks. This model, although useful, misses a key part of the earthquake process, i.e. aftershocks. Aftershocks occur within a short time period following the main-shock and are due to stress redistributions within the earth's crust rather than movement of the interacting tectonic plates. We describe here a modified version of CA slider-block model, which includes a time-to-failure mode, that allows blocks to fail below the static threshold value if enough time passes. This new feature allows multiple independent events to occur during a single plate update. We measure time in Monte Carlo steps and have tested various functions for the time-to-failure to understand the connection between the time-to-failure and Omori's law for the frequency of aftershocks following the main-shock. After each loader plate update, we see a main-shock followed in time by multiple aftershocks that decay in magnitude. We believe this to be another mechanism for the occurrence of aftershocks in addition to that found by Dietrich, JGR(1994).

  11. Decay of aftershock density with distance does not indicate triggering by dynamic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards-Dinger, K.; Stein, R.S.; Toda, S.

    2010-01-01

    Resolving whether static or dynamic stress triggers most aftershocks and subsequent mainshocks is essential to understand earthquake interaction and to forecast seismic hazard. Felzer and Brodsky examined the distance distribution of earthquakes occurring in the first five minutes after 2 ≤ M  M  M ≥ 2 aftershocks showed a uniform power-law decay with slope −1.35 out to 50 km from the mainshocks. From this they argued that the distance decay could be explained only by dynamic triggering. Here we propose an alternative explanation for the decay, and subject their hypothesis to a series of tests, none of which it passes. At distances more than 300 m from the 2 ≤  M< 3 mainshocks, the seismicity decay 5 min before the mainshocks is indistinguishable from the decay five minutes afterwards, indicating that the mainshocks have no effect at distances outside their static triggering range. Omori temporal decay, the fundamental signature of aftershocks, is absent at distances exceeding 10 km from the mainshocks. Finally, the distance decay is found among aftershocks that occur before the arrival of the seismic wave front from the mainshock, which violates causality. We argue that Felzer and Brodsky implicitly assume that the first of two independent aftershocks along a fault rupture triggers the second, and that the first of two shocks in a creep- or intrusion-driven swarm triggers the second, when this need not be the case.

  12. Bessel beam Grueneisen photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction-free, provides a long focal depth, but its side-lobes may deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic signals in ORPAM. Here, we present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples.

  13. Depth Perception In Remote Stereoscopic Viewing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Von Sydow, Marika

    1989-01-01

    Report describes theoretical and experimental studies of perception of depth by human operators through stereoscopic video systems. Purpose of such studies to optimize dual-camera configurations used to view workspaces of remote manipulators at distances of 1 to 3 m from cameras. According to analysis, static stereoscopic depth distortion decreased, without decreasing stereoscopitc depth resolution, by increasing camera-to-object and intercamera distances and camera focal length. Further predicts dynamic stereoscopic depth distortion reduced by rotating cameras around center of circle passing through point of convergence of viewing axes and first nodal points of two camera lenses.

  14. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  15. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  16. Joint inversion of teleseismic body-waves and geodetic data for the Mw6.8 aftershock of the Balochistan earthquake with refined epicenter location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S.; Wang, T.; Jonsson, S.; Avouac, J. P.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershocks of the 2013 Balochistan earthquake are mainly concentrated along the northeastern end of the mainshock rupture despite of much larger coseismic slip to the southwest. The largest event among them is an Mw6.8 earthquake which occurred three days after the mainshock. A kinematic slip model of the mainshock was obtained by joint inversion of the teleseismic body-waves and horizontal static deformation field derived from remote sensing optical and SAR data, which is composed of seven fault segments with gradually changing strikes and dips [Avouac et al., 2014]. The remote sensing data provide well constraints on the fault geometry and spatial distribution of slip but no timing information. Meanwhile, the initiation of the teleseismic waveform is very sensitive to fault geometry of the epicenter segment (strike and dip) and spatial slip distribution but much less sensitive to the absolute location of the epicenter. The combination of the two data sets allows a much better determination of the absolute epicenter location, which is about 25km to the southwest of the NEIC epicenter location. The well located mainshock epicenter is used to establish path calibrations for teleseismic P-waves, which are essential for relocating the Mw6.8 aftershock. Our grid search shows that the refined epicenter is located right at the northeastern end of the mainshock rupture. This is confirmed by the SAR offsets calculated from images acquired after the mainshock. The azimuth and range offsets display a discontinuity across the rupture trace of the mainshock. Teleseismic only and static only, as well as joint inversions all indicate that the aftershock ruptured an asperity with 25km along strike and range from 8km to 20km in depth. The earthquake was originated in a positive Coulomb stress change regime due to the mainshock and has complementary slip distribution to the mainshock rupture at the northeastern end, suggesting that the entire seismic generic zone in the crust was

  17. Geodetic displacements and aftershocks following the 2001 Mw = 8.4 Peru earthquake: Implications for the mechanics of the earthquake cycle along subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfettini, H.; Avouac, J.-P.; Ruegg, J.-C.

    2005-09-01

    We analyzed aftershocks and postseismic deformation recorded by the continuous GPS station AREQ following the Mw = 8.4, 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake. This station moved by 50 cm trenchward, in a N235°E direction during the coseismic phase, and continued to move in the same direction for an additional 15 cm over the next 2 years. We compare observations with the prediction of a simple one-dimensional (1-D) system of springs, sliders, and dashpot loaded by a constant force, meant to simulate stress transfer during the seismic cycle. The model incorporates a seismogenic fault zone, obeying rate-weakening friction, a zone of deep afterslip, the brittle creep fault zone (BCFZ) obeying rate-strengthening friction, and a zone of viscous flow at depth, the ductile fault zone (DFZ). This simple model captures the main features of the temporal evolution of seismicity and deformation. Our results imply that crustal strain associated with stress accumulation during the interseismic period is probably not stationary over most of the interseismic period. The BCFZ appears to control the early postseismic response (afterslip and aftershocks), although an immediate increase, by a factor of about 1.77, of ductile shear rate is required, placing constraints on the effective viscosity of the DFZ. Following a large subduction earthquake, displacement of inland sites is trenchward in the early phase of the seismic cycle and reverse to landward after a time ti for which an analytical expression is given. This study adds support to the view that the decay rate of aftershocks may be controlled by reloading due to deep afterslip. Given the ratio of preseismic to postseismic viscous creep, we deduce that frictional stresses along the subduction interface account for probably 70% of the force transmitted along the plate interface.

  18. Aftershock Observation of the 2014 South Napa Earthquake and Shallow S-wave Velocity Structure Obtained by Passive Surface Wave Method at Three Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Roughley, C.; Craig, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    A M6.0 earthquake occurred in South Napa County on August 24, 2014. We recorded aftershocks and conducted S-wave velocity (VS) surveys using a passive surface method at three sites in Napa.On the day of the earthquake, we confirmed surface rupture for at least 5 km. Seismographs were deployed at three locations the day after the mainshock; on east side of Napa Valley (CSUEB-3), the west side (CSUEB-2), and at Stone Bridge School (CSUEB-1 SBS), which is located directly on the line of surface rupture (Fig. 1). The seismographs recorded continuous data for two weeks. At least 60 aftershocks with magnitudes between 1.0 and 3.9 were recorded. Preliminary analysis indicates a difference in local amplification of horizontal ground motion for 1-5 Hz, with amplitudes on the west side of Napa Valley larger than those on the east side. A passive surface wave survey using the two-station spatial autocorrelation (2ST-SPAC) method was conducted at each of the aftershock observation sites. At each site, one seismograph was established at a fixed location and recorded ambient noise for the duration of the survey. A second seismograph was placed at a series of different locations, with the distance from the fixed station ranging from 5 to 40 m. At each measurement location, ambient noise was recorded for intervals ranging from 5 to 20 minutes using a 10 ms sample rate, for a total of approximately one hour of data acquisition per site. The vertical component of ambient noise was used in the SPAC analysis to calculate phase velocity. Fig. 2 shows a VS profile at Stone Bridge School (CSUEB-1), which consists of two layers; the first with VS of about 150 m/sec and the second with VS of 400-500 m/sec. Depth to the second layer is about 20 m.

  19. Lancang—Gengma Earthquake: A Preliminary Report on the November 6, 1988, Event and Its Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuntai; Wu, Francis T.

    On November 6, 1988, two earthquakes with magnitude >7 occurred within 15 minutes in southwestern Yunnan Province, China, near the Burmese border. The aftershock series in the next six weeks included three earthquakes with magnitude >6.0. Rapid deployment of accelerographs enabled us to record a large number of aftershocks, including two Ms >6 events, at near-source distances.At 130314.5 UT on November 6 an earthquake with Ms = 7.6 (U.S. Geological Survey Ms = 7.3) occurred 40 km northwest of Lancang (Figure 1). Thirteen minutes later another large event with Ms = 7.2 (USGS Ms 6.4) occurred 60 km north-northwest of the first shock. By December 20 more than 600 aftershocks with Ms >3 had occurred.

  20. Aftershocks and Images of South Central Chile: Results from the Analysis of the IMAD Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, S. W.; Beck, S. L.; Morell, M.; Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Meltzer, A.; Stachnik, J. C.; Russo, R. M.; Torpey, M.; Benz, H.

    2013-05-01

    In response to the Mw=8.8, Maule earthquake that occurred off the coast of Chile on February 27, 2010, seismologists from France, Germany, Great Britain, and the United States joined their Chilean colleagues to install seismic stations between 33-38.5S, from the coast to the foothills of the Andes to produce the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD) data set. These stations were deployed starting in mid-March with some stations pulled out in late September while others remained recording until the end of December of 2010. We used procedures developed by the USGS National Earthquake Information Center to generate earthquake locations, magnitudes, phase readings and regional moment tensors solutions. The catalog consists of some 44,000 events to approximately M2.0. We use the catalog locations and travel times as a starting point we use double difference techniques to investigate relative locations and earthquake clustering. We generated Receiver Functions (RFs) from teleseismic P and PP phases and construct common conversion point stacks to image the structure of the slab and forearc region down to a depth of ~120 km. The migrated RF image the oceanic slab Moho on several E-W and N-S profiles at 40 to 60 km depth beneath the array and several discontinuities above the slab in the forearc. We also image a prominent Ps conversion that we interpret as the continental Moho at ~35 km under the foothills of the Andes and decreasing to 25-30 km under the central valley of Chile. We observe a prominent Ps conversion at ~40-50 km depth on a NNE-SSW cross-section parallel to the strike of the slab that we interpret as the oceanic Moho in the down-going slab. We created an Ambient Noise Tomography image combining IMAD stations with other temporary and permanent broadband seismic stations in Chile and Argentina to obtain absolute shear velocities in the crust. Phase velocity maps between periods of 8 and 40 sec are inverted for a 3-D shear-wave velocity at 0.1° grid

  1. Aftershock source imaging using reverse time migration of data from the dense AIDA array deployed after the 2011 Virginia earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Davenport, K. K.; Hole, J. A.; Chapman, M. C.; Quiros, D. A.; Brown, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Reverse time migration has previously been used to back-project energy recorded by dense arrays to the source region of large subduction-zone earthquakes. The results have illuminated energy release as a function of time and space on the fault surface, improving our understanding of rupture processes. We apply reverse time migration to data from a dense local aftershock array to image magnitude <0 to 3.7 events. AIDA (Aftershock Imaging with Dense Arrays) recorded aftershocks of the August 23, 2011, magnitude 5.8 earthquake in Louisa County, Virginia. AIDA deployed 201 stations in three phases to record wavefields at 200-400 m spacing to reduce spatial aliasing and to lower the event detection threshold. Aftershocks recorded by AIDA were reverse-time migrated in a velocity model created by aftershock travel-time tomography. An aftershock with a magnitude less than 0 was successfully imaged as a point source with a resolution of <200 m. Slip propagation was successfully imaged for a magnitude 3.7 aftershock, propagating 200-300 m shallower and southward. Both P and S-wave data were independently migrated, with similar results. The method is being applied to automatically detect and locate tiny events with low signal-to-noise ratio. Tests show that the images are limited by insufficient temporal sampling and predictable migration artifacts caused by the station geometry. Future aftershock deployments can improve these conditions.

  2. GIS-based 3D visualization of the Mw 7.7, 2007, Tocopilla aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, S.; Sobiesiak, M.; Altenbrunn, K.

    2009-12-01

    The November 14, 2007 Mw 7.7 earthquake nucleated on the west coast of northern Chile about 40 km east of the city of Tocopilla. It took place in the southern part of a large seismic gap, the Iquique subduction zone segment which is supposed to be at the end of its seismic cycle. The Tocopilla fault plane appears to be the northern continuation of the Mw 8.0, 1995 Antofagasta earthquake. We present a complex 3D model of the rupture area including first hypocenter localizations of aftershocks following the event. The data was recorded during a mission of the German Task Force for Earthquakes after the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake. The seismic stations were recording the aftershocks from November 2007 until May 2008. In general, subduction zones have a complex structure where most of the volumes examined are characterized by strong variations in physical and material parameters. Therefore, 3D representation of the geophysical and geological conditions to be found are of great importance to understand such a subduction environment. We start with a two-dimensional visualization of the geological and geophysical setting. In a second step, we use GIS as a three-dimensional modeling tool which gives us the possibility to visualize the complex geophysical processes. One can easily add and delete data and focus on the information one needs. This allows us to investigate the aftershock distribution along the subducting slab and identify clear structures and clusters within the data set. Furthermore we combine the 2007 Tocopilla data set with the 1995 Antofagasta aftershocks which provides a new, three-dimensional insight into the segment boundary of these two events. Analyzing the aftershock sequence with a GIS-based model will not only help to visualize the setting but also be the base for various calculations and further explorations of the complex structures. Aftershocks following the 1995 Antofagasta earthquake and the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake

  3. Typical Scenario of Preparation, Implementation, and Aftershock Sequence of a Large Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodkin, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    We have tried here to construct and examine the typical scenario of a large earthquake occurrence. The Harvard seismic moment GCMT catalog was used to construct the large earthquake generalized space-time vicinity (LEGV) and to investigate the seismicity behavior in LEGV. LEGV was composed of earthquakes falling into the zone of influence of any of the considerable number (100, 300, or 1,000) of largest earthquakes. The LEGV construction is aimed to enlarge the available statistics, diminish a strong random component, and to reveal in result the typical features of pre- and post-shock seismic activity in more detail. In result of the LEGV construction the character of fore- and aftershock cascades was examined in more detail than it was possible without of the use of the LEGV approach. It was shown also that the mean earthquake magnitude tends to increase, and the b-values, mean mb/mw ratios, apparent stress values, and mean depth tend to decrease. Amplitudes of all these anomalies increase with an approach to a moment of the generalized large earthquake (GLE) as a logarithm of time interval from GLE occurrence. Most of the discussed anomalies agree well with a common scenario of development of instability. Besides of such precursors of common character, one earthquake-specific precursor was found. The revealed decrease of mean earthquake depth during large earthquake preparation testifies probably for the deep fluid involvement in the process. The revealed in LEGV typical features of development of shear instability agree well with results obtained in laboratory acoustic emission (AE) study. Majority of the revealed anomalies appear to have a secondary character and are connected mainly with an increase in a mean earthquake magnitude in LEGV. The mean magnitude increase was shown to be connected mainly with a decrease of a portion of moderate size events (Mw 5.0 - 5.5) in a closer GLE vicinity. We believe that this deficit of moderate size events hardly can be

  4. Ground Motion Scaling in Kachchh: a Preliminary Assessment from Aftershocks of the 2001 Bhuj, India, Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, P.; Malagnini, L.; Akinci, A.

    2002-12-01

    Considerable controversy surrounds the issues of how much and how systematically source and propagation characteristics of earthquakes that take place in relatively "stable" continental settings differ from those of earthquakes in more mobile crust. The 2001 Mw 7.7 Bhuj, India, earthquake may have been the largest such earthquake in more than 100 years. We are analyzing ground motions from aftershocks of the Bhuj earthquake recorded on a temporary network deployed within 100 km of the mainshock epicenter. Our goal is to determine the source and propagation characteristics in the region, taking into account site effects at our network sites, to facilitate comparison with similar studies in other tectonic environments. To date we have used data from about 1100 earthquakes ranging in magnitude from about 2 to about 5 1/2. We model peak amplitudes as a function of source-receiver distance for bandpass-filtered time series and the spectral amplitudes of time-windowed seismograms. Because the earthquakes occurred over a wide depth range, we have analyzed the data in two overlapping depth subsets-shallower than 25 km and deeper than 20 km. We find that propagation is well-modeled by a frequency-dependent quality factor Q = 680f0.48 combined with a rather simple geometric spreading function that varies only slightly between the deep and shallow data subsets. We modeled the source terms with an w2 single corner (Brune) model with a magnitude dependent stress drop. The larger earthquakes had stress drops of about 160 bars. Extrapolating our source and propagation values using Random Vibration Theory to an Mw 7.5 earthquake yields ground motion estimates that coincide closely with similar current estimates for eastern North America (ENA) earthquakes. Our preliminary assessment is that, from a ground motion perspective, the Bhuj earthquake presents an important opportunity to study an earthquake that (a) differs significantly from earthquakes in mobile crust, and (b) resembles

  5. DETERMINATION OF ELASTIC WAVE VELOCITY AND RELATIVE HYPOCENTER LOCATIONS USING REFRACTED WAVES. II. APPLICATION TO THE HAICHENG, CHINA, AFTERSHOCK SEQUENCE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, Kaye M.; Jones, Lucile M.; Ma, Xiufang

    1985-01-01

    The authors located the aftershocks of the February 4, 1975 Haicheng, China, aftershock sequence using an arrival time difference (ATD) simultaneous inversion method for determining the near-source (in situ) velocity and the location of the aftershocks with respect to a master event. The aftershocks define a diffuse zone, 70 km multiplied by 25 km, trending west-northwest, perpendicular to the major structural trend of the region. The main shock and most of the large aftershocks have strike-slip fault plane solutions. The preferred fault plane strikes west-northwest, and the inferred sense of motion is left-lateral. The entire Haicheng earthauake sequence appears to have been the response of an intensely faulted range boundary to a primarily east-west crustal compression and/or north-south extension.

  6. Depth keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvili, Ronen; Kaplan, Amir; Ofek, Eyal; Yahav, Giora

    2003-05-01

    We present a new solution to the known problem of video keying in a natural environment. We segment foreground objects from background objects using their relative distance from the camera, which makes it possible to do away with the use of color for keying. To do so, we developed and built a novel depth video camera, capable of producing RGB and D signals, where D stands for the distance to each pixel. The new RGBD camera enables the creation of a whole new gallery of effects and applications such as multi-layer background substitutions. This new modality makes the production of real time mixed reality video possible, as well as post-production manipulation of recorded video. We address the problem of color spill -- in which the color of the foreground object is mixed, along its boundary, with the background color. This problem prevents an accurate separation of the foreground object from its background, and it is most visible when compositing the foreground objects to a new background. Most existing techniques are limited to the use of a constant background color. We offer a novel general approach to the problem with enabling the use of the natural background, based upon the D channel generated by the camera.

  7. Focus cues affect perceived depth

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Simon J.; Akeley, Kurt; Ernst, Marc O.; Banks, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Depth information from focus cues—accommodation and the gradient of retinal blur—is typically incorrect in three-dimensional (3-D) displays because the light comes from a planar display surface. If the visual system incorporates information from focus cues into its calculation of 3-D scene parameters, this could cause distortions in perceived depth even when the 2-D retinal images are geometrically correct. In Experiment 1 we measured the direct contribution of focus cues to perceived slant by varying independently the physical slant of the display surface and the slant of a simulated surface specified by binocular disparity (binocular viewing) or perspective/texture (monocular viewing). In the binocular condition, slant estimates were unaffected by display slant. In the monocular condition, display slant had a systematic effect on slant estimates. Estimates were consistent with a weighted average of slant from focus cues and slant from disparity/texture, where the cue weights are determined by the reliability of each cue. In Experiment 2, we examined whether focus cues also have an indirect effect on perceived slant via the distance estimate used in disparity scaling. We varied independently the simulated distance and the focal distance to a disparity-defined 3-D stimulus. Perceived slant was systematically affected by changes in focal distance. Accordingly, depth constancy (with respect to simulated distance) was significantly reduced when focal distance was held constant compared to when it varied appropriately with the simulated distance to the stimulus. The results of both experiments show that focus cues can contribute to estimates of 3-D scene parameters. Inappropriate focus cues in typical 3-D displays may therefore contribute to distortions in perceived space. PMID:16441189

  8. Receiver Function Migration of Broadband Seismograms recorded by the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD) in Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, M.; Beck, S. L.; Roecker, S. W.; Meltzer, A.; Russo, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Mw=8.8 Maule earthquake that occurred off the coast of Chile on February 27, 2010 is one of the largest megathrust earthquakes ever to be recorded and ruptured ~600 km of the plate boundary. This segment of the Nazca-South America plate boundary is an ideal region to investigate the processes related to the structure of the down-dip edge of the seismogenic zone, forearc wedge and subducting slab. Immediately after the Maule earthquake, international teams from France, Germany, Great Britain and the United States joined Chilean seismologists to install an array of seismic stations between 33°-38.5°S, from the coast to the foothills of the Andes to produce the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD) data set. These arrays were deployed from mid-March until the end of December 2010 in order to capture and study the aftershocks in and around the rupture zone, and to better understand crustal and mantle wedge structure. We calculated receiver functions (RFs) from P and PP phases and made Common Conversion Point stacks to image the structures in the slab and forearc wedge down to a depth of 100 km. We have identified the oceanic slab Moho on several E-W and N-S profiles at 40 to 60 km depth beneath the array and several discontinuities above the slab in the forearc. These profiles also show a large low-velocity zone beneath the northern half of the array in the forearc. In addition, we are using a 2.5D finite difference teleseismic waveform tomography technique described in Roecker et al. (2010) to image the crust and upper mantle beneath that part of the Chilean Andes occupied by the IMAD array and the earlier TIPTEQ deployment of Rietbrock et al. (2005). While the technique does not require any kind of formal source deconvolution, in sparse deployments we can apply this technique in an RF type migration by normalizing medium sensitivities. Both these techniques will improve our imaging of the down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone, forearc wedge and

  9. Statistical Earthquake Focal Mechanism Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The new whole Earth focal mechanism forecast, based on the GCMT catalog, has been created. In the present forecast, the sum of normalized seismic moment tensors within 1000 km radius is calculated and the P- and T-axes for the focal mechanism are evaluated on the basis of the sum. Simultaneously we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms. This average angle shows tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The method was originally proposed by Kagan and Jackson (1994, JGR). Recent interest by CSEP and GEM has motivated some improvements, particularly to extend the previous forecast to polar and near-polar regions. The major problem in extending the forecast is the focal mechanism calculation on a spherical surface. In the previous forecast as our average focal mechanism was computed, it was assumed that longitude lines are approximately parallel within 1000 km radius. This is largely accurate in the equatorial and near-equatorial areas. However, when one approaches the 75 degree latitude, the longitude lines are no longer parallel: the bearing (azimuthal) difference at points separated by 1000 km reach about 35 degrees. In most situations a forecast point where we calculate an average focal mechanism is surrounded by earthquakes, so a bias should not be strong due to the difference effect cancellation. But if we move into polar regions, the bearing difference could approach 180 degrees. In a modified program focal mechanisms have been projected on a plane tangent to a sphere at a forecast point. New longitude axes which are parallel in the tangent plane are corrected for the bearing difference. A comparison with the old 75S-75N forecast shows that in equatorial regions the forecasted focal mechanisms are almost the same, and the difference in the forecasted focal mechanisms rotation angle is close to zero. However, though the forecasted focal mechanisms are similar

  10. Geodetic model of the 2015 April 25 Mw 7.8 Gorkha Nepal Earthquake and Mw 7.3 aftershock estimated from InSAR and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guangcai; Li, Zhiwei; Shan, Xinjian; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Guohong; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-11-01

    We map the complete surface deformation of 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha Nepal earthquake and its Mw 7.3 aftershock with two parallel ALOS2 descending ScanSAR paths' and two ascending Stripmap paths' images. The coseismic fault-slip model from a combined inversion of InSAR and GPS data reveals that this event is a reverse fault motion, with a slight right-lateral strike-slip component. The maximum thrust-slip and right-lateral strike-slip values are 5.7 and 1.2 m, respectively, located at a depth of 7-15 km, southeast to the epicentre. The total seismic moment 7.55 × 1020 Nm, corresponding to a moment magnitude Mw 7.89, is similar to the seismological estimates. Fault slips of both the main shock and the largest aftershock are absent from the upper thrust shallower than 7 km, indicating that there is a locking lower edge of Himalayan Main Frontal Thrust and future seismic disaster is not unexpected in this area. We also find that the energy released in this earthquake is much less than the accumulated moment deficit over the past seven centuries estimated in previous studies, so the region surrounding Kathmandu is still under the threaten of seismic hazards.

