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Sample records for ag ppb cd

  1. PPB | What is PPB?

    Cancer.gov

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare tumor of the lung that affects young children. PPB is caused by mutations in a gene known as DICER1. Not everyone with PPB has a change in DICER1. The PPB DICER1 Syndrome Study ‹an observational clinical research study‹is enrolling children with PPB and their families.

  2. PPB | What is PPB?

    Cancer.gov

    DICER1 is a gene that manages the function of other genes. Inherited changes in DICER1 can result in a variety of tumors, including pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). The PPB DICER1 Syndrome Study ‹an observational clinical research study‹is enrolling children with PPB and their families.

  3. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of CdO : Ag nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Linjie; Wang, Shufang; Liu, Ran; Zha, Xinyu; Sun, Niefeng; Wang, Shujie; Wang, Jianglong; Fu, Guangsheng

    2016-07-26

    CdO : Ag nanocomposites with metallic Ag nanoparticles embedded in the polycrystalline CdO matrix were synthesized by the solid-state reaction method. The addition of Ag led to increased grain boundaries of CdO and created numerous CdO/Ag interfaces. By incorporating Ag into the CdO matrix, the power factor was increased which was probably due to the carrier energy filtering effect induced by the enhanced energy-dependent scattering of electrons. In addition, reduced thermal conductivity was also achieved by stronger phonon scattering from grain boundaries, CdO/Ag interfaces and Ag nanoparticles. These concomitant effects resulted in enhanced ZT values for all CdO : Ag nanocomposites, demonstrating that the strategy of introducing metallic Ag nanoparticles into the CdO host was very effective in optimizing the thermoelectric performance. PMID:27411573

  4. PPB | About

    Cancer.gov

    The Pleuropulmonary Blastoma (PPB) DICER1 Syndrome Study ‹an observational clinical research study‹is enrolling children with PPB and their families. The goal of the study is to improve the care of children with PPB and other tumors associated with DICER1.

  5. Elastic Constants of the β1-AgCd Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Yoshie; Makita, Tomoko; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Nagasawa, Akira

    1981-04-01

    The elastic constants of single crystal of β1-AgCd alloy with 47.9± 0.1 at.%Cd have been measured in a temperature range between 180 K and 360 K, using a ultrasonic pulse-cho overlapping method. It is found that with increasing temperature, the elastic constants CL{=}(C11+C12+2C44)/2 and C44 decrease linearly but C'{=}(C11-C12)/2 increases. In addition, this alloy shows a high elastic anisotropy in comparison with other Ag-based β1-phase alloys such as AgMg and AgZn.

  6. Extranuclear dynamics of 111Ag(→111Cd) doped in AgI nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Mizuuchi, R.; Irioka, N.; Komatsuda, S.; Kawata, S.; Taoka, A.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic behavior of the extranuclear field relative to the 111Ag(→111Cd) probe nucleus introduced in a superionic conductor silver iodide (AgI) was investigated by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique. For poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP)-coated AgI nanoparticles, we observed nuclear spin relaxation of the probe at room temperature. This result signifies that Ag+ ions in the polymer-coated sample make hopping motion from site to site at this low temperature. The activation energy for the dynamic motion was successfully estimated to be 46(10) meV. The first atomic-level observation of the temperature-dependent dynamic behavior of Ag+ ions in the polymer-coated AgI is reported.

  7. Photoluminescence and upconversion on Ag/CdTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, A. E.; Gadallah, A.-S.; Mohamed, M. B.; Azzouz, I. M.

    2014-11-01

    Different sizes of aqueous CdTe QDs have been prepared by microwave via controlling the temperature and time of irradiation. To study the plasmonic effect on CdTe QDs, Silver NPs were prepared by using a chemical reduction method. Structure characterization of the nanocrystals (Ag NPs and CdTe QDs) was determined by transmission electron microscopy “TEM”. For optical characterization, the absorption and photolumincence (PL) spectra were measured. It has been found that there are two opposite behaviors (quenching and enhancement) in the fluorescence spectra based on the spectral coupling strength between Ag NPs and CdTe QDs. When there is strong overlapping, PL enhancement of CdTe QDs has been observed. On the other hand, when the overlapping is weak, the PL quenching was predominant at all Ag NPS concentrations. Input-output PL intensity dependence was also studied. Upconversion photoluminescence with low excitation intensity was observed in our CdTe QDs with a standard spectrofluorometer at excitation wavelength of 800 nm. Thermally assisted surface state mechanism has been proposed to be responsible for the upconverion process.

  8. Cladding technique for development of Ag In Cd decoupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshigawara, M.; Harada, M.; Saito, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Kogawa, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Kawai, M.; Kurishita, H.; Konashi, K.

    2005-08-01

    To develop a Ag (silver)-In (indium)-Cd (cadmium) alloy decoupler, a method is needed to bond the decoupler between two plates of the Al alloy (A6061-T6). We found that a better HIP condition was temperature, pressure and holding time at 803 K, 100 MPa and 1 h, respectively, for small test pieces ( ϕ 22 mm in diam. × 5 mm in height). Especially, a sandwich case (a Ag-In plate with thickness of 0.5 mm between two Ag-Cd plates with thickness of 1.25 mm) gave easier (or better) bonding results. Though a hardened layer is found in the bonding layer, the rupture strength of the bonding layer is more than 30 MPa, which is higher than the design stress in our application.

  9. A dry method to synthesize dendritic Ag2Se nanostructures utilizing CdSe quantum dots and Ag thin films.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lian; Zhang, Bingpo; Xu, Tianning; Li, Ruifeng; Wu, Huizhen

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic Ag2Se nanostructures are synthesized in a dry environment by UV irradiating the hybrids composed of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and silver (Ag). UV irradiation on CdSe QDs induces a photooxidation effect on the QD surface and leads to the formation of SeO2 components. Then SeO2 reacts with the Ag atoms in either Ag film or QD layer to produce the Ag2Se. The growth mechanism of Ag2Se dendrites on solid Ag films is explored and explained by a diffusion limited aggregation model in which the QD layer provides enough freedom for Ag2Se motion. Since the oxidation of the CdSe QDs is the critical step for the Ag2Se dendrites formation this dry chemical interaction between QDs and Ag film can be applied in the study of the QD surface chemical properties. With this dry synthesis method, the Ag2Se dendrites can also be facilely formed at the designed area on Ag substrates. PMID:25483981

  10. A dry method to synthesize dendritic Ag2Se nanostructures utilizing CdSe quantum dots and Ag thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lian; Zhang, Bingpo; Xu, Tianning; Li, Ruifeng; Wu, Huizhen

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic Ag2Se nanostructures are synthesized in a dry environment by UV irradiating the hybrids composed of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and silver (Ag). UV irradiation on CdSe QDs induces a photooxidation effect on the QD surface and leads to the formation of SeO2 components. Then SeO2 reacts with the Ag atoms in either Ag film or QD layer to produce the Ag2Se. The growth mechanism of Ag2Se dendrites on solid Ag films is explored and explained by a diffusion limited aggregation model in which the QD layer provides enough freedom for Ag2Se motion. Since the oxidation of the CdSe QDs is the critical step for the Ag2Se dendrites formation this dry chemical interaction between QDs and Ag film can be applied in the study of the QD surface chemical properties. With this dry synthesis method, the Ag2Se dendrites can also be facilely formed at the designed area on Ag substrates.

  11. Direct detection of Pb in urine and Cd, Pb, Cu, and Ag in natural waters using electrochemical sensors immobilized with DMSA functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Hongsirikarn, Kitiya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Choi, Daiwon; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2008-03-01

    Urine is universally recognized as one of the best non-invasive matrices for biomonitoring exposure to a broad range of xenobiotics including toxic metals. For direct, simple, and field-deployable monitoring of urinary Pb, electrochemical sensors employing superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a surface functionalization of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) has been developed. The metal detection involves rapid collection of dispersed metal-bound nanoparticles from a sample solution at a magnetic or electromagnetic electrode, followed by the stripping voltammetry of the metal in acidic medium. The sensors were evaluated as a function of solution pH, the binding affinity of Pb to DMSA-Fe3O4, the ratio of nanoparticles per sample volume, preconcentration time, and Pb concentrations. The effect of binding competitions between the DMSA-Fe3O4 and urine constituents for Pb on the sensor responses was studied. After 90s of preconcentration in samples containing 25 vol.% of rat urine and 0.1 g/L of DMSA-Fe3O4, the sensor could detect background level of Pb (< 1 ppb) and yielded linear responses from 0 to 50 ppb of Pb, excellent reproducibility (%R.S.D of 5.3 for seven measurements of 30 ppb Pb), and Pb concentrations comparable to those measured by ICP-MS. The sensor could also simultaneously detect background levels (< 1 ppb) of Cd, Pb, Cu, and Ag in river and seawater.

  12. Electrostatic assembles and optical properties of Au CdTe QDs and Ag/Au CdTe QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongzhi; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Qifan; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Shukun

    2008-09-01

    Au-CdTe and Ag/Au-CdTe assembles were firstly investigated through the static interaction between positively charged cysteamine-stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and negatively charged Au or core/shell Ag/Au nano-particles (NCs). The CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solution were capped with cysteamine which endowed them positive charges on the surface. Both Au and Ag/Au NCs were prepared through reducing precursors with gallic acid obtained from the hydrolysis of natural plant poly-phenols and favored negative charges on the surface of NCs. The fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs exhibited strong quenching with the increase of added Au or Ag/Au NCs. Railey resonance scattering spectra of Au or Ag/Au NCs increased firstly and decreased latter with the concentration of CdTe QDs, accompanied with the solution color changing from red to purple and colorless at last. Experimental results on the effects of gallic acid, chloroauric acid tetrahydrate and other reagents demonstrated the static interaction occurred between QDs and NCs. This finding reveals the possibilities to design and control optical process and electromagnetic coupling in hybrid structures.

  13. Influence of Ag doping concentration on structural and optical properties of CdS thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pragati; Saxena, Nupur; Gupta, Vinay; Agarwal, Avinash

    2015-05-15

    This work shows the influence of Ag concentration on structural properties of pulsed laser deposited nanocrystalline CdS thin film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies confirm the dopant concentration in CdS films and atomic concentration of elements. XPS studies show that the samples are slightly sulfur deficient. GAXRD scan reveals the structural phase transformation from cubic to hexagonal phase of CdS without appearance of any phase of CdO, Ag{sub 2}O or Ag{sub 2}S suggesting the substitutional doping of Ag ions. Photoluminescence studies illustrate that emission intensity increases with increase in dopant concentration upto 5% and then decreases for higher dopant concentration.

  14. Loading Ag nanoparticles on Cd(II) boron imidazolate framework for photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Zhang, De-Xiang; Chen, Shumei; Wen, Tian

    2016-05-01

    An amine-functionalized Cd(II) boron imidazolate framework (BIF-77) with three-dimensional open structure has been successfully synthesized, which can load Ag nanoparticles (NPs) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB).

  15. PPB | What is involved

    Cancer.gov

    The Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) DICER1 Syndrome Study ‹an observational clinical research study‹is enrolling children with PPB and their families. Families who join the study will be asked to complete questionnaires about medical history, give permission for the study team to obtain medical records, and give a blood specimen.

  16. Self-regulated route to ternary hybrid nanocrystals of Ag-Ag2S-CdS with near-infrared photoluminescence and enhanced photothermal conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guoxing; Bao, Chunlin; Liu, Yuanjun; Shen, Xiaoping; Xi, Chunyan; Xu, Zheng; Ji, Zhenyuan

    2014-09-01

    Developing hybrid nanocrystals is a hot topic in materials science. Herein, a ternary hybrid nanocrystal, Ag-Ag2S-CdS, combining near infrared emission and photothermal conversion properties was demonstrated. The ternary Ag-Ag2S-CdS hybrid nanocrystals with cubic shape and uniform size were synthesized by a simple one-pot and one-step colloidal method. The growth process is self-regulated with the formation order of Ag2S, Ag, and CdS, sequentially. The formation of Ag originates from the partial reduction of Ag2S, while the formation of CdS is through an Ag2S catalytic mechanism based on its superionic feature. The obtained ternary hybrid nanocrystals show near infrared emission and photothermal conversion properties in a lab-on-a-particle system. Importantly, an enhanced effect is observed for the photothermal conversion, which is mainly due to the presence of heterointerfaces among the crystals. This work will not only advance the synthesis chemistry of multi-component hybrid nanocrystals but also provide a possible route for the design of advanced multi-model materials used in bio-related fields.Developing hybrid nanocrystals is a hot topic in materials science. Herein, a ternary hybrid nanocrystal, Ag-Ag2S-CdS, combining near infrared emission and photothermal conversion properties was demonstrated. The ternary Ag-Ag2S-CdS hybrid nanocrystals with cubic shape and uniform size were synthesized by a simple one-pot and one-step colloidal method. The growth process is self-regulated with the formation order of Ag2S, Ag, and CdS, sequentially. The formation of Ag originates from the partial reduction of Ag2S, while the formation of CdS is through an Ag2S catalytic mechanism based on its superionic feature. The obtained ternary hybrid nanocrystals show near infrared emission and photothermal conversion properties in a lab-on-a-particle system. Importantly, an enhanced effect is observed for the photothermal conversion, which is mainly due to the presence of

  17. Ag adsorption on Cd-terminated CdS (0 0 0 1) and S-terminated CdS (0 0 0 1-bar) surfaces: First-principles investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yandong; Dai, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Xianghong; Huang, Baibiao

    2011-04-15

    First-principles calculations are performed to study the adsorption of Ag at Cd-terminated CdS (0 0 0 1) and S-terminated CdS (0 0 0 1-bar) surfaces as a function of Ag coverage. Our results reveal that Ag adsorption at Cd-terminated (0 0 0 1) has a large binging energy than at S-terminated (0 0 0 1-bar) surface. For Ag adsorption at Cd-terminated (0 0 0 1) surface, T4 structure is more favorable and the Ag-Cd bond posses an ionic-like character. While for Ag adsorption at S-terminated (0 0 0 1-bar) surface, the H3 structure is most stable and the bonding between Ag-S is covalent. It is found that the magnitude and the sign of surface dipole moment are partly determined by the difference between the electronegativities of Ag and the host atom bonding with Ag. The adsorption energy changes as a function of Ag coverage. In addition, related properties of Ag cluster adsorption at Cd-terminated (0 0 0 1) surface are also discussed. -- Graphical abstract: We studied the adsorption of Ag at Cd-terminated CdS (0 0 0 1) and S-terminated CdS (0 0 0 1-bar) surfaces as a function of Ag coverage by means of the first-principles calculations. In addition, related properties of Ag cluster adsorption at Cd-terminated (0 0 0 1) surface are also discussed. Our ab initio calculations are useful complement to the intense experimental studies for Ag-CdS interface. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Ag adsorption effects on electronic structure and associated physics properties of CdS is systemically studied. {yields} The surface dipole moment is partly determined by the difference between the electronegativities of silver and the host atom bonding with silver. {yields} The characteristic of Ag cluster (Ag{sub 2}, Ag{sub 4}, and Ag{sub 7}) adsorption on the CdS (0 0 0 1) surface is discussed.

  18. PPB | Study Team

    Cancer.gov

    The Pleuropulmonary Blastoma (PPB) DICER1 Syndrome Study team is made up of researchers from the National Cancer Institute, Children¹s National Medical Center, the International Pleuropulmonary Blastoma Registry, and Washington University in St. Louis.

  19. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic performance of ZnO nanowires integrated with CdS and Ag2S.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chienhua; Li, Zhengcao; Lin, Hehnan; Wang, Guojing; Liao, Jiecui; Li, Mingyang; Lv, Shasha; Li, Wei

    2016-02-18

    A series of ZnO-CdS-Ag2S ternary nanostructures with different amounts of Ag2S were prepared using simple and low-cost successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) and a chemical precipitation method. The ZnO nanowires, with a diameter of ∼100 nm and a length of ∼1 μm, were modified by coating CdS and Ag2S. CdS has a high absorption coefficient and can efficiently match with the energy levels of ZnO, which can enhance the light absorption ability of the nanostructures. In addition, Ag2S with a narrow band gap was used as the main light absorber and played an important role in increasing the light absorption in the visible light region. The photocatalytic activity of the ZnO-CdS-Ag2S ternary nanostructures was investigated using the degradation of methyl orange (MO) in an aqueous solution under visible light. The ZnO-CdS-Ag2S ternary nanostructures were found to be more efficient than ZnO nanowires, ZnO-CdS nanowires, and ZnO-Ag2S nanowires. There is 7.68 times more photocatalytic activity for MO degradation in terms of the rate constant for ZnO-CdS-Ag2S 15-cycle ternary nanostructure compared to the as-grown ZnO. Furthermore, the effect of the amount of Ag2S and CdS on the ZnO surface on the photocatalytic activity was analyzed. The superior photo-absorption properties and photocatalytic performance of the ZnO-CdS-Ag2S ternary nanostructures can be ascribed to the heterostructure, which enhanced the separation of the photo-induced electron-hole pairs. In addition, visible light could be absorbed by ZnO-CdS-Ag2S ternary nanostructures rather than by ZnO. PMID:26815888

  20. Ag2S/CdS/TiO2 Nanotube Array Films with High Photocurrent Density by Spotting Sample Method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Zhao, Peini; Zhang, Fanjun; Liu, Yuliang; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-12-01

    Ag2S/CdS/TiO2 hybrid nanotube array films (Ag2S/CdS/TNTs) were prepared by selectively depositing a narrow-gap semiconductor-Ag2S (0.9 eV) quantum dots (QDs)-in the local domain of the CdS/TiO2 nanotube array films by spotting sample method (SSM). The improvement of sunlight absorption ability and photocurrent density of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube array films (TNTs) which were obtained by anodic oxidation method was realized because of modifying semiconductor QDs. The CdS/TNTs, Ag2S/TNTs, and Ag2S/CdS/TNTs fabricated by uniformly depositing the QDs into the TNTs via the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method were synthesized, respectively. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) results demonstrated that the Ag2S/CdS/TNTs prepared by SSM and other films were successfully prepared. In comparison with the four films of TNTs, CdS/TNTs, Ag2S/TNTs, and Ag2S/CdS/TNTs by SILAR, the Ag2S/CdS/TNTs prepared by SSM showed much better absorption capability and the highest photocurrent density in UV-vis range (320~800 nm). The cycles of local deposition have great influence on their photoelectric properties. The photocurrent density of Ag2S/CdS/TNTs by SSM with optimum deposition cycles of 6 was about 37 times that of TNTs without modification, demonstrating their great prospective applications in solar energy utilization fields. PMID:26428017

  1. CD226 as a genetic adjuvant to enhance immune efficacy induced by Ag85A DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Fangli; Zhu, Junfeng; Sang, Lixuan; Han, Xue; Wang, Danan; Shan, Fengping; Li, Shengjun; Sun, Xun; Lu, Changlong

    2015-03-01

    Antigen-85A (Ag85A) is one of the major proteins secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Many studies on animal models have shown that vaccination with the recombinant Ag85A-DNA or Ag85A protein induces powerful immune response. However, these vaccines cannot generate sufficient protective immunity in the systemic compartment. CD226, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is expressed in the majority of NK cells, T cells, monocytes, and platelets, and can be served as a co-stimulator that contributes to multiple innate and adaptive responses. However, there has been no study where either CD226 protein or DNA has been used as an adjuvant for vaccine development. The aim of this study was to develop a novel Ag85A DNA vaccine with CD226 as the genetic adjuvant to increase the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A. Oral vaccination with pcDNA3.1-Ag85A-CD226 DNA induced potent immune responses in mice. CD226 was an effective genetic adjuvant that improved the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A and enhanced the activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells in mice. Th1 dominant cytokines (i.e. IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α), cellular immunity (i.e. CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells in splenocytes) and MLNs were also significantly elevated by pcDNA3.1-Ag85A-CD226 DNA vaccination. Our results suggest that CD226 is an effective adjuvant to enhance the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A. Our findings provide a new strategy for the development of a DNA vaccine co-expressing Ag85A and CD226. PMID:25582686

  2. Ag2S/CdS/TiO2 Nanotube Array Films with High Photocurrent Density by Spotting Sample Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong; Zhao, Peini; Zhang, Fanjun; Liu, Yuliang; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-10-01

    Ag2S/CdS/TiO2 hybrid nanotube array films (Ag2S/CdS/TNTs) were prepared by selectively depositing a narrow-gap semiconductor—Ag2S (0.9 eV) quantum dots (QDs)—in the local domain of the CdS/TiO2 nanotube array films by spotting sample method (SSM). The improvement of sunlight absorption ability and photocurrent density of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube array films (TNTs) which were obtained by anodic oxidation method was realized because of modifying semiconductor QDs. The CdS/TNTs, Ag2S/TNTs, and Ag2S/CdS/TNTs fabricated by uniformly depositing the QDs into the TNTs via the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method were synthesized, respectively. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) results demonstrated that the Ag2S/CdS/TNTs prepared by SSM and other films were successfully prepared. In comparison with the four films of TNTs, CdS/TNTs, Ag2S/TNTs, and Ag2S/CdS/TNTs by SILAR, the Ag2S/CdS/TNTs prepared by SSM showed much better absorption capability and the highest photocurrent density in UV-vis range (320~800 nm). The cycles of local deposition have great influence on their photoelectric properties. The photocurrent density of Ag2S/CdS/TNTs by SSM with optimum deposition cycles of 6 was about 37 times that of TNTs without modification, demonstrating their great prospective applications in solar energy utilization fields.

  3. Development of aluminum (Al5083)-clad ternary Ag In Cd alloy for JSNS decoupled moderator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshigawara, M.; Harada, M.; Saito, S.; Oikawa, K.; Maekawa, F.; Futakawa, M.; Kikuchi, K.; Kato, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Naoe, T.; Koyama, T.; Ooi, T.; Zherebtsov, S.; Kawai, M.; Kurishita, H.; Konashi, K.

    2006-09-01

    To develop Ag (silver)-In (indium)-Cd (cadmium) alloy decoupler, a method is needed to bond the decoupler between Al alloy (Al5083) and the ternary Ag-In-Cd alloy. We found that a better HIP condition was temperature, pressure and holding time at 803 K, 100 MPa and 10 min. for small test pieces ( ϕ22 mm in dia. × 6 mm in height). Hardened layer due to the formation of AlAg 2 was found in the bonding layer, however, the rupture strength of the bonding layer is more than 30 MPa, the calculated design stress. Bonding tests of a large size piece (200 × 200 × 30 mm 3), which simulated the real scale, were also performed according to the results of small size tests. The result also gave good bonding and enough required-mechanical-strength.

  4. High frequency of circulating HBcAg-specific CD8 T cells in hepatitis B infection: a flow cytometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, S; Yamamoto, K; Shimada, N; Okano, N; Okamoto, R; Suzuki, T; Hakoda, T; Mizuno, M; Higashi, T; Tsuji, T

    2001-01-01

    Viral antigen-specific T cells are important for virus elimination. We studied the hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T cell response using flow cytometry. Three phases of HBV infection were studied: Group A, HBeAg (+) chronic hepatitis; Group B, HBeAb (+) HBV carrier after seroconversion; and Group C, HBsAb (+) phase. Peripheral T cells were incubated with recombinant HB core antigen (HBcAg), and intracytoplasmic cytokines were analysed by flow cytometry. HBcAg-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells were identified in all three groups and the number of IFN-γpositive T cells was greater than TNF-α-positive T cells. The frequency of IFN-γ-positive CD4 and CD8 T cells was highest in Group C, compared with Groups A and B. No significant difference in the HBcAg-specific T cell response was observed between Group A and Group B. The HBcAg-specific CD8 T cell response was diminished by CD4 depletion, addition of antibody against human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I, class II or CD40L. Cytokine-positive CD8 T cells without HBcAg stimulation were present at a high frequency (7 of 13 cases) in Group B, but were rare in other groups. HBcAg-specific T cells can be detected at high frequency by a sensitive flow cytometric analysis, and these cells are important for controlling HBV replication. PMID:11472405

  5. Preparation, characterization, and bacteriostasis of AgNP-coated β-CD grafting cellulose beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Li, Bin; Lin, Li

    2013-03-01

    A novel functional material of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) grafting cellulose beads containing immobilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is presented in this paper. The morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Phenolphthalein probe molecule technique was used to detect the activity of the grafting β-CD, and the results demonstrated that the deposition of AgNPs had no influence on its encapsulation ability. Acid resistance of the AgNPs on the bead material was studied by atomic absorption spectrometry. The stability of the AgNPs was enhanced due to the grafting of β-CD. Tube dilution method was applied to study the bacteriostatic effect, and the minimal inhibitory doses of the novel material against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were 12.5 and 25 mg, respectively. The minimal bactericidal doses for the two bacteria were 25 and 25 mg, respectively. PMID:23340866

  6. Approaching the N=82 shell closure with mass measurements of Ag and Cd isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenfeldt, M.; Baruah, S.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Borgmann, Ch.; Boehm, Ch.; George, S.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Naimi, S.; Beck, D.; Dworschak, M.; Herfurth, F.; Savreux, R.; Yazidjian, C.; Blaum, K.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Delahaye, P.

    2010-03-15

    Mass measurements of neutron-rich Cd and Ag isotopes were performed with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The masses of {sup 112,114-124}Ag and {sup 114,120,122-124,126,128}Cd, determined with relative uncertainties between 2x10{sup -8} and 2x10{sup -7}, resulted in significant corrections and improvements of the mass surface. In particular, the mass of {sup 124}Ag was previously unknown. In addition, other masses that had to be inferred from Q values of nuclear decays and reactions have now been measured directly. The analysis includes various mass differences, namely the two-neutron separation energies, the applicability of the Garvey-Kelson relations, double differences of masses deltaV{sub pn}, which give empirical proton-neutron interaction strengths, as well as a comparison with recent microscopic calculations. The deltaV{sub pn} results reveal that for even-even nuclides around {sup 132}Sn the trends are similar to those in the {sup 208}Pb region.

  7. β-CD Dimer-immobilized Ag Assembly Embedded Silica Nanoparticles for Sensitive Detection of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Eunil; Jeong, Daham; Cha, Myeong Geun; Choi, Jae Min; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Kim, Hyung-Mo; Kim, Hwanhee; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong; Jung, Seunho; Jun, Bong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    We designed a β-CD dimer on silver nanoparticles embedded with silica nanoparticles (Ag@SiO2 NPs) structure to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Silica NPs were utilized as a template for embedding silver NPs to create hot spot structures and enhance the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, and a thioether-bridged dimeric β-CD was immobilized on Ag NPs to capture PAHs. The assembled Ag NPs on silica NPs were confirmed by TEM and the presence of β-CD dimer on Ag@SiO2 was confirmed by UV-vis and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs were used as SERS substrate for detecting perylene, a PAH, directly and in a wide linearity range of 10‑7 M to 10‑2 M with a low detection limit of 10‑8 M. Also, the β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs exhibited 1000-fold greater sensitivity than Ag@SiO2 NPs in terms of their perylene detection limit. Furthermore, we demonstrated the possibility of detecting various PAH compounds using the β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs as a multiplex detection tool. Various PAH compounds with the NPs exhibited their distinct SERS bands by the ratio of each PAHs. This approach of utilizing the assembled structure and the ligands to recognize target has potential for use in sensitive analytical sensors.

  8. β-CD Dimer-immobilized Ag Assembly Embedded Silica Nanoparticles for Sensitive Detection of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Eunil; Jeong, Daham; Cha, Myeong Geun; Choi, Jae Min; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Kim, Hyung-Mo; Kim, Hwanhee; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong; Jung, Seunho; Jun, Bong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    We designed a β-CD dimer on silver nanoparticles embedded with silica nanoparticles (Ag@SiO2 NPs) structure to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Silica NPs were utilized as a template for embedding silver NPs to create hot spot structures and enhance the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, and a thioether-bridged dimeric β-CD was immobilized on Ag NPs to capture PAHs. The assembled Ag NPs on silica NPs were confirmed by TEM and the presence of β-CD dimer on Ag@SiO2 was confirmed by UV-vis and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs were used as SERS substrate for detecting perylene, a PAH, directly and in a wide linearity range of 10(-7) M to 10(-2) M with a low detection limit of 10(-8) M. Also, the β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs exhibited 1000-fold greater sensitivity than Ag@SiO2 NPs in terms of their perylene detection limit. Furthermore, we demonstrated the possibility of detecting various PAH compounds using the β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs as a multiplex detection tool. Various PAH compounds with the NPs exhibited their distinct SERS bands by the ratio of each PAHs. This approach of utilizing the assembled structure and the ligands to recognize target has potential for use in sensitive analytical sensors. PMID:27184729

  9. β-CD Dimer-immobilized Ag Assembly Embedded Silica Nanoparticles for Sensitive Detection of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eunil; Jeong, Daham; Cha, Myeong Geun; Choi, Jae Min; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Kim, Hyung-Mo; Kim, Hwanhee; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong; Jung, Seunho; Jun, Bong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    We designed a β-CD dimer on silver nanoparticles embedded with silica nanoparticles (Ag@SiO2 NPs) structure to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Silica NPs were utilized as a template for embedding silver NPs to create hot spot structures and enhance the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, and a thioether-bridged dimeric β-CD was immobilized on Ag NPs to capture PAHs. The assembled Ag NPs on silica NPs were confirmed by TEM and the presence of β-CD dimer on Ag@SiO2 was confirmed by UV-vis and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs were used as SERS substrate for detecting perylene, a PAH, directly and in a wide linearity range of 10−7 M to 10−2 M with a low detection limit of 10−8 M. Also, the β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs exhibited 1000-fold greater sensitivity than Ag@SiO2 NPs in terms of their perylene detection limit. Furthermore, we demonstrated the possibility of detecting various PAH compounds using the β-CD dimer@Ag@SiO2 NPs as a multiplex detection tool. Various PAH compounds with the NPs exhibited their distinct SERS bands by the ratio of each PAHs. This approach of utilizing the assembled structure and the ligands to recognize target has potential for use in sensitive analytical sensors. PMID:27184729

  10. Metal-Semiconductor Hybrid Aerogels: Evolution of Optoelectronic Properties in a Low-Dimensional CdSe/Ag Nanoparticle Assembly.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Lamia; Esteves, Richard J Alan; Hafiz, Shopan; Özgür, Ümit; Arachchige, Indika U

    2015-10-27

    Hybrid nanomaterials composed of metal-semiconductor components exhibit unique properties in comparison to their individual counterparts, making them of great interest for optoelectronic applications. Theoretical and experimental studies suggest that interfacial interactions of individual components are of paramount importance to produce hybrid electronic states. The direct cross-linking of nanoparticles (NPs) via controlled removal of the surfactant ligands provides a route to tune interfacial interactions in a manner that has not been thoroughly investigated. Herein, we report the synthesis of CdSe/Ag heteronanostructures (aerogels) via oxidation induced self-assembly of thiol-coated NPs and the evolution of optical properties as a function of composition. Three hybrid systems were investigated, where the first and second excitonic energies of CdSe were matched with plasmonic energy of Au or Ag NPs and Ag hollow NPs. Physical characterization of the aerogels suggests the presence of an interconnected network of hexagonal CdSe and cubic Ag NPs. The optical properties of hybrids were systematically examined through UV-vis, photoluminescence (PL), and time-resolved (TR) PL spectroscopic studies that indicate the generation of alternate radiative decay pathways. A new emission (640 nm) from CdSe/Ag aerogels emerged at Ag loading as low as 0.27%, whereas absorption band tailing and PL quenching effects were observed at higher Ag and Au loading, respectively. The TRPL decay time of the new emission (∼600 ns) is markedly different from those of the band-edge (1.83 ± 0.03 ns) and trap-state (1190 ± 120 ns) emission maxima of phase pure CdSe, supporting the existence of alternate radiative relaxation pathways in sol-gel derived CdSe/Ag hybrids. PMID:26389642

  11. New chalcogenide glasses in the CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system

    SciTech Connect

    Kassem, M.; Le Coq, D.; Boidin, R.; Bychkov, E.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of macroscopic properties of the new CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the total conductivity of CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between the selenide and telluride equivalent systems. -- Abstract: Chalcogenide glasses in the pseudo-ternary CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system were synthesized and the glass-forming range was determined. The maximum content of CdTe in this glass system was found to be equal to 15 mol.%. The macroscopic characterizations of samples have consisted in Differential Scanning Calorimetry, density, and X-ray diffraction measurements. The cadmium telluride addition does not generate any significant change in the glass transition temperature but the resistance of binary AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses towards crystallisation is estimated to be decreasing on the base of {Delta}T = T{sub x} - T{sub g} parameter. The total electrical conductivity {sigma} was measured by complex impedance spectroscopy. First, the CdTe additions in the (AgI){sub 0.5}(As{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 0.5} host glass, (CdTe){sub x}(AgI){sub 0.5-x/2}(As{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 0.5-x/2} lead to a conductivity decrease at x {<=} 0.05. Then, the behaviour is reversed at 0.05 {<=} x {<=} 0.15. The obtained results are discussed by comparison with the equivalent selenide system.

  12. Metal coordination study at Ag and Cd sites in crown thioether complexes through DFT calculations and hyperfine parameters.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Rafael R; Lima, Filipe C D A; Gonçalves, Marcos B; Errico, Leonardo A; Rentería, Mario; Petrilli, Helena M

    2015-04-01

    Structural and electronic properties of [C12H24S6X], [C13H26S6OX], and [C14H28S6OX] (X: Ag(+), Cd(2+)) crown thioether complexes were investigated within the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) using the projector augmented wave (PAW) method. The theoretical results were compared with time-differential perturbed γ-γ angular correlations (TDPAC) experiments reported in the literature using the (111)Ag→(111)Cd probe. In the case of X=Ag(+), a refinement of the structure was performed and the predicted equilibrium structures compared with available X-ray diffraction experimental data. Structural distortions induced by replacing Ag(+) with Cd(2+) were investigated as well as the electric-field gradient (EFG) tensor at the Cd(2+) sites. Our results suggest that the EFG at Cd(2+) sites corresponds to the Ag(+) coordination sphere structure, i.e., before the structural relaxations of the molecule with X=Cd(2+) are completed. The results are discussed in terms of the characteristics of the TDPAC (111)Ag→(111)Cd probe and the time window of the measurement, and provide an interesting tool with which to probe molecular relaxations. PMID:25814377

  13. CdS and AgBr sensitized eriochrome black T (EBT) dye solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. D.; Dube, D. C.; Mathur, S. C.

    1985-11-01

    The photovoltaic and rectification properties of CdS- and AgBr-sensitized Eriochrome Black T dye solar cells have been studied. The dependence of the short-circuit current and the open-circuit voltage on light intensity and electrode material are examined and the variations with electrode material are explained on the basis of the built-in potential developed at the metal-semiconductor interface. Conversion efficiency, fill factor, diode factor and reverse saturation current are also calculated for each cell.

  14. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P. ); Andreani, L.C. ); Continenza, A. ); McMahan, A.K. )

    1993-05-15

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width [Delta]([epsilon]) in both the [ital J]=5/2 multiplet and in the [Gamma][sub 8], [Gamma][sub 7] crystal field states of the [ital f][sup 1] Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  15. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P.; Continenza, A. . Dipt. di Fisica); Andreani, L.C. ); McMahan, A.K. )

    1992-09-01

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width [Delta]([epsilon]) in both the J = 5/2 multiplet and in the [Gamma][sub 8], [Gamma][sub 7] crystal field states of the f[sup 1] Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  16. Volume dependence of Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, P.; Continenza, A.; Andreani, L.C.; McMahan, A.K.

    1992-09-01

    We have undertaken a first-principles theoretical study of the Anderson hybridization in cubic CeCd and CeAg as a function of volume reduction. We present results for the hybridization width {Delta}({epsilon}) in both the J = 5/2 multiplet and in the {Gamma}{sub 8}, {Gamma}{sub 7} crystal field states of the f{sup 1} Ce configuration. We also calculate the hybridization contribution to the magnetic transition temperature. This is found to increase with pressure but is smaller than the experimental values, indicating that the Coulomb exchange contribution to the magnetic coupling is not negligible in these compounds.

  17. Influence of reactive sulfide (AVS) and supplementary food on Ag, Cd and Zn bioaccumulation in the marine polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-S.; Lee, B.-G.; Yoo, H.; Koh, C.-H.; Luoma, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory bioassay determined the relative contribution of various pathways of Ag, Cd and Zn bioaccumulation in the marine polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed to moderately contaminated sediments. Juvenile worms were exposed for 25 d to experimental sediments containing 5 different reactive sulfide (acid volatile sulfides, AVS) concentrations (1 to 30 ??mol g-1), but with constant Ag, Cd, and Zn concentrations of 0.1, 0.1 and 7 ??mol g-1, respectively. The sediments were supplemented with contaminated food (TetraMin??) containing 3 levels of Ag-Cd-Zn (uncontaminated, 1?? or 5??1 metal concentrations in the contaminated sediment). The results suggest that bioaccumulation of Ag, Cd and Zn in the worms occurred predominantly from ingestion of contaminated sediments and contaminated supplementary food. AVS or dissolved metals (in porewater and overlying water) had a minor effect on bioaccumulation of the 3 metals in most of the treatments. The contribution to uptake from the dissolved source was most important in the most oxic sediments, with maximum contributions of 8% for Ag, 30% for Cd and 20% for Zn bioaccumulation. Sediment bioassays where uncontaminated supplemental food is added could seriously underestimate metal exposures in an equilibrated system; N. arenaceodentata feeding on uncontaminated food would be exposed to 40-60% less metal than if the food source was equilibrated (as occurs in nature). Overall, the results show that pathways of metal exposure are dynamically linked in contaminated sediments and shift as external geochemical characteristics and internal biological attributes vary.

  18. Development of CdO-graphite-Ag coatings for gas bearings to 427 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.

    1981-01-01

    Graphite is one of the most commonly known lubricants. Its effectiveness in a range between room temperature (RT) and 540 C is reportedly improved by adding cadmium oxide. CdO-graphite powder in a gas carrier has been used in numerous applications that rely on dry lubrication. A coating of this composition was developed and successfully tested in foil air bearings for long periods up to a temperature of 427 C and at a normal contacting load (during starting and stopping) of 14 kPa based on bearing projected area. The addition of ultra-fine silver to the CdO-graphite has improved the coating endurance. At 427 C, the CdO-graphite-Ag coating performed better than CdO-graphite without silver, both for extended periods at 14 kPa loading and for limited periods at 35 kPa. At 288 C, the coating was tested for an extended period up to 28 kPa and has also successfully completed high-speed shock tests to an acceleration level of 100g.

  19. Biological interaction between transition metals (Ag, Cd and Hg), selenide/sulfide and selenoprotein P.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, C; Suzuki, K T

    1998-09-01

    The interaction between transition metals (Ag+, Cd2+ and Hg2+) and selenium (Se) in the bloodstream was studied in vitro by means of the HPLC--inductively coupled argon plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP MS) method. Transition metal ions and selenide (produced in vitro from selenite in the presence of glutathione) or sulfide (Na2S) formed a (metal-Se/S) complex, which then bound to a plasma protein, selenoprotein P (Sel P), to form a ternary complex, (metal-Se/S)-Sel P. The molar ratios of metals to Se were 1:1 for Hg/Se and Cd/Se, but either 1:1 or 2:1 for Ag/Se, depending on the ratio of their doses. The results indicate that the interaction between transition metals and Se occurs through the general mechanism, i.e., transition metal ions and selenide form the unit complex (metal-Se)n, and then the complex binds to selenoprotein P to form the ternary complex ¿(metal-Se)n¿m--seleno-protein P in the bloodstream. PMID:9833321

  20. Availability of sediment-bound Cd, Co, and Ag to mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, C.; Fisher, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    Ingested sediment is one potentially important source of metals for benthic organisms. The influence of physical and chemical properties of oxidized sediments on the bioavailability of metals to marine filter feeders is largely unknown. The authors examined the relative importance of specific sedimentary components that may exert control on the uptake of Cd, Co, and Ag in the mussel Mytilus edulis. Iron and manganese oxides, montmorillonite clay, silica, and natural sediment particles were triple labeled with the gamma emitters {sup 109}Cd, {sup 57}Co, and {sup 110m}Ag. Some particles were also coated with fulvic acid (FA) to simulate the influence of organic coating on metal bioavailability. Metals associated with FA-coated particles were generally absorbed by mussels to a greater extent than metals associated with uncoated particles. Desorption experiments with labeled particles at pH 5 were performed in parallel to simulate the behavior of food-bound metals in the acidic gut of bivalves. High correlations (r > 0.97) between the amount of desorbed metal under these conditions and the assimilation efficiency for metals from FA-coated particles were noted among coated particles but not uncoated particles (r < 0.6). These results suggest that the relation between metal partitioning to sediments and biological availability of the metal is not obvious, since the organic coatings and the acidic digestion process influence assimilation of sediment-bound metals.

  1. Band bending at Al, In, Ag, and Pt interfaces with CdTe and ZnTe (110)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahi, A. K.; Miyano, K.; Carey, G. P.; Chiang, T. T.; Lindau, I.

    1990-01-01

    UV and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic methods are presently used to study the band-bending behavior and interfacial chemistry of Al, In, Ag, and Pt overlayers on vacuum-cleaved p-CdTe and p-ZnTe (110). All four metals are found to yield Schottky barriers on CdTe and ZnTe. The metal-induced gap states model prediction of a difference in barrier heights for two semiconductors which is dependent on their band lineup is borne out by the results for Ag, Pt, and Al, but not for In. Reaction and intermixing for Al, Ag, and Pt overlayers on CdTe and ZnTe indicate that these interfaces are not ideal.

  2. Hybrid Au-CdSe and Ag-CdSe nanoflowers and core-shell nanocrystals via one-pot heterogeneous nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    AbouZeid, Khaled M; Mohamed, Mona B; El-Shall, M Samy

    2011-12-01

    A general approach, based on heterogeneous nucleation and growth of CdSe nanostructures on Au or Ag nanocrystals, for the synthesis of Au-CdSe and Ag-CdSe hybrid nanostructures is developed. The new approach provides a versatile one-pot route for the synthesis of hybrid nanoflowers consisting of a gold or silver core and multipod CdSe rods or an intact CdSe shell with controlled thickness, depending on the nucleation and growth parameters. At lower growth temperatures such as 150 °C, the CdSe clusters are adsorbed on the surface of the metal cores in their surface defects, then multiple arms and branches form, resulting in nanoflower-shaped hybrid structures. Increasing the size of the metal core through the choice of the reducing and capping agents results in an improvement of the interface between the metal and CdSe domains, producing core-shell structures. The growth temperature appears to be the most important factor determining the nature of the interface between the metal and CdSe domains. At relatively high temperatures such as 300 °C, the formation of large, faceted Au cores creates preferential growth sites for the CdSe nanocrystalline shell, thus resulting in well-defined Au-CdSe core-shell structures with large interfaces between the Au and CdSe domains. The present approach is expected to foster systematic studies of the electronic structures and optical properties of the metal-semiconductor hybrid materials for potential applications in photovoltaic and nanoelectronic devices. PMID:21994186

  3. Low-energy electron elastic scattering from Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, Ag, and Cd atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2011-05-15

    Electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs) for ground and excited Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, Ag, and Cd atoms have been investigated in the electron-impact energy range 0 {<=}E{<=} 1 eV. The near-threshold TCSs for both the ground and excited states of these atoms are found to be characterized by Ramsauer-Townsend minima, shape resonances, and extremely sharp resonances corresponding to the formation of stable bound negative ions. The recently developed Regge-pole methodology where the crucial electron-electron correlations are embedded is employed for the calculations. From close scrutiny of the imaginary parts of the complex angular momenta, we conclude that these atoms form stable weakly bound ground and excited negative ions as Regge resonances through slow electron collisions. The extracted electron binding energies from the elastic TCSs of these atoms are contrasted with the available experimental and theoretical values.

  4. Metal arsonate polymers of Cd, Zn, Ag and Pb supported by 4-aminophenylarsonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lesikar-Parrish, Leslie A.; Neilson, Robert H.; Richards, Anne F.

    2013-02-15

    The coordination preferences of 4-aminophenylarsonic acid, 4-NH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3}H{sub 2}, (p-arsanilic acid) with CdCl{sub 2}{center_dot}2.5H{sub 2}O, ZnCl{sub 2}, Ag(SO{sub 3}CF{sub 3}) and Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} have been investigated affording five new metal arsonate polymers. The reaction between 4-aminophenylarsonic acid and CdCl{sub 2}{center_dot}2.5H{sub 2}O resulted in a one-dimensional polymer, [{l_brace}Cd(4-NH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3}H)(Cl){sub 2}{r_brace}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}, 1, in which the polymeric chain is propagated by bridging chlorides. Exchange of CdCl{sub 2} for ZnCl{sub 2} afforded [{l_brace}Zn{sub 2}(4-NH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3})(Cl){sub 2}{r_brace}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(Cl)]{sub n}, 2, featuring interlinked 6- and 8-membered [Zn-O-As] ring systems. The reaction of Ag(SO{sub 3}CF{sub 3}) with 4-aminophenylarsonic acid, afforded polymeric 3, [Ag(4-NH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3}H)(4-NH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3}H{sub 2})]{sub n} where coordination of the amino group to the silver center is observed and [{l_brace}Ag{sub 2}(4-NH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3}H)(4-NH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3})({mu}2-SO{sub 3}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}{r_brace}(SO{sub 3}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub n}, 4. By comparison, the reaction of p-arsanilic acid with Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} yielded a polymeric chain [Pb(4-NH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3}H)(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub n}, 5 of similar topology to 1. The structures of 1-5 have been indiscriminately characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and their composition supported by relevant spectroscopic techniques. A comparison of the structural features of these polymers is used to determine the coordination preference of the ligand and factors influencing structural motifs, for example, the role of the anion. - Graphical abstract: The reaction of 4-aminophenylarsonic acid, 4-NH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}AsO{sub 3}H{sub 2}, with cadmium, zinc, silver, and lead have resulted in

  5. Photocatalytic activity of CdS and Ag2S quantum dots deposited on poly(amidoamine) functionalized carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi

    2011-01-01

    Two novel ternary nanocatalysts, f-MWCNTs-CdS and f-MWCNTs-Ag2S were successfully constructed by covalent grafting of fourth generation (G4) hyperbranched, crosslinked poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) to carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) and subsequent deposition of CdS or Ag2S quantum dots (QDs). The structural transformation, surface potential, and morphology of functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs) and nanocatalysts were characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the effective anchoring of QDs on f-MWCNTs. The catalytic activity of nanocatalysts was evaluated by photodegradation of methyl orange under illumination of UV light. The coupling of MWCNTs, PAMAM and CdS or Ag2S QDs significantly enhanced the catalytic efficiency of nanocatalysts. The rate constants for degradation of methyl orange in presence of nanocatalysts were calculated using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Overall, the excellence in photodegradation was accomplished by hybridizing f-MWCNTs with CdS or Ag2S PMID:22267895

  6. Synthesis and properties of new CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} chalcogenide glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kassem, M.; Le Coq, D.; Fourmentin, M.; Hindle, F.; Bokova, M.; Cuisset, A.; Masselin, P.; Bychkov, E.

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Determination of the glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system. {yields} Characterization of macroscopic properties of the new CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glasses. {yields} Far infrared transmission of chalcogenide glasses. {yields} Characterization of the total conductivity of CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glasses. -- Abstract: The glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system was determined. Measurements including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), density, and X-ray diffraction were performed. The effect resulting from the addition of CdSe or AgI has been highlighted by examining three series of different base glasses. The characteristic temperatures of the glass samples, including glass transition (T{sub g}), crystallisation (T{sub x}), and melting (T{sub m}) temperatures are reported and used to calculate their {Delta}T = T{sub x} - T{sub g} and their Hruby, H{sub r} = (T{sub x} - T{sub g})/(T{sub m} - T{sub x}), criteria. Evolution of the total electrical conductivity {sigma} and the room temperature conductivity {sigma}{sub 298} was also studied. The terahertz transparency domain in the 50-600 cm{sup -1} region was pointed for different chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) and the potential of the THz spectroscopy was suggested to obtain structural information on ChGs.

  7. Synthesis, characterizations and anti-bacterial activities of pure and Ag doped CdO nanoparticles by chemical precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, S.; Venkatesan, A.; Soundhirarajan, P.; Khatiwada, Chandra Prasad

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, synthesized pure and Ag (1%, 2%, and 3%) doped Cadmium Oxide (CdO) nanoparticles by chemical precipitation method. Then, the synthesized products were characterized by thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Ultra violet-Vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis-DRS), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) spectroscopy, and anti-bacterial activities, respectively. The transition temperatures and phase transitions of Cd(OH)2 to CdO at 400 °C was confirmed by TG-DTA analysis. The XRD patterns show the cubic shape and average particle sizes are 21, 40, 34, and 37 nm, respectively for pure and Ag doped samples. FT-IR study confirmed the presence of CdO and Ag at 677 and 459 cm-1, respectively. UV-Vis-DRS study shows the variation on direct and indirect band gaps. The surface morphologies and elemental analysis have been confirmed from SEM and with EDX. In addition, the synthesized products have been characterized by antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and negative bacteria. Further, the present investigation suggests that CdO nanoparticles have the great potential applications on various industrial and medical fields of research.

  8. Frequency dependent electrical properties of nano-CdS/Ag junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, D.; Choudhury, A.

    2005-05-01

    Polymer embedded cadmium sulfide nanoparticles/quantum dots were synthesized by a chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (lmw) as the desired matrix. In an attempt to measure the electrical properties of nano-CdS/Ag samples, we propose that contribution from surface traps are mainly responsible in determining the I˜ V and C˜ V characteristics in high frequency ranges. To be specific, beyond 1.2 MHz, the carrier injection from the trap centers of the embedded quantum dots is ensured by large current establishment even at negative biasing condition of the junction. The unexpected nonlinear signature of C˜ V response is believed to be due to the fact that while trying to follow very high signal frequency (at least 10-3 of recombination frequency), there is complete abruptness in carrier trapping (charging) or/and detrapping (decay) in a given CdS nanoparticle assembly. The frequency dependent unique role of the trap carriers certainly find application in nanoelectronic devices at a desirable frequency of operation.

