Science.gov

Sample records for ag turbofan engines

  1. 78 FR 1776 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Aero Engines AG (IAE), V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, with a certain number (No.) 4 bearing... prompted by a report of an engine under-cowl fire and commanded in-flight shutdown. This proposed AD...

  2. 76 FR 82202 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, and certain serial numbers... engines. The existing AD currently requires initial and repetitive on-wing ultrasonic inspections...

  3. 77 FR 30371 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for all International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, and certain serial numbers (S/Ns) of IAE...

  4. 78 FR 22168 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain International Aero Engines AG (IAE), V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, with a certain No. 4 bearing internal scavenge tube and...

  5. Potential improvements in turbofan engine fuel economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, R. W.; Gaffin, W. O.

    1976-01-01

    The method developed for initial evaluation of possible performance improvements in the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program, directed toward improving the fuel economy of turbofan engines, is outlined, and results of the evaluation of 100 candidate engine modifications are presented. The study indicates that fuel consumption improvements of as much as 5% may be possible in current JT3D, JT8D, and JT9D turbofan engines. Aerodynamic, thermodynamic, material, and structural advances are expected to yield fuel consumption improvements on the order of 10 to 15% in advanced turbofan engines, with the greatest improvement stemming from significantly higher cycle pressure ratios. Higher turbine temperature and fan bypass ratios are also expected to contribute to fuel conservation.

  6. Noise Reduction Technologies for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2007-01-01

    Significant progress continues to be made with noise reduction for turbofan engines. NASA has conducted and sponsored research aimed at reducing noise from commercial aircraft. Since it takes many years for technologies to be developed and implemented, it is important to have aggressive technology goals that lead the target entry into service dates. Engine noise is one of the major contributors to the overall sound levels as aircraft operate near airports. Turbofan engines are commonly used on commercial transports due to their advantage for higher performance and lower noise. The noise reduction comes from combinations of changes to the engine cycle parameters and low noise design features. In this paper, an overview of major accomplishments from recent NASA research programs for engine noise will be given.

  7. 76 FR 72353 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION...) turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of five engine in-flight shutdowns and seven unplanned engine removals. This proposed AD would require inspections, cleaning, and engine modifications...

  8. 76 FR 77108 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Engines Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for International Aero Engines (IAE) V2500-A1... engines. This AD was prompted by three reports of high- pressure turbine (HPT) case burn-through...

  9. Online Normalization Algorithm for Engine Turbofan Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    it auto-adapts itself with piecewise linear models. 1. INTRODUCTION Turbofan engine abnormality diagnosis uses three steps: reduction of...applications. At component level we monitor the start system (Flandrois, Lacaille, Massé, & Ausloos, 2009; Lacaille, 2009), the fuel system and other...Control RACC Rotor Active Clearance Control ECS Environmental Control System TLA Thrust Lever Angle N1 Fan Speed XM Mach Number Endogenous

  10. Advanced Control Considerations for Turbofan Engine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the application of a model-based engine control (MBEC) methodology featuring a self tuning on-board model for an aircraft turbofan engine simulation. The nonlinear engine model is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the advanced control methodology over a wide range of operating points and life cycle conditions. The on-board model is a piece-wise linear model derived from the nonlinear engine model and updated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. MBEC is used here to show how advanced control architectures can improve efficiency during the design phase of a turbofan engine by reducing conservative operability margins. The operability margins that can be reduced, such as stall margin, can expand the engine design space and offer potential for efficiency improvements. Application of MBEC architecture to a nonlinear engine simulation is shown to reduce the thrust specific fuel consumption by approximately 1% over the baseline design, while maintaining safe operation of the engine across the flight envelope.

  11. 78 FR 44899 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and -115B turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by multiple... AD to prevent failure of the affected fuel supply tube, fuel leakage, engine fire, and damage to...

  12. 78 FR 76045 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request... (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines with certain high pressure compressor (HPC) rotor stage... are issuing this AD to prevent failure of a critical life-limited rotating engine part, which...

  13. 77 FR 58471 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request... GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive ultrasonic inspections (UI) of... resulting in one or more engine failure(s) and possible loss of the airplane. DATES: This AD is...

  14. 77 FR 57007 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY..., PW4152, PW4156A, PW4158, PW4164, PW4168, PW4168A, PW4460, and PW4462 turbofan engines. That AD currently... rotor disk assembly for certain affected engine models. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of...

  15. 77 FR 48110 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan engines. The existing AD requires... additional reports of fuel leaks and two reports of engine fire due to mis-assembled supporting brackets...

  16. 77 FR 42424 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are... turbofan engines. That AD currently requires removing the 15th stage high-pressure compressor (HPC) disk... stage HPC disk, uncontained engine failure, and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD is...

  17. 77 FR 4650 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY...-45 and CF6-50 series turbofan engines with certain low-pressure turbine (LPT) rotor stage 3 disks..., engine checks, and vibration surveys. This new AD retains the requirements of the two ADs...

  18. 77 FR 15939 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for all Pratt & Whitney (PW) JT9D series turbofan engines... the JT9D series engines ALS sections of the manufacturer's ICA. This AD was prompted by the need...

  19. 78 FR 16620 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Division (PW) turbofan engine models PW4074, PW4074D, PW4077, PW4077D, PW4084D, PW4090, and PW4090-3 with a... air seal, which could lead to an uncontained engine failure and damage to the airplane. DATES: We...

  20. 77 FR 40822 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed..., PW4160, PW4460, PW4462, and PW4650 turbofan engines, including models with any dash number suffix. This... could lead to LPT rotor damage, uncontained engine failure, and damage to the airplane. DATES: We...

  1. 77 FR 54791 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY...'' and PW4000-100'' turbofan engines having a 1st stage high-pressure turbine (HPT) seal support, part..., including 15 in-flight engine shutdowns. This AD requires removal and replacement of the 1st stage HPT...

  2. Jet noise from ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posey, Joe W.; Norum, Thomas D.; Brown, Martha C.; Bhat, Thonse R. S.

    2002-05-01

    Modern commercial jet transport aircraft are powered by turbofan engines. Thrust from a turbofan engine is derived in part from the exhaust of a ducted fan, which may or may not be mixed with the core exhaust before exiting the nacelle. The historical trend has been toward ever higher bypass ratios (BPRs). The BPR is the ratio of air mass passing through the fan to that going through the core. The higher BPR engines can be more efficient and quieter. In general, a higher BPR results in lower average exhaust velocities and less jet noise. In order to address a scarcity of noise data for BPRs greater than 6, an extensive database collection effort was undertaken using the Jet Engine Simulator in NASA Langley's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel. Forward flight simulations of Mach 0.1, 0.2, and 0.28 were used with BPRs of 5, 8, 11, and 14. Data was taken over the entire operating line of the simulated engines along with parametric deviations to provide a complete set of sensitivity measurements. The results will be used to develop an empirical jet noise prediction capability for ultrahigh bypass engines.

  3. 77 FR 3088 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...-10] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal... directive (AD) for General Electric Company (GE) CF34-10E series turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by a... center vent tube) support ring and on the inside diameter of the fan drive shaft at the mating...

  4. 77 FR 30926 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA..., PW4164, PW4168, PW4168A, PW4460, and PW4462 turbofan engines. The existing AD currently requires initial..., Pratt & Whitney has developed a redesigned HPC drum rotor disk assembly for certain affected...

  5. 78 FR 19628 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Electric Company (GE) GE90-76B, -85B, -90B, -94B, - 110B1, and -115B turbofan engines. This proposed AD was... prevent failure of the stage 1 HPT stator shrouds, resulting in in-flight shutdown of one or more...

  6. 77 FR 76977 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Supplemental... proposed airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan engines. That NPRM proposed to supersede an AD that required replacement of fuel tubes connected to...

  7. Airesearch QCGAT program. [quiet clean general aviation turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.; Norgren, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    A model TFE731-1 engine was used as a baseline for the NASA quiet clean general aviation turbofan engine and engine/nacelle program designed to demonstrate the applicability of large turbofan engine technology to small general aviation turbofan engines, and to obtain significant reductions in noise and pollutant emissions while reducing or maintaining fuel consumption levels. All new technology design for rotating parts and all items in the engine and nacelle that contributed to the acoustic and pollution characteristics of the engine system were of flight design, weight, and construction. The major noise, emissions, and performance goals were met. Noise levels estimated for the three FAR Part 36 conditions, are 10 t0 15 ENPdB below FAA requirements; emission values are considerably reduced below that of current technology engines; and the engine performance represents a TSFC improvement of approximately 9 percent over other turbofan engines.

  8. TF-34 turbofan quiet engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edkins, D. P.; Hirschkron, R.; Lee, R.

    1972-01-01

    A study of high bypass turbofan engines in heavily sound-suppressed nacelles based on the TF-34 engine. The four-engine noise objective was 95 PNdb at four locations typical of takeoff and landing. Three engines were studied; these had fan pressure ratios, bypass ratios, and fan tip speeds respectively of 1.48/6.5/404 m/sec (1327 ft/sec), 1.25/13/305 (1000), 1.25/13/366(1200). The bypass 13 engines had a variable pitch fan, direct- and gear-driven. Noise suppressive treatment was identified which met 95 PNdb objective except for sideline liftoff at 6.5 bypass, full power, which was 2 PNdb noisier; at 90% power, 95 PNdb was achieved.

  9. A Real-Time Simulator of a Turbofan Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    44j~ - i ~4 10 I’ Q Wk r7S~f~fNt4 0K - 4’ lt 4 .At .t’ 4--Q to Aa l A REAL-TIME SIMULATOR OF A TURBOFAN ENGINE Jonathan S. Litt n For Propulsion...error. "as" ,,,rmisu Mnim*& The F100 engine is a high performance, twin-spool, low by-pass ratio, turbofan engine . Figure 2 shows the locations of the...FORTRAN sim- ulation of a generalized turbofan engine . To create the simulator, the original HYTESS code was revised to incorporate F1O0 specific

  10. 78 FR 5710 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... GP7277 turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive borescope inspections and removal from service before further flight if one or more burn holes are detected, in certain high-pressure turbine (HPT) stage 2 nozzles. This AD also requires mandatory removal from service of these HPT stage...

  11. Fan rotor blades of turbofan engines

    SciTech Connect

    Zipps, R.H.; Rynaski, C.H.; Fulton, G.B.

    1986-11-11

    This patent describes a fan blade of the type extending outwardly from a rotor disk across the annular flowpath for working medium gases in the fan section of a turbofan engine, including: an airfoil section having an arcuate cross section contour at the inner wall of the working medium flowpath; and a root section having an upstream end and a downstream end wherein the root section is formed to an arcuate contour which approximates the arcuate contour of the airfoil cross section at the inner wall of the working medium flowpath projected onto the root section, and wherein the root section is convergently tapered from the downstream end toward the upstream end of the blade.

  12. 76 FR 72348 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... Pratt & Whitney JT9D-7R4D, -7R4D1, -7R4E, -7R4E1, -7R4G2, -7R4H1, and - 7R4E4 turbofan engines. This..., P/N 735907, is necessary. We are proposing this AD to prevent critical life-limited rotating...

  13. 77 FR 1043 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... International Inc. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... engines. DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD by March 9, 2012. ADDRESSES: You may send... referenced service information at the FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive...

  14. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of...

  15. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of...

  16. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of...

  17. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of...

  18. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of...