  11. Statistical properties of aftershock rate decay: Implications for the assessment of continuing activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamaki, Aggeliki; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Tsaklidis, George; Karakostas, Vassilios

    2011-08-01

    Aftershock rates seem to follow a power law decay, but the assessment of the aftershock frequency immediately after an earthquake, as well as during the evolution of a seismic excitation remains a demand for the imminent seismic hazard. The purpose of this work is to study the temporal distribution of triggered earthquakes in short time scales following a strong event, and thus a multiple seismic sequence was chosen for this purpose. Statistical models are applied to the 1981 Corinth Gulf sequence, comprising three strong (M = 6.7, M = 6.5, and M = 6.3) events between 24 February and 4 March. The non-homogeneous Poisson process outperforms the simple Poisson process in order to model the aftershock sequence, whereas the Weibull process is more appropriate to capture the features of the short-term behavior, but not the most proper for describing the seismicity in long term. The aftershock data defines a smooth curve of the declining rate and a long-tail theoretical model is more appropriate to fit the data than a rapidly declining exponential function, as supported by the quantitative results derived from the survival function. An autoregressive model is also applied to the seismic sequence, shedding more light on the stationarity of the time series.

  12. A possible mechanism for aftershocks: time-dependent stress relaxation in a slider-block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Joseph D.; Rundle, John B.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2012-08-01

    We propose a time-dependent slider-block model which incorporates a time-to-failure function for each block dependent on the stress. We associate this new time-to-failure mechanism with the property of stress fatigue. We test two failure time functions including a power law and an exponential. Failure times are assigned to 'damaged' blocks with stress above a damage threshold, σW and below a static failure threshold, σF. If the stress of a block is below the damage threshold the failure time is infinite. During the aftershock sequence the loader-plate remains fixed and all aftershocks are triggered by stress transfer from previous events. This differs from standard slider-block models which initiate each event by moving the loader-plate. We show the resulting behaviour of the model produces both the Gutenberg-Richter scaling law for event sizes and the Omori's scaling law for the rate of aftershocks when we use the power-law failure time function. The exponential function has limited success in producing Omori's law for the rate of aftershocks. We conclude the shape of the failure time function is key to producing Omori's law.

  13. Aftershocks and Omori's law in a modified Carlson-Langer model with nonlinear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Okamura, Kazuki

    2015-05-01

    A modified Carlson-Langer model for earthquakes is proposed, which includes nonlinear viscoelasticity. Several aftershocks are generated after the main shock owing to the damping of the additional viscoelastic force. Both the Gutenberg-Richter law and Omori's law are reproduced in a numerical simulation of the modified Carlson-Langer model on a critical percolation cluster of a square lattice.

  14. The 1886-1889 aftershocks of the Charleston, South Carolina, Earthquake: A Widespread burst of seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J. G.

    1987-03-01

    A systematic search of contemporary newspapers in South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia and eastern Tennessee during the 1886-1889 (inclusive) aftershock sequence of the August 31, 1886 earthquake near Charleston, South Carolina has provided more than 3000 intensity reports for 522 earthquakes as compared to 144 previously known earthquakes for the same period. Of these 144 events, 138 were felt in Charleston/Summerville and had been assigned epicenters in that area. In contrast the new data provide 112 well-constrained macroseismic epicenters. The 1886-1889 seismicity is characterized by a linear relation between log frequency and magnitude with a slope b≈1, a temporal decay of earthquake frequency proportional to time-1, and a low level of seismicity prior to the main shock. These are frequently observed characteristics of aftershock sequences. By 1889, the level of seismicity had decreased more than 2 orders of magnitude, reaching approximately the current level in the same area. The 1886-1889 epicenters delineate a large aftershock zone that extends northwest about 250 km across Appalachian strike from the coast into the Piedmont and at least 100 km along strike near the Fall Line of South Carolina and Georgia. An abrupt change in stress and/or effective strength is required over this zone. If this change can only occur in the near field of a single fault dislocation, this fault must be larger horizontally than the thickness of the seismogenic zone by an order of magnitude and must be shallow dipping. The correlation between the area of intensity VIII in the main shock with the area of large aftershocks is consistent with this hypothesis. The lack of a major fault affecting the post-Upper Jurassic onlap sediments also favors a shallow dipping active fault, possibly a Paleozoic-Mesozoic southeasterly dipping fault or detachment that may outcrop northwest of the aftershock zone. The 1886-1889 aftershocks occupy the same area as the South Carolina

  15. Time-dependent Induced Seismicity Rates Described with an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence Model at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. W.; Totten, E. J.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    To improve understanding of the link between injection/production activity and seismicity, we apply an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model to an earthquake catalog from The Geysers geothermal field (GGF) between 2005-2015 using >140,000 events and Mc 0.8 . We partition the catalog along a northeast-southwest trending divide, which corresponds to regions of high and low levels of enhanced geothermal stimulation (EGS) across the field. The ETAS model is fit to the seismicity data using a 6-month sliding window with a 1-month time step to determine the background seismicity rate. We generate monthly time series of the time-dependent background seismicity rate in 1-km depth intervals from 0-5km. The average wellhead depth is 2-3 km and the background seismicity rates above this depth do not correlate well with field-wide injected masses over the time period of interest. The auto correlation results show a 12-month period for monthly time series proximal to the average wellhead depths (2-3km and 3-4km) for northwest GGF strongly correlates with field-wide fluid injection masses, with a four-month phase shift between the two depth intervals as fluid migrates deeper. This periodicity is not observed for the deeper depth interval of 4-5 km, where monthly background seismicity rates reduce to near zero. Cross-correlation analysis using the monthly time series for background seismicity rate and the field-wide injection, production and net injection (injection minus production) suggest that injection most directly modulates seismicity. Periodicity in the background seismicity is not observed as strongly in the time series for the southeast field. We suggest that the variation in background seismicity rate is a proxy for pore-pressure diffusion of injected fluids at depth. We deduce that the contrast between the background seismicity rates in the northwest and southeast GGF is a result of reduced EGS activity in the southeast region.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging system by using a low-voltage-driving LC lens with a tunable focal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Marenori; Ishikuro, Shunsuke

    2015-09-01

    We develop a three-dimensional imaging system by using a low-voltage-driving liquid crystal (LC) lens for determining depth mapping properties of three-dimensional objects. The sequential photo images without the magnification and reduction are taken by electrically controlling a focal plane along a depth direction with no mechanical movements. The depth mapping properties can be obtained by processing an image digital filter from the different focal images.

  17. 2008 Little Andaman aftershock: Genetic linkages with the subducting 90°E ridge and 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine, J. K.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Ambikapathy, A.; Kundu, Bhaskar; Subrahmanyam, C.; Jade, S.; Bansal, Amit; Chadha, R. K.; Narsaiah, M.; Premkishore, L.; Gupta, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    We analyse the June 27, 2008 Little Andaman aftershock (Mw 6.6) of December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.2) that occurred near the trench in the subducting India plate beneath the Sunda Plate. Unlike majority of the other aftershocks in the frontal arc, the Little Andaman aftershock and its own aftershocks occurred through normal slip on the north-south oriented steep planes. We use the coseismic and ongoing postseismic deformation due to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake at a GPS site nearest to the Little Andaman aftershock and compute changes in the Coulomb stresses due to the coseismic slip and postseismic afterslip. The Coulomb stress on the Little Andaman aftershock fault plane progressively increased since the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake which probably led to the occurrence of the Little Andaman aftershock on the pre-existing N-S oriented strike-slip steep planes of the subducting 90°E ridge that were reactivated through normal slip.

  18. Effects of Aftershock Declustering in Risk Modeling: Case Study of a Subduction Sequence in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, D. L.; Nyst, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake hazard and risk models often assume that earthquake rates can be represented by a stationary Poisson process, and that aftershocks observed in historical seismicity catalogs represent a deviation from stationarity that must be corrected before earthquake rates are estimated. Algorithms for classifying individual earthquakes as independent mainshocks or as aftershocks vary widely, and analysis of a single catalog can produce considerably different earthquake rates depending on the declustering method implemented. As these rates are propagated through hazard and risk models, the modeled results will vary due to the assumptions implied by these choices. In particular, the removal of large aftershocks following a mainshock may lead to an underestimation of the rate of damaging earthquakes and potential damage due to a large aftershock may be excluded from the model. We present a case study based on the 1907 - 1911 sequence of nine 6.9 <= Mw <= 7.9 earthquakes along the Cocos - North American plate subduction boundary in Mexico in order to illustrate the variability in risk under various declustering approaches. Previous studies have suggested that subduction zone earthquakes in Mexico tend to occur in clusters, and this particular sequence includes events that would be labeled as aftershocks in some declustering approaches yet are large enough to produce significant damage. We model the ground motion for each event, determine damage ratios using modern exposure data, and then compare the variability in the modeled damage from using the full catalog or one of several declustered catalogs containing only "independent" events. We also consider the effects of progressive damage caused by each subsequent event and how this might increase or decrease the total losses expected from this sequence.

  19. Statistical Variability and Tokunaga Branching of Aftershock Sequences Utilizing BASS Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Mark R.; Van Aalsburg, Jordan; Turcotte, Donald L.; Abaimov, Sergey G.; Rundle, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Aftershock statistics provide a wealth of data that can be used to better understand earthquake physics. Aftershocks satisfy scale-invariant Gutenberg-Richter (GR) frequency-magnitude statistics. They also satisfy Omori's law for power-law seismicity rate decay and Båth's law for maximum-magnitude scaling. The branching aftershock sequence (BASS) model, which is the scale-invariant limit of the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model (ETAS), uses these scaling laws to generate synthetic aftershock sequences. One objective of this paper is to show that the branching process in these models satisfies Tokunaga branching statistics. Tokunaga branching statistics were originally developed for drainage networks and have been subsequently shown to be valid in many other applications associated with complex phenomena. Specifically, these are characteristic of a universality class in statistical physics associated with diffusion-limited aggregation. We first present a deterministic version of the BASS model and show that it satisfies the Tokunaga side-branching statistics. We then show that a fully stochastic BASS simulation gives similar results. We also study foreshock statistics using our BASS simulations. We show that the frequency-magnitude statistics in BASS simulations scale as the exponential of the magnitude difference between the mainshock and the foreshock, inverse GR scaling. We also show that the rate of foreshock occurrence in BASS simulations decays inversely with the time difference between foreshock and mainshock, an inverse Omori scaling. Both inverse scaling laws have been previously introduced empirically to explain observed foreshock statistics. Observations have demonstrated both of these scaling relations to be valid, consistent with our simulations. ETAS simulations, in general, do not generate Båth's law and do not generate inverse GR scaling.

  20. Decay of aftershock density with distance does not indicate triggering by dynamic stress.

    PubMed

    Richards-Dinger, Keith; Stein, Ross S; Toda, Shinji

    2010-09-30

    Resolving whether static or dynamic stress triggers most aftershocks and subsequent mainshocks is essential to understand earthquake interaction and to forecast seismic hazard. Felzer and Brodsky examined the distance distribution of earthquakes occurring in the first five minutes after 2 ≤ M < 3 and 3 ≤ M < 4 mainshocks and found that their magnitude M ≥ 2 aftershocks showed a uniform power-law decay with slope -1.35 out to 50 km from the mainshocks. From this they argued that the distance decay could be explained only by dynamic triggering. Here we propose an alternative explanation for the decay, and subject their hypothesis to a series of tests, none of which it passes. At distances more than 300 m from the 2 ≤ M < 3 mainshocks, the seismicity decay 5 min before the mainshocks is indistinguishable from the decay five minutes afterwards, indicating that the mainshocks have no effect at distances outside their static triggering range. Omori temporal decay, the fundamental signature of aftershocks, is absent at distances exceeding 10 km from the mainshocks. Finally, the distance decay is found among aftershocks that occur before the arrival of the seismic wave front from the mainshock, which violates causality. We argue that Felzer and Brodsky implicitly assume that the first of two independent aftershocks along a fault rupture triggers the second, and that the first of two shocks in a creep- or intrusion-driven swarm triggers the second, when this need not be the case. PMID:20882015

  1. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  2. Coda Q in the Kachchh Basin, Western India Using Aftershocks of the Bhuj Earthquake of January 26, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. C.; Kumar, Ashwani; Shukla, A. K.; Suresh, G.; Baidya, P. R.

    2006-08-01

    Q C -estimates of Kachchh Basin in western India have been obtained in a high frequency range from 1.5 to 24.0 Hz using the aftershock data of Bhuj earthquake of January 26, 2001 recorded within an epicentral distance of 80 km. The decay of coda waves of 30 sec window from 186 seismograms has been analysed in four lapse time windows, adopting the single backscattering model. The study shows that Q c is a function of frequency and increases as frequency increases. The frequency dependent Q c relations obtained for four lapse-time windows are: Q c =82 f 1.17 (20 50 sec), Q c =106 f 1.11 (30 60 sec), Q c =126f 1.03 (40 70 sec) and Q c =122f 1.02 (50 80 sec). These empirical relations represent the average attenuation properties of a zone covering the surface area of about 11,000, 20,000, 28,000 and 38,000 square km and a depth extent of about 60, 80, 95, 110 km, respectively. With increasing window length, the degree of frequency dependence, n, decreases marginally from 1.17 to 1.02, whereas Q 0 increases significantly from 82 to 122. At lower frequencies up to 6 Hz, Q c -1 of Kachchh Basin is in agreement with other regions of the world, whereas at higher frequencies from 12 to 24 Hz it is found to be low.

  3. Sex prevalence of focal dystonias.

    PubMed Central

    Soland, V L; Bhatia, K P; Marsden, C D

    1996-01-01

    The sex prevalence of idiopathic focal dystonia is reported from a data base review of all patients seen at the National Hospital of Neurology, Queen Square and King's College, London up to 1993. There was a higher prevalence of females to males in all categories of focal dystonia involving the craniocervical region. The female to male ratio for cranial dystonia was 1.92:1 (P < 0.01) and 1.6:1 (P < 0.001) for spasmodic torticollis. On the other hand, twice as many men than women had writer's cramp (M:F = 2.0:1, P < 0.01). At present, there is no clear explanation to account for this differences in the sex prevalence of different types of focal dystonia. PMID:8708656

  4. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  5. Analysis of Rapid Multi-Focal Zone ARFI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Stephen; Palmeri, Mark; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has shown promise for visualizing structure and pathology within multiple organs; however, because the contrast depends on the push beam excitation width, image quality suffers outside of the region of excitation. Multi-focal zone ARFI imaging has previously been used to extend the region of excitation (ROE), but the increased acquisition duration and acoustic exposure have limited its utility. Supersonic shear wave imaging has previously demonstrated that through technological improvements in ultrasound scanners and power supplies, it is possible to rapidly push at multiple locations prior to tracking displacements, facilitating extended depth of field shear wave sources. Similarly, ARFI imaging can utilize these same radiation force excitations to achieve tight pushing beams with a large depth of field. Finite element method simulations and experimental data are presented demonstrating that single- and rapid multi-focal zone ARFI have comparable image quality (less than 20% loss in contrast), but the multi-focal zone approach has an extended axial region of excitation. Additionally, as compared to single push sequences, the rapid multi-focal zone acquisitions improve the contrast to noise ratio by up to 40% in an example 4 mm diameter lesion. PMID:25643078

  6. A generalized law for aftershock rates in a damage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Zion, Y.; Lyakhovsky, V.

    2003-12-01

    Aftershocks are the response of a damaged rock surrounding large earthquake ruptures to the stress perturbations produced by the large events. Lyakhovsky et al. [JGR, 1997] developed a damage rheology model that provides a quantitative treatment for macroscopic effects of evolving distributed cracking with local density represented by a state variable a. The equation for damage evolution, based on the balance equations of energy and entropy and generalization of linear elasticity, accounts for both degradation and healing as a function of the existing strain tensor and material properties that may be constrained by lab data (rate coefficients and ratio of strain invariants separating states of degradation and healing). Analyses of stress-strain and acoustic emission laboratory data during deformation leading to brittle failure indicate further [Liu et al., AGU, F01; Hamiel et al., this meeting] that the fit between model predictions and observations improves if we also incorporate gradual accumulation of a non-reversible deformation with a rate proportional to the rate of damage increase. For analysis of aftershocks, we consider the relaxation process of a material following the application of a strain step associated with the occurrence of a mainshock. The coupled differential equations governing the damage evolution and stress relaxation can be written in non-dimensional form by scaling the elastic stress to its initial value and the time to characteristic time of damage evolution td. With this, the system behavior is controlled by a single non-dimensional ratio R = td/tM representing the ratio between the damage time scale to the Maxwell relaxation time tM. For very small R there is no relaxation and the response consists of constant rate of damage increase until failure. For very large R there is rapid relaxation without significant change to the level of damage. For intermediate cases the equations are strongly coupled and nonlinear. The analytical solution

  7. Hurricane Irene's Impacts on the Aftershock Sequence of the 2011 Mw5.8 Virginia Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, X.; Peng, Z.; Yang, H.; Allman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that typhoon could trigger shallow slow-slip events in Taiwan. However, it is unclear whether such extreme weather events could affect the occurrence of regular earthquakes as well. A good opportunity to test this hypothesis occurred in 2011 when an Mw 5.8 earthquake struck Louisa County, Virginia. This event ruptured a shallow, reverse fault. Roughly 5 days later, hurricane Irene struck the coast of Norfolk, Virginia, which is near the epicentral region of the Virginia mainshock. Because aftershocks listed in the ANSS catalog were incomplete immediately after the main shock, it is very difficult to find the genuine correlation between the seismicity rate changes and hurricane Irene. Hence, we use a recently developed waveform matched filter technique to scan through the continuous seismic data to detect small aftershocks that are previously unidentified. A mixture of 7 temporary stations from the IRIS Ramp deployment and 8 temporary stations deployed by Virginia Tech is used. The temporary stations were set up between 24 to 72 hours following the main shock around its immediate vicinity, which provides us a unique dataset recording the majority aftershock sequence of an intraplate earthquake. We us 80 aftershocks identified by Chapman [2013] as template events and scan through the continuous data from 23 August 2011 through 10 September 2011. So far, we have detected 704 events using a threshold of 12 times the median absolute deviation (MAD), which is ~25 times more than listed in the ANSS catalog. The aftershock rate generally decayed with time as predicted by the Omori's law. A statistically significant increase of seismicity rate is found when hurricane Irene passed by the epicentral region. A possible explanation is that the atmosphere pressure drop unloaded the surface, which brought the reverse faults closer to failure. However, we also identified similar fluctuations of seismicity rate changes at other times. Hence, it is still

  8. Earthquake depths and the relation to strain accumulation and stress near strike-slip faults in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.O. )

    1990-04-10

    Earthquakes in the major fault zones are predominantly deep. Earthquakes in the crustal blocks bounding the fault zones are predominantly shallow. In the San Jacinto fault zone, maximum earthquake depths correlate with surface heat flow. These relations together with focal mechanisms, geodetic strain measurements, and fault zone models are consistent with the following ideas: (1) Interseismic plate motion is accommodated by aseismic slip along an extension of the major fault zone below a brittle zone that is locked between large earthquakes. (2) The aseismic slip in a narrow fault zone in the brittle-plastic transition region concentrates strain at the base of the brittle fault zone. (3) Deep earthquakes occur in thelower part of the brittle fault zone due to stick-slip failure of highly stressed patches. (4) Background earhtquakes and aftershocks that occur several kilometers deeper than large earthquake hypocenters suggest that a zone of mixed slip behavior may exist between the stable sliding (deep) and stick-slip (shallow) regions of the fault zone. Furthermore, the difference in seismicity between the San Jacinto and southern San Andreas faults suggests that the nature of this mixed zone may evolve as total displacement in the fault zone increases. (5) Shear stress may be less in the crustal blocks than in the deep brittle fault zones and generally at a level sufficient to cause brittle failure only shallow in the crustal blocks. (6) In the stress field produced by plate motion and slip in the deep fault zone, the upper brittle fault zone is not oriented favorably for shear failure. Lack of shallow earthquakes in the fault zones and the predominance of shallow earthquakes on favorably oriented fractures in the adjacent crustal blocks suggest that either stress in the upper brittle fault zone is relatively low or the upper fault zone is effectively strong due to its orientation.

  9. Focal weakness following herpes zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O C; Ormerod, I E

    1993-01-01

    Three patients presented with focal weakness of an arm which followed segmental herpes zoster affecting the same limb. Neurophysiological investigations suggest that the site of the lesion lay at the root, plexus, or peripheral nerve level. This reflects the various ways in which the virus may affect the peripheral nervous system. PMID:8410022

  10. Real-time forecast of aftershocks from a single seismic station signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippiello, E.; Cirillo, A.; Godano, G.; Papadimitriou, E.; Karakostas, V.

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation of seismic hazard in the hours following large earthquakes is strongly affected by biases due to difficulties in determining earthquake location. This leads to the huge incompleteness of instrumental catalogs. Here we show that if, on the one hand, the overlap of aftershock coda waves hides many small events, on the other hand, it leads to a well-determined empirical law controlling the decay of the amplitude of the seismic signal at a given site. The fitting parameters of this law can be related to those controlling the temporal decay of the aftershock number, and it is then possible to obtain short-term postseismic occurrence probability from a single recorded seismic signal. We therefore present a novel procedure which, without requiring earthquake location, produces more accurate and almost real-time forecast, in a site of interest, directly from the signal of a seismic station installed at that site.

  11. The aftershock sequence of the 2015 April 25 Gorkha-Nepal earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, L. B.; Gautam, U. P.; Koirala, B. P.; Bhattarai, M.; Kandel, T.; Gupta, R. M.; Timsina, C.; Maharjan, N.; Maharjan, K.; Dahal, T.; Hoste-Colomer, R.; Cano, Y.; Dandine, M.; Guilhem, A.; Merrer, S.; Roudil, P.; Bollinger, L.

    2015-12-01

    The M 7.8 2015 April 25 Gorkha earthquake devastated the mountainous southern rim of the High Himalayan range in central Nepal. The main shock was followed by 553 earthquakes of local magnitude greater than 4.0 within the first 45 days. In this study, we present and qualify the bulletin of the permanent National Seismological Centre network to determine the spatio-temporal distribution of the aftershocks. The Gorkha sequence defines a ˜140-km-long ESE trending structure, parallel to the mountain range, abutting on the presumed extension of the rupture plane of the 1934 M 8.4 earthquake. In addition, we observe a second seismicity belt located southward, under the Kathmandu basin and in the northern part of the Mahabarat range. Many aftershocks of the Gorkha earthquake sequence have been felt by the 3 millions inhabitants of the Kathmandu valley.