  9. Decorating CdTe QD-Embedded Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres with Ag NPs to Prevent Bacteria Invasion for Enhanced Anticounterfeit Applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangyang; Dong, Qigeqi; Lan, Shi; Cai, Qian; Simalou, Oudjaniyobi; Zhang, Shiqi; Gao, Ge; Chokto, Harnoode; Dong, Alideertu

    2015-05-13

    Quantum dots (QDs) as potent candidates possess advantageous superiority in fluorescence imaging applications, but they are susceptible to the biological circumstances (e.g., bacterial environment), leading to fluorescence quenching or lose of fluorescent properties. In this work, CdTe QDs were embedded into mesoporous silica nanospheres (m-SiO2 NSs) for preventing QD agglomeration, and then CdTe QD-embedded m-SiO2 NSs (m-SiO2/CdTe NSs) were modified with Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to prevent bacteria invasion for enhanced anticounterfeit applications. The m-SiO2 NSs, which serve as intermediate layers to combine CdTe QDs with Ag NPs, help us establish a highly fluorescent and long-term antibacterial system (i.e., m-SiO2/CdTe/Ag NSs). More importantly, CdTe QD-embedded m-SiO2 NSs showed fluorescence quenching when they encounter bacteria, which was avoided by attaching Ag NPs outside. Ag NPs are superior to CdTe QDs for preventing bacteria invasion because of the structure (well-dispersed Ag NPs), size (small diameter), and surface charge (positive zeta potentials) of Ag NPs. The plausible antibacterial mechanisms of m-SiO2/CdTe/Ag NSs toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were established. As for potential applications, m-SiO2/CdTe/Ag NSs were developed as fluorescent anticounterfeiting ink for enhanced imaging applications. PMID:25901940

  10. Distributions of dissolved trace metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Ag) in the southeastern Atlantic and the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boye, M.; Wake, B. D.; Lopez Garcia, P.; Bown, J.; Baker, A. R.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2012-08-01

    Comprehensive synoptic datasets (surface water down to 4000 m) of dissolved cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb) and silver (Ag) are presented along a section between 34° S and 57° S in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean to the south off South Africa. The vertical distributions of Cu and Ag display nutrient-like profiles similar to silicic acid, and of Cd similar to phosphate. The distribution of Mn shows a subsurface maximum in the oxygen minimum zone, whereas Pb concentrations are rather invariable with depth. Dry deposition of aerosols is thought to be an important source of Pb to surface waters close to South Africa, and dry deposition and snowfall may have been significant sources of Cu and Mn at the higher latitudes. Furthermore, the advection of water masses enriched in trace metals following contact with continental margins appeared to be an important source of trace elements to the surface, intermediate and deep waters in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Hydrothermal inputs may have formed a source of trace metals to the deep waters over the Bouvet Triple Junction ridge crest, as suggested by relatively enhanced dissolved Mn concentrations. The biological utilization of Cu and Ag was proportional to that of silicic acid across the section, suggesting that diatoms formed an important control over the removal of Cu and Ag from surface waters. However, uptake by dino- and nano-flagellates may have influenced the distribution of Cu and Ag in the surface waters of the subtropical Atlantic domain. Cadmium correlated strongly with phosphate (P), yielding lower Cd / P ratios in the subtropical surface waters where phosphate concentrations were below 0.95 μM. The greater depletion of Cd relative to P observed in the Weddell Gyre compared to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current could be due to increase Cd uptake induced by iron-limiting conditions in these high-nutrient-low-chlorophyll waters

  11. Distributions of dissolved trace metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Ag) in the southeastern Atlantic and the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boye, M.; Wake, B. D.; Lopez Garcia, P.; Bown, J.; Baker, A. R.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2012-03-01

    Comprehensive synoptic datasets (surface water down to 4000 m) of dissolved cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb) and silver (Ag) are presented along a section between 34° S and 57° S in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean to the south off South Africa. The vertical distributions of Cu, Ag, and of Cd display nutrient-like profiles similar to silicic acid, and phosphate, respectively. The distribution of Mn shows a subsurface maximum in the oxygen minimum zone, whereas Pb concentrations are rather invariable with depth. Dry deposition of aerosols is thought to be an important source of Pb to surface waters close to South Africa, and dry deposition and snowfall may have been significant sources of Cu and Mn at the higher latitudes. Furthermore, the advection of water-masses enriched in trace metals following contact with continental margins appeared to be an important source of trace elements to the surface, intermediate and deep waters in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Hydrothermal inputs appeared to have formed a source of trace metals to the deep waters over the Bouvet Triple Junction ridge crest, as suggested by relatively enhanced dissolved Mn concentrations. The biological utilization of Cu and Ag was proportional to that of silicic acid across the section, suggesting that diatoms formed an important control over the removal of Cu and Ag from surface waters. However uptake by dino- and nano-flagelattes may have influenced the distribution of Cu and Ag in the surface waters of the subtropical Atlantic domain. Cadmium correlated strongly with phosphate (P), yielding lower Cd/P ratios in the subtropical surface waters where phosphate concentrations were below 0.95 μM. The greater depletion of Cd relative to P observed in the Weddell Gyre compared to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current could be due to increase Cd-uptake induced by iron-limiting conditions in these High-Nutrient Low

  12. Particulate contacts to Si and CdTe: Al, Ag, Hg-Cu-Te, and Sb-Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Ribelin, Rosine; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.

    1999-03-01

    Our team has been investigating the use of particle-based contacts in both Si and CdTe solar cell technologies. First, in the area of contacts to Si, powders of Al and Ag prepared by an electroexplosion process have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), TEM elemental determination X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and TEM electron diffraction (TEM-ED). These Al and Ag particles were slurried and tested as contacts to p- and n-type silicon wafers, respectively. Linear current-voltage (I-V) was observed for Ag on n-type Si, indicative of an ohmic contact, whereas the Al on p-type Si sample was non-ideal. A wet-chemical surface treatment was performed on one Al sample and TEM-EDS indicated a substantial decrease in the O contaminant level. The treated Al on p-type Si films exhibited linear I-V after annealing. Second, in the area of contacts to CdTe, particles of Hg-Cu-Te and Sb-Te have been applied as contacts to CdTe/CdS/SnO2 heterostructures prepared by the standard NREL protocol. First, Hg-Cu-Te and Sb-Te were prepared by a metathesis reaction. After CdCl2 treatment and NP etch of the CdTe layer, particle contacts were applied. The Hg-Cu-Te contacted cells exhibited good electrical characteristics, with Voc>810 mV and efficiencies > 11.5% for most cells. Although Voc>800 mV were observed for the Sb-Te contacted cells, efficiencies in these devices were limited to 9.1% presumably by a large series resistance (>20 Ω) observed in all samples.

  13. Efficient visible-light photocatalytic activity by band alignment in mesoporous ternary polyoxometalate-Ag2S-CdS semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornarakis, I.; Lykakis, I. N.; Vordos, N.; Armatas, G. S.

    2014-07-01

    Porous multicomponent semiconductor materials show improved photocatalytic performance due to the large and accessible pore surface area and high charge separation efficiency. Here we report the synthesis of well-ordered porous polyoxometalate (POM)-Ag2S-CdS hybrid mesostructures featuring a controllable composition and high photocatalytic activity via a two-step hard-templating and topotactic ion-exchange chemical process. Ag2S compounds and polyoxometalate cluster anions with different reduction potentials, such as PW12O403-, SiW12O404- and PMo12O403-, were employed as electron acceptors in these ternary heterojunction photocatalysts. Characterization by small-angle X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and N2 physisorption measurements showed hexagonal arrays of POM-Ag2S-CdS hybrid nanorods with large internal BET surface areas and uniform mesopores. The Keggin structure of the incorporated POM clusters was also verified by elemental X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis, infrared and diffuse-reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. These new porous materials were implemented as visible-light-driven photocatalysts, displaying exceptional high activity in aerobic oxidation of various para-substituted benzyl alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds. Our experiments show that the spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes at CdS through the potential gradient along the CdS-Ag2S-POM interfaces is responsible for the increased photocatalytic activity.Porous multicomponent semiconductor materials show improved photocatalytic performance due to the large and accessible pore surface area and high charge separation efficiency. Here we report the synthesis of well-ordered porous polyoxometalate (POM)-Ag2S-CdS hybrid mesostructures featuring a controllable composition and high photocatalytic activity via a two-step hard-templating and topotactic ion-exchange chemical process. Ag2S compounds and polyoxometalate cluster

  14. Testing WHAM-FTOX with laboratory toxicity data for mixtures of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ag, Pb).

    PubMed

    Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The Windermere humic aqueous model using the toxicity function (WHAM-FTOX ) describes cation toxicity to aquatic organisms in terms of 1) accumulation by the organism of metabolically active protons and metals at reversible binding sites, and 2) differing toxic potencies of the bound cations. Cation accumulation (νi , in mol g(-1) ) is estimated through calculations with the WHAM chemical speciation model by assuming that organism binding sites can be represented by those of humic acid. Toxicity coefficients (αi ) are combined with νi to obtain the variable FTOX (= Σ αi νi ) which, between lower and upper thresholds (FTOX,LT , FTOX,UT ), is linearly related to toxic effect. Values of αi , FTOX,LT , and FTOX,LT are obtained by fitting toxicity data. Reasonable fits (72% of variance in toxic effect explained overall) were obtained for 4 large metal mixture acute toxicity experiments involving daphnids (Cu, Zn, Cd), lettuce (Cu, Zn, Ag), and trout (Zn, Cd, Pb). Strong nonadditive effects, most apparent in results for tests involving Cd, could be explained approximately by purely chemical competition for metal accumulation. Tentative interpretation of parameter values obtained from these and other experimental data suggests the following order of bound cation toxicity: H < Al < (Cu Zn Pb UO2 ) < (Cd Ag). Another trend is a strong increase in Cd toxicity relative to that of Zn as organism complexity increases (from bacteria to fish). PMID:25318827

  15. CD209 (DC-SIGN) -336A>G promoter polymorphism and severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kelvin Yuen Kwong; Xu, Mei-Shu; Ching, Johannes Chi Yun; So, Thomas Man Kit; Lai, Sik-To; Chu, Chung-Ming; Yam, Loretta Y C; Wong, Andrew T Y; Chung, Pui Hong; Chan, Vera Sau Fong; Lin, Chen Lung Steve; Sham, Pak Chung; Leung, Gabriel M; Peiris, Joseph S M; Khoo, Ui-Soon

    2010-07-01

    CD209 (DC-SIGN) is an important C-type lectin which acts a receptor of many pathogens. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -336A>G in the CD209 promoter has been demonstrated to regulate promoter activity and to be associated with several important infectious diseases, such as human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Dengue fever. CD209 facilitates severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus spike protein-bearing pseudotype driven infection of permissive cells in vitro. In keeping with previously published findings, our in vitro studies confirmed that this SNP modulates gene promoter activity. Genetic association analysis of this SNP with clinico-pathologic outcomes in 824 serologic confirmed SARS patients showed that the -336AG/GG genotype SARS patients was associated with lower standardized lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH) levels compared with the -336AA patients (p = 0.014, odds ratio = 0.40). High LDH levels are known to be an independent predictor for poor clinical outcome, probably related to tissue destruction from immune hyperactivity. Hence, SARS patients with the CD209 -336 AA genotype carry a 60% chance of having a poorer prognosis. This association is in keeping with the role of CD209 in modulating immune response to viral infection. The relevance of these findings for other infectious diseases and inflammatory conditions would be worth investigating. PMID:20359516

  16. Bioleaching mechanism of Zn, Pb, In, Ag, Cd and As from Pb/Zn smelting slag by autotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Huang, Qifei; Li, Ting; Xin, Baoping; Chen, Shi; Guo, Xingming; Liu, Changhao; Li, Yuping

    2015-08-15

    A few studies have focused on release of valuable/toxic metals from Pb/Zn smelting slag by heterotrophic bioleaching using expensive yeast extract as an energy source. The high leaching cost greatly limits the practical potential of the method. In this work, autotrophic bioleaching using cheap sulfur or/and pyrite as energy matter was firstly applied to tackle the smelting slag and the bioleaching mechanisms were explained. The results indicated autotrophic bioleaching can solubilize valuable/toxic metals from slag, yielding maximum extraction efficiencies of 90% for Zn, 86% for Cd and 71% for In, although the extraction efficiencies of Pb, As and Ag were poor. The bioleaching performance of Zn, Cd and Pb was independent of leaching system, and leaching mechanism was acid dissolution. A maximum efficiency of 25% for As was achieved by acid dissolution in sulfursulfur oxidizing bacteria (S-SOB), but the formation of FeAsO4 reduced extraction efficiency in mixed energy source - mixed culture (MS-MC). Combined works of acid dissolution and Fe(3+) oxidation in MS-MC was responsible for the highest extraction efficiency of 71% for In. Ag was present in the slag as refractory AgPb4(AsO4)3 and AgFe2S3, so extraction did not occur. PMID:25996622

  17. Effects of morphology, diameter and periodic distance of the Ag nanoparticle periodic arrays on the enhancement of the plasmonic field absorption in the CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnehpoushi, Saman; Eskandari, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Yousefirad, Mansooreh; Nabavi, Elham

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the numerical calculations of plasmonic field absorption of Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) periodic arrays in the CdSe quantum dot (QD) film are investigated by the three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD). Diameter (D), periodic distance (P), and morphology effects of Ag NPs are investigated on the improvement of the plasmonic field absorption in CdSe QD film. Results show that plasmonic field absorption in CdSe QD film is enhanced with reduction of D of Ag NPs until 5 nm and reduces thereafter. It is observed that with raising D of Ag NPs, optimum plasmonic field absorption in CdSe QD film is shifted toward the higher P. Moreover, with varying morphology of Ag NPs from spherical to cylindrical, cubic, ringing and pyramid, the plasmonic field absorption is considerably enhanced in CdSe QD film and position of quadrupole plasmon mode (QPPM) is shifted toward further wavelength. For cylindrical Ag NPs, the QPPM intensity increased with raising height (H) until 15 nm and reduces thereafter.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of the photocatalytic performance of Ag-CdMoO{sub 4} solar light driven plasmonic photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Rajesh; Malla, Shova; Gyawali, Gobinda; Sekino, Tohru; Lee, Soo Wohn

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag-CdMoO{sub 4} solar light driven photocatalyst was successfully synthesized. • Photocatalyst exhibited strong absorption in the visible region. • Photocatalytic activity was significantly enhanced. • Enhanced activity was caused by the SPR effect induced by Ag nanoparticles. - Abstract: Ag-CdMoO{sub 4} plasmonic photocatalyst was synthesized in ethanol/water mixture by photo assisted co-precipitation method at room temperature. As synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analyzer. Photocatalytic activity was evaluated by performing the degradation experiment over methylene blue (MB) and indigo carmine (IC) as model dyes under simulated solar light irradiation. The results revealed that the Ag-CdMoO{sub 4} showed the higher photocatalytic performance as compared to CdMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles. Dispersion of Ag nanoparticles over the surface of CdMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles causes the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and enhances the broad absorption in the entire visible region of the solar spectrum. Hence, dispersion of Ag nanoparticles over CdMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles could be the better alternative to enhance the absorption of visible light by scheelite crystal family for effective photocatalysis.

  19. Structural features of AgCaCdMg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} and AgCd{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, two new compounds with the alluaudite-type structure, and their catalytic activity in butan-2-ol conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kacimi, Mohammed; Ziyad, Mahfoud; Hatert, Frederic . E-mail: fhatert@ulg.ac.be

    2005-04-20

    AgCaCdMg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} and AgCd{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, two new compounds with the alluaudite-type structure, were synthesized by a solid state reaction in air at 750 deg. C. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern of AgCaCdMg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} indicates the presence of small amounts of (Ca, Mg){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} with the whitlockite structure, as impurity, whereas AgCd{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} is constituted by pure alluaudite. The Rietveld refinements of the X-ray powder diffraction patterns indicate an ordered cationic distribution for AgCd{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, with Ag on A(2)', Cd on A(1) and M(1), and Mg on M(2), whereas a disordered distribution of Cd and Ca between the A(1) and M(1) sites is observed for AgCaCdMg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. The catalytic properties of these compounds has been measured in reaction of butan-2-ol dehydrogenation. In the absence of oxygen, both samples exhibit poor dehydrogenation activity. All samples displayed no dehydration activity. Introduction of oxygen into the feed changed totally the catalytic behavior of the catalysts. The production of methyl ethyl ketone increases with time on stream and the reaction temperature. AgCaCdMg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} is more efficient than AgCd{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}.

  20. Protection associated with a TB vaccine is linked to increased frequency of Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T cells but no increase in avidity for Ag85A.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Hannah J; Steinbach, Sabine; Jones, Gareth J; Connelley, Tim; Morrison, W Ivan; Vordermeier, Martin; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo

    2016-08-31

    There is a need to improve the efficacy of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination against tuberculosis in humans and cattle. Previously, we found boosting BCG-primed cows with recombinant human type 5 adenovirus expressing antigen 85A (Ad5-85A) increased protection against Mycobacterium bovis infection compared to BCG vaccination alone. The aim of this study was to decipher aspects of the immune response associated with this enhanced protection. We compared BCG-primed Ad5-85A-boosted cattle with BCG-vaccinated cattle. Polyclonal CD4(+) T cell libraries were generated from pre-boost and post-boost peripheral blood mononuclear cells - using a method adapted from Geiger et al. (2009) - and screened for antigen 85A (Ag85A) specificity. Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T cell lines were analysed for their avidity for Ag85A and their Ag85A epitope specificity was defined. Boosting BCG with Ad5-85A increased the frequencies of post-boost Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T cells which correlated with protection (reduced pathology). Boosting Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T cell responses did not increase their avidity. The epitope specificity was variable between animals and we found no clear evidence for a post-boost epitope spreading. In conclusion, the protection associated with boosting BCG with Ad5-85A is linked with increased frequencies of Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T cells without increasing avidity or widening of the Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T cell repertoire. PMID:27498622

  1. Ag plasmonic nanostructures and a novel gel electrolyte in a high efficiency TiO2/CdS solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Naresh; Deepa, Melepurath; Srivastava, Avanish Kumar

    2015-04-21

    A novel photoanode architecture with plasmonic silver (Ag) nanostructures embedded in titania (TiO2), which served as the wide band gap semiconducting support and CdS quantum dots (QDs), as light absorbers, is presented. Ag nanostructures were prepared by a polyol method and are comprised of clumps of nanorods, 15-35 nm wide, interspersed with globular nanoparticles and they were characterized by a face centered cubic lattice. Optimization of Ag nanostructures was achieved on the basis of a superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) obtained for the cell with a Ag/TiO2/CdS electrode encompassing a mixed morphology of Ag nano-rods and particles, relative to analogous cells with either Ag nanoparticles or Ag nanorods. Interfacial charge transfer kinetics was unraveled by fluorescence quenching and lifetime studies. Ag nanostructures improve the light harvesting ability of the TiO2/CdS photoanode via (a) plasmonic and scattering effects, which induce both near- and far-field enhancements which translate to higher photocurrent densities and (b) charging effects, whereby, photoexcited electron transfer from TiO2 to Ag is facilitated by Fermi level equilibration. Owing to the spectacular ability of Ag nanostructures to increase light absorption, a greatly increased PCE of 4.27% and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 55% (at 440 nm) was achieved for the cell based on Ag/TiO2/CdS, greater by 42 and 66%, respectively, compared to the TiO2/CdS based cell. In addition, the liquid S(2-) electrolyte was replaced by a S(2-) gel containing fumed silica, and the redox potential, conductivity and p-type conduction of the two were deduced to be comparable. Although the gel based cells showed diminished solar cell performances compared to their liquid counterparts, nonetheless, the Ag/TiO2/CdS electrode continued to outperform the TiO2/CdS electrode. Our studies demonstrate that Ag nanostructures effectively capture a significant chunk of the electromagnetic spectrum and aid QD

  2. Effect of adherent bacteria and bacterial extracellular polymers upon assimilation by Macoma balthica of sediment-bound Cd, Zn and Ag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of adherent bacteria and bacterial extracellular polymer (exopolymer) upon uptake of particle-bound Cd, Zn and Ag by the deposit-feeding clam Macoma balthica were studied in the laboratory. Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and unaltered and alkaline-extracted sediments were used as model particulates in separate, controlled deposit-feeding experiments. In general, amounts of metal taken up from ingested particles varied dramatically with the nature of the particle surface. Ingestion of contaminated iron oxide particles did not contribute to overall uptake of Cd and Ag in feeding clams, but accounted for 89 to 99% of total Zn uptake. Exopolymer adsorbed on iron oxide particles caused an increase in the biological availability of particle-bound metals in the order Ag>Cd>Zn, whereas adherent bacteria up to 3.2 X 1011 g-1 had no effect upon amounts of metal taken up from ingested particulates. At the higher Cd and Ag concentrations employed (3.6 X 10-7M), feeding rates declined with increasing amounts of iron oxide-bound exopolymer, suggesting behavioral avoidance due to increased metal availability. Much of the Cd (57 %) taken up by clams feeding on unaltered estuarine sediments originated from particulates, even though particle/solute distribution of Cd (86%) was similar to that in experiments with iron oxide particles. Uptake of Cd from alkalineextracted sediments was insignificant, as it was from unamended iron oxide. However, addition of exopolymer (10 mgg-1 sediment) caused a restoration nn bioavailability of sediment-bound Cd.

  3. Electronic Properties of MoSi2-Type Hf2X Intermetallic Compounds (X=Pd, Ag, Cd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaar, I.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Berant, Z.

    2001-11-01

    The Hf z coordinate and the value of the electric field gradient (efg) main component (V zz ), were calculated for three Hf2X compounds (X = Pd, Ag, Cd) on a first-principle basis, using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method. Exchange and correlation effects were treated either by the local spine density approximation (LSDA) or by the more advanced generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculated V zz values, in the Hf site, were in very good agreement with available 181Hf TDPAC experimental results.

  4. CdS-Nanowires Flexible Photo-detector with Ag-Nanowires Electrode Based on Non-transfer Process

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yanli; Pei, Ruihan; Liang, Xiaoci; Wang, Yuhao; Liu, Ling; Chen, Haibiao; Liang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, UV-visible flexible resistivity-type photo-detectors were demonstrated with CdS-nanowires (NWs) percolation network channel and Ag-NWs percolation network electrode. The devices were fabricated on Mixed Cellulose Esters (MCE) membrane using a lithographic filtration method combined with a facile non-transfer process. The photo-detectors demonstrated strong adhesion, fast response time, fast decay time, and high photo sensitivity. The high performance could be attributed to the high quality single crystalline CdS-NWs, encapsulation of NWs in MCE matrix and excellent interconnection of the NWs. Furthermore, the sensing performance was maintained even the device was bent at an angle of 90°. This research may pave the way for the facile fabrication of flexible photo-detectors with high performances. PMID:26899726

  5. CdS-Nanowires Flexible Photo-detector with Ag-Nanowires Electrode Based on Non-transfer Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yanli; Pei, Ruihan; Liang, Xiaoci; Wang, Yuhao; Liu, Ling; Chen, Haibiao; Liang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In this study, UV-visible flexible resistivity-type photo-detectors were demonstrated with CdS-nanowires (NWs) percolation network channel and Ag-NWs percolation network electrode. The devices were fabricated on Mixed Cellulose Esters (MCE) membrane using a lithographic filtration method combined with a facile non-transfer process. The photo-detectors demonstrated strong adhesion, fast response time, fast decay time, and high photo sensitivity. The high performance could be attributed to the high quality single crystalline CdS-NWs, encapsulation of NWs in MCE matrix and excellent interconnection of the NWs. Furthermore, the sensing performance was maintained even the device was bent at an angle of 90°. This research may pave the way for the facile fabrication of flexible photo-detectors with high performances.

  6. CdS-Nanowires Flexible Photo-detector with Ag-Nanowires Electrode Based on Non-transfer Process.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanli; Pei, Ruihan; Liang, Xiaoci; Wang, Yuhao; Liu, Ling; Chen, Haibiao; Liang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, UV-visible flexible resistivity-type photo-detectors were demonstrated with CdS-nanowires (NWs) percolation network channel and Ag-NWs percolation network electrode. The devices were fabricated on Mixed Cellulose Esters (MCE) membrane using a lithographic filtration method combined with a facile non-transfer process. The photo-detectors demonstrated strong adhesion, fast response time, fast decay time, and high photo sensitivity. The high performance could be attributed to the high quality single crystalline CdS-NWs, encapsulation of NWs in MCE matrix and excellent interconnection of the NWs. Furthermore, the sensing performance was maintained even the device was bent at an angle of 90°. This research may pave the way for the facile fabrication of flexible photo-detectors with high performances. PMID:26899726

  7. Bright white-light emission from Ag/SiO2/CdS-ZnS core/shell/shell plasmon couplers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen; Tang, Luping; Gao, Xiaoqin; Xu, Ruilin; Zhang, Huichao; Yu, Yongya; Lu, Changgui; Cui, Yiping; Zhang, Jiayu

    2015-12-28

    Well-defined plasmon couplers (PCs) that comprise a Ag core overcoated with a SiO(2) shell with controlled thickness, followed by a monolayer of CdS-ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized to modify the emission from trap-rich CdS-ZnS QDs by adjusting the distance between the QDs and Ag nanoparticles (NPs). When the thickness of the SiO(2) shell was 10 nm, because the shell could effectively suppress the non-radiative energy transfer from the semiconductor QDs to the metal NPs and the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the Ag NPs spectrally matched the emission peak of the CdS-ZnS QDs to bring about strong plasmon coupling, optimum enhancements of the surface state emission (SSE) (17 times) and band-edge emission (BEE) (4 times) were simultaneously realized and the SSE to BEE intensity ratio was increased to 55%. As a result, a bright white-light source with 1931 Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates of (0.32, 0.34) was realized by the superposition of the two emissions. The experimental results from Ag/SiO(2)/CdSe-ZnS and the Ag/SiO(2)/CdS:Mn-ZnS core/shell/shell PCs indicated that suppressing the non-radiative decay rate (k(nr)) was the underlying mechanism for plasmon coupling fluorescence enhancement. PMID:26592756

  8. Bright white-light emission from Ag/SiO2/CdS-ZnS core/shell/shell plasmon couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chen; Tang, Luping; Gao, Xiaoqin; Xu, Ruilin; Zhang, Huichao; Yu, Yongya; Lu, Changgui; Cui, Yiping; Zhang, Jiayu

    2015-12-01

    Well-defined plasmon couplers (PCs) that comprise a Ag core overcoated with a SiO2 shell with controlled thickness, followed by a monolayer of CdS-ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized to modify the emission from trap-rich CdS-ZnS QDs by adjusting the distance between the QDs and Ag nanoparticles (NPs). When the thickness of the SiO2 shell was 10 nm, because the shell could effectively suppress the non-radiative energy transfer from the semiconductor QDs to the metal NPs and the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the Ag NPs spectrally matched the emission peak of the CdS-ZnS QDs to bring about strong plasmon coupling, optimum enhancements of the surface state emission (SSE) (17 times) and band-edge emission (BEE) (4 times) were simultaneously realized and the SSE to BEE intensity ratio was increased to 55%. As a result, a bright white-light source with 1931 Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates of (0.32, 0.34) was realized by the superposition of the two emissions. The experimental results from Ag/SiO2/CdSe-ZnS and the Ag/SiO2/CdS:Mn-ZnS core/shell/shell PCs indicated that suppressing the non-radiative decay rate (knr) was the underlying mechanism for plasmon coupling fluorescence enhancement.

  9. Static quadrupole moments of 106Agm and 109Agm and the electric field gradient of Ag in Zn and Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkes, I.; Hlimi, B.; Marest, G.; Sayouty, E. H.; Coussement, R.; Hardeman, F.; Put, P.; Scheveneels, G.

    1984-12-01

    Low temperature nuclear orientation of 106Agm and 110Agm in Zn and Fe and level mixing resonances on 109Agm have been measured in order to deduce Q and Vzz values. A fourth-order resonance in 109AgmZn has been found with a full width at half maximum of 1.9 × 10-9 eV, and Vzz(AgCd)Vzz(AgZn)=1.0064(34) was deduced. The electric quadrupole moments found in the literature, reevaluated for Sternheimer correction Q(108Agm)=+1.32(7) b and Q(110Agm)=+1.44(10) b, are used for the calibration of Vzz and yield Q(106Agm)=+1.11(11) b, Q(109Agm)=(+)0.97(11) b, and Vzz(AgZn)=+4.2(5)×1017 V/cm2. Furthermore, μ(106Agm)=(+)3.82(8)μN and several δ(E 2M 1) mixing ratios in 106Pd are also determined. The quadrupole moments are in good agreement with Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic model and folded-Yukawa microscopic model calculations. The particle states can be described in terms of deformed Nilsson orbitals or three valence-proton holes coupled to a quadrupole vibrator.

  10. Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cell Death Induced by Bortezomib and AG 490 Activates Dendritic Cells through CD91

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, Mara; Di Renzo, Livia; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Conte, Valeria; Trivedi, Pankaj; Santarelli, Roberta; Gonnella, Roberta; Frati, Luigi; Faggioni, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    To understand how cytotoxic agent-induced cancer cell death affects the immune system is of fundamental importance to stimulate immune response to counteract the high mortality due to cancer. Here we compared the immunogenicity of Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) cell death induced by anticancer drug Bortezomib (Velcade) and Tyrphostin AG 490, a Janus Activated Kinase 2/signal trasducer and activator of transcription-3 (JAK2/STAT3) inhibitor. We show that both treatments were able to induce PEL apoptosis with similar kinetics and promote dendritic cells (DC) maturation. The surface expression of molecules involved in immune activation, namely calreticulin (CRT), heat shock proteins (HSP) 90 and 70 increased in dying cells. This was correlated with DC activation. We found that PEL cell death induced by Bortezomib was more effective in inducing uptake by DC compared to AG 490 or combination of both drugs. However the DC activation induced by all treatments was completely inhibited when these cells were pretreated with a neutralizing antiboby directed against the HSP90/70 and CRT common receptor, CD91. The activation of DC by Bortezomib and AG 490 treated PEL cells, as seen in the present study, might have important implications for a combined chemo and immunotherapy in such patients. PMID:22412839

  11. High-Performance Fully Nanostructured Photodetector with Single-Crystalline CdS Nanotubes as Active Layer and Very Long Ag Nanowires as Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    An, Qinwei; Meng, Xianquan; Sun, Pan

    2015-10-21

    Long and single-crystalline CdS nanotubes (NTs) have been prepared via a physical evaporation process. A metal-semiconductor-metal full-nanostructured photodetector with CdS NTs as active layer and Ag nanowires (NWs) of low resistivity and high transmissivity as electrodes has been fabricated and characterized. The CdS NTs-based photodetectors exhibit high performance, such as lowest dark currents (0.19 nA) and high photoresponse ratio (Ilight/Idark ≈ 4016) (among CdS nanostructure network photodetectors and NTs netwok photodetectors reported so far) and very low operation voltages (0.5 V). The photoconduction mechanism, including the formation of a Schottky barrier at the interface of Ag NW and CdS NTs and the effect of oxygen adsorption process on the Schottky barrier has also been provided in detail based on the studies of CdS NTs photodetector in air and vacuum. Furthermore, CdS NTs photodetector exhibits an enhanced photosensitivity as compared with CdS NWs photodetector. The enhancement in performance is dependent on the larger surface area of NTs adsorbing more oxygen in air and the microcavity structure of NTs with higher light absorption efficiency and external quantum efficiency. It is believed that CdS NTs can potentially be useful in the designs of 1D CdS-based optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26457660

  12. AGS67E, an Anti-CD37 Monomethyl Auristatin E Antibody–Drug Conjugate as a Potential Therapeutic for B/T-Cell Malignancies and AML: A New Role for CD37 in AML

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniel S.; Guevara, Claudia I.; Jin, Liqing; Mbong, Nathan; Verlinsky, Alla; Hsu, Ssucheng J.; Aviña, Hector; Karki, Sher; Abad, Joseph D.; Yang, Peng; Moon, Sung-Ju; Malik, Faisal; Choi, Michael Y.; An, Zili; Morrison, Kendall; Challita-Eid, Pia M.; Doñate, Fernando; Joseph, Ingrid B.J.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Dick, John E.; Stover, David R.

    2015-01-01

    CD37 is a tetraspanin expressed on malignant B cells. Recently, CD37 has gained interest as a therapeutic target. We developed AGS67E, an antibody–drug conjugate that targets CD37 for the potential treatment of B/T-cell malignancies. It is a fully human monoclonal IgG2 antibody (AGS67C) conjugated, via a protease-cleavable linker, to the microtubule-disrupting agent mono-methyl auristatin E (MMAE). AGS67E induces potent cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell-cycle alterations in many non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell lines and patient-derived samples in vitro. It also shows potent antitumor activity in NHL and CLL xenografts, including Rituxan-refractory models. During profiling studies to confirm the reported expression of CD37 in normal tissues and B-cell malignancies, we made the novel discovery that the CD37 protein was expressed in T-cell lymphomas and in AML. AGS67E bound to >80% of NHL and T-cell lymphomas, 100% of CLL and 100% of AML patient-derived samples, including CD34+CD38− leukemic stem cells. It also induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell-cycle alterations in AML cell lines and antitumor efficacy in orthotopic AML xenografts. Taken together, this study shows not only that AGS67E may serve as a potential therapeutic for B/T-cell malignancies, but it also demonstrates, for the first time, that CD37 is well expressed and a potential drug target in AML. PMID:25934707

  13. Ag nanoclusters could efficiently quench the photoresponse of CdS quantum dots for novel energy transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yue; Liang, Yan-Yu; He, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-11-15

    Herein the influence of ultrasmall Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) against CdS quantum dots (QDs) in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) nanosystem was exploited for the first time, based on which a novel PEC bioanalysis was successfully developed via the efficient quenching effect of Ag NCs against the CdS QDs. In a model system, DNA assay was achieved by using molecular beacon (MB) probes anchored on a CdS QDs modified electrode, and the MB probes contain two segments that can hybridize with both target DNA sequence and the label of DNA encapsulated Ag NCs. After the MB probe was unfolded by the target DNA sequence, the labels of oligonucleotide encapsulated Ag NCs would be brought in close proximity to the CdS QDs electrode surface, and efficient photocurrent quenching of QDs could be resulted from an energy transfer process that originated from NCs. Thus, by monitoring the attenuation in the photocurrent signal, an elegant and sensitive PEC DNA bioanalysis could be accomplished. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0pM to 10nM and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3pM. This work presents a feasible signaling principle that could act as a common basis for general PEC bioanalysis development. PMID:27315518

  14. Bioconcentration of Ag, Cd, Co, Mn and Zn in the Mangrove Oyster (Crassostrea gasar) and Preliminary Human Health Risk Assessment: A Radiotracer Study.

    PubMed

    Kuranchie-Mensah, Harriet; Teyssié, Jean-Louis; Oberhänsli, François; Tumnoi, Yutthana; Pouil, Simon; Warnau, Michel; Metian, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Bioaccumulation kinetics of five dissolved metals were determined in the mangrove oyster Crassostrea gasar, using corresponding radiotracers ((54)Mn, (57)Co, (65)Zn, (109)Cd and (110m)Ag). Additionally, their bioaccessibility to human consumers was estimated. Results indicated that over a 14-day exposure (54)Mn and (57)Co were linearly concentrated in oysters whereas (109)Cd, (65)Zn and (110m)Ag were starting to saturate (steady-state not reached). Whole-body concentration factors at 14 days (CF14d in toto) ranged from 187 ± 65 to 629 ± 179 with the lowest bioconcentration capacity for Co and the highest for Ag. Depuration kinetics were best described by a double-exponential model with associated biological half-lives ranging from 26 days (Ag) to almost 8 months (Zn and Cd). Bioaccessible fraction of the studied elements was estimated using in vitro digestions, which suggested that oysters consumed seasoned with lemon enhanced the accessibility of Cd, Mn and Zn to human consumers, but not Ag and Co. PMID:27194421

  15. Plasmon enhanced CdS-quantum dot sensitized solar cell using ZnO nanorods array deposited with Ag nanoparticles as photoanode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, M.; Ahmadi, V.; Yousefi rad, M.; Kohnehpoushi, S.

    2015-04-01

    CdS-quantum dot sensitized solar cell using ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) array deposited with Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as photoanode was fabricated. Light absorption effect of Ag NPs on improvement of the cell performance was investigated. Performance improvement of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) was controlled by the structure design and architecture. Different decorations and densities of Ag NPs were utilized on the photoanode. Results showed that using 5% Ag NPs in the photoanode results in the increased efficiency, fill factor, and circuit current density from 0.28% to 0.60%, 0.22 to 0.29, and 2.18 mA/cm2 to 3.25 mA/cm2, respectively. Also, incident photon-to-current efficiencies (IPCE) results showed that cell performance improvement is related to enhanced absorption in the photoanode, which is because of the surface plasmonic resonance and light scattering of Ag NPs in the photoanode. Measurements of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that hole transfer kinetics increases with introduction of Ag NPs into photoanode. Also, it is shown that chemical capacitance increases with introduction of Ag NPs. Such increase can be attributed to the surface palsmonic resonance of Ag NPs which leads to absorption of more light in the photoanode and generation of more photoelectron in the photoanode.

  16. Enhanced DSSCs efficiency via Cooperate co-absorbance (CdS QDs) and plasmonic core-shell nanoparticle (Ag@PVP)

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Omid; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Bagheri, Samira; Yousefi, Amin Termeh

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes cooperate the co-absorbance (CdS QDs) and the plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles (Ag@PVP) of dye synthesized solar cells in which CdS QDs and Ag@PVP are incorporated into the TiO2 layer. Cooperative nanoparticles show superior behavior on enhancing light absorption in comparison with reference cells. Cooperated DSSC exhibits the best performance with the power conversion efficiency of 7.64% which is superior to that of the free–modified DSSC with the PCE of 5%. Detailed studies offer an effective approach to enhance the efficiency of dye synthesized solar cells. PMID:27143126

  17. Enhanced DSSCs efficiency via Cooperate co-absorbance (CdS QDs) and plasmonic core-shell nanoparticle (Ag@PVP).

    PubMed

    Amiri, Omid; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Bagheri, Samira; Yousefi, Amin Termeh

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes cooperate the co-absorbance (CdS QDs) and the plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles (Ag@PVP) of dye synthesized solar cells in which CdS QDs and Ag@PVP are incorporated into the TiO2 layer. Cooperative nanoparticles show superior behavior on enhancing light absorption in comparison with reference cells. Cooperated DSSC exhibits the best performance with the power conversion efficiency of 7.64% which is superior to that of the free-modified DSSC with the PCE of 5%. Detailed studies offer an effective approach to enhance the efficiency of dye synthesized solar cells. PMID:27143126

  18. Enhanced DSSCs efficiency via Cooperate co-absorbance (CdS QDs) and plasmonic core-shell nanoparticle (Ag@PVP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Omid; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Bagheri, Samira; Yousefi, Amin Termeh

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes cooperate the co-absorbance (CdS QDs) and the plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles (Ag@PVP) of dye synthesized solar cells in which CdS QDs and Ag@PVP are incorporated into the TiO2 layer. Cooperative nanoparticles show superior behavior on enhancing light absorption in comparison with reference cells. Cooperated DSSC exhibits the best performance with the power conversion efficiency of 7.64% which is superior to that of the free–modified DSSC with the PCE of 5%. Detailed studies offer an effective approach to enhance the efficiency of dye synthesized solar cells.

  19. PPB | What is a Clinical Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) DICER1 Syndrome Study ‹an observational clinical research study‹is enrolling children with PPB and their families. In an observational study, investigators assess health outcomes in groups of participants according to a protocol or research plan.

  20. Thermally induced effect on sub-band gap absorption in Ag doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Sharma, Kriti; Bharti, Shivani; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of Ag doped CdSe have been prepared by thermal evaporation using inert gas condensation (IGC) method taking Argon as inert gas. The prepared thin films are annealed at 363 K for one hour. The sub-band gap absorption spectra in the as deposited and annealed thin films have been studied using constant photocurrent method (CPM). The absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region is described by an Urbach tail in both as deposited and annealed thin films. The value of Urbach energy and number density of trap states have been calculated from the absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region which have been found to increase after annealing treatment indicating increase in disorderness in the lattice. The energy distribution of the occupied density of states below Fermi level has also been studied using derivative procedure of absorption coefficient.

  1. Physiological characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimated to chronic stress induced by Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu and Hg ions.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Beatrycze; Pluciński, Bartosz; Kuczyńska, Paulina; Kruk, Jerzy

    2016-08-01

    Acclimation to heavy metal-induced stress is a complex phenomenon. Among the mechanisms of heavy metal toxicity, an important one is the ability to induce oxidative stress, so that the antioxidant response is crucial for providing tolerance to heavy metal ions. The effect of chronic stress induced by ions of five heavy metals, Ag, Cu, Cr (redox-active metals) Cd, Hg (nonredox-active metals) on the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined at two levels - the biochemical (content of photosynthetic pigments and prenyllipid antioxidants, lipid peroxidation) and the physiological (growth rate, photosynthesis and respiration rates, induction of nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence). The expression of the genes which encode the enzymes participating in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (APX1, CAT1, FSD1, MSD1) was measured. The other gene measured was one required for plastoquinone and α-tocopherol biosynthesis (VTE3). The application of heavy metal ions partly inhibited growth and biosynthesis of chlorophyll. The growth inhibition was accompanied by enhanced lipid peroxidation. An increase in the content of prenyllipid antioxidants was observed in cultures exposed to Cr2O7(2-), Cd(2+) (α- and γ-tocopherol and plastoquinone) and Cu(2+) (only tocopherols). The induction of nonphotochemical quenching was enhanced in cultures exposed to Cu(2+), Cr2O7(2-) and Cd(2+), as compared to the control. Chronic heavy metal-induced stress led to changes in gene expression dependent on the type and concentration of heavy metal ions. The up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes was usually accompanied by the up-regulation of the VTE3 gene. PMID:27104807

  2. Metal (Ag, Cd, Cu, Ni, Tl, and Zn) Binding to Cytosolic Biomolecules in Field-Collected Larvae of the Insect Chaoborus.

    PubMed

    Rosabal, Maikel; Mounicou, Sandra; Hare, Landis; Campbell, Peter G C

    2016-03-15

    We characterized the biomolecules involved in handling cytosolic metals in larvae of the phantom midge (Chaoborus) collected from five mining-impacted lakes by determining the distribution of Ag, Cd, Cu, Ni, Tl, and Zn among pools of various molecular weights (HMW: high molecular weight, >670-40 kDa; MMW: medium molecular weight, 40-<1.3 kDa; LMW: low molecular weight, <1.3 kDa). Appreciable concentrations of nonessential metals were found in the potentially metal-sensitive HMW (Ag and Ni) and LMW (Tl) pools, whereas the MMW pool, which includes metallothioneins (MTs) and metallothionein-like proteins and peptides (MTLPs), appears to be involved in Ag and Cd detoxification. Higher-resolution fractionation of the heat-stable protein (HSP) fraction revealed further differences in the partitioning of nonessential metals (i.e., Ag = Cd ≠ Ni ≠ Tl). These results provide unprecedented details about the metal-handling strategies employed by a metal-tolerant, freshwater animal in a field situation. PMID:26886407

  3. Cluster formation in Ag{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-CdCl{sub 2} glass system

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.S.; Singh, N.B.

    2008-11-03

    Ag{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ag{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-20 wt% CdCl{sub 2} glasses were prepared by melt quenching method and characterized with the help of several experimental techniques. Powder X-ray diffraction study indicated that the glasses are amorphous in nature. DSC studies showed that CdCl{sub 2} doped glass is chemically more durable. Electrical conductivity and ionic transference number measurements have shown that both the glasses are ionic conductors with Ag{sup +} ions as the charge carriers. The electrical conductivity of the doped glass is found to be higher than the undoped one. Structures of the glasses have been proposed on the basis of IR spectral analysis. From SEM studies it has been inferred that addition of 20 wt% CdCl{sub 2} modifies the morphology of Ag{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass and in its presence formation of clusters composed of nanofibers occur.

  4. Cation ordering and physicochemical characterization of the quaternary diamond-like semiconductor Ag{sub 2}CdGeS{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetta, Carl D.; Minsterman, William C.; Lake, Charles H.; Aitken, Jennifer A.

    2012-03-15

    The quaternary diamond-like semiconductor, Ag{sub 2}CdGeS{sub 4}, was synthesized via high-temperature solid-state synthesis as well as structurally and physicochemically characterized. Single crystal X-ray diffraction provided a model for Ag{sub 2}CdGeS{sub 4} in the orthorhombic, noncentrosymmetric space group Pna2{sub 1} with a=13.7415(8) A, b=8.0367(5) A and c=6.5907(4) A, in contrast to a previously published model in Pmn2{sub 1} from the Rietveld analysis of laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data. The Pna2{sub 1} space group is supported by the Rietveld analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. Differential thermal analysis suggests that Ag{sub 2}CdGeS{sub 4} exists in two polymorphs. Optical diffuse reflectance UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy indicates that the orange compound is a semiconductor with a band gap of 2.32 eV. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy were used to further characterize the material. - Graphical abstract: The structure of the diamond-like semiconductor Ag{sub 2}CdGeS{sub 4} has been solved and refined in the orthorhombic noncentrosymmetric space group Pna2{sub 1}. A view down the a-axis shows that all MS{sub 4} tetrahedra are pointing in the same direction along the c-axis. The structure can be derived from that of lonsdaleite. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of Ag{sub 2}CdGeS{sub 4} is solved from single crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure is supported by the Rietveld analysis of synchrotron diffraction data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag{sub 2}CdGeS{sub 4} is a semiconductor with an optical band gap of 2.32 eV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Additional characterization is reported.

  5. Fluorometric sensing of ultralow As(III) concentrations using Ag doped hollow CdS/ZnS bi-layer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Boxi, Siddhartha Sankar; Paria, Santanu

    2015-12-21

    Arsenic poisoning from drinking water has been an important global issue in recent years. Because of the high level toxicity of arsenic to human health, an easy, inexpensive, low level and highly selective detection technique is of great importance to take any early precautions. This study reports the synthesis of Ag doped hollow CdS/ZnS bi-layer (Ag-h-CdS/ZnS) nanoparticles for the easy fluorometric determination of As(iii) ions in the aqueous phase. The hollow bi-layer structures were synthesized by a sacrificial core method using AgBr as the sacrificial core and the core was removed by dissolution in an ammonium hydroxide solution. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using different instrumental techniques. A good linear relationship was obtained between fluorescence quenching intensity and As(iii) concentration in the range of 0.75-22.5 μg L(-1) at neutral pH with a limit of detection as low as 0.226 μg L(-1). PMID:26541652

  6. Studies of the spin Hamiltonian parameters and defect structures for Ag2+ in NaF and CsCdF3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Juan; Wu, Shao-Yi; Ding, Chang-Chun; Hu, Xian-Fen; He, Jia-Jun

    2016-03-01

    The spin Hamiltonian parameters (g factors g//, g⊥, hyperfine structure constants A//, A⊥ and superhyperfine parameters Az‧, Ax‧ and Ay‧) and defect structures for Ag2+ in NaF and CsCdF3 crystals are theoretically studied using the improved perturbation formulas of these quantities for a 4d9 ion in a tetragonally elongated octahedron. The contributions from both the crystal-field and charge transfer mechanisms are taken into account, and the relevant model parameters are quantitatively obtained from the cluster approach in a consistent way. The impurity centers are found to undergo the relative tetragonal elongations of about 9.4% and 8.2% for Ag2+ in NaF and CsCdF3, respectively, along the C4 axis due to the Jahn-Teller effect. By employing the few adjustable parameters, the calculated spin Hamiltonian parameters based on the above uniform formulas and the local tetragonal elongation distortions agree well with the experimental data. Despite dominant ionicity of the hosts, the charge transfer contributions are actually important to the spin Hamiltonian parameters (e.g., about 20% for the g-shifts) due to strong covalency of impurity Ag2+.

  7. Metals (Ag(+) , Cd(2+) , Cr(6+) ) affect ATPase activity in the gill, kidney, and muscle of freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus following acute and chronic exposures.

    PubMed

    Atli, Gülüzar; Canli, Mustdafa

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus were individually acutely exposed to different concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 μg/mL) of Cd(2+) , Cr(6+) , and Ag(+) for 96 h and 0.05 μg/mL concentration of the same metals for different periods (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 days) chronically. Following each experimental protocol, Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase, Mg(2+) -ATPase, and Ca(2+) -ATPase activities were measured in the gill, kidney, and muscle of O. niloticus. In vitro experiments were also performed to determine the direct effects of metal ions (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 μg/mL) on ATPases. Except Ag(+) , none of the metals caused fish mortality within 30 days. Silver killed all the fishes within 16 days. Metal exposures generally decreased Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase and Ca(2+) -ATPase activities in the tissues of O. niloticus, although there were some fluctuations in Mg(2+) -ATPase activity. Ag(+) and Cd(2+) were found to be more toxic to ATPase activities than Cr(6+) . It was also observed that metal efficiency was higher in the gill than in the other tissues. Results indicated that the response of ATPases varied depending on metals, exposure types, and tissues. Because ATPases are sensitive to metal toxicity, their activity can give valuable data about fish physiology. Therefore, they may be used as a sensitive biomarker in environmental monitoring in contaminated waters. PMID:21901811

  8. Effects of metal-bearing nanoparticles (Ag, Au, CdS, ZnO, SiO2) on developing zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Lacave, José María; Retuerto, Ander; Vicario-Parés, Unai; Gilliland, Douglas; Oron, Miriam; Cajaraville, Miren P; Orbea, Amaia

    2016-08-12

    Due to the increasing commercialization of consumer and industrial products containing nanoparticles (NPs), an increase in the introduction of these materials into the environment is expected. NP toxicity to aquatic organisms depends on multiple biotic and abiotic factors, resulting in an unlimited number of combinations impossible to test in practice. The zebrafish embryo model offers a useful screening tool to test and rank the toxicity of nanomaterials according to those diverse factors. This work aims to study the acute and sublethal toxicity of a set of metal-bearing NPs displaying different properties, in comparison to that of the ionic and bulk forms of the metals, in order to establish a toxicity ranking. Soluble NPs (Ag, CdS and ZnO) showed the highest acute and sublethal toxicity, with LC50 values as low as 0.529 mg Ag l(-1) for Ag NPs of 20 nm, and a significant increase in the malformation prevalence in embryos exposed to 0.1 mg Cd l(-1) of CdS NPs of ∼4 nm. For insoluble NPs, like SiO2 NPs, acute effects were not observed during early embryo development due to the protective effect of the chorion. But effects on larvae could be expected, since deposition of fluorescent SiO2 NPs over the gill lamella and excretion through the intestine were observed after hatching. In other cases, such as for gold NPs, the toxicity could be attributed to the presence of additives (sodium citrate) in the NP suspension, as they displayed a similar toxicity when tested separately. Overall, the results indicated that toxicity to zebrafish embryos depends primarily on the chemical composition and, thus, the solubility of the NPs. Other characteristics, such as size, played a secondary role. This was supported by the observation that ionic forms of the metals were always more toxic than the nano forms, and bulk forms were the least toxic to the developing zebrafish embryos. PMID:27363512

  9. Effects of metal-bearing nanoparticles (Ag, Au, CdS, ZnO, SiO2) on developing zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Lacave, José; Retuerto, Ander; Vicario-Parés, Unai; Gilliland, Douglas; Oron, Miriam; Cajaraville, Miren P.; Orbea, Amaia

    2016-08-01

    Due to the increasing commercialization of consumer and industrial products containing nanoparticles (NPs), an increase in the introduction of these materials into the environment is expected. NP toxicity to aquatic organisms depends on multiple biotic and abiotic factors, resulting in an unlimited number of combinations impossible to test in practice. The zebrafish embryo model offers a useful screening tool to test and rank the toxicity of nanomaterials according to those diverse factors. This work aims to study the acute and sublethal toxicity of a set of metal-bearing NPs displaying different properties, in comparison to that of the ionic and bulk forms of the metals, in order to establish a toxicity ranking. Soluble NPs (Ag, CdS and ZnO) showed the highest acute and sublethal toxicity, with LC50 values as low as 0.529 mg Ag l‑1 for Ag NPs of 20 nm, and a significant increase in the malformation prevalence in embryos exposed to 0.1 mg Cd l‑1 of CdS NPs of ∼4 nm. For insoluble NPs, like SiO2 NPs, acute effects were not observed during early embryo development due to the protective effect of the chorion. But effects on larvae could be expected, since deposition of fluorescent SiO2 NPs over the gill lamella and excretion through the intestine were observed after hatching. In other cases, such as for gold NPs, the toxicity could be attributed to the presence of additives (sodium citrate) in the NP suspension, as they displayed a similar toxicity when tested separately. Overall, the results indicated that toxicity to zebrafish embryos depends primarily on the chemical composition and, thus, the solubility of the NPs. Other characteristics, such as size, played a secondary role. This was supported by the observation that ionic forms of the metals were always more toxic than the nano forms, and bulk forms were the least toxic to the developing zebrafish embryos.

  10. The effect of TiO{sub 2} and Ag nanoparticles on reproduction and development of Drosophila melanogaster and CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Philbrook, Nicola A.; Winn, Louise M.; Afrooz, A.R.M. Nabiul; Saleh, Navid B.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2011-12-15

    In the last two decades, nanoparticles (NPs) have found applications in a wide variety of consumer goods. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and silver (Ag) NPs are both found in cosmetics and foods, but their increasing use is of concern due to their ability to be taken up by biological systems. While there are some reports of TiO{sub 2} and Ag NPs affecting complex organisms, their effects on reproduction and development have been largely understudied. Here, the effects of orally administered TiO{sub 2} or Ag NPs on reproduction and development in two different model organisms were investigated. TiO{sub 2} NPs reduced the developmental success of CD-1 mice after a single oral dose of 100 or 1000 mg/kg to dams, resulting in a statistically significant increase in fetal deformities and mortality. Similarly, TiO{sub 2} NP addition to food led to a significant progeny loss in the fruit fly, Drosophila, as shown by a decline in female fecundity. Ag NP administration resulted in an increase in the mortality of fetal mice. Similarly in Drosophila, Ag NP feeding led to a significant decrease in developmental success, but unlike TiO{sub 2} NP treatment, there was no decline in fecundity. The distinct response associated with each type of NP likely reflects differences in NP administration as well as the biology of the particular model. Taken together, however, this study warns that these common NPs could be detrimental to the reproductive and developmental health of both invertebrates and vertebrates.