  19. Effect of Accessory Power Take-off Variation on a Turbofan Engine Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-26

    EFFECT OF ACCESSORY POWER TAKE-OFF VARIATION ON A TURBOFAN ENGINE PERFORMANCE THESIS...ACCESSORY POWER TAKE-OFF VARIATIONS ON A TURBOFAN ENGINE PERFORMANCE DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and...TURBOFAN ENGINE PERFORMANCE Anis Faidi, BS 1st Lieutenant, TUNAF Approved

  20. Software Development for EECU Platform of Turbofan Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bo Gyoung; Kwak, Dohyup; Kim, Byunghyun; Choi, Hee ju; Kong, Changduk

    2017-04-01

    The turbofan engine operation consists of a number of hardware and software. The engine is controlled by Electronic Engine Control Unit (EECU). In order to control the engine, EECU communicates with an aircraft system, Actuator Drive Unit (ADU), Engine Power Unit (EPU) and sensors on the engine. This paper tried to investigate the process form starting to taking-off and aims to design the EECU software mode and defined communication data format. The software is implemented according to the designed software mode.

  1. Study of Turbofan Engines Designed for Low Enery Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, R. E.; Hirschkron, R.; Johnston, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    Subsonic transport turbofan engine design and technology features which have promise of improving aircraft energy consumption are described. Task I addressed the selection and evaluation of features for the CF6 family of engines in current aircraft, and growth models of these aircraft. Task II involved cycle studies and the evaluation of technology features for advanced technology turbofans, consistent with initial service in 1985. Task III pursued the refined analysis of a specific design of an advanced technology turbofan engine selected as the result of Task II studies. In all of the above, the impact upon aircraft economics, as well as energy consumption, was evaluated. Task IV summarized recommendations for technology developments which would be necessary to achieve the improvements in energy consumption identified.

  2. 78 FR 48339 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Corporation Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... to certain Rolls-Royce Corporation (RRC) AE 3007A series turbofan engines. The existing AD currently..., and reduces their approved life limits. This proposed AD would clarify the AE 3007A turbofan...

  3. 78 FR 24671 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 A1/A2/A3/A5/A8/A5F/B1/B2/B4/B5F/B6/B1F/B2F/B4F/B6F/B7F/D1F turbofan engines...-AD; Amendment 39-17438; AD 2013-08-20] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule....

  4. 75 FR 55459 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ...) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... amend 14 CFR part 39 with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies to PW PW4000 series turbofan...

  5. Simulating the Use of Alternative Fuels in a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Chin, Jeffrey Chevoor; Liu, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The interest in alternative fuels for aviation has created a need to evaluate their effect on engine performance. The use of dynamic turbofan engine simulations enables the comparative modeling of the performance of these fuels on a realistic test bed in terms of dynamic response and control compared to traditional fuels. The analysis of overall engine performance and response characteristics can lead to a determination of the practicality of using specific alternative fuels in commercial aircraft. This paper describes a procedure to model the use of alternative fuels in a large commercial turbofan engine, and quantifies their effects on engine and vehicle performance. In addition, the modeling effort notionally demonstrates that engine performance may be maintained by modifying engine control system software parameters to account for the alternative fuel.

  6. 77 FR 9868 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of a rim/web separation of a first stage low... uncontained disk separation, leading to fuel tank penetration, fire, personal injury, and damage to the... receive about this proposed AD. Discussion We received a report of a rim/web separation on an LPT1...

  7. 78 FR 47534 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... prohibition as AD 2013-14-51 and also prohibits operation of any airplane 60 days after the effective date of... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2013-0447; Directorate Identifier 2013-NE... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule;...

  8. 77 FR 74125 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all General...

  9. 78 FR 72567 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company (GE) GE90... Proposed AD The Boeing Company and FedEx Express agreed with the AD as proposed. Request To Change...

  10. 78 FR 72552 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company model GEnx..., contact General Electric Company, GE Aviation, Room 285, 1 Neumann Way, Cincinnati, OH 45215; phone:...

  11. 75 FR 44725 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... PW4000 series turbofan engines. The docket number is incorrect in all three of its locations. This... PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines; Correction AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... Engineer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine and Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive...

  12. System Noise Prediction of the DGEN 380 Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    The DGEN 380 is a small, separate-flow, geared turbofan. Its manufacturer, Price Induction, is promoting it for a small twinjet application in the emerging personal light jet market. Smaller, and producing less thrust than other entries in the industry, Price Induction is seeking to apply the engine to a 4- to 5-place twinjet designed to compete in an area currently dominated by propeller-driven airplanes. NASA is considering purchasing a DGEN 380 turbofan to test new propulsion noise reduction technologies in a relevant engine environment. To explore this possibility, NASA and Price Induction have signed a Space Act Agreement and have agreed to cooperate on engine acoustic testing. Static acoustic measurements of the engine were made by NASA researchers during July, 2014 at the Glenn Research Center. In the event that a DGEN turbofan becomes a NASA noise technology research testbed, it is in the interest of NASA to develop procedures to evaluate engine system noise metrics. This report documents the procedures used to project the DGEN static noise measurements to flight conditions and the prediction of system noise of a notional airplane powered by twin DGEN engines.

  13. 75 FR 14375 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ...) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of..., PW4156, PW4156A, PW4158, PW4164, PW4168, PW4168A, PW4460, and PW4462 turbofan engines. This proposed AD... proposed AD. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rose Len, Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification...

  14. 75 FR 57660 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation (RRC) AE 3007A Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires performing an eddy current inspection (ECI) or...' prefix Initial Eddy Current Inspection (ECI) or Surface Wave Ultrasonic Testing (SWUT) Inspection (g)...

  15. Effect of flight loads on turbofan engine performance deterioration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Jay, A.; Todd, E. S.; Kafka, P. G.; White, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    A significant percentage of high bypass ratio, turbofan engine performance deterioration was caused by an increase in operating clearance between fan/compressor and turbine blades and their outer air seals. These increased clearances resulted from rubs induced by a combination of engine power transients and aircraft flight loads. An analytical technique for predicting the effect of quasi-steady state aircraft flight loads on engine performance deterioration was developed and is presented. Thrust, aerodynamic and inertia loads were considered. Analytical results are shown and compared to actual engine test experience.

  16. Effect of flight loads on turbofan engine performance deterioration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Jay, A.; Todd, E. S.; Kafka, P. G.; White, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    A significant percentage of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine performance deterioration is caused by an increase in operating clearance between fan/compressor and turbine blades and their outer air seals. These increased clearances result from rubs induced by a combination of engine power transients and aircraft flight loads. An analytical technique for predicting the effect of quasi-steady state aircraft flight loads on engine performance deterioration has been developed and is presented. Thrust, aerodynamic and inertia loads are considered. Analytical results are shown and compared to actual engine test experience.

  17. Conceptual design of single turbofan engine powered light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, F. S.; Voorhees, C. G.; Heinrich, A. M.; Baisden, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptual design of a four place single turbofan engine powered light aircraft was accomplished utilizing contemporary light aircraft conventional design techniques as a means of evaluating the NASA-Ames General Aviation Synthesis Program (GASP) as a preliminary design tool. In certain areas, disagreement or exclusion were found to exist between the results of the conventional design and GASP processes. Detail discussion of these points along with the associated contemporary design methodology are presented.

  18. Bird Ingestion into Large Turbofan Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    292 04/06/90 B767 CF6 80C2 SEMB FOR LD 268 05/ 23 /90 A320 CFM56 5 SEMB FOR TR 247 05/31/90 A300 JT9D 59A INVOLUNTARY POWER LOSS FOR TR 273 06/14/90 A320...OR MORE 1 0 0 1 6 TO 17 0 2 .0 2 4 TO 5 1 0 0 1 UNKNOWN 7 44 4 55 TOTALS 38 347 12 397 23 TABLE 4.2. BIRD SPECIES SPECIES MODAL WEIGHT MULTIPLE SPECIES...Gov.ernm.nt Accistton No, 3, Rec.p.ent’s Catalog No. DOT/FAA/CT-91/1 7 4. Title and Subtitle 5 . Report fote May 1992 BIRD INGESTION INTO LARGE TURBOFAN

  19. 78 FR 5126 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... and corrected, could lead to LP location bearing damage, possibly resulting in uncontained engine... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for...-Trent 970-84, 970B-84, 972-84, 972B-84, 977- 84, 977B-84, and 980-84 turbofan engines. This AD...

  20. 77 FR 73268 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for...) RB211-Trent 900 series turbofan engines. This AD requires inspection of the low pressure turbine (LPT) bearing housing end cover assembly in certain engines and, if necessary, its replacement. This AD...

  1. 75 FR 78881 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive borescope inspections (BSI) or fluorescent.... We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the HPC 10th stage disk, uncontained engine failure,...

  2. 77 FR 6666 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S.A. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ..., S.A. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... CFM56-5B series turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by a normal quality sampling at CFM International.... We are issuing this AD to prevent an inflight shutdown (IFSD) of one or more engines...

  3. 77 FR 13485 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for RB211- Trent 800 series turbofan engines. This AD requires... prevent uncontained engine failure and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective April...

  4. 77 FR 39157 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for...) models RB211-Trent 970-84, 970B-84, 972- 84, 972B-84, 977-84, 977B-84, and 980-84 turbofan engines. That... based on possible changes in wear rate. This AD was prompted by RR identifying wear beyond engine...

  5. 78 FR 61168 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are..., RB211-535E4-C- 37, and RB211-535E4-B-75 turbofan engines. This AD requires removal of affected parts..., which could result in uncontained engine damage and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD...

  6. 77 FR 40820 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by an investigation by RR concluding that certain... uncontained IP turbine disc failure, engine failure, and damage to the airplane. DATES: We must...

  7. Core noise measurements on a YF-102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, M.; Karchmer, A. M.; Penko, P. F.; Mcardle, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Core noise from a YF-102 high bypass ratio turbofan engine was investigated through the use of simultaneous measurements of internal fluctuating pressures and far field noise. Acoustic waveguide probes, located in the engine at the compressor exit, in the combustor, at the turbine exit, and in the core nozzle, were employed to measure internal fluctuating pressures. Spectra showed that the internal signals were free of tones, except at high frequency where machinery noise was present. Data obtained over a wide range of engine conditions suggest that below 60% of maximum fan speed the low frequency core noise contributes significantly to the far field noise.

  8. The Design and Testing of a Miniature Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosentino, Gary B.; Murray, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf jet propulsion in the 50 - 500 lb thrust class sparse. A true twin-spool turbofan in this range does not exist. Adapting an off-the-shelf turboshaft engine is feasible. However the approx.10 Hp SPT5 can t quite make 50 lbs. of thrust. Packaging and integration is challenging, especially the exhaust. Building on our engine using a 25 Hp turboshaft seems promising if the engine becomes available. Test techniques used, though low cost, adequate for the purpose.

  9. Enhanced Fan Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Stone, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work by consultants to Diversitech Inc. for the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to revise the fan noise prediction procedure based on fan noise data obtained in the 9- by 15 Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at GRC. The purpose of this task is to begin development of an enhanced, analytical, more physics-based, fan noise prediction method applicable to commercial turbofan propulsion systems. The method is to be suitable for programming into a computational model for eventual incorporation into NASA's current aircraft system noise prediction computer codes. The scope of this task is in alignment with the mission of the Propulsion 21 research effort conducted by the coalition of NASA, state government, industry, and academia to develop aeropropulsion technologies. A model for fan noise prediction was developed based on measured noise levels for the R4 rotor with several outlet guide vane variations and three fan exhaust areas. The model predicts the complete fan noise spectrum, including broadband noise, tones, and for supersonic tip speeds, combination tones. Both spectra and directivity are predicted. Good agreement with data was achieved for all fan geometries. Comparisons with data from a second fan, the ADP fan, also showed good agreement.

  10. 75 FR 32262 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S.A. Models CFM56-3 and -3B Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ..., S.A. Models CFM56-3 and -3B Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... International, S.A. models CFM56-3 and -3B turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive inspections... CFM International, S.A. models CFM56-3 and -3B turbofan engines. We published the proposed AD in...