  12. The Mechanisms and Spatiotemporal Behavior of the 2011 Mw7.1 Van, Eastern Turkey Earthquake Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezgi Guvercin Isik, Sezim; Ozgun Konca, A.; Karabulut, Hayrullah

    2016-04-01

    We studied the mechanisms and spatiotemporal distribution of the aftershocks of the Mw7.1 Van Earthquake, in Eastern Turkey. The 2011 Van Earthquake occurred on a E-W trending blind thrust fault in Eastern Turkey which is under N-S compression due to convergence of the Arabian plate toward the Eurasia. In this study, we relocated and studied the mechanisms of the M3.5-5.5 aftershocks from regional Pnl and surface waves using the "Cut and Paste" algorithm of Zhu and Helmberger (1996). Our results reveal that the aftershocks in the first day following the mainshock are in the vicinity of the co-seismic slip and have mostly thrust mechanism consistent with the mainshock. In the following day, a second cluster of activity at the northeast termination of the fault ( North of Lake Erçek) has started. These aftershocks have approximately N-S lineation and left lateral source mechanisms. The aftershocks surrounding the mainshock rupture are deeper (>20 km) than the aftershocks triggered on the north (<15km). We also observe strike slip earthquakes on the south of the mainshock. Both of delayed activities (north of the mainshock and south of the mainshock) are consistent with the Coulomb stress increase due to slip on the mainshock. We propose that the Van Fault is truncated by two strike-slip faults at each end, which has determined the along-strike rupture extent of the 2011 mainshock.

  13. Evolution of the vigorous 2006 swarm in Zakynthos (Greece) and probabilities for strong aftershocks occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Gospodinov, Dragomir; Karakostas, Vassilis; Astiopoulos, Anastasios

    2013-04-01

    A multiplet of moderate-magnitude earthquakes (5.1 ≤ M ≤ 5.6) took place in Zakynthos Island and offshore area (central Ionian Islands, Greece) in April 2006. The activity in the first month occupied an area of almost 35 km long, striking roughly NNW-SSE, whereas aftershocks continued for several months, decaying with time but persisting at the same place. The properties of the activated structure were investigated with accurate relocated data and the available fault plane solutions of some of the stronger events. Both the distribution of seismicity and fault plane solutions show that thrusting with strike-slip motions are both present in high-angle fault segments. The segmentation of the activated structure could be attributed to the faulting complexity inherited from the regional compressive tectonics. Investigation of the spatial and temporal behavior of seismicity revealed possible triggering of adjacent fault segments that may fail individually, thus preventing coalescence in a large main rupture. In an attempt to forecast occurrence probabilities of six of the strong events ( M w ≥ 5.0), estimations were performed following the restricted epidemic-type aftershock sequence model, applied to data samples before each one of these strong events. Stochastic modeling was also used to identify "quiescence" periods before the examined aftershocks. In two out of the six cases, real aftershock rate did decrease before the next strong shock compared to the modeled one. The latter results reveal that rate decrease is not a clear precursor of strong shocks in the swarm and no quantitative information, suitable to supply probability gain, could be extracted from the data.

  14. Urban seismology - Northridge aftershocks recorded by multi-scale arrays of portable digital seismographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meremonte, M.; Frankel, A.; Cranswick, E.; Carver, D.; Worley, D.

    1996-01-01

    We deployed portable digital seismographs in the San Fernando Valley (SFV), the Los Angeles basin (LAB), and surrounding hills to record aftershocks of the 17 January 1994 Northridge California earthquake. The purpose of the deployment was to investigate factors relevant to seismic zonation in urban areas, such as site amplification, sedimentary basin effects, and the variability of ground motion over short baselines. We placed seismographs at 47 sites (not all concurrently) and recorded about 290 earthquakes with magnitudes up to 5.1 at five stations or more. We deployed widely spaced stations for profiles across the San Fernando Valley, as well as five dense arrays (apertures of 200 to 500 m) in areas of high damage, such as the collapsed Interstate 10 overpass, Sherman Oaks, and the collapsed parking garage at CalState Northridge. Aftershock data analysis indicates a correlation of site amplification with mainshock damage. We found several cases where the site amplification depended on the azimuth of the aftershock, possibly indicating focusing from basin structures. For the parking garage array, we found large ground-motion variabilities (a factor of 2) over 200-m distances for sites on the same mapped soil unit. Array analysis of the aftershock seismograms demonstrates that sizable arrivals after the direct 5 waves consist of surface waves traveling from the same azimuth as that of the epicenter. These surface waves increase the duration of motions and can have frequencies as high as about 4 Hz. For the events studied here, we do not observe large arrivals reflected from the southern edge of the San Fernando Valley.

  15. Long aftershock sequences within continents and implications for earthquake hazard assessment.

    PubMed

    Stein, Seth; Liu, Mian

    2009-11-01

    One of the most powerful features of plate tectonics is that the known plate motions give insight into both the locations and average recurrence interval of future large earthquakes on plate boundaries. Plate tectonics gives no insight, however, into where and when earthquakes will occur within plates, because the interiors of ideal plates should not deform. As a result, within plate interiors, assessments of earthquake hazards rely heavily on the assumption that the locations of small earthquakes shown by the short historical record reflect continuing deformation that will cause future large earthquakes. Here, however, we show that many of these recent earthquakes are probably aftershocks of large earthquakes that occurred hundreds of years ago. We present a simple model predicting that the length of aftershock sequences varies inversely with the rate at which faults are loaded. Aftershock sequences within the slowly deforming continents are predicted to be significantly longer than the decade typically observed at rapidly loaded plate boundaries. These predictions are in accord with observations. So the common practice of treating continental earthquakes as steady-state seismicity overestimates the hazard in presently active areas and underestimates it elsewhere. PMID:19890328

  16. Can current New Madrid seismicity be explained as a decaying aftershock sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hough, S. E.; Felzer, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    It has been suggested that continuing seismicity in the New Madrid, central U.S. region is primarily composed of the continuing long-lived aftershock sequence of the 1811-1812 sequence, and thus cannot be taken as an indication of present-day strain accrual in the region. We examine historical and instrumental seismicity in the New Madrid region to determine if such a model is feasible given 1) the observed protracted nature of past New Madrid sequences, with multiple mainshocks with apparently similar magnitudes; 2) the rate of historically documented early aftershocks from the 1811-1812 sequence; and 3) plausible mainshock magnitudes and aftershock-productivity parameters. We use ETAS modeling to search for sub-critical sets of direct Omori parameters that are consistent with all of these datasets, given a realistic consideration of their uncertainties, and current seismicity in the region. The results of this work will help to determine whether or not future sequences are likely to be clusters of events like those in the past, a key issue for earthquake response planning.

  17. Main shock and aftershock records of the 1999 Izmit and Duzce, Turkey earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.; Akkar, Sinan; Gulerce, U.; Sanli, A.; Bundock, H.; Salkin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The August 17, 1999 Izmit (Turkey) earthquake (Mw=7.4) will be remembered as one of the largest earthquakes of recent times that affected a large urban environment (U.S. Geological Survey, 1999). This significant event was followed by many significant aftershocks and another main event (Mw=7.2) that occurred on November 12, 1999 near Duzce (Turkey). The shaking that caused the widespread damage and destruction was recorded by a handful of accelerographs (~30) in the earthquake area operated by different networks. The characteristics of these records show that the recorded peak accelerations, shown in Figure 1, even those from near field stations, are smaller than expected (Çelebi, 1999, 2000). Following this main event, several organizations from Turkey, Japan, France and the USA deployed temporary accelerographs and other aftershock recording hardware. Thus, the number of recording stations in the earthquake affected area was quadrupled (~130). As a result, as seen in Figure 2, smaller magnitude aftershocks yielded larger peak accelerations, indicating that because of the sparse networks, recording of larger motions during the main shock of August 17, 1999 were possibly missed.

  18. MRI of Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Albiin, Nils

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, MRI has more advantages than ultrasound, computed tomography, CT, positron emission tomography, PET, or any other imaging modality in diagnosing focal hepatic masses. With a combination of basic T1 and T2 weighted sequences, diffusion weighted imaging, DWI, and hepatobiliary gadolinium contrast agents, that is gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB), most liver lesions can be adequately diagnosed. Benign lesions, as cyst, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH or adenoma, can be distinguished from malignant lesions. In a non-cirrhotic liver, the most common malignant lesions are metastases which may be hypovascular or hypervascular. In the cirrhotic liver hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC, is of considerable importance. Besides, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and other less common malignancies has to be assessed. In this review, the techniques and typical MRI features are presented as well as the new algorithm issued by American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD). PMID:23049491

  19. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  20. Properties of the Aftershock Sequences of the 2003 Bingöl, M D = 6.4, (Turkey) Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, S.; Çinar, H.; Bayrak, Y.; Karsli, H.; Daniel, G.

    2008-02-01

    Aftershock sequences of the magnitude M W =6.4 Bingöl earthquake of 1 May, 2003 (Turkey) are studied to analyze the spatial and temporal variability of seismicity parameters of the b value of the frequency-magnitude distribution and the p value describing the temporal decay rate of aftershocks. The catalog taken from the KOERI contains 516 events and one month’s time interval. The b value is found as 1.49 ± 0.07 with Mc =3.2. Considering the error limits, b value is very close to the maximum b value stated in the literature. This larger value may be caused by the paucity of the larger aftershocks with magnitude M D ≥ 5.0. Also, the aftershock area is divided into four parts in order to detect the differences in b value and the changes illustrate the heterogeneity of the aftershock region. The p value is calculated as 0.86 ± 0.11, relatively small. This small p value may be a result of the slow decay rate of the aftershock activity and the small number of aftershocks. For the fitting of a suitable model and estimation of correct values of decay parameters, the sequence is also modeled as a background seismicty rate model. Constant background activity does not appear to be important during the first month of the Bingöl aftershock sequences and this result is coherent with an average estimation of pre-existing seismicity. The results show that usage of simple modified Omori law is reasonable for the analysis. The spatial variability in b value is between 1.2 and 1.8 and p value varies from 0.6 to 1.2. Although the physical interpretation of the spatial variability of these seismicity parameters is not straightforward, the variation of b and p values can be related to the stress and slip distribution after the mainshock, respectively. The lower b values are observed in the high stress regions and to a certain extent, the largest b values are related to Holocene alluvium. The larger p values are found in some part of the aftershock area although no slip occurred

  1. Spatial/Temporal interdependence of aftershocks following the 10/31/2001 M5.1 Anza Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D.; Martynov, V.; Vernon, F. L.

    2004-12-01

    On 10/31/2001, a M5.1 earthquake occurred in the middle of the ANZA network (7 24-bit broadband stations were within 20 km of the epicenter) that spans the San Jacinto fault zone in southern California. A high pass filter (f > 1.0 Hz) was used to identify seismic arrival times of the aftershocks and in turn determine the aftershock locations. In this way, we cataloged 599 events (0< M < 2.5) in the initial 2 hours of this sequence and 4500 aftershocks within the first 2 months, complete to M ≈ 0.0. Here, we study three different temporal/spatial features found in these data. (1) Initially we suspected earthquakes within the region of the mainshock had a bimodal distribution of earthquake magnitudes (peaks at M=0.1 and M=1.5); however, we found this distribution was an artifact of the spatial recording capabilities of small magnitude aftershocks. (2) In the original aftershock locations we found two linear voids in seismicity (trends ˜N45W and ˜N45E) in the primary aftershock cluster forming an X pattern. This is not likely caused by the number of significant digits in the location algorithm because these voids do not follow individual latitude or longitude lines, nor is this likely due to recording inaccuracies because the network coverage of the region is more than optimal. We are investigating other causes of these voids. (3) In the broadband data, we found only one detectable aftershock in the first 2 minutes of the continuous waveforms; yet on the short period records at one of the closest stations, TRO, we can identify an additional event at 15 seconds into the sequence. To quantify our detection capabilities, we estimate when aftershocks of different magnitudes can be identified within the mainshock coda. We are fairly confident that \\> M 1.5 events 45 seconds or longer after the mainshock should be detectable, which suggests that the lack of seismicity in the 45 second-2.0 minute range is potentially real. This non-zero lag-time between the mainshock

  2. An Improved Source-Scanning Algorithm for Locating Earthquake Clusters or Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Kao, H.; Hsu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Source-scanning Algorithm (SSA) was originally introduced in 2004 to locate non-volcanic tremors. Its application was later expanded to the identification of earthquake rupture planes and the near-real-time detection and monitoring of landslides and mud/debris flows. In this study, we further improve SSA for the purpose of locating earthquake clusters or aftershock sequences when only a limited number of waveform observations are available. The main improvements include the application of a ground motion analyzer to separate P and S waves, the automatic determination of resolution based on the grid size and time step of the scanning process, and a modified brightness function to utilize constraints from multiple phases. Specifically, the improved SSA (named as ISSA) addresses two major issues related to locating earthquake clusters/aftershocks. The first one is the massive amount of both time and labour to locate a large number of seismic events manually. And the second one is to efficiently and correctly identify the same phase across the entire recording array when multiple events occur closely in time and space. To test the robustness of ISSA, we generate synthetic waveforms consisting of 3 separated events such that individual P and S phases arrive at different stations in different order, thus making correct phase picking nearly impossible. Using these very complicated waveforms as the input, the ISSA scans all model space for possible combination of time and location for the existence of seismic sources. The scanning results successfully associate various phases from each event at all stations, and correctly recover the input. To further demonstrate the advantage of ISSA, we apply it to the waveform data collected by a temporary OBS array for the aftershock sequence of an offshore earthquake southwest of Taiwan. The overall signal-to-noise ratio is inadequate for locating small events; and the precise arrival times of P and S phases are difficult to

  3. [Focal liver lesion, incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Jenssen, C

    2012-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of incidentally found Focal Liver Lesions (FLL) is complex. Screening procedures so far are only defined for patients with liver cirrhosis. Characterization of a FLL begins as soon as it is detected. Taking patients history and thorough clinical examination are essential. An imaging procedure that is used to detect liver masses should also allow the examiner to determine whether the lesion is benign or malignant. Conventional B-mode US and colour Doppler imaging are effective at detecting and characterizing typical liver cysts and calcifications. Laboratory data, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and imaging guided liver biopsy are complementary methods.Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) is a well established diagnostic imaging technique for a variety of indications and applications. One of the most important applications is in the liver where it is frequently a first-line technique for the detection and diagnosis (characterization) of focal liver lesions (FLL). In this setting the accurate differentiation of benign from malignant lesions is critical to ensure the patient undergoes the appropriate therapeutic option. This has been documented in recently published guidelines, in particular in terms of the enhancement patterns of the most common FLL hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia hepatocellular adenoma and their differentiation from malignant lesions. In this article the role of CEUS in the characterization of incidentally found FLL is described. PMID:23033169

  4. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for…

  5. Shaping the focal field of radially/azimuthally polarized phase vortex with Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lei; Urbach, H. Paul

    2016-06-01

    The focal field properties of radially/azimuthally polarized Zernike polynomials are studied. A method to design the pupil field in order to shape the focal field of radially or azimuthally polarized phase vortex is introduced. With this method, we are able to obtain a pupil field to achieve a longitudinally polarized hollow spot with a depth of focus up to 12λ and 0.28λ lateral resolution (FWHM) for an optical system with numerical aperture 0.99; a pupil field to generate eight focal spots along the optical axis is also obtained with this method.

  6. 3D strain measurement in electronic devices using through-focal annular dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suhyun; Jung, Younheum; Lee, Sungho; Jung Kim, Joong; Byun, Gwangseon; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum

    2014-11-01

    Spherical aberration correction in high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) allows us to form an electron probe with reduced depth of field. Using through-focal HAADF imaging, we experimentally demonstrated 3D strain measurement in a strained-channel transistor. The strain field distribution in the channel region was obtained by scanning an electron beam over a plan-view specimen. Furthermore, the decrease in the strain fields toward the silicon substrate was revealed at different focal planes with a 5-nm focal step. These results demonstrate that it is possible to reconstruct the 3D strain field in electronic devices. PMID:24859824

  7. Confocal microscopy and variable-focal length microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Raighne, Aaron M.; Yang, Lisong; Dunbar, L. Andrea; McCabe, Eithne M.; Scharf, Toralf

    2004-07-01

    Confocal microscopy has a unique optical sectioning property which allows three-dimensional images at different depths. Use of a microlens array is a potential alternative to the Nipkow disk for parallel imaging with high throughput in real-time confocal microscopy. The use of variable-focal-length microlenses can provide a way to axially scan the foci electronically avoiding the inflexible mechanical movement of the lens or the sample. Here we demonstrate a combination of a variable-focal-length microlens array and a fiber optic bundle as a way to create a high throughput aperture array that would be potentially applied as confocal imaging in vivo biological specimens. Variable focal length microlenses that we use consist of a liquid crystal film sandwiched between a pair of conductive substrates with patterned electrodes. The incident side of the microlens array was determined by examining the focus distribution in the axial direction. The variation of the focal length obtained by changing the voltage and corresponding focus intensity were measured through a conventional microscope. Meanwhile, the fiber bundle was characterized by coupling with either coherent or incoherent light source. We use the fiber bundle as both a multiple aperture and an image-carrying element and combine it with a microlens array to built up a confocal system. Axial responses are measured in two optical arrangements as a route to investigate endoscope potential.

  8. Rupture Processes of the Mw8.3 Sea of Okhotsk Earthquake and Aftershock Sequences from 3-D Back Projection Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, P. R.; Hung, S. H.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    On May 24, 2013, the largest deep earthquake ever recorded in history occurred on the southern tip of the Kamchatka Island, where the Pacific Plate subducts underneath the Okhotsk Plate. Previous 2D beamforming back projection (BP) of P- coda waves suggests the mainshock ruptured bilaterally along a horizontal fault plane determined by the global centroid moment tensor solution. On the other hand, the multiple point source inversion of P and SH waveforms argued that the earthquake comprises a sequence of 6 subevents not located on a single plane but actually distributed in a zone that extends 64 km horizontally and 35 km in depth. We then apply a three-dimensional MUSIC BP approach to resolve the rupture processes of the manishock and two large aftershocks (M6.7) with no a priori setup of preferential orientations of the planar rupture. The maximum pseudo-spectrum of high-frequency P wave in a sequence of time windows recorded by the densely-distributed stations from US and EU Array are used to image 3-D temporal and spatial rupture distribution. The resulting image confirms that the nearly N-S striking but two antiparallel rupture stages. The first subhorizontal rupture initially propagates toward the NNE direction, while at 18 s later it directs reversely to the SSW and concurrently shifts downward to 35 km deeper lasting for about 20 s. The rupture lengths in the first NNE-ward and second SSW-ward stage are about 30 km and 85 km; the estimated rupture velocities are 3 km/s and 4.25 km/s, respectively. Synthetic experiments are undertaken to assess the capability of the 3D MUSIC BP for the recovery of spatio-temporal rupture processes. Besides, high frequency BP images based on the EU-Array data show two M6.7 aftershocks are more likely to rupture on the vertical fault planes.

  9. Seismic and Aseismic Slip on the San-Jacinto Fault Near Anza, CA, from Joint Analysis of Strain and Aftershock Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbal, A.; Avouac, J. P.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The San-Jacinto Fault (SJF) is the most active fault in southern California, which together with the southern San-Andreas Fault accommodates a large fraction of the motion across the plate boundary. Seismicity along the SJF is distributed over several fault segments with distinct spatio-temporal characteristics. One of these segments, known as the Anza seismic gap, is a 25 km long strand almost devoid of seismicity. In recent years, four M4-5 events occurred SE of the gap. Despite their moderate magnitudes, these earthquakes triggered rich aftershock sequences and pronounced afterslip that lasted for several weeks, and was well captured by nearby PBO borehole strain meters. A similar transient was remotely triggered by the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. Geodetic and seismic observations following a local M5.4 mainshock indicate that afterslip propagated unilaterally towards the NW at speed of about 5 km/day. We infer the distribution of slip via a joint inversion of the aftershock and strain data. Our approach is based on Dieterich's (1994) model relating the evolution of seismicity rate to applied stresses, within the framework of rate-and-state friction. This approach provides resolution power at depths inaccessible to the surface geodetic network. Moreover, it allows us to gain important insights onto the fault mechanical properties. We apply this inversion scheme to episodes that occurred during 2010. Remarkably, we find that the cumulative moment released post-seismically during the locally triggered transient is 5-10 times larger than the moment of the mainshock. We show that the data favour a model in which deep slip transients, which may develop due to local or remote earthquakes, occur on a weak, close-to-velocity-neutral fault. The transients increase the stress along the Anza gap, and trigger earthquakes outside it through static stress transfer.

  10. Aftershock mechanisms from the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake: detailed analysis using full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbrock, A.; Hicks, S. P.; Chagas, B.; Detzel, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since the earthquake rupture process is extremely heterogeneous, it is vital to understand how structural variations in the overriding plate and downgoing slab may control slip style along the subduction megathrust. The large-scale 3-D geometry of subduction plate boundaries is rapidly becoming well understood; however, the nature of any finer-scale structure along the plate interface remains elusive. A detailed study of earthquake source mechanisms along a megathrust region can shed light on the nature of fine-scale structures along the megathrust. The Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake that struck central Chile in 2010 is the sixth largest earthquake ever recorded. Following the earthquake, there was an international deployment of seismic stations in the rupture area, making this one of the best datasets of an aftershock sequence following a large earthquake. This dataset provides a unique opportunity to perform a detailed study of megathrust earthquake source mechanisms. Based on a high-resolution 3-D velocity model and robust earthquake locations [Hicks et al., 2014], we calculate regional moment tensors using the ISOLA software package [Sokos & Zahradnik, 2008]. We incorporate accelerometer recordings, important for constraining solutions of large earthquakes in the overriding plate. We also validate the robustness of our solutions by assessing the consistency of mechanisms with P-wave polarities observed at both onshore and offshore seismic stations, and compare them to already published solutions. We find that accurate earthquake locations are vital for the fine-scale interpretation of focal mechanisms, particularly for offshore events. Our results show that most moment tensor solutions with thrusting mechanisms have a nodal plane dipping parallel to the subducting plate interface. Interestingly, we also find earthquakes with normal faulting mechanisms lying along to the megathrust plate interface in the south of the rupture area. This finding suggests that megathrust

  11. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  12. Shallow gas cloud illumination analysis by the focal beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latiff, Abdul Halim Abdul

    2016-02-01

    This research will address the illumination issue of seismic data below a shallow gas cloud, also known as shallow gas accumulation. In general, poor and distorted seismic data underneath gas zones depend on four major factors; namely the velocity of the gas zones, the depth of the target reflector, the location of the source and the receiver during seismic acquisition, and the frequency of the seismic signals. These factors will be scrutinized in detail by using the focal beam method. The focal beam method incorporates the double focusing concept in order to obtain two important attributes for illumination analysis: (i) Resolution function beam, (ii) amplitude versus ray parameter (AVP) imprint, which is obtained by transforming the modelled data into the radon domain. Both illumination attributes are then applied to a gas-affected field in the Malaysia Basin. The results show well-defined illumination beneath the shallow anomalies and provide a better representation of the subsurface.

  13. Estimating seismic site response in Christchurch City (New Zealand) from dense low-cost aftershock arrays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, Anna E.; Benites, Rafael A.; Chung, Angela I.; Haines, A. John; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Fry, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The Mw 7.1 September 2010 Darfield earthquake, New Zealand, produced widespread damage and liquefaction ~40 km from the epicentre in Christchurch city. It was followed by the even more destructive Mw 6.2 February 2011 Christchurch aftershock directly beneath the city’s southern suburbs. Seismic data recorded during the two large events suggest that site effects contributed to the variations in ground motion observed throughout Christchurch city. We use densely-spaced aftershock recordings of the Darfield earthquake to investigate variations in local seismic site response within the Christchurch urban area. Following the Darfield main shock we deployed a temporary array of ~180 low-cost 14-bit MEMS accelerometers linked to the global Quake-Catcher Network (QCN). These instruments provided dense station coverage (spacing ~2 km) to complement existing New Zealand national network strong motion stations (GeoNet) within Christchurch city. Well-constrained standard spectral ratios were derived for GeoNet stations using a reference station on Miocene basalt rock in the south of the city. For noisier QCN stations, the method was adapted to find a maximum likelihood estimate of spectral ratio amplitude taking into account the variance of noise at the respective stations. Spectral ratios for QCN stations are similar to nearby GeoNet stations when the maximum likelihood method is used. Our study suggests dense low-cost accelerometer aftershock arrays can provide useful information on local-scale ground motion properties for use in microzonation. Preliminary results indicate higher amplifications north of the city centre and strong high-frequency amplification in the small, shallower basin of Heathcote Valley.