  11. Influence of technological defects on the optical and photoelectric properties of AgCd{sub 2-x}Mn{sub x}GaSe{sub 4} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyak, A. P. Davydyuk, H. Ye.; Bozhko, V. V.; Bulatetska, L. V.; Parasyuk, O. V.

    2012-03-15

    The study is concerned with the photoelectric and optical properties of a AgCd{sub 2-x}Mn{sub x}GaSe{sub 4} alloy with a Mn {yields} Cd isovalent substitution. The positions of the photoconductivity and photoluminescence peaks are determined, and the band gap of the alloy is estimated, based on compositional analysis. The influence of technological defects on specific features of the alloy's photoelectric and optical properties is analyzed. It is established that the centers controlling the alloy crystals' photosensitivity are cation vacancies. The photoluminescence centers responsible for emission at awavelengths from 0.77 to 0.88 {mu}m (dependent on the relation between components in the alloy) are defect complexes consisting of cation and anion vacancies. A physically consistent model is proposed to interpret the effects observed in the alloy.

  12. Influence of metal (Cd and Zn) waterborne exposure on radionuclide (134Cs, 110Ag, and 57Co) bioaccumulation by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): a field and laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Ausseil, Olivier; Adam, Christelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Baudin, Jean-Pierre; Casellas, Claude; Porcher, Jean-Marc

    2002-03-01

    Field and laboratory experiments were carried out to assess the influence of Cd and Zn on the contamination levels of 110Ag, 57Co, and 134Cs in rainbow trout. During a four-week prior exposure phase, two fish groups were held in tanks in the Lot River (France) at a reference (<0.05 microg Cd/L and 68 microg Zn/L) and at a polluted site (1.5 microg Cd/L and 152 microg Zn/L). During a subsequent phase, organisms were brought back to the laboratory, where the radionuclide accumulation and depuration were studied for 14 and 7 d, respectively. During this second phase, the water used in the experiments was brought back from the two sites on the Lot River in order to work under the same chemical conditions. The potential effect of chronic exposure to stable metals on several biomarkers has been explored: Plasma analysis indicated the disruption of certain variables linked to the energetic metabolism and to the maintenance of the ionic balance. In contrast, no significant disruption of the measured enzyme activities was observed. With regard to the bioaccumulation of radionuclides, concentrations in fish exposed to metals are much lower than those in fish from the control group. Various hypotheses are proposed to link fish metabolic profiles due to metal exposure to the radiocontamination of organisms. PMID:11878476

  13. FAS -670 A/G polymorphism may be associated with the depletion of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Renata Bezerra; Santana, Bárbara Brasil; Lima, Sandra Souza; Neris Martins Feitosa, Rosimar; de Oliveira Guimarães Ishak, Marluísa; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the polymorphisms in the FAS and FASL genes was investigated in a sample of 198 HIV-1-seropositive individuals and 191 seronegative controls to evaluate a possible association between polymorphisms and the infection. The identification of the A and G alleles of the FAS -670 polymorphism was accomplished through polymerase chain reaction assays followed by digestion with the restriction enzyme MvaI. The identification of the A and G alleles of the FAS -124 polymorphism and the T and delT alleles of the FAS -169 polymorphism were performed using the amplification-created restriction site method followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism reactions. The comparative analysis of allelic and genotypic frequencies between the groups did not reveal any significant differences. However, the quantitative analysis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes suggests that the G allele of the FAS -670 A/G polymorphism can be a protective factor against the depletion of these cells in the course of an HIV-1 infection. Polymorphisms in the FAS and FASL genes were not associated with the number of CD8(+) T lymphocytes or the plasma viral load. Our findings suggest that the FAS -670 polymorphism may be associated with apoptosis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes after infection by HIV-1. PMID:26429326

  14. Flowing Liquid Anode Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge as an Excitation Source for Optical Emission Spectrometry with the Improved Detectability of Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, and Zn.

    PubMed

    Greda, Krzysztof; Swiderski, Krzysztof; Jamroz, Piotr; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-09-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in contact with a flowing liquid anode (FLA-APGD) was developed as the efficient excitation source for the optical emission spectrometry (OES) detection. Differences in the appearance and the electrical characteristic of the FLA-APGD and a conventional system operated with a flowing liquid cathode (FLC-APGD) were studied in detail and discussed. Under the optimal operating conditions for the FLA-APGD, the emission from the analytes (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, and Zn) was from 20 to 120 times higher as compared to the FLC-APGD. Limits of detections (LODs) established with a novel FLA-APGD system were on average 20 times better than those obtained for the FLC-APGD. A further improvement of the LODs was achieved by reducing the background shift interferences and, as a result, the LODs for Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, and Zn were 0.004, 0.040, 0.70, 1.7, 0.035, and 0.45 μg L(-1), respectively. The precision of the FLA-APGD-OES method was evaluated to be within 2-5% (as the relative standard deviation of the repeated measurements). The method found its application in the determination of the content of Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, and Zn in a certified reference material (CRM) of Lobster hepatopancreas (TORT-2), four brass samples as well as mineral water and tea leaves samples spiked with the analytes. In the case of brass samples, a reference method, i.e., inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was used. A good agreement between the results obtained with FLA-APGD-OES and the certified values for the CRM TORT-2 as well as the reference values obtained with ICP-OES for the brass samples was revealed, indicating the good accuracy of the proposed method. The recoveries obtained for the spiked samples of mineral water and tea leaves were within the range of 97.5-102%. PMID:27476678

  15. A comparative computational study on hydrogen adsorption on the Ag(+), Cu(+), Mg(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) cationic sites in zeolites.

    PubMed

    Kozyra, Paweł; Piskorz, Witold

    2016-05-14

    In this article the interaction between H2 and Ag(+), Cu(+), Mg(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) cations in cluster models of several sizes has been studied computationally. Depending on the changes imposed by the adsorption process on the H2 molecule the activation can vary in a wide range - from only slight weakening of the H-H bond to complete dissociation of the H2 molecule. The NOCV (Natural Orbitals for Chemical Valence) analysis allowed for decomposition of the electron density distortion into contributions easier for interpretation. Three essential factors have been identified (i-iii). In the case of bare cations the main contribution is a donation from σH2 to the cation (i). When a zeolite framework surrounding the cation is introduced, it hinders σ-donation and enhances π-backdonation from the cation to the antibonding orbital of the molecule (ii). For Cu(i) and Ag(i) sites π-backdonation becomes dominant, while for Mg(ii), Cd(ii), and Zn(ii) cations, the σ-donation, albeit diminished, still remains a dominant contribution. Calculations showed that the localization and coordination of Zn(ii) have crucial influence on its interaction with H2. We identified a Zn(2+) position at which the H2 molecule dissociates - here the interaction between H2 and oxygen framework (iii) plays a crucial role. Based on the calculations the mechanism of H2 transformation has been proposed. Upon heterolytic dissociation of H2 the Zn(0) moiety and two OH groups can be formed. Eventually, in two elementary steps, the H2 molecule can be restored. In this case, the ability of the site to activate/dissociate hydrogen is caused by the low coordination number of the zinc cation and the geometry of the site which allows positively charged H2 to interact with framework oxygen what enhances the formation of OH and Z-O-(ZnH)(+) groups. PMID:27092373

  16. Fluorometric selective detection of fluoride ions in aqueous media using Ag doped CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Boxi, Siddhartha Sankar; Paria, Santanu

    2016-01-14

    The presence of fluoride ions in drinking water plays an important role in human health. For that reason, maintaining the optimum concentration of fluoride ions in drinking water is essential, as both low and excess (above the permissible level) concentrations can cause different health problems, such as fluorosis, urolithiasis, kidney failure, cancer, and can even lead to death. So, development of a simple and low cost method for the detection of fluoride ions in water is highly desirable. In this study, a fluorometric method based on Ag-CdS/Ag-ZnS core/shell nanoparticles is developed for fluoride ion detection. The method was tested in aqueous solution at different pH values. The selectivity and sensitivity of the fluorescence probe was checked in the presence of other anions (Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), NO3(-) SO4(2-), HCO3(-), HPO4(2-), CH3COO(-), and H2PO4(-)) and found there is no significant interference of these associated ions. The fluoride ion concentration was varied in the range 190-22 800 μg L(-1) and a lower detection limit was obtained as 99.7 μg L(-1). PMID:26645767

  17. Photocatalytic removal of M(2+) (Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+)) over new catalyst CuCrO(2).

    PubMed

    Ketir, W; Bouguelia, A; Trari, M

    2008-10-30

    The metal ions M(2+) (Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+)) are potentially toxic. Their electro deposition has been carried out in aqueous air-equilibrated CuCrO(2) suspension upon visible illumination. The delafossite CuCrO(2) is p-type semiconductor characterized by a low band gap (1.28 eV) and a long-term chemical stability. The corrosion rate is found to be 10(-2) micromol m(-2)month(-1) in aqua regia. The oxide has been elaborated through nitrate route where the specific surface area is increased via the surface/bulk ratio. A correlation exists between the dark M(2+) adsorption, the redox potential of M(2+/0) couple and the conduction band of CuCrO(2) positioned at -1.06 V(SCE). Ag(+) cannot be photoreduced because of its positive potential located far above the valence band. By contrast, Zn(2+) is efficiently deposited due to the large driving force at the interface. The improved photoactivity of copper with a deposition percentage (90%) is attributed to the strong dark adsorption onto the surface catalyst. The results indicate a competitive effect with the water reduction; it has been observed that the M(2+) deposition goes parallel with the hydrogen evolution. Such behavior is attributed to the low H(2) over voltage when ultra fine aggregate of M islands are photodeposited onto CuCrO(2) substrate. PMID:18384943

  18. Subcellular partitioning of non-essential trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl) in livers of American (Anguilla rostrata) and European (Anguilla anguilla) yellow eels.

    PubMed

    Rosabal, Maikel; Pierron, Fabien; Couture, Patrice; Baudrimont, Magalie; Hare, Landis; Campbell, Peter G C

    2015-03-01

    We determined the intracellular compartmentalization of the trace metals Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl in the livers of yellow eels collected from the Saint Lawrence River system in Canada (Anguilla rostrata) and in the area of the Gironde estuary in France (Anguilla anguilla). Differential centrifugation, NaOH digestion and thermal shock were used to separate eel livers into putative "sensitive" fractions (heat-denatured proteins, mitochondria and microsomes+lysosomes) and detoxified metal fractions (heat-stable peptides/proteins and granules). The cytosolic heat-stable fraction (HSP) was consistently involved in the detoxification of all trace metals. In addition, granule-like structures played a complementary role in the detoxification of Ni, Pb, and Tl in both eel species. However, these detoxification mechanisms were not completely effective because increasing trace metal concentrations in whole livers were accompanied by significant increases in the concentrations of most trace metals in "sensitive" subcellular fractions, that is, mitochondria, heat-denatured cytosolic proteins and microsomes+lysosomes. Among these "sensitive" fractions, mitochondria were the major binding sites for As, Cd, Pb, and Tl. This accumulation of non-essential metals in "sensitive" fractions likely represents a health risk for eels inhabiting the Saint Lawrence and Gironde environments. PMID:25635611

  19. Atomic-level observation of Ag-ion hopping motion in AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Komatsuda, S.; Mizuuchi, R.; Irioka, N.; Kawata, S.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Applicability of the 111mCd(→111Cd) and 111In(→111Cd) probes to the study of dynamics in polycrystalline silver iodide (AgI) was examined by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique. It was found that the 111mCd(→111Cd) probe occupies a unique site in γ-AgI and exhibits nuclear relaxation caused by dynamic perturbation arising from Ag + hopping motion in α-AgI; while the residential sites of 111In(→111Cd) vary, suggesting that 111In ions can not settle themselves in a fixed site in the AgI crystal structure. We here demonstrate that 111mCd(→111Cd) can be a potential nucleus to probe the Ag +-ion dynamic motion in α-AgI.

  20. Thermally deposited Ag-doped CdS thin film transistors with high-k rare-earth oxide Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoi, P.

    2013-03-15

    The performance of thermally deposited CdS thin film transistors doped with Ag has been reported. Ag-doped CdS thin films have been prepared using chemical method. High dielectric constant rare earth oxide Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been used as gate insulator. The thin film trasistors are fabricated in coplanar electrode structure on ultrasonically cleaned glass substrates with a channel length of 50 {mu}m. The thin film transistors exhibit a high mobility of 4.3 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} and low threshold voltage of 1 V. The ON-OFF ratio of the thin film transistors is found as 10{sup 5}. The TFTs also exhibit good transconductance and gain band-width product of 1.15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mho and 71 kHz respectively.

  1. Effects of increased pCO2 and temperature on trace element (Ag, Cd and Zn) bioaccumulation in the eggs of the common cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoue-Labarthe, T.; Martin, S.; Oberhänsli, F.; Teyssié, J.-L.; Markich, S.; Jeffree, R.; Bustamante, P.

    2009-05-01

    Cephalopods play a key role in many marine trophic networks and constitute alternative fisheries resources, especially given the ongoing decline in finfish stocks. Along the European coast, the eggs of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis are characterized by an increasing permeability of the eggshell during development, which leads to selective accumulation of essential and non-essential elements in the embryo. Temperature and pH are two critical factors that affect the metabolism of marine organisms in the coastal shallow waters. In this study, we are testing the effects of pH and temperature through a crossed (3×2) laboratory experiment. Seawater pH showed a strong effect on the egg weight and non-significant impact on the hatchlings weight at the end of development implying egg swelling process and embryo growth disturbances. The lower pH of incubation seawater of eggs, the more the hatchlings accumulated 110m Ag in their tissues. The 109Cd CF decreased with increasing pH and 65Zn CF reached the maximal values pH 7.85, independent of temperature. Our results suggest that pH and temperature affected both the permeability properties of the eggshell and the embryo metabolism. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first studies on the ocean acidification and ocean warming consequences on the metal uptake in marine organisms, stimulating further interest to evaluate the likely ecotoxicological impact of the global change on the early-life stage of the cuttlefish.

  2. Ion conduction in the Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4}-Cu{sub 2}HgI{sub 4} systems doped with Cd{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Na{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, S.M.; Yahya, A.I.; Ahmad, A.

    1996-03-01

    Ion conductivities of face centered cubic Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4}-Cu{sub 2}HgI{sub 4} systems doped with Cd{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Na{sup +} were measured. In 67 mol% Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4} solid solution doped with Cd{sup 2+} ions, the phase transition occurs at a lower temperature than in the parent compounds and the system shows higher conductivity. The increase in conductivity is discussed in terms of vacancies produced. K{sup +} doped Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4} exhibits higher conductivity prior to the phase transition, which is attributed to lattice loosening. A decrease in conductivity is observed above 140{degrees}C. This is interpreted in terms of anion framework collapse. Na{sup +} doped Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4} shows high conductivity for the high temperature phase because of the small size of Na{sup +} ions. The activation energy for ionic motion for all the samples is calculated from the graph of log({delta}T) versus 1/T.

  3. Effects of increased pCO2 and temperature on trace element (Ag, Cd and Zn) bioaccumulation in the eggs of the common cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoue-Labarthe, T.; Martin, S.; Oberhänsli, F.; Teyssié, J.-L.; Markich, S.; Ross, J.; Bustamante, P.

    2009-11-01

    Cephalopods play a key role in many marine trophic networks and constitute alternative fisheries resources, especially given the ongoing decline in finfish stocks. Along the European coast, the eggs of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis are characterized by an increasing permeability of the eggshell during development, which leads to selective accumulation of essential and non-essential elements in the embryo. Temperature and pH are two critical factors that affect the metabolism of marine organisms in the coastal shallow waters. In this study, we investigated the effects of pH and temperature through a crossed (3×2; pH 8.1 (pCO2, 400 ppm), 7.85 (900 ppm) and 7.6 (1400 ppm) at 16 and 19°C, respectively) laboratory experiment. Seawater pH showed a strong effect on the egg weight and non-significant impact on the weight of hatchlings at the end of development implying an egg swelling process and embryo growth disturbances. The lower the seawater pH, the more 110 mAg was accumulated in the tissues of hatchlings. The 109Cd concentration factor (CF) decreased with decreasing pH and 65Zn CF reached maximal values pH 7.85, independently of temperature. Our results suggest that pH and temperature affected both the permeability properties of the eggshell and embryonic metabolism. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first studies on the consequences of ocean acidification and ocean warming on metal uptake in marine organisms, and our results indicate the need to further evaluate the likely ecotoxicological impact of the global change on the early-life stages of the cuttlefish.

  4. Open beauty measurements in pPb collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunchul

    2014-11-01

    The B+, B0 and Bs0 mesons are exclusively reconstructed in proton-lead (pPb) collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV by the CMS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The cross sections are measured in the range of transverse momentum of 10 to 60 GeV / c and the center-of-mass rapidity smaller than 1.93. The nuclear modification factor, which is the ratio of the cross section in between pPb and proton-proton (pp) collisions, is estimated using the experimental data from pPb collisions and theoretical calculations as the pp reference. The calculated nuclear modification factors for each particle species are consistent with unity within the current uncertainties. The forward-to-backward asymmetry of B+ is also analyzed and does not show any nuclear effect in the measured rapidity range.

  5. The − 5 A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism in the core promoter region of MT2A and its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starska, Katarzyna; Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina; Aleksandrowicz, Paweł; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; and others

    2014-10-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which participate in the mechanisms of Zn homeostasis, and protect against toxic metals. MTs contain metal-thiolate cluster groups and suppress metal toxicity by binding to them. The aim of this study was to determine the − 5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu content in squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCC) and non-cancerous laryngeal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region − 5 A/G SNP was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 323 SCC and 116 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. The frequency of A allele carriage was 94.2% and 91.8% in SCC and NCM, respectively, while G allele carriage was detected in 5.8% and 8.2% of SCC and NCM samples, respectively. As a result, a significant association was identified between the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The significant differences were identified between A/A and both the A/G and G/G genotypes, with regard to the concentration of the contaminating metal. The Spearman rank correlation results showed that the MT2A expression and Cd, Zn, Cu levels were negatively correlated. Results obtained in this study suggest that − 5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and accumulation of metal levels in laryngeal cancer. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in laryngeal cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn and Cu levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels.

  6. Syntheses, crystal structures and fluorescent properties of Cd(II), Hg(II) and Ag(I) coordination polymers constructed from 1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Degang; Xie Lixia; Fan Yaoting; Hou Hongwei; Xu Yan

    2009-06-15

    Three new d{sup 10} coordination polymers, namely [Cd(taa)Cl]{sub n}1, [Hg(taa)Cl]{sub n}2, and [Ag{sub 1.5}(taa)(NO{sub 3}){sub 0.5}]{sub n}3 (taa=1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-acatate anion) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 consists of two-dimensional layers constructed by carboxyl-linked helical chains, which are further linked through carboxyl group to generate a unique 3D open framework. Topological analysis reveals that the structure of 1 can be classified as an unprecedented (3,8)-connected network with the Schlaefli symbol (4.5{sup 2}){sub 2}(4{sup 2}.5{sup 8}.6{sup 14}.7{sup 3}.8). Compound 2 manifests a doubly interpenetrated decorated alpha-polonium cubic network with the Schlaefli symbol of (4{sup 10}.6{sup 2}.8{sup 3}). Compound 3 consists of 2D puckered layers made up of Ag centers and taa{sup -} bridges. In addition, all of these compounds are photoluminescent in the solid state with spectra that closely resemble those of the ligand precursor. - Graphical abstract: Three new compounds based on 1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-acetic acid and Cd(II), Hg(II) and Ag(I) salts display luminescent properties and may be potential candidates for luminescent materials.

  7. Evidence for Collective Multiparticle Correlations in p-Pb Collisions.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Randle-conde, A; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Zenoni, F; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Dos Reis Martins, T; Molina, J; Mora Herrera, C; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Tao, J; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; 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Spiropulu, M; Vlimant, J R; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carlson, B; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Krohn, M; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Eggert, N; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Skinnari, L; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitbeck, A; Whitmore, J; Yang, F; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Carver, M; Curry, D; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Snowball, M; Sperka, D; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, J R; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Kurt, P; O'Brien, C; Sandoval Gonzalez, I D; Silkworth, C; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Rahmat, R; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Anderson, I; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Bruner, C; Gray, J; Kenny, R P; Majumder, D; Malek, M; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Sekaric, J; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Wood, J S; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Bierwagen, K; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Meier, F; Ratnikov, F; Snow, G R; Zvada, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Musienko, Y; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Smith, G; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Malik, S; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Primavera, F; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Zablocki, J; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Korjenevski, S; Petrillo, G; Verzetti, M; Vishnevskiy, D; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wolfe, E; Wood, J; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Vuosalo, C; Woods, N

    2015-07-01

    The second-order azimuthal anisotropy Fourier harmonics, v2, are obtained in p-Pb and PbPb collisions over a wide pseudorapidity (η) range based on correlations among six or more charged particles. The p-Pb data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35  nb-1, were collected during the 2013 LHC p-Pb run at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02  TeV by the CMS experiment. A sample of semiperipheral PbPb collision data at √sNN=2.76  TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.5  μb-1 and covering a similar range of particle multiplicities as the p-Pb data, is also analyzed for comparison. The six- and eight-particle cumulant and the Lee-Yang zeros methods are used to extract the v2 coefficients, extending previous studies of two- and four-particle correlations. For both the p-Pb and PbPb systems, the v2 values obtained with correlations among more than four particles are consistent with previously published four-particle results. These data support the interpretation of a collective origin for the previously observed long-range (large Δη) correlations in both systems. The ratios of v2 values corresponding to correlations including different numbers of particles are compared to theoretical predictions that assume a hydrodynamic behavior of a p-Pb system dominated by fluctuations in the positions of participant nucleons. These results provide new insights into the multiparticle dynamics of collision systems with a very small overlapping region. PMID:26182092

  8. Ppb detection of Sarin surrogate in liquid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Matthieu; Hamoniaux, Jennifer; Rocha, Licinio; Normand, Stéphane

    2013-05-01

    Sarin, a well-known chemical warfare agent, is toxic for concentrations as low as 0.03 ppm in the air (Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health value). A technology providing "on the field" detection could be fluorescence spectroscopy. This presentation shows a sensitive method for the detection of Diethyl Chlorophosphate (DCP), a Sarin surrogate, which provides in a few seconds a turn-off fluorescence response of the sensor for ppb levels of DCP. For instance, a I/I0 = 0.68 (fluorescence quenching) was obtained when the sensor was exposed to 16 ppb of DCP.

  9. The PPB Systems Analyst: Skills and Training Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Augustus B.

    Results are given of a six-week effort to (1) define the knowledge and skill requirements for successful performance as a Planning-Programming-Budgeting (PPB) systems analyst, (2) determine how these requirements are best acquired, and (3) evaluate the implications for the training programs of the Civil Service Commission. The findings in relation…

  10. The potential effect of metallothionein 2A - 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism on blood cadmium, lead, zinc and copper levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kayaalti, Zeliha Aliyev, Vugar; Soeylemezoglu, Tuelin

    2011-10-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, metal-binding proteins. Because of their rich thiol groups, MTs bind to the biologically essential metals and perform these metals' homeostatic regulations; absorb the heavy metals and assist with their transportation and extraction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the metallothionein 2A (MT2A) core promoter region - 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu levels in the blood samples. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the standard polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique using the 616 blood samples and the genotype frequencies were found as 86.6% homozygote typical (AA), 12.8% heterozygote (AG) and 0.6% homozygote atypical (GG). Metal levels were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrophotometer system and the average levels of Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu in the blood samples were 1.69 {+-} 1.57 ppb, 30.62 {+-} 14.13 ppb, 0.98 {+-} 0.49 ppm and 1.04 {+-} 0.45 ppm, respectively. As a result; highly statistically significant associations were detected between the - 5 A/G core promoter region SNP in the MT2A gene and Cd, Pb and Zn levels (p = 0.004, p = 0.012 and p = 0.002, respectively), but no association was found with Cu level (p = 0.595). Individuals with the GG genotype had statistically lower Zn level and higher Cd and Pb levels in the blood samples than individuals with AA and AG genotypes. This study suggests that having the GG genotype individuals may be more sensitive for the metal toxicity and they should be more careful about protecting their health against the toxic effects of the heavy metals. - Highlights: > MT2A -5A/G SNP has strong effect on the Cd, Pb and Zn levels in the blood. > MT2A GG individuals should be more careful for their health against metal toxicity. > This SNP might be considered as a biomarker for risk of disease related to metals.

  11. A first-principles study on the negative thermal expansion material: Mn3(A0.5B0.5)N (A=Cu, Zn, Ag, or Cd; B=Si, Ge, or Sn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Bingyan; He, Haiyan; Pan, Bicai

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, using the first-principles calculations, we systemically study the magnetic and the negative thermal expansion (NTE) properties of Mn3(A0.5B0.5)N (A = Cu, Zn, Ag, or Cd; B = Si, Ge, or Sn). From the calculated results, except Mn3(Cu0.5Si0.5)N, all the doped compounds considered would exhibit the NTE. For the dopants at B sites, the working temperature of the NTE shifts to higher temperature range from Si to Sn, and among the compounds with these dopants, Mn3(A0.5Ge0.5)N has the largest amplitude of the NTE coefficient. As to the dopants at A sites, compared to Mn3(Cu0.5B0.5)N, Mn3(A0.5B0.5)N (A = Ag or Cd) exhibit the NTE with higher temperature ranges and lower coefficient of the thermal expansion. In a word, these compounds would have different working temperatures and coefficients of the NTE, which is important for the applications in different conditions.

  12. Complexation of Cd2+, Ni2+, and Ag+ metal ions with 4,13-didecyl-l,7,10,16-tetraoxa-4,13-diazacyclooctadecane in acetonitrile-ethylacetate binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadyar, M.; Rounaghi, G. H.; Tarahomi, S.; Mohajeri, M.

    2013-12-01

    Conductometric titrations have been performed in acetonitrile-ethylacetate (AN-EtOAc) binary solutions at 288, 298, 308, and 318 K to obtain the stoichiometry, the complex stability constants and the standard thermodynamic parameters for the complexation of Cd2+, Ni2+, and Ag+ cations with 4,13-didecyl-1,7,10,16-tetraoxa-4,13-diazacyclooctadecane (cryptand 22DD). The stability constants of the resulting 1: 1 complexes formed between the metal cations and the ligand were determined by computer fitting of the conductance-mole ratio data. There is a non-linear relationship between the log K f values of complexes and the mole fraction of ethylacetate in the mixed solvent system. In addition, the conductometric data show that the stoichiometry of the complexes formed between the Cd2+, Ni2+, and Ag+ cations with the ligand changes with the nature of the solvent. The standard enthalpy and entropy values for the 1: 1 [ML] complexation reactions were evaluated from the temperature dependence of the formation constants. Thermodynamically, the complexation processes of the metal cations with the C22DD, is mainly entropy governed and the values of thermodynamic parameters are influenced by the nature and composition of the binary mixed solvent solutions.

  13. Impacts of anthropogenic pressures on the water quality of the Gironde Estuary (SW France) from the Urban Agglomeration of Bordeaux: spatial characterization and inputs of trace metal elements (Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessaci, Kahina; Coynel, Alexandra; Blanc, Gérard; Deycard, Victoria N.; Derriennic, Hervé; Schäfer, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Recent European legislation (2000/60/CE) has listed eight trace metal elements as priority toxic substances for water quality. Urban metal inputs into hydrosystems are of increasing interest to both scientists and managers facing restrictive environmental protection policies, population increase and changing metal applications. The Gironde Estuary (SW France; 625 km2) is known for its metal/metalloid pollution originating from industrial (e.g. Cd, Zn, Cu, As, Ag, Hg) or agricultural sources (e.g. Cu) in the main fluvial tributaries (Garonne and Dordogne Rivers). However, little peer-reviewed scientific work has addressed the impact of urban sources on the Gironde Estuary, especially the Urban Agglomeration of Bordeaux (~1 million inhabitants) located on the downstream branch of the Garonne River. In this study, a snapshot sampling campaign was performed in 2011 for characterizing the spatial distribution of dissolved and particulate metal/metalloid (As, Ag, Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu) concentrations in three suburban watersheds: the Jalle of Blanquefort (330 km2), Eau Bourde (140 km2), and Peugue (112 km2). Furthermore, particulate metal Enrichment Factors (EF) were calculated using local geochemical background measured at the bottom of a sediment core (492 cm). Results indicated that metal concentrations displayed a high spatial variability depending on the suburban watershed and the studied element. Local concentrations anomalies were observed for: (i) As in the Eau Bourde River in dissolved (4.2 μg/l) and particulate phases (246 mg/kg; EF= 20) and attributed to a nearby industrial incinerator; (ii) Zn in the Peugue River with maximum dissolved and particulate concentrations of 87 μg/l and 1580 mg/kg (EF=17), respectively, probably due to urban habitation runoff; (iii) Ag in the Jalle of Blanquefort River with high dissolved (74 ng/l) and particulate concentrations (33.7 mg/kg; EF=117) due to industrial activities in the downstream part. Based on hydro

  14. Analytical performance of a lab-made concomitant metal analyzer to generate volatile species of Ag, Au, Cd, Cu, Ni, Sn and Zn using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a reaction media.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Alonso, Julia; Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the main parameters affecting Ag, Au, Cd, Cu, Ni, Sn and Zn vapor generation using a lab-made concomitant metal analyzer (CMA) as a reaction chamber and gas-liquid separator. The modifier used in the reaction media was 8-hydroxyquinoline, and Inductively-Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry was used as detection technique. The performance of the lab-made concomitant analyzer was compared with the performance of a continuous flow gas-liquid separator and of a cyclonic spray chamber. Standards were prepared in acid media and included 1 mg L(-1) of Co as a catalyzer. The optimum concentrations of the reagents in the standards were: 450 mg L(-1) of 8-hydroxyquinoline and 0.4 M nitric acid. The optimum concentration of sodium borohydride to generate the vapors was 2.25% (w/v) (prepared in 0.4% (w/v) NaOH). The volatile species were swept from the CMA to the torch by an argon flow of 0.6 mL min(-1). The use of the CMA led to an improvement of the detection limits for some elements compared to conventional nebulization: 1.1 μg L(-1) for Ag, 7.0 μg L(-1) for Au and 4.3 μg L(-1) for Sn. The limit of detection for Cu was 1.4 μg L(-1) and for Ni 22.5 μg L(-1). The direct mixing of the reagents on the spray chamber was not effective for Cd and Zn; a deviation of the linearity was observed for these elements. PMID:23141310

  15. Syntheses, crystal structures and fluorescent properties of Cd(II), Hg(II) and Ag(I) coordination polymers constructed from 1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, De-Gang; Xie, Li-Xia; Fan, Yao-Ting; Hou, Hong-Wei; Xu, Yan

    2009-06-01

    Three new d10 coordination polymers, namely [Cd(taa)Cl] n1, [Hg(taa)Cl] n2, and [Ag 1.5(taa)(NO 3) 0.5] n3 (taa=1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-acatate anion) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 consists of two-dimensional layers constructed by carboxyl-linked helical chains, which are further linked through carboxyl group to generate a unique 3D open framework. Topological analysis reveals that the structure of 1 can be classified as an unprecedented (3,8)-connected network with the Schläfli symbol (4.5 2) 2(4 2.5 8.6 14.7 3.8). Compound 2 manifests a doubly interpenetrated decorated α-polonium cubic network with the Schläfli symbol of (4 10.6 2.8 3). Compound 3 consists of 2D puckered layers made up of Ag centers and taa - bridges. In addition, all of these compounds are photoluminescent in the solid state with spectra that closely resemble those of the ligand precursor.

  16. A rapid, partial leach and organic separation for the sensitive determination of Ag, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, and Zn in surface geologic materials by flame atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; Clark, J.R.; Campbell, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    A solution of dilute hydrochloric acid, ascorbic acid, and potassium iodide has been found to dissolve weakly bound metals in soils, stream sediments, and oxidized rocks. Silver, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, and Zn are selectively extracted from this solution by a mixture of Aliquat 336 (tricaprylyl methyl ammonium chloride) and MIBK (methyl isobutyl ketone). Because potentially interfering major and minor elements do not extract, the organic separation allows interference-free determinations of Ag and Cd to the 0.05 ppm level, Mo, Cu, and Zn to 0.5 ppm, and Bi, Pb, and Sb to 1 ppm in the sample using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The analytical absorbance values of the organic solution used in the proposed method are generally enhanced more than threefold as compared to aqueous solutions, due to more efficient atomization and burning characteristics. The leaching and extraction procedures are extremely rapid; as many as 100 samples may be analyzed per day, yielding 800 determinations, and the technique is adaptable to field use. The proposed method was compared to total digestion methods for geochemical reference samples as well as soils and stream sediments from mineralized and unmineralized areas. The partial leach showed better anomaly contrasts than did total digestions. Because the proposed method is very rapid and is sensitive to pathfinder elements for several types of ore deposits, it should be useful for reconnaissance surveys for concealed deposits. ?? 1984.

  17. Vibrational Spectroscopy of HD{sup +} with 2-ppb Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Roth, B.; Wicht, A.; Ernsting, I.; Schiller, S.

    2007-04-27

    By measurement of the frequency of a vibrational overtone transition in the molecular hydrogen ion HD{sup +}, we demonstrate the first optical spectroscopy of trapped molecular ions with submegahertz accuracy. We use a diode laser, locked to a stable frequency comb, to perform resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy on sympathetically cooled HD{sup +} ions at 50 mK. The achieved 2-ppb relative accuracy is a factor of 150 higher than previous results for HD{sup +}, and the measured transition frequency agrees well with recent high-accuracy ab initio calculations, which include high-order quantum electrodynamic effects. We also show that our method bears potential for achieving considerably higher accuracy and may, if combined with slightly improved theoretical calculations, lead to a new and improved determination of the electron-proton mass ratio.

  18. Studies on structural & optical properties of CdS0.2Se0.8: Ag nanocomposite thin film for photosensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, J. B.; Patil, R. S.; Patil, I. J.; Jagtap, P. P.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2012-06-01

    Silver doped CdS0.2Se0.8 thin films of different concentrations were grown by simple and economical chemical bath deposition technique and later on characterized for optoelectronic and physicochemical properties. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of undoped and doped sample indicates polycrystalline nature with hexagonal structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph showed uniform morphology with cabbage type structure for undoped film and leaf-like structure for doped films over the entire glass substrate. Room temperature absorbance for 1 wt% doping concentration of silver showed an excitonic peak which confirms the size quantization of the particle. I-V characteristic for undoped and doped film shows ohmic and Schottky junction behavior.

  19. Valence Fluctuations Revealed by Magnetic Field and Pressure Scans: Comparison with Experiments in YbXCu4 (X=In, Ag, Cd) and CeYIn5 (Y=Ir, Rh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Tsuruta, Atsushi; Miyake, Kazumasa; Flouquet, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    The mechanism of how critical end points of the first-order valence transition (FOVT) are controlled by a magnetic field is discussed. We demonstrate that critical temperature is suppressed to be a quantum critical point (QCP) by a magnetic field. This results explain the field dependence of the isostructural FOVT observed in Ce metal and YbInCu4. Magnetic field scan can make the system reenter in a critical valence fluctuation region. Even in intermediate-valence materials, the QCP is induced by applying a magnetic field, at which magnetic susceptibility also diverges. The driving force of the field-induced QCP is shown to be a cooperative phenomenon of the Zeeman effect and the Kondo effect, which creates a distinct energy scale from the Kondo temperature. The key concept is that the closeness to the QCP of the FOVT is vital in understanding Ce- and Yb-based heavy-fermions. This explains the peculiar magnetic and transport responses in CeYIn5 (Y=Ir, Rh) and metamagnetic transition in YbXCu4 for X=In as well as the sharp contrast between X=Ag and Cd.

  20. Improvement of room temperature ppb level Cl2 sensing characteristics of copper phthalocyanine film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.; Aswal, D. K.

    2013-02-01

    Room temperature ppb level Cl2 sensing characteristics of 50 nm films of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and its non-peripheral derivative Cu(II) 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H, 31H-phthalocyanine (CuPcOC4) have been studied in the 5-1500 ppb range. By making butoxy substitutions at non-peripheral sites of CuPc molecule, the detection limit of film is lowered from 50 ppb to 5 ppb with faster response and recovery time as compared to unsubstituted CuPc film of same thickness. For 1500 ppb of Cl2, the response of CuPcOC4 film is four times higher than CuPc film. These results are further enhanced by using self-assembled nanowires of CuPcOC4. The response of nanowires is five times higher than unsubstituted CuPc film with response and recovery time of 20 sec and 270 sec for 1500 ppb of Cl2.

  1. AGS II

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in rare K decays, neutrino oscillations and other fields have generated an increasing demand for running, and improved intensity and duty cycle, at the AGS. Current projects include acceleration of polarized protons and light ions (up to mass 32). Future plans are for a booster to increase intensity and allow heavy ions (up to mass 200), and a stretcher to give 100% duty cycle. A later upgrade could yield an average current of 32 ..mu.. amps. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Ag(I)-binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Mehra, R K; Tran, K; Scott, G W; Mulchandani, P; Saini, S S

    1996-02-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides with the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)nGly, where n varies from 2 to 11. A variety of metal ions such as Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Ag(I) induce PC synthesis in plants and some yeasts. It has generally been assumed that the inducer metals also bind PCs. However, very little information is available on the binding of metals other than Cu(I) and Cd(II) to PCs. In this paper, we describe the Ag(I)-binding characteristics of PCs with the structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly. The Ag(I)-binding stoichiometries of these three peptides were determined by (i) UV/VIS spectrophotometry, (ii) luminescence spectroscopy at 77 K, and (iii) reverse-phase HPLC. The three techniques yielded similar results. ApoPCs exhibit featureless absorption in the 220-340 nm range. The binding of Ag(I) to PCs induced the appearance of specific absorption shoulders. The titration end point was indicated by the flattening of the characteristic absorption shoulders. Similarly, luminescence at 77 K due to Ag(I)-thiolate clusters increased with the addition of graded Ag(I) equivalents. The luminescence declined when Ag(I) equivalents in excess of the saturating amounts were added to the peptides. At neutral pH, (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly bind 1.0, 1.5, and 4.0 equivalents of Ag(I), respectively. The Ag(I)-binding capacity of (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly and (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly was increased at pH 5.0 and below so that Ag(I)/-SH ratio approached 1.0. A similar pH-dependent binding of Ag(I) to glutathione was also observed. The increased Ag(I)-binding to PCs at lower pH is of physiological significance as these peptides accumulate in acidic vacuoles. We also report lifetime data on Ag(I)-PCs. The relatively long decay-times (approximately 0.1-0.3 msec) accompanied with a large Stokes shift in the emission band are indicative of spin-forbidden phosphorescence. PMID

  3. W boson studies in pPb and PbPb collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapon, Émilien; CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The electroweak W bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and thus constitute clean probes of the initial state of nuclear collisions. They provide a unique constraint on the nuclear parton distributions, in particular on the antiquarks from the sea. A first analysis of PbPb data has confirmed the medium-blind characteristic of the electroweak bosons. With the new pPb data collected at the beginning of 2013, nuclear matter without the creation of a hot medium can hence be studied. Being 10 times more prevalent than Z bosons, the yield of W bosons recorded from pPb collisions allows precise comparisons to theoretical predictions. A yield of approximately 20 000 W is observed in pPb collisions in both the muon and electron channels. In this paper the CMS measurements of W bosons in PbPb at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of \\sqrt{sNN} = 2.76 TeV and from the new pPb data at \\sqrt{sNN} = 5.02 TeV are reported. The charge asymmetry, forward/backward asymmetry and fully corrected yields will be shown.

  4. Better CD4+ T cell recovery in Brazilian HIV-infected individuals under HAART due to cumulative carriage of SDF-1-3'A, CCR2-V64I, CCR5-D32 and CCR5-promoter 59029A/G polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Rigato, Paula O; Hong, Marisa A; Casseb, Jorge; Ueda, Mirthes; de Castro, Isac; Benard, Gil; Duarte, Alberto J S

    2008-09-01

    Polymorphisms of chemokines and chemokine-receptors genes have been shown to influence the rate of progression to AIDS; however, their influence on response to HAART remains unclear. We investigated the frequency of the SDF-1-3'A, CCR2-64I, CCR5-D32 and CCR5-Promoter-59029-A/G polymorphisms in Brazilian HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals and their influence on CD4+ T-cell evolution HIV-1 infected individuals before and during HAART. Polymorphism detection was done in a transversal study of 200 HIV-1-infected and 82 uninfected individuals. The rate of CD4+ T cell increase or decrease was studied in a cohort of 155 HIV-1 infected individuals on pre and post-HAART. Polymorphisms were determined by PCR associated with RFLP. The rate of CD4+ T-cell decline or increase was also determined. HIV-1 infected and uninfected subjects showed, respectively, frequencies of 0.193 and 0.220 for SDF-1-3'A, of 0.140 and 0.110 for CCR2-V64I, of 0.038 and 0.055 for CCR5-D32, and of 0.442 and 0.390 for CCR5-P-59029-A/G. HIV-1-infected subjects carrying one, two or three of these four polymorphisms showed better CD4+ T-cell recovery than HIV-1-infected subjects carrying the four wild-type alleles (+2.7, +1.6, +3.5, and -0.9 lymphocytes/microl/month, respectively). Regression logistic analysis showed that the CCR5-D32/CCR2-V64I association was predictor of positive CD4+ T cell slope after HAART. The distribution of polymorphisms did not differ between HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, but differed from more homogenous ethnic groups probably reflecting the miscegenation of the Brazilian population. We add further evidence of the role of these polymorphisms by showing that the CD4 gain was influenced by carriage of one or more of the polymorphisms studied here. These results highlight the possibility that these genetic traits can be useful to identify patients at risk for faster progression to AIDS or therapeutic failure. PMID:18855658

  5. Preparation, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong; Xiong, Tianqing; Wang, Tingting

    2014-02-01

    Porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts were synthesized by a multistep route, including a dealloying method to prepare porous Ag, a transformation from Ag to AgBr and AgBrI, and a photo-reduction process to form Ag nanoparticles on the surface of AgBr and AgBrI. It was found that the porous structure kept unchanged during Ag was transferred into AgBr, AgBrI, AgBr@Ag, and AgBrI@Ag. Both porous AgBr@Ag and porous AgBrI@Ag showed much higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than cubic AgBr@Ag for the degradation of methyl orange, which is because the interconnected pore channels not only provide more reactive sites but also favor the transportation of photo-generated electrons and holes. For AgBrI@Ag, AgBrI solid solution formed at the interface of AgBr and AgI, and the phase junction can effectively separate the photo-generated electrons and holes, favorable to the improvement of photocatalytic activity. The optimal I content for obtaining the highest activity is ∼10 at.%.

  6. Cellular and molecular requirements for the recall of IL-4-producing memory CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD27(-) T cells during protection induced by attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Dupeh R; Krzych, Urszula

    2002-03-01

    The requirements for maintenance of antigen (Ag)-specific memory T cells in protection to malaria is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated a recall of IL-4-producing memory CD4(+)CD45RO(+) T cells with parasitized red blood cells (pRBC) in persons protected by radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (gamma-spz). Using the CD27 marker, we have now identified two subsets of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) T cells: CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD27(+) T cells representing an early memory and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD27() T cells representing a terminally differentiated memory cells. A small subset of CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD27(-) T cells also expressed CD70, the CD27 ligand. The addition of anti-CD70 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to pRBC-stimulated cultures significantly inhibited the conversion of CD27(+) to CD27(-) subset without profoundly affecting IL-4 production. In contrast, the inclusion of anti-CD27 mAb in parallel cultures abrogated IL-4 production without interfering with conscription of T cells into the CD27(-) T cell set. We propose that the persistence of memory CD4(+) T cells depends on Ag-driven conscription of a mature memory phenotype through co-ligation of CD27 and CD70 expressed, respectively, on CD27(+) and CD27(-) T cells. Hence, protracted protection in malaria depends in part on memory CD4(+) T cells that require specific Ag presumably from the repositories of liver-and blood-stage antigens and the delivery of a second signal from the CD27:CD70 interaction. PMID:11857339

  7. Levels of human platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand depend on haplotypes of CD40LG-CD40-ITGA2

    PubMed Central

    Aloui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Fagan, Jocelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Chakroun, Tahar; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Increased circulating soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is commonly associated with inflammatory disorders. We aimed to investigate whether gene polymorphisms in CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 are associated with a propensity to secrete sCD40L; thus, we examined this issue at the level of human platelets, the principal source of sCD40L. We performed single polymorphism and haplotype analyses to test for the effect of twelve polymorphisms across the CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 genes in blood donors. ITGA2 presented a positive association with rs1126643, with a significant modification in sCD40L secretion (carriers of C allele, P = 0.02), unlike the investigated CD40LG and CD40 polymorphisms. One CD40LG haplotype (TGGC) showing rs975379 (C/T), rs3092952 (A/G), rs3092933 (A/G) and rs3092929 (A/C) was associated with increased sCD40L levels (1.906 μg/L (95% CI: 1.060 to 2.751); P = 0.000009). The sCD40L level was associated with the inter-chromosomal CD40LG/CD40/ITGA2 haplotype (ATC), displaying rs3092952 (A/G), rs1883832 (C/T) and rs1126643 (C/T), with increased sCD40L levels (P = 0.0135). Our results help to decipher the genetic role of CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 with regard to sCD40L levels found in platelet components. Given the crucial role of sCD40L, this haplotype study in a transfusion model may be helpful to further determine the role of haplotypes in inflammatory clinical settings. PMID:27094978

  8. Elliptic and triangular flow in p-Pb and peripheral Pb-Pb collisions from parton scatterings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bzdak, Adam; Ma, Guo-Liang

    2014-12-15

    Using a multiphase transport model (AMPT) we calculate the elliptic v₂ and triangular v₃ Fourier coefficients of the two-particle azimuthal correlation function in proton-nucleus (p-Pb) and peripheral nucleus-nucleus (Pb-Pb) collisions. Our results for v₃ are in a good agreement with the CMS data collected at the Large Hadron Collider. The v₂ coefficient is very well described in p-Pb collisions and is underestimated for higher transverse momenta in Pb-Pb interactions. The characteristic mass ordering of v₂ in p-Pb is reproduced, whereas for v₃, this effect is not observed. We further predict the pseudorapidity dependence of v₂ and v₃ in p-Pb andmore » observe that both are increasing when going from a proton side to a Pb-nucleus side. Predictions for the higher-order Fourier coefficients, v₄ and v₅, in p-Pb are also presented.« less

  9. The Role of Crop Cd Bioavailability in Potential for Transfer of Soil Cd Risk to Humans and Wildlife

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cd is a common contaminant in soils affected by mining and smelting of Zn, Pb, Cu and Ag ores and where biosolids, composts and manures are applied. Zn is usually present at 100-200 times higher concentrations than Cd. Because of this relationship of Cd and Zn in ores and contaminated soils, Zn is...

  10. Synchrotron Micro-XRF Mapping of Ag Storage in a Coastal Marine Diatom: Implications for Ag as a Novel Paleoproductivity Proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M. W.; Hendy, I. L.; Lai, B.

    2012-12-01

    Silver (Ag) has potential for use as a paleoproductivity proxy in environments where a high flux of organic matter creates reducing conditions in sediments. Its proposed sequestration under reducing conditions as the species Ag2S confers an advantage over the more conventional productivity proxy barite, which becomes unreliable when sulfate reduction occurs in sediments. Other conventional productivity proxies (organic carbon and biogenic silica) are subject to rapid remineralization during early diagenesis, whereas Ag is likely to be preserved. Prior studies have hinted that Ag may be delivered to sediments via diatom debris. However, whether Ag is primarily associated with the frustule silica matrix or with diatom organic matter has not been established, and hence the mechanism of Ag delivery to sediments remains ambiguous. In this study we investigated the location of Ag storage in diatoms using synchrotron micro-XRF to map Ag, along with Ca, P, S, Si, and Fe, in single cells of the coastal marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Diatoms were cultured in the laboratory with Ag added to the growth medium at 50 and 100 ppb. Samples were analyzed at the sub-micron scale at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Detectable Ag concentrations appear to be localized to intracellular "hotspots" that are not associated with frustule Si, either as part of the matrix or surface-adsorbed. Silver "hotspots" are co-localized with Fe, suggesting that Ag is stored within vacuoles, as recently shown for Fe in centric diatoms. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that Ag is delivered to sediments with diatom organic matter and suggest a common strategy by centric diatoms for intracellular sequestration of micronutrient (Fe) and nonessential (Ag) trace metals.

  11. One-step synthesis of size-tunable Ag nanoparticles incorporated in electrospun PVA/cyclodextrin nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Celebioglu, Asli; Aytac, Zeynep; Umu, Ozgun C O; Dana, Aykutlu; Tekinay, Turgay; Uyar, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    One-step synthesis of size-tunable silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) incorporated into electrospun nanofibers was achieved. Initially, in situ reduction of silver salt (AgNO3) to Ag-NP was carried out in aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Here, PVA was used as reducing agent and stabilizing polymer as well as electrospinning polymeric matrix for the fabrication of PVA/Ag-NP nanofibers. Afterwards, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) was used as an additional reducing and stabilizing agent in order to control size and uniform dispersion of Ag-NP. The size of Ag-NP was ∼8 nm and some Ag-NP aggregates were observed for PVA/Ag-NP nanofibers, conversely, the size of Ag-NP decreased from ∼8 nm down to ∼2 nm within the fiber matrix without aggregation were attained for PVA/HPβCD nanofibers. The PVA/Ag-NP and PVA/HPβCD/Ag-NP nanofibers exhibited surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Moreover, antibacterial properties of PVA/Ag-NP and PVA/HPβCD/Ag-NP nanofibrous mats were tested against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. PMID:24274573

  12. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. 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Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-05-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at , in the range and pseudorapidity in the proton-nucleon center-of-mass frame. For , the charged-particle production is asymmetric about , with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lower center-of-mass energies. The distribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with compared to expectations from the pp reference. The enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.

  13. Two-particle correlations in p-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Leonardo; Alice Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    The double ridge structure previously observed in Pb-Pb collisions has also been recently observed in high-multiplicity p-Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV. These systems show a long-range structure (large separation in Δη) at the near- (Δphiv ≊ 0) and away-side (Δphiv ≊ π) of the trigger particle. In order to understand the nature of this effect the two-particle correlation analysis has been extended to identified particles. Particles are identified up to transverse momentum pT values of 4 GeV/c using the energy loss signal in the Time Projection Chamber detector, complemented with the information from the Time of Flight detector. This measurement casts a new light on the potential collective (i.e. hydrodynamic) behaviour of particle production in p-Pb collisions.

  14. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  15. Productions of J/ψ mesons in p-Pb collisions at 5 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Hu; Lao, Hai-Ling; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-06-01

    The rapidity distributions of J/ψ mesons produced in proton-lead (p-Pb) collisions at center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair sNN = 5TeV are studied by using a multisource thermal model and compared with the experimental data of the LHCb and ALICE Collaborations. Correspondingly, the pseudorapidity distributions are accurately obtained from the parameters extracted from the rapidity distributions. At the same time, the transverse momentum distributions in the same experiments are described by the simplest Erlang distribution which is the folding result of two exponential distributions which are contributed by the target and projectile partons, respectively.