  11. Turbofan gas turbine engine with variable fan outlet guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter John (Inventor); Zenon, Ruby Lasandra (Inventor); LaChapelle, Donald George (Inventor); Mielke, Mark Joseph (Inventor); Grant, Carl (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan gas turbine engine includes a forward fan section with a row of fan rotor blades, a core engine, and a fan bypass duct downstream of the forward fan section and radially outwardly of the core engine. The forward fan section has only a single stage of variable fan guide vanes which are variable fan outlet guide vanes downstream of the forward fan rotor blades. An exemplary embodiment of the engine includes an afterburner downstream of the fan bypass duct between the core engine and an exhaust nozzle. The variable fan outlet guide vanes are operable to pivot from a nominal OGV position at take-off to an open OGV position at a high flight Mach Number which may be in a range of between about 2.5-4+. Struts extend radially across a radially inwardly curved portion of a flowpath of the engine between the forward fan section and the core engine.

  12. Study of small turbofan engines applicable to single-engine light airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The design, efficiency and cost factors are investigated for application of turbofan propulsion engines to single engine, general aviation light airplanes. A companion study of a hypothetical engine family of a thrust range suitable to such aircraft and having a high degree of commonality of design features and parts is presented. Future turbofan powered light airplanes can have a lower fuel consumption, lower weight, reduced airframe maintenance requirements and improved engine overhaul periods as compared to current piston engined powered airplanes. Achievement of compliance with noise and chemical emission regulations is expected without impairing performance, operating cost or safety.

  13. DESIGN POINT PERFORMANCE OF TURBOJET AND TURBOFAN ENGINE CYCLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanco, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    This program is one designed for the calculation of design-point performance of turbojet and turbofan engine cycles. This program requires as input the airplane Mach number, the altitude-state equations, turbine-inlet temperature, afterburner temperature, duct burner temperature, bypass ratio, coolant flow, component efficiences, and component pressure ratios. The output yields specific thrust, specific fuel consumption, engine efficiency, and several component temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamic properties of the gas are expressed as functions of temperature and fuel-to-air ratio. The program is provided with an example case. The program has been implemented on the IBM 7094.

  14. 78 FR 35574 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... directive (AD) for all Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) model Tay 650-15 turbofan engines. This...-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow, Germany; phone: 49...

  15. 77 FR 66771 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-710 series turbofan engines. This proposed AD was... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow, Germany; telephone: 49 0...

  16. 78 FR 77382 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-715A1-30, BR700-715B1- 30, and BR700-715C1-30 turbofan engines...-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow, Germany; phone: 49...

  17. 78 FR 2197 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) Model Tay 620-15 turbofan engines. This AD requires a one-time... Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde- Mahlow, Germany; phone: 49 0...

  18. 78 FR 35752 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final...-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-725A1-12 turbofan engines with fuel pump tube part number... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow, Germany; phone: 49 0...

  19. 78 FR 70198 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... & Co KG (RRD) model Tay 620-15, 650-15, and 651-54 turbofan engines. This AD requires a one-time... airworthiness directive (AD): 2013-23-01 Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG: Amendment 39-17656; Docket No....

  20. 78 FR 59291 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co. KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co. KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co. KG (RRD) Tay 620-15, 650-15, and 651- 54 turbofan engines. This... information identified in this proposed AD, contact Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg...

  1. 76 FR 64287 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF34-10E Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Company CF34-10E Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... General Electric Company (GE) CF34-10E series turbofan engines. This proposed AD was ] prompted by a... center vent tube) support ring and on the inside diameter of the fan drive shaft at the mating...

  2. 78 FR 34605 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International S.A. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ....A. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ] ACTION: Notice of proposed...-7B series turbofan engines with certain accessory gearboxes (AGBs) not equipped with a handcranking pad ``oil dynamic seal'' assembly. This proposed AD was prompted by 42 events of total loss of...

  3. 78 FR 54149 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ...) Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are..., 892B-17, and 895-17 turbofan engines. AD 2012-10-12 required inspecting the intermediate-pressure (IP... compressor rotor shaft, as required by AD 2012- 10-12, to add on-wing ] inspections for the Trent 500...

  4. 77 FR 20508 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for..., RB211- Trent 892B-17, and RB211-Trent 895-17 turbofan engines. That AD currently requires initial and... prevent LP compressor blades from failing due to blade root cracks, which could lead to uncontained...

  5. 75 FR 61114 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration.... Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, England, DE248BJ; telephone: 011-44... proposed AD, for Rolls- Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. That proposed AD would...

  6. 77 FR 12755 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of 3rd and 4th stage vane fractures in the low pressure turbine (LPT) of certain PW4000-94'' and PW4000-100'' turbofan engines. These fractures caused an... to prevent 3rd and 4th stage vane fractures in the LPT, which could damage the LPT rotor and lead...

  7. 75 FR 77570 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ...) for General Electric (GE) CF6-45/-50 series and CF6-80A series turbofan engines with certain part... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice...

  8. Digital computer program for generating dynamic turbofan engine models (DIGTEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Krosel, S. M.; Szuch, J. R.; Westerkamp, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes DIGTEM, a digital computer program that simulates two spool, two-stream turbofan engines. The turbofan engine model in DIGTEM contains steady-state performance maps for all of the components and has control volumes where continuity and energy balances are maintained. Rotor dynamics and duct momentum dynamics are also included. Altogether there are 16 state variables and state equations. DIGTEM features a backward-differnce integration scheme for integrating stiff systems. It trims the model equations to match a prescribed design point by calculating correction coefficients that balance out the dynamic equations. It uses the same coefficients at off-design points and iterates to a balanced engine condition. Transients can also be run. They are generated by defining controls as a function of time (open-loop control) in a user-written subroutine (TMRSP). DIGTEM has run on the IBM 370/3033 computer using implicit integration with time steps ranging from 1.0 msec to 1.0 sec. DIGTEM is generalized in the aerothermodynamic treatment of components.

  9. Kalman Filtering with Inequality Constraints for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints (which may be based on physical considerations) are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. This paper develops two analytic methods of incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter. The first method is a general technique of using hard constraints to enforce inequalities on the state variable estimates. The resultant filter is a combination of a standard Kalman filter and a quadratic programming problem. The second method uses soft constraints to estimate state variables that are known to vary slowly with time. (Soft constraints are constraints that are required to be approximately satisfied rather than exactly satisfied.) The incorporation of state variable constraints increases the computational effort of the filter but significantly improves its estimation accuracy. The improvement is proven theoretically and shown via simulation results. The use of the algorithm is demonstrated on a linearized simulation of a turbofan engine to estimate health parameters. The turbofan engine model contains 16 state variables, 12 measurements, and 8 component health parameters. It is shown that the new algorithms provide improved performance in this example over unconstrained Kalman filtering.

  10. JT8D-100 turbofan engine, phase 1. [noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The JT8D turbofan engine, widely used in short and medium range transport aircraft, contributes substantially to airport community noise. The jet noise is predominant in the JT8D engine and may be reduced in a modified engine, without loss of thrust, by increasing the airflow to reduce jet velocity. A configuration study evaluated the effects of fan airflow, fan pressure ratio, and bypass ratio on noise, thrust, and fuel comsumption. The cycle selected for the modified engine was based upon an increased diameter, single-stage fan and two additional core engine compressor stages, which replace the existing two-stage fan. Modifications were also made to the low pressure turbine to provide the increased torque required by the larger diameter fan. The resultant JT8D-100 engine models have the following characteristics at take-off thrust, compared to the current JT8D engine: Airflow and bypass ratio are increased, and fan pressure ratio and engine speed are reduced. The resultant engine is also longer, larger in diameter, and heavier than the JT8D base model, but these latter changes are compensated by the increased thrust and decreased fuel comsumption of the modified engine, thus providing the capability for maintaining the performance of the current JT8D-powered aircraft.

  11. Bird Ingestion into Large Turbofan Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    A320 CFM56 5 SEMB FOR 292 04/06/90 B767 CF6 80C2 SEMB FOR LID 268 05/ 23 /90 A320 CFM56 5 SEMB FOR TR 247 05/31/90 A300 JT9D 59A INVOLUNTARY POWER LOSS FOR...Documentation Pog 1, Report No." 2. Government Accession No. 3. Rec•p-ent’s Catolog No. DOT/FAA/CT-911/17 4. Taide and Subtitle 5 . Report Oat* May...i 2 ENGINES, AIRCRAFT, AND OPERATIONS 2 3 INGESTION EVENTS AND RATES 7 4 CHARACTERISTICS OF INGESTED BIRDS 22 5 EFFECTS ON ENGINES AND FLIGHTS 35 5.1

  12. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  13. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  14. Towards an Automated Full-Turbofan Engine Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.; Turner, Mark G.; Norris, Andrew; Veres, Joseph P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the high-fidelity numerical simulation of a modern high-bypass turbofan engine. The simulation utilizes the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) thermodynamic cycle modeling system coupled to a high-fidelity full-engine model represented by a set of coupled three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) component models. Boundary conditions from the balanced, steady-state cycle model are used to define component boundary conditions in the full-engine model. Operating characteristics of the three-dimensional component models are integrated into the cycle model via partial performance maps generated automatically from the CFD flow solutions using one-dimensional meanline turbomachinery programs. This paper reports on the progress made towards the full-engine simulation of the GE90-94B engine, highlighting the generation of the high-pressure compressor partial performance map. The ongoing work will provide a system to evaluate the steady and unsteady aerodynamic and mechanical interactions between engine components at design and off-design operating conditions.

  15. ADAM: An Axisymmetric Duct Aeroacoustic Modeling system. [aircraft turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    An interconnected system of computer programs for analyzing the propagation and attenuation of sound in aeroengine ducts containing realistic compressible subsonic mean flows, ADAM was developed primarily for research directed towards the reduction of noise emitted from turbofan aircraft engines. The two basic components are a streamtube curvature program for determination of the mean flow, and a finite element code for solution of the acoustic propagation problem. The system, which has been specifically tailored for ease of use, is presently installed at NASA Langley Reseach Center on a Control Data Cyber 175 Computer under the NOS Operating system employing a Tektronix terminal for interactive graphics. The scope and organization of the ADAM system is described. A users guide, examples of input data, and results for selected cases are included.

  16. Aircraft Turbofan Engine Health Estimation Using Constrained Kalman Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints (which may be based on physical considerations) are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. This paper develops an analytic method of incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter. The resultant filter is a combination of a standard Kalman filter and a quadratic programming problem. The incorporation of state variable constraints increases the computational effort of the filter but significantly improves its estimation accuracy. The improvement is proven theoretically and shown via simulation results obtained from application to a turbofan engine model. This model contains 16 state variables, 12 measurements, and 8 component health parameters. It is shown that the new algorithms provide improved performance in this example over unconstrained Kalman filtering.

  17. 78 FR 10501 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... & Co KG (RRD) BR700-710A1-10 and BR700- 710A2-20 turbofan engines, and certain BR700-710C4-11 model... the following new AD: 2013-03-17 Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (Formerly Rolls-Royce...

  18. 77 FR 10952 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International S.A. Model CFM56 Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Federal Register. That AD applies to CFM International S.A. CFM56-2, CFM56-3, CFM56-5A, CFM56-5B, CFM56-5C, and CFM56-7B series turbofan engines with certain part number (P/N) and serial number (SN) high....A. Model CFM56 Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION:...