  14. An Autonomous System for Grouping Events in a Developing Aftershock Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D. B.; Dodge, D. A.

    2011-03-22

    We describe a prototype detection framework that automatically clusters events in real time from a rapidly unfolding aftershock sequence. We use the fact that many aftershocks are repetitive, producing similar waveforms. By clustering events based on correlation measures of waveform similarity, the number of independent event instances that must be examined in detail by analysts may be reduced. Our system processes array data and acquires waveform templates with a short-term average (STA)/long-term average (LTA) detector operating on a beam directed at the P phases of the aftershock sequence. The templates are used to create correlation-type (subspace) detectors that sweep the subsequent data stream for occurrences of the same waveform pattern. Events are clustered by association with a particular detector. Hundreds of subspace detectors can run in this framework a hundred times faster than in real time. Nonetheless, to check the growth in the number of detectors, the framework pauses periodically and reclusters detections to reduce the number of event groups. These groups define new subspace detectors that replace the older generation of detectors. Because low-magnitude occurrences of a particular signal template may be missed by the STA/LTA detector, we advocate restarting the framework from the beginning of the sequence periodically to reprocess the entire data stream with the existing detectors. We tested the framework on 10 days of data from the Nevada Seismic Array (NVAR) covering the 2003 San Simeon earthquake. One hundred eighty-four automatically generated detectors produced 676 detections resulting in a potential reduction in analyst workload of up to 73%.

  15. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  16. Geotechnical effects of the 2015 magnitude 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake and aftershocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moss, Robb E S; Thompson, Eric; Kieffer, D Scott; Tiwari, Binod; Hashash, Youssef M A; Acharya, Indra; Adhikari, Basanta; Asimaki, Domniki; Clahan, Kevin B.; Collins, Brian D.; Dahal, Sachindra; Jibson, Randall W.; Khadka, Diwakar; Macdonald, Amy; Madugo, Chris L M; Mason, H Benjamin; Pehlivan, Menzer; Rayamajhi, Deepak; Uprety, Sital

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the geotechnical effects of the 25 April 2015 M 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake and aftershocks, as documented by a reconnaissance team that undertook a broad engineering and scientific assessment of the damage and collected perishable data for future analysis. Brief descriptions are provided of ground shaking, surface fault rupture, landsliding, soil failure, and infrastructure performance. The goal of this reconnaissance effort, led by Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance, is to learn from earthquakes and mitigate hazards in future earthquakes.

  17. Matched-filter Detection of the Missing Foreshocks and Aftershocks of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Huang, H.; Wang, Y.; Plasencia Linares, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    The 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake occurred at the bottom edge of the locking portion of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), where the Indian plate under-thrusts the Himalayan wedge. The earthquake is followed by a number of large aftershocks but is not preceded by any foreshocks within ~3 weeks according to the NEIC, ISC and NSC catalog. However, a large portion of aftershocks could be missed due to either the contamination of the mainshock coda or small signal to noise ratio. It is also unclear whether there are foreshocks preceding the mainshock, the underlying physical processes of which are crucial for imminent seismic hazard assessment. Here, we employ the matched filter technique to recover the missing events from 22 April to 30 April. We collect 3-component broadband seismic waveforms recorded by one station in Nepal operated by Ev-K2-CNR, OGS Italy and eleven stations in Tibet operated by the China Earthquake Networks Center. We bandpass the seismograms to 1-6 Hz to retain high frequency energies. The template waveforms with high signal-to-noise ratios (> 5) are obtained at several closest stations. To detect and locate the events that occur around the templates, correlograms are shifted at each station with differential travel time as a function of source location based on the CRUST1.0 model. We find ~14 times more events than those listed in the ISC catalog. Some of the detected events are confirmed by visual inspections of the waveforms at the closest stations. The preliminary results show a streak of seismicity occurred around 2.5 days before the mainshock to the southeast of the mainshock hypocenter. The seismicity rate is elevated above the background level during this period of time and decayed subsequently following the Omori's law. The foreshocks appear to migrate towards the hypocenter with logarithmic time ahead of the mainshock, which indicates possible triggering of the mainshock by the propagating afterslip of the foreshocks. Immediately

  18. The Hellenic Seismological Network Of Crete (HSNC): Validation and results of the 2013 aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzopoulos, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Ilias; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2015-04-01

    The number and quality of seismological networks in Europe has increased in the past decades. Nevertheless, the need for localized networks monitoring areas of great seismic and scientific interest is constant. Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC) covers this need for the vicinity of the South Aegean Sea and Crete Island. In the present work with the use of Z-map software (www.seismo.ethz.ch) the spatial variability of Magnitude of Completeness (Mc) is calculated from HSNC's manual analysis catalogue of events for the period 2011 until today, proving the good coverage of HSNC in the areas. Furthermore the 2013, South Aegean seismicity where two large shallow earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of Crete Island, is discussed. The first event takes place on 15th June 2013 in the front of the Hellenic Arc, south from central Crete, while the second one on 12th October, 2013 on the western part of Crete. The two main shocks and their aftershock sequences have been relocated with the use of hypoinverse earthquake location software and an appropriate crust model. The HSNC identified more than 500 and 300 aftershocks respectively followed after the main events. The detailed construction of aftershocks catalogue permits the applicability of modern theories based on complexity sciences as described recently in the frame of non extensive statistical physics. In addition site effects in the stations locations are presented using event and noise recordings. This work was implemented through the project IMPACT-ARC in the framework of action "ARCHIMEDES III-Support of Research Teams at TEI of Crete" (MIS380353) of the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" and is co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national funds References A. Tzanis and F. Vallianatos, "Distributed power-law seismicity changes and crustal deformation in the EW Hellenic Arc", Natural Hazards and Earth Systems Sciences, 3, 179-195, 2003 F. Vallianatos, G

  19. Statistical Properties of the Immediate Aftershocks of the 15 October 2013 Magnitude 7.1 Earthquake in Bohol, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batac, Rene C.

    2016-02-01

    The aftershock records of the magnitude 7.1 earthquake that hit the island of Bohol in central Philippines on 15 October 2013 is investigated in the light of previous results for the Philippines using historical earthquakes. Statistics of interevent distances and interevent times between successive aftershocks recorded for the whole month of October 2013 show marked differences from those of historical earthquakes from two Philippine catalogues of varying periods and completeness levels. In particular, the distributions closely follow only the regimes of the historical distributions that were previously attributed to the strong spatio-temporal correlations. The results therefore suggest that these correlated regimes which emerged naturally from the analyses are strongly dominated by the clustering of aftershock events.

  20. Radiated seismic energy of aftershocks of the 20 March 2012 earthquake, Mw7.5, Ometepec-Pinotepa Nacional, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata Martinez, R. O.; Perez-Campos, X.; Singh, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Radiated seismic energy is a valuable parameter in assessing the size and source characteristics of an earthquake. We study aftershocks of the 20 March 2012 earthquake (Mw7.5) in Ometepec-Pinotepa Nacional,located in the subduction zone of the Pacific coast of Mexico, with the purpose of examining the distribution of the scaled seismic energy (Es) with seismic moment (Mo), Es/Mo, over the main event's rupture area. We estimate Es from regional velocity and acceleration records. For some, larger, aftershocks we also estimate Es from teleseismic data. Preliminary energy estimations suggest that aftershocks closer to the trench have a smaller Es/Mo ratio. In contrast, Es/Mo is larger for events closer to the coast (near the epicenter of the mainshock).

  1. Bessel-beam Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-11-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction free, provides a long focal depth, but its side lobes deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic (PA) signals in OR-PAM. We present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in PA imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples.

  2. Bessel-beam Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-11-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction free, provides a long focal depth, but its side lobes deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic (PA) signals in OR-PAM. We present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in PA imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples. PMID:26524679

  3. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the focal axis of an asymmetrical antenna such as an offset paraboloid reflector whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture but whose focal point is known is provided. A transmitting feed horn array consisting of at least two feed horn elements is positioned asymmetrically on either side of an estimated focal axis which is generally inclined with respect to the boresight axis of the antenna. The feed horn array is aligned with the estimated focal axis so that the phase centers (CP sub 1, CP sub 2) of the two feed horn elements are located on a common line running through the focal point (F) orthogonally with respect to the estimated focal axis.

  4. Distribution and migration of aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Ogasawara Islands intraplate normal-faulting earthquake related to a fracture zone in the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; No, Tetsuo; Kaiho, Yuka; Kodaira, Shuichi; Yamashita, Mikiya; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    describe the aftershocks of a Mw 7.4 intraplate normal-faulting earthquake that occurred 150 km east Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan, on 21 December 2010. It occurred beneath the outer trench slope of the Izu-Ogasawara trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Aftershock observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) began soon after the earthquake and multichannel seismic reflection surveys were conducted across the aftershock area. Aftershocks were distributed in a NW-SE belt 140 km long, oblique to the N-S trench axis. They formed three subparallel lineations along a fracture zone in the Pacific plate. The OBS observations combined with data from stations on Chichi-jima and Haha-jima Islands revealed a migration of the aftershock activity. The first hour, which likely outlines the main shock rupture, was limited to an 80 km long area in the central part of the subsequent aftershock area. The first hour activity occurred mainly around, and appears to have been influenced by, nearby large seamounts and oceanic plateau, such as the Ogasawara Plateau and the Uyeda Ridge. Over the following days, the aftershocks expanded beyond or into these seamounts and plateau. The aftershock distribution and migration suggest that crustal heterogeneities related to a fracture zone and large seamounts and oceanic plateau in the incoming Pacific plate affected the rupture of the main shock. Such preexisting structures may influence intraplate normal-faulting earthquakes in other regions of plate flexure prior to subduction.

  5. Zemmouri earthquake rupture zone (Mw 6.8, Algeria): Aftershocks sequence relocation and 3D velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, A.; Dorbath, C.; Ousadou, F.; Maouche, S.; Chikh, M.; Bounif, M. A.; Meghraoui, M.

    2008-09-01

    We analyze the aftershocks sequence of the Zemmouri thrust faulting earthquake (21 May 2003, Mw 6.8) located east of Algiers in the Tell Atlas. The seismic sequence located during ˜2 months following the mainshock is made of more than 1500 earthquakes and extends NE-SW along a ˜60-km fault rupture zone crossing the coastline. The earthquake relocation was performed using handpicked P and S phases located with the tomoDD in a detailed 3D velocity structure of the epicentral area. Contrasts between velocity patches seem to correlate with contacts between granitic-volcanic basement rocks and the sedimentary formation of the eastern Mitidja basin. The aftershock sequence exhibits at least three seismic clouds and a well-defined SE-dipping main fault geometry that reflects the complex rupture. The distribution of seismic events presents a clear contrast between a dense SW zone and a NE zone with scattered aftershocks. We observe that the mainshock locates between the SW and NE seismic zones; it also lies at the NNS-SSE contact that separates a basement block to the east and sedimentary formations to the west. The aftershock distribution also suggests fault bifurcation at the SW end of the fault rupture, with a 20-km-long ˜N 100° trending seismic cluster, with a vertical fault geometry parallel to the coastline juxtaposed. Another aftershock cloud may correspond to 75° SE dipping fault. The fault geometry and related SW branches may illustrate the interference between pre-existing fault structures and the SW rupture propagation. The rupture zone, related kinematics, and velocity contrasts obtained from the aftershocks distribution are in agreement with the coastal uplift and reflect the characteristics of an active zone controlled by convergent movements at a plate boundary.

  6. Variation of b and p values from aftershocks sequences along the Mexican subduction zone and their relation to plate characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila-Barrientos, L.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Q.; Guzmán-Speziale, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aftershock sequences along the Mexican subduction margin (between coordinates 110ºW and 91ºW) were analyzed by means of the p value from the Omori-Utsu relation and the b value from the Gutenberg-Richter relation. We focused on recent medium to large (Mw > 5.6) events considered susceptible of generating aftershock sequences suitable for analysis. The main goal was to try to find a possible correlation between aftershock parameters and plate characteristics, such as displacement rate, age and segmentation. The subduction regime of Mexico is one of the most active regions of the world with a high frequency of occurrence of medium to large events and plate characteristics change along the subduction margin. Previous studies have observed differences in seismic source characteristics at the subduction regime, which may indicate a difference in rheology and possible segmentation. The results of the analysis of the aftershock sequences indicate a slight tendency for p values to decrease from west to east with increasing of plate age although a statistical significance is undermined by the small number of aftershocks in the sequences, a particular feature distinctive of the region as compared to other world subduction regimes. The b values show an opposite, increasing trend towards the east even though the statistical significance is not enough to warrant the validation of such a trend. A linear regression between both parameters provides additional support for the inverse relation. Moreover, we calculated the seismic coupling coefficient, showing a direct relation with the p and b values. While we cannot undoubtedly confirm the hypothesis that aftershock generation depends on certain tectonic characteristics (age, thickness, temperature), our results do not reject it thus encouraging further study into this question.

  7. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Described are electrical means for determining the focal axis of an offset reflector antenna whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture. Even and odd sensing functions are employed in the focal region, leading to both amplitude and phase criteria for resolving a focal axis generally inclined with respect to the system axis. The analytical aspects of the problem are discussed, and an example related to a 4-meter Large-Antenna Multiple-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is included. The technique is useful for focal axis determination in mathematical simulations and in the physical world.

  8. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  9. Neurocysticercosis presenting as focal hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Azharuddin Mohammed; Shamim, Md Dilawez; Ahmad, Mehtab; Abdali, Nasar

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache, nausea and vomiting, with generalised seizures for the past 15 days. On examination he had bilateral papilloedema, visual acuity was 6/6 in both eyes but perimetry showed right homonymous inferior quadrantanopia. His MRI showed numerous small cystic lesions with eccentric nodules, diffusely distributed in bilateral cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. There was also focal hydrocephalus involving occipital and temporal horns of the left lateral ventricle leading to its selective dilation. Stool examination showed ova of Taenia solium. He was treated with albendazole, prednisone and sustained release sodium valproate for 1 month. His headache resolved and he is free of seizures. Repeat perimetry at 1 month also showed resolution of visual field defect. PMID:24962486

  10. Optimal focal-plane restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Image restoration can be implemented efficiently by calculating the convolution of the digital image and a small kernel during image acquisition. Processing the image in the focal-plane in this way requires less computation than traditional Fourier-transform-based techniques such as the Wiener filter and constrained least-squares filter. Here, the values of the convolution kernel that yield the restoration with minimum expected mean-square error are determined using a frequency analysis of the end-to-end imaging system. This development accounts for constraints on the size and shape of the spatial kernel and all the components of the imaging system. Simulation results indicate the technique is effective and efficient.

  11. Depth determination for shallow teleseismic earthquakes Methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, S.; Wiens, D.A.

    1986-11-01

    Contemporary methods used to determine depths of moderate-sized shallow teleseismic earthquakes are described. These include techniques based on surface wave spectra, and methods which estimate focal depth from the waveforms of body waves. The advantages of different methods and their limitations are discussed, and significant results for plate tectonics, obtained in the last five years by the application of these methods, are presented. 119 references.

  12. Computational Software for Fitting Seismic Data to Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern earthquake catalogs are often analyzed using spatial-temporal point process models such as the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) models of Ogata (1998). My work introduces software to implement two of ETAS models described in Ogata (1998). To find the Maximum-Likelihood Estimates (MLEs), my software provides estimates of the homogeneous background rate parameter and the temporal and spatial parameters that govern triggering effects by applying the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm introduced in Veen and Schoenberg (2008). Despite other computer programs exist for similar data modeling purpose, using EM-algorithm has the benefits of stability and robustness (Veen and Schoenberg, 2008). Spatial shapes that are very long and narrow cause difficulties in optimization convergence and problems with flat or multi-modal log-likelihood functions encounter similar issues. My program uses a robust method to preset a parameter to overcome the non-convergence computational issue. In addition to model fitting, the software is equipped with useful tools for examining modeling fitting results, for example, visualization of estimated conditional intensity, and estimation of expected number of triggered aftershocks. A simulation generator is also given with flexible spatial shapes that may be defined by the user. This open-source software has a very simple user interface. The user may execute it on a local computer, and the program also has potential to be hosted online. Java language is used for the software's core computing part and an optional interface to the statistical package R is provided.

  13. Including foreshocks and aftershocks in time-independent probabilistic seismic hazard analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver S.

    2012-01-01

    Time‐independent probabilistic seismic‐hazard analysis treats each source as being temporally and spatially independent; hence foreshocks and aftershocks, which are both spatially and temporally dependent on the mainshock, are removed from earthquake catalogs. Yet, intuitively, these earthquakes should be considered part of the seismic hazard, capable of producing damaging ground motions. In this study, I consider the mainshock and its dependents as a time‐independent cluster, each cluster being temporally and spatially independent from any other. The cluster has a recurrence time of the mainshock; and, by considering the earthquakes in the cluster as a union of events, dependent events have an opportunity to contribute to seismic ground motions and hazard. Based on the methods of the U.S. Geological Survey for a high‐hazard site, the inclusion of dependent events causes ground motions that are exceeded at probability levels of engineering interest to increase by about 10% but could be as high as 20% if variations in aftershock productivity can be accounted for reliably.

  14. Automatic dynamic depth focusing for NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Jorge; Cruza, Jorge F.; Fritsch, Carlos; Moreno, José M.

    2014-02-01

    Automatic Dynamic Depth Focusing (ADDF) is a function currently not available in state of the art phased array NDT instruments. However, it would be a valuable tool to inspect arbitrarily shaped parts or when the part-array geometry is not accurately known. ADDF will avoid the burden of computing and programming focal laws, the complications of CAD-based geometry descriptions and is an effective tool to adapt to changes in the probe-part geometry during the inspection. Furthermore, the dynamic depth focusing feature will yield the best possible image quality with phased array technology. This work proposes an ADDF technique based on a procedure that automatically obtains the array-part geometry and sets up all the required focusing parameters. The array-part geometry is estimated from the first echo time of arrival using a few trigger shots. A virtual array that operates in the second medium only allows computing the initial values for a real-time dynamic depth focusing hardware. This technique is well adapted to inspect parts of unknown or variable geometry, or when the distance and/or the alignment of the array probe with the part changes during the inspection. The overall procedure is relatively fast (about 2 seconds using standard computers), even faster than currently available geometry-based focal law calculators.

  15. FOCAL LESIONS OF VISUAL CORTEX: EFFECTS ON VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Focal lesions were placed in the visual cortex of Long-Evans hooded rats, immediately below skull screw recording electrodes. Lesions were produced by heat and extended an average depth of about 0.9 mm below the cortical surface. Evoked potentials recorded from the electrode over...

  16. GABAergic networks jump-start focal seizures.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Abnormally enhanced glutamatergic excitation is commonly believed to mark the onset of a focal seizure. This notion, however, is not supported by firm evidence, and it will be challenged here. A general reduction of unit firing has been indeed observed in association with low-voltage fast activity at the onset of seizures recorded during presurgical intracranial monitoring in patients with focal, drug-resistant epilepsies. Moreover, focal seizures in animal models start with increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneuronal activity that silences principal cells. In vitro studies have shown that synchronous activation of GABAA receptors occurs at seizure onset and causes sizeable elevations in extracellular potassium, thus facilitating neuronal recruitment and seizure progression. A paradoxical involvement of GABAergic networks is required for the initiation of focal seizures characterized by low-voltage fast activity, which represents the most common seizure-onset pattern in focal epilepsies. PMID:27061793

  17. Aftershock distribution as a constraint on the geodetic model of coseismic slip for the 2004 Parkfield earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennington, Ninfa; Thurber, Clifford; Feigl, Kurt; Murray-Moraleda Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Several studies of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake have linked the spatial distribution of the event’s aftershocks to the mainshock slip distribution on the fault. Using geodetic data, we find a model of coseismic slip for the 2004 Parkfield earthquake with the constraint that the edges of coseismic slip patches align with aftershocks. The constraint is applied by encouraging the curvature of coseismic slip in each model cell to be equal to the negative of the curvature of seismicity density. The large patch of peak slip about 15 km northwest of the 2004 hypocenter found in the curvature-constrained model is in good agreement in location and amplitude with previous geodetic studies and the majority of strong motion studies. The curvature-constrained solution shows slip primarily between aftershock “streaks” with the continuation of moderate levels of slip to the southeast. These observations are in good agreement with strong motion studies, but inconsistent with the majority of published geodetic slip models. Southeast of the 2004 hypocenter, a patch of peak slip observed in strong motion studies is absent from our curvature-constrained model, but the available GPS data do not resolve slip in this region. We conclude that the geodetic slip model constrained by the aftershock distribution fits the geodetic data quite well and that inconsistencies between models derived from seismic and geodetic data can be attributed largely to resolution issues.

  18. Determination of the Fault Plane of the 2013 Santa Cruz Earthquake, Bolivia, Through Relative Location of Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivadeneyra Vera, J. C.; Assumpcao, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Central Andes of southern Bolivia is a highly seismic region due to the faults present in this area which eventually could generate earthquakes up to 8.5 Mw. Nevertheless most of them are shallow and have low magnitude. In 2013, an earthquake of 5.0 Mw ocurred in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, it was followed by five aftershocks in the two months after the mainshock. Distances between epicenters of the aftershocks and the mainshock are up to 34 km, which is greater than expected for an earthquake of this magnitude. Additionaly the uncertainty of the epicenters is around 20 km; this scenario is not suitable for studies looking to determine the seismogenic fault orientation. Using data from South American stations of the international network of the Incorporated Research Institutions dor Seismology (IRIS) and the relative location technique, that uses the surface waves (usually the clearest wave in noisy sismograms), the epicenters of five aftershocks of the Santa Cruz series were determinated in relation the mainshock. This method enabled to achieve epicentral locations with uncertainties smaller than 2 km, distances between the aftershocks and the mainshock are up to 7 km, in accordance with the magnitude of the earthquake. The result of the relative location showed a N - S trend of the epicenters in agreement with the location and orientation of the Mandeyapecua fault, the largest reverse fault in Bolivia. Key words: Relative location, Surface waves

  19. Kinematic rupture process of the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake and its main aftershocks from teleseismic and strong-motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrat, S.; Madariaga, R.; Buforn, E.; Campos, J.; Asch, G.; Vilotte, J. P.

    2010-09-01

    We study a large Mw = 7.6 earthquake that occurred on 2007 November 14 in the Northern Chile seismic gap near the city of Tocopilla. Using a variety of seismic data we show that this earthquake ruptured only the lower part of the interplate seismic zone and generated a series of plate interface aftershocks. Two large aftershocks on 2007 November 15 ruptured the interplate zone oceanwards of the Mejillones Peninsula, a major geographical feature in the Antofagasta region. On 2007 December 16, a large Mw = 6.8 aftershock, that occurred near the southern bottom of the fault plane of the main event, is shown to be a slab-push earthquake located inside the subducted Nazca Plate and triggered by along slab compression. Aftershocks of this event demonstrate that it occurred on an almost vertical fault. The Tocopilla earthquake took place just after the installation of a new seismological network by Chilean, German and French researchers. The accelerometric data combined with far field seismic data provide a quite complete and consistent view of the rupture process. The earthquake broke a long (130 km) and narrow (about 30-50 km) zone of the plate interface just above the transition zone. Using a non-linear kinematic inversion method, we determined that rupture occurred on two well-defined patches of roughly elliptical shape. We discuss the consequences of this event for models of gap filling earthquakes in Chile proposed in the 1970s.

  20. GIS-based 3D modeling and visualization of the Mw7.7, 2007, Tocopilla aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, S.; Sobiesiak, M.