  16. Metal dispersion and mobility in soils from the Lik Zn-Pb-Ag massive sulphide deposit, NW Alaska: Environmental and exploration implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, K.D.; Kelley, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Lik deposit in northern Alaska is a largely unexposed shale-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag massive sulphide deposit that is underlain by continuous permafrost. Residual soils overlying the mineralized zone have element enrichments that are two to six times greater than baseline values. The most prominent elements are Ag, Mo, P, Se, Sr, V by total 4-acid digestion and Tl by a weak partial digestion (Enzyme Leach or EL) because they show multi-point anomalies that extend across the entire mineralized zone, concentration ranges are 0.5-2.6 ppm Ag, 4-26 ppm Mo, 0.1-0.3% P, 3-22 ppm Se, 90-230 ppm Sr, 170-406 ppm V, and 1.6-30 ppb Tl. Lead, Sb, and Hg are also anomalous (up to 178 ppm, 30 ppm, and 1.9 ppm, respectively), but all are characterized by single point anomalies directly over the mineralized zone, with only slightly elevated concentrations over the lower mineralized section. Zinc (total) has a consistent baseline response of 200 ppm, but it is not elevated in soils overlying the mineralized zone. However, Zn by EL shows a distinct single-point anomaly over the ore zone that suggests it was highly mobile and partly adsorbed on oxides or other secondary phases during weathering. In situ analyses (by laser ablation ICP-MS) of pyrite and sphalerite from drill core suggest that sphalerite is the primary residence for Ag, Cd, and Hg in addition to Zn, and pyrite contains As, Fe, Sb, and Tl. The level and degree of oxidation, and the proportion of reacting pyrite and carbonate minerals are two factors that affected the mobility and transport of metals. In oxidizing conditions, Zn is highly mobile relative to Hg and Ag, perhaps explaining the decoupling of Zn from the other sphalerite-hosted elements in the soils. Soils are acidic (to 3.9 pH) directly over the deposit due to the presence of acid-producing pyrite, but acid-neutralizing carbonate away from the mineralized zone yield soils that are near neutral. The soils therefore formed in a complex system involving oxidation and

  17. Refinement of the canine CD1 locus topology and investigation of antibody binding to recombinant canine CD1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Schjaerff, Mette; Keller, Stefan M; Fass, Joseph; Froenicke, Lutz; Grahn, Robert A; Lyons, Leslie; Affolter, Verena K; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Moore, Peter F

    2016-03-01

    CD1 molecules are antigen-presenting glycoproteins primarily found on dendritic cells (DCs) responsible for lipid antigen presentation to CD1-restricted T cells. Despite their pivotal role in immunity, little is known about CD1 protein expression in dogs, notably due to lack of isoform-specific antibodies. The canine (Canis familiaris) CD1 locus was previously found to contain three functional CD1A genes: canCD1A2, canCD1A6, and canCD1A8, where two variants of canCD1A8, canCD1A8.1 and canCD1A8.2, were assumed to be allelic variants. However, we hypothesized that these rather represented two separate genes. Sequencing of three overlapping bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) spanning the entire canine CD1 locus revealed canCD1A8.2 and canCD1A8.1 to be located in tandem between canCD1A7 and canCD1C, and canCD1A8.1 was consequently renamed canCD1A9. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused canine CD1 transcripts were recombinantly expressed in 293T cells. All proteins showed a highly positive GFP expression except for canine CD1d and a splice variant of canine CD1a8 lacking exon 3. Probing with a panel of anti-CD1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) showed that Ca13.9H11 and Ca9.AG5 only recognized canine CD1a8 and CD1a9 isoforms, and Fe1.5F4 mAb solely recognized canine CD1a6. Anti-CD1b mAbs recognized the canine CD1b protein, but also bound CD1a2, CD1a8, and CD1a9. Interestingly, Ca9.AG5 showed allele specificity based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located at position 321. Our findings have refined the structure of the canine CD1 locus and available antibody specificity against canine CD1 proteins. These are important fundamentals for future investigation of the role of canine CD1 in lipid immunity. PMID:26687789

  18. MoOx modified Ag anode for top-emitting organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jin; Jiang, XueYin; Zhang, ZhiLin

    2006-12-01

    Efficient top-emitting organic light-emitting devices (TOLEDs) using a thin MoOx layer modified Ag as the effective hole-injection anode are demonstrated. With tris-(8-hydroxy quinoline)aluminum as emitting layer and trilayer LiF /Al/Ag as semitransparent cathode, the Ag /MoOx based TOLED shows a tune-on voltage of 2.67V and a maximum current efficiency of 7.27cd/A, which are much better than those (3.92V, 6.12cd/A) obtained from Ag /Ag2O based TOLED and those (5.25V, 3.5cd/A) obtained from the corresponding bottom-emitting organic light-emitting devices. Contact potential difference measurement shows that the work function of Ag /MoOx is higher than those of Ag /Ag2O and ozone-treated indium tin oxide, leading to a stronger hole injection. The good performance of Ag /MoOx based TOLED is attributed to the efficient hole injection from the Ag /MoOx anode as well as a microcavity effect.

  19. Kinematic bias on centrality selection of jet events in pPb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armesto, Néstor; Gülhan, Doğa Can; Milhano, José Guilherme

    2015-07-01

    Centrality selection has been observed to have a large effect on jet observables in pPb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, stronger than that predicted by the nuclear modification of parton densities. We study to which extent simple considerations of energy-momentum conservation which link the hard process with the underlying event that provides the centrality estimator, affect jets observables in such collisions. We develop a simplistic approach that considers first the production of jets in a pp collision as described by PYTHIA. From each pp collision, the value of the energy of the parton from the proton participating in the hard scattering is extracted. Then, the underlying event is generated simulating a pPb collision through HIJING, but with the energy of the proton decreased according to the value extracted in the previous step, and both collisions are added. This model is able to capture the bulk of the centrality effect for central to semicentral collisions, for the two available sets of data: dijets from the CMS Collaboration and single jets from the ATLAS Collaboration. As expected, the model fails for peripheral collisions where very few nucleons from Pb participate.

  20. Positive selection of self-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells by hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hisakata; Shibata, Kensuke; Sakuraba, Koji; Fujimura, Kenjiro; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2013-08-01

    In contrast to thymic epithelial cells, which induce the positive selection of conventional CD8(+) T cells, hematopoietic cells (HCs) select innate CD8(+) T cells whose Ag specificity is not fully understood. Here we show that CD8(+) T cells expressing an H-Y Ag-specific Tg TCR were able to develop in mice in which only HCs expressed MHC class I, when HCs also expressed the H-Y Ag. These HC-selected self-specific CD8(+) T cells resemble innate CD8(+) T cells in WT mice in terms of the expression of memory markers and effector functions, but are phenotypically distinct from the thymus-independent CD8(+) T-cell population. The peripheral maintenance of H-Y-specific CD8(+) T cells required presentation of the self-Ag and IL-15 on HCs. HC-selected CD8(+) T cells in mice lacking the Tg TCR also showed these features. Furthermore, by using MHC class I tetramers with a male Ag peptide, we found that self-Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells in TCR non-Tg mice could develop via HC-induced positive selection, supporting results obtained from H-Y TCR Tg mice. These findings indicate the presence of self-specific CD8(+) T cells that are positively selected by HCs in the peripheral T-cell repertoire. PMID:23636825

  1. Characterization of CdS thin film in high efficient CdS/CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Miwa; Aramoto, Tetsuya; Ohyama, Hideaki; Hibino, Takeshi; Omura, Kuniyoshi

    2000-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin film is the most commonly used window material for high-efficient cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic devices. High-efficient CdS/CdTe solar cells have been developed using ultra-thin CdS films having a thickness of below 0.1 μm. CdS film is deposited on transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film coated glass substrates by the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, CdTe film is subsequently deposited by the close-spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. Finally, carbon and Ag-In electrodes are fabricated by the screen printing and sintering method. Cell performance depends primarily on the electrical and optical properties of CdS film, and hence we started to develop higher quality CdS film and found out clear differences between high- and low-quality CdS films from various analyses: SEM, AFM, SIMS, TDS and FT-IR. As a result of controlling qualities of CdS films, photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 10.5% has been achieved for a size of 1376 cm 2 of the solar module under air mass (AM) 1.5 conditions by the Japan Quality Assurance Organization (JQA).

  2. The Synthesis of Ag-Doped Mesoporous TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohong S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wang, Chong M.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-04-15

    Ag-doped mesoporous titanium oxide was prepared using non-ionic surfactants and easily handled titanium precursors, under mild reaction conditions. In contrast to the stabilizing effect of Cd-doping on mesoporous TiO2, Ag-doping was found to significantly destabilize the mesoporous structure.

  3. CD Recorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of CD (compact disc) recorders describes recording applications, including storing large graphic files, creating audio CDs, and storing material downloaded from the Internet; backing up files; lifespan; CD recording formats; continuous recording; recording software; recorder media; vulnerability of CDs; basic computer requirements; and…

  4. CD Rainbows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    Several papers have been published on the use of a CD as a grating for undergraduate laboratories and/or for high school and college class demonstrations. Four years ago "The Physics Teacher" had a spectacular cover picture showing emission spectrum as viewed through a CD with no coating. That picture gave the impetus to develop a system that can…

  5. The AgNORs.

    PubMed

    Derenzini, M

    2000-04-01

    The structure and the function of interphase AgNORs and the importance of the "AgNOR" parameter in tumor pathology have been reviewed. Interphase AgNORs are structural-functional units of the nucleolus in which all the components necessary for ribosomal RNA synthesis are located. Two argyrophilic proteins involved in rRNA transcription and processing, nucleolin and nucleophosmin, are associated with interphase AgNORs and are responsible for their stainability with silver methods, thus allowing interphase AgNORs to be visulaized at light microscopic level, also in routine cyto-histopathological preparations. The number of interphase AgNORs is strictly related to rRNA transcriptional activity and, in continuously proliferating cells, to the rapidity of cell proliferation. Evaluation of the quantitative distribution of interphase AgNORs has been applied in tumor pathology both for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. The "AgNOR" parameter has been proved to represent a reliable tool for defining the clinical outcome of cancer disease, being an independent prognostic factor in many types of tumors. PMID:10588056

  6. AgRISTARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    An introduction to the overall AgRISTARS program, a general statement on progress, and separate summaries of the activities of each project, with emphasis on the technical highlights are presented. Organizational and management information on AgRISTARS is included in the appendices, as is a complete bibliography of publication and reports.

  7. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-18

    We observed the collective behavior of hadronic particles in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In our work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. Moreover, the thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low pT direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2–3 in 0%–1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermalmore » photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.« less

  8. Aerosol formation by ozonolysis of α- and β-pinene with initial concentrations below 1 ppb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saathoff, Harald; Naumann, Karl-Heinz; Möhler, Ottmar

    2014-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are a large fraction of the tropospheric aerosol especially over tropical continental regions. The dominant SOA forming compounds are monoterpenes of which pinene is the most abundant. The reactions of monoterpenes with OH radicals, NO3 radicals, and ozone yield secondary organic aerosol mass in highly variable yields. Despite the various studies on SOA formation the influence of temperature and precursor concentrations on SOA yields are still major uncertainties in tropospheric aerosol models. In previous studies we observed a negative temperature dependence of SOA yields for SOA from ozonolysis α-pinene and limonene (Saathoff et al., 2009). However, this study as well as most of the literature data for measured SOA yields is limited to terpene concentrations of several ppb and higher (e.g. Bernard et al., 2012), hence about an order of magnitude higher than terpene concentrations even near their sources. Monoterpene concentrations in and above tropical or boral forests reach values up to a few tenth of a ppb during daytime decreasing rapidly with altitude in the boundary layer (Kesselmeier et al. 2000; Boy et al., 2004). Therefore we investigated the yield of SOA material from the ozonolysis of α- and β-pinene under simulated tropospheric conditions in the large aerosol chamber AIDA on time scales of several hours and for terpene concentrations between 0.1 and 1 ppb. The temperatures investigated were 243, 274, and 296 K with relative humidities ranging from 25% to 41%. The organic aerosol was generated by controlled oxidation with an excess of ozone (220-930 ppb) and the aerosol yield is calculated from size distributions measured with differential mobility analysers (SMPS, TSI, 3071 & 3080N) in the size range between 2 and 820 nm. On the basis of the measured initial particle size distribution, particle number concentration (CPC, TSI, 3775, 3776, 3022), and

  9. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry: on-line trace gas analysis at the ppb level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-11-01

    A system for trace gas analysis using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of analysis of breath taken from smokers and non-smokers as well as from patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver, and of air in buildings as well as of ambient air taken at a road crossing demonstrate the wide range of applicability of this method. An enhanced level of acetonitrile in the breath is a most suitable indicator that a person is a smoker. Enhanced levels of propanol strongly indicate that a person has a severe liver deficiency.

  10. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-19

    The collective behavior of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low p_{T} direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0%-1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems. PMID:26943529

  11. Transverse momentum dependence of inclusive primary charged-particle production in p-Pb collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.

    2014-09-01

    The transverse momentum ($p_{\\mathrm T}$) distribution of primary charged particles is measured at midrapidity in minimum-bias p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC in the range $0.15

  12. Dendritic Cell Migration and Antigen Presentation Are Coordinated by the Opposing Functions of the Tetraspanins CD82 and CD37.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eleanor L; Wee, Janet L; Demaria, Maria C; Blakeley, Jessica; Ho, Po Ki; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Villadangos, Jose A; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Hickey, Michael J; Hämmerling, Günther J; Wright, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    This study supports a new concept where the opposing functions of the tetraspanins CD37 and CD82 may coordinate changes in migration and Ag presentation during dendritic cell (DC) activation. We have previously published that CD37 is downregulated upon monocyte-derived DC activation, promotes migration of both skin and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), and restrains Ag presentation in splenic and BMDCs. In this article, we show that CD82, the closest phylogenetic relative to CD37, appears to have opposing functions. CD82 is upregulated upon activation of BMDCs and monocyte-derived DCs, restrains migration of skin and BMDCs, supports MHC class II maturation, and promotes stable interactions between T cells and splenic DCs or BMDCs. The underlying mechanism involves the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton via a differential activation of small GTPases. Both CD37(-/-) and CD82(-/-) BMDCs lack cellular projections, but where CD37(-/-) BMDCs spread poorly on fibronectin, CD82(-/-) BMDCs are large and spread to a greater extent than wild-type BMDCs. At the molecular level, CD82 is a negative regulator of RhoA, whereas CD37 promotes activation of Rac-1; both tetraspanins negatively regulate Cdc42. Thus, this study identifies a key aspect of DC biology: an unactivated BMDC is CD37(hi)CD82(lo), resulting in a highly motile cell with a limited ability to activate naive T cells. By contrast, a late activated BMDC is CD37(lo)CD82(hi), and thus has modified its migratory, cytoskeletal, and Ag presentation machinery to become a cell superbly adapted to activating naive T cells. PMID:26729805

  13. Jet production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured by ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Rosi; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Particle jets, formed when a hard scattered parton fragments into a jet of hadrons, are an ideal probe of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. The hard-scattered partons that produce them come from early in the collision, prior to the medium formation. These partons lose energy as they traverse the medium, and eventually fragment into jets of hadrons, which exhibit a modification when compared to jets produced in pp and p-Pb collisions. At LHC energies, the parton production cross-section is much larger than at RHIC, allowing jets to be reconstructed over a much wider kinematic range. Jet reconstruction allows for a more differential investigation of the parton energy loss than single hadrons, which have been used as jet proxies in the past, as the jets collect a larger percentage of the final state energy, which means their kinematics are more closely correlated to the kinematics of the initial parton. Jets are reconstructed in ALICE either using information from the tracking systems, or by combining this with the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). In these proceedings, jet spectra from 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb and pp collisions will be presented. In particular, the centrality and event-plane dependence of the measured spectra and the background will be discussed. Jets from different centrality classes and event-plane orientations provide additional information necessary for understanding the path-length and temperature dependence of energy loss mechanisms. The reconstruction and correction procedures for jets will be shown. Results from Pb-Pb events will be compared to the baseline pp and p-Pb results, which allows the initial state and cold nuclear matter effects to be disentangled from hot medium effects. The jet nuclear modification, which quantifies the suppression, will be compared to energy-loss models.

  14. Explore the high-density QCD medium via particle correlations in pPb collisions at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-15

    The observation of a long-range, near-side two-particle correlation (“ridge”) in very high multiplicity proton–proton and proton–lead collisions has opened up new opportunity of studying novel QCD phenomena in small collision systems. In 2013, high luminosity pPb data were collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. New results of two- and multi-particle correlations in pPb collisions from CMS are presented over a wide event multiplicity and transverse momentum range. A direct comparison of pPb and PbPb systems is provided. Physics implications, especially in the context of color glass condensate and hydrodynamics models are also discussed.

  15. Performance of Graphite Pastes Doped with Various Materials as Back Contact for CdS/CdTe Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafusa, Akira; Aramoto, Tetsuya; Morita, Akikatsu

    2001-12-01

    To date the problem of developing a suitable back contact for CdS/CdTe solar cells has yet to be resolved. The Cu-doped graphite paste that is widely used as a back contact is associated with degradation problems due to possible Cu diffusion across the CdS/CdTe junction. This study was designed to find ways to improve the graphite paste for superior electrical contacts. Mixtures of graphite paste with various material constituents and dopants consisting of silver-, lead-, nickel-, antimony-, bismuth-, or phosphor-based compounds, were studied. Results show that the performances of solar cells fabricated from these graphite pastes vary with the change in the composition. In the cases of Ag2Te and Ni2P, we studied their relationship with the solar cell characteristics with regard to dopant quantity, and furthermore in the case of Ag2Te, with regard to the sintering temperature of the graphite electrode. A fill factor (F.F.) of over 0.65 and efficiencies over 13% were obtained with Ag2Te, Ag3PO4, Ag2MoO4, and NiTe, and efficiencies over 12% were obtained with AgF, AgCl, Ni2P, and Ni3P.

  16. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition.

  17. Selective decrease of CD26 expression in T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, M V; Madueño, J A; Gonzalez, R; Jurado, R; Bachovchin, W W; Peña, J; Muñoz, E

    1992-11-01

    The decrease of CD4+ cells in AIDS patients is widely documented, although the selective loss within different subsets of CD4+ cells and the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are controversial. In the present report we have analyzed the proliferative response to Ag and mitogen of peripheral blood T lymphocytes from HIV-infected individuals, the phenotype profile of CD26+ and CD26- subset of cells and their infectivity by the HIV. The expression of CD26 Ag, either in CD4+ or CD8+ cells, was clearly diminished in all the patients tested. On the other hand, the expression of CD29 seems not to be affected, nevertheless T cells from these patients were unable to generate a proliferative response against soluble Ag. In 11 out of 13 patients, polymerase chain reaction studies demonstrated that the CD26- subset of CD4+ cells was the main reservoir for HIV-1 in infected individuals and HIV-1 virus preferentially infected in vitro CD4+/CD26- subpopulation. This capacity for preferential infectivity, together with the selective loss of cells expressing CD26 Ag, helps to explain the progressive impairment in the immune system of these patients and sheds new light on our understanding of the AIDS pathophysiology. PMID:1357035

  18. Ag Nanoparticle-Sensitized WO3 Hollow Nanosphere for Localized Surface Plasmon Enhanced Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Ji, Fangxu; Yin, Mingli; Ren, Xianpei; Ma, Qiang; Yan, Junqing; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2016-07-20

    Ag nanoparticle (NP)-sensitized WO3 hollow nanospheres (Ag-WO3-HNSs) are fabricated via a simple sonochemical synthesis route. It is found that the Ag-WO3-HNS shows remarkable performance in gas sensors. Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images reveal that the Agx-WO3 adopts the HNS structure in which WO3 forms the outer shell framework and the Ag NPs are grown on the inner wall of the WO3 hollow sphere. The size of the Ag NPs can be controlled by adjusting the addition amount of WCl6 during the reaction. The sensor Agx-WO3 exhibits extremely high sensitivity and selectivity toward alcohol vapor. In particular, the Ag(15nm)-WO3 sensor shows significantly lower operating temperature (230 °C), superior detection limits as low as 0.09 ppb, and faster response (7 s). Light illumination was found to boost the sensor performance effectively, especially at 405 and 900 nm, where the light wavelength resonates with the absorption of Ag NPs and the surface oxygen vacancies of WO3, respectively. The improved sensor performance is attributed to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect. PMID:27348055

  19. Evaluation testing of a portable vapor detector for Part-Per-Billion (PPB) level UDMH and N2H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Dan; Lueck, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    Trace level detection of hydrazine (N2H4), monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) has been receiving increased attention over the past several years. In May 1995 the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) lowered their acceptable threshold limit value (TLV) from 100 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 10 ppb. Several types of ppb-level detectors are being developed by the United States Air Force (USAF) Space and Missile Systems Center (SMSC). A breadboard version of a portable, lightweight hydrazine detection sensor was developed and produced by Giner Corp. for the USAF. This sensor was designed for ppb level UDMH and N2H4 vapor detection in near real-time. This instrument employs electrochemical sensing, utilizing a three electrode cell with an anion-exchange polymer electrolyte membrane as the only electrolyte in the system. The sensing, counter and reference electrodes are bonded to the membrane forming a single component. The only liquid required to maintain the sensor is deionized water which hydrates the membrane. At the request of the USAF SMSC, independent testing and evaluation of the breadboard instrument was performed at NASA's Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) for response to ppb-level N2H4 and UDMH and MMH. The TVDL, located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the unique ability to generate calibrated sample vapor streams of N2H4, UDMH, and MMH over a range from less than 10 ppb to thousands of parts per million (ppm) with full environmental control of relative humidity (0-90%) and temperature (0-50 C). The TVDL routinely performs these types of tests. Referenced sensors were subjected to extensive testing, including precision, linearity, response/recovery times, zero and span drift, humidity and temperature effects as well as ammonia interference. Results of these tests and general operation characteristics are reported.

  20. Pirquitasite, Ag2ZnSnS4

    PubMed Central

    Schumer, Benjamin N.; Downs, Robert T.; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Andrade, Marcelo B; Origlieri, Marcus J.

    2013-01-01

    Pirquitasite, ideally Ag2ZnSnS4 (disilver zinc tin tetra­sulfide), exhibits tetra­gonal symmetry and is a member of the stannite group that has the general formula A2BCX 4, with A = Ag, Cu; B = Zn, Cd, Fe, Cu, Hg; C = Sn, Ge, Sb, As; and X = S, Se. In this study, single-crystal X-ray diffraction data are used to determine the structure of pirquitasite from a twinned crystal from the type locality, the Pirquitas deposit, Jujuy Province, Argentina, with anisotropic displacement parameters for all atoms, and a measured composition of (Ag1.87Cu0.13)(Zn0.61Fe0.36Cd0.03)SnS4. One Ag atom is located on Wyckoff site Wyckoff 2a (symmetry -4..), the other Ag atom is statistically disordered with minor amounts of Cu and is located on 2c (-4..), the (Zn, Fe, Cd) site on 2d (-4..), Sn on 2b (-4..), and S on general site 8g. This is the first determination of the crystal structure of pirquitasite, and our data indicate that the space group of pirquitasite is I-4, rather than I-42m as previously suggested. The structure was refined under consideration of twinning by inversion [twin ratio of the components 0.91 (6):0.09 (6)]. PMID:23424398

  1. A wafer-level liquid cavity integrated amperometric gas sensor with ppb-level nitric oxide gas sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatty, Hithesh K.; Stemme, Göran; Roxhed, Niclas

    2015-10-01

    A miniaturized amperometric nitric oxide (NO) gas sensor based on wafer-level fabrication of electrodes and a liquid electrolyte chamber is reported in this paper. The sensor is able to detect NO gas concentrations of the order of parts per billion (ppb) levels and has a measured sensitivity of 0.04 nA ppb-1 with a response time of approximately 12 s. A sufficiently high selectivity of the sensor to interfering gases such as carbon monoxide (CO) and to ammonia (NH3) makes it potentially relevant for monitoring of asthma. In addition, the sensor was characterized for electrolyte evaporation which indicated a sensor operation lifetime allowing approximately 200 measurements.

  2. Summary of resources available to small water systems for meeting the 10 ppb arsenic drinking water limit.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Thomson, Bruce M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ziegler, Matt (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Susan (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Himmelberger, Heather (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2007-01-01

    With the lowering of the EPA maximum contaminant level of arsenic from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb, many public water systems in the country and in New Mexico in particular, are faced with making decisions about how to bring their system into compliance. This document provides detail on the options available to the water systems and the steps they need to take to achieve compliance with this regulation. Additionally, this document provides extensive resources and reference information for additional outreach support, financing options, vendors for treatment systems, and media pilot project results.

  3. T Cell-Extrinsic CD18 Attenuates Antigen-Dependent CD4+ T cell Activation In Vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingxin; Lahiri, Amit; Sarin, Ritu; Abraham, Clara

    2015-01-01

    The β2 integrins (CD11/CD18) are heterodimeric leukocyte adhesion molecules expressed on hematopoietic cells. The role of T cell-intrinsic CD18 in trafficking of naïve T cells to secondary lymphoid organs, and in antigen-dependent T cell activation in vitro and in vivo has been well-defined. However, the T cell-extrinsic role for CD18, including on antigen presenting cells (APC), in contributing to T cell activation in vivo is less well understood. We examined the role for T cell-extrinsic CD18 in the activation of WT CD4+ T cells in vivo through the adoptive transfer of DO11.10 Ag-specific CD4+ T cells into CD18−/− mice. We found that T cell-extrinsic CD18 was required for attenuating OVA-induced T cell proliferation in peripheral lymph nodes (PLN). The increased proliferation of WT DO11.10 CD4+ T cells in CD18−/− PLN was associated with a higher percentage of APC, and these APC demonstrated an increased activation profile and increased Ag-uptake, in particular in F4/80+ APC. Depletion of F4/80+ cells both reduced and equalized antigen-dependent T cell proliferation in CD18−/− relative to littermate control PLN, demonstrating that these cells play a critical role in the enhanced T cell proliferation in CD18−/− mice. Consistently, CD11b blockade, which is expressed on F4/80+ macrophages, enhanced the proliferation of DO11.10+ T cells in CD18+/− PLN. Thus, in contrast to the T cell-intrinsic essential role for CD18 in T cell activation, T cell-extrinsic expression of CD18 attenuates antigen-dependent CD4+ T cell activation in PLN in vivo. PMID:25801431

  4. Can iron oxides remove Cr(VI) from drinking water at sub-ppb levels?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaprara, Efthymia; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Samaras, Petros; Zouboulis, Anastasios; Mitrakas, Manassis

    2013-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has long been recognized as a potential carcinogen via inhalation, in contrast to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] which is 100 times less toxic and also a necessary nutrient, essential to human glucidic metabolism. Nowadays there is an increasing concern that Cr(VI) is also carcinogenic by the oral route of exposure, while an increased number of publications indicate that Cr(VI) is a common natural pollutant. Hexavalent chromium formation is attributed to natural oxidation of Cr(III) in ultramafic derived soils and ophiolithic rocks. To verify this theory, drinking water samples were collected from targeted areas of Greece e.g. areas in which the geological background is predominated by ultramafic minerals and the water supply depends mainly on groundwater resources. Valuable guide for the samples collection was the geological map of Greece and emphasis was given to regions where the natural occurrence of Cr(VI) is thought to be more possible. A wide range of Cr concentrations (2-100 μg/L) were detected in the areas studied, with most of them ranging below the current limit of 50 μg/L, and the Cr(VI) concentration being more than 90% of the total. Since the Cr(VI) affects significant part of population worldwide, a debate was established concerning the enforcement of stringent regulation, which also demands the drinking water treatment processes re-evaluation in view of Cr(VI) removal at sub-ppb level. In this regard, adsorption has evolved as the front line of defense for chromium removal. The motivation of this work was to investigate the efficiency of iron oxides for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from drinking water and its removal at sub-ppb levels. The adsorbents examined included iron oxy-hydroxides and magnetite prepared using common low cost iron salts. Their effectiveness as Cr(VI) adsorbents was evaluated through the decrease of a Cr(VI) concentration of 100μg/L prepared in NSF water at pH 7. Preliminary batch experiments did not

  5. Flow of strange and charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Zhoudunming

    2016-01-01

    Observation of a long-range near-side two-particle correlation (known as the“Ridge”) in high-multiplicity pPb and pp collisions opened up new opportunities of exploring novel QCD dynamics in small collision systems. Latest CMS results in pPb and PbPb collisions will be shown: (1) The multi-particle correlation in pPb collisions will be presented for the high multiplicity events, indicating the collective behavior in small collision systems. (2) Identified pT spectra of π+/π-, K+/K-, and p/p¯ in pPb collisions show a strong multiplicity dependence, which indicates radial flow at high multiplicity events. (3) The second-order anisotropy harmonics (v2) of strange particle K0s and Λ/Λ¯ are extracted from long-range correlations as a function of particle multiplicity and pT. The mass ordering effect of vn at low pT as predicted by hydrodynamics also points to the strong collective nature of expanding medium in small collision systems. Finally, the possible constituent quark number of scaling of v2 between mesons and baryons may indicate the deconfinement in small systems.

  6. Advances in Instrumentation for Quantification of Isotopic Nitrous Oxide from ppb levels to 100%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, F.; Gupta, M.; Leen, J.; Provencal, R. A.; Owano, T. G.; Baer, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic composition of trace gases provides information of their origin and fate that cannot be determined from their concentration measurements alone. Biological source and loss processes, like bacterial production of nitrous oxide, are typically accompanied by isotopic selectivity associated with the kinetics of bond formation and destruction. Of the three important biologically mediated greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O), the understanding of nitrous oxide isotopic budget in air lags behind the other two gases primarily due to the relatively low concentration of N2O in ambient air (~320 ppb). Furthermore, the origin of nitrates in rivers, lakes, ocean and other water supplies may be determined from analyses of isotopic nitrous oxide produced via chemical reduction or biological conversion. These processes can produce nitrous oxide at levels considerably greater than those present in ambient air. To date, analyses of isotopic nitrous oxide requires either pre-concentration of samples containing low concentrations or dilution of samples with high concentrations. We report significant advances of instrumentation for real-time measurements of site-specific isotopic nitrogen (δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ15N, δ18O) and mixing ratio [N2O] of nitrous oxide over a very wide range of mole fractions in air. Specifically, LGR's Isotopic N2O Analyzer can report site-specific isotopic nitrogen and isotopic oxygen continuously in flows ranging from 0.2 to over 20 ppm (parts per million) nitrous oxide in air (with preconcentration or dilution). Furthermore, for samples of limited volume, a batch technique may be used for similar isotopic measurements in discrete samples containing 0.2 ppm to 100% nitrous oxide (e.g., sample volumes from bacterial digestion can be as little as 1-10 mL). This novel technology, which employs cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) and a mid-infrared laser (4.56 microns) and does not require any cryogenic components, has been

  7. Raman gas sensing of modified Ag nanoparticle SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myoung, NoSoung; Yoo, Hyung Keun; Hwang, In-Wook

    2014-03-01

    Recent progress in modified Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) using Ag nanoparticles makes them promising optical technique for direct gas sensing of interest. However, SERS has been shown to provide sub ppb level detection of the compounds in the vapor phase. The major problem with the sensitivity scaling-up was in the development of fabrication technology for stability and reproducibility of SERS substrates. We report an optimization of 1-propanethiol coated multiple Ag nanoparticle layers on SiO2 substrate as well as new records of real-time, simultaneous vapor phase detection of toluene and 1-2 dichlorobenzene by the radiation of fiber optic coupled 785 nm diode laser and spectrograph. Multiple depositions of Ag NPs were loaded on SiO2 and soaked in 1-propanethiol solution for 24 hours to modify the surface into hydrophobic due to the characteristics of vapor phase of our interests. Raman bands at 1003 cm-1 and 1130 cm-1 for toluene and 12DCB, respectively were compared to 1089 cm-1 and each gas concentration in 1000 mL flask were calculated as a function of each vapor phase ratio. The saturation of toluene and 12DCB were limited only by 800 ppm and the detectable range was 0.6-800 ppm.

  8. Heavy-flavour production in high-energy d-Au and p-Pb collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraudo, Andrea; De Pace, Arturo; Monteno, Marco; Nardi, Marzia; Prino, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Soft-hadron measurements in high-energy collisions of small systems like p-Pb and d-Au show peculiar qualitative features (long-range rapidity correlations, flattening of the p T -spectra with increasing hadron mass and centrality, non-vanishing Fourier harmonics in the azimuthal particle distributions) suggestive of the formation of a strongly-interacting medium displaying a collective behaviour, with a hydrodynamic flow as a response to the pressure gradients in the initial conditions. Hard observables (high- p T jet and hadron spectra) on the other hand, within the current large systematic uncertainties, appear only midly modified with the respect to the benchmark case of minimum-bias p-p collisions. What should one expect for heavy-flavour particles, initially produced in hard processes but tending, in the nucleus-nucleus case, to approach kinetic equilibrium with the rest of the medium? This is the issue we address in the present study, showing how the current experimental findings are compatible with a picture in which the formation of a hot medium even in proton-nucleus collisions modifies the propagation and hadronization of heavy-flavour particles.

  9. Quarkonium shadowing in pPb and Pb+Pb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R

    2007-05-21

    The d+Au data from RHIC, including the pA results from the fixed-target CERN SPS pA data, suggest increased importance of initial-state shadowing and decreasing nuclear absorption with increasing energy. This is not surprising since smaller x is probed at higher energy while absorption due to multiple scattering is predicted to decrease with energy. The CERN SPS data suggest a J/{psi} absorption cross section of about 4 mb without shadowing, and a larger absorption cross section if it is included since the SPS x range is in the antishadowing region. The d+Au RHIC data support smaller absorption, {sigma}{sup J/{psi}}{sub abs} {approx} 0-2 mb. Thus our predictions for J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production in pPb and Pb+Pb interactions at the LHC are shown for initial-state shadowing alone with no absorption or dense matter effects. We note that including absorption would only move the calculated ratios down in proportion to the absorption survival probability since, at LHC energies, any rapidity dependence of absorption is at very large |y|, outside the detector acceptance.

  10. Approaching the ppb detection limits for copper in water using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Walid; Sawaf, Sausan

    2014-05-01

    Copper concentrations in drinking-water is very important to be monitored which can cause cancer if it exceed about 10 mg/liter. In the present work, we have developed a simple, low laser power method to improve the detection limits of laser induced plasma spectroscopy LIBS for copper in aqueous solutions with different concentrations. In this method a medium density fiberboard (MDF) wood have been used as a substrate that absorbs the liquid sample to transform laser liquid interaction to laser solid interaction. Using the fundamental wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, the constructed plasma emissions were monitored for elemental analysis. The signal-to-noise ratio SNR was optimized using low laser fluence of 32 J cm-2, and detector (CDD camera) gate delay of 0.5 μs. Both the electron temperature and density of the induced plasma were determined using Boltzmann plot and the FWHM of the Cu at 324.7 nm, respectively. The plasma temperature was found to be 1.197 eV, while the plasma density was about 1.66 x 1019 cm-3. The detection limits for Cu at 324.7 nm is found to be 131 ppb comparable to the results by others using complicated system.

  11. A HPLC method for the quantification of butyramide and acetamide at ppb levels in hydrogeothermal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Earl D. Mattson; Jessica E. Little

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative analytical method to determine butyramide and acetamide concentrations at the low ppb levels in geothermal waters has been developed. The analytes are concentrated in a preparation step by evaporation and analyzed using HPLC-UV. Chromatographic separation is achieved isocratically with a RP C-18 column using a 30 mM phosphate buffer solution with 5 mM heptane sulfonic acid and methanol (98:2 ratio) as the mobile phase. Absorbance is measured at 200 nm. The limit of detection (LOD) for BA and AA were 2.0 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 2.5 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for BA and AA were 5.7 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 7.7 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively, at the detection wavelength of 200 nm. Attaining these levels of quantification better allows these amides to be used as thermally reactive tracers in low-temperature hydrogeothermal systems.

  12. Longitudinal Requirement for CD4+ T Cell Help for Adenovirus Vector–Elicited CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Borducchi, Erica N.; McNally, Anna; Parenteau, Lily R.; Kaufman, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of replication-incompetent recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vectors as candidate vaccine platforms, the mechanism by which these vectors elicit CD8+ T cell responses remains poorly understood. Our data demonstrate that induction and maintenance of CD8+ T cell responses by Ad vector immunization is longitudinally dependent on CD4+ T cell help for a prolonged period. Depletion of CD4+ T cells in wild type mice within the first 8 d following Ad immunization resulted in dramatically reduced induction of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells, decreased T-bet and eomesodermin expression, impaired KLRG1+ effector differentiation, and atypical expression of the memory markers CD127, CD27, and CD62L. Moreover, these CD8+ T cells failed to protect against a lethal recombinant Listeria monocytogenes challenge. Depletion of CD4+ T cells between weeks 1 and 4 following immunization resulted in increased contraction of memory CD8+ T cells. These data demonstrate a prolonged temporal requirement for CD4+ T cell help for vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cell responses in mice. These findings have important implications in the design of vaccines aimed at eliciting CD8+ T cell responses and may provide insight into the impaired immunogenicity of vaccines in the context of AIDS and other CD4+ T cell immune deficiencies. PMID:24778441

  13. Ag-Modified In₂O₃/ZnO Nanobundles with High Formaldehyde Gas-Sensing Performance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Bai, Lu; Song, Dongsheng; Yang, Hongping; Sun, Xiaoming; Sun, Hongyu; Zhu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles with micro/nano porous structures have been designed and synthesized with by hydrothermal method continuing with dehydration process. Each bundle consists of nanoparticles, where nanogaps of 10-30 nm are present between the nanoparticles, leading to a porous structure. This porous structure brings high surface area and fast gas diffusion, enhancing the gas sensitivity. Consequently, the HCHO gas-sensing performance of the Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles have been tested, with the formaldehyde-detection limit of 100 ppb (parts per billion) and the response and recover times as short as 6 s and 3 s, respectively, at 300 °C and the detection limit of 100 ppb, response time of 12 s and recover times of 6 s at 100 °C. The HCHO sensing detect limitation matches the health standard limitation on the concentration of formaldehyde for indoor air. Moreover, the strategy to synthesize the nanobundles is just two-step heating and easy to scale up. Therefore, the Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles are ready for industrialization and practical applications. PMID:26287205

  14. Growth of CdS Nanorods and Deposition of Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Yang, Fanghong; Yang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Systematic investigations have been done to deposit silver nanoparticles on seeded CdS nanorods. The CdS nanorods were synthesized by using CdS nanocrystals as seeds being indexed to the cubic structure (zinc-blende) and tetradecylphosphonic acid as surfactants to enable preferential growth on the reactive {001} facets. Ostwald ripening process occurred during the growth of CdS nanorods. Ag/CdS heterostructures were obtained through a facile method in which oleylamine was employed as reducing agents under an elevated temperature. Exposing CdS nanorods to Ag+ ions resulted in Ag domains depositing on the tips of the nanorods or defected sites embedding in the nanorod surfaces. Ag domains formed separate nuclei and grew quickly at a high concentration of AgNO3 solution. We further focused on discussing the morphology formation mechanism and optical properties of the heterostructures and the nanorods. The as-synthesized Ag/CdS heterostructures can facilitate charge separation at the metal-semiconductor interface. Herein, it opens up an application possibility of enhancing photocatalytic processes and other devices. PMID:26505026

  15. Fabrication and characterization of a α,β,γ,δ-Tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphine/silica nanocomposite thin-layer membrane for detection of ppb-level heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Latt, Kyaing Kyaing; Takahashi, Yukiko

    2011-03-01

    A new detection membrane for filtration enrichment combined with colorimetric determination of Cd(II), Zn(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions is presented. We have demonstrated the use of a dye nanoparticle coated test strip (DNTS) structured with a reagent layer for on-site analysis of trace metal ions. In this study, a [TMPyP/SA] DNTS coated with a nanocomposite layer (average thickness: 5.39 μm) of α,β,γ,δ-Tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphine (TMPyP) and silica-SA on the top surface of a cellulose ester membrane filter was fabricated by a simple filtration of an aqueous TMPyP/silica-SA nanocomposite dispersion through a membrane filter. The nanocomposite formation of cationic TMPyP and negatively charged colloidal SA (9-80 nm) was based on electrostatic interaction and was confirmed in the 120-800 nm diameter range by a dynamic light scattering photometer (DLS). To optimize the DNTS nanocomposite layer, surface uniformity, mechanical strength, the percent retention of TMPyP, and sensitivity to Cd(II) detection for six DNTSs with five different types of silica were examined. A half[TMPyP/SA] DNTS with an average layer thickness of 2.60 μm, which was prepared by controlling the amount of TMPyP and SA, demonstrated the highest sensitivity to Cd(II) ion because it had the lowest background absorbance. In addition, factors that affected the percent retention of TMPyP, such as pH and TMPyP/SA ratio, were determined. More than 99% of the TMPyP was retained on a membrane filter at pH 7.8 with a TMPyP and SA concentration of 2 × 10(-5) M and 4 × 10(-5) wt%, respectively. Filtration enrichment of 100mL of an aqueous solution containing Cd(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) at ppb levels was achieved by concentrating the metal ions in a nanocomposite layer (the effective TMPyP area was 1.77 cm(2), pH 10.2). The signaling surface changed from a brown color to green when the ions were captured. The percent extraction for metal ions on a half[TMPyP/SA] DNTS were estimated by TLC

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Salmonid CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maisey, Kevin; Montero, Ruth; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Valenzuela, Beatriz; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Sandino, Ana María; Zou, Jun; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Imarai, Mónica

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the isolation and functional characterization of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CD4-1(+) T cells and the establishment of an IL-15-dependent CD4-1(+) T cell line. By using Abs specific for CD4-1 and CD3ε it was possible to isolate the double-positive T cells in spleen and head kidney. The morphology and the presence of transcripts for T cell markers in the sorted CD4-1(+)CD3ε(+) cells were studied next. Cells were found to express TCRα, TCRβ, CD152 (CTLA-4), CD154 (CD40L), T-bet, GATA-3, and STAT-1. The sorted CD4-1(+) T cells also had a distinctive functional attribute of mammalian T lymphocytes, namely they could undergo Ag-specific proliferation, using OVA as a model Ag. The OVA-stimulated cells showed increased expression of several cytokines, including IFN-γ1, IL-4/13A, IL-15, IL-17D, IL-10, and TGF-β1, perhaps indicating that T cell proliferation led to differentiation into distinct effector phenotypes. Using IL-15 as a growth factor, we have selected a lymphoid cell line derived from rainbow trout head kidney cells. The morphology, cell surface expression of CD4-1, and the presence of transcripts of T cell cytokines and transcription factors indicated that this is a CD4-1(+) T cell line. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the presence of CD4-1(+)CD3ε(+) T cells in salmonids. As in mammals, CD4-1(+) T cells may be the master regulators of immune responses in fish, and therefore these findings and the new model T cell line developed will contribute to a greater understanding of T cell function and immune responses in teleost fish. PMID:27053758

  17. Optimized core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles for label-free Raman determination of trace Rhodamine B with cancer risk in food product.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Guo, Xiaoyu; Fu, Shuyue; Yang, Tianxi; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-12-01

    A simple and reliable method based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with a portable Raman system is described for sensitive determination of trace levels of Rhodamine B (RB) in hot sauce samples. The sodium salt of phytic acid (IP6) stabilized Au@Ag core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles are constructed and used as SERS substrate, yielding high Raman enhancement of RB. The limit of detection for RB in water is 5 nM (2 ppb), which is below China Exit and Entry Inspection and Quarantine Bureau's tolerance level of 5 ppb. Also, the proposed easy assay of IP6-Au@Ag NPs combining with portable Raman system could be applied for on-site monitoring RB in hot sauce. PMID:26041175

  18. Results from particle identification in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, F.

    2014-06-01

    The particle identification capability of the ALICE apparatus is unique among the LHC experiments as it exploits almost all known techniques. In this paper, the working principles of the relevant PID detectors in the central barrel will be discussed. A particular emphasis will be given to recent results on identified particle spectra and production yield ratios at mid-rapidity in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions.

  19. Probing novel long-range correlation phenomena in pPb collisions with identified particles at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenyu; CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Observation of a long-range near-side two-particle correlation (known as the ”Ridge”) in high-multiplicity pp and pPb collisions opened up new opportunities of exploring novel QCD dynamics in small collision systems. To further investigate the origin of this phenomenon, studies of two-particle correlations with identified K0s and Λ/\\barΛ trigger particles in 5.02 TeV pPb collisions are presented, and compared to PbPb collisions over a similar multiplicity range. The K0s and Λ/\\barΛ are cleanly reconstructed via their secondary decay vertices over a wide pseudorapidity and transverse momentum range. The second-order anisotropy harmonics (v2) of K0s and Λ/\\barΛ are extracted from long-range correlations as a function of particle multiplicity and pT. The wide pT coverage and rich sample of high multiplicity pPb events allow: (1) a precise examination of the mass ordering effect of vn at low pT as predicted by hydrodynamics for a collectively expanding medium; (2) exploration of possible constituent quark number scaling of v2 between mesons and baryons as was observed in high-energy nucleus- nucleus collisions.

  20. Suppression of ψ(2S) production in p-Pb collisions at = 5 .02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The ALICE Collaboration has studied the inclusive production of the charmonium state ψ(2S) in proton-lead (p-Pb) collisions at the nucleon-nucleon centre of mass energy = 5.02 TeV at the CERN LHC. The measurement was performed at forward (2 .03 < y cms < 3 .53) and backward (-4 .46 < y cms < -2 .96) centre of mass rapidities, studying the decays into muon pairs. In this paper, we present the inclusive production cross sections σ ψ(2S), both integrated and as a function of the transverse momentum p T, for the two y cms domains. The results are compared to those obtained for the 1S vector state (J/ ψ), by showing the ratios between the production cross sections, as well as the double ratios [ σ ψ(2S) /σ J /ψ ]pPb /[ σ ψ(2S) /σ J/ ψ ]pp between p-Pb and proton-proton collisions. Finally, the nuclear modification factor for inclusive ψ(2S) is evaluated and compared to the measurement of the same quantity for J/ ψ and to theoretical models including parton shadowing and coherent energy loss mechanisms. The results show a significantly larger suppression of the ψ(2S) compared to that measured for J/ ψ and to models. These observations represent a clear indication for sizeable final state effects on ψ(2S) production. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Multiplicity dependence of the average transverse momentum in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, F.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Elwood, B. G.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.

    2013-12-01

    The average transverse momentum versus the charged-particle multiplicity Nch was measured in p-Pb collisions at a collision energy per nucleon-nucleon pair √{sNN}=5.02 TeV and in pp collisions at collision energies of √{s}=0.9,2.76, and 7 TeV in the kinematic range 0.15p-Pb collisions, a strong increase of with Nch is observed, which is much stronger than that measured in Pb-Pb collisions. For pp collisions, this could be attributed, within a model of hadronizing strings, to multiple-parton interactions and to a final-state color reconnection mechanism. The data in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions cannot be described by an incoherent superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions and pose a challenge to most of the event generators.

  2. Controllable synthesis of metal selenide heterostructures mediated by Ag2Se nanocrystals acting as catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiangcong; Huang, Feng; Xu, Ju; Wang, Yuansheng

    2013-10-21

    Ag2Se nanocrystals were demonstrated to be novel semiconductor mediators, or in other word catalysts, for the growth of semiconductor heterostructures in solution. This is a result of the unique feature of Ag2Se as a fast ion conductor, allowing foreign cations to dissolve and then to heterogrow the second phase. Using Ag2Se nanocrystals as catalysts, dimeric metal selenide heterostructures such as Ag2Se-CdSe and Ag2Se-ZnSe, and even multi-segment heterostructures such as Ag2Se-CdSe-ZnSe and Ag2Se-ZnSe-CdSe, were successfully synthesized. Several interesting features were found in the Ag2Se based heterogrowth. At the initial stage of heterogrowth, a layer of the second phase forms on the surface of an Ag2Se nanosphere, with a curved junction interface between the two phases. With further growth of the second phase, the Ag2Se nanosphere tends to flatten the junction surface by modifying its shape from sphere to hemisphere in order to minimize the conjunct area and thus the interfacial energy. Notably, the crystallographic relationship of the two phases in the heterostructure varies with the lattice parameters of the second phase, in order to reduce the lattice mismatch at the interface. Furthermore, a small lattice mismatch at the interface results in a straight rod-like second phase, while a large lattice mismatch would induce a tortuous product. The reported results may provide a new route for developing novel selenide semiconductor heterostructures which are potentially applicable in optoelectronic, biomedical, photovoltaic and catalytic fields. PMID:24056899

  3. Activation of cord T lymphocytes. IV. Analysis of surface expression and functional role of 1F7 (CD26) molecule.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Muscat, C; Ercolani, R; Bistoni, O; Tognellini, R; Mariggió, M A; Spinozzi, F; Bertotto, A

    1994-04-15

    A role for CD26 surface antigen (Ag) in both CD3- and CD2-mediated T cell activation has been previously demonstrated. To analyze the functional role of CD26 in the CD3- and CD2-induced activation pathways of cord T cells, which represent the most reliable source of Ag-unprimed T cells, we employed a newly developed anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody, termed anti-1F7, anti-CD3 and anti-CD2 in activating T lymphocytes. The results showed that CD26 Ag is expressed on the surface of almost all resting cord T cells and that its fluorescence intensity is enhanced by activation. The binding of anti-1F7 induced a decrease in CD26 membrane expression, with no detectable effect on the surface expression of other cord T cell-related molecules. Moreover, the modulation of CD26 resulted in an increase in anti-CD3-mediated cord T cell activation through an enhancement in intracellular calcium levels, IL-2 receptor expression, and IL-2 synthesis, whereas it had no effect on cord T cell activation induced by anti-CD2 or anti-CD2 plus exogenous IL-2. The fact that the selective involvement of CD26 in the activation pathway triggered by anti-CD3, but not anti-CD2, could be reversed by prior stimulation of cord T cells with anti-CD3 suggests that this functional feature, which resembles that of mature thymocytes, may be linked to the Ag-unprimed cell phenotype of cord T lymphocytes. PMID:7909498

  4. Antigen targeting reveals splenic CD169+ macrophages as promoters of germinal center B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Veninga, Henrike; Borg, Ellen G F; Vreeman, Kyle; Taylor, Philip R; Kalay, Hakan; van Kooyk, Yvette; Kraal, Georg; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; den Haan, Joke M M

    2015-03-01

    Ag delivery to specific APCs is an attractive approach in developing strategies for vaccination. CD169(+) macrophages in the marginal zone of the spleen represent a suitable target for delivery of Ag because of their strategic location, which is optimal for the capture of blood-borne Ag and their close proximity to B cells and T cells in the white pulp. Here we show that Ag targeting to CD169(+) macrophages in mice resulted in strong, isotype-switched, high-affinity Ab production and the preferential induction and long-term persistence of Ag-specific GC B cells and follicular Th cells. In agreement with these observations, CD169(+) macrophages retained intact Ag, induced cognate activation of B cells, and increased expression of costimulatory molecules upon activation. In addition, macrophages were required for the production of cytokines that promote B-cell responses. Our results identify CD169(+) macrophages as promoters of high-affinity humoral immune responses and emphasize the value of CD169 as target for Ag delivery to improve vaccine responses. PMID:25487358

  5. Efficacy evaluation of two synthetic lysine lipidated tripeptides as vaccine adjuvants against HBsAg.

    PubMed

    Sidiq, Tabasum; Khajuria, Anamika; Shafi, Syed; Ismail, Tabasum; Sampath Kumar, Halmathur; Kannappa Srinivas, Vellimedu; Krishna, Ella; Kamal Johri, Rakesh

    2013-04-01

    In the present investigation, adjuvant potential of two novel lipidated tripeptide lysine derivatives (KKSM and KKSMB) was evaluated using various in vitro and animal-derived models of humoral and cell-mediated immune events in response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The results were compared with alum adjuvanted with HBsAg. Both these molecules were found to stimulate anti-HBsAg IgG and neutralizing (IgG1 and IgG2a) antibody titres in mice sera. The two molecules stimulated the proliferation of T-lymphocyte sub-sets (CD4/CD8) as well as the production of soluble mediators of Th1 (IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th2 response (IL-4) in spleen cell culture supernatant. Furthermore, the two lipidated tripeptides enhanced the CD4, CD8, CD3 and CD19 cell populations as well as CD4/CD8 derived IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and TNF-α in whole blood of treated mice. There was found to be the significant enhancement in the release of IL-12, IFN-γ and nitrite content in macrophage supernatant. Moreover, the two lipidated tripeptides enhanced the population of CD80 and CD86 in spleen-derived macrophages and did not show any hemolytic effect on rabbit RBCs. Taken together, these results suggest that both these molecules are the potent enhancers of anti-HBsAg immune response via augmenting Th1/Th2 response in a dose dependent manner. PMID:23474022

  6. PIXE analysis of heavy metals in water at sub-ppb levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, R.; Ghermandi, G.; Calvelli, G.; Mittner, P.

    1986-04-01

    In order to determine the metal concentrations in natural water, we have used a preconcentration technique based on the extraction of the metals as carbamates and we have studied the treatment of large sample volumes (300-500 cm 3) for checking the capability of this method in low concentrations PIXE measurements. In analysis of solutions containing 1000, 500, 100, 50 and 10 {pg}/{cm 3} (ppt) of Fe, Co, Ni. Cu, Cd, Hg and Pb and Pd as internal standard, we have obtained a linear behaviour of the experimental results versus the nominal concentrations. The detection limits should permit PIXE application in measuring the amount of metal in sea water samples.