  19. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1994-01-01

    A three-channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and the high-pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provide blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. To minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three-channel controller by up to 16 dB over a +/- 30-deg angle about the engine axis. A single-channel controller could produce reduction over a +/- 15-deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Outside of the areas contolled, the levels of the tone actually increased due to the generation of radial modes by the control sources. Simultaneous control of two tones is achieved with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high-pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  20. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine in order to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and high pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provides blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. In order to minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three channel controller by up to 16 dB over a 60 deg angle about the engine axis. A single channel controller could produce reduction over a 30 deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Simultaneous control of two tones is done with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 dBA and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  1. Interactive Educational Tool for Turbofan and Afterburning Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    A workstation-based, interactive educational computer program has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to aid in the teaching and understanding of turbine engine design and analysis. This tool has recently been extended to model the performance of two-spool turbofans and afterburning turbojets. The program solves for the flow conditions through the engine by using classical one-dimensional thermodynamic analysis found in various propulsion textbooks. Either an approximately thermally perfect or calorically perfect gas can be used in the thermodynamic analysis. Students can vary the design conditions through a graphical user interface; engine performance is calculated immediately. A variety of graphical formats are used to present results, including numerical results, moving bar charts, and student-generated temperature versus entropy (Ts), pressure versus specific volume (pv), and engine performance plots. The package includes user-controlled printed output, restart capability, online help screens, and a browser that displays teacher-prepared lessons in turbomachinery. The program runs on a variety of workstations or a personal computer using the UNIX operating system and X-based graphics. It is being tested at several universities in the midwestern United States; the source and executables are available free from the author.

  2. Study of turbofan engines designed for low energy consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    The near-term technology improvements which can reduce the fuel consumed in the JT9D, JT8D, and JT3D turbofans in commercial fleet operation through the 1980's are identified. Projected technology advances are identified and evaluated for new turbofans to be developed after 1985. Programs are recommended for developing the necessary technology.

  3. Energy Efficient Engine program advanced turbofan nacelle definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, David C.; Wynosky, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced, low drag, nacelle configurations were defined for some of the more promising propulsion systems identified in the earlier Benefit/Cost Study, to assess the benefits associated with these advanced technology nacelles and formulate programs for developing these nacelles and low volume thrust reversers/spoilers to a state of technology readiness in the early 1990's. The study results established the design feasibility of advanced technology, slim line nacelles applicable to advanced technology, high bypass ratio turbofan engines. Design feasibility was also established for two low volume thrust reverse/spoiler concepts that meet or exceed the required effectiveness for these engines. These nacelle and thrust reverse/spoiler designs were shown to be applicable in engines with takeoff thrust sizes ranging from 24,000 to 60,000 pounds. The reduced weight, drag, and cost of the advanced technology nacelle installations relative to current technology nacelles offer a mission fuel burn savings ranging from 3.0 to 4.5 percent and direct operating cost plus interest improvements from 1.6 to 2.2 percent.

  4. 75 FR 16361 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S.A. Models CFM56-3 and -3B Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ..., S.A. Models CFM56-3 and -3B Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...), for certain CFM International, S.A. models CFM56-3 and -3B turbofan engines. That proposed AD would... inspection compliance threshold, to correct the engine model designations affected, and to clarify some...

  5. 75 FR 50945 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney JT8D-209, -217, -217A, -217C, and -219 Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... JT8D-209, -217, -217A, -217C, and -219 Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... airworthiness directive (AD) for Pratt & Whitney (PW) JT8D-209, -217, -217A, -217C, and -219 turbofan engines. That AD currently requires revisions to the engine manufacturer's time limits section (TLS) to...

  6. Kalman Filter Constraint Tuning for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2005-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. Recently published work has shown a new method for incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter, which has been shown to generally improve the filter s estimation accuracy. However, the incorporation of inequality constraints poses some risk to the estimation accuracy as the Kalman filter is theoretically optimal. This paper proposes a way to tune the filter constraints so that the state estimates follow the unconstrained (theoretically optimal) filter when the confidence in the unconstrained filter is high. When confidence in the unconstrained filter is not so high, then we use our heuristic knowledge to constrain the state estimates. The confidence measure is based on the agreement of measurement residuals with their theoretical values. The algorithm is demonstrated on a linearized simulation of a turbofan engine to estimate engine health.

  7. 78 FR 61171 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are... engines. This AD requires removal of affected parts using a drawdown plan. This AD was prompted by... of the engine and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective November 7, 2013....

  8. Spectral Separation of the Turbofan Engine Coherent Combustion Noise Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2008-01-01

    The core noise components of a dual spool turbofan engine (Honeywell TECH977) were separated by the use of a coherence function. A source location technique based on adjusting the time delay between the combustor pressure sensor signal and the far-field microphone signal to maximize the coherence and remove as much variation of the phase angle with frequency as possible was used. While adjusting the time delay to maximize the coherence and minimize the cross spectrum phase angle variation with frequency, the discovery was made that for the 130 microphone a 90.027 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 0 to 200 Hz while a 86.975 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 200 to 400 Hz. Since the 0 to 200 Hz band signal took more time to travel the same distance, it is slower than the 200 to 400 Hz band signal. This suggests the 0 to 200 Hz coherent cross spectral density band is partly due to indirect combustion noise attributed to hot spots interacting with the turbine. The signal in the 200 to 400 Hz frequency band is attributed mostly to direct combustion noise.

  9. System Would Detect Foreign-Object Damage in Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed data-fusion system, to be implemented mostly in software, would further process the digitized and preprocessed outputs of sensors in a turbofan engine to detect foreign-object damage (FOD) [more precisely, damage caused by impingement of such foreign objects as birds, pieces of ice, and runway debris]. The proposed system could help a flight crew to decide what, if any, response is necessary to complete a flight safely, and could aid mechanics in deciding what post-flight maintenance action might be needed. The sensory information to be utilized by the proposed system would consist of (1) the output of an accelerometer in an engine-vibration-monitoring subsystem and (2) features extracted from a gas path analysis. ["Gas path analysis" (GPA) is a term of art that denotes comprehensive analysis of engine performance derived from readings of fuel-flow meters, shaft-speed sensors, temperature sensors, and the like.] The acceleration signal would first be processed by a wavelet-transform-based algorithm, using a wavelet created for the specific purpose of finding abrupt FOD-induced changes in noisy accelerometer signals. Two additional features extracted would be the amplitude of vibration (determined via a single- frequency Fourier transform calculated at the rotational speed of the engine), and the rate of change in amplitude due to an FOD-induced rotor imbalance. This system would utilize two GPA features: the fan efficiency and the rate of change of fan efficiency with time. The selected GPA and vibrational features would be assessed by two fuzzy-logic inference engines, denoted the "Gas Path Expert" and the "Vibration Expert," respectively (see Figure 1). Each of these inference engines would generate a "possibility" distribution for occurrence of an FOD event: Each inference engine would assign, to its input information, degrees of membership, which would subsequently be transformed into basic probability assignments for the gas path and vibration

  10. 76 FR 70382 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2B Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2B Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... directive (AD) that applies to all GE CF6-80C2B series turbofan engines. The existing AD currently...

  11. 76 FR 292 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6-45 and CF6-50 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... directive (AD) that applies to General Electric Company (GE) CF6-45 and CF6-50 series turbofan engines. The... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6-45 and CF6-50 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  12. Research on Turbofan Engine Model above Idle State Based on NARX Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bing; Shu, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear model for turbofan engine above idle state based on NARX is studied. Above all, the data sets for the JT9D engine from existing model are obtained via simulation. Then, a nonlinear modeling scheme based on NARX is proposed and several models with different parameters are built according to the former data sets. Finally, the simulations have been taken to verify the precise and dynamic performance the models, the results show that the NARX model can well reflect the dynamics characteristic of the turbofan engine with high accuracy.

  13. Minimum time acceleration of aircraft turbofan engines by using an algorithm based on nonlinear programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, F.

    1977-01-01

    Minimum time accelerations of aircraft turbofan engines are presented. The calculation of these accelerations was made by using a piecewise linear engine model, and an algorithm based on nonlinear programming. Use of this model and algorithm allows such trajectories to be readily calculated on a digital computer with a minimal expenditure of computer time.

  14. 76 FR 68660 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2011-0944; Directorate Identifier 2011-NE-11-AD] RIN... propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for PW4000 series turbofan engines. This proposed AD... after the effective date of this proposed AD. This proposed AD was prompted by an engine overspeed...

  15. 76 FR 72130 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney JT9D Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... revisions to the Airworthiness Limitations Section (ALS) of the manufacturer's Instructions for Continued... life-limited parts. This proposed AD would require additional revisions to the JT9D series engines ALS... all PW JT9D series turbofan engines. That AD requires revisions to the ALS of the manufacturer's...

  16. Procedure for Separating Noise Sources in Measurements of Turbofan Engine Core Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2006-01-01

    The study of core noise from turbofan engines has become more important as noise from other sources like the fan and jet have been reduced. A multiple microphone and acoustic source modeling method to separate correlated and uncorrelated sources has been developed. The auto and cross spectrum in the frequency range below 1000 Hz is fitted with a noise propagation model based on a source couplet consisting of a single incoherent source with a single coherent source or a source triplet consisting of a single incoherent source with two coherent point sources. Examples are presented using data from a Pratt & Whitney PW4098 turbofan engine. The method works well.

  17. DYNGEN: A program for calculating steady-state and transient performance of turbojet and turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. F.; Daniele, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The DYNGEN, a digital computer program for analyzing the steady state and transient performance of turbojet and turbofan engines, is described. The DYNGEN is based on earlier computer codes (SMOTE, GENENG, and GENENG 2) which are capable of calculating the steady state performance of turbojet and turbofan engines at design and off-design operating conditions. The DYNGEN has the combined capabilities of GENENG and GENENG 2 for calculating steady state performance; to these the further capability for calculating transient performance was added. The DYNGEN can be used to analyze one- and two-spool turbojet engines or two- and three-spool turbofan engines without modification to the basic program. A modified Euler method is used by DYNGEN to solve the differential equations which model the dynamics of the engine. This new method frees the programmer from having to minimize the number of equations which require iterative solution. As a result, some of the approximations normally used in transient engine simulations can be eliminated. This tends to produce better agreement when answers are compared with those from purely steady state simulations. The modified Euler method also permits the user to specify large time steps (about 0.10 sec) to be used in the solution of the differential equations. This saves computer execution time when long transients are run. Examples of the use of the program are included, and program results are compared with those from an existing hybrid-computer simulation of a two-spool turbofan.

  18. 75 FR 51657 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PW615F-A Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...-06] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PW615F-A Turbofan... adding the following new AD: 2010-17-06 Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (formerly Pratt & Whitney Canada.... Applicability (c) This AD applies to Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW615F-A turbofan engines with fuel/oil...

  19. 78 FR 9003 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... material. This proposed AD would also require mandatory removal from service of these HPC stage 6 disks at... 7-9 spool, uncontained engine failure, and damage to the airplane. DATES: We must receive comments... England Executive Park, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at the...

  20. 78 FR 35747 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... plate is missing material. This AD also requires mandatory removal from service of these HPC stage 6... spool, uncontained engine failure, and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD is effective July 19, 2013...-505-0, before further flight if the feature is missing any material. That NPRM also proposed...