    2009-04-01

    The November 14, 2007 Mw 7.7 earthquake nucleated on the west coast of northern Chile about 40 km east of the city of Tocopilla. It took place in the southern part of the of a large seismic gap namely, the Iquique subduction zone segment which is supposed to be at the end of its seismic cycle. The Tocopilla fault plane appears to be the northern continuation of the Mw 8.0, 1995 Antofagasta earthquake. We present a complex 3D model of the rupture area including first hypocenter localizations of aftershocks following the event. The data was recorded during a mission of the German Task Force for Earthquakes after the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake. 34 seismic stations were recording the aftershocks from November 2007 until May 2008. In general, subduction zones have a complex structure where most of the volumes examined are characterized by strong variations in physical and material parameters and are far away from a homogeneously layered half space. Therefore, 3D representation of the geophysical and geological conditions to be found are of great importance to understand such a subduction environment. Using ArcScene as a three-dimensional modeling tool gives us the possibility to visualize the aftershock distribution along the subducting slab and identify clear structures and clusters within the data set. Furthermore we combine the 2007 Tocopilla data set with the 1995 Antofagasta aftershocks which provides a new, three-dimensional insight into the segment boundary of these two events.

  1. The Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) for OSI - Experiences from IFE14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Sick, Benjamin; Häge, Martin; Blake, Thomas; Labak, Peter; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    An on-site inspection (OSI) is the third of four elements of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The sole purpose of an OSI is to confirm whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the treaty and to gather any facts which might assist in identifying any possible violator. It thus constitutes the final verification measure under the CTBT if all other available measures are not able to confirm the nature of a suspicious event. The Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) carried out the Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE14) in the Dead Sea Area of Jordan from 3 November to 9. December 2014. It was a fictitious OSI whose aim was to test the inspection capabilities in an integrated manner. The technologies allowed during an OSI are listed in the Treaty. The aim of the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) is to detect and localize aftershocks of low magnitudes of the triggering event or collapses of underground cavities. The locations of these events are expected in the vicinity of a possible previous explosion and help to narrow down the search area within an inspection area (IA) of an OSI. The success of SAMS depends on the main elements, hardware, software, deployment strategy, the search logic and not least the effective use of personnel. All elements of SAMS were tested and improved during the Built-Up Exercises (BUE) which took place in Austria and Hungary. IFE14 provided more realistic climatic and hazardous terrain conditions with limited resources. Significant variations in topography of the IA of IFE14 in the mountainous Dead Sea Area of Jordan led to considerable challenges which were not expected from experiences encountered during BUE. The SAMS uses mini arrays with an aperture of about 100 meters and with a total of 4 elements. The station network deployed during IFE14 and results of the data analysis will be presented. Possible aftershocks of

  2. Report on SEQUAL/FOCAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, E. J.; Philander, S. G. H.; Richardson, P. L.

    In Eos (April 6, 1982), United States plans for a program to study the dynamic response of the equatorial Atlantic to seasonally varying surface winds were described. Now, 6 years later, we report on progress toward our goal “to describe accurately, and to model correctly” the changes in the currents and density field of the upper equatorial Atlantic Ocean during a 2-year period. A major effort toward this goal was the field phase of SEQUAL (Seasonal Response of the Equatorial Atlantic) and the closely coordinated French program FOCAL (Français Océan et Climat dans l'Atlantique Equatorial).Between February 1983 and September 1984 changes in the surface winds and in oceanic conditions in the equatorial Atlantic were monitored continuously with a variety of instruments. Figure 1 shows key deployments and sections. The resulting data include six current meter moorings, 15 inverted echo sounders and island tide gauges, 57 near-surface drifters, and 18 French and five U.S. cruises that made 1200 hydrographic stations and 800 current profiles. All these data, as well as nearly 10,000 expendable bathythermographs (XBTs) (from the cruises, from air-dropped expendable bathythermograph (AXBT) programs, and from repeated ship of opportunity lines run between 1980 and 1985) were combined and documented by George Heimerdinger, of the National Oceanographic Data Center, and are available from NODC on request.

  3. Focal liver lesions found incidentally

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, Abdullah A; Alshuhri, Abdullah H; Alonazi, Majed M; Mourad, Moustafa Mabrouk; Bramhall, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Incidentally found focal liver lesions are a common finding and a reason for referral to hepatobiliary service. They are often discovered in patients with history of liver cirrhosis, colorectal cancer, incidentally during work up for abdominal pain or in a trauma setting. Specific points should considered during history taking such as risk factors of liver cirrhosis; hepatitis, alcohol consumption, substance exposure or use of oral contraceptive pills and metabolic syndromes. Full blood count, liver function test and tumor markers can act as a guide to minimize the differential diagnosis and to categorize the degree of liver disease. Imaging should start with B-mode ultrasound. If available, contrast enhanced ultrasound is a feasible, safe, cost effective option and increases the ability to reach a diagnosis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography should be considered next. It is more accurate in diagnosis and better to study anatomy for possible operation. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance is the gold standard with the highest sensitivity. If doubt still remains, the options are biopsy or surgical excision. PMID:27028805

  4. The study of recent seismicity in the aftershock area of Neftegorsk earthquake using waveform cross correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitov, Ivan; Turuntaev, Sergey; Konovalov, Alexei; Stepnov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Unusually long duration of seismic activity (more than 20 years) was observed in the aftershock area of the 1995 Neftegorsk, Sakhalin, Russia catastrophic earthquake (Ms=7.6). To study the phenomena, we have processed seismic data from 130 events occurred within that area as measured between 2006 and 2015. In order to improve the accuracy of relative location and magnitude estimation of these events we have applied new techniques based on waveform cross correlation. We use 7 three-component (3-C) seismic stations which detected most of these events. Three-component waveform templates were prepared for these stations from those events which had signals with SNR>5 at vertical channels. The events with 3 and more templates are used as master-events for waveform cross correlation. Overall, the re-estimated location and magnitudes demonstrate higher precisions and are used for the statistical analysis and numerical modelling of seismo-tectonic regime within the studied zone.

  5. Delineating the Fault Planes of the 2006 Pingtung Doublet Earthquakes by Aftershock Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Hsu, S.

    2011-12-01

    The 2006 Pintung doublet earthquakes (Mw=6.9) were occurred in the offshore region of southwestern Taiwan, where were rarely expected to have large earthquake. Based on the global centroid-moment-tensor(CMT) inversion result, the first one is associated with a normal-faulting and the other with a strike-slip faulting. In this study, the aftershock sequences recorded by an OBS array deployed over the source zone for one week, were relocated to estimate the true fault planes. The preliminary relocation results indicate that the most events in the northern part were aligned with the eastward dipping fault plan of the fist mainshock, and the remnants were spread sparsely but seemed to follow the westward dipping fault plan of the second mainshock. This result is not usually expected because the hypocenter of the first event was located southern than that of the second one. However, the more detailed examination is still needed.

  6. Depth of field in modern thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Norbert; Franks, John

    2015-05-01

    Modern thermal imaging lenses for uncooled detectors are high aperture systems. Very often, their aperture based fnumber is faster than 1.2. The impact of this on the depth of field is dramatic, especially for narrow field lenses. The users would like to know how the image quality changes with and without refocusing for objects at different distances from the camera core. The Depth of Field approach presented here is based on the lens specific Through Focus MTF. It will be averaged for the detector area. The lens specific Through Focus MTF will be determined at the detector Nyquist frequency, which is defined by the pixel pitch. In this way, the specific lens and the specific FPA-geometry (pixel pitch, detector area) are considered. The condition, that the Through Focus MTF at full Nyquist must be higher than 0.25, defines a certain symmetrical depth of focus. This criterion provides a good discrimination for reasonable lens/detector combinations. The examples chosen reflect the actual development of uncooled camera cores. The symmetrical depth of focus is transferred to object space using paraxial relations. This defines a typical depth of field diagram containing three functions: Hyperfocal distance, nearest and furthest distance versus sharp distance (best focus). Pictures taken with an IR Camera illustrate the effect in the depth of field and its dependence on focal length. These pictures confirm the methodology. A separate problem is the acceptable drop of resolution in combination with a specific camera core and specific object scenes. We propose to evaluate the MTF-graph at half Nyquist frequency. This quantifies the resolution loss without refocus in accordance with the IR-picture degradation at the limits of the Depth of Field. The approach is applied to different commercially available lenses. Pictures illustrate the Depth of Field for different pixel pitches and pixel counts.

  7. The 11 April 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake triggered large aftershocks worldwide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Stein, Ross S.; Sevilgen, Volkan; Burgmann, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Large earthquakes trigger very small earthquakes globally during passage of the seismic waves and during the following several hours to days1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, but so far remote aftershocks of moment magnitude M≥5.5 have not been identified11, with the lone exception of an M=6.9 quake remotely triggered by the surface waves from an M=6.6 quake 4,800 kilometres away12. The 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake that had a moment magnitude of 8.6 is the largest strike-slip event ever recorded. Here we show that the rate of occurrence of remote M≥5.5 earthquakes (>1,500 kilometres from the epicentre) increased nearly fivefold for six days after the 2012 event, and extended in magnitude to M≥7. These global aftershocks were located along the four lobes of Love-wave radiation; all struck where the dynamic shear strain is calculated to exceed 10-7 for at least 100 seconds during dynamic-wave passage. The other M≥8.5 mainshocks during the past decade are thrusts; after these events, the global rate of occurrence of remote M≥5.5 events increased by about one-third the rate following the 2012 shock and lasted for only two days, a weaker but possibly real increase. We suggest that the unprecedented delayed triggering power of the 2012 earthquake may have arisen because of its strike-slip source geometry or because the event struck at a time of an unusually low global earthquake rate, perhaps increasing the number of nucleation sites that were very close to failure.

  8. Applications of the predictability of the Coherent Noise Model to aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulos, Stavros-Richard; Sarlis, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    A study [1] of the coherent noise model [2-4] in natural time [5-7] has shown that it exhibits predictability. Interestingly, one of the predictors suggested [1] for the coherent noise model can be generalized and applied to the case of (real) aftershock sequences. The results obtained [8] so far are beyond chance. Here, we apply this approach to several aftershock sequences of strong earthquakes with magnitudes Mw ≥6.9 in Indonesia, California and Greece, including the Mw9.2 earthquake that occurred on 26 December 2004 in Sumatra. References. [1] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Predictability of the coherent-noise model and its applications, Physical Review E, 85, 051136, 2012. [2] M.E.J. Newman, Self-organized criticality, evolution and the fossil extinction record, Proc. R. Soc. London B, 263, 1605-1610, 1996. [3] M. E. J. Newman and K. Sneppen, Avalanches, scaling, and coherent noise, Phys. Rev. E, 54, 6226-6231, 1996. [4] K. Sneppen and M. Newman, Coherent noise, scale invariance and intermittency in large systems, Physica D, 110, 209 - 222. [5] P. Varotsos, N. Sarlis, and E. Skordas, Spatiotemporal complexity aspects on the interrelation between Seismic Electric Signals and seismicity, Practica of Athens Academy, 76, 294-321, 2001. [6] P.A. Varotsos, N.V. Sarlis, and E.S. Skordas, Long-range correlations in the electric signals that precede rupture, Phys. Rev. E, 66, 011902, 2002. [7] Varotsos P. A., Sarlis N. V. and Skordas E. S., Natural Time Analysis: The new view of time. Precursory Seismic Electric Signals, Earthquakes and other Complex Time-Series (Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg) 2011. [8] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, "Visualization of the significance of Receiver Operating Characteristics based on confidence ellipses", Computer Physics Communications, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpc.2013.12.009

  9. Early aftershocks statistics: first results of prospective test of alarm-based model (EAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, Peter; Narteau, Clement; Holschneider, Matthias; Schorlemmer, Danijel

    2010-05-01

    It was shown recently that the c-value systematically changes across different faulting styles and thus may reflect the state of stress. Hypothesizing that smaller c-values indicate places more vulnerable to moderate and large earthquakes, we suggested a simple alarm-based forecasting model, called EAST, submitted for the test in CSEP in California (3-month, M ≥ 4 class); the official test was started on July 1, 2009. We replaced the c-value by more robust parameter, the geometric average of the aftershock elapsed times (the ea-value). We normalize the ea-value calculated for last 5 years by the value calculated for preceding 25 years. When and where the normalized ea-value exceeds a given threshold, an 'alarm' is issued: an earthquake is expected to occur within the next 3 months. Retrospective tests of the model show good and stable results (even better for targets M ≥ 5). During the first 6 months of the prospective test 22 target earthquakes took place in the testing area. 14 of them (more than 60%) were forecasted with the alarm threshold resulting in only 1% of space-time occupied by alarms (5% if space is normalized by past earthquake frequencies). This highly encouraging result was obtained mostly due to successful forecast of the sequence of 11 earthquakes near Lone Pine in 1-9 October 2009. However, if we disregard aftershocks as targets, then 4 out of 9 main shocks occurred in alarms with normalized ea-value threshold resulting in 2.5% of normalized space-time occupied by alarms, the result is also impossible to get by chance at a significance level 1%. To expand the evaluation of the EAST model relative to larger number of forecast models, we have developed its frequency-based version. We estimate the expected frequency of earthquakes using joint retrospective statistics of targets and the ea-value.

  10. Multiple event location analysis of aftershock sequences in the Pannonian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekesi, Eszter; Sule, Balint; Bondar, Istvan

    2016-04-01

    Accurate seismic event location is crucial to understand tectonic processes such as crustal faults that are most commonly investigated by studying seismic activity. Location errors can be significantly reduced using multiple event location methods. We applied the double difference method to relocate the earthquake occurred near Oroszlány and its 200 aftershocks to identify the geometry of the related fault. We used the extended ISC location algorithm, iLoc to determine the absolute single event locations for the Oroszlány aftershock sequence and applied double difference algorithm on the new hypocenters. To improve location precision, we added differential times from waveform cross-correlation to the multiple event location process to increase the accuracy of arrival time readings. We also tested the effect of various local 1-D velocity models on the results. We compared hypoDD results of bulletin and iLoc hypocenters to investigate the effect of initial hypocenter parameters on the relocation process. We show that hypoDD collapses the initial, rather diffuse locations into a smaller cluster and the vertical cross-sections show sharp images of seismicity. Unsurprisingly, the combined use of catalog and cross-correlation data sets provides the more accurate locations. Some of the relocated events in the cluster are ground truth quality with a location accuracy of 5 km or better. Having achieved accurate locations for the event cluster we are able to resolve the fault plane ambiguity in the moment tensor solutions and determine the accurate strike of the fault.

  11. Imaging and Understanding Foreshock and Aftershock Behavior Around the 2014 Iquique, Northern Chile, Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Meng, X.; Peng, Z.; Newman, A. V.; Hu, S.; Williamson, A.

    2014-12-01

    On April 1st, 2014, a moment magnitude (MW) 8.2 earthquake occurred offshore Iquique, Northern Chile. There were numerous smaller earthquakes preceding and following the mainshock, making it an ideal case to study the spatio-temporal relation among these events and their association with the mainshock. We applied a matched-filter technique to detect previously missing foreshocks and aftershocks of the 2014 Iquique earthquake. Using more than 900 template events recorded by 19 broadband seismic stations (network code CX) operated by the GEOFON Program of GFZ Potsdam, we found 4392 earthquakes between March 1st and April 3rd, 2014, including more than 30 earthquakes with magnitude larger than 4 that were previously missed in the catalog from the Chile National Seismological Center. Additionally, we found numerous small earthquakes with magnitudes between 1 and 2 preceding the largest foreshock, an MW 6.7 event occurring on March 16th, approximately 2 weeks before the Iquique mainshock. We observed that the foreshocks migrated northward at a speed of approximately 6 km/day. Using a finite fault slip model of the mainshock determined from teleseismic waveform inversion (Hayes, 2014), we calculated the Coulomb stress changes in the nearby regions of the mainshock. We found that there was ~200% increase in seismicity in the areas with increased Coulomb stress. Our next step is to evaluate the Coulomb stress changes associated with earlier foreshocks and their roles in triggering later foreshocks, and possibly the mainshock. For this, we plan to create a fault model of the temporal evolution of the Coulomb behavior along the interface with time, assuming Wells and Coppersmith (1994) type fault parameters. These results will be compared with double-difference relocations (using HypoDD), presenting a more accurate understanding of the spatial-temporal evolution of foreshocks and aftershocks of the 2014 Iquique earthquake.

  12. Correlation between the parameters of the aftershock rate equation: Implications for the forecasting of future sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, Paolo; Lolli, Barbara

    2006-06-01

    We analyzed the correlations among the parameters of the Reasenberg and Jones [Reasenberg, P.A., Jones, L.M., 1989. Earthquake hazard after a mainshock in California, Science 243, 1173-1176] formula describing the aftershock rate after a mainshock as a function of time and magnitude, on the basis of parameter estimates made in previous works for New Zealand, Italy and California. For all of three datasets we found that the magnitude-independent productivity a is significantly correlated with the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law and, in some cases, with parameters p and c of the modified Omori's law. We also found significant correlations between p and c but, different from some previous works, not between p and b. We verified that assuming a coefficient for mainshock magnitude α ≈ 2/3 b (instead of b) removes the correlation between a and b and improves the ability to forecast the behavior of Italian sequences occurred from 1997 to 2003 on the basis of average parameters estimated from sequences occurred from 1981 to 1996. This assumption well agrees with direct α estimates made in the framework of an epidemic type model (ETAS) from the data of some large Italian sequences. Our results suggest a modification of the original Reasenberg and Jones (1989) formulation leading to predict lower rates (and probabilities) for stronger mainshocks and conversely higher rates for weaker ones. We also inferred that the correlation of a with p and c might be the consequence of the trade-off between the two parameters of the modified Omori's law. In this case the correlation can be partially removed by renormalizing the time-dependent part of the rate equation. Finally, the absence of correlation between p and b, observed for all the examined datasets, indicates that such correlation, previously inferred from theoretical considerations and empirical results in some regions, does not represent a common property of aftershock sequences in different part of the world.

  13. The 11 April 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake triggered large aftershocks worldwide.

    PubMed

    Pollitz, Fred F; Stein, Ross S; Sevilgen, Volkan; Bürgmann, Roland

    2012-10-11

    Large earthquakes trigger very small earthquakes globally during passage of the seismic waves and during the following several hours to days, but so far remote aftershocks of moment magnitude M ≥ 5.5 have not been identified, with the lone exception of an M = 6.9 quake remotely triggered by the surface waves from an M = 6.6 quake 4,800 kilometres away. The 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake that had a moment magnitude of 8.6 is the largest strike-slip event ever recorded. Here we show that the rate of occurrence of remote M ≥ 5.5 earthquakes (>1,500 kilometres from the epicentre) increased nearly fivefold for six days after the 2012 event, and extended in magnitude to M ≤ 7. These global aftershocks were located along the four lobes of Love-wave radiation; all struck where the dynamic shear strain is calculated to exceed 10(-7) for at least 100 seconds during dynamic-wave passage. The other M ≥ 8.5 mainshocks during the past decade are thrusts; after these events, the global rate of occurrence of remote M ≥ 5.5 events increased by about one-third the rate following the 2012 shock and lasted for only two days, a weaker but possibly real increase. We suggest that the unprecedented delayed triggering power of the 2012 earthquake may have arisen because of its strike-slip source geometry or because the event struck at a time of an unusually low global earthquake rate, perhaps increasing the number of nucleation sites that were very close to failure. PMID:23023131

  14. Focusing wave group on a current of finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkoune, D.; Touboul, J.; Abcha, N.; Mouazé, D.; Ezersky, A.

    2013-11-01

    Formation of freak waves resulting from the wave packets propagating in finite water depth on the background of a current is studied experimentally and numerically. In the experiment, the freak waves appear as a result of dispersion focusing of wave train excited by wave maker with modulated frequency. The space evolution of the frequency modulated train is studied in numerical simulations. We showed that in the water of finite depth, a distance of focusing increases and amplitude in the focal point decreases in comparison with infinite water depth. Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical simulations if wave breaking of surface waves does not occur.

  15. Displacement measurement of the depth migration of transparent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Makoto; Ishimaru, Ichirou; Ishizaki, Katsumi; Yasokawa, Toshiki; Kuriyama, Shigeki; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nakai, Seiji; Takegawa, Kaoru; Tanaka, Naoyuki

    2006-12-11

    This letter reports a method for displacement measurement of the depth migration of transparent cells. This proposed optical spatial filtering method allows visualization of the transparent cells and determination of depth migration as a horizontal displacement positive or negative first order diffracted light on the detector surface. When the sample is displaced upward or downward from the focal plane, first and negative first order diffracted light form images at a different point as a light circle. The coordinates of these two light circles on the detector surface change places when the displacement of depth migration moves to the opposite direction.

  16. Seismic Illumination Analysis in Poor Oil & Gas Field Data by Using Focal Beam Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latiff, A. H. Abdul; Ghosh, D. P.; Harith, Z. Z. Tuan

    2014-03-01

    The area underneath shallow gas cloud is an area where the image of subsurface data is generally poor. This distorted image underneath gas zones usually contains precious information of hydrocarbon accumulation. Previously, we analyse the factors contribute to poor subsurface seismic image underneath the gas cloud model and use focal beam technique to understand subsurface illumination information. Encourage by model-based success, we shift our focus to data-based application by applying the focal beam technique into a real field data. The results from this field were analyse in term of resolution function and amplitude versus ray parameter (AVP) imprint for different reflector depth, followed by acquisition analysis on the surface level. For this purpose, a velocity data of a field located in Malay Basin was built before applying the focal beam calculation. We will demonstrate that by using focal beam analysis for this field, we will able to obtain good imaging particularly for target reflector at 2000ms, 4000ms and 6000ms depth, provided the full 3D acquisition geometry was used during focal beam application.

  17. The Gorkha earthquake of April 25, 2015 in Nepal: Tectonic position, aftershock process, and possibilities of forecasting the evolution of seismic situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhin, E. A.; Lutikov, A. I.; Sobisevich, L. E.; Shen, To; Kanonidi, K. Kh.

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of the foci for the main shock and strongest aftershocks of the Gorkha earthquake of April 25, 2015 in Nepal are described. The macroseismic data and examples of seismic dislocations are discussed. The progression of the release of seismic energy by the aftershock process is analyzed. The data for the geophysical and seismological precursors of the main shock and the strongest aftershock of May 12, 2015 are presented. These data allowed us to formulate the short-term forecast of this event.

  18. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  19. WE-E-BRE-04: Dual Focal Spot Dose Painting for Precision Preclinical Radiobiological Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J; Lindsay, P; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent progress in small animal radiotherapy systems has provided the foundation for delivering the heterogeneous, millimeter scale dose distributions demanded by preclinical radiobiology investigations. Despite advances in preclinical dose planning, delivery of highly heterogeneous dose distributions is constrained by the fixed collimation systems and large x-ray focal spot common in small animal radiotherapy systems. This work proposes a dual focal spot dose optimization and delivery method with a large x-ray focal spot used to deliver homogeneous dose regions and a small focal spot to paint spatially heterogeneous dose regions. Methods: Two-dimensional dose kernels were measured for a 1 mm circular collimator with radiochromic film at 10 mm depth in a solid water phantom for the small and large x-ray focal spots on a recently developed small animal microirradiator. These kernels were used in an optimization framework which segmented a desired dose distribution into low- and high-spatial frequency regions for delivery by the large and small focal spot, respectively. For each region, the method determined an optimal set of stage positions and beam-on times. The method was demonstrated by optimizing a bullseye pattern consisting of 0.75 mm radius circular target and 0.5 and 1.0 mm wide rings alternating between 0 and 2 Gy. Results: Compared to a large focal spot technique, the dual focal spot technique improved the optimized dose distribution: 69.2% of the optimized dose was within 0.5 Gy of the intended dose for the large focal spot, compared to 80.6% for the dual focal spot method. The dual focal spot design required 14.0 minutes of optimization, and will require 178.3 minutes for automated delivery. Conclusion: The dual focal spot optimization and delivery framework is a novel option for delivering conformal and heterogeneous dose distributions at the preclinical level and provides a new experimental option for unique radiobiological investigations

  20. Velocity Inhomogeneity of The Seismic Focal Zone In Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanina, I.; Gontovaya, L.; Levina, V.; Stepanova, M.