  7. Freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ precursors to novel AgBr/AgCl-Ag hybrid nanocrystals for visible-light-driven photodegradation of organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deliang; Chen, Qianqian; Zhang, Wenjie; Ge, Lianfang; Shao, Gang; Fan, Bingbing; Lu, Hongxia; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Daoyuan; Shao, Guosheng

    2015-04-01

    AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals with various molar Br-to-Ag ratios (RBr/Ag = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 1) and different photoreduction times (0-20 min) were synthesized via stepwise liquid-solid reactions using the freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ hybrid as the Ag source, followed by a photoreduction reaction. The AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals obtained take on a spherical morphology with a particle-size range of 58 ± 15 nm. The photocatalytic performance of AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals was evaluated by photodegrading organic dyes, 4-chlorophenol and isopropanol under artificial visible light (λ ⩾ 420 nm, 100 mW cm-2). For the decomposition of rhodamine B, the AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals has a photodegradation rate of ∼0.87 min-1, ∼159 times higher than that (∼0.0054 min-1) of TiO2 (P25), whereas the AgCl-Ag and AgBr-Ag nanocrystals have photodegradation rates of 0.35 min-1 and 0.45 min-1, respectively. The efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the ternary system consisting of AgBr, AgCl and Ag species plays a key role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance.

  8. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4+ T cell responses requires antigen presentation by CD8α− conventional dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhoujie; Dahlin, Joakim S.; Xu, Hui; Heyman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    IgE, forming an immune complex with small proteins, can enhance the specific antibody and CD4+ T cell responses in vivo. The effects require the presence of CD23 (Fcε-receptor II)+ B cells, which capture IgE-complexed antigens (Ag) in the circulation and transport them to splenic B cell follicles. In addition, also CD11c+ cells, which do not express CD23, are required for IgE-mediated enhancement of T cell responses. This suggests that some type of dendritic cell obtains IgE-Ag complexes from B cells and presents antigenic peptides to T cells. To elucidate the nature of this dendritic cell, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE and OVA, and different populations of CD11c+ cells, obtained from the spleens four hours after immunization, were tested for their ability to present OVA. CD8α− conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) were much more efficient in inducing specific CD4+ T cell proliferation ex vivo than were CD8α+ cDCs or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Thus, IgE-Ag complexes administered intravenously are rapidly transported to the spleen by recirculating B cells where they are delivered to CD8α− cDCs which induce proliferation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:27306570

  9. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4(+) T cell responses requires antigen presentation by CD8α(-) conventional dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhoujie; Dahlin, Joakim S; Xu, Hui; Heyman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    IgE, forming an immune complex with small proteins, can enhance the specific antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses in vivo. The effects require the presence of CD23 (Fcε-receptor II)(+) B cells, which capture IgE-complexed antigens (Ag) in the circulation and transport them to splenic B cell follicles. In addition, also CD11c(+) cells, which do not express CD23, are required for IgE-mediated enhancement of T cell responses. This suggests that some type of dendritic cell obtains IgE-Ag complexes from B cells and presents antigenic peptides to T cells. To elucidate the nature of this dendritic cell, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE and OVA, and different populations of CD11c(+) cells, obtained from the spleens four hours after immunization, were tested for their ability to present OVA. CD8α(-) conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) were much more efficient in inducing specific CD4(+) T cell proliferation ex vivo than were CD8α(+) cDCs or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Thus, IgE-Ag complexes administered intravenously are rapidly transported to the spleen by recirculating B cells where they are delivered to CD8α(-) cDCs which induce proliferation of CD4(+) T cells. PMID:27306570

  10. Ag K- and L3-edge XAFS study on Ag species in Ag/Ga2O3 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yamamoto, N.; Nomoto, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, H.; Yagi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Ag loaded Ga2O3 (Ag/Ga2O3) shows photocatalytic activity for reduction of CO2 with water. Ag L3-edge XANES and K-edge EXAFS spectra were measured for various Ag/Ga2O3 samples, which suggested that structural and chemical states of Ag species varied with the loading amount of Ag and the preparation method. The Ag species were metallic Ag particles with an AgGaO2-like interface structure in the sample with high loading amount of Ag while predominantly Ag metal clusters in the sample with low loading amount of Ag. The XANES feature just above the edge represented the interaction between the Ag species and the Ga2O3 surface, showing that the Ag metal clusters had more electrons in the d-orbitals by interacting with the Ga2O3 surface, which would contribute the high photocatalytic activity.

  11. AGS experiments -- 1995, 1996 and 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.; Presti, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains (1) FY 1995 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; (3) FY 1997 AGS schedule as run; (4) FY 1998--1999 AGS schedule (proposed); (5) AGS beams 1997; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program; (9) AGS experimental area FY 1998--1999 physics program (proposed); (10) a listing of experiments by number; (11) two-page summaries of each experiment, in order by number; and (12) listing of publications of AGS experiments.

  12. AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993. Tenth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments {ge} FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments.

  13. Destabilization of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) by adsorbed sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Russell, Selena M.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2011-10-17

    Sulfur accelerates coarsening of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) at 300 K, and this effect is enhanced with increasing sulfur coverage over a range spanning a few hundredths of a monolayer, to nearly 0.25 monolayers. We propose that acceleration of coarsening in this system is tied to the formation of AgS{sub 2} clusters primarily at step edges. These clusters can transport Ag more efficiently than can Ag adatoms (due to a lower diffusion barrier and comparable formation energy). The mobility of isolated sulfur on Ag(100) is very low so that formation of the complex is kinetically limited at low sulfur coverages, and thus enhancement is minimal. However, higher sulfur coverages force the population of sites adjacent to step edges, so that formation of the cluster is no longer limited by diffusion of sulfur across terraces. Sulfur exerts a much weaker effect on the rate of coarsening on Ag(100) than it does on Ag(111). This is consistent with theory, which shows that the difference between the total energy barrier for coarsening with and without sulfur is also much smaller on Ag(100) than on Ag(111).

  14. Shortened Intervals during Heterologous Boosting Preserve Memory CD8 T Cell Function but Compromise Longevity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emily A; Beura, Lalit K; Nelson, Christine E; Anderson, Kristin G; Vezys, Vaiva

    2016-04-01

    Developing vaccine strategies to generate high numbers of Ag-specific CD8 T cells may be necessary for protection against recalcitrant pathogens. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunization has been shown to result in large quantities of functional memory CD8 T cells with protective capacities and long-term stability. Completing the serial immunization steps for heterologous prime-boost-boost can be lengthy, leaving the host vulnerable for an extensive period of time during the vaccination process. We show in this study that shortening the intervals between boosting events to 2 wk results in high numbers of functional and protective Ag-specific CD8 T cells. This protection is comparable to that achieved with long-term boosting intervals. Short-boosted Ag-specific CD8 T cells display a canonical memory T cell signature associated with long-lived memory and have identical proliferative potential to long-boosted T cells Both populations robustly respond to antigenic re-exposure. Despite this, short-boosted Ag-specific CD8 T cells continue to contract gradually over time, which correlates to metabolic differences between short- and long-boosted CD8 T cells at early memory time points. Our studies indicate that shortening the interval between boosts can yield abundant, functional Ag-specific CD8 T cells that are poised for immediate protection; however, this is at the expense of forming stable long-term memory. PMID:26903479

  15. AGS preinjector improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, H.N.; Brodowski, J.; Gough, R.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Witkover, R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a polarized H/sup -/ source was installed to permit the acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS, using a low current, 750 keV RFQ Linear Accelerator as the preinjector. This RFQ was designed by LANL and has proved to be quite satisfactory and reliable. In order to improve the reliability and simplify maintenance of the overall AGS operations, it has been decided to replace one of the two 750 keV Cockcroft-Waltons (C-W) with an RFQ. The design of a new high current RFQ has been carried out by LBL and is also being constructed there. This paper describes the preinjector improvement project, centered around that RFQ, which is underway at BNL.

  16. Retrogenic ICOS Expression Increases Differentiation of KLRG-1hiCD127loCD8+ T Cells during Listeria Infection and Diminishes Recall Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Danya; Burd, Eileen M; Coopersmith, Craig M; Ford, Mandy L

    2016-02-01

    Following T cell encounter with Ag, multiple signals are integrated to collectively induce distinct differentiation programs within Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell populations. Several factors contribute to these cell fate decisions, including the amount and duration of Ag, exposure to inflammatory cytokines, and degree of ligation of cosignaling molecules. The ICOS is not expressed on resting T cells but is rapidly upregulated upon encounter with Ag. However, the impact of ICOS signaling on programmed differentiation is not well understood. In this study, we therefore sought to determine the role of ICOS signaling on CD8(+) T cell programmed differentiation. Through the creation of novel ICOS retrogenic Ag-specific TCR-transgenic CD8(+) T cells, we interrogated the phenotype, functionality, and recall potential of CD8(+) T cells that receive early and sustained ICOS signaling during Ag exposure. Our results reveal that these ICOS signals critically impacted cell fate decisions of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, resulting in increased frequencies of KLRG-1(hi)CD127(lo) cells, altered BLIMP-1, T-bet, and eomesodermin expression, and increased cytolytic capacity as compared with empty vector controls. Interestingly, however, ICOS retrogenic CD8(+) T cells also preferentially homed to nonlymphoid organs and exhibited reduced multicytokine functionality and reduced ability to mount secondary recall responses upon challenge in vivo. In sum, our results suggest that an altered differentiation program is induced following early and sustained ICOS expression, resulting in the generation of more cytolyticly potent, terminally differentiated effectors that possess limited capacity for recall response. PMID:26729800

  17. A new Schiff base based on vanillin and naphthalimide as a fluorescent probe for Ag+ in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanmei; Zhou, Hua; Ma, Tongsen; Zhang, Junli; Niu, Jingyang

    2012-03-01

    A new Schiff base based on vanillin and naphthalimide was designed and synthesized as fluorescent probe. The probe showed high selectivity for Ag+ over other metal ions such as Pb2+, Na+, K+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Cr3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Ca2+, Al3+ and Mg2+ in aqueous solution. A new fluorescence emission was observed at 682 nm in the presence of Ag+ ion. The fluorescence intensity quenched with increasing the concentration of Ag+ at 682 nm. The method of job's plot confirmed the 1:2 complex between Ag+ and probe, and the mechanism was proposed.

  18. Activation of cord T lymphocytes. III. Role of LFA-1/ICAM-1 and CD2/LFA-3 adhesion molecules in CD3-induced proliferative response.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Muscat, C; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Spinozzi, F; Cernetti, C; Bertotto, A

    1993-04-15

    As cord T cells, a model of antigen (Ag)-unprimed cell, display a functional defect when stimulated through the CD3 molecule, the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1(LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and CD2/lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) receptor-ligand pairs in cord CD3-triggered T-cell activation was analyzed using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against each adhesion molecule. The addition of anti-CD11a, anti-CD18, or anti-CD2 to both adult and cord peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultures led to a decrease in CD3-induced proliferation. In contrast, CD3-stimulated cord, but not adult, PBMC proliferation was markedly enhanced when anti-CD54 or anti-CD58 were added. Despite the fact that ICAM-1 and LFA-3 molecules were virtually absent on cord resting T cells, mAb against these two molecules boosted both mitogenesis of and interleukin (IL)-2 production by purified cord T cells stimulated with plastic immobilized anti-CD3. Cord T-cell supernatant levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were undetectable with CD3 stimulation, slightly raised with CD58/CD3 costimulation, but normal when T cells were preincubated with IL-2 for 24 hr before being costimulated with anti-CD3/CD58. Evidence that IL-2 and IFN-gamma play a pivotal role in fully activating cord T cells came from the demonstration that IL-2 and IFN-gamma are able to bypass the CD3-proliferative defect through differential up-regulation of the adhesion molecules. It would, therefore, seem that ICAM-1 and LFA-3 molecules are crucially implicated in the CD3-activation pathway of Ag-unprimed T cells. PMID:7684326

  19. Evidence for transverse momentum and pseudorapidity dependent event plane fluctuations in PbPb and pPb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-22

    A systematic study of the factorization of long-range azimuthal two-particle correlations into a product of single-particle anisotropies is presented as a function of pT and η of both particles and as a function of the particle multiplicity in PbPb and pPb collisions. The data were taken with the CMS detector for PbPb collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV and pPb collisions at √sNN=5.02 TeV, covering a very wide range of multiplicity. Factorization is observed to be broken as a function of both particle pT and η. When measured with particles of different pT, the magnitude of the factorization breakdown for the second Fourier harmonic reaches 20% for very central PbPb collisions but decreases rapidly as the multiplicity decreases. The data are consistent with viscous hydrodynamic predictions, which suggest that the effect of factorization breaking is mainly sensitive to the initial-state conditions rather than to the transport properties (e.g., shear viscosity) of the medium. The factorization breakdown is also computed with particles of different η. The effect is found to be weakest for mid-central PbPb events but becomes larger for more central or peripheral PbPb collisions, and also for very-high-multiplicity pPb collisions. The η-dependent factorization data provide new insights to the longitudinal evolution of the medium formed in heavy ion collisions.

  20. Evidence for transverse momentum and pseudorapidity dependent event plane fluctuations in PbPb and pPb collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-22

    A systematic study of the factorization of long-range azimuthal two-particle correlations into a product of single-particle anisotropies is presented as a function of pT and η of both particles and as a function of the particle multiplicity in PbPb and pPb collisions. The data were taken with the CMS detector for PbPb collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV and pPb collisions at √sNN=5.02 TeV, covering a very wide range of multiplicity. Factorization is observed to be broken as a function of both particle pT and η. When measured with particles of different pT, the magnitude of the factorization breakdown for the secondmore » Fourier harmonic reaches 20% for very central PbPb collisions but decreases rapidly as the multiplicity decreases. The data are consistent with viscous hydrodynamic predictions, which suggest that the effect of factorization breaking is mainly sensitive to the initial-state conditions rather than to the transport properties (e.g., shear viscosity) of the medium. The factorization breakdown is also computed with particles of different η. The effect is found to be weakest for mid-central PbPb events but becomes larger for more central or peripheral PbPb collisions, and also for very-high-multiplicity pPb collisions. The η-dependent factorization data provide new insights to the longitudinal evolution of the medium formed in heavy ion collisions.« less

  1. Ag-Modified In2O3/ZnO Nanobundles with High Formaldehyde Gas-Sensing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Bai, Lu; Song, Dongsheng; Yang, Hongping; Sun, Xiaoming; Sun, Hongyu; Zhu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles with micro/nano porous structures have been designed and synthesized with by hydrothermal method continuing with dehydration process. Each bundle consists of nanoparticles, where nanogaps of 10–30 nm are present between the nanoparticles, leading to a porous structure. This porous structure brings high surface area and fast gas diffusion, enhancing the gas sensitivity. Consequently, the HCHO gas-sensing performance of the Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles have been tested, with the formaldehyde-detection limit of 100 ppb (parts per billion) and the response and recover times as short as 6 s and 3 s, respectively, at 300 °C and the detection limit of 100 ppb, response time of 12 s and recover times of 6 s at 100 °C. The HCHO sensing detect limitation matches the health standard limitation on the concentration of formaldehyde for indoor air. Moreover, the strategy to synthesize the nanobundles is just two-step heating and easy to scale up. Therefore, the Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles are ready for industrialization and practical applications. PMID:26287205

  2. Fabrication of Cu-Ag core-shell bimetallic superfine powders by eco-friendly reagents and structures characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jun; Zhang Dongming; Zhao Jie

    2011-09-15

    Superfine bimetallic Cu-Ag core-shell powders were synthesized by reduction of copper sulfate pentahydrate and silver nitrate with eco-friendly ascorbic acid as a reducing agent and cyclodextrins as a protective agent in an aqueous system. The influence of Ag/Cu ratio on coatings was investigated. Ag was homogeneously distributed on the surface of Cu particles at a mole ratio of Ag/Cu=1. FE-SEM showed an uniformity of Ag coatings on Cu particles. Antioxidation of Cu particles was improved by increasing Ag/Cu ratio. TEM-EDX and UV-vis spectra also revealed that Cu cores were covered by Ag nanoshells on the whole. The surface composition analysis by XPS indicated that only small parts of Cu atoms in the surface were oxidized. It was noted that the hindrance of cyclodextrins chemisorbed on particles plays an important role in forming high quality and good dispersity Cu-Ag (Cu-Ag) core-shell powders. - Graphical abstract: Mechanism of fabricating Cu-Ag particles with good dispersibility using {beta}-CDs as a protective agent was studied because of its special structure. Highlights: > Green supramolecular {beta}-CD used as a protective agent and ascorbic acid(Vc) as a reducing agent to fabricate Cu-Ag powders. > Particles are monodisperse and the diameter is close to nanoscale(100-150 nm). > Resistance of Cu particles to oxidation was higher. > Formation mechanism explained.

  3. Influence of Ag+ interaction on 1D droplet array spacing and the repulsive forces between stimuli-responsive nanoemulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, V; Philip, John

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports results on the effect of interaction of Ag(+) on 1D droplet array spacing and the repulsive forces between stimuli-responsive nanoemulsion droplets, stabilized with an anionic surfactant--sodium dodecyl sulfate--and a diblock polymer--poly(vinyl alcohol)-vinyl acetate. The repulsive interaction is probed by measuring the in-situ equilibrium force-distance in the presence of Ag(+) using the magnetic chaining technique. At a constant static magnetic field, emulsion droplets form 1D array that diffract visible light. A large blue-shift in the diffracted light is observed in the presence of interacting Ag(+) because of the reduction in the interdroplet spacing within the 1D array. The in-situ equilibrium force-distance measurement results show that the onset of repulsions and magnitude of repulsive forces are strongly influenced by the presence of Ag(+) in ppb levels. This suggests that the Ag(+) ions screen the surface charges through the formation of both Stern and diffuse electric double layer and produces a dramatic blue-shift in surfactant-stabilized emulsion, whereas a dramatic conformational change in the adsorbed polymer layer causes a reduction in the 1D array spacing in the diblock polymer stabilized emulsion. The force-distance results are compared with the predictions of electrical double-layer and repulsive steric forces. The droplet array shows an excellent selectivity to Ag(+) due to the strong interaction of Ag(+) with the stabilizing moieties at the oil-water interface. The possible mechanisms of interaction of Ag(+) with surfactant and polymer are discussed. The dramatic decrease in the 1D array spacing in the presence of Ag(+) may find promising practical applications in the development of optical sensors for selective detection of cations with ultrahigh sensitivity. PMID:25105903

  4. Antigen targeting reveals splenic CD169+ macrophages as promoters of germinal center B‐cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Veninga, Henrike; Borg, Ellen G. F.; Vreeman, Kyle; Taylor, Philip R.; Kalay, Hakan; van Kooyk, Yvette; Kraal, Georg; Martinez‐Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Ag delivery to specific APCs is an attractive approach in developing strategies for vaccination. CD169+ macrophages in the marginal zone of the spleen represent a suitable target for delivery of Ag because of their strategic location, which is optimal for the capture of blood‐borne Ag and their close proximity to B cells and T cells in the white pulp. Here we show that Ag targeting to CD169+ macrophages in mice resulted in strong, isotype‐switched, high‐affinity Ab production and the preferential induction and long‐term persistence of Ag‐specific GC B cells and follicular Th cells. In agreement with these observations, CD169+ macrophages retained intact Ag, induced cognate activation of B cells, and increased expression of costimulatory molecules upon activation. In addition, macrophages were required for the production of cytokines that promote B‐cell responses. Our results identify CD169+ macrophages as promoters of high‐affinity humoral immune responses and emphasize the value of CD169 as target for Ag delivery to improve vaccine responses. PMID:25487358

  5. Influence of dopant concentration on the electrical properties of the CdSe-PMMA nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Ramneek; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and electrical characterization of CdSe-PMMA nanocomposite. CdSe-PMMA nanocomposite has been prepared by ex-situ technique through chemical route. The influence of three different Ag doping concentrations on the electrical properties has been studied in the temperature range ˜ 303-353 K. Transmission electron micrograph reveals the spherical morphology of the CdSe nanoparticles and their proper dispersion in the PMMA matrix. The electrical conduction of the polymer nanocomposites is through thermally activated process with single activation energy. With Ag doping, initially the activation energy increases upto 0.2 % Ag doping concentration but with further increase in Ag concentration, it decreases. This behavior has been discussed on the basis of randomly oriented grain boundaries and defect states. Thus, the results indicate that the transport properties of the polymer nanocomposites can be tailored by controlled doping concentration.

  6. Detection of petroleum hydrocarbons at low ppb levels using quartz resonator sensors and instrumentation of a smart environmental monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, I; Seyama, M; Nakamura, M

    1999-04-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon vapors at low ppb levels can be detected using a thickness shear mode resonator (TSMR) coated with a chemical-sensing overlayer, prepared by radiofrequency sputtering of porous sintered-polyethylene (PS-PE). The sensing capabilities of PS-PE sensors were profoundly affected by the sputtering methods; they were enhanced by the photo-excitation effect, and were reduced by carbonization and water treatment. The photo-assisted PS-PE sensor was extremely sensitive and could detect linear hydrocarbon (> C12) vapors below the ppb level. The time constant of the sorption curve, however, was large, indicating a slow sensing speed. Toward creating instrumentation for a smart environmental monitoring system, the TSMR sensors were arrayed on a circuit board equipped with a serial interface and signal processing chips of the oscillation drive and frequency counter. Co-sorption with water vapor at a relative humidity of about 10% has almost no effect on the sensing ability of PS-PE sensors for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Conversely, it enhances the sensitivity of the TSMR sensor coated with a D-phenylalanine film. Upward shifts in the baseline are evident with elapsed time. However, a rigorous ten-cycle iteration test for 100 ppm toluene vapor demonstrated good reproducibility of the sensor's signals. PMID:11529091

  7. Nonstoichiometric Co-rich ZnCo2O4 Hollow Nanospheres for High Performance Formaldehyde Detection at ppb Levels.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Ju; Kim, Jinmo; Choi, Nak-Jin; Song, Hyunjoon; Lee, Dae-Sik

    2016-02-10

    Since metal oxide semiconductors were investigated as chemiresistors, rapid advances have been reported in this field. However, better performance metrics are still required, such as higher sensitivity and selectivity levels for practical applications. To improve the sensing performance, we discuss an optimal composition of the active sensing material, nonstoichiometric Co-rich ZnCo2O4, prepared by the partial substitution of Co(2+) into Zn(2+) in Co3O4 without altering a hollow sphere morphology. Remarkably, this Co-rich ZnCo2O4 phase achieved detection limits for formaldehyde as low as 13 ppb in experimental measurements and 2 ppb in theory, which were the lowest values ever reported from actual measurements at a working temperature of 225 °C. It was also unprecedented that the selectivity for formaldehyde was greatly enhanced with respect to the selectivity levels against other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These excellent sensing performances are due to the optimal composition of the Co-rich ZnCo2O4 material with a proper hole concentration and well-organized conductive network. PMID:26791623

  8. Studies of dijet and photon-jet properties in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Richard Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Studies of dijet and photon-jet properties in pPb collisions are of great importance for establishing a QCD baseline for hadronic interactions with cold nuclear matter. Dijet and photon-jet production has been measured in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV. The transverse momentum balance and azimuthal angle correlations are studied in both dijet and photon-jet channels, leading to the observation that there is no significant modification, which allows these systems to be used as tools to probe the nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions (PDFs). In the dijet system, pseudorapidity distributions are studied as a function of the transverse energy in the forward calorimeters (ETHF). The mean value of the dijet pseudorapidity is found to change monotonically with increasing ETHF, indicating a correlation between the energy emitted at large pseudorapidity and the longitudinal motion of the dijet frame. The pseudorapidity distribution of the dijet system is compared with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD predictions obtained from both nucleon and nuclear PDFs, and the data more closely match the latter. In addition to the studies of initial state, the photon-jet measurements related to quenching in PbPb are updated to have a more precise pp reference based on the 2013 LHC run at 2.76 TeV.

  9. J/ ψ production and nuclear effects in p-Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchi, L.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Erasmo, G. D.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.

    2014-02-01

    Inclusive J/ ψ production has been studied with the ALICE detector in p-Pb collisions at the nucleon-nucleon center of mass energy = 5.02 TeV at the CERN LHC. The measurement is performed in the center of mass rapidity domains 2.03 < y cms < 3 .53 and -4 .46 < y cms < -2 .96, down to zero transverse momentum, studying the μ + μ - decay mode. In this paper, the J/ ψ production cross section and the nuclear modification factor R pPb for the rapidities under study are presented. While at forward rapidity, corresponding to the proton direction, a suppression of the J/ ψ yield with respect to binary-scaled pp collisions is observed, in the backward region no suppression is present. The ratio of the forward and backward yields is also measured differentially in rapidity and transverse momentum. Theoretical predictions based on nuclear shadowing, as well as on models including, in addition, a contribution from partonic energy loss, are in fair agreement with the experimental results. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Preparation and antibacterial activities of Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites made by pomegranate (Punica granatum) rind extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Ren, Yan-yu; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chuang

    Nano-silver and its composite materials are widely used in medicine, food and other industries due to their strong conductivity, size effect and other special performances. So far, more microbial researches have been applied, but a plant method is rarely reported. In order to open up a new way to prepare AgNP composites, pomegranate peel extract was used in this work to reduce Ag+ to prepare Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. UV-Vis was employed to detect and track the reduction of Ag+ and the forming process of AgNPs. The composition, structure and size of the crystal were analyzed by XRD and TEM. Results showed that, under mild conditions, pomegranate peel extract reacted with dilute AgNO3 solution to produce Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. At pH = 8 and 10 mmol/L of AgNO3 concentration, the size of the achieved composites ranged between 15 and 35 nm with spherical shapes and good crystallinity. The bactericidal experiment indicated that the prepared Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles had strong antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. FTIR analysis revealed that biological macromolecules with groups of sbnd NH2, sbnd OH, and others were distributed on the surface of the newly synthesized Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles. This provided a useful clue to further study the AgNP biosynthesis mechanism.

  11. Prototype development and test results of a continuous ambient air monitoring system for hydrazine at the 10 ppb level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghelli, Barry; Parrish, Clyde; Barile, Ron; Lueck, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    into the dilute acid stream. The HVAM system provides two measurement ranges (threshold limit value (TLV): 10 to 1000 parts per billion (ppb)/LEAK: 100 ppb to 10 parts per million (ppm)). The LEAK range is created by dilution of the sulfuric acid/hydrazine liquid sample with pure water. This dual range capability permits the analyzer to quantify ambient air samples whose hydrazine concentrations range from 10 ppb to as high as 10 ppm. The laboratory and field prototypes have demonstrated total system response times on the order of 10 to 12 minutes for samples ranging from 10 to 900 ppb in the lLV mode and is greater than 2 minutes for samples ranging from 100 to 1300 ppb in the LEAK mode. Service intervals of over 3 months have been demonstrated for continuous 24 hour/day, 7 day/week usage. The HVAM is made up of a purged cabinet that contains power supplies, RS422 signal transmission capabilities, a UPS, an on-site warning system, and a Line Replaceable Unit (LRU). The LRU includes all of the liquid flow system, the analyzer, the control/data system microprocessor and assorted flow and liquid-level sensors.

  12. Prototype development and test results of a continuous ambient air monitoring system for hydrazine at the 10 ppb level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghelli, Barry; Parrish, Clyde; Barile, Ron; Lueck, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    into the dilute acid stream. The HVAM system provides two measurement ranges (threshold limit value (TLV): 10 to 1000 parts per billion (ppb)/LEAK: 100 ppb to 10 parts per million (ppm)). The LEAK range is created by dilution of the sulfuric acid/hydrazine liquid sample with pure water. This dual range capability permits the analyzer to quantify ambient air samples whose hydrazine concentrations range from 10 ppb to as high as 10 ppm. The laboratory and field prototypes have demonstrated total system response times on the order of 10 to 12 minutes for samples ranging from 10 to 900 ppb in the lLV mode and is greater than 2 minutes for samples ranging from 100 to 1300 ppb in the LEAK mode. Service intervals of over 3 months have been demonstrated for continuous 24 hour/day, 7 day/week usage. The HVAM is made up of a purged cabinet that contains power supplies, RS422 signal transmission capabilities, a UPS, an on-site warning system, and a Line Replaceable Unit (LRU). The LRU includes all of the liquid flow system, the analyzer, the control/data system microprocessor and assorted flow and liquid-level sensors. The LRU is mounted on a track slide system so it can be serviced inplace or totally removed and quickly exchanged with another calibrated unit, thus minimizing analyzer downtime. Once an LRU is removed from an analyzer enclosure, it can be brought to a laboratory facility for complete calibration and periodic maintenance.

  13. Immediate Dysfunction of Vaccine-Elicited CD8+ T Cells Primed in the Absence of CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Provine, Nicholas M; Larocca, Rafael A; Aid, Malika; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Borducchi, Erica N; Yates, Kathleen B; Abbink, Peter; Kirilova, Marinela; Ng'ang'a, David; Bramson, Jonathan; Haining, W Nicholas; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-09-01

    CD4(+) T cell help is critical for optimal CD8(+) T cell memory differentiation and maintenance in many experimental systems. In addition, many reports have identified reduced primary CD8(+) T cell responses in the absence of CD4(+) T cell help, which often coincides with reduced Ag or pathogen clearance. In this study, we demonstrate that absence of CD4(+) T cells at the time of adenovirus vector immunization of mice led to immediate impairments in early CD8(+) T cell functionality and differentiation. Unhelped CD8(+) T cells exhibited a reduced effector phenotype, decreased ex vivo cytotoxicity, and decreased capacity to produce cytokines. This dysfunctional state was imprinted within 3 d of immunization. Unhelped CD8(+) T cells expressed elevated levels of inhibitory receptors and exhibited transcriptomic exhaustion and anergy profiles by gene set enrichment analysis. Dysfunctional, impaired effector differentiation also occurred following immunization of CD4(+) T cell-deficient mice with a poxvirus vector. This study demonstrates that following priming with viral vectors, CD4(+) T cell help is required to promote both the expansion and acquisition of effector functions by CD8(+) T cells, which is accomplished by preventing immediate dysfunction. PMID:27448585

  14. Immediate Dysfunction of Vaccine-Elicited CD8+ T Cells Primed in the Absence of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Aid, Malika; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Borducchi, Erica N.; Yates, Kathleen B.; Abbink, Peter; Kirilova, Marinela; Ng’ang’a, David; Bramson, Jonathan; Haining, W. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cell help is critical for optimal CD8+ T cell memory differentiation and maintenance in many experimental systems. In addition, many reports have identified reduced primary CD8+ T cell responses in the absence of CD4+ T cell help, which often coincides with reduced Ag or pathogen clearance. In this study, we demonstrate that absence of CD4+ T cells at the time of adenovirus vector immunization of mice led to immediate impairments in early CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. Unhelped CD8+ T cells exhibited a reduced effector phenotype, decreased ex vivo cytotoxicity, and decreased capacity to produce cytokines. This dysfunctional state was imprinted within 3 d of immunization. Unhelped CD8+ T cells expressed elevated levels of inhibitory receptors and exhibited transcriptomic exhaustion and anergy profiles by gene set enrichment analysis. Dysfunctional, impaired effector differentiation also occurred following immunization of CD4+ T cell–deficient mice with a poxvirus vector. This study demonstrates that following priming with viral vectors, CD4+ T cell help is required to promote both the expansion and acquisition of effector functions by CD8+ T cells, which is accomplished by preventing immediate dysfunction. PMID:27448585

  15. Ag-Air Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Econ, Inc.'s agricultural aerial application, "ag-air," involves more than 10,000 aircraft spreading insecticides, herbicides, fertilizer, seed and other materials over millions of acres of farmland. Difficult for an operator to estimate costs accurately and decide what to charge or which airplane can handle which assignment most efficiently. Computerized service was designed to improve business efficiency in choice of aircraft and determination of charge rates based on realistic operating cost data. Each subscriber fills out a detailed form which pertains to his needs and then receives a custom-tailored computer printout best suited to his particular business mix.

  16. Lithogeochemistry and fluid inclusions of an Au-Ag vein deposit in a granodiorite intrusive

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, R.; Ikramuddin, M.

    1985-01-01

    Forty-eight samples of altered and unaltered rocks and quartz veins from the Acme mine in northeast Washington, an Au-Ag vein deposit in a granodiorite intrusive, have been analyzed for SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Feo, MgO, CaO, Na/sub 2/O, K/sub 2/O, TiO/sub 2/, MnO, P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, Ag, Au, Ba, Cu, Pb, Rb, Sr, Tl, and Zn. A comparison of major and trace elements shows that the altered granodiorite is enriched in SiO/sub 2/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, Ag, Au, Ba, Cu, Pb, Rb, Tl, and Zn and depleted in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, FeO, MgO, CaO, Na/sub 2/O, TiO/sub 2/, MnO, P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, and Sr. The average contents of Au in unaltered and altered granodiorite and quartz veins are 9 ppb. 270 ppb and 1020 ppb respectively. The average Ba/Tl ratio in the altered samples decrease and average Rb/Sr and Tl/Sr ratios increase. K, Rb, and Tl are enriched in the altered granodiorite by factors of 1.5, 1.6, and 1.4 respectively. Tl is not enriched relative to Rb and K in the altered samples due to the high temperature of the deposit. The Ba/Tl, K/Tl and K/Rb ratios do not show complete separation of altered from unaltered samples. However, the Ba/Tl and K/Tl ratios in the quartz vein are significantly lower than the unaltered and altered granodiorite. This is due to the enrichment of Tl over K and Rb in the quartz veins. The Rb/Sr and Tl/Sr ratios are higher in the altered granodiorite and quartz veins compared to unaltered samples. The enrichment of Tl and presence of low Ba/Tl and high Rb/Sr and Tl/Sr ratios in a granodiorite indicate that the rocks are hydrothermally altered and represent a possible Au-Ag target.

  17. β-Cyclodextrin coated SiO₂@Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles for SERS detection of PCBs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yilin; Yao, Guohua; Sun, Kexi; Huang, Qing

    2015-09-01

    A new type of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate consisting of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) coated SiO2@Au@Ag nanoparticles (SiO2@Au@Ag@CD NPs) has been achieved. Our protocol was a simplified approach as the fabrication and modification of the silver shell were realized in a single-step reaction by taking advantage of β-CD as both the reducing and stabilizing agents. The as-synthesized SiO2@Au@Ag@CD NPs were uniform in size and demonstrated high SERS activity and reproducibility. The substrates consisting of the SiO2@Au@Ag@CD NPs were employed for SERS detection of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) including PCB-3, PCB-29 and PCB-77. The SERS detection sensitivity was significantly improved due to enrichment of more PCB molecules captured by β-CD on the substrate surface, as confirmed by the appearance of the new Raman bands which are attributed to the complexes between β-CD and PCBs according to the theoretical simulation. Therefore, this work presents a novel approach to the fabrication of effective SERS substrates that can be employed for rapid determination of trace amounts of PCBs in the environment with high detection sensitivity and recognition selectivity. PMID:25478906

  18. Cutting edge: Failure of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell recruitment to the kidney during systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Rebecca A; Wallace, Carol; Reid, Delyth M; Way, Sing Sing; Kaplan, Daniel H; Brown, Gordon D

    2014-12-01

    Candida albicans is the leading cause of systemic candidiasis, a fungal disease associated with high mortality and poor treatment options. The kidney is the target organ during infection and whose control is largely dependent on innate immunity, because lymphocytes appear redundant for protection. In this article, we show that this apparent redundancy stems from a failure of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells to migrate into infected kidneys. In contrast, Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells are recruited normally. Using Ag-loaded immunoliposomes to artificially reverse this defective migration, we show that recruited Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells polarize toward a Th17 phenotype in the kidney and are protective during fungal infection. Therefore, our data explain the redundancy of CD4(+) T cells for defense against systemic infection with C. albicans and have important implications for our understanding of antifungal immunity and the control of renal infections. PMID:25344471

  19. NSOM/QD-Based Direct Visualization of CD3-Induced and CD28-Enhanced Nanospatial Coclustering of TCR and Coreceptor in Nanodomains in T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Richard C.; Gong, Guangming; Yan, Lin; Huang, Dan; Chen, Zheng W.

    2009-01-01

    Direct molecular imaging of nano-spatial relationship between T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 and CD4 or CD8 co-receptor before and after activation of a primary T cell has not been reported. We have recently innovated application of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) and immune-labeling quantum dots (QD) to image Ag-specific TCR response during in vivo clonal expansion, and now up-graded the NSOM/QD-based nanotechnology through dipole-polarization and dual-color imaging. Using this imaging system scanning cell-membrane molecules at a best-optical lateral resolution, we demonstrated that CD3, CD4 or CD8 molecules were distinctly distributed as single QD-bound molecules or nano-clusters equivalent to 2–4 QD fluorescence-intensity/size on cell-membrane of un-stimulated primary T cells, and ∼6–10% of CD3 were co-clustering with CD4 or CD8 as 70–110 nm nano-clusters without forming nano-domains. The ligation of TCR/CD3 on CD4 or CD8 T cells led to CD3 nanoscale co-clustering or interaction with CD4 or CD8 co-receptors forming 200–500 nm nano-domains or >500 nm micro-domains. Such nano-spatial co-clustering of CD3 and CD4 or CD3 and CD8 appeared to be an intrinsic event of TCR/CD3 ligation, not purely limited to MHC engagement, and be driven by Lck phosphorylation. Importantly, CD28 co-stimulation remarkably enhanced TCR/CD3 nanoscale co-clustering or interaction with CD4 co-receptor within nano- or micro-domains on the membrane. In contrast, CD28 co-stimulation did not enhance CD8 clustering or CD3–CD8 co-clustering in nano-domains although it increased molecular number and density of CD3 clustering in the enlarged nano-domains. These nanoscale findings provide new insights into TCR/CD3 interaction with CD4 or CD8 co-receptor in T-cell activation. PMID:19536289

  20. NSOM/QD-based direct visualization of CD3-induced and CD28-enhanced nanospatial coclustering of TCR and coreceptor in nanodomains in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liyun; Zeng, Gucheng; Lu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Richard C; Gong, Guangming; Yan, Lin; Huang, Dan; Chen, Zheng W

    2009-01-01

    Direct molecular imaging of nano-spatial relationship between T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 and CD4 or CD8 co-receptor before and after activation of a primary T cell has not been reported. We have recently innovated application of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) and immune-labeling quantum dots (QD) to image Ag-specific TCR response during in vivo clonal expansion, and now up-graded the NSOM/QD-based nanotechnology through dipole-polarization and dual-color imaging. Using this imaging system scanning cell-membrane molecules at a best-optical lateral resolution, we demonstrated that CD3, CD4 or CD8 molecules were distinctly distributed as single QD-bound molecules or nano-clusters equivalent to 2-4 QD fluorescence-intensity/size on cell-membrane of un-stimulated primary T cells, and approximately 6-10% of CD3 were co-clustering with CD4 or CD8 as 70-110 nm nano-clusters without forming nano-domains. The ligation of TCR/CD3 on CD4 or CD8 T cells led to CD3 nanoscale co-clustering or interaction with CD4 or CD8 co-receptors forming 200-500 nm nano-domains or >500 nm micro-domains. Such nano-spatial co-clustering of CD3 and CD4 or CD3 and CD8 appeared to be an intrinsic event of TCR/CD3 ligation, not purely limited to MHC engagement, and be driven by Lck phosphorylation. Importantly, CD28 co-stimulation remarkably enhanced TCR/CD3 nanoscale co-clustering or interaction with CD4 co-receptor within nano- or micro-domains on the membrane. In contrast, CD28 co-stimulation did not enhance CD8 clustering or CD3-CD8 co-clustering in nano-domains although it increased molecular number and density of CD3 clustering in the enlarged nano-domains. These nanoscale findings provide new insights into TCR/CD3 interaction with CD4 or CD8 co-receptor in T-cell activation. PMID:19536289

  1. Bimetallic Pt-Ag and Pd-Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Debdutta; Bunker, Bruce; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Zhang, Zhenyuan; Meisel, Dan; Doudna, C. M.; Bertino, M. F.; Blum, Frank D.; Tokuhiro, A. T.; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Terry, Jeff

    2005-04-19

    We report studies of bimetallic nanoparticles with 15%–16% atomic crystal parameters size mismatch. The degree of alloying was also probed in a 2-nm Pt core ssmallest attainable core sized of Pt–Ag nanoparticles scompletely immiscible in bulkd and 20-nm-diameter Pd–Ag nanowires scompletely miscible in bulkd. Particles were synthesized radiolytically, and depending on the initial parameters, they assume spherical or cylindrical snanowired morphologies. In all cases, the metals are seen to follow their bulk alloying characteristics. Also, Pt and Ag segregate in both spherical and wire forms, which indicates that strain due to crystallographic mismatch overcomes the excess surface free energy in the small particles. The Pd–Ag nanowires alloy similar to previously reported spherical Pd–Ag particles of similar diameter and composition

  2. Bimetallic Pt-Ag and Pd-Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Debdutta; Bunker, Bruce; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Zhang, Zhenyuan; Meisel, Dan; Doudna, C.M.; Bertino, M. F.; Blum, Frank D.; Tokuhiro, A.T.; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Terry, Jeff

    2005-05-01

    We report studies of bimetallic nanoparticles with 15%-16% atomic crystal parameters size mismatch. The degree of alloying was probed in a 2-nm Pt core (smallest attainable core size) of Pt-Ag nanoparticles (completely immiscible in bulk) and 20-nm-diameter Pd-Ag nanowires (completely miscible in bulk). Particles were synthesized radiolytically, and depending on the initial parameters, they assume spherical or cylindrical (nanowire) morphologies. In all cases, the metals are seen to follow their bulk alloying characteristics. Pt and Ag segregate in both spherical and wire forms, which indicates that strain due to crystallographic mismatch overcomes the excess surface free energy in the small particles. The Pd-Ag nanowires alloy similar to previously reported spherical Pd-Ag particles of similar diameter and composition.

  3. CD83 Modulates B Cell Activation and Germinal Center Responses.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Urbat, Anne; Hutzler, Stefan; Ostalecki, Christian; Gläsner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André; Winkler, Thomas H; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Nitschke, Lars

    2016-05-01

    CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells. In the B cell lineage, CD83 is expressed especially on activated B cells and on light zone B cells during the germinal center (GC) reaction. The function of CD83 during GC responses is unclear. CD83(-/-) mice have a strong reduction of CD4(+) T cells, which makes it difficult to analyze a functional role of CD83 on B cells during GC responses. Therefore, in the present study we generated a B cell-specific CD83 conditional knockout (CD83 B-cKO) model. CD83 B-cKO B cells show defective upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 expression and impaired proliferation after different stimuli. Analyses of GC responses after immunization with various Ags revealed a characteristic shift in dark zone and light zone B cell numbers, with an increase of B cells in the dark zone of CD83 B-cKO mice. This effect was not accompanied by alterations in the level of IgG immune responses or by major differences in affinity maturation. However, an enhanced IgE response was observed in CD83 B-cKO mice. Additionally, we observed a strong competitive disadvantage of CD83-cKO B cells in GC responses in mixed bone marrow chimeras. Furthermore, infection of mice with Borrelia burgdorferi revealed a defect in bacterial clearance of CD83 B-cKO mice with a shift toward a Th2 response, indicated by a strong increase in IgE titers. Taken together, our results show that CD83 is important for B cell activation and modulates GC composition and IgE Ab responses in vivo. PMID:26983787

  4. Detection of Foreign Antigen-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by MHC Class II Tetramer and Intracellular CD154 Staining

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Young

    2013-01-01

    The unrestricted population of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, which have been known to control the expression of autoimmune diseases and protective immunity to inflammatory reactions, has led to greater appreciation of functional plasticity. Detecting and/or isolating Ag-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs at the single cell level are required to study their function and plasticity. In this study, we established and compared both MHC class II tetramer and intracellular CD154 staining, in order to detect CD4+Foxp3+ Treg specific for foreign Ag in acute and chronic infections with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Our results revealed that MHC class II tetramer staining showed a lower detection rate of LCMV GP66-77-specific CD4+ T cells because most of MHC class II tetramers were unbound and unstable when combined staining was performed with intracellular cytokines. In contrast, intracellular CD154 staining was revealed to be easier and simple for detecting LCMV GP66-77-specific CD4+ T cells, compared to MHC class II tetramer staining. Subsequently, we employed intracellular CD154 staining to detect LCMV GP66-77-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs using Foxp3GFP knock-in mouse, and found that LCMV GP66-77-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs and polyclonal CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs showed differential expansion in mice infected with LCMV Arms or Cl13 at acute (8 and 13 days pi) and chronic phases (35 days pi). Therefore, our results provide insight into the valuable use of intracellular CD154 staining to detect and characterize foreign Ag-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Treg in various models. PMID:24385945

  5. A highly sensitive photoelectrochemical detection of perfluorooctanic acid with molecularly imprined polymer-functionalized nanoarchitectured hybrid of AgI-BiOI composite.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingming; Fang, Tian; Peng, Dinghua; Li, Aimin; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-11-15

    A rapid and ultrasensitive signal-off photoelectrochemical sensor has been developed under visible-light irradiation, for the detection of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), especially low level PFOA present in environment, whereby a novel nanostructured probe made of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) modified AgI nanoparticles-BiOI nanoflake arrays (AgI-BiOINFs) is designed as the photoactive electrode (denoted as MIP@AgI-BiOINFs). Here, the unique nanoarchitectured hybrid of AgI-BiOINFs was first in situ synthesized via a facile successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) approach and then employed as a matrix to graft the recognition element of MIP. Such a newly designed PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of PFOA. The PEC analysis is highly linear over the PFOA concentration ranging from 0.02 to 1000.0 ppb with a detection limit of 0.01 ppb (S/N=3). This value obtained by using the facile PEC sensor is comparable to the results obtained by using well-established liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Toward practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay was successfully applied to measure PFOA in real water samples. PMID:26092130

  6. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Judy

    Ag-Ed is an agricultural education project aimed at upper primary students, held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show (similar to a county fair) in Queensland, Australia. The program achieves its purpose of helping children understand the impact and relevance that agriculture has on their everyday lives through two components, an Ag-Ed day and a…

  7. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  8. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  9. Dendritic cell vaccine modified by Ag85A gene enhances anti-tumor immunity against bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Wang, Jinyan; Wang, Danan; Wang, Huan; Shan, Fengping; Chen, Liudan; Hou, Ying; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Chang-Long

    2012-11-01

    The ability of dendritic cells to provide all the signals required for T-cell activation makes them an ideal cancer vaccine platform. With the use of established DC2.4 cell line, originated from C57BL/6 mice and developed by superinfecting GM-CSF transduced bone marrow cells with myc and raf oncogenes, we investigated whether the DC 2.4 cell line transfected with Ag85A gene could enhance immunity against bladder cancer. Both phenotypic and functional analyses of Ag85A-DCs were done with use of FCM and T cell proliferation test. The cytotoxicity of Ag85A-DCs loaded with tumor cell lysate was verified by LDH. Finally, the production of interferon gamma was assayed by both ELISA and FCM. The immunotherapeutic effect of DC vaccine on murine bladder cancer was assessed pharmacologically and pathologically. Our results showed that Ag85A gene transfected DCs expressed high levels of key surface markers such as CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. The CTL primed with MB49 lysate-pulsed Ag85A-DCs elicits higher activity against MB49 tumor cells and upregulated level of IFN-γ production. Furthermore, the significant inhibitive effect on tumor growth in mice was found in the group of Ag85A-DC vaccine. The infiltration of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cell within established tumor treated by Ag85A-DC vaccine significantly increased as compared with control groups. It is therefore concluded that DCs engineered by Ag85A gene exerts enhanced anti-tumor immunity against bladder cancer and this study might provide a meaningful mode of action with the use of Ag85A engineered DC vaccination in anti-cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22884511

  10. Magnesium and cadmium containing Heusler phases REPd2Mg, REPd2Cd, REAg2Mg, REAu2Mg and REAu2Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnscher, Michael; Stein, Sebastian; Niehaus, Oliver; Benndorf, Christopher; Heletta, Lukas; Kersting, Marcel; Höting, Christoph; Eckert, Hellmut; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-eight new Heusler phases REPd2Mg, REPd2Cd, REAg2Mg, REAu2Mg and REAu2Cd with different rare earth elements were synthesized from the elements in sealed niobium ampoules in a water-cooled sample chamber of an induction furnace. The samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction. The cell volumes show the expected lanthanide contraction. The structures of YPd2Cd, GdPd2Cd, GdAu2Cd, Y1.12Ag2Mg0.88 and GdAg2Mg were refined based on single crystal diffractometer data. The magnetic properties were determined for fifteen phase pure samples. LuAu2Mg is a weak Pauli paramagnet with a susceptibility of 1.0(2) × 10-5 emu mol-1 at room temperature. The remaining samples show stable trivalent rare earth ions and most of them order magnetically at low temperatures. The ferromagnet GdAg2Mg shows the highest ordering temperature of TC = 98.3 K. 113Cd and 89Y MAS NMR spectra of YAu2Cd and YPd2Cd confirm the presence of unique crystallographic sites. The resonances are characterized by large Knight shifts, whose magnitude can be correlated with electronegativity trends.

  11. Gut Microbial Membership Modulates CD4 T Cell Reconstitution and Function after Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Babcock, Jeffrey C; Dileepan, Thamotharampillai; Murphy, Katherine A; Kucaba, Tamara A; Badovinac, Vladimir P; Griffith, Thomas S

    2016-09-01

    Transient lymphopenia is one hallmark of sepsis, and emergent data indicate the CD4 T cell compartment in sepsis survivors is numerically and functionally altered (when examined at the Ag-specific level) compared with nonseptic control subjects. Previous data from our laboratory demonstrated Ag-independent, lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation to be a contributing mechanism by which CD4 T cells numerically recover in sepsis survivors. However, we reasoned it is also formally possible that some CD4 T cells respond directly to Ag expressed by gut-resident microbes released during polymicrobial sepsis. The effect of gut microbiome leakage on CD4 T cells is currently unknown. In this study, we explored the number and function of endogenous CD4 T cells specific for segmented filamentous bacterium (SFB) after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis using mice that either contained or lacked SFB as a normal gut-resident microbe. Interestingly, SFB-specific CD4 T cells underwent Ag-driven proliferation in CLP-treated SFB(+), but not in SFB(-), mice. Moreover, CLP-treated SFB(+) mice showed resistance to secondary lethal infection with recombinant SFB Ag-expressing virulent Listeria (but not wild-type virulent Listeria), suggesting the CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis primed for a protective response by the SFB-specific CD4 T cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that the numerical recovery and functional responsiveness of Ag-specific CD4 T cells in sepsis survivors is, in part, modulated by the intestinal barrier's health discreetly defined by individual bacterial populations of the host's microbiome. PMID:27448587

  12. Dual effect of CD85/leukocyte Ig-like receptor-1/Ig-like transcript 2 and CD152 (CTLA-4) on cytokine production by antigen-stimulated human T cells.