  1. Turbofan Engine Simulated in a Graphical Simulation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the development of intelligent engine technology with advanced active component control. The computer engine models used in these control studies are component-level models (CLM), models that link individual component models of state space and nonlinear algebraic equations, written in a computer language such as Fortran. The difficulty faced in performing control studies on Fortran-based models is that Fortran is not supported with control design and analysis tools, so there is no means for implementing real-time control. It is desirable to have a simulation environment that is straightforward, has modular graphical components, and allows easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface. Such a tool should also provide the ability to convert a control design into real-time code, helping to make it an extremely powerful tool in control and diagnostic system development. Simulation time management is shown: Mach number versus time, power level angle versus time, altitude versus time, ambient temperature change versus time, afterburner fuel flow versus time, controller and actuator dynamics, collect initial conditions, CAD output, and component-level model: CLM sensor, CAD input, and model output. The Controls and Dynamics Technologies Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and demonstrated a flexible, generic turbofan engine simulation platform that can meet these objectives, known as the Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS). MAPSS is a Simulink-based implementation of a Fortran-based, modern high pressure ratio, dual-spool, low-bypass, military-type variable-cycle engine with a digital controller. Simulink (The Mathworks, Natick, MA) is a computer-aided control design and simulation package allows the graphical representation of dynamic systems in a block diagram form. MAPSS is a nonlinear, non-real-time system composed of controller and actuator dynamics

  2. Design study of a dual-cycle turbofan-ramjet engine for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.; Suwanprasert, S.

    1983-01-01

    Computer modelling was used with two different designs of an advanced turbofan-ramjet in order to derive performance predictions. The engine would enable an aircraft to take-off, accelerate to Mach 5.0, and climb to 90,000 ft. The two concepts included a turbofan with a ramjet annularly wrapped around it and a side-by-side configuration with the ramjet having a rectangular shape and mounted alongside the turbofan. The studies were performed to model weight, length, fuel efficiency, and the requirements of the thrust/drag ratio to exceed unity over the entire flight path. LH2 would be used for fuel and to regeneratively cool the combustion chamber. Turbofan operation with and without afterburner and with and without the ramjet inlet open were examined, as were variable areas for the burners. A side-by-side configuration displayed the best performance predictions, with a ramjet mass flow being 75 percent that of the turbofan and maximum temperatures being equal.

  3. 78 FR 71532 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ] ACTION: Notice... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, D-15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow, Germany; phone: 49 0 33 7086 1200; fax: 49... & Co KG: Docket No. FAA-2006-24777; Directorate Identifier 2006-NE-19-AD. (a) Comments Due Date The...

  4. 77 FR 16917 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827... Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (Formerly Rolls-Royce plc, Derby, England): Amendment...

  5. 77 FR 20987 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ...-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. The last comment response in the preamble and the first sentence of regulatory text paragraph (g)(1) are incorrect. The repetitive inspection interval should be 2,000 flight cycles, not 1,000 flight cycles. This document corrects those errors. In all other respects, the...

  6. 76 FR 64283 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... currently requires inspecting the intermediate-pressure (IP) compressor rotor shaft rear balance land for... 895-17 turbofan engines. That AD requires a onetime eddy current inspection (ECI) of the rear balance... rear balance land of IP compressor rotor shafts. We issued that AD to detect cracking on the...

  7. 75 FR 51659 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW617F-E Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...-01] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW617F-E Turbofan Engines... & Whitney Canada Corp. issued an Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) No. PW600-72-A66019 to inspect and replace any... power reduction. Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. issued an ASB No. PW600-72-A66019 to inspect and...

  8. 75 FR 27491 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW617F-E Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... Canada Corp. PW617F-E Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... Metering Unit (FMU), resulting in fuel flow drop and subsequent power reduction. Pratt & Whitney Canada... holidays. Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp., 1000 Marie-Victorin, Longueuil,...

  9. 75 FR 27489 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW615F-A Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... Canada Corp. PW615F-A Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... Metering Unit (FMU), resulting in fuel flow drop and subsequent power reduction. Pratt & Whitney Canada... Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. has confirmed similar dormant failure of worn through poppets of...

  10. FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

  11. 78 FR 17080 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ...-29-AD; Amendment 39-17385; AD 2013-05-13] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce... rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-710 series turbofan engines. This AD requires replacement of the affected...

  12. 78 FR 68360 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ...-01-AD; Amendment 39-17599; AD 2013-19-17] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc.... SUMMARY: The FAA is correcting an airworthiness directive (AD) that published in the Federal Register. That AD applies to all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535E4-B-37 series turbofan engines. The AD number...

  13. 75 FR 7209 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation (RRC) AE 3007A Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ...: The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for RRC AE 3007A series turbofan engines. This proposed AD would require removing or performing initial and repetitive eddy current inspections... wheels for cracks. This proposed AD also reduces the approved life limits of certain HPT stage 2...

  14. 78 FR 17079 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... 2012-NE-36-AD; Amendment 39-17396; AD 2013-06-01] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce... rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) models Tay 620-15 and Tay 650-15 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by...

  15. 78 FR 17297 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ...-01-AD; Amendment 39-17390; AD 2013-05-18] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc... comments. SUMMARY: We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211 Trent 500 series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires a one-time inspection of the...

  16. 76 FR 67591 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Corporation Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Rolls- Royce Corporation... identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce Corporation, P.O. Box 420, Indianapolis, IN 46206; phone:...

  17. Exhaust nozzle control and core engine fuel control for turbofan engine

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, V.T.

    1981-10-13

    This control serves to optimize thrust during steady state and transient operation modes of a turbofan engine of the mixed flow type by adjusting or trimming the exhaust nozzle area as a function of fan pressure ratio and fan rotor speed and by adjusting or trimming the core engine fuel flow as a function of fan rotor speed and/or turbine inlet temperature. The control serves to enhance stability by assuring airflow in the engine and its inlet is within a given value avoiding inlet buzz and high distortion to the engine and avoiding even transient operation in conditions that might cause compressor flow instability or stall. Fuel flow is adjusted or trimmed as a function of fan rotor speed or turbine inlet temperature limits depending on which is calling for the least amount of fuel.

  18. Electro-impulse de-icing of a turbofan engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    The application of electromagnetic impulse deicing (EIDI) systems to turbofan engine inlets on business aircraft has been investigated experimentally. The tests were performed in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA's Lewis Research Center. The deicing system testbed was a Falcon Fanjet 20 engine nacelle. The effectiveness of various deicing coil configurations and mount designs were compared, and design parameters were developed specifically for EIDI systems in turbofan engines. Flight tests were also carried out at altitudes in the range 3000-6000 ft corresponding to a temperature range of -3 to -8 C. It is shown that the ice particles removed from the engine inlet by the deicing system were small enough for the engine to ingest. Tentative design specifications are given with respect to the optimum coil configuration, and operating power of a EIDI production candidate.

  19. Evaluation of an Outer Loop Retrofit Architecture for Intelligent Turbofan Engine Thrust Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane

    2006-01-01

    The thrust control capability of a retrofit architecture for intelligent turbofan engine control and diagnostics is evaluated. The focus of the study is on the portion of the hierarchical architecture that performs thrust estimation and outer loop thrust control. The inner loop controls fan speed so the outer loop automatically adjusts the engine's fan speed command to maintain thrust at the desired level, based on pilot input, even as the engine deteriorates with use. The thrust estimation accuracy is assessed under nominal and deteriorated conditions at multiple operating points, and the closed loop thrust control performance is studied, all in a complex real-time nonlinear turbofan engine simulation test bed. The estimation capability, thrust response, and robustness to uncertainty in the form of engine degradation are evaluated.

  20. Simulating Effects of High Angle of Attack on Turbofan Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Claus, Russell W.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A method of investigating the effects of high angle of attack (AOA) flight on turbofan engine performance is presented. The methodology involves combining a suite of diverse simulation tools. Three-dimensional, steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is used to model the change in performance of a commercial aircraft-type inlet and fan geometry due to various levels of AOA. Parallel compressor theory is then applied to assimilate the CFD data with a zero-dimensional, nonlinear, dynamic turbofan engine model. The combined model shows that high AOA operation degrades fan performance and, thus, negatively impacts compressor stability margins and engine thrust. In addition, the engine response to high AOA conditions is shown to be highly dependent upon the type of control system employed.

  1. Preliminary Study on Acoustic Detection of Faults Experienced by a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2014-01-01

    The vehicle integrated propulsion research (VIPR) effort conducted by NASA and several partners provided an unparalleled opportunity to test a relatively low TRL concept regarding the use of far field acoustics to identify faults occurring in a high bypass turbofan engine. Though VIPR Phase II ground based aircraft installed engine testing wherein a multitude of research sensors and methods were evaluated, an array of acoustic microphones was used to determine the viability of such an array to detect failures occurring in a commercially representative high bypass turbofan engine. The failures introduced during VIPR testing included commanding the engine's low pressure compressor (LPC) exit and high pressure compressor (HPC) 14th stage bleed values abruptly to their failsafe positions during steady state

  2. 77 FR 74123 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) models Tay 620-15 and Tay 650-15 turbofan engines. This... correct an unsafe condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: The Tay 650-15 and Tay 650-15/10... assemblies installed in Tay 650-15 and Tay 650-15/10 engines as well as in Tay 620-15 and Tay...

  3. Method and apparatus for rapid thrust increases in a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. E.; Corley, R. C.; Fraley, T. O.; Saunders, A. A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Upon a landing approach, the normal compressor stator schedule of a fan speed controlled turbofan engine is temporarily varied to substantially close the stators to thereby increase the fuel flow and compressor speed in order to maintain fan speed and thrust. This running of the compressor at an off-design speed substantially reduces the time required to subsequently advance the engine speed to the takeoff thrust level by advancing the throttle and opening the compressor stators.

  4. Sea Level Operation Demonstration of F404-GE-400 Turbofan Engine with JP-5/Bio-Fuel Mixture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-30

    Aircraft Test and Evaluation Facility Hush House at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, on 13 October 2009. The test consisted of two separate...turbofan engine inside the Aircraft Test and Evaluation Facility Hush House at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, on 13 October 2009. The test...turbofan engine (ESN 310810) inside the Aircraft Test and Evaluation Facility Hush House at Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, Maryland, on 13

  5. Development of a Turbofan Engine Simulation in a Graphical Simulation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Guo, Ten-Heui

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a generic component level model of a turbofan engine simulation with a digital controller, in an advanced graphical simulation environment. The goal of this effort is to develop and demonstrate a flexible simulation platform for future research in propulsion system control and diagnostic technology. A previously validated FORTRAN-based model of a modern, high-performance, military-type turbofan engine is being used to validate the platform development. The implementation process required the development of various innovative procedures, which are discussed in the paper. Open-loop and closed-loop comparisons are made between the two simulations. Future enhancements that are to be made to the modular engine simulation are summarized.

  6. Study of small civil turbofan engines applicable to military trainer airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.; Merrill, G. L.; Burnett, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Small turbofan engine design concepts were applied to military trainer airplanes to establish the potential for commonality between civil and military engines. Several trainer configurations were defined and studied. A ""best'' engine was defined for the trainer mission, and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the effects on airplane size and efficiency of wing loading, power loading, configuration, aerodynamic quality, and engine quality. It is concluded that a small civil aircraft is applicable to military trainer airplanes. Aircraft designed with these engines are smaller, less costly, and more efficient than existing trainer aircraft.

  7. An Assessment of Gas Foil Bearing Scalability and the Potential Benefits to Civilian Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years the term oil-free turbomachinery has been used to describe a rotor support system for high speed turbomachinery that does not require oil for lubrication, damping, or cooling. The foundation technology for oil-free turbomachinery is the compliant foil bearing. This technology can replace the conventional rolling element bearings found in current engines. Two major benefits are realized with this technology. The primary benefit is the elimination of the oil lubrication system, accessory gearbox, tower shaft, and one turbine frame. These components account for 8 to 13 percent of the turbofan engine weight. The second benefit that compliant foil bearings offer to turbofan engines is the capability to operate at higher rotational speeds and shaft diameters. While traditional rolling element bearings have diminished life, reliability, and load capacity with increasing speeds, the foil bearing has a load capacity proportional to speed. The traditional applications for foil bearings have been in small, lightweight machines. However, recent advancements in the design and manufacturing of foil bearings have increased their potential size. An analysis, grounded in experimentally proven operation, is performed to assess the scalability of the modern foil bearing. This analysis was coupled to the requirements of civilian turbofan engines. The application of the foil bearing to larger, high bypass ratio engines nominally at the 120 kN (approx.25000 lb) thrust class has been examined. The application of this advanced technology to this system was found to reduce mission fuel burn by 3.05 percent.