    Kamchatka is situated in the junction zone of Kuril-Kamchatka and Aleutian island arcs. According to P.R.Vogt et.al the geometry of this conjunction is determined by the Hawaiian-Emperor Volcanic Seamount Chain. The Kluchevsky volcanic group be- longs to intersection of these structures on the Kamchatka Peninsula. Due to high yield of magmatic material this group can be considered as one of the so-called hot spots on Earth. We studied the velocity structure of the Earth's crust and upper mantle in the transition zone continent-Pacific Ocean up to the depth about 120 km. 3-D veloc- ity structure is reconstructed by seismic tomography method (SSA modification). We used regional catalogue of Kamchatka earthquakes for the period 1975-1999 recorded by 35 seismological stations within the territory of Kamchatka (Kuril-Kamchatka is- land arc) and the Bering Island. Data are carefully selected according to special re- quirements on depth, magnitude, accuracy in coordinates and origin time. The amount of data provides high resolution of observation pattern and accuracy of obtained veloc- ity residuals. Distributions of Vp and Vs velocities are presented for the depth ranges 0-20, 20-35, 35-60, 60-90 and 90-120 km, and for vertical crossections along and across the Kuril-Kamchatka island arc. Significant lateral and vertical inhomogeneity of the seismic focal zone is revealed. We identify narrow steep dipping low velocity zones, related to deep faults with continuation on the Peninsula. These zones sepa- rate crust and mantle blocks with high contrast within the focal layer. Usually strong earthquakes are related to these boundaries. The conjunction zone of the island arc and the Emperor fault (its continuation under Kamchatka) coincides with the low velocity zone in the mantle at depth 60-90 km, continued in the continental block. A chain of volcanoes oriented across Eastern-Kamchatka volcanic belt is related to this zone. Volcanic belt on the whole is shifted westwards in

  1. Oxygen depth profiling with subnanometre depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmata, Marcel; Munnik, Frans; Hanf, Daniel; Grötzschel, Rainer; Crocoll, Sonja; Möller, Wolfhard

    2014-10-01

    A High-depth Resolution Elastic Recoil Detection (HR-ERD) set-up using a magnetic spectrometer has been taken into operation at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the first time. This instrument allows the investigation of light elements in ultra-thin layers and their interfaces with a depth resolution of less than 1 nm near the surface. As the depth resolution is highly influenced by the experimental measurement parameters, sophisticated optimisation procedures have been implemented. Effects of surface roughness and sample damage caused by high fluences need to be quantified for each kind of material. Also corrections are essential for non-equilibrium charge state distributions that exist very close to the surface. Using the example of a high-k multilayer SiO2/Si3N4Ox/SiO2/Si it is demonstrated that oxygen in ultra-thin films of a few nanometres thickness can be investigated by HR-ERD.

  2. Depth migration of seasonally induced seismicity at The Geysers geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Totten, Eoghan J.; Bürgmann, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Seismicity from injected fluids provides insight into the hydraulically conductive fracture network at The Geysers (TG), California, geothermal reservoir. Induced earthquakes at TG result from both thermoelastic and poroelastic stresses as injected fluids cool the rocks and increase pore pressure. The spatiotemporal evolution of M ≥ 1.5 seismicity is characterized as a function of depth in the northwest and southeast regions of TG to develop time-dependent earthquake rates using an epidemic-type aftershock sequence model. The seismicity and injection follow an annual cycle that peaks in the winter months and is correlated by depth. The results indicate a time lag of ≤6 months for fluids to migrate >3 km below the injection depth. Water injection is the main cause of seismicity as fluids penetrate into the reservoir. Our results suggest that a steeply dipping fracture network of hydraulically conductive faults allows fluid migration to a few kilometers below the point of injection.

  3. Aftershock Duration of the 1976 Ms 7.8 Tangshan Earthquake: Implication for the Seismic Hazard Model with a Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Q.; Shi, B.

    2011-12-01

    The disaster of the Ms 7.8 earthquake occurred in Tangshan, China, on July 28th 1976 caused at least 240,000 deaths. The mainshock was followed by two largest aftershocks, the Ms 7.1 occurred after 15 hr later of the mainshock, and the Ms 6.9 occurred on 15 November. The aftershock sequence is lasting to date, making the regional seismic activity rate around the Tangshan main fault much higher than that of before the main event. If these aftershocks are involved in the local main event catalog for the PSHA calculation purpose, the resultant seismic hazard calculation will be overestimated in this region and underestimated in other place. However, it is always difficult to accurately determine the time duration of aftershock sequences and identifies the aftershocks from main event catalog for seismologist. In this study, by using theoretical inference and empirical relation given by Dieterich, we intended to derive the plausible time length of aftershock sequences of the Ms 7.8 Tangshan earthquake. The aftershock duration from log-log regression approach gives us about 120 years according to the empirical Omori's relation. Based on Dietrich approach, it has been claimed that the aftershock duration is a function of remote shear stressing rate, normal stress acting on the fault plane, and fault frictional constitutive parameters. In general, shear stressing rate could be estimated in three ways: 1. Shear stressing rate could be written as a function of static stress drop and a mean earthquake recurrence time. In this case, the time length of aftershock sequences is about 70-100 years. However, since the recurrence time inherits a great deal of uncertainty. 2. Ziv and Rubin derived a general function between shear stressing rate, fault slip speed and fault width with a consideration that aftershock duration does not scale with mainshock magnitude. Therefore, from Ziv's consideration, the aftershock duration is about 80 years. 3. Shear stressing rate is also can be

  4. Stereoscopic depth constancy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Phillip; Banks, Martin S

    2016-06-19

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269596

  5. Stereoscopic depth constancy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269596

  6. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David Lynn

    2011-08-01

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  7. Fault systems of the 1971 San Fernando and 1994 Northridge earthquakes, southern California: Relocated aftershocks and seismic images from LARSE II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Clayton, R.W.; Davis, P.M.; Ryberg, T.; Lutter, W.J.; Okaya, D.A.; Hauksson, E.; Prodehl, C.; Murphy, J.M.; Benthien, M.L.; Baher, S.A.; Kohler, M.D.; Thygesen, K.; Simila, G.; Keller, Gordon R.

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed a composite image of the fault systems of the M 6.7 San Fernando (1971) and Northridge (1994), California, earthquakes, using industry reflection and oil test well data in the upper few kilometers of the crust, relocated aftershocks in the seismogenic crust, and LARSE II (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, Phase II) reflection data in the middle and lower crust. In this image, the San Fernando fault system appears to consist of a decollement that extends 50 km northward at a dip of ???25?? from near the surface at the Northridge Hills fault, in the northern San Fernando Valley, to the San Andreas fault in the middle to lower crust. It follows a prominent aseismic reflective zone below and northward of the main-shock hypocenter. Interpreted upward splays off this decollement include the Mission Hills and San Gabriel faults and the two main rupture planes of the San Fernando earthquake, which appear to divide the hanging wall into shingle- or wedge-like blocks. In contrast, the fault system for the Northridge earthquake appears simple, at least east of the LARSE II transect, consisting of a fault that extends 20 km southward at a dip of ???33?? from ???7 km depth beneath the Santa Susana Mountains, where it abuts the interpreted San Fernando decollement, to ???20 km depth beneath the Santa Monica Mountains. It follows a weak aseismic reflective zone below and southward of the mainshock hypocenter. The middle crustal reflective zone along the interpreted San Fernando decollement appears similar to a reflective zone imaged beneath the San Gabriel Mountains along the LARSE I transect, to the east, in that it appears to connect major reverse or thrust faults in the Los Angeles region to the San Andreas fault. However, it differs in having a moderate versus a gentle dip and in containing no mid-crustal bright reflections.

  8. Fault systems of the 1971 San Fernando and 1994 Northridge earthquakes, southern California: Relocated aftershocks and seismic images from LARSE II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, Gary S.; Clayton, Robert W.; Davis, Paul M.; Ryberg, Trond; Lutter, William J.; Okaya, David A.; Hauksson, Egill; Prodehl, Claus; Murphy, Janice M.; Benthien, Mark L.; Baher, Shirley A.; Kohler, Monica D.; Thygesen, Kristina; Simila, Gerry; Keller, G. Randy

    2003-02-01

    We have constructed a composite image of the fault systems of the M 6.7 San Fernando (1971) and Northridge (1994), California, earthquakes, using industry reflection and oil test well data in the upper few kilometers of the crust, relocated aftershocks in the seismogenic crust, and LARSE II (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, Phase II) reflection data in the middle and lower crust. In this image, the San Fernando fault system appears to consist of a decollement that extends 50 km northward at a dip of ˜25° from near the surface at the Northridge Hills fault, in the northern San Fernando Valley, to the San Andreas fault in the middle to lower crust. It follows a prominent aseismic reflective zone below and northward of the main-shock hypocenter. Interpreted upward splays off this decollement include the Mission Hills and San Gabriel faults and the two main rupture planes of the San Fernando earthquake, which appear to divide the hanging wall into shingle- or wedge-like blocks. In contrast, the fault system for the Northridge earthquake appears simple, at least east of the LARSE II transect, consisting of a fault that extends 20 km southward at a dip of ˜33° from ˜7 km depth beneath the Santa Susana Mountains, where it abuts the interpreted San Fernando decollement, to ˜20 km depth beneath the Santa Monica Mountains. It follows a weak aseismic reflective zone below and southward of the main-shock hypocenter. The middle crustal reflective zone along the interpreted San Fernando decollement appears similar to a reflective zone imaged beneath the San Gabriel Mountains along the LARSE I transect, to the east, in that it appears to connect major reverse or thrust faults in the Los Angeles region to the San Andreas fault. However, it differs in having a moderate versus a gentle dip and in containing no mid-crustal bright reflections.

  9. A case study of two M~5 mainshocks in Anza, California: Is the footprint of an aftershock sequence larger than we think?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, Karen R.; Kilb, Debi

    2009-01-01

    It has been traditionally held that aftershocks occur within one to two fault lengths of the mainshock. Here we demonstrate that this perception has been shaped by the sensitivity of seismic networks. The 31 October 2001 Mw 5.0 and 12 June 2005 Mw 5.2 Anza mainshocks in southern California occurred in the middle of the densely instrumented ANZA seismic network and thus were unusually well recorded. For the June 2005 event, aftershocks as small as M 0.0 could be observed stretching for at least 50 km along the San Jacinto fault even though the mainshock fault was only ∼4.5 km long. It was hypothesized that an observed aseismic slipping patch produced a spatially extended aftershock-triggering source, presumably slowing the decay of aftershock density with distance and leading to a broader aftershock zone. We find, however, the decay of aftershock density with distance for both Anza sequences to be similar to that observed elsewhere in California. This indicates there is no need for an additional triggering mechanism and suggests that given widespread dense instrumentation, aftershock sequences would routinely have footprints much larger than currently expected. Despite the large 2005 aftershock zone, we find that the probability that the 2005 Anza mainshock triggered the M 4.9 Yucaipa mainshock, which occurred 4.2 days later and 72 km away, to be only 14%±1%. This probability is a strong function of the time delay; had the earthquakes been separated by only an hour, the probability of triggering would have been 89%.

  10. Depth segmentation of the seismogenic continental crust: The 2008 and 2009 Qaidam earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. R.; Parsons, B.; Jackson, J. A.; Shan, X.; Sloan, R. A.; Walker, R. T.

    2011-03-01

    The seismic hazard in the immediate vicinity of an earthquake is usually assumed to be reduced after rupture of a continental fault, with along-strike portions being brought closer to failure and aftershocks being significantly smaller. This period of reduced hazard will persist as strain re-accumulates over decades or centuries. However, this is only realised if the entire seismogenic layer ruptured in the event. Here we use satellite radar measurements to show the ruptures of two Mw 6.3 earthquakes, occurring in almost the same epicentral location ten months apart in the Qaidam region, China, were nearly coplanar. The 2008 earthquake ruptured the lower half of the seismogenic layer, the 2009 event the upper half. Fault segmentation with depth allows a significant seismic hazard to remain even after a moderate and potentially devastating earthquake. This depth segmentation possibly exists in the case of the 2003 Bam earthquake where satellite radar and aftershock measurements showed that it ruptured only the upper half of the 15-20 km deep seismogenic region [Jackson et al., 2006], and that the lower, unruptured part may remain as a continuing seismic hazard.

  11. Teleseismic Source Models and Source Depth Constraints for Events of the Bhuj Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    Earthquake locations determined from the MAEC/ISTAR deployment in the epicentral region show a distribution of source depths ranging from the base of the crust to about 5km from the surface. Teleseismic P waveform data are collected from GSN and IMS three component stations and array stations to independently place constraints on source depths of events greater than M4.0 using pP-P and sP-P phase times. Joint analysis of local and teleseismic data are also used to determine source mechanisms and to generate an appropriate model for local structure than can be used in the computation of teleseismic Green's functions and subsequent source inversions. Thick Kachchh basin sediments modify the signature of sP, in particular, and produce reverberation effects later in the P waveforms that may be misconstrued as contributions from shallow faulting. Using the M5.8 aftershock waveforms as empirical Green's functions, a relative inversion of mainshock/aftershock surface waves and a standard slip inversion of teleseimic P and S waves are performed to investigate different models of source geometry and slip distribution for the mainshock.

  12. Deep depth undex simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, R. R.; Malakhoff, A.

    1985-01-29

    A deep depth underwater simulator is illustrated for determining the dual effects of nuclear type underwater explosion shockwaves and hydrostatic pressures on a test vessel while simulating, hydrostatically, that the test vessel is located at deep depths. The test vessel is positioned within a specially designed pressure vessel followed by pressurizing a fluid contained between the test and pressure vessels. The pressure vessel, with the test vessel suspended therein, is then placed in a body of water at a relatively shallow depth, and an explosive charge is detonated at a predetermined distance from the pressure vessel. The resulting shockwave is transmitted through the pressure vessel wall so that the shockwave impinging on the test vessel is representative of nuclear type explosive shockwaves transmitted to an underwater structure at great depths.

  13. Focal Mechanism determination of local M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vales, Dina; Custório, Susana; Carrilho, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    We determine the focal mechanisms of local small (ML<3.9) earthquakes that occurred between 2013 and 2014 in mainland Portugal. These low magnitude events were recorded by several stations that provide first-motion polarity solutions. However, only few stations are located near the epicenter and record a waveform with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) high enough to allow full waveform modelling. To overcome this limitation, we used a new approach called cyclic scanning of the polarity solutions (CSPS) (Fojtíková and Zahradnik, 2014), which performs a joint inversion of full waveform and first motion polarities to retrieve the focal mechanism. This methodology has the advantage of yielding reliable focal mechanism solutions, even when high SNR waveforms are available from only a few near field stations (or in the limiting case, only with one single station). To apply the CSPS method one needs to: i) run the the FOCal MEChanism (FOCMEC) code (Snoke, 2003) to obtain a suite of the DC solutions corresponding to the first motion polarities, and then ii) perform the waveform modelling in order to decrease the uncertainty. The ISOLated Asperities (ISOLA) software (Sokos and Zahradník, 2008, 2013) is used in this second step. We applied this method to weak events recorded by a network of 30 broadband seismic stations that transmit data in real-time to Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA), the institution responsible for seismic monitoring in Portugal. We interpret the obtained fault plane solutions in light of active faults and regional tectonics, and in comparison with focal mechanisms previously inferred for events in the region. The focal mechanisms obtained for small earthquakes allow us to significantly expand the database of available focal mechanisms in mainland Portugal, contributing to the understanding of active deformation in the region.

  14. NMDA receptor binding in focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    McGinnity, C J; Koepp, M J; Hammers, A; Riaño Barros, D A; Pressler, R M; Luthra, S; Jones, P A; Trigg, W; Micallef, C; Symms, M R; Brooks, D J; Duncan, J S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor availability in patients with focal epilepsies using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]GE-179, a ligand that selectively binds to the open NMDA receptor ion channel, which is thought to be overactive in epilepsy. Methods Eleven patients (median age 33 years, 6 males) with known frequent interictal epileptiform discharges had an [18F]GE-179 PET scan, in a cross-sectional study. MRI showed a focal lesion but discordant EEG changes in two, was non-localising with multifocal EEG abnormalities in two, and was normal in the remaining seven patients who all had multifocal EEG changes. Individual patient [18F]GE-179 volume-of-distribution (VT) images were compared between individual patients and a group of 10 healthy controls (47 years, 7 males) using Statistical Parametric Mapping. Results Individual analyses revealed a single cluster of focal VT increase in four patients; one with a single and one with multifocal MRI lesions, and two with normal MRIs. Post hoc analysis revealed that, relative to controls, patients not taking antidepressants had globally increased [18F]GE-179 VT (+28%; p<0.002), and the three patients taking an antidepressant drug had globally reduced [18F]GE-179 VT (−29%; p<0.002). There were no focal abnormalities common to the epilepsy group. Conclusions In patients with focal epilepsies, we detected primarily global increases of [18F]GE-179 VT consistent with increased NMDA channel activation, but reduced availability in those taking antidepressant drugs, consistent with a possible mode of action of this class of drugs. [18F]GE-179 PET showed focal accentuations of NMDA binding in 4 out of 11 patients, with difficult to localise and treat focal epilepsy. PMID:25991402

  15. Depth Optimization Study

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kawase, Mitsuhiro

    2009-11-22

    The zipped file contains a directory of data and routines used in the NNMREC turbine depth optimization study (Kawase et al., 2011), and calculation results thereof. For further info, please contact Mitsuhiro Kawase at kawase@uw.edu. Reference: Mitsuhiro Kawase, Patricia Beba, and Brian Fabien (2011), Finding an Optimal Placement Depth for a Tidal In-Stream Conversion Device in an Energetic, Baroclinic Tidal Channel, NNMREC Technical Report.

  16. Focal lengths of Venus Monitoring Camera from limb locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Krauss, R.; Ignatiev, N.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K. D.

    2015-08-01

    The Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) carried by European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter (Svedhem et al., 2007) consists of four optical units, each with a separate filter casting an image on a single CCD (Markiewicz et al., 2007a, 2007b). The desire to capture as much of the planet in a single frame during the spacecraft's 24 h, 0.84 eccentricity orbit led to optics with 18° field of view. Analysis of Venus images obtained by the VMC indicated that the computed limb radius and altitude of haze layers were somewhat inconsistent with prior knowledge and expectations. Possible causes include errors in the knowledge of image geometry, misalignment of the optic axis from the pointing direction, and optical distortion. These were explored and eliminated, leaving only deviations from the ground and pre-solar damage estimate of the focal length lengths as the most likely reason. We use the location of planet's limb to estimate the focal length of each camera using images of the planet when the orbiter was more than 20,000 km from planet center. The method relies on the limb radius to be constant at least over a small range of solar zenith angles. We were able to achieve better estimates for the focal lengths for all four cameras and also estimate small offsets to the boresight alignment. An outcome of this analysis is the finding that the slant unit optical depth varies more rapidly with solar zenith angle in the afternoon as compared to morning, with lowest values at local noon. A variation of this level is also observed with latitude. Both are indicative of the presence of overlying haze above the clouds, and the morning afternoon asymmetry suggests different photochemical processes in destruction and production of the haze.

  17. Short-term forecasting of aftershock sequences, microseismicity and swarms inside the Corinth Gulf continental rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segou, Margarita

    2014-05-01

    Corinth Gulf (Central Greece) is the fastest continental rift in the world with extension rates 11-15 mm/yr with diverse seismic deformation including earthquakes with M greater than 6.0, several periods of increased microseismic activity, usually lasting few months and possibly related with fluid diffusion, and swarm episodes lasting few days. In this study I perform a retrospective forecast experiment between 1995-2012, focusing on the comparison between physics-based and statistical models for short term time classes. Even though Corinth gulf has been studied extensively in the past there is still today a debate whether earthquake activity is related with the existence of either a shallow dipping structure or steeply dipping normal faults. In the light of the above statement, two CRS realization are based on resolving Coulomb stress changes on specified receiver faults, expressing the aforementioned structural models, whereas the third CRS model uses optimally-oriented for failure planes. The CRS implementation accounts for stress changes following all major ruptures with M greater than 4.5 within the testing phase. I also estimate fault constitutive parameters from modeling the response to major earthquakes at the vicinity of the gulf (Aσ=0.2, stressing rate app. 0.02 bar/yr). The generic ETAS parameters are taken as the maximum likelihood estimates derived from the stochastic declustering of the modern seismicity catalog (1995-2012) with minimum triggering magnitude M2.5. I test whether the generic ETAS can efficiently describe the aftershock spatio-temporal clustering but also the evolution of swarm episodes and microseismicity. For the reason above, I implement likelihood tests to evaluate the forecasts for their spatial consistency and for the total amount of predicted versus observed events with M greater than 3.0 in 10-day time windows during three distinct evaluation phases; the first evaluation phase focuses on the Aigio 1995 aftershock sequence (15

  18. Testing the ability of different seismic detections approaches to monitor aftershocks following a moderate magnitude event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Paula; Díaz, Jordi; Ruiz, Mario; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Gomez-García, Clara

    2016-04-01

    The detection and picking of seismic events is a permanent concern for seismic surveying, in particular when dealing with aftershocks of moderate magnitude events. Many efforts have been done to find the balance between computer efficiency and the robustness of the detection methods. In this work, data recorded by a high density seismic network deployed following a 5.2 magnitude event located close to Albacete, SE Spain, is used to test the ability of classical and recently proposed detection methodologies. Two days after the main shock, occurred the 23th February, a network formed by 11 stations from ICTJA-CSIC and 2 stations from IGN were deployed over the region, with inter-station distances ranging between 5 and 10 km. The network remained in operation until April 6th, 2015 and allowed to manually identify up to 552 events with magnitudes from 0.2 to 3.5 located in an area of just 25 km2 inside the network limits. The detection methods here studied applied are the classical STA/LTA, a power spectral method, a detector based in the Benford's law and a waveform similarity method. The STA/LTA method, based in the comparison of background noise and seismic signal amplitudes, is taken as a reference to evaluate the results arising from the other approaches. The power spectral density method is based in the inspection of the characteristic frequency pattern associated to seismic events. The Benford's Law detector analyses the distribution of the first-digit of displacement count in the histogram of a seismic waveform, considering that only the windows containing seismic wave arrivals will match the logarithmic law. Finally, the waveform similarity method is based in the analysis of the normalized waveform amplitude, detecting those events with waveform similar to a previously defined master event. The aim of this contribution is to inspect the ability of the different approaches to accurately detect the aftershocks events for this kind of seismic crisis and to

  19. The M 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake and its aftershock sequence: deployment of a Task Force local network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Eggert, S.; Woith, H.; Grosser, H.; Peyrat, S.; Vilotte, J.; Medina, E.; Ruch, J.; Walter, T.; Victor, P.; Barrientos, S.; Gonzalez, G.

    2008-05-01

    After the November 14, 2007 Tocopilla earthquake in northern Chile, a local network of 20 short period seismic stations, 5 strong motion instruments, 6 GPS stations and 3 extensometers has been installed in the fault plane area between Tocopilla and Antofagasta by the German Task Force for earthquakes (GFZ Potsdam). The hydrogeology group of the TF sampled 20 thermal water sources in the area of the El Tatio geyser field, located about 170 km E of the epicentre. In collaboration with the IPG Paris, 4 broad band stations were deployed at the northern end of the fault plane between Tocopilla and Maria Elena. Major targets of the investigations of the aftershock sequence are the segment boundary between the 1995 Antofagasta earthquake and the recent Tocopilla event, stress transfer between both successively ruptured subduction zone segments, structural properties of the fault plane, possible consequences for the northern adjacent Iquique segment, and the influence of earthquake seismic waves on the El Tatio hydrothermal field. In our presentation we would like to show first results on the spatial distribution of the aftershocks and discuss these in relation to studies we have made on the Antofagasta aftershock sequence.

  20. The 20th April 2005 Koryakia earthquake (Russia): a case of study for its aftershock seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccamo, D.; Barbieri, L. M.; Lagana, C.; Francesco, P.; D'Amico, S.