    PubMed

    Saverino, Daniele; Merlo, Andrea; Bruno, Silvia; Pistoia, Vito; Grossi, Carlo E; Ciccone, Ermanno

    2002-01-01

    The functional outcome of a T cell response to Ag is the result of a balance between coactivation and inhibitory signals. In this study we have investigated the effects of the CD85/leukocyte Ig-like receptor (LIR)-1/Ig-like transcript (ILT) 2 and of CD152 (CTLA-4) inhibitory receptors on the modulation of cell-mediated immune responses to specific Ags, both at the effector and at the resting/memory cell level. Proliferation and cytokine production of CD4+ T lymphocytes stimulated by recall Ags have been evaluated. Cross-linking of CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 or CD152 molecules on cultured T cells using specific mAb and goat anti-mouse antiserum inhibits Ag-specific T cell proliferation. This inhibition is always paralleled by increased production of cytokines that down-regulate immune responses, e.g., IL-10 and TGF-beta. In contrast, the production of cytokines that support T cell expansion and function (e.g., IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-13) is significantly decreased. A long-term effect of CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 and of CD152 occurs during Ag-specific T cell activation and expansion. T cells, primed in the presence of anti-CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 and anti-CD152 blocking mAb (but in the absence of cross-linking), proliferate at higher rates and produce higher amounts of IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-13, in comparison with T cells stimulated with the Ag alone. We also show that the inhibitory receptors exert a similar effect during Ag activation of specific CD4+ effector T cells. Ag-specific polyclonal CD4+ T cell lines exhibit increased proliferation and IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-13 production when the CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 receptor is blocked by specific mAb. In contrast, cross-linking of this receptor down-regulates Ag-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation and increases IL-10 and TGF-beta production. PMID:11751964

  13. In situ synthesis of CdS/CdWO4/WO3 heterojunction films with enhanced photoelectrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Faqi; Li, Jie; Li, Wenzhang; Yang, Yahui; Liu, Wenhua; Li, Yaomin

    2016-09-01

    CdS/CdWO4/WO3 heterojunction films on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates are for the first time prepared as an efficient photoanode for photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen generation by an in situ conversion process. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet visible spectrometry (UV-vis) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The CdS hollow spheres (∼80 nm) sensitized WO3 plate film with a CdWO4 buffer-layer exhibits increased visible light absorption and a significantly improved photoelectrochemical performance. The photocurrent density at 0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) of the CdS/CdWO4/WO3 anode is ∼3 times higher than that of the CdWO4/WO3 anode, and ∼9 times higher than that of pure WO3 under illumination. The highest incident-photon-to-current-efficiency (IPCE) value increased from 16% to 63% when the ternary heterojunction was formed. This study demonstrates that the synthesis of ternary composite photocatalysts by the in situ conversion process may be a promising approach to achieve high photoelectric conversion efficiency.

  14. Antigen-dependent and –independent contributions to primary memory CD8 T cell activation and protection following infection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T-cell activation, including expression of IFN-γ and granzymeB, can be induced by antigen (Ag)-dependent signals through the T-cell-receptor, or by pathogen-derived inflammatory cytokines in an Ag-independent manner. Recent studies have come to conflicting results regarding the contributions of Ag and/or inflammation to memory CD8 T-cell activation. Additionally, research has indicated that inflammation-driven CD8 T-cell responses during un-related infections (bystander activation) have the potential to provide protection, but whether protection occurs in immuno-competent hosts is unclear. To investigate these questions, we examined activation of virus-specific memory CD8 T-cells following infection with L. monocytogenes either expressing or not cognate Ag. We show that Ag and inflammation act synergistically in vitro to induce memory activation. In vivo, we found that when memory CD8 T-cells significantly contribute to clearance of infection, early activation and continued responses by these cells are enhanced by cognate Ag recognition. Mechanistically, we show that bystander responses by memory are dependent upon the dose of infection and the amount of inflammation elicited following infection and are able to provide protection in IFN-γ deficient mice, but not in immuno-competent hosts. The data elucidate the requirements for memory CD8 T-cell activation and the protective role of bystander responses. PMID:26658291

  15. Detection of nitrogen dioxide down to ppb levels using flower-like tungsten oxide nanostructures under different annealing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Ding, Mengdi; Kou, Xueying; Guo, Lanlan; Feng, Changhao; Li, Xin; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Peng; Sun, Yanfeng; Lu, Geyu

    2016-12-01

    3D hierarchical flower-like WO3·0.33H2O nanostructures were synthesized via a facile solvothermal method without using any template or surfactant. After annealed at high temperature, the as-prepared WO3·0.33H2O would partly or fully transform into monoclinic WO3 with the morphology almost unchanged. Gas sensing properties of the sensor based on these flower-like nanostructures with the relationship of annealing temperature were also investigated systematically. The experiment results indicate the sensor shows highest response to NO2 when the annealing temperature is 500°C. At the same time, the detection limit can be as low as ∼5ppb level. Thus, the novel flower-like nanostructures might be a promising material for designing NO2 gas sensor with high performance. PMID:27565963

  16. Study of the production of charged pions, kaons, and protons in pPb collisions at 5.02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Van der Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Selvaggi, M.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins Junior, M. Correa; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. 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S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Kanishchev, F. K.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Grigelionis, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de La Cruz, I. Heredia; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Linares, E. Casimiro; Pineda, A. Morelos; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Butt, J.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; Da Cruz E Silva, C. Beirão; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Nguyen, F.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Korotkikh, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Vardanyan, I.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcarez Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Llatas, M. Chamizo; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Lopez, O. Gonzalez; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pelayo, J. Puerta; Quinario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzales Caballero, I.; Iglesias, L. Lloret; Gomez, J. Piedra; Cifuentes, J. A. Brochero; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Campderros, J. Duarte; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Sanchez, F. J. Munoz; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Cortabitarte, R. Vilar; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bendavid, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. Coarasa; Colafranceschi, S.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y.-J.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Taroni, S.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Bahtiyar, H.; Barlas, E.; Cankocak, K.; Günaydin, Y. O.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Bryer, A. Guneratne; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Felcini, M.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Takasugi, E.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Jandir, P.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Kcira, D.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Lacroix, F.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Mozer, M. U.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2014-06-01

    Spectra of identified charged hadrons are measured in pPb collisions with the CMS detector at the LHC at . Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range -1.7 and laboratory rapidity are identified via their energy loss in the silicon tracker. The average increases with particle mass and the charged multiplicity of the event. The increase of the average with charged multiplicity is greater for heavier hadrons. Comparisons to Monte Carlo event generators reveal that Epos Lhc, which incorporates additional hydrodynamic evolution of the created system, is able to reproduce most of the data features, unlike Hijing and Ampt. The spectra and integrated yields are also compared to those measured in pp and PbPb collisions at various energies. The average transverse momentum and particle ratio measurements indicate that particle production at LHC energies is strongly correlated with event particle multiplicity.

  17. New mass measurement of {sup 6}Li and ppb-level systematic studies of the Penning trap mass spectrometer TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Smith, M.; Dilling, J.; Brunner, T.; Champagne, C.; Lapierre, A.; Ringle, R.; Ryjkov, V. L.; Delheij, P.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.

    2009-10-15

    The frequency ratio of {sup 6}Li to {sup 7}Li was measured using the TITAN Penning trap mass spectrometer. This measurement resolves a 16-ppb discrepancy between the {sup 6}Li mass of 6.015 122 795(16) u from the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 (AME03), which is based on a measurement by JILATRAP, and the more recent measurement of 6.015 122 890(40) u by SMILETRAP. Our measurement agrees with SMILETRAP and a more precise mass value for {sup 6}Li of 6.015 122 889(26) u is presented along with systematic evaluations of the measurement uncertainties. This result makes {sup 6}Li a solid anchor point for future mass measurements on highly charged ions with m/q{approx}6.

  18. Producing CD-ROMs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyams, Peter, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue presents 11 articles that address issues relating to the production of CD-ROMs. Highlights include current uses of CD-ROM; standards; steps involved in producing CD-ROMs, including data capture, conversion, and tagging, product design, and indexing; authoring; selecting indexing and retrieval software; costs; multimedia CD-ROMs; and…

  19. CD14+CD16+ and CD14+CD163+ monocyte subpopulations in kidney allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monocytes represent a heterogeneous population of cells subdivided according to the expression level of membrane antigens. A pro-inflammatory (intermediate/nonclassical) subpopulation of monocytes is defined by expression of CD16. CD163 seems to be characteristically preferentially expressed by immunosuppressive monocytes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the distribution of monocyte subpopulations in 71 patients with kidney allograft transplantation. Results The phenotype was evaluated by flow cytometry in defined time points. The proportions of peripheral CD14+CD16+ monocytes were downregulated immediately after the kidney transplantation and basiliximab treatment partially attenuated this trend. The transient downregulation of the CD14+CD16+ subpopulation was adjusted to basal values in two months. The proportions of CD14+CD163+ monocytes were transiently upregulated early after the kidney transplantation and remained higher during the first month in most patients. In ATG treated patients, the expansion of CD14+CD163+ monocytes was delayed but their upregulation lasted longer. In vitro data showed the direct effect of ATG and methylprednisolone on expression of CD16 and CD163 molecules while basiliximab did not affect the phenotype of cultured monocytes. Conclusions We assume from our data that kidney allograft transplantation is associated with modulation of monocyte subpopulations (CD14+CD16+ and CD14+CD163+) partially affected by an immunosuppressive regime used. PMID:24499053

  20. THE AGS ELECTROSTATIC SEPTUM.

    SciTech Connect

    HOCK,J.RUSSO,T.GLEN,J.BROWN,K.

    2003-05-12

    The previous slow beam extraction electro static septum in the AGS was designed in 1981. Research documented at the Fermi Laboratory was used as the base line for this design. The septum consisted of a ground plane of .002 inch diameter wire tungsten-rhenium alloy (75%W 25%Re) with a hollow welded titanium cathode assembly. The vacuum chamber is stationary and the septum is moved with a pair of high vacuum linear feed throughs. After years of beam time, the frequency of failures increased. The vacuum system design was poor by today's standards and resulted in long pump down times after repairs. The failures ranged from broken septum wires to a twisted cathode. In addition to the failures, the mechanical drive system had too much backlash, making the operating position difficult to repeat. The new septum needed to address all of these issues in order to become a more reliable septum.

  1. EPIDAUROS Biotechnologie AG.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Hans-Peter; Kluge, Peter; Mauch, Simon

    2005-07-01

    EPIDAUROS Biotechnologie AG is a leading provider of pharmacogenetic consulting, genotyping and research services to the international pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, contract research organizations and healthcare providers. The company's mission is to improve safety, efficacy and predictability in drug development and drug therapy. EPIDAUROS determines its customers' needs in the field of pharmacogenetics using an in-depth consultancy process. The development and conduct of genotyping assays for drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters and drug targets (for example, receptors)--all performed under stringent quality standards--are a major activity at EPIDAUROS. The company offers its research services to academic and industrial partners for the development of innovative diagnostic solutions by using its intellectual property. PMID:16014003

  2. A sub-ppb measurement of the mass of cesium for a new determination of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Michael Patrick

    2000-12-01

    This thesis describes a recent measurement of the mass of atomic Cesium with a relative uncertainty of 2 × 10-10. This measurement reduces the uncertainty on the mass of Cesium by a factor of 100, and removes this uncertainty as a limitation on the accuracy of a determination of the fine-structure constant alpha via a Cesium photon recoil experiment. Removal of this limit should ultimately allow this value of alpha to have a relative accuracy ~1 ppb, which would be comparable to or even better than the most accurate measurement of alpha currently available. This value of alpha will help shed light on the current ~50 ppb discrepancies between values of alpha measured via different routes. In addition to the mass measurement of Cesium, this thesis also describes related mass measurements of atomic Rubidium and Sodium which reduce the uncertainties on these masses by factors ~100, with a view to possible future photon recoil measurements using these species. The measurements were taken using a new Penning trap mass spectrometer constructed by the author and his colleagues. This new spectrometer followed the general design principles of previous MIT ICR Lab Penning trap mass spectrometers, and incorporated a DC SQUID as an ion detector for the first time. This thesis concludes with a discussion of a passive two- coil system designed for shielding magnetic field gradients. These may prove to be the key enabling technology for a future double Penning trap mass spectrometer. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  3. AgH, Ag/sub 2/, and AgO revisited: Basis set extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    An extended basis set has been developed for Ag which significantly improves the agreement between theoretical and experimental spectroscopic parameters for AgH, AgO, and Ag/sub 2/. The major improvement comes about as a result of the improved treatment of electron correlation in the Ag d shell upon the introduction of f functions. Their inclusion produces very slight differences at the SCF level, but significant reductions in r/sub e/ and increases in ..omega../sub e/ and D/sub e/ in the Mo-dash-barller--Plesset perturbation theory expansion. At the MP4(SDTQ) level, typical results are 0.02 A too long for r/sub e/, 4% too low for ..omega../sub e/, and 10 kcal too small for D/sub e/. From a pragmatic standpoint, MP2 give results very similar to this at a much reduced level of effort.

  4. Stable core/shell CdTe/Mn-CdS quantum dots sensitized three-dimensional, macroporous ZnO nanosheet photoelectrode and their photoelectrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Weili; Sheng, Pengtao; Feng, Hongyan; Yin, Xuehua; Zhu, Xuewei; Yang, Xu; Cai, Qingyun

    2014-08-13

    A novel photoelectrode based on ZnS/CdTe/Mn-CdS/ZnS-sensitized three-dimensional macroporous ZnO nanosheet (NS) has been prepared by electrodeposition and successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The photoelectrode performances were significantly improved through the coupling of the core/shell CdTe/Mn-CdS quantum dots (QDs) with ZnO NS, and the introduction of the ZnS layer as a potential barrier. The photocurrent density systematically increases from ZnO NS (0.45 mA/cm(2)), CdTe/Mn-CdS/ZnO NS (4.98 mA/cm(2)), to ZnS/CdTe/Mn-CdS/ZnS/ZnO (6.23 mA/cm(2)) under the irradiation of AM 1.5G simulated sunlight. More important, the ZnS/CdTe/Mn-CdS/ZnS-sensitized ZnO NS photoelectrode provides a remarkable photoelectrochemical cell efficiency of 4.20% at -0.39 V vs Ag/AgCl. PMID:25010851

  5. Geochemistry of the Patricia Zn-Pb-Ag Deposit (paguanta, NE Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinchilla Benavides, D.; Merinero Palomares, R.; Piña García, R.; Ortega Menor, L.; Lunar Hernández, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Patricia Zn-Pb-Ag ore deposit is located within the Paguanta mining project, situated at the northern end of the Andean Oligocene Porphyry Copper Belt of Chile. The sulfide mineralization occurs as W-E oriented veins hosted in volcanic rocks, mainly andesite (pyroclastic, ash and lavas), of Upper Cretaceous to Middle Tertiary age. The ore mineralogy (obtained by EMPA analyses) comprises in order of abundance, pyrite, sphalerite (5.5 - 10.89 wt % Fe, 9.8-19 % molar FeS and 0.52 wt % Cd), galena, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite and Ag-bearing sulfosalts. The veins show a zoned and banded internal structure with pyrite at the edges and sphalerite in the center. The Ag occurs mostly as Ag-Cu-Sb sulfosalts, in order of abundance: series freibergite - argentotennantite -polybasite and stephanite. Other minor Ag phases such as argentite, pyrargirite and diaphorite were also identified. These Ag phases are typically associated with the base-metal sulfides. Freibergite occurs filling voids within sphalerite, chalcopyrite and at the contact between sphalerite and galena. Polybasite, stephanite, pyrargirite and argentite are mostly in close association with freibergite. In the case of diaphorite, it commonly occurs filling voids between galena crystals or as inclusions within galena. Some minor Ag-bearing sulfosalts are also identified between pyrite crystals. The alteration minerals are dominated by chlorite, illite and kaolinite. The gangue minerals consist of quartz and carbonates identified by XRD as kutnahorite. We obtained linear correlation statistically significant only for Ag, As Au, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb and Zn and therefore we generated an enhanced scatter plot matrix of these elements. Bulk rock analyses (ICP/MS and XRF) of drill cores show that Ag is strongly and positively correlated with Pb and As, moderately with Cd, Sb, Au and Zn and weakly with Cu, while Au is moderately and positively correlated with Ag, As, Cd, Sb and Zn and weakly with Cu and Pb. These results

  6. Heterologous vaccination against human tuberculosis modulates antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell function.

    PubMed

    Dintwe, One B; Day, Cheryl L; Smit, Erica; Nemes, Elisa; Gray, Clive; Tameris, Michele; McShane, Helen; Mahomed, Hassan; Hanekom, Willem A; Scriba, Thomas J

    2013-09-01

    Heterologous prime-boost strategies hold promise for vaccination against tuberculosis. However, the T-cell characteristics required for protection are not known. We proposed that boost vaccines should induce long-lived functional and phenotypic changes to T cells primed by Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) and/or natural exposure to mycobacteria. We characterized changes among specific CD4(+) T cells after vaccination with the MVA85A vaccine in adults, adolescents, and children. CD4(+) T cells identified with Ag85A peptide-bearing HLA class II tetramers were characterized by flow cytometry. We also measured proliferative potential and cytokine expression of Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T cells. During the effector phase, MVA85A-induced specific CD4(+) T cells coexpressed IFN-γ and IL-2, skin homing integrins, and the activation marker CD38. This was followed by contraction and a transition to predominantly IL-2-expressing, CD45RA(-) CCR7(+) CD27(+) or CD45RA(+) CCR7(+) CD27(+) specific CD4(+) T cells. These surface phenotypes were similar to Ag85A-specific T cells prior to MVA85A. However, functional differences were observed postvaccination: specific proliferative capacity was markedly higher after 6-12 months than before vaccination. Our data suggest that MVA85A vaccination may modulate Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T-cell function, resulting in greater recall potential. Importantly, surface phenotypes commonly used as proxies for memory T-cell function did not associate with functional effects of vaccination. PMID:23737382

  7. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  8. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavour decays in p-Pb collisions at √(S{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE collaboration, Cristiane Jahnke for the

    2014-11-11

    Electrons from the decay of hadrons containing charm or beauty quarks have been measured in p-Pb collisions at √(S{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE. Electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays were identified using the Time Projection Chamber and the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of ALICE. The nuclear modification factor R{sub pPb} was calculated using a pp reference obtained from a perturbative QCD-based √(s)-extrapolation of the cross section measured at 7 TeV and from a FONLL prediction.

  9. NK Cells Help Induce Anti-Hepatitis B Virus CD8+ T Cell Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meijuan; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-15

    Although recent clinical studies demonstrate that NK cell function is impaired in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-persistent patients, whether or how NK cells play a role in anti-HBV adaptive immunity remains to be explored. Using a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection by hydrodynamic injection of an HBV plasmid, we observed that although serum hepatitis B surface Ag and hepatitis B envelope Ag were eliminated within 3 to 4 wk, HBV might persist for >8 wk in CD8(-/-) mice and that adoptive transfer of anti-HBV CD8(+) T cells restored the ability to clear HBV in HBV-carrier Rag1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that CD8(+) T cells are critical in HBV elimination. Furthermore, NK cells increased IFN-γ production after HBV plasmid injection, and NK cell depletion led to significantly increased HBV persistence along with reduced frequency of hepatitis B core Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of IFN-γ-sufficient NK cells restored donor CD8(+) T cell function, indicating that NK cells positively regulated CD8(+) T cells via secreting IFN-γ. We also observed that NK cell depletion correlated with decreased effector memory CD8(+) T cell frequencies. Importantly, adoptive transfer experiments showed that NK cells were involved in anti-HBV CD8(+) T cell recall responses. Moreover, DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional, but not DX5(-)CD49a(+) liver-resident, NK cells were involved in improving CD8(+) T cell responses against HBV. Overall, the current study reveals that NK cells, especially DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional NK cells, promote the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cell responses via secreting IFN-γ in a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection. PMID:27183639

  10. Collaborative interactions between type 2 innate lymphoid cells and antigen-specific CD4+ Th2 cells exacerbate murine allergic airway diseases with prominent eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Lee, Jee-Boong; Chen, Chun-Yu; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2015-04-15

    Type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and the acquired CD4(+) Th2 and Th17 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of experimental asthma; however, their roles in Ag-driven exacerbation of chronic murine allergic airway diseases remain elusive. In this study, we report that repeated intranasal rechallenges with only OVA Ag were sufficient to trigger airway hyperresponsiveness, prominent eosinophilic inflammation, and significantly increased serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE in rested mice that previously developed murine allergic airway diseases. The recall response to repeated OVA inoculation preferentially triggered a further increase of lung OVA-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, whereas CD4(+) Th17 and ILC2 cell numbers remained constant. Furthermore, the acquired CD4(+) Th17 cells in Stat6(-/-)/IL-17-GFP mice, or innate ILC2s in CD4(+) T cell-ablated mice, failed to mount an allergic recall response to OVA Ag. After repeated OVA rechallenge or CD4(+) T cell ablation, the increase or loss of CD4(+) Th2 cells resulted in an enhanced or reduced IL-13 production by lung ILC2s in response to IL-25 and IL-33 stimulation, respectively. In return, ILC2s enhanced Ag-mediated proliferation of cocultured CD4(+) Th2 cells and their cytokine production, and promoted eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia driven by adoptively transferred Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells. Thus, these results suggest that an allergic recall response to recurring Ag exposures preferentially triggers an increase of Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, which facilitates the collaborative interactions between acquired CD4(+) Th2 cells and innate ILC2s to drive the exacerbation of a murine allergic airway diseases with an eosinophilic phenotype. PMID:25780046

  11. Investigation on the interaction of nanoAg with Cu-Zn SOD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Ruijing; Liu, Yang; Liu, Rutao

    2015-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (nanoAg) are used more and more widely, particularly because of their antimicrobial properties. The effect of exposure to nanoAg on the structure of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was thoroughly investigated using fluorescence measurements, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements, UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering (RLS), circular dichroism (CD), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Through van der Waal's force, nanoAg interacted with Cu-Zn SOD and influenced the active site by inducing structural changes, which influenced the function of SOD. The fluorescence studies show that both static and dynamic quenching processes occur. This paper provides reference data for toxicological studies of nanoAg, which are important in the future development of nanotechnology. PMID:25754791

  12. An overwhelmingly selective colorimetric sensor for Ag(+) using a simple modified polyacrylonitrile fiber.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaoli; Yang, Huixiao; Tao, Minli; Zhang, Wenqin

    2015-10-30

    A carboxymethyl-dithiocarbamate immobilized polyacrylonitrile fiber colorimetric sensor has been synthesized. This fiber sensor exhibits excellent selectivity and sensitivity for Ag(+) in aqueous solution with a remarkable color change from light pink to red-brown over a wide pH range of 2-12. The sensor responds selectively to Ag(+) in the presence of other ions, including Mg(2+), Al(3+), Ca(2+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+). The colorimetric sensor has an extremely fast response time (10s) and a low visual limit of detection (5.53×10(-12) mol/L). The fiber sensor also undergoes an obvious color change in the presence of Ag(+) solutions containing EDTA, NaCl or NaBr. Density functional theory optimization reveals that the sensor and Ag(+) interact via a seven-membered ring complexation mechanism. PMID:25967097

  13. A novel rosamine based fluorescent sensor for Ag+ recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lian-Qing; Gao, Le-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Rosamine derivative, N-(9-(4-(bis(2-(ethylthio)ethyl)amino)phenyl)-6-(diethylamino)-3H-xanthen-3-ylidene)-N-ethylethanaminium hexafluorophosphate, L, bearing an NS2 group as receptor, was synthesized as a turn on chemosensor for silver ion in ethanol solution. Sensor L exhibited high selectivity toward Ag+ in comparison to other metal cations (Cd2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Na+, Mg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Fe3+, and Zn2+). The detection limit for Ag+ was in 10-7 level. The binding properties between silver ion and L were further studied by 1HNMR titration experiments. The chemosensor L can be used as a potential material for silver recognition.

  14. Spin dynamics simulations at AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    To preserve proton polarization through acceleration, it is important to have a correct model of the process. It has been known that with the insertion of the two helical partial Siberian snakes in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the MAD model of AGS can not deal with a field map with offset orbit. The stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi provides a tool to represent the real electromagnetic fields in the modeling of the optics and spin dynamics for the AGS. Numerical experiments of resonance crossing, including spin dynamics in presence of the snakes and Q-jump, have been performed in AGS lattice models, using Zgoubi. This contribution reports on various results so obtained.

  15. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K < T < 280 K. The 109Ag NMR spectra for both samples have close to Lorentzian shapes and turn out to be mixtures of homogeneous and inhomogeneous lines. The linewidth Δ ν at room temperature is 1.3 kHz for both samples and gradually increases with decreasing temperature. Both the Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  16. Mannose-Capped Lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induces CD4+ T Cell Anergy via GRAIL.

    PubMed

    Sande, Obondo J; Karim, Ahmad F; Li, Qing; Ding, Xuedong; Harding, Clifford V; Rojas, Roxana E; Boom, W Henry

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall glycolipid, lipoarabinomannan, can inhibit CD4(+) T cell activation by downregulating the phosphorylation of key proximal TCR signaling molecules: Lck, CD3ζ, ZAP70, and LAT. Inhibition of proximal TCR signaling can result in T cell anergy, in which T cells are inactivated following an Ag encounter, yet remain viable and hyporesponsive. We tested whether mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (LAM)-induced inhibition of CD4(+) T cell activation resulted in CD4(+) T cell anergy. The presence of LAM during primary stimulation of P25 TCR-transgenic murine CD4(+) T cells with M. tuberculosis Ag85B peptide resulted in decreased proliferation and IL-2 production. P25 TCR-transgenic CD4(+) T cells primed in the presence of LAM also exhibited decreased response upon restimulation with Ag85B. The T cell anergic state persisted after the removal of LAM. Hyporesponsiveness to restimulation was not due to apoptosis, generation of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells, or inhibitory cytokines. Acquisition of the anergic phenotype correlated with upregulation of gene related to anergy in lymphocytes (GRAIL) protein in CD4(+) T cells. Inhibition of human CD4(+) T cell activation by LAM also was associated with increased GRAIL expression. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of GRAIL before LAM treatment abrogated LAM-induced hyporesponsiveness. In addition, exogenous IL-2 reversed defective proliferation by downregulating GRAIL expression. These results demonstrate that LAM upregulates GRAIL to induce anergy in Ag-reactive CD4(+) T cells. Induction of CD4(+) T cell anergy by LAM may represent one mechanism by which M. tuberculosis evades T cell recognition. PMID:26667170

  17. A Brucella spp. Protease Inhibitor Limits Antigen Lysosomal Proteolysis, Increases Cross-Presentation, and Enhances CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Coria, Lorena M; Ibañez, Andrés E; Tkach, Mercedes; Sabbione, Florencia; Bruno, Laura; Carabajal, Marianela V; Berguer, Paula M; Barrionuevo, Paula; Schillaci, Roxana; Trevani, Analía S; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Pasquevich, Karina A; Cassataro, Juliana

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that the unlipidated (U) outer membrane protein (Omp) 19 from Brucella spp. is a competitive inhibitor of human cathepsin L. U-Omp19 inhibits lysosome cathepsins and APC-derived microsome activity in vitro and partially inhibits lysosomal cathepsin L activity within live APCs. Codelivery of U-Omp19 with the Ag can reduce intracellular Ag digestion and increases Ag half-life in dendritic cells (DCs). U-Omp19 retains the Ag in Lamp-2(+) compartments after its internalization and promotes a sustained expression of MHC class I/peptide complexes in the cell surface of DCs. Consequently, U-Omp19 enhances Ag cross-presentation by DCs to CD8(+) T cells. U-Omp19 s.c. delivery induces the recruitment of CD11c(+)CD8α(+) DCs and monocytes to lymph nodes whereas it partially limits in vivo Ag proteolysis inside DCs. Accordingly, this protein is able to induce CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo against codelivered Ag. Antitumor responses were elicited after U-Omp19 coadministration, increasing survival of mice in a murine melanoma challenge model. Collectively, these results indicate that a cysteine protease inhibitor from bacterial origin could be a suitable component of vaccine formulations against tumors. PMID:27084100

  18. Systemic immunological tolerance to ocular antigens is mediated by TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-expressing CD8+ T cells*

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Thomas S.; Brincks, Erik L.; Gurung, Prajwal; Kucaba, Tamara A.; Ferguson, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic immunological tolerance to Ag encountered in the eye restricts the formation of potentially damaging immune responses that would otherwise be initiated at other anatomical locations. We previously demonstrated that tolerance to Ag administered via the anterior chamber (AC) of the eye required FasL-mediated apoptotic death of inflammatory cells that enter the eye in response to the antigenic challenge. Moreover, the systemic tolerance induced after AC injection of Ag was mediated by CD8+ regulatory T cells. The present study examined the mechanism by which these CD8+ regulatory T cells mediate tolerance after AC injection of Ag. AC injection of Ag did not prime CD4+ T cells, and led to increased TRAIL expression by splenic CD8+ T cells. Unlike wildtype mice, Trail−/− or Dr5−/− mice did not develop tolerance to Ag injected into the eye, even though responding lymphocytes underwent apoptosis in the AC of the eyes of these mice. CD8+ T cells from Trail−/− mice that were first injected AC with Ag were unable to transfer tolerance to naïve recipient wildtype mice, but CD8+ T cells from AC-injected wildtype or Dr5−/− mice could transfer tolerance. Importantly, the transferred wildtype (Trail+/+) CD8+ T cells were also able to decrease the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells into the eye; however, Trail−/− CD8+ T cells were unable to limit the inflammatory cell ingress. Together, our data suggest that “helpless” CD8+ regulatory T cells generated after AC injection of Ag enforce systemic tolerance in a TRAIL-dependent manner to inhibit inflammation in the eye. PMID:21169546

  19. CD103+ dendritic cells suppress Helminth-driven Type 2 immunity through constitutive expression of IL-12

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Batf3-dependent CD103+ and CD8alpha+ dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the development of type 1 immune responses. However, their role in type 2 immunity remains unclear. We found that Th2 cell responses were enhanced in Batf3-/- mice responding to helminth parasite antigens (Ag). As a r...

  20. STABILITY OF PPB HAZARDOUS ORGANIC CYLINDER GASES AND PERFORMANCE AUDIT RESULTS OF SOURCE TEST AND AMBIENT AIR MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS--STATUS REPORT #5

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of 29 gaseous organic compounds at PPB levels incompressed gas cylinders was conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Primary objectives of this on-going project are to 1) evaluate the quality of measurements made by EPA, state/local agencies or ...

  1. Eccentric protons? Sensitivity of flow to system size and shape in p+p, p+Pb, and Pb+Pb collisions.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Björn; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-09-01

    We determine the transverse system size of the initial nonequilibrium Glasma state and of the hydrodynamically evolving fireball as a function of produced charged particles in p+p, p+Pb, and Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Our results show features similar to those of recent measurements of Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii by the ALICE Collaboration. Azimuthal anisotropy coefficients vn generated by combining the early time Glasma dynamics with viscous fluid dynamics in Pb+Pb collisions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for a wide range of centralities. In particular, event-by-event distributions of the vn values agree with the experimental data out to fairly peripheral centrality bins. In striking contrast, our results for p+Pb collisions significantly underestimate the magnitude and do not reproduce the centrality dependence of data for v2 and v3 coefficients. We argue that the measured vn data and HBT radii strongly constrain the shapes of initial parton distributions across system sizes that would be compatible with a flow interpretation in p+Pb collisions. Alternately, additional sources of correlations may be required to describe the systematics of long-range rapidity correlations in p+p and p+Pb collisions. PMID:25238350

  2. Measurement of dijet kT in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Chunhui, Z.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.

    2015-06-01

    A measurement of dijet correlations in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV with the ALICE detector is presented. Jets are reconstructed from charged particles measured in the central tracking detectors and neutral energy deposited in the electromagnetic calorimeter. The transverse momentum of the full jet (clustered from charged and neutral constituents) and charged jet (clustered from charged particles only) is corrected event-by-event for the contribution of the underlying event, while corrections for underlying event fluctuations and finite detector resolution are applied on an inclusive basis. A projection of the dijet transverse momentum, kTy = pT,jetch+ne sin (Δφdijet) with Δφdijet the azimuthal angle between a full and charged jet and pT,jetch+ne the transverse momentum of the full jet, is used to study nuclear matter effects in p-Pb collisions. This observable is sensitive to the acoplanarity of dijet production and its potential modification in p-Pb collisions with respect to pp collisions. Measurements of the dijet kTy as a function of the transverse momentum of the full and recoil charged jet, and the event multiplicity are presented. No significant modification of kTy due to nuclear matter effects in p-Pb collisions with respect to the event multiplicity or a PYTHIA8 reference is observed.

  3. Freeze-out radii extracted from three-pion cumulants in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.

    2014-12-01

    In high-energy collisions, the spatio-temporal size of the particle production region can be measured using the Bose-Einstein correlations of identical bosons at low relative momentum. The source radii are typically extracted using two-pion correlations, and characterize the system at the last stage of interaction, called kinetic freeze-out. In low-multiplicity collisions, unlike in high-multiplicity collisions, two-pion correlations are substantially altered by background correlations, e.g. mini-jets. Such correlations can be suppressed using three-pion cumulant correlations. We present the first measurements of the size of the system at freeze-out extracted from three-pion cumulant correlations in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE. At similar multiplicity, the invariant radii extracted in p-Pb collisions are found to be 5-15% larger than those in pp, while those in Pb-Pb are 35-55% larger than those in p-Pb. Our measurements disfavor models which incorporate substantially stronger collective expansion in p-Pb as compared to pp collisions at similar multiplicity.

  4. A novel biosensor based on Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles for SERS detection of arsenic (III).

    PubMed

    Song, Lulu; Mao, Kang; Zhou, Xiaodong; Hu, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose for the first time a simple and novel approach based on SERS and As (III) -aptamer for detection of As (III) with excellent selectivity and sensitivity. To maintain the wonderful SERS substrate, Au@Ag shell-core nanoparticle has been successfully synthesized by seeds growth method. As-prepared Au@Ag not only has well-dispersed but also obtains high SERS efficiency. The novel As (III) biosensor has an excellent linear correlation with the concentration of As (III) ranging from 0.5 to 10 ppb. The detection limit of this assay for As (III) is 0.1 ppb (3 times standard deviation rules) which is lower than the maximum limitation guided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Importantly, the results were demonstrated that no other ions interfered with the detection of As (III) in water. Further, this As (III) biosensor was demonstrated in monitoring As (III) in lake water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26695265

  5. Ag@Au core-shell dendrites: a stable, reusable and sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun Yin, Hong; Yang Chen, Zhao; Mei Zhao, Yong; Yang Lv, Ming; An Shi, Chun; Long Wu, Zheng; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Luo; Li Wang, Ming; Jun Xu, Hai

    2015-09-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on fabricated Ag@Au core-shell dendrite was achieved. Ag dendrites were grown on Si wafer by the hydrothermal corrosion method and Au nanofilm on the surface of Ag dendritic nanostructure was then fabricated by chemical reduction. With the help of sodium borohydride in water, Au surface absorbates such as thiophene, adenine, rhodamine, small anions (Br- and I-), and a polymer (PVP, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)) can be completely and rapidly removed. After four repeatable experiments, the substrate SERS function did not decrease at all, indicating that the Ag@Au dendrite should be of great significance to SERS application because it can save much resource. Six-month-duration stability tests showed that the Ag@Au core-shell dendrite substrate is much more stable than the Ag dendrite substrates. We have also experimented on fast detection of Cd2+ at 10-8  M concentration by decorating single-stranded DNA containing adenine and guanine bases on the surface of this Ag@Au dendrite. Finite-difference time-domain simulations were carried out to investigate the influence of Au nanolayer on Ag dendrites, which showed that the local electric fields and enhancement factor are hardly affected when a 4 nm Au nanolayer is coated on Ag dendrite surface.

  6. Ag@Au core-shell dendrites: a stable, reusable and sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong Jun; Chen, Zhao Yang; Zhao, Yong Mei; Lv, Ming Yang; Shi, Chun An; Wu, Zheng Long; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Luo; Wang, Ming Li; Xu, Hai Jun

    2015-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on fabricated Ag@Au core-shell dendrite was achieved. Ag dendrites were grown on Si wafer by the hydrothermal corrosion method and Au nanofilm on the surface of Ag dendritic nanostructure was then fabricated by chemical reduction. With the help of sodium borohydride in water, Au surface absorbates such as thiophene, adenine, rhodamine, small anions (Br(-) and I(-)), and a polymer (PVP, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)) can be completely and rapidly removed. After four repeatable experiments, the substrate SERS function did not decrease at all, indicating that the Ag@Au dendrite should be of great significance to SERS application because it can save much resource. Six-month-duration stability tests showed that the Ag@Au core-shell dendrite substrate is much more stable than the Ag dendrite substrates. We have also experimented on fast detection of Cd(2+) at 10(-8) M concentration by decorating single-stranded DNA containing adenine and guanine bases on the surface of this Ag@Au dendrite. Finite-difference time-domain simulations were carried out to investigate the influence of Au nanolayer on Ag dendrites, which showed that the local electric fields and enhancement factor are hardly affected when a 4 nm Au nanolayer is coated on Ag dendrite surface. PMID:26412773

  7. Ag@Au core-shell dendrites: a stable, reusable and sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate

    PubMed Central

    Jun Yin, Hong; Yang Chen, Zhao; Mei Zhao, Yong; Yang Lv, Ming; An Shi, Chun; Long Wu, Zheng; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Luo; Li Wang, Ming; Jun Xu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on fabricated Ag@Au core-shell dendrite was achieved. Ag dendrites were grown on Si wafer by the hydrothermal corrosion method and Au nanofilm on the surface of Ag dendritic nanostructure was then fabricated by chemical reduction. With the help of sodium borohydride in water, Au surface absorbates such as thiophene, adenine, rhodamine, small anions (Br– and I–), and a polymer (PVP, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)) can be completely and rapidly removed. After four repeatable experiments, the substrate SERS function did not decrease at all, indicating that the Ag@Au dendrite should be of great significance to SERS application because it can save much resource. Six-month-duration stability tests showed that the Ag@Au core-shell dendrite substrate is much more stable than the Ag dendrite substrates. We have also experimented on fast detection of Cd2+ at 10−8  M concentration by decorating single-stranded DNA containing adenine and guanine bases on the surface of this Ag@Au dendrite. Finite-difference time-domain simulations were carried out to investigate the influence of Au nanolayer on Ag dendrites, which showed that the local electric fields and enhancement factor are hardly affected when a 4 nm Au nanolayer is coated on Ag dendrite surface. PMID:26412773

  8. Insights into the adsorption capacity and breakthrough properties of a synthetic zeolite against a mixture of various sulfur species at low ppb levels.

    PubMed

    Vellingiri, Kowsalya; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kwon, Eilhann E; Deep, Akash; Jo, Sang-Hee; Szulejko, Jan E

    2016-01-15

    The sorptive removal properties of a synthetic A4 zeolite were evaluated against sulfur dioxide (SO2) and four reference reduced sulfur compounds (RSC: hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanethiol (CH3SH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS, (CH3)2S), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, CH3SSCH3). To this end, a sorbent bed of untreated (as-received) A4 zeolite was loaded with gaseous standards at four concentration levels (10-100 part-per-billion (ppb (v/v)) at four different volumes (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1 L increments) in both increasing (IO: 0.1-1.0 L) and decreasing volume order (DO: 1.0 to 0.1 L). Morphological properties were characterized by PXRD, FTIR, and BET analysis. The removal efficiency of SO2 decreased from 100% for all concentrations at 0.1 L (initial sample volume) to ∼82% (100 ppb) or ∼96% (10 ppb) at 3.6 L. In contrast, removal efficiency of RSC was near 100% at small loading volumes but then fell sharply, irrespective of concentration (10-100 ppb) (e.g., 32% (DMS) to 52% (H2S) at 100 ppb). The adsorption capacity of zeolite, if expressed in terms of solid-gas partition coefficient (e.g., similar to the Henry's law constant (mmol kg(-1) Pa(-1))), showed moderate variabilities with the standard concentration levels and S compound types such as the minimum of 2.03 for CH3SH (at 20 ppb) to the maximum of 13.9 for SO2 (at 10 ppb). It clearly demonstrated a notable distinction in the removal efficiency of A4 zeolite among the different S species in a mixture with enhanced removal efficiency of SO2 compared to the RSCs. PMID:26562781

  9. Strong magnetization damping induced by Ag nanostructures in Ag/NiFe/Ag trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley Domínguez, D.; da Silva, G. L.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2013-07-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance has been used to investigate the magnetization relaxation in trilayers of Ag(t)/NiFe(10 nm)/Ag(t), sputter deposited on Si(001) where the thickness of the Ag layer varied from 0 nm to 24 nm. In the first stages of formation, the Ag layers form islands that work as mold to imprint defects or inhomogeneities on the NiFe film surface. The magnetic inhomogeneities and defects imprinted on the surface of the NiFe film act as extrinsic sources of magnetization relaxation in addition to the intrinsic Gilbert damping mechanism. Weak inhomogeneities are associated to the two-magnon scattering source and the strong inhomogeneities are associated to the fluctuations of the local magnetization. By adding the three different sources of magnetization damping, we were able to explain the azimuthal dependence of the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth.

  10. CD8+ CD28− and CD8+ CD57+ T cells and their role in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Strioga, Marius; Pasukoniene, Vita; Characiejus, Dainius

    2011-01-01

    Chronic antigenic stimulation leads to gradual accumulation of late-differentiated, antigen-specific, oligoclonal T cells, particularly within the CD8+ T-cell compartment. They are characterized by critically shortened telomeres, loss of CD28 and/or gain of CD57 expression and are defined as either CD8+CD28− or CD8+CD57+ T lymphocytes. There is growing evidence that the CD8+CD28− (CD8+CD57+) T-cell population plays a significant role in various diseases or conditions, associated with chronic immune activation such as cancer, chronic intracellular infections, chronic alcoholism, some chronic pulmonary diseases, autoimmune diseases, allogeneic transplantation, as well as has a great influence on age-related changes in the immune system status. CD8+CD28− (CD8+CD57+) T-cell population is heterogeneous and composed of various functionally competing (cytotoxic and immunosuppressive) subsets thus the overall effect of CD8+CD28− (CD8+CD57+) T-cell-mediated immunity depends on the predominance of a particular subset. Many articles claim that CD8+CD28− (CD8+CD57+) T cells have lost their proliferative capacity during process of replicative senescence triggered by repeated antigenic stimulation. However recent data indicate that CD8+CD28− (CD8+CD57+) T cells can transiently up-regulate telomerase activity and proliferate under certain stimulation conditions. Similarly, conflicting data is provided regarding CD8+CD28− (CD8+CD57+) T-cell sensitivity to apoptosis, finally leading to the conclusion that this T-cell population is also heterogeneous in terms of its apoptotic potential. This review provides a comprehensive approach to the CD8+CD28− (CD8+CD57+) T-cell population: we describe in detail its origins, molecular and functional characteristics, subsets, role in various diseases or conditions, associated with persistent antigenic stimulation. PMID:21711350

  11. Targeting with bovine CD154 enhances humoral immune responses induced by a DNA vaccine in sheep.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Sharmila; Griebel, Philip J; Babiuk, Lorne A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2003-01-15

    CD40-CD154 interactions play an important role in regulating humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, these interactions have been exploited for the development of therapeutic and preventive treatments. The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine CD154 to target a plasmid-encoded Ag to CD40-expressing APCs. To achieve this, a plasmid coding for bovine CD154 fused to a truncated secreted form of bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein D (tgD), pSLIAtgD-CD154, was constructed. The chimeric tgD-CD154 was expressed in vitro in COS-7 cells and reacted with both glycoprotein D- and CD154-specific Abs. Both tgD and tgD-CD154 were capable of binding to epithelial cells, whereas only tgD-CD154 bound to B cells. Furthermore, dual-labeling of ovine PBMCs revealed that tgD-CD154 was bound by primarily B cells. The functional integrity of the tgD-CD154 chimera was confirmed by the induction of both IL-4-dependent B cell proliferation and tgD-specific lymphoproliferative responses in vitro. Finally, sheep immunized with pSLIAtgD-CD154 developed a more rapid primary tgD-specific Ab response and a significantly stronger tgD-specific secondary response when compared with animals immunized with pSLIAtgD and control animals. Similarly, virus-neutralizing Ab titers were significantly higher after secondary immunization with pSLIAtgD-CD154. These results demonstrate that using CD154 to target plasmid-expressed Ag can significantly enhance immune responses induced by a DNA vaccine. PMID:12517965

  12. Synthesis of Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms and their use as DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ma, Zhanfang

    2011-06-01

    A simple synthetic route to prepare Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms consists of the facile addition of Na(2) S to a solution of triangular Ag nanoprisms. The resulting Ag(2) S-Ag nanoparticles are more stable in solution than the original Ag nanoprisms, and two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of the original Ag nanoprisms still remain. In addition, the SPR bands of the Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms are tunable over a wide range. The Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms can be directly bioconjugated via well-established stable Ag(2) S surface chemistry with readily available sulfur coupling agents. The nanoprisms are used in the hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides, and show promise as probes for future biosensing applications. PMID:21538868

  13. Study of the oxygen transport through Ag (110), Ag (poly), and Ag 2.0 Zr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Wu, D.; Davidson, M. R.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of oxygen through high-purity membranes of Ag (110), Ag (poly), Ag (nano), and Ag 2.0 Zr has been studied by an ultrahigh vacuum permeation method over the temperature range of 400-800 C. The data show that there are substantial deviations from ordinary diffusion-controlled transport. A surface limitation has been confirmed by glow-discharge studies where the upstream O2 supply has been partially converted to atoms, which, for the same temperature and pressure, gave rise to over an order of magnitude increase in transport flux. Further, the addition of 2.0 wt percent Zr to the Ag has provided increased dissociative adsorption rates, which, in turn, increased the transport flux by a factor of 2. It was also observed that below a temperature of 630 C, the diffusivity exhibits an increase in activation energy of over 4 kcal/mol, which has been attributed to trapping of the atomic oxygen and/or kinetic barriers at the surface and subsurface of the vacuum interface. Above 630 C, the activation barrier decreases to the accepted value of about 11 kcal/mol for Ag (poly), consistent with zero concentration at the vacuum interface.

  14. CdTe and ZnTe metal interface formation and Fermi-level pinning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahi, A. K.; Carey, G. P.; Chiang, T. T.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    Interfacial morphology and Fermi-level pinning behavior at the interfaces of Al, Ag, and Pt with UHV-cleaved CdTe and ZnTe are studied using X-ray photoelectron and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopies. Results are compared to metal/HgCdTe interface formation. For Al/CdTe, a case is found where significantly greater intermixing occurs in CdTe than seen on HgCdTe. The Al/ZnTe interface is also more abrupt than Al/CdTe. Band bending results for interfaces of all three metals with p-CdTe and p-ZnTe are presented and implications for metal/HgZnTe interface formation are considered.

  15. In situ decoration of plasmonic Ag nanocrystals on the surface of (BiO)2CO3 hierarchical microspheres for enhanced visible light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fan; Li, Qiuyan; Zhou, Ying; Sun, Yanjun; Zhang, Haidong; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2014-07-01

    Novel plasmonic 0D Ag nanocrystal decorated 3D (BiO)2CO3 hierarchical microspheres were fabricated with a one-pot hydrothermal method. The as-prepared samples were systematically characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, ns-level time-resolved fluorescence spectra, photocurrent generation and EIS measurement. The results indicated that the 0D Ag nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of 3D (BiO)2CO3 hierarchical microspheres. The deposited Ag nanoparticles were reduced from Ag(+) by the citrate ions from bismuth citrate. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples was evaluated towards the degradation of NO at ppb-level under visible light irradiation. The intermediate NO2 was monitored on-line during the photocatalytic reaction. The pure (BiO)2CO3 microspheres exhibited decent visible light photocatalytic activity because of the surface scattering and reflecting (SSR effect) resulting from the special 3D hierarchical architecture. The Ag-decorated (BiO)2CO3 microspheres (Ag/BOC) exhibited greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity, photocurrent generation and promoted NO2 oxidation compared to the pure (BiO)2CO3 microspheres. The enhanced photocatalytic activity and photocurrent generation of Ag/BOC was ascribed to the cooperative contribution of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR effect), efficient separation of electron-hole pairs and prolonged lifetime of charge carriers induced by Ag nanoparticles. The photocatalytic performance of Ag/BOC was dependent on the content of Ag loading. When the amount of Ag is controlled at 5%, the highest photocatalytic performance can be achieved. Further increasing the Ag loading content promotes aggregation of the Ag particles and transforms the uniform microspheres into non-uniform microspheres, which is not beneficial

  16. Characterization of Highly Efficient CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells by Low-Temperature Photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Matsuzaki, Yuichi; Amin, Nowshad; Yamada, Akira; Konagai, Makoto

    1998-07-01

    Highly efficient CdTe thin film solar cells prepared by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) method with a glass/ITO/CdS/CdTe/Cu-doped carbon/Ag structure were characterized by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement. A broad 1.42 eV band probably due to VCd Cl defect complexes appeared as a result of CdCl2 treatment. CdS/CdTe junction PL revealed that a CdSxTe1-x mixed crystal layer was formed at the CdS/CdTe interface region during the deposition of CdTe by CSS and that CdCl2 treatment promoted the formation of the mixed crystal layer. Furthermore, in the PL spectra of the heat-treated CdTe after screen printing of the Cu-doped carbon electrode, a neutral-acceptor bound exciton (ACu0, X) line at 1.590 eV was observed, suggesting that Cu atoms were incorporated into CdTe as effective acceptors after the heat treatment.

  17. Preferential induction of CD4+ T cell responses through in vivo targeting of antigen to dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-1.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert W; Thompson, Clare; Reid, Delyth M; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F

    2006-08-15

    Targeting of Ags and therapeutics to dendritic cells (DCs) has immense potential for immunotherapy and vaccination. Because DCs are heterogeneous, optimal targeting strategies will require knowledge about functional specialization among DC subpopulations and identification of molecules for targeting appropriate DCs. We characterized the expression of a fungal recognition receptor, DC-associated C-type lectin-1 (Dectin-1), on mouse DC subpopulations and investigated the ability of an anti-Dectin-1 Ab to deliver Ag for the stimulation of immune responses. Dectin-1 was shown to be expressed on CD8alpha-CD4-CD11b+ DCs found in spleen and lymph nodes and dermal DCs present in skin and s.c. lymph nodes. Injection of Ag-anti-Dectin-1 conjugates induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell and Ab responses at low doses where free Ag failed to elicit a response. Notably, qualitatively different immune responses were generated by targeting Ag to Dectin-1 vs CD205, a molecule expressed on CD8alpha+CD4-CD11b- DCs, dermal DCs, and Langerhans cells. Unlike anti-Dectin-1, anti-CD205 conjugates failed to elicit an Ab response. Moreover, when conjugates were injected i.v., anti-Dectin-1 stimulated a much stronger CD4+ T cell response and a much weaker CD8+ T cell response than anti-CD205. The results reveal Dectin-1 as a potential targeting molecule for immunization and have implications for the specialization of DC subpopulations. PMID:16887988

  18. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells efficiently capture HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins via CD4 for antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Loré, Karin

    2013-07-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient Ag uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4(+) Th cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. In this study, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalize and present recombinant Env to CD4(+) T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalized Env via C-type lectin receptors, whereas blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) myeloid DCs, CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs), and CD141(+) DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of C-type lectin receptors and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for Ag uptake compared with myeloid DCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalize Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1(+) endosomes that progressed to Lamp1(+) and MHC class II(+) lysosomes where internalized Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalize an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4(+) T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described in this paper, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to Ag presentation, and this may therefore be a mechanism used by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  19. CD3+CD8+CD28− T Lymphocytes in Patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The results of studies on the CD3+CD8+CD28− cells in SLE are inconsistent since several analyses describe CD3+CD8+CD28− as either immunosuppressive or cytotoxic. The aim of this study is to inquire whether the quantitative changes of CD3+CD8+CD28− T lymphocytes subpopulation are related to the clinical status of patients with lupus nephritis. Evaluation of Foxp3 expression on CD3+CD8+CD28− cells may shed some light on functional properties of these cells. 54 adult SLE patients and 19 sex and age matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. There were 15 patients in inactive (SLEDAI ≤ 5) and 39 in active (SLEDAI > 5) phase of disease. We determined absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− and CD3+CD8+CD28−Foxp3+ subpopulations by flow cytometry. We observed a statistically significant increase in absolute count and percentage of CD3+CD8+CD28− in SLE patients compared to HC (p < 0.001). Moreover there was significant positive correlation between increasing absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− cells and disease activity measured by SLEDAI (rs = 0.281, p = 0.038). Active LN patients had increased absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− cells compared to HC. Positive correlation of CD3+CD8+CD28− number with disease activity, and lack of Foxp3 expression on these cells, suggests that CD3+CD8+CD28− lymphocytes might be responsible for an increased proinflammatory response in the exacerbation of SLE. PMID:27446964

  20. CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T Lymphocytes in Patients with Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Żabińska, Marcelina; Krajewska, Magdalena; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The results of studies on the CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells in SLE are inconsistent since several analyses describe CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) as either immunosuppressive or cytotoxic. The aim of this study is to inquire whether the quantitative changes of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocytes subpopulation are related to the clinical status of patients with lupus nephritis. Evaluation of Foxp3 expression on CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells may shed some light on functional properties of these cells. 54 adult SLE patients and 19 sex and age matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. There were 15 patients in inactive (SLEDAI ≤ 5) and 39 in active (SLEDAI > 5) phase of disease. We determined absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) and CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-)Foxp3(+) subpopulations by flow cytometry. We observed a statistically significant increase in absolute count and percentage of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) in SLE patients compared to HC (p < 0.001). Moreover there was significant positive correlation between increasing absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells and disease activity measured by SLEDAI (rs = 0.281, p = 0.038). Active LN patients had increased absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells compared to HC. Positive correlation of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) number with disease activity, and lack of Foxp3 expression on these cells, suggests that CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) lymphocytes might be responsible for an increased proinflammatory response in the exacerbation of SLE. PMID:27446964

  1. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au+ ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  2. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures. PMID:26563266

  3. Enhancement of photoluminescence of different quantum dots by Ag@SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ya-Hsing; Lu, Yu-Chieh; Chou, Kan-Sen

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Enhancement effects of CdS/ZnS, Cd{sub 0.3}Pb{sub 0.7}S and ZnS QDs linked to Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were studied. ► There existed an optimal thickness of SiO{sub 2} shell on the enhancement. ► The enhancement factor was in the range of 2.5–3 for CdS/ZnS and Cd{sub 0.3}Pb{sub 0.7}S QDs. ► The PL intensity of ZnS QD was totally quenched due to absorption by silver particles. - Abstract: The enhancement of photoluminescence of several quantum dots, namely CdS/ZnS, Cd{sub 0.3}Pb{sub 0.7}S and pure ZnS, by Ag@SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles is studied and reported in this work. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) was used to link QDs to the core–shell nanoparticles. For CdS/ZnS, the Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles showed a maximum enhancement of about 2.5 due to surface plasmon resonance of silver particles when the shell thickness was 16 nm. When the shell thickness increased to 30 nm, the enhancement effect became negligible. Conversely, when the thickness decreased to 6 nm, the effect was also smaller due to possible capture of excited electrons by silver particles. For Cd{sub 0.3}Pb{sub 0.7}S, a similar enhancement effect was observed. However when pure ZnS was the QD, the photoluminescence went zero after the QD was linked to Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. This was caused by the fact that for ZnS QDs, the emission wavelength was 415 nm, which also corresponds to the absorbance peak of silver particles.