  8. Analytical Modeling of Herschel-Quincke Concept Applied to Inlet Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallez, Raphael F.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Gerhold, Carl H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the period from January 1999 to December 2000 on the project 'Investigation of an Adaptive Herschel-Quincke Tube Concept for the Reduction of Tonal and Broadband Noise from Turbofan Engines', funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The Herschel-Quincke (HQ) tube concept is a developing technique the consists of circumferential arrays of tubes around the duct. The analytical model is developed to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of the HQ concept to turbofan engine inlets. An infinite duct model is developed and used to provide insight into attenuation mechanisms and design strategies. Based on this early model, the NASA-developed TBIEM3D code is modified for the HQ system. This model allows for investigation of the HQ system combined with a passive liner.

  9. Effects of Test Cell Recirculation on High-Bypass Turbofan Engines during Simulated Altitude Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    methods used to describe and correct for test cell recirculation have led to this investigation, which is in line with the objectives previously stated...between pressure profiles on the cell wall and those on the model surfaces, which is in line with previous observations. Removal of the diffuser...AEDC-TR-85-55 , , . ’ . . . .L Effects of Test Cell Recirculation on High-Bypass Turbofan Engines During Simulated Altitude Tests OCT 0 9

  10. Core noise investigation of the CF6-50 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic data obtained during the running of the CF6-50 turbofan engine on an outdoor test stand are presented. The test was conducted to acquire simultaneous internal and far-field measurements to determine the influence of internally generated noise on the far-field measurements. The data includes internal and far-field narrowband and one-third octave band pressure spectra.

  11. HYDES: A generalized hybrid computer program for studying turbojet or turbofan engine dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    This report describes HYDES, a hybrid computer program capable of simulating one-spool turbojet, two-spool turbojet, or two-spool turbofan engine dynamics. HYDES is also capable of simulating two- or three-stream turbofans with or without mixing of the exhaust streams. The program is intended to reduce the time required for implementing dynamic engine simulations. HYDES was developed for running on the Lewis Research Center's Electronic Associates (EAI) 690 Hybrid Computing System and satisfies the 16384-word core-size and hybrid-interface limits of that machine. The program could be modified for running on other computing systems. The use of HYDES to simulate a single-spool turbojet and a two-spool, two-stream turbofan engine is demonstrated. The form of the required input data is shown and samples of output listings (teletype) and transient plots (x-y plotter) are provided. HYDES is shown to be capable of performing both steady-state design and off-design analyses and transient analyses.

  12. 76 FR 77107 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Corp. (PW) JT9D-7R4H1 Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2011-0731; Directorate Identifier 2010-NE-39-AD; Amendment 39-16886; AD 2011-25-10] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Corp. (PW) JT9D-7R4H1 Turbofan... new airworthiness directive (AD) for all PW JT9D-7R4H1 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted...

  13. Status report - DARPA/NASA convertible turbofan/turboshaft engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellin, A. I.; Brooks, A.

    1983-01-01

    A development status report is presented for the NASA/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency convertible turbofan-turboshaft engine, which can power a high speed rotorcraft in vertical flight, as well as in horizontal flight up to speeds of Mach 0.85. The basis for this development program is a modified TF34-GE-400 engine. Program objectives include both the demonstration of dual output mode (jet thrust and shaft horsepower) capability and the development of a control system which will operate the engine in either mode and convert operation between the modes.

  14. Design and evaluation of an integrated Quiet, Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) engine and aircraft propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    German, J.; Fogel, P.; Wilson, C.

    1980-01-01

    The design was based on the LTS-101 engine family for the core engine. A high bypass fan design (BPR=9.4) was incorporated to provide reduced fuel consumption for the design mission. All acoustic and pollutant emissions goals were achieved. A discussion of the preliminary design of a business jet suitable for the developed propulsion system is included. It is concluded that large engine technology can be successfully applied to small turbofans, and noise or pollutant levels need not be constraints for the design of future small general aviation turbofan engines.

  15. Development and verification of real-time, hybrid computer simulation of F100-PW-100(3) turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.; Seldner, K.; Cwynar, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, hybrid computer simulation of a turbofan engine is described. Controls research programs involving that engine are supported by the simulation. The real time simulation is shown to match the steady state and transient performance of the engine over a wide range of flight conditions and power settings. The simulation equations, FORTRAN listing, and analog patching diagrams are included.

  16. Computer method for design of acoustic liners for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A design package is presented for the specification of acoustic liners for turbofans. An estimate of the noise generation was made based on modifications of existing noise correlations, for which the inputs are basic fan aerodynamic design variables. The method does not predict multiple pure tones. A target attenuation spectrum was calculated which was the difference between the estimated generation spectrum and a flat annoyance-weighted goal attenuated spectrum. The target spectrum was combined with a knowledge of acoustic liner performance as a function of the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. The liner design method at present is limited to annular duct configurations. The detailed structure of the liner was specified by combining the required impedance (which is a result of the previous step) with a mathematical model relating impedance to the detailed structure. The design procedure was developed for a liner constructed of perforated sheet placed over honeycomb backing cavities. A sample calculation was carried through in order to demonstrate the design procedure, and experimental results presented show good agreement with the calculated results of the method.

  17. Small Engine Technology (SET) - Task 4, Regional Turboprop/Turbofan Engine Advanced Combustor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Robert; Srinivasan, Ram; Myers, Geoffrey; Cardenas, Manuel; Penko, Paul F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under the SET Program Task 4 - Regional Turboprop/Turbofan Engine Advanced Combustor Study, a total of ten low-emissions combustion system concepts were evaluated analytically for three different gas turbine engine geometries and three different levels of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) reduction technology, using an existing AlliedSignal three-dimensional (3-D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code to predict Landing and Takeoff (LTO) engine cycle emission values. A list of potential Barrier Technologies to the successful implementation of these low-NOx combustor designs was created and assessed. A trade study was performed that ranked each of the ten study configurations on the basis of a number of manufacturing and durability factors, in addition to emissions levels. The results of the trade study identified three basic NOx-emissions reduction concepts that could be incorporated in proposed follow-on combustor technology development programs aimed at demonstrating low-NOx combustor hardware. These concepts are: high-flow swirlers and primary orifices, fuel-preparation cans, and double-dome swirlers.

  18. Development of dynamic simulation of TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine with post-stall capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krosel, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hybrid computer simulation of a TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine with post-stall capability. The simulation operates in real-time and will be used to test and evaluate stall recovery control modes for this engine. The simulation calculations are performed by an analog computer with a peripheral multivariable function generation unit used for computing bivariate functions. Tabular listings of simulation variables are obtained by interfacing to a digital computer and using a custom software package for data collection and display.

  19. Development of dynamic simulation of TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine with post-stall capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krosel, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hybrid computer simulation of a TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine with post-stall capability. The simulation operates in real-time and will be used to test and evaluate stall recovery control modes for this engine. The simulation calculations are performed by an analog computer with a peripheral multivariable function generation unit used for computing bivariate functions. Tabular listings of a simulation variables are obtained by interfacing to a digital computer and using a custom software package for data collection and display.

  20. Preliminary experiments on active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.; Burdisso, R. A.; Fuller, C. R.; O'Brien, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    In the preliminary experiments reported here, active acoustic sources positioned around the circumference of a turbofan engine were used to control the fan noise radiated forward through the inlet. The main objective was to demonstrate the potential of active techniques to alleviate the noise pollution that will be produced by the next generation of larger engines. A reduction of up to 19 dB in the radiation directivity was demonstrated in a zone that encompasses a 30-deg angle, near the error sensor, while spillover effects were observed toward the lateral direction. The simultaneous control of two tones was also demonstrated using two identical controllers in a parallel control configuration.

  1. 77 FR 16921 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ..., cleaning, and engine modifications to address coking in the No. 4 bearing compartment and in the oil.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James Gray, Aerospace Engineer, Engine & Propeller Directorate, FAA... inspections, cleaning, and engine modifications to address coking in the No. 4 bearing compartment and...

  2. Performance (Off-Design) Cycle Analysis for a Turbofan Engine With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Mattingly, J. D.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the performance of a steady-state, dual-spool, separate-exhaust turbofan engine, with an interstage turbine burner (ITB) serving as a secondary combustor. The ITB, which is located in the transition duct between the high- and the low-pressure turbines, is a relatively new concept for increasing specific thrust and lowering pollutant emissions in modern jet-engine propulsion. A detailed off-design performance analysis of ITB engines is written in Microsoft(Registered Trademark) Excel (Redmond, Washington) macrocode with Visual Basic Application to calculate engine performances over the entire operating envelope. Several design-point engine cases are pre-selected using a parametric cycle-analysis code developed previously in Microsoft(Registered Trademark) Excel, for off-design analysis. The off-design code calculates engine performances (i.e. thrust and thrust-specific-fuel-consumption) at various flight conditions and throttle settings.

  3. 76 FR 64844 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... vibration surveys and reporting to the FAA any crack findings, disks that fail the UI, and engines that fail the engine core vibration survey. That AD resulted from reports received of additional causes of HPT... or a failed engine core vibration survey. This proposed AD would also establish a new lower...

  4. Real-time simulation of the TF30-P-3 turbofan engine using a hybrid computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.; Bruton, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A real-time, hybrid-computer simulation of the TF30-P-3 turbofan engine was developed. The simulation was primarily analog in nature but used the digital portion of the hybrid computer to perform bivariate function generation associated with the performance of the engine's rotating components. FORTRAN listings and analog patching diagrams are provided. The hybrid simulation was controlled by a digital computer programmed to simulate the engine's standard hydromechanical control. Both steady-state and dynamic data obtained from the digitally controlled engine simulation are presented. Hybrid simulation data are compared with data obtained from a digital simulation provided by the engine manufacturer. The comparisons indicate that the real-time hybrid simulation adequately matches the baseline digital simulation.

  5. Abradable compressor and turbine seals, volume 1. [for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, D. V.; Dennis, R. E.; Hurst, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The application and advantages of abradable coatings as gas-path seals in a general aviation turbine engine were evaluated for use on the high-pressure compressor, the high-pressure turbine, and the low-pressure turbine shrouds. Topics covered include: (1) the initial selection of candidate materials for interim full-scale engine testing; (2) interim engine testing of the initially selected materials and additional candidate materials; (3) the design of the component required to adapt the hardware to permit full-scale engine testing of the most promising materials; (4) finalization of the fabrication methods used in the manufacture of engine test hardware; and (5) the manufacture of the hardware necessary to support the final full-scale engine tests.

  6. Advanced component technologies for energy-efficient turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reviews NASA's Energy Efficient Engine Project which was initiated to provide the advanced technology base for a new generation of fuel-conservative engines for introduction into airline service by the late 1980s. Efforts in this project are directed at advancing engine component and systems technologies to a point of demonstrating technology-readiness by 1984. Early results indicate high promise in achieving most of the goals established in the project.

  7. Performance deterioration of commercial high-bypass ratio turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, C. M.; Ziemianski, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of engine performance deterioration investigations based on historical data, special engine tests, and specific tests to define the influence of flight loads and component clearances on performance are presented. The results of analyses of several damage mechanisms that contribute to performance deterioration such as blade tip rubs, airfoil surface roughness and erosion, and thermal distortion are also included. The significance of these damage mechanisms on component and overall engine performance is discussed.