    2009-12-01

    Even if the Koryakia earthquake (April 20, 2005 at 23:25:02-UTC) occurred in sparsely populated northeastern Russia about 40 people were injured and the several villages were destroyed. Some buildings and water supply systems were badly damaged as well. The Koryakia earthquake occurred in north-northeast of the Kamchatka Peninsula. The earthquake was in a complicated geological setting where the configuration and interaction of the tectonic plates between northeastern Asia and northwestern North America are still poorly understood. The aim of this paper is to study the Koryakia seismic sequence trough the application of the Delta/Sigma method (PEPI - Caccamo et al. 2005) and using data coming from the USGS data-bank. Using this method is possible to observe statistically significant anomalies in the temporal decay of seismic sequence before the occurrence of a large aftershock. The Delta/Sigma analysis show some anomalies in the temporal decay a few days before the occurrence of large aftershock. They possibly are not random fluctuations but probably could be considered as precursors. Fractal geometry is sometimes important to better explain the mechanisms of seismicity and so it could be useful to analyze the behavior of aftershocks occurrence. In this paper a fractal analysis od the seismic sequence was performed investigating the box-counting dimension (D0) and the correlation dimension (D2).

  1. Focal Plane Metrology for the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hale, Layton; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric; Perl, Martin; Schindler, Rafe; Takacs, Peter; Thurston, Timothy; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    Meeting the science goals for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) translates into a demanding set of imaging performance requirements for the optical system over a wide (3.5{sup o}) field of view. In turn, meeting those imaging requirements necessitates maintaining precise control of the focal plane surface (10 {micro}m P-V) over the entire field of view (640 mm diameter) at the operating temperature (T {approx} -100 C) and over the operational elevation angle range. We briefly describe the hierarchical design approach for the LSST Camera focal plane and the baseline design for assembling the flat focal plane at room temperature. Preliminary results of gravity load and thermal distortion calculations are provided, and early metrological verification of candidate materials under cold thermal conditions are presented. A detailed, generalized method for stitching together sparse metrology data originating from differential, non-contact metrological data acquisition spanning multiple (non-continuous) sensor surfaces making up the focal plane, is described and demonstrated. Finally, we describe some in situ alignment verification alternatives, some of which may be integrated into the camera's focal plane.

  2. Focal dysplasia of the cerebral cortex in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D. C.; Falconer, M. A.; Bruton, C. J.; Corsellis, J. A. N.

    1971-01-01

    An unusual microscopic abnormality has been identified in the lobectomy specimens removed surgically from the brains of 10 epileptic patients. The abnormality could seldom be identified by palpation or with the naked eye. Histologically, it consisted of congregations of large, bizarre neurones which were littered through all but the first cortical layer. In most, but not in all cases, grotesque cells, probably of glial origin, were also present in the depths of the affected cortex and in the subjacent white matter. This kind of abnormality appears to be a malformation. The picture is reminiscent of tuberous sclerosis but too many distinguishing features, both in the clinical and in the pathological aspects, make this diagnosis untenable. The cases are therefore looked on provisionally (since all but one are still alive) as comprising a distinct form of cortical dysplasia in which localized, exotic populations of nerve cells underlie the electrical and clinical manifestations of certain focal forms of epilepsy. Images PMID:5096551

  3. Explanation of temporal clustering of tsunami sources using the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal clustering of tsunami sources is examined in terms of a branching process model. It previously was observed that there are more short interevent times between consecutive tsunami sources than expected from a stationary Poisson process. The epidemic‐type aftershock sequence (ETAS) branching process model is fitted to tsunami catalog events, using the earthquake magnitude of the causative event from the Centennial and Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalogs and tsunami sizes above a completeness level as a mark to indicate that a tsunami was generated. The ETAS parameters are estimated using the maximum‐likelihood method. The interevent distribution associated with the ETAS model provides a better fit to the data than the Poisson model or other temporal clustering models. When tsunamigenic conditions (magnitude threshold, submarine location, dip‐slip mechanism) are applied to the Global CMT catalog, ETAS parameters are obtained that are consistent with those estimated from the tsunami catalog. In particular, the dip‐slip condition appears to result in a near zero magnitude effect for triggered tsunami sources. The overall consistency between results from the tsunami catalog and that from the earthquake catalog under tsunamigenic conditions indicates that ETAS models based on seismicity can provide the structure for understanding patterns of tsunami source occurrence. The fractional rate of triggered tsunami sources on a global basis is approximately 14%.

  4. Large-amplitude moho reflections (SmS) from Landers aftershocks, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mori, J.; Helmberger, D.

    1996-01-01

    Closely spaced aftershocks of the 28 June 1992 Landers earthquake (Mw 7.3) were used to make event record sections that show the transverse components of 5 and SmS arrivals at a distance of 70 to 170 km. For the data recorded toward the north in the Mojave desert, large SmS phases are observed with amplitudes 2 to 5 times greater than the direct S. For similar distances to the south, the SmS arrival is comparable to or smaller than the S. Comparisons to synthetic seismograms indicate that the large-amplitude SmS phases are produced by the simple crustal structure of the Mojave desert that allows a large Moho reflection. In contrast, the more complex geologic structure to the south partitions the seismic energy into a more complicated set of seismic phases, so that the Moho reflection is diminished in amplitude. The large SmS phases observed in the Mojave enhance the overall ground motions by a factor of 2 to 3. This suggests that when damaging earthquakes occur in other regions of simple crustal structures, Moho reflections will produce amplified strong motions at distance ranges around 100 km depending on the local structure.

  5. Suppression of Periodic Disturbances in Seismic Aftershock Recordings for Better Localisation of Underground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-03-01

    For precise localisation of a potential underground nuclear explosion, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, during an on-site inspection, can set up seismic sensors to find the very small signals from aftershocks. These signals can be masked by periodic disturbances from, for example, helicopters. We present a new method to characterise every such disturbance by the amplitude, frequency and phase of the underlying sine in the time domain using a mathematical expression for its Hann-windowed discrete Fourier transform. The contributions of these sines are computed and subtracted from the complex spectrum sequentially. Two examples show the performance of the procedure: (1) synthetic sines superposed to a coal-mine induced event, orders of magnitude stronger than the latter, can be removed successfully, (2) removal of periodic content from the signals of a helicopter overflight reduces the amplitude by a factor 3.3 when the frequencies are approximately constant. The procedure cannot yet cope with peaks that change frequency too fast, for example by the Doppler effect when passing, and with peaks that lie too close to each other. Improvement to solve these problems seems possible.

  6. Comparison of main-shock and aftershock fragility curves developed for New Zealand and US buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uma, S.R.; Ryu, H.; Luco, N.; Liel, A.B.; Raghunandan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic risk assessment involves the development of fragility functions to express the relationship between ground motion intensity and damage potential. In evaluating the risk associated with the building inventory in a region, it is essential to capture 'actual' characteristics of the buildings and group them so that 'generic building types' can be generated for further analysis of their damage potential. Variations in building characteristics across regions/countries largely influence the resulting fragility functions, such that building models are unsuitable to be adopted for risk assessment in any other region where a different set of building is present. In this paper, for a given building type (represented in terms of height and structural system), typical New Zealand and US building models are considered to illustrate the differences in structural model parameters and their effects on resulting fragility functions for a set of main-shocks and aftershocks. From this study, the general conclusion is that the methodology and assumptions used to derive basic capacity curve parameters have a considerable influence on fragility curves.

  7. The Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC): validation and results of the 2013 aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, I.; Vallianatos, F.

    2016-02-01

    The last century, the global urbanization has leaded the majority of population to move into big, metropolitan areas. Small areas on the Earth's surface are being built with tall buildings in areas close to seismogenic zones. Such an area of great importance is the Hellenic arc in Greece. Among the regions with high seismicity is Crete, located on the subduction zone of the Eastern Mediterranean plate underneath the Aegean plate. The Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC) has been built to cover the need on continuous monitoring of the regional seismicity in the vicinity of the South Aegean Sea and Crete Island. In the present work, with the use of Z-map software the spatial variability of Magnitude of Completeness (Mc) is calculated from HSNC's manual analysis catalogue of events from the beginning of 2008 till the end of September 2015, supporting the good coverage of HSNC in the area surrounding Crete Island. Furthermore, we discuss the 2013 seismicity when two large earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of Crete Island. The two main shocks and their aftershock sequences have been relocated with the use of HYPOINVERSE earthquake location software. Finally, the quality of seismological stations is addressed using the standard PQLX software.

  8. Chapter D. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Aftershocks and Postseismic Effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reasenberg, Paul A., (Edited By)

    1997-01-01

    While the damaging effects of the earthquake represent a significant social setback and economic loss, the geophysical effects have produced a wealth of data that have provided important insights into the structure and mechanics of the San Andreas Fault system. Generally, the period after a large earthquake is vitally important to monitor. During this part of the seismic cycle, the primary fault and the surrounding faults, rock bodies, and crustal fluids rapidly readjust in response to the earthquake's sudden movement. Geophysical measurements made at this time can provide unique information about fundamental properties of the fault zone, including its state of stress and the geometry and frictional/rheological properties of the faults within it. Because postseismic readjustments are rapid compared with corresponding changes occurring in the preseismic period, the amount and rate of information that is available during the postseismic period is relatively high. From a geophysical viewpoint, the occurrence of the Loma Prieta earthquake in a section of the San Andreas fault zone that is surrounded by multiple and extensive geophysical monitoring networks has produced nothing less than a scientific bonanza. The reports assembled in this chapter collectively examine available geophysical observations made before and after the earthquake and model the earthquake's principal postseismic effects. The chapter covers four broad categories of postseismic effect: (1) aftershocks; (2) postseismic fault movements; (3) postseismic surface deformation; and (4) changes in electrical conductivity and crustal fluids.

  9. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  10. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  11. Non extensive statistical physics properties of the 2003 (Mw6.2), Lefkada, Ionian island Greece, aftershock sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, F.; Karakostas, V.; Papadimitriou, E.

    2012-04-01

    On 14 August 2003, Lefkada Island (Central Ionian) was affected by an Mw=6.2 earthquake. Due to a dense temporary seismic network that operating immediately after the main shock occurrence, hundreds of aftershocks were recorded and located with high precision whereas relocation of the main shock and early strong aftershocks became also feasible. Thus, the spatio-temporal distribution of aftershocks onto the main and the neighboring fault segments was investigated in detail enabling the recognition of four distinctive seismicity clusters separated by less active patches. The aftershock spatiotemporal properties studied here using the concept of Non-Extensive Statistical Physics (NESP). The cumulative distribution functions of the inter-event times and the inter-event distances are estimated for the data set in each seismicity cluster and the analysis results to a value of the statistical thermodynamic qT and qD parameters for each cluster, where qT varies from 1.15 to 1.47 and qD from 0.5 to 0.77 for the interevent times and distances distributions respectively. These values confirm the complexity and non-additivity of the spatiotemporal evolution of seismicity and the usefulness of NESP in investigating such phenomena. The temporal structure is also discussed using the complementary to NESP approach of superstatistics, which is based on a superposition of ordinary local equilibrium statistical mechanics. The result indicates that the temporal evolution of the Lefkada aftershock sequence in clusters A, B and C governed by very low number of degrees of freedom while D is less organized seismicity structure with a much higher number of degrees of freedom. Acknowledgments. This work was supported in part by the THALES Program of the Ministry of Education of Greece and the European Union in the framework of the project entitled "Integrated understanding of Seismicity, using innovative Methodologies of Fracture mechanics along with Earthquake and non extensive

  12. Design Aspects of Focal Beams From High-Intensity Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    As the applications of ultrasonic thermal therapies expand, the design of the high-intensity array must address both the energy delivery of the main beam and the character and relevance of off-target beam energy. We simulate the acoustic field performance of a selected set of circular arrays organized by array format, including flat versus curved arrays, periodic versus random arrays, and center void diameter variations. Performance metrics are based on the −3-dB focal main lobe (FML) positioning range, axial grating lobe (AGL) temperatures, and side lobe levels. Using finite-element analysis, we evaluate the relative heating of the FML and the AGLs. All arrays have a maximum diameter of 100λ, with element count ranging from 64 to 1024 and continuous wave frequency of 1.5 MHz. First, we show that a 50% spherical annulus produces focus beam side lobes which decay as a function of lateral distance at nearly 87% of the exponential rate of a full aperture. Second, for the arrays studied, the efficiency of power delivery over the −3-dB focus positioning range for spherical arrays is at least 2-fold greater than for flat arrays; the 256-element case shows a 5-fold advantage for the spherical array. Third, AGL heating can be significant as the focal target is moved to its distal half-intensity depth from the natural focus. Increasing the element count of a randomized array to 256 elements decreases the AGL-to-FML heating ratio to 0.12 at the distal half-intensity depth. Further increases in element count yield modest improvements. A 49% improvement in the AGL-to-peak heating ratio is predicted by using the Sumanaweera spiral element pattern with randomization. PMID:21859578

  13. Shaping a Subwavelength Needle with Ultra-long Focal Length by Focusing Azimuthally Polarized Light

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Fei; Huang, Kun; Wu, Jianfeng; Jiao, Jiao; Luo, Xiangang; Qiu, Chengwei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Flat optics, which could planarize and miniaturize the traditional optical elements, possesses the features of extremely low profile and high integration for advanced manipulation of light. Here we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a planar metalens to realize an ultra-long focal length of ~240λ with a large depth of focus (DOF) of ~12λ, under the illumination of azimuthally polarized beam with vortical phase at 633 nm. Equally important is that such a flat lens could stably keep a lateral subwavelength width of 0.42λ to 0.49λ along the needle-like focal region. It exhibits one-order improvement in the focal length compared to the traditional focal lengths of 20~30λ of flat lens, under the criterion of having subwavelength focusing spot. The ultra-long focal length ensures sufficient space for subsequent characterization behind the lens in practical industry setups, while subwavelength cross section and large DOF enable high resolution in transverse imaging and nanolithography and high tolerance in axial positioning in the meantime. Such planar metalens with those simultaneous advantages is prepared by laser pattern generator rather than focused ion beam, which makes the mass production possible. PMID:25943500

  14. Shaping a Subwavelength Needle with Ultra-long Focal Length by Focusing Azimuthally Polarized Light.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fei; Huang, Kun; Wu, Jianfeng; Jiao, Jiao; Luo, Xiangang; Qiu, Chengwei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Flat optics, which could planarize and miniaturize the traditional optical elements, possesses the features of extremely low profile and high integration for advanced manipulation of light. Here we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a planar metalens to realize an ultra-long focal length of ~240λ with a large depth of focus (DOF) of ~12λ, under the illumination of azimuthally polarized beam with vortical phase at 633 nm. Equally important is that such a flat lens could stably keep a lateral subwavelength width of 0.42λ to 0.49λ along the needle-like focal region. It exhibits one-order improvement in the focal length compared to the traditional focal lengths of 20~30λ of flat lens, under the criterion of having subwavelength focusing spot. The ultra-long focal length ensures sufficient space for subsequent characterization behind the lens in practical industry setups, while subwavelength cross section and large DOF enable high resolution in transverse imaging and nanolithography and high tolerance in axial positioning in the meantime. Such planar metalens with those simultaneous advantages is prepared by laser pattern generator rather than focused ion beam, which makes the mass production possible. PMID:25943500

  15. A New Set of Focal Mechanisms and a Geodynamic Model for the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, M. T.; Powell, C. A.; Choi, E.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new set of 26 focal mechanisms for the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and discuss the implications for regional uplift. The mechanisms are for earthquakes with magnitudes 2.5 and greater occurring after 1999. The ETSZ is the second largest seismic zone in the central and eastern US and the seismicity is attributed to reactivation of a major Grenville-age shear zone. P- and S- wave velocity models, the distribution of hypocenters, focal mechanisms, and potential field anomalies suggest the presence of a basement shear zone. The new focal mechanism solutions supplement and are consistent with a previously calculated set of 26 focal mechanisms for the period 1983-1993. Focal mechanisms fall into two groups. The first group shows strike-slip motion on steeply dipping nodal planes striking N-S/E-W and NE-SW/NW-SE. Mechanisms in the second group display primarily dip-slip motion and are constrained geographically to the southern portion of the seismic zone. Events in the second group are among the shallowest in the dataset (8-12 km). We are developing a geodynamic model of the regional structure to examine the stress regime, which may be changing with depth. This model will be used to determine a possible relationship between the localized normal faulting and previously established recent regional uplift.

  16. Radon depth migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.T. ); Carroll, R.J. )

    1993-02-01

    A depth migration method is presented that used Radon-transformed common-source seismograms as input. It is shown that the Radon depth migration method can be extended to spatially varying velocity depth models by using asymptotic ray theory (ART) to construct wavefield continuation operators. These operators downward continue an incident receiver-array plane wave and an assumed point-source wavefield into the subsurface. The migration velocity model is constrain to have longer characteristic wavelengths than the dominant source wavelength such that the ART approximations for the continuation operators are valid. This method is used successfully to migrate two synthetic data examples: (1) a point diffractor, and (2) a dipping layer and syncline interface model. It is shown that the Radon migration method has a computational advantage over the standard Kirchhoff migration method in that fewer rays are computed in a main memory implementation.

  17. Depth from water reflection.

    PubMed

    Linjie Yang; Jianzhuang Liu; Xiaoou Tang

    2015-04-01

    The scene in a water reflection image often exhibits bilateral symmetry. In this paper, we design a framework to reconstruct the depth from a single water reflection image. This problem can be regarded as a special case of two-view stereo vision. It is challenging to obtain correspondences from the real scene and the mirror scene due to their large appearance difference. We first propose an appearance adaptation method to transform the appearance of the mirror scene so that it is much closer to the real scene. We then present a stereo matching algorithm to obtain the disparity map of the real scene. Compared with other depth-from-symmetry work that deals with man-made objects, our algorithm can recover the depth maps of a variety of scenes, where both natural and man-made objects may exist. PMID:25643408

  18. Actinic Granuloma with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Phasukthaworn, Ruedee; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2016-01-01

    Actinic granuloma is an uncommon granulomatous disease, characterized by annular erythematous plaque with central clearing predominately located on sun-damaged skin. The pathogenesis is not well understood, ultraviolet radiation is recognized as precipitating factor. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic annular erythematous plaques on the forehead and both cheeks persisting for 2 years. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings support the diagnosis of actinic granuloma. During that period of time, she also developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The association between actinic granuloma and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis needs to be clarified by further studies. PMID:27293392

  19. Hybrid Extrinsic Silicon Focal Plane Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerrenig, D. H.; Meinhardt, T.; Lowe, J.

    1981-02-01

    Large-area focal planes require mechanical assembly techniques which must be compatible with optical alignment, minimum deadspace, and cryogenic requirements in order to achieve optimum performance. Hybrid extrinsic silicon has been found particularly suitable for such an application. It will be shown that by choosing a large-area extrinsic silicon detector array which is hybrid-mated to a multiplicity of multiplexers a very cost-effective and high-density focal plane module can be assembled. Other advantages of this approach are inherent optical alignment and excellent performance.

  20. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  1. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed. PMID:25523277

  2. Anomalous stress diffusion, Omori's law and Continuous Time Random Walk in the 2010 Efpalion aftershock sequence (Corinth rift, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michas, Georgios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Karakostas, Vassilios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Sammonds, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Efpalion aftershock sequence occurred in January 2010, when an M=5.5 earthquake was followed four days later by another strong event (M=5.4) and numerous aftershocks (Karakostas et al., 2012). This activity interrupted a 15 years period of low to moderate earthquake occurrence in Corinth rift, where the last major event was the 1995 Aigion earthquake (M=6.2). Coulomb stress analysis performed in previous studies (Karakostas et al., 2012; Sokos et al., 2012; Ganas et al., 2013) indicated that the second major event and most of the aftershocks were triggered due to stress transfer. The aftershocks production rate decays as a power-law with time according to the modified Omori law (Utsu et al., 1995) with an exponent larger than one for the first four days, while after the occurrence of the second strong event the exponent turns to unity. We consider the earthquake sequence as a point process in time and space and study its spatiotemporal evolution considering a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model with a joint probability density function of inter-event times and jumps between the successive earthquakes (Metzler and Klafter, 2000). Jump length distribution exhibits finite variance, whereas inter-event times scale as a q-generalized gamma distribution (Michas et al., 2013) with a long power-law tail. These properties are indicative of a subdiffusive process in terms of CTRW. Additionally, the mean square displacement of aftershocks is constant with time after the occurrence of the first event, while it changes to a power-law with exponent close to 0.15 after the second major event, illustrating a slow diffusive process. During the first four days aftershocks cluster around the epicentral area of the second major event, while after that and taking as a reference the second event, the aftershock zone is migrating slowly with time to the west near the epicentral area of the first event. This process is much slower from what would be expected from normal diffusion, a

  3. In-situ stress measurement in an earthquake focal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukahara, H.; Ikeda, R.; Omura, K.

    1996-09-01

    A 2-km-deep borehole was drilled into granitic rock where many shallow earthquakes, with focal depths from 2 to 15 km, have occurred. The drill site, Ashio, is 100 km north of Tokyo. Downhole testing and measurements were conducted five times: four times after each 500 m drilling and the fifth time after completing the 2000 m borehole. Measurements of in-situ stress orientation and magnitude were conducted by the hydraulic fracturing method, stress-induced well bore breakout analysis, and drilling-mud pressure induced hydraulic fracturing analysis. Breakouts and mud pressure induced hydraulic fractures were observed below 650 m and 1250 m, respectively. The circular well bore is maintained only in limited spots below 650 m because of breakouts indicating a large differential stress condition between the maximum and the minimum principal stresses. The differential stress is calculated at 90 ± 20 MPa at the depth of 2000 m based on the condition under which the breakout with some degree of width appears. It is interpreted that this large differential stress is representative of the regional crustal stress condition in the earthquake swarm area. Each spot of the circular well bore is always adjacent to a fracture zone. This suggests that the fracture zone has small differential stress. The stress values were measured where the well bore is circular by the hydraulic fracturing method. For example, the maximum and the minimum horizontal compressive stresses are about 35 MPa and about 25 MPa, respectively, at the depth of 1650 m; giving the differential stress of 10 MPa. The water pressure in pre-existing fractures was also measured, and found that they were nearly equal to the hydrostatic water pressure at the corresponding depths. The stress direction estimated from the azimuth of the breakouts and the hydraulic fracture is consistent with that estimated from the earthquake focal mechanisms. These results support the following conclusions. The differential stress is

  4. Dual focus diffractive optical element with extended depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Isao

    2014-09-01

    A dual focus property and an extended depth of focus were verified by a new type of diffractive lens displaying on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices. This type of lens is useful to read information on multilayer optical discs and tilted discs. The radial undulation of the phase groove on the diffractive lens gave the dual focus nature. The focal extension was performed by combining the dual focus lens with the axilens that was invented for expanding the depth of focus. The number of undulations did not affect the intensity along the optical axis but the central spot of the diffraction pattern.

  5. Depth remapping using seam carving for depth image based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Ikuko; Iwauchi, Kenichi

    2015-03-01

    Depth remapping is a technique to control depth range of stereo images. Conventional remapping which uses a transform function in the whole image has a stable characteristic, however it sometimes reduces the 3D appearance too much. To cope with this problem, a depth remapping method which preserves the details of depth structure is proposed. We apply seam carving, which is an effective technique for image retargeting, to depth remapping. An extended depth map is defined as a space-depth volume, and a seam surface which is a 2D monotonic and connected manifold is introduced. The depth range is reduced by removing depth values on the seam surface from the space-depth volume. Finally a stereo image pair is synthesized from the corrected depth map and an input color image by depth image based rendering.

  6. Three-Dimensional Resistivity Modeling Around the Focal Zones of Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Ogawa, Y.; Saito, Z.; Ushioda, M.; Ichihara, H.; Ichiki, M.; Mishina, M.