  4. Probing the rupture of a Ag atomic junction in a Ag-Au mixed electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We probed that the atomic junction in Ag part ruptures during stretching of atomic sized contacts of Ag-Au mixed electrodes, resulting in Ag-Ag electrodes through a scanning tunneling microscope breaking junction (STM-BJ) technique. We observed that the conductance and tunneling decay constant for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions are essentially the same for the Ag-Au mixed and the Ag-Ag electrodes. We also found the molecular plateau length and the evolution patterns with the Ag-Au mixed electrodes are similar to those with Ag-Ag electrodes rather than the Au-Au electrodes in the molecular junction elongation. This result is attributed to the smaller binding energy of Ag atoms compared to that of Au atoms, so the Ag junction part is more easily broken than that of Au part in stretching of Ag-Au mixed electrodes. Furthermore, we successfully observed that the rupture force of the atomic junction for the Ag-Au mixed electrodes was identical to that for the Ag-Ag electrodes and smaller than that for the Au-Au electrodes. This study may advance the understanding of the electrical and the mechanical properties in molecular devices with Ag and Au electrodes in future.

  5. The AGS Booster control system

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, R.; Auerbach, E.; Culwick, B.; Clifford, T.; Mandell, S.; Mariotti, R.; Salwen, C.; Schumburg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Although moderate in size, the Booster construction project requires a comprehensive control system. There are three operational modes: as a high intensity proton injector for the AGS, as a heavy ion accelerator and injector supporting a wide range of ions and as a polarized proton storage injector. These requirements are met using a workstation based extension of the existing AGS control system. Since the Booster is joining a complex of existing accelerators, the new system will be capable of supporting multiuser operational scenarios. A short discussion of this system is discussed in this paper.

  6. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t1/2 = 37.24 min) - accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36Cl/Cl analysis.

  7. Highly ordered surfactant micelles function as the extraction matrix for direct electrochemical detection of halonitrobenzenes at the ppb level.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lina; Yan, Fei; Su, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Halonitrobenzenes (HNBs) are a class of molecules that are highly toxic to human health and the ecological environment. Thus, effective and efficient approaches capable of monitoring and detecting HNBs are greatly desired. We report herein a simple and sensitive method for the detection of HNBs. The detection was based on the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with a binary assembly of highly ordered surfactant micelles (OSMs) and silica mesochannels (SMs). The SMs have a diameter of 2-3 nm and a vertical orientation, which provide a hard support to stabilize soft OSMs. Moreover, each OSM consists of a hydrophobic core due to the organized assembly of surfactant hydrocarbon chains, which can selectively extract and concentrate lipophilic HNBs from aqueous media, allow their transport to the underlying ITO electrode surface and therein their detection by voltammetry. As a proof-of-concept experiment, 1-chloro-3-nitrobenzene, 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene, 1-bromo-4-nitrobenzene and 2,4-dinitrobromobenzene were analyzed in aqueous solutions. A simple and fast detection was achieved in all cases, with a wide linear dynamic range, a high sensitivity and a low limit of detection at the ppb level. Apart from the extraction ability, the OSMs also prohibited the access of and surface contamination by unwanted substances, showing excellent anti-fouling and anti-interference power. Indeed, as we demonstrated, the sensor could be employed for direct electrochemical detection of HNBs in complex samples, such as lake water and soil dispersion, without any pre-treatment, indicating its potential usefulness in practical analysis. PMID:26887641

  8. Comparison between Elecsys HBsAg II and Architect HBsAg QT Assays for Quantification of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen among Patients Coinfected with HIV and Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Maylin, Sarah; Boyd, Anders; Delaugerre, Constance; Zoulim, Fabien; Lavocat, Fabien; Simon, François; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) quantification has been steadily gaining interest as a clinical marker of therapeutic efficacy, for which two commercial assays are currently available: Architect HBsAg QT (Architect) and Elecsys HBsAg II (Elecsys). HBsAg quantification was evaluated using both assays in 126 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients initiating treatment with tenofovir dipivoxil fumarate. Linear regression and correlation were used to establish the relationship between the two methods. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to determine mean between-assay difference and limits of agreement (LOA) (±2 standard deviations [SD]) both overall and stratified on HBV (hepatitis B envelope antigen [HBeAg] status, replication, genotype, HBV mutants) or HIV (CD4+ cell count) cofactors. There was a significant correlation between Elecsys and Architect assays (correlation coefficient, r = 0.959; P < 0.001). HBsAg quantification using the Elecsys assay was on average 0.200 log10 IU/ml (LOA, −0.500, 0.800) higher than that using Architect, which was consistent across levels of CD4+ cell count, presence of precore and YMDD mutations, and HBeAg status. A slightly larger mean between-assay difference was observed with genotypes A and G (0.196 and 0.201, respectively) versus HBV genotypes D and E (0.036 and 0.030, respectively). Mutations on the S region at position s120/s145 were the only determinant in which the mean between-assay difference in HBsAg quantification was lower than the null value (−0.078). In conclusion, the Elecsys assay, with automatic on-board dilution, is capable of quantifying serum HBsAg levels in HIV-HBV-coinfected patients, with very high correlation with the Architect assay. PMID:22190396

  9. Comparison between Elecsys HBsAg II and architect HBsAg QT assays for quantification of hepatitis B surface antigen among patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Maylin, Sarah; Boyd, Anders; Delaugerre, Constance; Zoulim, Fabien; Lavocat, Fabien; Simon, François; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Lacombe, Karine

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) quantification has been steadily gaining interest as a clinical marker of therapeutic efficacy, for which two commercial assays are currently available: Architect HBsAg QT (Architect) and Elecsys HBsAg II (Elecsys). HBsAg quantification was evaluated using both assays in 126 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients initiating treatment with tenofovir dipivoxil fumarate. Linear regression and correlation were used to establish the relationship between the two methods. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to determine mean between-assay difference and limits of agreement (LOA) (±2 standard deviations [SD]) both overall and stratified on HBV (hepatitis B envelope antigen [HBeAg] status, replication, genotype, HBV mutants) or HIV (CD4(+) cell count) cofactors. There was a significant correlation between Elecsys and Architect assays (correlation coefficient, r = 0.959; P < 0.001). HBsAg quantification using the Elecsys assay was on average 0.200 log(10) IU/ml (LOA, -0.500, 0.800) higher than that using Architect, which was consistent across levels of CD4(+) cell count, presence of precore and YMDD mutations, and HBeAg status. A slightly larger mean between-assay difference was observed with genotypes A and G (0.196 and 0.201, respectively) versus HBV genotypes D and E (0.036 and 0.030, respectively). Mutations on the S region at position s120/s145 were the only determinant in which the mean between-assay difference in HBsAg quantification was lower than the null value (-0.078). In conclusion, the Elecsys assay, with automatic on-board dilution, is capable of quantifying serum HBsAg levels in HIV-HBV-coinfected patients, with very high correlation with the Architect assay. PMID:22190396

  10. Diet composition, not calorie intake, rapidly alters intrinsic excitability of hypothalamic AgRP/NPY neurons in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Pham, Kevin; Gammons, Jesse W.; Sutherland, Daniel; Liu, Yanyun; Smith, Alana; Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; O’Connell, Kristen M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition resulting from a long-term pattern of poor diet and lifestyle. Long-term consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) leads to persistent activation and leptin resistance in AgRP neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH). Here, for the first time, we demonstrate acute effects of HFD on AgRP neuronal excitability and highlight a critical role for diet composition. In parallel with our earlier finding in obese, long-term HFD mice, we found that even brief HFD feeding results in persistent activation of ARH AgRP neurons. However, unlike long-term HFD-fed mice, AgRP neurons from short-term HFD-fed mice were still leptin-sensitive, indicating that the development of leptin-insensitivity is not a prerequisite for the increased firing rate of AgRP neurons. To distinguish between diet composition, caloric intake, and body weight, we compared acute and long-term effects of HFD and CD in pair-fed mice on AgRP neuronal spiking. HFD consumption in pair-fed mice resulted in a significant increase in AgRP neuronal spiking despite controls for weight gain and caloric intake. Taken together, our results suggest that diet composition may be more important than either calorie intake or body weight for electrically remodeling arcuate AgRP/NPY neurons. PMID:26592769

  11. Photoreduction of Ag+ in Ag/Ag2S/Au memristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, N. I.; Tabib-Azar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Silver halides and chalcogenides are excellent memristor materials that have been extensively used in the past as photosensitive layers in photography. Here we examine the effect of illumination on the operating voltages and switching speed of Ag/Ag2S/Au memristors using a green laser (473-523 nm). Our results indicate that illumination decreases the average switching time from high to low resistance states by ∼19% and decreases the turn-off voltages dramatically from -0.8 V to -0.25 V that we attribute to the change in sulfur valency and a photo-induced change in its oxidation/reduction potential. Photo-induced reduction of silver in Ag2S may be used in three dimensional optical memories that can be electronically read and reset.

  12. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2011-04-01

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses.

  13. Room-temperature NH3 gas sensors based on Ag-doped γ-Fe2O3/SiO2 composite films with sub-ppm detection ability.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongliang; Li, Zhijie; Zu, Xiaotao; Ma, Jinyi; Wang, Lu; Yang, Jing; Du, Bo; Yu, Qingkai

    2015-11-15

    In this report, NH3 gas sensors based on Ag-doped γ-Fe2O3/SiO2 composite films are investigated. The composite films were prepared with a sol-gel process, and the films' electrical resistance responded to the change of NH3 concentration in the environment. The SEM and AFM investigations showed that the films had a porous structure, and the XRD investigation indicated that the size of Ag particles changed with the modification of Ag loading content. Through a comparative gas sensing study among the Ag-doped composite films, undoped composite film, γ-Fe2O3 film, and SiO2 film, the Ag-doped composite films were found to be much more sensitive than the sensors based on the undoped composite film and γ-Fe2O3 film at room temperature, indicating the significant influences of the SiO2 and Ag on the sensing property. Moreover, the sensor based on Ag-doped (4%) γ-Fe2O3/SiO2 composite film was able to detect the NH3 gas at ppb level. Conversely, the responses of the sensor to other test gases (C2H5OH, CO, H2, CH4 and H2S) were all markedly low, suggesting excellent selectivity. PMID:26057440

  14. The removal of selenate to low ppb levels from flue gas desulfurization brine using the H2-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR).

    PubMed

    Van Ginkel, Steven W; Yang, Ziming; Kim, Bi-o; Sholin, Mark; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2011-05-01

    The H(2)-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was shown to consistently remove nitrate, nitrite, and selenate at high efficiencies from flue-gas desulfurization brine. Selenate was removed to <50 ppb which is the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) criteria for the brine to be released into the environment. When selenate was removed to <50 ppb, nitrate and nitrite were still present in the mg/L range which suggests that selenate is able to be secondarily reduced to low levels when nitrate and nitrite serve as the main electron acceptors for bacterial growth. SO(4)(2-) was not removed and therefore did not compete with nitrate and selenate reduction for the available H(2). PMID:21454073

  15. Pseudorapidity density of charged particles in p+Pb collisions at √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV.

    PubMed

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    2013-01-18

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over four units of pseudorapidity in nonsingle-diffractive p+Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81±0.71 (syst), which corresponds to 2.14±0.17 (syst) per participating nucleon, calculated with the Glauber model. This is 16% lower than in nonsingle-diffractive pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy and 84% higher than in d+Au collisions at s√(s(NN))=0.2 TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p+Pb collisions is compared to model predictions and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions. PMID:23373913

  16. Production of inclusive ϒ(1S) and ϒ(2S) in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the production of inclusive ϒ(1S) and ϒ(2S) in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV at the LHC. The measurement is performed with the ALICE detector at backward (- 4.46 p-Pb collisions with respect to the yield from pp collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions is observed at forward rapidity but not at backward rapidity. The results are compared to theoretical model calculations including nuclear shadowing or partonic energy loss effects.

  17. Ag-Ag2S Hybrid Nanoprisms: Structural versus Plasmonic Evolution.

    PubMed

    Shahjamali, Mohammad M; Zhou, Yong; Zaraee, Negin; Xue, Can; Wu, Jinsong; Large, Nicolas; McGuirk, C Michael; Boey, Freddy; Dravid, Vinayak; Cui, Zhifeng; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-05-24

    Recently, Ag-Ag2S hybrid nanostructures have attracted a great deal of attention due to their enhanced chemical and thermal stability, in addition to their morphology- and composition-dependent tunable local surface plasmon resonances. Although Ag-Ag2S nanostructures can be synthesized via sulfidation of as-prepared anisotropic Ag nanoparticles, this process is poorly understood, often leading to materials with anomalous compositions, sizes, and shapes and, consequently, optical properties. In this work, we use theory and experiment to investigate the structural and plasmonic evolution of Ag-Ag2S nanoprisms during the sulfidation of Ag precursors. The previously observed red-shifted extinction of the Ag-Ag2S hybrid nanoprism as sulfidation occurs contradicts theoretical predictions, indicating that the reaction does not just occur at the prism tips as previously speculated. Our experiments show that sulfidation can induce either blue or red shifts in the extinction of the dipole plasmon mode, depending on reaction conditions. By elucidating the correlation with the final structure and morphology of the synthesized Ag-Ag2S nanoprisms, we find that, depending on the reaction conditions, sulfidation occurs on the prism tips and/or the (111) surfaces, leading to a core(Ag)-anisotropic shell(Ag2S) prism nanostructure. Additionally, we demonstrate that the direction of the shift in the dipole plasmon is a function of the relative amounts of Ag2S at the prism tips and Ag2S shell thickness around the prism. PMID:27148792

  18. CD90 is upregulated in gastric cancer tissues and inhibits gastric cancer cell apoptosis by modulating the expression level of SPARC protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang Chao; Gao, Lu; He, Junyu; Long, Yuehua; Liao, Shan; Wang, Haiyun; Li, Xujuan; Yi, Wei; Pei, Zhen; Wu, Minghua; Xiang, Juanjuan; Peng, Shuping; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Ming; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Xiang, Bo; Xiong, Wei; Tang, Ke; Cao, Li; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2015-11-01

    Cluster of differentiation 90 (CD90) (Thy-1) plays important roles in the oncogenesis in various types of malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the expression of CD90 in gastric cancer (GC) tissues by q-PCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and western blot technologies. The results showed that CD90 was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with the level in the adjacent non‑cancerous tissues. To explore the possible mechanism of CD90 in GC, we elucidated the effect of CD90 on the apoptosis of AGS gastric cancer cells, and found that a considerable decrease in apoptotic cells was observed for AGS cells with CD90 overexpression. Meanwhile, the rate of apoptotic cells was increased in the AGS cells with CD90 interference (siCD90) compared with that in the AGS cells. Cell apoptosis is closely related to a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium ion (Ca2+) concentrations. Our results showed that overexpression of CD90 in the AGS gastric cancer cells led to an increase in ΔΨm and a decrease in intracellular ROS and Ca2+ concentrations. At the same time, siCD90 reduced ΔΨm and the increase in intracellular ROS and Ca2+ concentrations. Furthermore, we identified and confirmed that CD90 functions by modulating the expression level of secreted protein, acidic, cysteine‑rich (osteonectin) (SPARC) in vitro through LC‑MS/MS analyses and western blot technology. In summary, our results suggest that CD90 is upregulated in gastric cancer and inhibits gastric cancer cell apoptosis by modulating the expression level of SPARC protein. PMID:26329007

  19. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Biasotto, M.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fanzago, F.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. 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H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Korotkikh, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Vardanyan, I.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. 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I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. 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K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (KS0 or Λ /Λbar) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 nb-1, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (√{sNN}) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v2) and third-order (v3) anisotropy harmonics of KS0 and Λ /Λbar particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v2 and v3 is observed. For pT < 2 GeV, the v2 and v3 values of KS0 particles are larger than those of Λ /Λbar particles at the same pT. This splitting effect between two particle species is found to be stronger in pPb than in PbPb collisions in the same multiplicity range. When divided by the number of constituent quarks and compared at the same transverse kinetic energy per quark, both v2 and v3 for KS0 particles are observed to be consistent with those for Λ /Λbar particles at the 10% level in pPb collisions. This consistency extends over a wide range of particle transverse kinetic energy and event multiplicities.

  20. Explanation of systematics of CMS p+Pb high multiplicity dihadron data at sNN=5.02TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusling, Kevin; Venugopalan, Raju

    2013-03-01

    In a recent article [K. Dusling and R. Venugopalan, arXiv:1210.3890 [Phys. Rev. D (to be published)]PRVDAQ0556-2821], we showed that high multiplicity dihadron proton-proton (p+p) data from the CMS experiment are in excellent agreement with computations in the color glass condensate effective field theory. This agreement of the theory with several hundred data points provides a nontrivial description of both nearside (“ridge”) and awayside azimuthal collimations of long range rapidity correlations in p+p collisions. Our prediction in Dusling and Venugopalan [arXiv:1210.3890 [Phys. Rev. D (to be published)]PRVDAQ0556-2821] for proton-lead (p+Pb) collisions is consistent with results from the recent CMS p+Pb run at sNN=5.02TeV for the largest track multiplicity Ntrack˜40 we considered. The CMS p+Pb data shows the following striking features: (i) a strong dependence of the ridge yield on Ntrack, with a significantly larger signal than in p+p for the same Ntrack, (ii) a stronger pT dependence than in p+p for large Ntrack, and (iii) a nearside collimation for large Ntrack comparable to the awayside for the lower pT=pTtrig=pTassoc dihadron windows. We show here that these systematic features of the CMS p+Pb di-hadron data are all described by the color glass condensate (with parameters fixed by the p+p data) when we extend our prediction in Dusling and Venugopalan [arXiv:1210.3890 [Phys. Rev. D (to be published)]PRVDAQ0556-2821] to rarer high multiplicity events. We also predict the azimuthally collimated yield for yet unpublished windows in the pTtrig and pTassoc matrix.

  1. TAG CD-ROM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Myrna Syamara

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to produce a CD-ROM for the Technology Applications Group. The CD was being developed to allow interested people, organizations, or companies to view the technologies available to them that were developed by NASA research. The CD's main audience however, is any small business. The CD will give the small business an opportunity to see what technologies are available in an inexpensive manner. Most companies probably have a CD-ROM drive on their computers but may not have access to the internet. By using only the internet to inform on the technologies, NASA was not considering a large segment of the population. The CD-ROM can now cover that group of the population.

  2. AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992. Ninth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ``as run``; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters.

  3. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linley, Judy; Mylne, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Ag-Ed, an agricultural education project for upper elementary students, was held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show in Queensland, Australia. Agriculture industry representatives provided 20 interactive agricultural presentations for class groups, which were supplemented with a teacher resource-package containing a directory and 13 sections of…

  4. AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

  5. AGS experiments: 1985, 1986, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout, table of beam parameters and fluxes, experiment schedule ''as run,'' experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, two-page summaries of each experiment, also ordered by number, and publications of AGS experiments, 1982-1987.

  6. AGS 20th anniversary celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Baggett, N.V.

    1980-05-22

    On May 22, 1980, a symposium was held at Brookhaven to celebrate the 20th birthday of the AGS, to recall its beginnings, and to review major discoveries that have been made with its beams. The talks at the symposium are recorded in this volume.

  7. Furin-processed antigens targeted to the secretory route elicit functional TAP1-/-CD8+ T lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Medina, Francisco; Ramos, Manuel; Iborra, Salvador; de León, Patricia; Rodríguez-Castro, Marta; Del Val, Margarita

    2009-10-01

    Most pathogen-derived peptides recognized by CD8+ CTL are produced by proteasomes and delivered to the endoplasmic reticulum by the TAP transporters associated with Ag processing. Alternative proteases also produce antigenic peptides, but their actual relevance is unclear. There is a need to quantify the contribution of these supplementary pathways in vitro and in vivo. A well-defined TAP-independent secretory route of Ag processing involves the trans-Golgi network protease furin. Quantitation of this route by using OVA constructs encoded by vaccinia viruses indicates that it provides approximately one-third of all surface complexes of peptide and MHC class I molecules. Generation of the epitope carboxyl terminus is a dramatic rate-limiting step, since bypassing it increased efficiency by at least 1000-fold. Notably, the secretory construct activated a similar percentage of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells in wild type as in TAP1-deficient mice, which allow only secretory routes but which have a 10- to 20-fold smaller CD8 compartment. Moreover, these TAP1(-/-) OVA-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes accomplished elimination of epitope-bearing cells in vivo. The results obtained with this experimental system underscore the potential of secretory pathways of MHC class I Ag presentation to elicit functional CD8+ T lymphocytes in vivo and support the hypothesis that noncytosolic processing mechanisms may compensate in vivo for the lack of proteasome participation in Ag processing in persons genetically deficient in TAP and thus contribute to pathogen control. PMID:19752221

  8. Cd Isotope Fractionation During Adsorption Varies with Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasylenki, L. E.; Montanez, G.; Anbar, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    compositions were measured using MC-ICP-MS with a Ag spike for mass bias correction. The fractionation between dissolved and adsorbed Cd was ~0.3‰ in terms of δ114/110Cd (relative to our ICP standard solution) for the KNO3-only experiments (adsorbed Cd is lighter) and very near zero for the NaCl-rich experiments. Our NaCl-rich result is consistent with the results of [4] and [6]. In addition, our KNO3-only result suggests that adsorption of Cd to mineral surfaces in low salinity waters, such as riverine water or groundwater, could be one of the few abiotic processes that can significantly fractionate Cd isotopes. We hypothesize that NaCl concentration affects Cd fractionation in this system by changing Cd speciation. Cd likely complexes with Cl in predominantly tetrahedral molecules, in contrast to the octahedral hydrated Cd cations present in low-Cl solutions. [1] Boyle et al. (1976) Nature 263, 42. [2] Lacan et al. (2006) GCA 70, 5104. [3] Ripperger et al. (2007) EPSL 261, 670. [4] Rehkämper et al. (2008) GCA 72 Suppl., A392. [5] Wombacher et al. (2003) GCA 67, 4639. [6] Schmitt et al. GCA 71 Suppl., A898.

  9. CD40 ligand preferentially modulates immune response and enhances protection against influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Anwar M; Gravel, Caroline; Chen, Ze; Yi, Yinglei; Tocchi, Monika; Jaentschke, Bozena; Fan, Xingliang; Li, Changgui; Rosu-Myles, Michael; Pereboev, Alexander; He, Runtao; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Xuguang

    2014-07-15

    CD40L, a key regulator of the immune system, was studied as both a targeting ligand and a molecular adjuvant in nucleoprotein (NP)-based host defense against influenza in mouse models with different genetic backgrounds. Adenoviral vectors secreting NP-CD40L fusion protein (denoted as rAd-SNP40L) afforded full protection of immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice (CD40L(-/-) and CD4(-/-)) against lethal influenza infection. Mechanistically, rAd-SNP40L preferentially induced early and persistent B cell germinal center formation, and accelerated Ig isotype-switching and Th1-skewed, NP-specific Ab response. Moreover, it drastically augmented primary and memory NP-specific CTL activity and polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells. The markedly enhanced nonneutralizing Abs and CTLs significantly reduced viral burdens in the lungs of mice upon lethal virus challenge. Data generated from CD40L(-/-) and CD4(-/-) mice revealed that the protection was indeed CD40L mediated but CD4(+) T cell independent, demonstrating the viability of the fusion Ags in protecting immunodeficient hosts. Notably, a single dose of rAd-SNP40L completely protected mice from lethal viral challenge 4 mo after immunization, representing the first report, to our knowledge, on NP in conjunction with a molecular adjuvant inducing a robust and long-lasting memory immune response against influenza. This platform is characterized by an increased in vivo load of CD40-targeted Ag upon the secretion of the fusion protein from adenovirus-infected cells and may represent a promising strategy to enhance the breadth, durability, and potency of Ag-specific immune responses. PMID:24928989

  10. Study of ψ(2 S) production and cold nuclear matter effects in pPb collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}=5 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-03-01

    The production of ψ(2 S) mesons is studied in dimuon final states using proton-lead (pPb) collision data collected by the LHCb detector. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1 .6 nb-1. The nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of the pPb collisions is sqrt{s_{NN}}=5 TeV. The measurement is performed using ψ(2 S) mesons with transverse momentum less than 14 GeV/ c and rapidity y in the ranges 1 .5 < y < 4 .0 and -5 .0 < y < -2 .5 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass system. The forward-backward production ratio and the nuclear modification factor are determined for ψ(2 S) mesons. Using the production cross-section results of ψ(2 S) and J/ψ mesons from b-hadron decays, the boverline{b} cross-section in pPb collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}=5 TeV is obtained. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.

    2016-03-01

    The production of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays was measured as a function of transverse momentum (pT) in minimum-bias p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV using the ALICE detector at the LHC. The measurement covers the pT interval 0.5 p-Pb collisions to a pp reference at the same centre-of-mass energy, which was obtained by interpolating measurements at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV and √{ s} = 7 TeV. The RpPb is consistent with unity within uncertainties of about 25%, which become larger for pT below 1 GeV / c. The measurement shows that heavy-flavour production is consistent with binary scaling, so that a suppression in the high-pT yield in Pb-Pb collisions has to be attributed to effects induced by the hot medium produced in the final state. The data in p-Pb collisions are described by recent model calculations that include cold nuclear matter effects.

  12. Antigen-Induced Increases in Pulmonary Mast Cell Progenitor Numbers Depend on IL-9 and CD1d-Restricted NKT Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tatiana G.; Hallgren, Jenny; Humbles, Alison; Burwell, Timothy; Finkelman, Fred D.; Alcaide, Pilar; Austen, K. Frank; Gurish, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary mast cell progenitor (MCp) numbers increase dramatically in sensitized and aerosolized Ag-challenged mice. This increase depends on CD4+ T cells, as no MCp increase occurs in the lungs of sensitized wild-type (WT) mice after mAb depletion of CD4+ but not CD8+ cells before aerosol Ag challenge. Neither the genetic absence of IL-4, IL-4Rα chain, STAT-6, IFN-γ, or IL-12p40 nor mAb blockade of IFN-γ, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17A, IL-12p40, or IL-12p40Rβ1 before Ag challenge in WT mice reduces the pulmonary MCp increase. However, sensitized and Ag-challenged IL-9-deficient mice and sensitized WT mice given mAb to IL-9 just before Ag challenge show significant reductions in elicited lung MCp/106 mononuclear cells of 47 and 66%, respectively. CD1d-deficient mice and WT mice receiving anti-CD1d before Ag challenge also show significant reductions of 65 and 59%, respectively, in elicited lung MCp/106 mononuclear cells, revealing an additional requirement for MCp recruitment. However, in Jα18-deficient mice, which lack only type 1 or invariant NKT cells, the increase in the numbers of lung MCp with Ag challenge was intact, indicating that their recruitment must be mediated by type 2 NKT cells. Furthermore, anti-CD1d treatment of IL-9-deficient mice or anti-IL-9 treatment of CD1d-deficient mice does not further reduce the significant partial impairment of MCp recruitment occurring with a single deficiency. These findings implicate type 2 NKT cells and IL-9 as central regulators that function in the same pathway mediating the Ag-induced increase in numbers of pulmonary MCp. PMID:19783672

  13. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation by CdSe/CdS Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fen; Han, Zhiji; Peterson, Jeffrey J; Odoi, Michael Y; Sowers, Kelly L; Krauss, Todd D

    2016-09-14

    The photocatalytic hydrogen (H2) production activity of various CdSe semiconductor nanoparticles was compared including CdSe and CdSe/CdS quantum dots (QDs), CdSe quantum rods (QRs), and CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods (DIRs). With equivalent photons absorbed, the H2 generation activity orders as CdSe QDs ≫ CdSe QRs > CdSe/CdS QDs > CdSe/CdS DIRs, which is surprisingly the opposite of the electron-hole separation efficiency. Calculations of photoexcited surface charge densities are positively correlated with the H2 production rate and suggest the size of the nanoparticle plays a critical role in determining the relative efficiency of H2 production. PMID:27478995

  14. Human CD4+CD39+ regulatory T cells produce adenosine upon co-expression of surface CD73 or contact with CD73+ exosomes or CD73+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, P J; Saze, Z; Hong, C-S; Muller, L; Gillespie, D G; Cheng, D; Harasymczuk, M; Mandapathil, M; Lang, S; Jackson, E K; Whiteside, T L

    2014-01-01

    While murine CD4+CD39+ regulatory T cells (Treg) co-express CD73 and hydrolyze exogenous (e) adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to immunosuppressive adenosine (ADO), surface co-expression of CD73 on human circulating CD4+CD39+ Treg is rare. Therefore, the ability of human Treg to produce and utilize ADO for suppression remains unclear. Using mass spectrometry, we measured nucleoside production by subsets of human CD4+CD39+ and CD4+CD39(–)CD73+ T cells or CD19+ B cells isolated from blood of 30 volunteers and 14 cancer patients. CD39 and CD73 expression was evaluated by flow cytometry, Western blots, confocal microscopy or reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR). Circulating CD4+CD39+ Treg which hydrolyzed eATP to 5′-AMP contained few intracytoplasmic granules and had low CD73 mRNA levels. Only ∼1% of these Treg were CD39+CD73+. In contrast, CD4+CD39negCD73+ T cells contained numerous CD73+ granules in the cytoplasm and strongly expressed surface CD73. In vitro-generated Treg (Tr1) and most B cells were CD39+CD73+. All these CD73+ T cell subsets and B cells hydrolyzed 5′-AMP to ADO. Exosomes isolated from plasma of normal control (NC) or cancer patients carried enzymatically active CD39 and CD73+ and, when supplied with eATP, hydrolyzed it to ADO. Only CD4+CD39+ Treg co-incubated with CD4+CD73+ T cells, B cells or CD39+CD73+ exosomes produced ADO. Thus, contact with membrane-tethered CD73 was sufficient for ADO production by CD4+CD39+ Treg. In microenvironments containing CD4+CD73+ T cells, B cells or CD39+CD73+ exosomes, CD73 is readily available to CD4+CD39+CD73neg Treg for the production of immunosuppressive ADO. PMID:24749746

  15. An efficient photocatalyst for degradation of various organic dyes: Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Yang; Lu, Yi; Liu, Jin-Ku

    2016-04-15

    The Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite was prepared by a facile in-situ anion-exchange method, then the Ag nanoparticles were coated on this composite through photodeposition route to form a novel Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite. The in-situ Br(-) replacement in a crystal lattice node position of Ag2MoO4 crystal allows for overcoming the resistance of electron transition effectively. Meanwhile silver nano-particles on the surface of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite could act as electron traps to intensify the photogeneration electron-hole separation and the subsequent transfer of the trapped electron to the adsorbed O2 as an electron acceptor. As an efficient visible light catalyst, the Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity for the degradation of various organic dyes. The experimental results demonstrated superior photocatalytic rate of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite compared to pure AgBr and Ag2MoO4 crystals (37.6% and 348.4% enhancement respectively). The Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite cloud degraded Rhodamin B, bromophenol blue, and amino black 10b completed in 7min. PMID:26775100

  16. Antibacterial activity and reusability of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Yun, Hyosuk; Kim, Gwui Cheol; Lee, Chul Won; Choi, Hyun Chul

    2013-10-01

    A facile approach to the synthesis of novel CNT-Ag and GO-Ag antibacterial materials, in which thiol groups are utilized as linkers to secure silver (Ag) nanoparticles to the CNT and GO surfaces without agglomeration, is reported. The resulting CNT-Ag and GO-Ag samples were characterized by performing TEM, XRD, Auger, XPS, and Raman measurements, which revealed that in these antibacterial materials size-similar and quasi-spherical Ag nanoparticles are anchored to the CNT and GO surfaces. The Ag nanoparticles in CNT-Ag and GO-Ag have narrow size distributions with average diameters of 2.6 and 3.5 nm respectively. The antibacterial activities of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag against Escherichia coli were assessed with the paper-disk diffusion method and by determining the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). CNT-Ag was found to have higher antibacterial activity than the reference Ag colloid. Moreover, both CNT-Ag and GO-Ag retain more than 50% of their original antibacterial activities after 20 washes with detergent, which indicates their potential as antibacterial materials for laboratory and medical purposes.

  17. Comparative Study of Antimicrobial Activity of AgBr and Ag Nanoparticles (NPs)

    PubMed Central

    Suchomel, Petr; Kvitek, Libor; Panacek, Ales; Prucek, Robert; Hrbac, Jan; Vecerova, Renata; Zboril, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The diverse mechanism of antimicrobial activity of Ag and AgBr nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and also against several strains of candida was explored in this study. The AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by simple precipitation of silver nitrate by potassium bromide in the presence of stabilizing polymers. The used polymers (PEG, PVP, PVA, and HEC) influence significantly the size of the prepared AgBr NPs dependently on the mode of interaction of polymer with Ag+ ions. Small NPs (diameter of about 60–70 nm) were formed in the presence of the polymer with low interaction as are PEG and HEC, the polymers which interact with Ag+ strongly produce nearly two times bigger NPs (120–130 nm). The prepared AgBr NPs were transformed to Ag NPs by the reduction using NaBH4. The sizes of the produced Ag NPs followed the same trends – the smallest NPs were produced in the presence of PEG and HEC polymers. Prepared AgBr and Ag NPs dispersions were tested for their biological activity. The obtained results of antimicrobial activity of AgBr and Ag NPs are discussed in terms of possible mechanism of the action of these NPs against tested microbial strains. The AgBr NPs are more effective against gram-negative bacteria and tested yeast strains while Ag NPs show the best antibacterial action against gram-positive bacteria strains. PMID:25781988

  18. Canine CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive T cells can develop from CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Bismarck, Doris; Moore, Peter F; Alber, Gottfried; von Buttlar, Heiner

    2014-12-15

    For a long time the expression of the CD4 and CD8 receptor on peripheral blood T cells was thought to be mutually exclusive. However, in canine peripheral blood, similar to other species as swine or human for example, mature CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive (dp) T cells exist which simultaneously express both surface receptors and have features of activated T cells. Canine CD4(+)CD8(+)dp T cells are heterogeneous and can be divided into three subpopulations by their intensity of CD4 and CD8α expression: CD4(bright)CD8α(bright), CD4(dim)CD8α(bright) and CD4(dim)CD8α(dim). The number of CD4(+)CD8α(+)dp T cells increases after in vitro stimulation of canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) raising the question of their progenitor(s). Thus, the aim of our study was to characterize the progenitor(s) of canine CD4(+)CD8α(+)dp T cells. By cell tracing experiments we identified both CD4(+) single-positive (sp) and also CD8α(+)sp T cells as progenitors of canine CD4(+)CD8α(+)dp T cells after in vitro stimulation. CD4(+)sp T cells almost exclusively upregulate a CD8αα homodimer, whereas CD8α(+)sp T cells can become CD4(+)CD8αβ(+) or CD4(+)CD8αα(+). Even in the absence of other cells, highly purified CD4(+)sp T cells can become double-positive upon in vitro stimulation, whereas highly purified CD8α(+)sp T cells fail to do so. However, CD8α(+)sp T cells can additionally express CD4 when stimulated in the presence of CD4(-)CD8α(-) double-negative (dn) cells or more efficiently when stimulated in the presence of CD4(+)sp T cells. Soluble factors secreted by CD4(+)sp T cells are sufficient for the upregulation of CD4 on CD8α(+)sp T cells, but direct cell-cell contact between CD4(+)sp and CD8α(+)sp T cells is more efficient. mRNA analysis shows that additional CD4 expression on CD8α(+)sp T cells results from de novo synthesis. Thus, uptake of soluble CD4 or trogocytosis is less likely as mechanism for generation of canine double-positive T cells. CD4(+)CD

  19. Use of MHC class II tetramers to investigate CD4+ T cell responses: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Virginia; Moro, Monica; Del Mare, Sara; Dellabona, Paolo; Casorati, Giulia

    2008-11-01

    MHC-class I tetramers technology enabled the characterization of peptide-specific T cells at the single cell level in a variety of studies. Several laboratories have also developed MHC-class II multimers to characterize Ag-specific CD4+ T cells. However, the generation and use of MHC-class II multimers seems more problematic than that of MHC-I multimers. We have generated HLA-DR*1101 tetramers in a versatile empty form, which can be loaded after purification with peptides of interest. We discuss the impact of critical biological and structural parameters for the optimal staining of Ag-specific CD4+ T cells using HLA-DR*1101 tetramers, such as: (i) activation state of CD4+ T cells; (ii) membrane trafficking in the target CD4+ T cells; (iii) binding characteristics of the loaded CD4 epitope. Our data indicate that reorganization of TCR on the plasma membrane upon CD4+ T cell activation, as well as an homogenous binding frame of the CD4 epitopes to the soluble HLA-DR monomer, are critical for a stable TCR/MHC-class II tetramer interaction. These factors, together with the low frequencies and affinities of specific CD4+ T cells, explain the need for in vitro expansion or ex vivo enrichment of specific T cells for the optimal visualization with MHC-class II tetramers. PMID:18612991

  20. Intranasal vaccination with proinsulin DNA induces regulatory CD4+ T cells that prevent experimental autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Every, Alison L; Kramer, David R; Mannering, Stuart I; Lew, Andrew M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2006-04-15

    Insulin, an autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, when administered mucosally to diabetes-prone NOD mice induces regulatory T cells (T(reg)) that protect against diabetes. Compared with protein, Ag encoded as DNA has potential advantages as a therapeutic agent. We found that intranasal vaccination of NOD mice with plasmid DNA encoding mouse proinsulin II-induced CD4+ T(reg) that suppressed diabetes development, both after adoptive cotransfer with "diabetogenic" spleen cells and after transfer into NOD mice given cyclophosphamide to accelerate diabetes onset. In contrast to prototypic CD4+ CD25+ T(reg), CD4+ T(reg) induced by proinsulin DNA were both CD25+ and CD25- and not defined by markers such as glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR), CD103, or Foxp3. Intriguingly, despite induction of T(reg) and reduced islet inflammation, diabetes incidence in proinsulin DNA-treated mice was unchanged. However, diabetes was prevented when DNA vaccination was performed under the cover of CD40 ligand blockade, known to prevent priming of CTL by mucosal Ag. Thus, intranasal vaccination with proinsulin DNA has therapeutic potential to prevent diabetes, as demonstrated by induction of protective T(reg), but further modifications are required to improve its efficacy, which could be compromised by concomitant induction of pathogenic immunity. PMID:16585551

  1. Identification of CD14 transcript in blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes and functional variation in Holsteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, J M; Wang, X G; Jiang, Q; Sun, Y; Yang, C H; Ju, Z H; Hao, H S; Wang, C F; Zhong, J F; Zhu, H B

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) leukocytes are primary phagocytic cells of the bovine mammary gland and a first line of defense against invading pathogens during bovine mastitis infection. Cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) is mainly expressed in macrophages and neutrophils and acts as a co-receptor that binds bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and recruits PMNs to CD14-LPS complexes in mammary epithelial cells. In this study, we identified a novel splice variant in PMNs, named CD14-SV, characterized by a deleted region from c.143-579 nt compared to the CD14 reference mRNA sequence. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism (c.523 A>G) in exon 2 of CD14 was identified and found to modify the secondary structure and hydrophilicity of the CD14 protein. Association analysis also showed that the milk somatic cell score, an indicator of mastitis, of cows with the GG genotype was lower than that of cows with the AA and AG genotypes. Our findings suggest that the expression of CD14 in bovine blood PMNs is regulated by alternative splicing, and that CD14-SV is a candidate functional marker that may influence mastitis-resistance in dairy cows. PMID:27173290

  2. BaCdSnS4 and Ba3CdSn2S8: syntheses, structures, and non-linear optical and photoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Ni; Wu, Kui; Wang, Ying; Li, Qiang; Gao, Wenhui; Hou, Dianwei; Yang, Zhihua; Jiang, Huaidong; Dong, Yongjun; Pan, Shilie

    2016-06-28

    Two non-centrosymmetric metal chalcogenides, BaCdSnS4 and Ba3CdSn2S8, were synthesized using a high temperature solid-state reaction in an evacuated silica tube. Although the two compounds have the same building units in their structures, namely CdS4, SnS4 and BaS8 units, both of them have different structures. BaCdSnS4 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Fdd2 and its structure can be characterized by the two-dimensional ∞[Cd-Sn-S] layers composed of corner- and edge-sharing CdS4 and SnS4 tetrahedra with Ba atoms located between the two adjacent ∞[Cd-Sn-S] layers. Ba3CdSn2S8 crystallizes in the space group I4[combining macron]3d of the orthorhombic system and the CdS4 and SnS4 groups are connected with each other via corner-sharing to form a three-dimensional framework, which is different from the 2D ∞[Cd-Sn-S] layer structure in BaCdSnS4. The UV-vis-NIR diffuse-reflectance spectra show that the experimental band gaps are about 2.30 eV for BaCdSnS4 and 2.75 eV for Ba3CdSn2S8, respectively. IR and Raman measurement results indicate that their transparent ranges are up to 25 μm. Second-order NLO measurements show that BaCdSnS4 exhibits strong powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) intensities at 2.09 μm laser pumping that are ∼5 and 0.7 times that of AgGaS2 in the particle size 38-55 and 150-200 μm, respectively, whereas Ba3CdSn2S8 only exhibits SHG intensities of about 0.8 and 0.1 times that of AgGaS2 at the same particle sizes. The origin of the NLO response in BaCdSnS4 may originate from the macroscopic arrangement of the SnS4 and CdS4 tetrahedra. Furthermore, the photoluminescence properties of the two compounds have also been investigated and show obvious blue and green light emission. PMID:27272926

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of a Ag/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sandwich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Melissa; Alexson, D. M.; Prokes, Sharka; Glembocki, Orest; Vivoni, Alberto; Hosten, Charles

    2011-02-01

    α,ω-Dithiols are a useful class of compounds in molecular electronics because of their ability to easily adsorb to two metal surfaces, producing a molecular junction. We have prepared Ag nanosphere/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sol (AgNS/OPE/Ag sol) and Ag nanowire/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sol (AgNW/OPE/Ag sol) sandwiches to simulate the architecture of a molecular electronic device. This was achieved by self-assembly of OPE on the silver nanosurface, deprotection of the terminal sulfur, and deposition of Ag sol atop the monolayer. These sandwiches were then characterized by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The resulting spectra were compared to the bulk spectrum of the dimer and to the Ag nanosurface/OPE SERS spectra. The intensities of the SERS spectra in both systems exhibit a strong dependence on Ag deposition time and the results are also suggestive of intense interparticle coupling of the electromagnetic fields in both the AgNW/OPE/Ag and the AgNS/OPE/Ag systems. Three previously unobserved bands (1219, 1234, 2037 cm -1) arose in the SER spectra of the sandwiches and their presence is attributed to the strong enhancement of the electromagnetic field which is predicted from the COSMOL computational package. The 544 cm -1 disulfide bond which is observed in the spectrum of solid OPE but is absent in the AgNS/OPE/Ag and AgNW/OPE/Ag spectra is indicative of chemisorption of OPE to the nanoparticles through oxidative dissociation of the disulfide bond.

  4. HIV-specific CD8+ T cell function in children with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection is critically influenced by age and the state of the CD4+ T cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Johan K; Fast, Noam M; Jordan, Kimberly A; Furlan, Scott N; Barbour, Jason D; Fennelly, Glenn; Dobroszycki, Joanna; Spiegel, Hans M L; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenberg, Michael G; Nixon, Douglas F

    2003-04-15

    The immunology of vertical HIV transmission differs from that of adult infection in that the immune system of the infant is not fully matured, and the factors that influence the functionality of CD8(+) T cell responses against HIV in children remain largely undefined. We have investigated CD8(+) T cell responses in 65 pediatric subjects with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection. Vigorous, broad, and Ag dose-driven CD8(+) T cell responses against HIV Ags were frequently observed in children who were older than 3 years of age and maintained CD4(+) T cell counts >400 cells/ micro l. In contrast, younger age or a CD4(+) T cell count <400 cells/ micro l was associated with poor CD8(+) T cell responses and high HIV loads. Furthermore, subjects with a severely depleted and phenotypically altered CD4(+) T cell compartment had circulating Gag-specific CD8(+) T cells with impaired IFN-gamma production. When viral load was not suppressed by antiviral treatment, subjects that fell below the putative age and CD4(+) T cell count thresholds had significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell responses and significantly higher viral loads. Thus, the data suggest that fully effective HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses take years to develop despite an abundance of Ag in early life, and responses are further severely impaired, independent of age, in children who have a depleted or skewed CD4(+) T cell compartment. The results are discussed in relation to differences between the neonatal and adult immune systems in the ability to respond to HIV infection. PMID:12682278

  5. CD26 surface molecule involvement in T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis in rheumatoid and other inflammatory synovitis.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Bistoni, O; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Cesarotti, M; Bombardieri, S

    1996-07-01

    T cell surface expression and the functional role of CD26 antigen (Ag), a surface ectoenzyme involved in T cell activation and migration across the extracellular matrix, were analyzed in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with inflammatory arthritides. CD26 membrane expression on T cells was detected by cytofluorometry using two different monoclonal antibodies, anti-Ta1 and anti-1F7, while cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were evaluated in anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-stimulated cell cultures after Ag surface modulation with anti-1F7. The results showed that Ta1 and 1F7 Ag expression were increased on T cells from PB of patients with active, but not inactive, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most SF T cells from RA or other inflammatory arthritides displayed the memory marker CD45R0 and the Ta1 Ag, but lacked the 1F7 molecule. In addition, in vitro 1F7 modulation, which enhanced RA PB T cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma synthesis, did not synergize with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 in inducing IL-2-dependent activation of SF T cells, but reduced IFN-gamma production. A spontaneous reappearance of 1F7 Ag on the SF T cell surface was seen after 2-5 days in culture. Phorbol myristate acetate, able to accelerate its reexpression, also restored a normal response of SF T cells to anti-1F7 comitogenic effects. These data confirm a role of the CD26 surface molecule in regulating T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. This observation may have important implications in the regulation of T cell activity at the joint level during chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:8674237

  6. Molecular-like Ag clusters sensitized near-infrared down-conversion luminescence in oxyfluoride glasses for broadband spectral modification

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Yu, Yunlong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yuansheng

    2013-08-26

    Molecular-like Ag clusters sized at 1–4 nm have been stabilized in Pb/Cd-free oxyfluoride glasses, showing broadband excitation/emission characteristics and unique wavelength-dependent luminescent performance with a maximal quantum yield of 26.9%. It was experimentally demonstrated that an energy transfer route of Ag clusters → Tb{sup 3+} → Yb{sup 3+} occurs in Ag{sup +}/Tb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} tri-doped sample, wherein Ag clusters act as sensitizers for near-infrared down-conversion spectral modification. Hopefully, the proposed strategy that noble metal clusters being applied for harvesting solar radiation may potentially solve the sticky problems of the narrow excitation bandwidth and the low excitation efficiency in rare earth ions doped down-conversion materials.

  7. Molecular-like Ag clusters sensitized near-infrared down-conversion luminescence in oxyfluoride glasses for broadband spectral modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Yu, Yunlong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yuansheng

    2013-08-01

    Molecular-like Ag clusters sized at 1-4 nm have been stabilized in Pb/Cd-free oxyfluoride glasses, showing broadband excitation/emission characteristics and unique wavelength-dependent luminescent performance with a maximal quantum yield of 26.9%. It was experimentally demonstrated that an energy transfer route of Ag clusters → Tb3+ → Yb3+ occurs in Ag+/Tb3+/Yb3+ tri-doped sample, wherein Ag clusters act as sensitizers for near-infrared down-conversion spectral modification. Hopefully, the proposed strategy that noble metal clusters being applied for harvesting solar radiation may potentially solve the sticky problems of the narrow excitation bandwidth and the low excitation efficiency in rare earth ions doped down-conversion materials.

  8. Combinations of CD45 isoforms are crucial for immune function and disease.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Ritu; Petrova, Svetla; Liu, Zhe; Wraith, David; Beverley, Peter C L; Tchilian, Elma Z

    2006-03-15

    Expression of the CD45 Ag in hemopoietic cells is essential for normal development and function of lymphocytes, and both mice and humans lacking expression exhibit SCID. Human genetic variants of CD45, the exon 4 C77G and exon 6 A138G alleles, which alter the pattern of CD45 isoform expression, are associated with autoimmune and infectious diseases. We constructed transgenic mice expressing either an altered level or combination of CD45 isoforms. We show that the total level of CD45 expressed is crucial for normal TCR signaling, lymphocyte proliferation, and cytokine production. Most importantly, transgenic lines with a normal level, but altered combinations of CD45 isoforms, CD45(RABC/+) and CD45(RO/+) mice, which mimic variant CD45 expression in C77G and A138G humans, show more rapid onset and increased severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. CD45(RO/+) cells produce more TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. Thus, for the first time, we have shown experimentally that it is the combination of CD45 isoforms that affects immune function and disease. PMID:16517710

  9. Discover IDEA CD 2002. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    This Macintosh and PC compatible CD-ROM includes key resources about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) amendments of 1997. It is designed as a research and training tool for administrators, professors and students in higher education, families, advocates, policy makers, and service providers who strive for quality education…

  10. Discover IDEA CD '99. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Regional Resource Center, Eugene, OR.

    Designed for educators, related service providers, parents, and others, this CD-ROM provides information on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997. Contents include the statute in its entirety, complete final regulations and analysis of comments taken verbatim from the Federal Register of March 12, 1999. Also included are topical…

  11. Valence band structure of the icosahedral Ag-In-Yb quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, H. R.; Simutis, G.; Dhanak, V. R.; Nugent, P. J.; McGrath, R.; Cui, C.; Shimoda, M.; Tsai, A. P.; Ishii, Y.

    2010-03-01

    The valence band structure of the icosahedral (i) Ag-In-Yb quasicrystal, which is isostructural to the binary i-Cd-Yb system, is investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Experimental results are compared with electronic-structure calculations of a cubic approximant of the same phase. UPS spectra from the fivefold, threefold, and twofold i-Ag-In-Yb surfaces reveal that the valence band near to the Fermi level is dominated by Yb 4f-derived states, in agreement with calculations. The spectra also exhibit peaks which are surface core level shifted, caused by changes in the electronic structure in surface layers. Calculations yield a pseudogap in the density of states due to a hybridization of the Yb 5d band with the Ag 5p and In 5p bands. Both experimental and calculated band features are very similar to those of Cd-Yb. The modification of the band structure after surface treatment by sputtering and by oxidation is also studied. Additionally, the work function of i-Ag-In-Yb measured from the width of UPS spectrum is found to be almost unaffected by surface orientation, but increases after sputtering or oxidation.