  8. Application of the MNA design method to a nonlinear turbofan engine. [multivariable Nyquist array method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    Using nonlinear digital simulation as a representative model of the dynamic operation of the QCSEE turbofan engine, a feedback control system is designed by variable frequency design techniques. Transfer functions are generated for each of five power level settings covering the range of operation from approach power to full throttle (62.5% to 100% full power). These transfer functions are then used by an interactive control system design synthesis program to provide a closed loop feedback control using the multivariable Nyquist array and extensions to multivariable Bode diagrams and Nichols charts.

  9. Measurement of gaseous emissions from a turbofan engine at simulated altitude conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, L. A.; Biaglow, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Gaseous emission from a TFE 731-2 turbofan engine were measured over a range of fuel-air ratios from idle to full power at simulated from near sea level to 13,200 m. Carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions were highest at idle and lowest at high power settings; oxides of nitrogen exhibited the reverse trend. Carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon levels decreased with increasing altitude. Oxides of nitrogen emissions were successfully correlated by a parametric group of combustor operating variables.

  10. Effects of fan inlet temperature disturbances on the stability of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelwahab, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of steady-state and time-dependent fan inlet total temperature disturbances on the stability of a TF30-P-3 turbofan engine were determined. Disturbances were induced by a gaseous-hydrogen-fueled burner system installed upstream of the fan inlet. Data were obtained at a fan inlet Reynolds number index of 0.50 and at a low-pressure-rotor corrected speed of 90 percent of military speed. All tests were conducted with a 90 deg extent of the fan inlet circumference exposed to above-average temperatures.

  11. Effect of spatial inlet temperature and pressure distortion on turbofan engine stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, circumferential pressure distortion, and combined temperature and pressure distortion on the stability of an advanced turbofan engine were investigated experimentally at simulated altitude conditions. With circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, a flow instability generated by the fan operating near stall caused the high-pressure compressor to surge at, or near, the same time as the fan. The effect of combined distortion was dependent on the relative location of the high-temperature and low-pressure regions; high-pressure compressor stalls occurred when the regions coincided, and fan stalls occurred with the regions separated.

  12. GENENG: A program for calculating design and off-design performance for turbojet and turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, R. W.; Fishbach, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program entitled GENENG employs component performance maps to perform analytical, steady state, engine cycle calculations. Through a scaling procedure, each of the component maps can be used to represent a family of maps (different design values of pressure ratios, efficiency, weight flow, etc.) Either convergent or convergent-divergent nozzles may be used. Included is a complete FORTRAN 4 listing of the program. Sample results and input explanations are shown for one-spool and two-spool turbojets and two-spool separate- and mixed-flow turbofans operating at design and off-design conditions.

  13. Net thrust calculation sensitivity of an afterburning turbofan engine to variations in input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Ray, R. J.; Walton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The calculated value of net thrust of an aircraft powered by a General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine was evaluated for its sensitivity to various input parameters. The effects of a 1.0-percent change in each input parameter on the calculated value of net thrust with two calculation methods are compared. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and also gives the estimated accuracy of the overall net thrust calculation as determined from the influence coefficients and estimated parameter measurement accuracies.

  14. Automated procedure for developing hybrid computer simulations of turbofan engines. Part 1: General description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.; Krosel, S. M.; Bruton, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic, computer-aided, self-documenting methodology for developing hybrid computer simulations of turbofan engines is presented. The methodology that is pesented makes use of a host program that can run on a large digital computer and a machine-dependent target (hybrid) program. The host program performs all the calculations and data manipulations that are needed to transform user-supplied engine design information to a form suitable for the hybrid computer. The host program also trims the self-contained engine model to match specified design-point information. Part I contains a general discussion of the methodology, describes a test case, and presents comparisons between hybrid simulation and specified engine performance data. Part II, a companion document, contains documentation, in the form of computer printouts, for the test case.

  15. A Comparison of Hybrid Approaches for Turbofan Engine Gas Path Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng; Wang, Yafan; Huang, Jinquan; Wang, Qihang

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid diagnostic method utilizing Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA) is presented for performance degradation estimation and sensor anomaly detection of turbofan engine. The EKF is used to estimate engine component performance degradation for gas path fault diagnosis. The AGA is introduced in the integrated architecture and applied for sensor bias detection. The contributions of this work are the comparisons of Kalman Filters (KF)-AGA algorithms and Neural Networks (NN)-AGA algorithms with a unified framework for gas path fault diagnosis. The NN needs to be trained off-line with a large number of prior fault mode data. When new fault mode occurs, estimation accuracy by the NN evidently decreases. However, the application of the Linearized Kalman Filter (LKF) and EKF will not be restricted in such case. The crossover factor and the mutation factor are adapted to the fitness function at each generation in the AGA, and it consumes less time to search for the optimal sensor bias value compared to the Genetic Algorithm (GA). In a word, we conclude that the hybrid EKF-AGA algorithm is the best choice for gas path fault diagnosis of turbofan engine among the algorithms discussed.

  16. Analytical evaluation of the impact of broad specification fuels on high bypass turbofan engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Six conceptual combustor designs for the CF6-50 high bypass turbofan engine and six conceptual combustor designs for the NASA/GE E3 high bypass turbofan engine were analyzed to provide an assessment of the major problems anticipated in using broad specification fuels in these aircraft engine combustion systems. Each of the conceptual combustor designs, which are representative of both state-of-the-art and advanced state-of-the-art combustion systems, was analyzed to estimate combustor performance, durability, and pollutant emissions when using commercial Jet A aviation fuel and when using experimental referee board specification fuel. Results indicate that lean burning, low emissions double annular combustor concepts can accommodate a wide range of fuel properties without a serious deterioration of performance or durability. However, rich burning, single annular concepts would be less tolerant to a relaxation of fuel properties. As the fuel specifications are relaxed, autoignition delay time becomes much smaller which presents a serious design and development problem for premixing-prevaporizing combustion system concepts.

  17. Demonstration of a Packaged Capacitive Pressure Sensor System Suitable for Jet Turbofan Engine Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Meredith, Roger D.; Harsh, Kevin; Pilant, Evan; Usrey, Michael W.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the development and characterization of a packaged pressure sensor system suitable for jet engine health monitoring is demonstrated. The sensing system operates from 97 to 117 MHz over a pressure range from 0 to 350 psi and a temperature range from 25 to 500 deg. The sensing system consists of a Clapp-type oscillator that is fabricated on an alumina substrate and is comprised of a Cree SiC MESFET, MIM capacitors, a wire-wound inductor, chip resistors and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. The pressure sensor is located in the LC tank circuit of the oscillator so that a change in pressure causes a change in capacitance, thus changing the resonant frequency of the sensing system. The chip resistors, wire-wound inductors and MIM capacitors have all been characterized at temperature and operational frequency, and perform with less than 5% variance in electrical performance. The measured capacitive pressure sensing system agrees very well with simulated results. The packaged pressure sensing system is specifically designed to measure the pressure on a jet turbofan engine. The packaged system can be installed by way of borescope plug adaptor fitted to a borescope port exposed to the gas path of a turbofan engine.

  18. A Foreign Object Damage Event Detector Data Fusion System for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    A Data Fusion System designed to provide a reliable assessment of the occurrence of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in a turbofan engine is presented. The FOD-event feature level fusion scheme combines knowledge of shifts in engine gas path performance obtained using a Kalman filter, with bearing accelerometer signal features extracted via wavelet analysis, to positively identify a FOD event. A fuzzy inference system provides basic probability assignments (bpa) based on features extracted from the gas path analysis and bearing accelerometers to a fusion algorithm based on the Dempster-Shafer-Yager Theory of Evidence. Details are provided on the wavelet transforms used to extract the foreign object strike features from the noisy data and on the Kalman filter-based gas path analysis. The system is demonstrated using a turbofan engine combined-effects model (CEM), providing both gas path and rotor dynamic structural response, and is suitable for rapid-prototyping of control and diagnostic systems. The fusion of the disparate data can provide significantly more reliable detection of a FOD event than the use of either method alone. The use of fuzzy inference techniques combined with Dempster-Shafer-Yager Theory of Evidence provides a theoretical justification for drawing conclusions based on imprecise or incomplete data.

  19. Separating Turbofan Engine Noise Sources Using Auto and Cross Spectra from Four Microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2008-01-01

    The study of core noise from turbofan engines has become more important as noise from other sources such as the fan and jet were reduced. A multiple-microphone and acoustic-source modeling method to separate correlated and uncorrelated sources is discussed. The auto- and cross spectra in the frequency range below 1000 Hz are fitted with a noise propagation model based on a source couplet consisting of a single incoherent monopole source with a single coherent monopole source or a source triplet consisting of a single incoherent monopole source with two coherent monopole point sources. Examples are presented using data from a Pratt& Whitney PW4098 turbofan engine. The method separates the low-frequency jet noise from the core noise at the nozzle exit. It is shown that at low power settings, the core noise is a major contributor to the noise. Even at higher power settings, it can be more important than jet noise. However, at low frequencies, uncorrelated broadband noise and jet noise become the important factors as the engine power setting is increased.

  20. 77 FR 16967 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... field event led Pratt & Whitney to re-evaluate the low- cycle fatigue analysis of the PW2000 engine and..., call 781-238-7125. Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on March 14, 2012. Peter A. White,...

  1. Design concepts for low-cost composite turbofan engine frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, S. C.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    Design concepts for low cost, lightweight composite engine frames were applied to the design requirements for the frame of a commercial, high bypass engine. Four alternative composite frame design concepts identified which consisted of generic type components and subcomponents that could be adapted to use in different locations in the engine and the different engine sizes. A variety of materials and manufacturing methods were projected with a goal for the lowest number of parts at the lowest possible cost. After a preliminary evaluation of all four frame concepts, two designs were selected for an extended design and evaluation which narrowed the final selection down to one frame that was significantly lower in cost and slighty lighter than the other frame. An implementation plan for this lowest cost frame is projected for future development and includes prospects for reducing its weight with proposed unproven, innovative fabrication techniques.

  2. 77 FR 51459 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... and force early shop visits. Onur Air noted that its engines would lose 1,300 cycles and it would... shop burden from a hub life reduction. We do not agree. We determined that removal of the HPT stage...

  3. Multiplexed Predictive Control of a Large Commercial Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, hanz; Singaraju, Anil; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01

    Model predictive control is a strategy well-suited to handle the highly complex, nonlinear, uncertain, and constrained dynamics involved in aircraft engine control problems. However, it has thus far been infeasible to implement model predictive control in engine control applications, because of the combination of model complexity and the time allotted for the control update calculation. In this paper, a multiplexed implementation is proposed that dramatically reduces the computational burden of the quadratic programming optimization that must be solved online as part of the model-predictive-control algorithm. Actuator updates are calculated sequentially and cyclically in a multiplexed implementation, as opposed to the simultaneous optimization taking place in conventional model predictive control. Theoretical aspects are discussed based on a nominal model, and actual computational savings are demonstrated using a realistic commercial engine model.

  4. A real-time simulator of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Delaat, John C.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1989-01-01

    A real-time digital simulator of a Pratt and Whitney F100 engine has been developed for real-time code verification and for actuator diagnosis during full-scale engine testing. This self-contained unit can operate in an open-loop stand-alone mode or as part of closed-loop control system. It can also be used for control system design and development. Tests conducted in conjunction with the NASA Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation program show that the simulator is a valuable tool for real-time code verification and as a real-time actuator simulator for actuator fault diagnosis. Although currently a small perturbation model, advances in microprocessor hardware should allow the simulator to evolve into a real-time, full-envelope, full engine simulation.