    2015-12-01

    The 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake (M 7.2) was an unusually large earthquake, which occurred near the volcanic regions. To understand the mechanism of inland earthquakes, it is important to study the structure around the area. Okada et al. (2012) observed aftershocks precisely and estimated the seismic velocity structure. Iinuma et al. (2009) detected coseismic and aseismic slips with GPS observations. Mishina (2009) and Ichihara et al. (2014) conducted 2-D and 3-D MT surveys respectively. However, the MT station distributions of the previous MT surveys were sparse. We carried out denser surveys and showed more precise resistivity structures around the area. We conducted MT surveys at 66 stations (59 stations from October until November in 2012 and 7 stations from October until November in 2014) around the area and estimated 3-D resistivity structures using inversion code of Siripunvaraporn and Egbert (2009) with full impedance tensor as response functions. The result of our final resistivity structures is similar to the one in Ichihara et al. (2014), but is more complex. We found a low resistivity zone to the northeast of Mt. Kurikoma below 3km depth. This anomaly is connected with a low resistivity zone located under Mt. Kurikoma below 10km depth. The locations of aseismic and co-seismic slips in Iinuma et al. (2009) correspond to the locations of low resistivity and high resistivity zones in our model respectively. This may represent that low resistivity zones are brittle and high resistivity zones are ductile.

  7. Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  8. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  9. Optical interconnections to focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rienstra, J.L.; Hinckley, M.K.

    2000-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated an optical data interconnection from the output of a focal plane array to the downstream data acquisition electronics. The demonstrated approach included a continuous wave laser beam directed at a multiple quantum well reflectance modulator connected to the focal plane array analog output. The output waveform from the optical interconnect was observed on an oscilloscope to be a replica of the input signal. They fed the output of the optical data link to the same data acquisition system used to characterize focal plane array performance. Measurements of the signal to noise ratio at the input and output of the optical interconnection showed that the signal to noise ratio was reduced by a factor of 10 or more. Analysis of the noise and link gain showed that the primary contributors to the additional noise were laser intensity noise and photodetector receiver noise. Subsequent efforts should be able to reduce these noise sources considerably and should result in substantially improved signal to noise performance. They also observed significant photocurrent generation in the reflectance modulator that imposes a current load on the focal plane array output amplifier. This current loading is an issue with the demonstrated approach because it tends to negate the power saving feature of the reflectance modulator interconnection concept.

  10. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  11. Dual band QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Choi, Kwong Kit (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that provides two-color image sensing. Two different quantum wells are configured to absorb two different wavelengths. The QWIPs are arrayed in a focal plane array (FPA). The two-color QWIPs are selected for readout by selective electrical contact with the two different QWIPs or by the use of two different wavelength sensitive gratings.

  12. Sensory-motor integration in focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Avanzino, Laura; Tinazzi, Michele; Ionta, Silvio; Fiorio, Mirta

    2015-12-01

    Traditional definitions of focal dystonia point to its motor component, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. However, focal dystonia is tightly linked also to sensory dysfunction. Accurate motor control requires an optimal processing of afferent inputs from different sensory systems, in particular visual and somatosensory (e.g., touch and proprioception). Several experimental studies indicate that sensory-motor integration - the process through which sensory information is used to plan, execute, and monitor movements - is impaired in focal dystonia. The neural degenerations associated with these alterations affect not only the basal ganglia-thalamic-frontal cortex loop, but also the parietal cortex and cerebellum. The present review outlines the experimental studies describing impaired sensory-motor integration in focal dystonia, establishes their relationship with changes in specific neural mechanisms, and provides new insight towards the implementation of novel intervention protocols. Based on the reviewed state-of-the-art evidence, the theoretical framework summarized in the present article will not only result in a better understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia, but it will also lead to the development of new rehabilitation strategies. PMID:26164472

  13. Towards Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Rafol, S. B.; Salazar, D.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024 x 1024 pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes have been demonstrated with excellent imaging performance. The MWIR QWIP detector array has demonstrated a noise equivalent differential temperature (NEDT) of 17 mK at a 95 K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300 K background and the LWIR detector array has demonstrated a NEDT of 13 mK at a 70 K operating temperature with the same optical and background conditions as the MWIR detector array after the subtraction of system noise. Both MWIR and LWIR focal planes have shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90 K and 70 K operating temperatures respectively, with similar optical and background conditions. In addition, we have demonstrated MWIR and LWIR pixel co-registered simultaneously readable dualband QWIP focal plane arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the performance in terms of quantum efficiency, NEDT, uniformity, operability, and modulation transfer functions of the 1024 x 1024 pixel arrays and the progress of dualband QWIP focal plane array development work.

  14. Large Format Multicolor QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, A.; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Nguyen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) multicolor focal plane array (FPA) cameras are essential for many DoD and NASA applications including Earth and planetary remote sensing. In this paper we summarize our recent development of large format multicolor QWIP FPA that cover MWIR and LWIR bands.

  15. Magnitude-dependent epidemic-type aftershock sequences model for earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Spassiani, Ilaria; Sebastiani, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    We propose a version of the pure temporal epidemic type aftershock sequences (ETAS) model: the ETAS model with correlated magnitudes. As for the standard case, we assume the Gutenberg-Richter law to be the probability density for the magnitudes of the background events. Instead, the magnitude of the triggered shocks is assumed to be probabilistically dependent on that of the relative mother events. This probabilistic dependence is motivated by some recent works in the literature and by the results of a statistical analysis made on some seismic catalogs [Spassiani and Sebastiani, J. Geophys. Res. 121, 903 (2016)10.1002/2015JB012398]. On the basis of the experimental evidences obtained in the latter paper for the real catalogs, we theoretically derive the probability density function for the magnitudes of the triggered shocks proposed in Spassiani and Sebastiani and there used for the analysis of two simulated catalogs. To this aim, we impose a fundamental condition: averaging over all the magnitudes of the mother events, we must obtain again the Gutenberg-Richter law. This ensures the validity of this law at any event's generation when ignoring past seismicity. The ETAS model with correlated magnitudes is then theoretically analyzed here. In particular, we use the tool of the probability generating function and the Palm theory, in order to derive an approximation of the probability of zero events in a small time interval and to interpret the results in terms of the interevent time between consecutive shocks, the latter being a very useful random variable in the assessment of seismic hazard. PMID:27176281

  16. Magnitude-dependent epidemic-type aftershock sequences model for earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassiani, Ilaria; Sebastiani, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    We propose a version of the pure temporal epidemic type aftershock sequences (ETAS) model: the ETAS model with correlated magnitudes. As for the standard case, we assume the Gutenberg-Richter law to be the probability density for the magnitudes of the background events. Instead, the magnitude of the triggered shocks is assumed to be probabilistically dependent on that of the relative mother events. This probabilistic dependence is motivated by some recent works in the literature and by the results of a statistical analysis made on some seismic catalogs [Spassiani and Sebastiani, J. Geophys. Res. 121, 903 (2016), 10.1002/2015JB012398]. On the basis of the experimental evidences obtained in the latter paper for the real catalogs, we theoretically derive the probability density function for the magnitudes of the triggered shocks proposed in Spassiani and Sebastiani and there used for the analysis of two simulated catalogs. To this aim, we impose a fundamental condition: averaging over all the magnitudes of the mother events, we must obtain again the Gutenberg-Richter law. This ensures the validity of this law at any event's generation when ignoring past seismicity. The ETAS model with correlated magnitudes is then theoretically analyzed here. In particular, we use the tool of the probability generating function and the Palm theory, in order to derive an approximation of the probability of zero events in a small time interval and to interpret the results in terms of the interevent time between consecutive shocks, the latter being a very useful random variable in the assessment of seismic hazard.

  17. Optimally oriented ``fault-valve'' thrusts: Evidence for aftershock-related fluid pressure pulses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklethwaite, S.

    2008-04-01

    damage, breach overpressured fluid reservoirs, and generate fluid-pressure driven aftershocks.

  18. Propagation of Coulomb stress uncertainties in physics-based aftershock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattania, Camilla; Hainzl, Sebastian; Wang, Lifeng; Roth, Frank; Enescu, Bogdan

    2014-10-01

    Stress transfer between earthquakes is recognized as a fundamental mechanism governing aftershock sequences. A common approach to relate stress changes to seismicity rate changes is the rate-and-state constitutive law developed by Dieterich: these elements are the foundation of Coulomb-rate-and-state (CRS) models. Despite the successes of Coulomb hypothesis and of the rate-and-state formulation, such models perform worse than statistical models in an operational forecasting context: one reason is that Coulomb stress is subject to large uncertainties and intrinsic spatial heterogeneity. In this study, we characterize the uncertainties in Coulomb stress inherited from different physical quantities and assess their effect on CRS models. We use a Monte Carlo method and focus on the following aspects: the existence of multiple receiver faults; the stress heterogeneity within grid cells, due to their finite size; and errors inherited from the coseismic slip model. We study two well-recorded sequences from different tectonic settings: the Mw = 6.0 Parkfield and the Mw= 9.0 Tohoku earthquakes. We find that the existence of multiple receiver faults is the most important source of intrinsic stress heterogeneity, and CRS models perform significantly better when this variability is taken into account. The choice of slip model also generates large uncertainties. We construct an ensemble model based on published slip models and find that it outperforms individual models. Our findings highlight the importance of identifying sources of errors and quantifying confidence boundaries in the forecasts; moreover, we demonstrate that consideration of stress heterogeneity and epistemic uncertainty has the potential to improve the performance of operational forecasting models.

  19. A stochastic estimate of ground motion at Oceano, California, for the M 6.5 22 December 2003 San Simeon earthquake, derived from aftershock recordings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di, Alessandro C.; Boatwright, J.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey deployed a digital seismic station in Oceano, California, in February 2004, to investigate the cause of damage and liquefaction from the 22 December 2003 M 6.5 San Simeon earthquake. This station recorded 11 M > 2.8 aftershocks in almost 8 weeks. We analyze these recordings, together with recordings of the mainshock and the same aftershocks obtained from nearby stations in Park Hill and San Luis Obispo, to estimate the mainshock ground motion in Oceano. We estimate the Fourier amplitude spectrum using generalized spectral ratio analysis. We test a set of aftershocks as Green's functions by comparing simulated and recorded acceleration amplitude spectra for the mainshock at San Luis Obispo and Park Hill. We convolve the aftershock accelerograms with a stochastic operator to simulate the duration and phase of the mainshock accelerograms. This approximation allows us to extend the range of aftershocks that can be used as Green's functions to events nearly three magnitude units smaller than the mainshock. Our realizations for the mainshock accelerogram at Oceano yield peak ground accelerations distributed as 28% ?? 4%g. We interpret these realizations as upper bounds for the actual ground motion, because our analysis assumes a linear response, whereas the presence of liquefaction indicates that the ground behaved nonlinearly in Oceano.

  20. Modeling of Kashmir Aftershock Decay Based on Static Coulomb Stress Changes and Laboratory-Derived Rate-and-State Dependent Friction Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, F.; Hainzl, S.; Aoudia, A.; Qaisar, M.

    2016-05-01

    We model the spatial and temporal evolution of October 8, 2005 Kashmir earthquake's aftershock activity using the rate-and-state dependent friction model incorporating uncertainties in computed coseismic stress perturbations. We estimated the best possible value for frictional resistance " Aσ n", background seismicity rate " r" and coefficient of stress variation "CV" using maximum log-likelihood method. For the whole Kashmir earthquake sequence, we measure a frictional resistance Aσ n ~ 0.0185 MPa, r ~ 20 M3.7+ events/year and CV = 0.94 ± 0.01. The spatial and temporal forecasted seismicity rate of modeled aftershocks fits well with the spatial and temporal distribution of observed aftershocks that occurred in the regions with positive static stress changes as well as in the apparent stress shadow region. To quantify the effect of secondary aftershock triggering, we have re-run the estimations for 100 stochastically declustered catalogs showing that the effect of aftershock-induced secondary stress changes is obviously minor compared to the overall uncertainties, and that the stress variability related to uncertain slip model inversions and receiver mechanisms remains the major factor to provide a reasonable data fit.

  1. Did stress triggering cause the large off-fault aftershocks of the 25 March 1998 MW=8.1 Antarctic plate earthquake?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toda, S.; Stein, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    The 1998 Antarctic plate earthquake produced clusters of aftershocks (MW ??? 6.4) up to 80 km from the fault rupture and up to 100 km beyond the end of the rupture. Because the mainshock occurred far from the nearest plate boundary and the nearest recorded earthquake, it is unusually isolated from the stress perturbations caused by other earthquakes, making it a good candidate for stress transfer analysis despite the absence of near-field observations. We tested whether the off-fault aftershocks lie in regions brought closer to Coulomb failure by the main rupture. We evaluated four published source models for the main rupture. In fourteen tests using different aftershocks sets and allowing the rupture sources to be shifted within their uncertainties, 6 were significant at ??? 99% confidence, 3 at > 95% confidence, and 5 were not significant (< 95% level). For the 9 successful tests, the stress at the site of the aftershocks was typically increased by 1-2 bars (0.1-0.2 MPa). Thus the Antarctic plate event, together with the 1992 MW=7.3 Landers and its MW=6.5 Big Bear aftershock 40 km from the main fault, supply evidence that small stress changes might indeed trigger large earthquakes far from the main fault rupture.

  2. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  3. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  4. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the companyused technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  5. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications

  6. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  7. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  8. Sequence-based Parameter Estimation for an Epidemiological Temporal Aftershock Forecasting Model using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalayer, Fatemeh; Ebrahimian, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Introduction The first few days elapsed after the occurrence of a strong earthquake and in the presence of an ongoing aftershock sequence are quite critical for emergency decision-making purposes. Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) models are used frequently for forecasting the spatio-temporal evolution of seismicity in the short-term (Ogata, 1988). The ETAS models are epidemic stochastic point process models in which every earthquake is a potential triggering event for subsequent earthquakes. The ETAS model parameters are usually calibrated a priori and based on a set of events that do not belong to the on-going seismic sequence (Marzocchi and Lombardi 2009). However, adaptive model parameter estimation, based on the events in the on-going sequence, may have several advantages such as, tuning the model to the specific sequence characteristics, and capturing possible variations in time of the model parameters. Simulation-based methods can be employed in order to provide a robust estimate for the spatio-temporal seismicity forecasts in a prescribed forecasting time interval (i.e., a day) within a post-main shock environment. This robust estimate takes into account the uncertainty in the model parameters expressed as the posterior joint probability distribution for the model parameters conditioned on the events that have already occurred (i.e., before the beginning of the forecasting interval) in the on-going seismic sequence. The Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation scheme is used herein in order to sample directly from the posterior probability distribution for ETAS model parameters. Moreover, the sequence of events that is going to occur during the forecasting interval (and hence affecting the seismicity in an epidemic type model like ETAS) is also generated through a stochastic procedure. The procedure leads to two spatio-temporal outcomes: (1) the probability distribution for the forecasted number of events, and (2) the uncertainty in estimating the

  9. Television monitor field shifter and an opto-electronic method for obtaining a stereo image of optimal depth resolution and reduced depth distortion on a single screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus is developed for obtaining a stereo image with reduced depth distortion and optimum depth resolution. Static and dynamic depth distortion and depth resolution tradeoff is provided. Cameras obtaining the images for a stereo view are converged at a convergence point behind the object to be presented in the image, and the collection-surface-to-object distance, the camera separation distance, and the focal lengths of zoom lenses for the cameras are all increased. Doubling the distances cuts the static depth distortion in half while maintaining image size and depth resolution. Dynamic depth distortion is minimized by panning a stereo view-collecting camera system about a circle which passes through the convergence point and the camera's first nodal points. Horizontal field shifting of the television fields on a television monitor brings both the monitor and the stereo views within the viewer's limit of binocular fusion.

  10. Embedding perspective cue in holographic projection display by virtual variable-focal-length lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Xiaorui; Zhao, Fuliang

    2014-10-01

    To make a view perspective cue emerging in reconstructed images, a new approach is proposed by incorporating virtual variable-focal-length lenses into computer generated Fourier hologram (CGFH). This approach is based on a combination of monocular vision principle and digital hologram display, thus it owns properties coming from the two display models simultaneously. Therefore, it can overcome the drawback of the unsatisfied visual depth perception of the reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) images in holographic projection display (HPD). Firstly, an analysis on characteristics of conventional CGFH reconstruction is made, which indicates that a finite depthof- focus and a non-adjustable lateral magnification are reasons of the depth information lack on a fixed image plane. Secondly, the principle of controlling lateral magnification in wave-front reconstructions by virtual lenses is demonstrated. And the relation model is deduced, involving the depth of object, the parameters of virtual lenses, and the lateral magnification. Next, the focal-lengths of virtual lenses are determined by considering perspective distortion of human vision. After employing virtual lenses in the CGFH, the reconstructed image on focal-plane can deliver the same depth cues as that of the monocular stereoscopic image. Finally, the depthof- focus enhancement produced by a virtual lens and the effect on the reconstruction quality from the virtual lens are described. Numerical simulation and electro-optical reconstruction experimental results prove that the proposed algorithm can improve the depth perception of the reconstructed 3D image in HPD. The proposed method provides a possibility of uniting multiple display models to enhance 3D display performance and viewer experience.

  11. Source parameters and effects of bandwidth and local geology on high- frequency ground motions observed for aftershocks of the northeastern Ohio earthquake of 31 January 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glassmoyer, G.; Borcherdt, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    A 10-station array (GEOS) yielded recordings of exceptional bandwidth (400 sps) and resolution (up to 96 dB) for the aftershocks of the moderate (mb???4.9) earthquake that occurred on 31 January 1986 near Painesville, Ohio. Nine aftershocks were recorded with seismic moments ranging between 9 ?? 1016 and 3 ?? 1019 dyne-cm (MW: 0.6 to 2.3). The aftershock recordings at a site underlain by ???8m of lakeshore sediments show significant levels of high-frequency soil amplification of vertical motion at frequencies near 8, 20 and 70 Hz. Viscoelastic models for P and SV waves incident at the base of the sediments yield estimates of vertical P-wave response consistent with the observed high-frequency site resonances, but suggest additional detailed shear-wave logs are needed to account for observed S-wave response. -from Authors

  12. Teal Amber Visible Focal Plane Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Charles R.; Burczewski, Ron

    1981-12-01

    Deep-space surveillance missions have imposed severe demands on existing technology and simulated the search for new, advanced technology developments to provide higher performance. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored Teal Amber as a visible charge-coupled device (CCD) and associated focal plane signal processing technology development and demonstration program. This paper describes this large-scale, staring-array-sensor concept. The current state of art in the resulting visibled CCD imagers is specified, along with the focal plane signal processor implementation in low power-weight-volume large-scale integrated (LSI) circuitry. Performance requirements and analytic predictions are compared to demonstration system results from an electro-optical test site in White Sands, New Mexico.

  13. Dynamic reactive astrocytes after focal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shinghua

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are specialized and most numerous glial cell type in the central nervous system and play important roles in physiology. Astrocytes are also critically involved in many neural disorders including focal ischemic stroke, a leading cause of brain injury and human death. One of the prominent pathological features of focal ischemic stroke is reactive astrogliosis and glial scar formation associated with morphological changes and proliferation. This review paper discusses the recent advances in spatial and temporal dynamics of morphology and proliferation of reactive astrocytes after ischemic stroke based on results from experimental animal studies. As reactive astrocytes exhibit stem cell-like properties, knowledge of dynamics of reactive astrocytes and glial scar formation will provide important insights for astrocyte-based cell therapy in stroke. PMID:25657720

  14. Myxoid adrenal adenoma with focal pseudoglandular pattern.

    PubMed

    De Padua, Michelle; Rajagopal, V

    2008-05-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors with myxoid change are rare tumors. To our knowledge, only 22 cases have been described so far in literature, which include 13 carcinomas and 9 adenomas. A pseudoglandular pattern has been described in 9 of these tumors. We report a case of a myxoid adenoma of the left adrenal gland in a 67-year-old woman, with a focal pseudoglandular pattern involving about 20% of the studied tumor. Rest of the tumor was composed of anastomosing cords of tumor cells. Abundant myxoid stroma was present, which stained positively with alcian blue and was weakly focally positive with periodic acid Schiff. Immunophenotype was consistent with an adrenal tumor, i.e., positive for vimentin, inhibin, and melan A. Cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and chromogranin were negative. MIB-1 index was < 0.1%. PMID:18579979

  15. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-03-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice. PMID:20380955

  16. Focal tracer uptake in the jaw.

    PubMed

    El-Zahry, Mai R; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Focal tracer uptake in the jaw during conventional bone scintigraphy is a quite frequent finding usually due to dental disease and seldom to other diseases including malignant disease. Methylene diphosphonate-technetium-99m ((99m)Tc-MDP) 3-phase bone scan is considered the most sensitive imaging method for the detection of jaw osteonecrosis at an early stage. This finding can also but seldom be seen in patients undergoing palliative radionuclide treatment for bone metastases. In conclusion, focal jaw lesions are usually benign and of dental origin. In a small percentage of cancer patients of about 4.3%, jaw lesions as diagnosed among 347 cases of various carcinomas may be due to malignancy. Unfortunately, the number of studies is small, most of them are retrospective and few show biopsy results. PMID:25397621

  17. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  18. Extensive Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Zahra; Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Noormohamadi, Robab

    2015-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck’s disease is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by human papilloma virus especially subtypes 13 or 32. The frequency of this disease varies widely from one geographic region and ethnic groups to another. This paper reports an Iranian case of extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia. A 35-year-old man with FEH is described, in whom the lesions had persisted for more than 25 years. The lesion was diagnosed according to both clinical and histopathological features. Dental practitioner should be aware of these types of lesions and histopathological examination together and a careful clinical observation should be carried out for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26351501

  19. Focal colors are universal after all

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Terry; Kay, Paul; Cook, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely held that named color categories in the world's languages are organized around universal focal colors and that these focal colors tend to be chosen as the best examples of color terms across languages. However, this notion has been supported primarily by data from languages of industrialized societies. In contrast, recent research on a language from a nonindustrialized society has called this idea into question. We examine color-naming data from languages of 110 nonindustrialized societies and show that (i) best-example choices for color terms in these languages cluster near the prototypes for English white, black, red, green, yellow, and blue, and (ii) best-example choices cluster more tightly across languages than do the centers of category extensions, suggesting that universal best examples (foci) may be the source of universal tendencies in color naming. PMID:15923257

  20. Focal adhesions, stress fibers and mechanical tension

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, Keith; Guilluy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Stress fibers and focal adhesions are complex protein arrays that produce, transmit and sense mechanical tension. Evidence accumulated over many years led to the conclusion that mechanical tension generated within stress fibers contributes to the assembly of both stress fibers themselves and their associated focal adhesions. However, several lines of evidence have recently been presented against this model. Here we discuss the evidence for and against the role of mechanical tension in driving the assembly of these structures. We also consider how their assembly is influenced by the rigidity of the substratum to which cells are adhering. Finally, we discuss the recently identified connections between stress fibers and the nucleus, and the roles that these may play, both in cell migration and regulating nuclear function. PMID:26519907

  1. Infrared fiber optic focal plane dispersers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Far infrared transmissive fiber optics as a component in the design of integrated far infrared focal plane array utilization is discussed. A tightly packed bundle of fibers is placed at the focal plane, where an array of infrared detectors would normally reside, and then fanned out in two or three dimensions to individual detectors. Subsequently, the detectors are multiplexed by cryogenic electronics for relay of the data. A second possible application is frequency up-conversion (v sub 1 + v sub 2 = v sub 3), which takes advantage of the nonlinear optical index of refraction of certain infrared transmissive materials in fiber form. Again, a fiber bundle is utilized as above, but now a laser of frequency v sub 1 is mixed with the incoming radiation of frequency v sub 1 within the nonlinear fiber material. The sum, v sub 2 is then detected by near infrared or visible detectors which are more sensitive than those available at v sub 2. Due to the geometrical size limitations of detectors such as photomultipliers, the focal plane dispersal technique is advantageous for imaging up-conversion.

  2. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  3. [Focal therapy for prostate cancer: German version].

    PubMed

    Kasivisvanathan, V; Shah, T T; Donaldson, I; Kanthabalan, A; Moore, C M; Emberton, M; Ah