  12. Surface plasmon polariton enhanced ultrathin nano-structured CdTe solar cell.

    PubMed

    Luk, Ting S; Fofang, Nche T; Cruz-Campa, Jose L; Frank, Ian; Campione, Salvatore

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate numerically that two-dimensional arrays of ultrathin CdTe nano-cylinders on Ag can serve as an effective broadband anti-reflection structure for solar cell applications. Such devices exhibit strong absorption properties, mainly in the CdTe semiconductor regions, and can produce short-circuit current densities of 23.4 mA/cm(2), a remarkable number in the context of solar cells given the ultrathin dimensions of our nano-cylinders. The strong absorption is enabled via excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) under plane wave incidence. In particular, we identified the key absorption mechanism as enhanced fields of the SPP standing waves residing at the interface of CdTe nano-cylinders and Ag. We compare the performance of Ag, Au, and Al substrates, and observe significant improvement when using Ag, highlighting the importance of using low-loss metals. Although we use CdTe here, the proposed approach is applicable to other solar cell materials with similar absorption properties. PMID:25322192

  13. Peptidases released by necrotic cells control CD8+ T cell cross-priming

    PubMed Central

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Kapanadze, Tamar; Han, Miaojun; Wissing, Josef; Ma, Chi; Jaensch, Lothar; Manns, Michael P.; Armstrong, Todd; Jaffee, Elizabeth; White, Ayla O.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-priming of CD8+ T cells and generation of effector immune responses is pivotal for tumor immunity as well as for successful anticancer vaccination and therapy. Dead and dying cells produce signals that can influence Ag processing and presentation; however, there is conflicting evidence regarding the immunogenicity of necrotic cell death. We used a mouse model of sterile necrosis, in which mice were injected with sterile primary necrotic cells, to investigate a role of these cells in priming of CD8+ T cells. We discovered a molecular mechanism operating in Ag donor cells that regulates cross-priming of CD8+ T cells during primary sterile necrosis and thereby controls adaptive immune responses. We found that the cellular peptidases dipeptidyl peptidase 3 (DPP-3) and thimet oligopeptidase 1 (TOP-1), both of which are present in nonimmunogenic necrotic cells, eliminated proteasomal degradation products and blocked Ag cross-presentation. While sterile necrotic tumor cells failed to induce CD8+ T cell responses, their nonimmunogenicity could be reversed in vitro and in vivo by inactivation of DPP-3 and TOP-1. These results indicate that control of cross-priming and thereby immunogenicity of primary sterile necrosis relies on proteasome-dependent oligopeptide generation and functional status of peptidases in Ag donor cells. PMID:24216478

  14. Visualizing Redox Dynamics of a Single Ag/AgCl Heterogeneous Nanocatalyst at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yimin A; Li, Liang; Li, Zheng; Kinaci, Alper; Chan, Maria K Y; Sun, Yugang; Guest, Jeffrey R; McNulty, Ian; Rajh, Tijana; Liu, Yuzi

    2016-03-22

    Operando characterization of gas-solid reactions at the atomic scale is of great importance for determining the mechanism of catalysis. This is especially true in the study of heterostructures because of structural correlation between the different parts. However, such experiments are challenging and have rarely been accomplished. In this work, atomic scale redox dynamics of Ag/AgCl heterostructures have been studied using in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in combination with density function theory (DFT) calculations. The reduction of Ag/AgCl to Ag is likely a result of the formation of Cl vacancies while Ag(+) ions accept electrons. The oxidation process of Ag/AgCl has been observed: rather than direct replacement of Cl by O, the Ag/AgCl nanocatalyst was first reduced to Ag, and then Ag was oxidized to different phases of silver oxide under different O2 partial pressures. Ag2O formed at low O2 partial pressure, whereas AgO formed at atmospheric pressure. By combining in situ ETEM observation and DFT calculations, this structural evolution is characterized in a distinct nanoscale environment. PMID:26937679

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Cord blood-derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. RESULTS HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. CONCLUSIONS HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers. PMID:27188537

  16. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. Material/Methods Cord blood–derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. Results HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. Conclusions HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers. PMID:27188537

  17. Induction of CD8+ T cell responses through targeting of antigen to Dectin-2.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert W; Thompson, Clare; Reid, Delyth M; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F

    2006-02-01

    Targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells (DC) can be used to optimise immunisation. We investigated whether the efficacy with which immune responses are induced can be improved by targeting Ags to a C-type lectin receptor, Dectin-2. When anti-Dectin-2 mAbs were injected s.c., mAb binding was detected on a low percentage of DC in the draining lymph node. Ag conjugated to anti-Dectin-2 mAbs was presented efficiently to CD8+ T cells in vivo and elicited CD8+ T cell responses at low doses where free Ag failed to induce a response. The results reveal Dectin-2 as a potential targeting molecule for immunisation. PMID:16781694

  18. Visible emission from Ag+ exchanged SOD zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Imakita, K.; Fujii, M.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.; Gordina, N. E.; Saïd, B.; Galarneau, A.

    2015-09-01

    Broad visible emissions dominant at green or red have been observed for the thermally-treated Ag+ exchanged SOD zeolites, determined by the Ag+ loading contents and the excitation wavelengths. Contrary to the notable reversible green/red dominant emission evolution in the Ag+ exchanged LTA zeolites upon hydration/dehydration in air (or water vapor)/vacuum, emission spectra of the Ag+ exchanged SOD zeolites are insensitive to the environmental change. This is most probably due to the difficult H2O permeation in SOD zeolites in comparison with LTA zeolites. By combining the environment dependent emission spectra of the Ag+ exchanged LTA and SOD zeolites, we proposed the following emission mechanisms for Ag+ exchanged LTA and SOD zeolites: the green emission is due to the transition from ligand-to-metal (framework O2- --> Ag+) charge transfer state to the ground state and the red emission is due to the transition from the metal-metal (Ag+-Ag+) charge transfer state to the ground state. The insensitive environment dependent emission characteristics of Ag+ exchanged SOD zeolites may have potential applications as robust phosphors.

  19. Superior photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity of CdS (core)-SiO2 (shell) nanostructures obtained by CdS photoetching and Au deposition.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Pal, Bonamali

    2013-07-01

    Core-shell morphology of silica (SiO2) coated CdS nanocomposites (SiO2@CdS) of different shapes have been made for better stability, luminescence and photochemical activity of CdS nanoparticles. A thin layer (thickness 1-1.4 nm) of SiO2 shell is deposited over CdS nanorods (CdS-NR) of aspect ratio = 21 and CdS nanospheres (CdS-NS) of size 6-8 nm by alkyl silane agents. Synthesized nanostructures were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra, HR-TEM, BET surface measurement, LB surface film, and absorption and photoluminescence analysis. Photoetching (PE) of CdS core led to blue shift of the absorbance onset of SiO2@CdS-NR along with the appearance of an exciton band at 485 nm due to the quantum confinement effect. Photodissolution of CdS core shifts the band gap energy from initial 2.4 to 2.6 eV for CdS-NR and 2.5 to 2.67 eV for CdS-NS. TEM images reveal the increase in aspect ratio of NR from 21 to 31 and decrease in the spherical core to 2.5 nm from 6-8 nm after PE. Photoetched SiO2@CdS-NC displayed highly intense fluorescence emission (SiO2@CdS-NS > SiO2@CdS-NR) than unetched SiO2@CdS-NC at 488 nm corresponding to band edge position. The Au (0.5 wt.%) deposition onto photoetched SiO2@CdS-NR(PE) composites highly enhanced the fluorescence intensity in comparison to 1 wt.% of Au and Ag loading. SiO2@CdS-NC(PE) displayed improved photocatalytic activity during benzaldehyde photooxidation under UV (125 W, Hg-arc, 10.4 mW/cm2) irradiation. Silica coating onto CdS particles improves the photostability and photoactivity of CdS upon long UV irradiation. PMID:23901532

  20. Capacitive deionization of seawater effected by nano Ag and Ag@C on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cai, P-F; Su, C-J; Chang, W-T; Chang, F-C; Peng, C-Y; Sun, I-W; Wei, Y-L; Jou, C-J; Wang, H Paul

    2014-08-30

    Drinking water shortage has become worse in recent decades. A new capacitive deionization (CDI) method for increasing water supplies through the effective desalination of seawater has been developed. Silver as nano Ag and Ag@C which was prepared by carbonization of the Ag(+)-β-cyclodextrin complex at 573 K for 30 min can add the antimicrobial function into the CDI process. The Ag@C and Ag nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (Ag@C/rGO and nano Ag/rGO) were used as the CDI electrodes. The nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can reduce the charging resistant, and enhance the electrosorption capability. Better CDI efficiencies with the nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can therefore be obtained. When reversed the voltage, the electrodes can be recovered up to 90% within 5 min. This work presents the feasibility for the nano Ag and Ag@C on rGO electrodes applied in CDI process to produce drinking water from seawater or saline water. PMID:24928455

  1. Structuring effect of heteroepitaxial CdHgTe/CdZnTe systems under irradiation with silver ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizov, F. F.; Savkina, R. K.; Smirnov, A. B.; Udovytska, R. S.; Kladko, V. P.; Gudymenko, A. I.; Safryuk, N. V.; Lytvyn, O. S.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of a damaged layer of p-CdxHg1 - xTe/CdZnTe ( x ˜ 0.223) heterostructures after implantation by 100-keV silver ions with the implantation dose Q = 3.0 × 1013 cm-2 have been obtained using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and electron microscopy. It has been found that, as a result of the ion implantation and subsequent annealing (75°C), a uniform array of nanostructures is formed on the surface of Hg(Cd)Te/Zn(Cd)Te samples. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the structurized Hg(Cd)Te/Zn(Cd)Te sample indicate the formation of polycrystalline Hg(Cd)Te phases of cubic structure with a composition x ˜ 0.20 and also oxide Ag2O in the subsurface (<100 nm) region of the host material. The observed effects of transformation of the defect-impurity system and structuring of the surface of the heteroepitaxial film of the low-energy-gap semiconductor have been explained using a deformation model.

  2. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian; Gannagé, Monique

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4(+) T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4(+) T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4(+) T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26608910

  3. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1–specific CD4+ T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4+ T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4+ T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4+ T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26608910

  4. Eomesodermin Expression in CD4+ T Cells Restricts Peripheral Foxp3 Induction.

    PubMed

    Lupar, Ekaterina; Brack, Maria; Garnier, Laure; Laffont, Sophie; Rauch, Katharina S; Schachtrup, Kristina; Arnold, Sebastian J; Guéry, Jean-Charles; Izcue, Ana

    2015-11-15

    CD4(+) T cells polarize into effector Th subsets characterized by signature transcription factors and cytokines. Although T-bet drives Th1 responses and represses the alternative Th2, Th17, and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell fates, the role of the T-bet-related transcription factor eomesodermin (Eomes) in CD4(+) T cells is less well understood. In this study, we analyze the expression and effects of Eomes in mouse CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We find that Eomes is readily expressed in activated CD4(+) Th1 T cells in vivo. Eomes(+) CD4(+) T cells accumulated in old mice, under lymphopenic conditions in a T cell transfer model of colitis, and upon oral Ag administration. However, despite its expression, genetic deletion of Eomes in CD4(+) T cells did not impact on IFN-γ production nor increase Th2 or Th17 responses. In contrast, Eomes deficiency favored the accumulation of Foxp3(+) cells in old mice, after in vivo differentiation of Eomes-deficient naive CD4(+) T cells, and in response to oral Ag in a cell-intrinsic way. Enforced Eomes expression during in vitro regulatory T cell induction also reduced Foxp3 transcription. Likewise, bystander Eomes-deficient CD4(+) T cells were more efficient at protecting from experimental autoimmune encephalitis compared with wild-type CD4(+) T cells. This enhanced capacity of Eomes-deficient CD4(+) T cells to inhibit EAE in trans was associated with an enhanced frequency of Foxp3(+) cells. Our data identify a novel role for Eomes in CD4(+) T cells and indicate that Eomes expression may act by limiting Foxp3 induction, which may contribute to the association of EOMES to susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26453746

  5. CD1-restricted recognition of exogenous and self-lipid antigens by duodenal gammadelta+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Russano, Anna M; Bassotti, Gabrio; Agea, Elisabetta; Bistoni, Onelia; Mazzocchi, Alessandro; Morelli, Antonio; Porcelli, Steven A; Spinozzi, Fabrizio

    2007-03-15

    Gammadelta T cells are present in the mucosal intestinal epithelia and secrete factors necessary to maintain tissue integrity. Ags recognized by these cells are poorly defined, although in mice non-classical MHC class I molecules have been implicated. Since MHC class I-like CD1 receptors are widely expressed at the surface of epithelial and dendritic intestinal cells and have the capacity to present lipid Ags to T cells, we hypothesized that these molecules might present autologous and/or exogenous phospholipids to intestinal gammadelta T lymphocytes. Intraepithelial T lymphocytes from normal human duodenal mucosal biopsies were cloned and exposed to natural and synthetic phospholipids using CD1a-, CD1b-, CD1c- or CD1d-transfected C1R lymphoblastoid or HeLa cell lines as APCs. Their cytolytic properties and regulatory cytokine secretion were also examined. Most clones obtained from duodenal mucosa (up to 70%) were TCRalphabeta+, and either CD4+ or CD8+, whereas 20% were CD4-CD8- (6 clones) or TCRgammadelta+ (12 clones). A relevant percentage (up to 66%) of TCRgammadelta+ but few (<5%) TCRalphabeta+ T cell clones responded to synthetic and/or natural phospholipids presented by CD1 molecules, as measured by both [(3)H]thymidine incorporation and IL-4 release assays. A Th1-like cytolytic and functional activity along with the ability to secrete regulatory cytokines was observed in most phospholipid-specific gammadelta T cell clones. Thus, a substantial percentage of TCRgammadelta+ but few TCRalphabeta+ from human duodenal mucosa recognize exogenous phospholipids in a CD1-restricted fashion. This adaptive response could contribute to mucosal homeostasis, but could also favor the emergence of inflammatory or allergic intestinal diseases. PMID:17339459

  6. Optical nonlinearity of CdSe-PMMA hybrid nanocomposite investigated via Z-scan technique and semi-empirical relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Ramneek; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    CdSe-PMMA nanocomposite has been synthesized by ex-situ technique. The effect of different Ag doping concentrations on its structural and optical properties has been studied. X-ray diffraction reveals the hexagonal wurtzite structure of the polymer nanocomposites with preferential growth of the nanocrystals along (1 0 0) direction. Transmission electron micrograph shows the spherical CdSe nanoparticles embedded in polymer matrix. The nonlinear refractive index of the nanocomposites has been calculated using Tichy & Ticha semi-empirical relations and Z-scan technique. Z-scan results disclose the two photon absorption process in the hybrid nanocomposites with self focussing behaviour. With Ag doping, the nonlinearity is found to be increased up to 0.2% Ag doping concentration due to the confined effect of Surface Plasmon, Quantum confinement and thermal lensing. Above 0.2% Ag concentration, its value decreases due to the declined linear refractive index of the nanocomposites. Maximum two photon figure of merit is 76 for 0.2% Ag doped CdSe-PMMA hybrid nanocomposite. The present results accentuate the possibility of tuning the optical non-linearity of CdSe-PMMA hybrid nanocomposite by adjusting the doping concentration.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of dendritic cells is insufficient to mature dendritic cells to generate CTLs from naive polyclonal CD8+ T cells in vitro, whereas CD40 ligation is essential.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, M; Beverley, P C

    2001-12-01

    Many cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses are dependent on the interactions between CD40 ligand on the helper CD4+ T cell and CD40 on the APC. Although CD40 triggering of dendritic cells (DC) has been shown to mature the DC by increasing the level of expression of costimulatory molecules and inducing IL-12 secretion, the precise mechanisms by which CD40-CD40 ligand interactions allow DC to drive CTL responses remain unknown. We have used an in vitro model in which naive polyclonal CD8+ T cells can be activated by bone marrow-derived DC to investigate factor(s) that are responsible for this CD40-dependent generation of CTLs. DC modulated with agonistic anti-CD40 mAb (aCD40) are able to generate Ag-specific CTL responses while DC modulated with the microbial stimulus LPS alone do not. We compared the Ag-presenting capacity, levels of costimulatory molecules, and release of cytokines and chemokines of DC modulated with aCD40 to that of DC modulated by LPS. None of the factors assayed account for the unique capacity of anti-CD40-matured DC to drive CTL but this model provides a simplified system for further investigation. Although we attempted to use an LPS-free system for these studies, we are unable to rule out the possibility that very low levels of endotoxin (<20 pg/ml) may synergize with CD40 ligation in the generation of CTLs. PMID:11714787

  8. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2011-04-15

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses. PMID:21389573

  9. CD4+ Group 1 Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILC) Form a Functionally Distinct ILC Subset That Is Increased in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roan, Florence; Stoklasek, Thomas A; Whalen, Elizabeth; Molitor, Jerry A; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Buckner, Jane H; Ziegler, Steven F

    2016-03-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a heterogeneous group of cellular subsets that produce large amounts of T cell-associated cytokines in response to innate stimulation in the absence of Ag. In this study, we define distinct patterns of surface marker and cytokine expression among the ILC subsets that may further delineate their migration and function. Most notably, we found that the subset previously defined as group 1 ILC (ILC1) contains CD4(+) CD8(-), CD4(-) CD8(+), and CD4(-) CD8(-) populations. Although all ILC1 subsets shared characteristics with Th1 cells, CD4(+) ILC1 also demonstrated significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. We also show that the frequencies of CD4(+) ILC1 and NKp44(+) group 3 ILC, but not CD4(-) ILC1 or group 2 ILC, are increased in the peripheral blood of individuals with systemic sclerosis (SSc), a disease characterized by fibrotic and vascular pathology, as well as immune dysregulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4(+) and CD4(-) ILC1 are functionally divergent based on their IL-6Rα expression and that the frequency of IL-6Rα expression on ILC is altered in SSc. The distinct phenotypic and functional features of CD4(+) and CD4(-) ILC1 suggest that they may have differing roles in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases, such as SSc. PMID:26826243

  10. DNA-templated Ag nanoclusters as fluorescent probes for sensing and intracellular imaging of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Ru-Ping; Xiao, Sai-Jin; Bai, Jian-Mei; Zheng, Lin-Ling; Zhan, Lei; Zhao, Xi-Juan; Qiu, Jian-Ding; Huang, Cheng-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a simple, rapid and label-free sensor for the essential biological OH radicals based on the fluorescence quenching of DNA-templated Ag nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs). The OH radicals generated from the Fenton reagent attack and cleave the DNA template, which disturbs the microenvironments around Ag NCs, resulting in spontaneous aggregation due to the lack of stabilization and further the quenching of the Ag NCs fluorescence. These changes in fluorescence intensity allow sensing of OH radicals with good sensitivity and selectivity under optimal conditions. The sensor can be also applied for quantifying the radical scavenging action of antioxidants. Various characterizations including absorption spectra, fluorescence lifetimes, light scattering (LS) spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dark field light scattering imaging, and circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry have been employed to illustrate the proposed sensing mechanism. Further investigations demonstrate that the fluorescent probe could penetrate into intact cell membranes to selectively detect intracellular OH radicals induced by the phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation. These advantageous characteristics make the fluorescent DNA-Ag NCs potentially useful as a new candidate to monitor OH in broad biosystems. PMID:24274306

  11. Centrality dependence of ψ(2S) suppression in p-Pb collisions at {√{s}}_{NN}=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.

    2016-06-01

    The inclusive production of the ψ(2S) charmonium state was studied as a function of centrality in p-Pb collisions at the nucleon-nucleon center of mass energy {√{s}}_{NN}=5.02 TeV at the CERN LHC. The measurement was performed with the ALICE detector in the center of mass rapidity ranges -4 .46 < y cms < -2 .96 and 2 .03 < y cms < 3 .53, down to zero transverse momentum, by reconstructing the ψ(2S) decay to a muon pair. The ψ(2S) production cross section σ ψ(2S) is presented as a function of the collision centrality, which is estimated through the energy deposited in forward rapidity calorimeters. The relative strength of nuclear effects on the ψ(2S) and on the corresponding 1S charmonium state J/ ψ is then studied by means of the double ratio of cross sections [σ ψ(2S) /σJ/ ψ ]pPb /[σ ψ(2S) /σJ/ ψ ]pp between p-Pb and pp collisions, and by the values of the nuclear modification factors for the two charmonium states. The results show a large suppression of ψ(2S) production relative to the J/ ψ at backward (negative) rapidity, corresponding to the flight direction of the Pb-nucleus, while at forward (positive) rapidity the suppressions of the two states are comparable. Finally, comparisons to results from lower energy experiments and to available theoretical models are presented. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Centrality dependence of inclusive J/ ψ production in p-Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Chunhui, Z.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.

    2015-11-01

    We present a measurement of inclusive J/ ψ production in p-Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=5.02 TeV as a function of the centrality of the collision, as estimated from the energy deposited in the Zero Degree Calorimeters. The measurement is performed with the ALICE detector down to zero transverse momentum, p T, in the backward (-4 .46 < y cms < -2 .96) and forward (2 .03 < y cms < 3 .53) rapidity intervals in the dimuon decay channel and in the mid-rapidity region (-1 .37 < y cms < 0 .43) in the dielectron decay channel. The backward and forward rapidity intervals correspond to the Pb-going and p-going direction, respectively. The p T-differential J /ψ production cross section at backward and forward rapidity is measured for several centrality classes, together with the corresponding average p T and p T2 values. The nuclear modification factor is presented as a function of centrality for the three rapidity intervals, and as a function of p T for several centrality classes at backward and forward rapidity. At mid- and forward rapidity, the J /ψ yield is suppressed up to 40% compared to that in pp interactions scaled by the number of binary collisions. The degree of suppression increases towards central p-Pb collisions at forward rapidity, and with decreasing p T of the J /ψ. At backward rapidity, the nuclear modification factor is compatible with unity within the total uncertainties, with an increasing trend from peripheral to central p-Pb collisions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Event activity dependence of (nS) production in = 5 .02 TeV pPb and = 2 .76 TeV pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T. J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Velde, C. Vander; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Marono, M. Vidal; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins, M. Correa; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá, W. 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M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Biasotto, M.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Fanzago, F.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Triossi, A.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. 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A.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y.-J.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Bahtiyar, H.; Barlas, E.; Cankocak, K.; Günaydin, Y. O.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Ilic, J.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Felcini, M.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Lacroix, F.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Shrinivas, A.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Kcira, D.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2014-04-01

    The production of (1S), (2S), and (3S) is investigated in pPb and pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and 2.76 TeV, respectively. The datasets correspond to integrated luminosities of about 31 nb-1 (pPb) and 5.4 pb-1 (pp), collected in 2013 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Upsilons that decay into muons are reconstructed within the rapidity interval | y CM| < 1 .93 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass frame. Their production is studied as a function of two measures of event activity, namely the charged-particle multiplicity measured in the pseudorapidity interval | η| < 2 .4, and the sum of transverse energy deposited at forward pseudorapidity, 4 .0 < | η| < 5 .2. The cross sections normalized by their event activity integrated values, (nS) /<(nS)>, are found to rise with both measures of the event activity in pp and pPb. In both collision systems, the ratios of the excited to the ground state cross sections, (nS) / (1S), are found to decrease with the charged-particle multiplicity, while as a function of the transverse energy the variation is less pronounced. The event activity integrated double ratios, [(nS) / (1S)]pPb /[(nS) / (1S)]pp, are also measured and found to be 0 .83 ± 0 .05 (stat .) ± 0 .05 (syst .) and 0 .71 ± 0 .08 (stat .) ± 0 .09 (syst .) for (2S) and (3S), respectively. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. CdSxTe1-x Alloying in CdS/CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.; Pankow, J. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    A CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer forms by interdiffusion of CdS and CdTe during the fabrication of thin film CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. The CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer is thought to be important because it relieves strain at the CdS/CdTe interface that would otherwise exist due to the 10% lattice mismatch between these two materials. Our previous work has indicated that the electrical junction is located in this interdiffused CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} region. Further understanding, however, is essential to predict the role of this CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer in the operation of CdS/CdTe devices. In this study, CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloy films were deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and coevaporation from CdTe and CdS sources. Both radio-frequency-magnetron-sputtered and coevaporated CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} films of lower S content (x < 0.3) have a cubic zincblende (ZB) structure akin to CdTe, whereas those of higher S content have a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure like that of CdS. Films become less preferentially oriented as a result of a CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment at {approx}400 C for 5 min. Films sputtered in a 1% O{sub 2}/Ar ambient are amorphous as deposited, but show CdTe ZB, CdS WZ, and CdTe oxide phases after a CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment. Films sputtered in O{sub 2} partial pressure have a much wider bandgap than expected. This may be explained by nanocrystalline size effects seen previously for sputtered oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) films.

  15. CdSxTe1-x Alloying in CdS/CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.; Pankow, J. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

    2011-05-01

    A CdSxTe1-x layer forms by interdiffusion of CdS and CdTe during the fabrication of thin-film CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. The CdSxTe1-x layer is thought to be important because it relieves strain at the CdS/CdTe interface that would otherwise exist due to the 10% lattice mismatch between these two materials. Our previous work [1] has indicated that the electrical junction is located in this interdiffused CdSxTe1-x region. Further understanding, however, is essential to predict the role of this CdSxTe1-x layer in the operation of CdS/CdTe devices. In this study, CdSxTe1-x alloy films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering and co-evaporation from CdTe and CdS sources. Both radio-frequency-magnetron-sputtered and co-evaporated CdSxTe1-x films of lower S content (x<0.3) have a cubic zincblende (ZB) structure akin to CdTe, while those of higher S content have a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure like that of CdS. Films become less preferentially oriented as a result of a CdCl2 heat treatment at ~400 degrees C for 5 min. Films sputtered in a 1% O2/Ar ambient are amorphous as deposited, but show CdTe ZB, CdS WZ, and CdTe oxide phases after a CdCl2 heat treatment (HT). Films sputtered in O2 partial pressure have a much wider bandgap (BG) than expected. This may be explained by nanocrystalline size effects seen previously [2] for sputtered oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) films.

  16. Facile synthesis of S–Ag nanocomposites and Ag2S short nanorods by the interaction of sulfur with AgNO3 in PEG400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Xie, Xin-Yuan; Liang, Ming; Xie, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jie-Mei; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    A facile, eco-friendly and inexpensive method to prepare Ag2S short nanorods and S–Ag nanocomposites using sublimed sulfur, AgNO3, PVP and PEG400 was studied. According to x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the Ag2S, the products are highly crystalline and pure Ag2S nanorods with diameters of 70–160 nm and lengths of 200–360 nm. X-ray diffraction of the S–Ag nanocomposites shows that we obtained cubic Ag and S nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ plays an important role in controlling the size and morphology of the S–Ag nanocomposites. When the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ was 10:1, smaller sizes, better dispersibility and narrower distribution of S–Ag nanocomposites with diameters of 10–40 nm were obtained. The formation mechanism of the S–Ag nanocomposites was studied by designing a series of experiments using ultraviolet–visible measurement, and it was found that S nanoparticles are produced first and act as seed crystals; then Ag+ becomes Ag nanocrystals on the surfaces of the S nanoparticles by the reduction of PVP. PEG400 acts as a catalyzer, accelerating the reaction rate, and protects the S–Ag nanocomposites from reacting to produce Ag2S. The antimicrobial experiments show that the S–Ag nanocomposites have greater antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and blue mold than Ag nanoparticles.

  17. Observation of ozone and aerosols in the Antarctic ozone hole of 1991 under the Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) Project. Preliminary result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Masahiko; Murata, Isao; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Kondo, Yutaka; Kanzawa, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary results for the PPB (Polar Patrol Balloon) experiment. The balloon was launched at 07:55 UT on 23 September and dropped at 21 UT on 28 September 1991. During the period, ozone and aerosol concentrations were measured correspondingly along the track. During the Lagrangian type observation, drastic change of ozone concentration in 'same air mass' and positive correlation between ozone concentration and sulfate aerosol amount were obtained at the level within 80-78 hPa. During the descent motion at 80 deg S active PSC's (type-1 and -2) were observed from 200 hPa to 80 hPa.

  18. Open-beauty production in pPb collisions at √{sNN}=5 TeV: Effect of the gluon nuclear densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conesa del Valle, Z.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Fleuret, F.; Lansberg, J. P.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.

    2014-06-01

    We present our results on open-beauty production in proton-nucleus collisions for the recent LHC pPb run at √{sNN}=5 TeV. We have analyzed the effect of the modification of the gluon PDFs in a nucleus at the level of the nuclear modification factor. Because of the absence of measurements in pp collisions at the same collision energy, √{sNN}, we also propose the study of the forward-to-backward yield ratio in which the unknown proton-proton yield cancels. Our results are compared with the data obtained by the LHCb collaboration and show a good agreement.

  19. Progress in Solving the Elusive Ag Transport Mechanism in TRISO Coated Particles: What is new?

    SciTech Connect

    Isabella Van Rooyen

    2014-10-01

    The TRISO particle for HTRs has been developed to an advanced state where the coating withstands internal gas pressures and retains fission products during irradiation and under postulated accidents. However, one exception is Ag that has been found to be released from high quality TRISO coated particles when irradiated and can also during high temperature accident heating tests. Although out- of- pile laboratory tests have never hither to been able to demonstrate a diffusion process of Ag in SiC, effective diffusion coefficients have been derived to successfully reproduce measured Ag-110m releases from irradiated HTR fuel elements, compacts and TRISO particles It was found that silver transport through SiC does not proceed via bulk volume diffusion. Presently grain boundary diffusion that may be irradiation enhanced either by neutron bombardment or by the presence of fission products such as Pd, are being investigated. Recent studies of irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), transmission kukuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used to further the understanding of Ag transport through TRISO particles. No silver was observed in SiC grains, but Ag was identified at triple-points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in some of the very same triple junctions, but this could be related to silver behavior as Ag-110m decays to Cd-110. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries and in most SiC grain boundaries and the potential role of Pd in the transport of Ag will be discussed.

  20. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Hale, Laura P; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  1. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Hale, Laura P.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  2. CD3+CD8+CD161high Tc17 cells are depleted in HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ullum, Henrik; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2013-02-20

    CD8 Tc17 cells with pro-inflammatory properties have only recently been acknowledged, and Tc17 cells in HIV-infection are not described. CD3CD8CD161 Tc17 cells and the production of interleukin (IL)-17 were examined in untreated and treated HIV-infected patients, HIV-hepatitis C virus co-infected patients, and healthy controls. Depletion of CD3CD8CD161 Tc17 cells and diminished production of IL-17 in HIV-infected patients were found. The level of Tc17 cells was associated with the CD4 cell count in treated patients. PMID:23135168

  3. Acceleration of polarized proton at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y Y

    1980-01-01

    The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A collaborative effort is underway by the groups in Argonne, Michigan, Rice, Yale and Brookhaven to improve and modify the AGS to accelerate polarized protons. With the appropriate funding the first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS should be possible by 1983.

  4. The cardiovascular response to the AGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David; Mctaggart, Wesley G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of experiments on human subjects conducted to study the cardiovascular response to various g-levels and exposure times using an artificial gravity simulator (AGS). The AGS is a short arm centrifuge consisting of a turntable, a traction system, a platform and four beds. Data collection hardware is part of the communication system. The AGS provides a steep acceleration gradient in subjects in the supine position.

  5. AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids with highly efficient visible-light driven photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Masanao; Suzuki, Tohru; Kaneco, Satoshi

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid was prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} displays the excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transforms to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system. • h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization over AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The activity enhancement is ascribed to a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI. - Abstract: Highly efficient visible-light-driven AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid photocatalysts with different mole ratios of AgI were prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) technique. Under visible light irradiation (>420 nm), the AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} photocatalysts displayed the higher photocatalytic activity than pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and AgI for the decolorization of acid orange 7 (AO 7). Among the hybrid photocatalysts, AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 80% of AgI exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for the decolorization of AO 7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transformed to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system while the photocatalytic activity of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} remained after 5 recycling runs. In addition, the quenching effects of different scavengers displayed that the reactive h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization. The photocatalytic activity enhancement of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids can be ascribed to the efficient separation of electron–hole pairs through a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI, in which Ag nanoparticles act as the charge separation center.

  6. Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Régent, Alexis; Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Cheynier, Rémi; Terrier, Benjamin; Charmeteau-De Muylder, Bénédicte; Krivitzky, Alain; Oksenhendler, Eric; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Hubert, Pascale; Lortholary, Olivier; Dupin, Nicolas; Debré, Patrice; Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic CD4 T lymphocytopenia (ICL) is a rare and severe condition with limited available data. We conducted a French multicenter study to analyze the clinical and immunologic characteristics of a cohort of patients with ICL according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria. We recruited 40 patients (24 female) of mean age 44.2 ± 12.2 (19–70) years. Patients underwent T-lymphocyte phenotyping and lymphoproliferation assay at diagnosis, and experiments related to thymic function and interferon (IFN)-γ release by natural killer (NK) cell were performed. Mean follow-up was 6.9 ± 6.7 (0.14–24.3) years. Infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic events were recorded, as were outcomes of interleukin 2 therapy. In all, 25 patients had opportunistic infections (12 with human papillomavirus infection), 14 had autoimmune symptoms, 5 had malignancies, and 8 had mild or no symptoms. At the time of diagnosis, the mean cell counts were as follows: mean CD4 cell count: 127/mm3 (range, 4–294); mean CD8: 236/mm3 (range, 1–1293); mean CD19: 113/mm3 (range, 3–547); and mean NK cell count: 122/mm3 (range, 5–416). Most patients had deficiency in CD8, CD19, and/or NK cells. Cytotoxic function of NK cells was normal, and patients with infections had a significantly lower NK cell count than those without (p = 0.01). Patients with autoimmune manifestations had increased CD8 T-cell count. Proliferation of thymic precursors, as assessed by T-cell rearrangement excision circles, was increased. Six patients died (15%). CD4 T-cell count <150/mm3 and NK cell count <100/mm3 were predictors of death. In conclusion, ICL is a heterogeneous disorder often associated with deficiencies in CD8, CD19, and/or NK cells. Long-term prognosis may be related to initial CD4 and NK cell deficiency. PMID:24646462

  7. Neem leaf glycoprotein promotes dual generation of central and effector memory CD8(+) T cells against sarcoma antigen vaccine to induce protective anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Saha, Akata; Dasgupta, Shayani; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that Neem Leaf Glycoprotein (NLGP) mediates sustained tumor protection by activating host immune response. Now we report that adjuvant help from NLGP predominantly generates CD44(+)CD62L(high)CCR7(high) central memory (TCM; in lymph node) and CD44(+)CD62L(low)CCR7(low) effector memory (TEM; in spleen) CD8(+) T cells of Swiss mice after vaccination with sarcoma antigen (SarAg). Generated TCM and TEM participated either to replenish memory cell pool for sustained disease free states or in rapid tumor eradication respectively. TCM generated after SarAg+NLGP vaccination underwent significant proliferation and IL-2 secretion following SarAg re-stimulation. Furthermore, SarAg+NLGP vaccination helps in greater survival of the memory precursor effector cells at the peak of the effector response and their maintenance as mature memory cells, in comparison to single modality treatment. Such response is corroborated with the reduced phosphorylation of FOXO in the cytosol and increased KLF2 in the nucleus associated with enhanced CD62L, CCR7 expression of lymph node-resident CD8(+) T cells. However, spleen-resident CD8(+) T memory cells show superior efficacy for immediate memory-to-effector cell conversion. The data support in all aspects that SarAg+NLGP demonstrate superiority than SarAg vaccination alone that benefits the host by rapid effector functions whenever required, whereas, central-memory cells are thought to replenish the memory cell pool for ultimate sustained disease free survival till 60 days following post-vaccination tumor inoculation. PMID:26851529

  8. Visible-light-driven photocatalysts Ag/AgCl dispersed on mesoporous Al2O3 with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhouzhou; Yu, Jiajie; Sun, Dongping; Wang, Tianhe

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, Ag/AgCl and Ag/AgCl/Al2O3 photocatalysts were synthesized via a precipitation reaction between NaCl and CH3COOAg or Ag(NH3)2NO3, wherein Ag/AgCl was immobilized into mesoporous Al2O3 medium. The Ag/AgCl-based nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and so on. The photocatalysts displayed excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradations of methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) pollutants under visible light irradiation. The Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg)/Al2O3 sample exhibited the best photocatalytic performance, degrading 99% MO after 9min of irradiation, which was 1.1 times, 1.22 times and 1.65 times higher than that of Ag/AgCl(Ag(NH3)2NO3)/Al2O3, Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg) and Ag/AgCl(Ag(NH3)2NO3) photocatalyst, respectively. Meanwhile, Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg)/Al2O3 also showed excellent capability of MB degradation. Compared to the data reported for Ag/AgCl/TiO2, the Ag/AgCl/Al2O3 prepared in this work exhibited a good performance for the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The results suggest that the dispersion of Ag/AgCl on mesoporous Al2O3 strongly affected their photocatalytic activities. O2(-), OH radicals and Cl(0) atoms are main active species during photocatalysis. PMID:27442145

  9. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Hattori, T.; Lin, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  10. CD44 Gene Polymorphisms and Environmental Factors on Oral Cancer Susceptibility in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ying-Erh; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Hsin, Chung-Han; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Lai, Yi-Cheng; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Huang, Shu-Ching; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the fourth leading cause of male cancer death in Taiwan. Exposure to environmental carcinogens is the primary risk factor for developing OSCC. CD44, a well-known tumor marker, plays a crucial role in tumor cell differentiation, invasion, and metastasis. This study investigated CD44 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with environmental risk factors to determine OSCC susceptibility and clinicopathological characteristics. Methodology/Principal Findings Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to analyze 6 SNPs of CD44 in 599 patients with oral cancer and 561 cancer-free controls. We determined that the CD44 rs187115 polymorphism carriers with the genotype AG, GG, or AG+GG were associated with oral cancer susceptibility. Among 731 smokers, CD44 polymorphisms carriers with the betel-nut chewing habit had a 10.30–37.63-fold greater risk of having oral cancer compared to CD44 wild-type (WT) carriers without the betel-nut chewing habit. Among 552 betel-nut chewers, CD44 polymorphisms carriers who smoked had a 4.23–16.11-fold greater risk of having oral cancer compared to those who carried the WT but did not smoke. Finally, we also observed that the stage III and IV oral cancer patients had higher frequencies of CD44 rs187115 polymorphisms with the variant genotype (AG+GG) compared with the wild-type (WT) carriers. Conclusion Our results suggest that gene–environment interactions between the CD44 polymorphisms and betel quid chewing and tobacco smoking increase the susceptibility to oral cancer development. Patients with CD44 rs187115 variant genotypes (AG+GG) were correlated with a higher risk of oral cancer development, and these patients may possess greater chemoresistance to advanced- to late-stage oral cancer than WT carriers do. The CD44 rs187115 polymorphism has potential predictive significance in oral carcinogenesis and also may be applied as factors to predict the clinical stage in OSCC

  11. B lymphoblastoid cell lines as efficient APC to elicit CD8+ T cell responses against a cytomegalovirus antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Q; Burton, R L; Dai, L J; Britt, W J; Lucas, K G

    2000-10-01

    Potent and readily accessible APC are critical for development of immunotherapy protocols to treat viral disease and cancer. We have shown that B lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCL) that stably express CMV phosphoprotein 65 (BLCLpp65), as a result of retroviral transduction, can be used to generate ex vivo CTL cultures that possess cytotoxicity against CMV and EBV. In this report, we demonstrate that the EBV-specific cytotoxicity in the BLCLpp65-primed culture had a spectrum of EBV-Ag recognition similar to that of the BLCL-primed counterpart, suggesting that retroviral transduction and expression of the CMV Ag would not compromise the Ag-presenting capacity of BLCL. In addition, BLCLpp65 appeared to present multiple natural pp65 epitopes, because pp65-specific CTL, which recognized different CMV clinical isolates, were generated in BLCLpp65-primed cultures from individuals with various HLA backgrounds. Consistent with a polyclonal expansion of virus-specific CTL, T cell lines established from the BLCLpp65-primed CTL cultures expressed different TCR-Vbeta Although most of the virus-specific T cell isolates were CD8+, EBV-specific CD4+ lines were also established from BLCLpp65-primed cultures. Western blot analysis revealed that the CD8+ lines, but not the CD4+ line, expressed granzyme B, consistent with features of classic CTL. Thus, our results suggested that BLCL stably expressing a foreign Ag might be used as a practical APC to elicit CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:11034422

  12. Synthesis and characterization of nano Cdo/NiO, nano Ag/ZnO composites & Ag/Zno embedded polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godasu, Rahul

    Nanoparticles are finest structures whose size composition is within nanometer range. Thus nanoparticles are a collection of atoms bonded together with structural radius less than 100 nm. Nanocomposites are multiphase solid materials where one of the phases has one, two or three dimensions of less than 100 mn. Nano composites are prepared to improve mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical, electrochemical, catalytic properties from its parent materials. For instance, blend of nanoparticles with a polymer are called polymer nanocomposites. Nanostructured composites like Cadmium oxide/Nickel oxide (CdO/NiO) and silver/zinc oxide (Ag/ZnO) were prepared. Characterization of these prepared nanocomposites were carried out using X-ray powder diffraction, Differential scanning calorimetry, Scanning electron microscopy and the average sizes were determined using zeta sizer. Results obtained using characterization methods were in agreement stating that we were successful in synthesizing composites. The prepared Ag/ZnO nano composite was embedded in PCL polymer and we made films of PCL embedded with nano composite. The SEM image of the 5% Ag/ZnO embedded film clearly shows two regions, which indicates that Ag/ZnO nano composite was successfully embedded into the polymer using a non insitu method. SEM results also showed that the Zinc Oxide nano particles were successfully embedded into the polymer .

  13. Synthesis of Cu-Ag@Ag particles using hyperbranched polyester as template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen-Song

    2015-07-01

    In this manuscript, the third-generation hyperbranched polyester was synthesized with 2, 2-dimethylol propionic acid as AB2 monomer and pentaerythrite as core molecule by using step by step polymerization process at first. Then, the Cu-Ag particles were prepared by co-reduction of silver nitrate and copper nitrate with ascorbic acid in the aqueous solution using hyperbranched polyester as template. Finally, the Cu-Ag@Ag particles were prepared by coating silver on the surface of Cu-Ag particles by reduction of silver nitrate. The synthesized hyperbranched polyester and Cu-Ag@Ag particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV-vis spectra, x-ray diffraction, Laser light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and SEM. UV-vis spectra results showed that the Cu-Ag@Ag particles had a strong absorption band at around 420 nm. Laser light scattering and SEM studies confirmed that the most frequent particle sizes of Cu-Ag@Ag particles were 1.2 um. TGA results indicated that the Cu-Ag@Ag particles had good thermal stability. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Antibacterial action of Ag-containing MFI zeolite at low Ag loadings.

    PubMed

    Lalueza, Patricia; Monzón, Marta; Arruebo, Manuel; Santamaria, Jesus

    2011-01-14

    We show that Ag-containing zeolites are highly effective against Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacteria even at low Ag loadings and in the presence of high (10(9) CFU per mL) bacterial concentrations. At short contact times the bactericidal efficiency correlates strongly with Ag(+) release. At longer times data dispersion is higher, probably as a consequence of bacterial metabolism. PMID:21103583

  15. 78 FR 30965 - AG Valley Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Ag Valley Holdings, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board AG Valley Railroad, LLC--Operation Exemption--Ag Valley Holdings, LLC AG... original and 10 copies of all pleadings, referring to Docket No. FD 35736, must be filed with the...

  16. Progress with the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demands that a rapid- cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues needing special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Polarization preservation in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The successful operation of a high energy polarized beam at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) with the concommitant development of depolarizing resonance correction techniques has led to the present project of commissioning such a beam at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). A description of the project was presented at the 1981 National Accelerator Conference. I would like to now present a more detailed description of how we plan to preserve the polarization during acceleration, and to present our game plan for tuning through some 50 resonances and reaching our goal of a 26 GeV polarized proton beam with greater than 60% polarization.

  18. Hypernuclear research at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Although the field of hypernuclear research is over 30 years old, progress in exploring the detailed behavior of hypernuclei has been slow. This fact is due mainly to the technical problems of producing and studying these strange objects. Indeed each step in the improvement of technique has been accompanied by a breakthrough in our understanding of this fascinating subject. In this paper, the aim is to describe the evolution of hypernuclear research, stressing especially the contributions of the program based on the Brookhaven AGS. 23 references, 17 figures, 1 table.

  19. New AGS fast extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1980-09-01

    Both the high energy physics program and ISA injection require an improved fast extraction system from the AGS. The proposed new system consists of a fast kicker at H5 and an ejector magnet at H10. The H5 kicker is capable of producing 1.2 mrad deflection and rising up to 99% strength in 150 nsec with flat top ripple within +- 1%. It is found that the focusing strengths and positions of UQ3-UQ7 have to be modified to achieve an achromatic condition at the end of 8/sup 0/-bend. Also, the conceptual design of the H5 magnet and the pulser system are discussed.

  20. Downregulation of CD44 reduces doxorubicin resistance of CD44+CD24− breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Phuc, Pham; Nhan, Phan Lu Chinh; Nhung, Truong Hai; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Hoang, Nguyen Minh; Tue, Vuong Gia; Thuy, Duong Thanh; Ngoc, Phan Kim

    2011-01-01

    Background Cells within breast cancer stem cell populations have been confirmed to have a CD44+CD24− phenotype. Strong expression of CD44 plays a critical role in numerous types of human cancers. CD44 is involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and metastasis of cancer cells. Methods In this study, we reduced CD44 expression in CD44+CD24− breast cancer stem cells and investigated their sensitivity to an antitumor drug. The CD44+CD24− breast cancer stem cells were isolated from breast tumors; CD44 expression was downregulated with siRNAs followed by treatment with different concentrations of the antitumor drug. Results The proliferation of CD44 downregulated CD44+CD24− breast cancer stem cells was decreased after drug treatment. We noticed treated cells were more sensitive to doxorubicin, even at low doses, compared with the control groups. Conclusions It would appear that expression of CD44 is integral among the CD44+CD24− cell population. Reducing the expression level of CD44, combined with doxorubicin treatment, yields promising results for eradicating breast cancer stem cells in vitro. This study opens a new direction in treating breast cancer through gene therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy. PMID:21792314

  1. Toxicokinetics of Ag in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to Ag NPs and AgNO₃ via soil and food.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been used in numerous consumer products and may enter the soil through the land application of biosolids. However, little is known about the relationship between Ag NP exposure and their bioavailability for soil organisms. This study aims at comparing the uptake and elimination kinetics of Ag upon exposures to different Ag forms (NPs and ionic Ag (as AgNO3)) in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus. Isopods were exposed to contaminated Lufa 2.2 soil or alder leaves as food. Uptake and elimination rate constants for soil exposure did not significantly differ between Ag NPs and ionic Ag at 30 and 60 mg Ag/kg. For dietary exposure, the uptake rate constant was up to 5 times higher for Ag NPs than for AgNO3, but this was related to feeding activity and exposure concentrations, while no difference in the elimination rate constants was found. When comparing both routes, dietary exposure resulted in lower Ag uptake rate constants but elimination rate constants did not differ. A fast Ag uptake was observed from both routes and most of the Ag taken up seemed not to be eliminated. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence showed Ag in the S-cells of the hepatopancreas, thus supporting the observations from the kinetic experiment (i.e. low elimination). In addition, our results show that isopods have an extremely high Ag accumulation capacity, suggesting the presence of an efficient Ag storage compartment. PMID:26581474

  2. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-→1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-←1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(υ)→1Ag-(υ) emission and the 3Ag-(υ)←1Ag-(υ) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of υ = 2 → 1 → 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  3. Silver Nanoclusters for High-Efficiency Quenching of CdS Nanocrystal Electrochemiluminescence and Sensitive Detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Yan; Feng, Qiu-Mei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, oligonucleotide-encapusulated silver nanoclusters were applied in the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) system of CdS nanocrystals (NCs)/ K2S2O8 based on dual ECL quenching effects. We found that the ECL emission of CdS NCs matched well with the absorption band of oligonucleotide encapsulated Ag nanoclusters, which could act as the energy acceptor of CdS NCs ECL so as to lead to an effective ECL resonance energy transfer (RET). On the other hand, the Ag nanoclusters could also catalyze electrochemical reduction of K2S2O8, resulting in increased consumption of ECL coreactant near the working electrode and decreased ECL intensity from CdS NCs. On the basis of the dual ECL quenching effects, a sensitive ECL biosensor for detection of microRNA was successfully achieved with a wide linear range from 10 fM to 100 pM. PMID:26561442

  4. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm {NN}}} =5.02$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV, in the range 0.4T < 120 GeV/c and pseudorapidity |ηCM|<1.8 in the proton–nucleon center-of-mass frame. For pT < 10 GeV/c, the charged-particle production is asymmetric about ηCM=0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at √s = 5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lower center-of-mass energies. The pTdistribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with pT > 20GeV/c compared to expectations from the pp reference. As a result, the enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.

  5. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at $$\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm {NN}}} =5.02$$ TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV, in the range 0.4T < 120 GeV/c and pseudorapidity |ηCM|<1.8 in the proton–nucleon center-of-mass frame. For pT < 10 GeV/c, the charged-particle production is asymmetric about ηCM=0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at √s = 5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lower center-of-mass energies. The pTdistribution measured inmore » pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with pT > 20GeV/c compared to expectations from the pp reference. As a result, the enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.« less

  6. Transverse momentum spectra of b jets in pPb collisions at √(sNN) = 5.02 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    We present a measurement of b jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra in protonlead (pPb) collisions using a dataset corresponding to about 35 nb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Jets from b quark fragmentation are found by exploiting the long lifetime of hadrons containing a b quark through tagging methods using distributions of the secondary vertex mass and displacement. Extracted cross sections for b jets are scaled by the effective number of nucleon-nucleon collisions and are compared to a reference obtained from PYTHIA simulations of pp collisions. Furthermore, the PYTHIA-based estimate of the nuclear modification factor is found to be 1.22±0.15 (stat+syst pPb)_0.27 (syst PYTHIA) averaged over all jets with pT between 55 and 400 GeV/c and with |η lab| < 2. We then compare this result to predictions from models using perturbative calculations in quantum chromodynamics.

  7. Transverse momentum spectra of inclusive b jets in pPb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Assran, Y.; Awad, A.; El Sawy, M.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a measurement of b jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra in proton-lead (pPb) collisions using a dataset corresponding to about 35 nb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Jets from b quark fragmentation are found by exploiting the long lifetime of hadrons containing a b quark through tagging methods using distributions of the secondary vertex mass and displacement. Extracted cross sections for b jets are scaled by the effective number of nucleon-nucleon collisions and are compared to a reference obtained from PYTHIA simulations of pp collisions. The PYTHIA-based estimate of the nuclear modification factor is found to be 1.22 ± 0.15 (stat +syst pPb) ± 0.27(syst PYTHIA) averaged over all jets with pT between 55 and 400 GeV / c and with |ηlab | < 2. We also compare this result to predictions from models using perturbative calculations in quantum chromodynamics.

  8. Measurement of inclusive jet production and nuclear modifications in pPb collisions at √{s_{_NN}} =5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fang, W.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.

    2016-07-01

    Inclusive jet production in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) center-of-mass energy of √{s_{_NN}} =5.02 TeV is studied with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 30.1 nb^{-1} is analyzed. The jet transverse momentum spectra are studied in seven pseudorapidity intervals covering the range -2.0<η _{CM}< 1.5 in the NN center-of-mass frame. The jet production yields at forward and backward pseudorapidity are compared and no significant asymmetry about η _{CM} = 0 is observed in the measured kinematic range. The measurements in the pPb system are compared to reference jet spectra obtained by extrapolation from previous measurements in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV . In all pseudorapidity ranges, nuclear modifications in inclusive jet production are found to be small, as predicted by next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations that incorporate nuclear effects in the parton distribution functions.

  9. Centrality dependence of charged jet production in p-Pb collisions at √{s_NN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.;