  5. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  6. Load Sharing Behavior of Star Gearing Reducer for Geared Turbofan Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Shuai; Zhang, Yidu; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Feiming; Matsumura, Shigeki; Houjoh, Haruo

    2017-03-01

    Load sharing behavior is very important for power-split gearing system, star gearing reducer as a new type and special transmission system can be used in many industry fields. However, there is few literature regarding the key multiple-split load sharing issue in main gearbox used in new type geared turbofan engine. Further mechanism analysis are made on load sharing behavior among star gears of star gearing reducer for geared turbofan engine. Comprehensive meshing error analysis are conducted on eccentricity error, gear thickness error, base pitch error, assembly error, and bearing error of star gearing reducer respectively. Floating meshing error resulting from meshing clearance variation caused by the simultaneous floating of sun gear and annular gear are taken into account. A refined mathematical model for load sharing coefficient calculation is established in consideration of different meshing stiffness and supporting stiffness for components. The regular curves of load sharing coefficient under the influence of interactions, single action and single variation of various component errors are obtained. The accurate sensitivity of load sharing coefficient toward different errors is mastered. The load sharing coefficient of star gearing reducer is 1.033 and the maximum meshing force in gear tooth is about 3010 N. This paper provides scientific theory evidences for optimal parameter design and proper tolerance distribution in advanced development and manufacturing process, so as to achieve optimal effects in economy and technology.

  7. Constrained Kalman Filtering Via Density Function Truncation for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints (which may be based on physical considerations) are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. This paper develops an analytic method of incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter. The resultant filter truncates the PDF (probability density function) of the Kalman filter estimate at the known constraints and then computes the constrained filter estimate as the mean of the truncated PDF. The incorporation of state variable constraints increases the computational effort of the filter but significantly improves its estimation accuracy. The improvement is demonstrated via simulation results obtained from a turbofan engine model. The turbofan engine model contains 3 state variables, 11 measurements, and 10 component health parameters. It is also shown that the truncated Kalman filter may be a more accurate way of incorporating inequality constraints than other constrained filters (e.g., the projection approach to constrained filtering).

  8. Combined pressure and temperature distortion effects on internal flow of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braithwaite, W. M.; Soeder, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    An additional data base for improving and verifying a computer simulation developed by an engine manufacturer was obtained. The multisegment parallel compressor simulation was designed to predict the effects of steady-state circumferential inlet total-pressure and total-temperature distortions on the flows into and through a turbofan compression system. It also predicts the degree of distortion that will result in surge of the compressor. The effect of combined 180 deg square-wave distortion patterns of total pressure and total temperature in various relative positions is reported. The observed effects of the combined distortion on a unitary bypass ratio turbofan engine are presented in terms of total and static pressure profiles and total temperature profiles at stations ahead of the inlet guide vanes as well as through the fan-compressor system. These observed profiles are compared with those predicted by the complex multisegment model. The effects of relative position of the two components comprising the combined distortion on the degree resulting in surge are discussed. Certain relative positions required less combined distortion than either a temperature or pressure distortion by itself.

  9. 78 FR 19983 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ...'' throughout the document. Airlines track the aircraft flight hours, but not the time that an engine operates while the aircraft is on the ground. We agree. We changed the AD to use flight hours throughout the AD... that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce...

  10. 77 FR 14312 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International, Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...-pressure (LP) turbine blades. This proposed AD would require operational checks of the engine overspeed... the LP turbine blades and damage to the airplane. DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD... release of LP turbine blades. Investigation revealed that the overspeed trip system on both of...

  11. 77 FR 23637 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... stage high-pressure turbine (HPT) seal support, part number (P/N) 55K601 or P/N 50K532, installed. This proposed AD was prompted by 58 reports of cracked 1st stage HPT air seal rings, including 15 in-flight engine shutdowns. This proposed AD would require installation of a redesigned 1st stage HPT seal...

  12. 77 FR 51892 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... of a rim/ web separation of a first stage low-pressure ] turbine (LPT1) rotor assembly. This AD... this AD to prevent uncontained disk separation, engine failure, and damage to the airplane. DATES: This... and CASA 101 airplanes. LPT disk separations in these airplanes have been determined to be higher...

  13. 77 FR 12448 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... the maintenance planning guide for main fuel pumps, including in the engine manual additional... perform the FMU modification using their normal maintenance program and shop procedures. ] We partially... maintenance program and shop procedures. We changed the AD to IBR the portion of the Hamilton Sundstrand...

  14. 77 FR 32009 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International, Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... by two reports of engines experiencing uncontained release of low-pressure (LP) turbine blades. This... LP turbine overspeed leading to uncontained release of the LP turbine blades and damage to the... experiencing uncontained release of low-pressure (LP) turbine blades. We are issuing this AD to prevent...

  15. 75 FR 9140 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525-D5, V2527-A5, V2527E-A5, V2527M-A5, V2528-D5, V2530-A5, and V2533-A5 Turbofan Engines; Correction AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT...-A5, V2527E-A5, V2527M-A5, V2528-D5, V2530-A5, and V2533-A5 turbofan engines. The docket number...

  16. A Method to Predict Compressor Stall in the TF34-100 Turbofan Engine Utilizing Real-Time Performance Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Douglas Probert, “Detection and Prediction of the Performance Deterioration of a Turbofan Engine”, Proceedings of the International Gas Turbine ...Handbook”, A-10 Turbine Engine Monitor System, for Version 54.1 and 56.1 software, section 3.1.4 VG Schedule. 82 APPENDIX A. THE FORMULA TO

  17. 77 FR 10355 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ...-12-AD; Amendment 39-16956; AD 2012-04-01] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR...: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for all RR RB211-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires removal from service of certain...

  18. 76 FR 68663 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation..., contact Rolls-Royce plc, Corporate Communications, P.O. Box 31, Derby, England, DE248BJ; phone: 011-44...-Royce plc substantiated their proposed increased life of P/N FK21117 by rig test and analysis. AD...

  19. 75 FR 801 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 500, 700, and 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc... airworthiness directive (AD) for Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. That AD currently... through Friday, except Federal holidays. Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31,...

  20. 75 FR 2064 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S.A. CFM56-7B Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    .... CFM56-7B series turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive eddy current inspections (ECIs... about 3 work-hours to perform an eddy current inspection of an LP turbine rear frame. The average labor...-258-0; or 340-166-259-0, do the following: (1) Perform an initial eddy current inspection (ECI) of...

  1. Multivarable nyquist array method with application to turbofan engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    Extensions to the multivariable Nyquist array (MNA) method are used to design a feedback control system for the quiet clean shorthaul experimental engine. The results of this design are compared with those obtained from the deployment of an alternate control system design on a full scale nonlinear, real time digital simulation. The results clearly demonstrate the utility of the MNA synthesis procedures for highly nonlinear sophisticated design applications.

  2. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine with Ice Crystal Ingestion; Follow-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  3. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine With Ice Crystal Ingestion: Follow-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  4. Active Control of Inlet Noise on the JT15D Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerome P.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the year from November 1997 to December 1998 on the Active Noise Control of Turbofan Engines research project funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The concept of implementing active noise control techniques with fuselage-mounted error sensors is investigated both analytically and experimentally. The analytical part of the project involves the continued development of an advanced modeling technique to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of active noise control techniques to large, realistic high bypass engines of the type on which active control methods are expected to be applied. Results from the advanced analytical model are presented that show the effectiveness of the control strategies, and the analytical results presented for fuselage error sensors show good agreement with the experimentally observed results and provide additional insight into the control phenomena. Additional analytical results are presented for active noise control used in conjunction with a wavenumber sensing technique. The experimental work is carried out on a running JT15D turbofan jet engine in a test stand at Virginia Tech. The control strategy used in these tests was the feedforward Filtered-X LMS algorithm. The control inputs were supplied by single and multiple circumferential arrays of acoustic sources equipped with neodymium iron cobalt magnets mounted upstream of the fan. The reference signal was obtained from an inlet mounted eddy current probe. The error signals were obtained from a number of pressure transducers flush-mounted in a simulated fuselage section mounted in the engine test cell. The active control methods are investigated when implemented with the control sources embedded within the acoustically absorptive material on a passively-lined inlet. The experimental results show that the combination of active control techniques with fuselage

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of a Turbine/Rotary Combustion Compound Engine for a Subsonic Transport. [fuel consumption and engine tests of turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Civinskas, K. C.; Kraft, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    The fuel consumption of a modern compound engine with that of an advanced high pressure ratio turbofan was compared. The compound engine was derived from a turbofan engine by replacing the combustor with a rotary combustion (RC) engine. A number of boost pressure ratios and compression ratios were examined. Cooling of the RC engine was accomplished by heat exchanging to the fan duct. Performance was estimated with an Otto-cycle for two levels of energy lost to cooling. The effects of added complexity on cost and maintainability were not examined and the comparison was solely in terms of cruise performance and weight. Assuming a 25 percent Otto-cycle cooling loss (representative of current experience), the best compound engine gave a 1.2 percent improvement in cruise. Engine weight increased by 23 percent. For a 10 percent Otto-cycle cooling loss (representing advanced insulation/high temperature materials technology), a compound engine with a boost PR of 10 and a compression ratio of 10 gave an 8.1 percent lower cruise than the reference turbofan.

  6. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Bloomer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady-state reverse and forward-to-reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original QCSEE 4-segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30-deg half-angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30-deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress and approximately a 20% improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35% of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff-to-reverse thrust transients.

  7. Measurement effects on the calculation of in-flight thrust for an F404 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed that investigates parameter measurement effects on calculated in-flight thrust for the General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine which powered the X-29A forward-swept wing research aircraft. Net-thrust uncertainty and influence coefficients were calculated and are presented. Six flight conditions were analyzed at five engine power settings each. Results were obtained using the mass flow-temperature and area-pressure thrust calculation methods, both based on the commonly used gas generator technique. Thrust uncertainty was determined using a common procedure based on the use of measurement uncertainty and influence coefficients. The effects of data nonlinearity on the uncertainty calculation procedure were studied and results are presented. The advantages and disadvantages of using this particular uncertainty procedure are discussed. A brief description of the thrust-calculation technique along with the uncertainty calculation procedure is included.

  8. Optical detection of blade flutter. [in YF-100 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieberding, W. C.; Pollack, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines the capabilities of photoelectric scanning (PES) and stroboscopic imagery (SI) as optical monitoring tools for detection of the onset of flutter in the fan blades of an aircraft gas turbine engine. Both optical techniques give visual data in real time as well as video-tape records. PES is shown to be an ideal flutter monitor, since a single cathode ray tube displays the behavior of all the blades in a stage simultaneously. Operation of the SI system continuously while searching for a flutter condition imposes severe demands on the flash tube and affects its reliability, thus limiting its use as a flutter monitor. A better method of operation is to search for flutter with the PES and limit the use of SI to those times when the PES indicates interesting blade activity.

  9. Near-field sound radiation of fan tones from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Alan; Gaffney, James; Kingan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The development of a distributed source model to predict fan tone noise levels of an installed turbofan aero-engine is reported. The key objective is to examine a canonical problem: how to predict the pressure field due to a distributed source located near an infinite, rigid cylinder. This canonical problem is a simple representation of an installed turbofan, where the distributed source is based on the pressure pattern generated by a spinning duct mode, and the rigid cylinder represents an aircraft fuselage. The radiation of fan tones can be modelled in terms of spinning modes. In this analysis, based on duct modes, theoretical expressions for the near-field acoustic pressures on the cylinder, or at the same locations without the cylinder, have been formulated. Simulations of the near-field acoustic pressures are compared against measurements obtained from a fan rig test. Also, the installation effect is quantified by calculating the difference in the sound pressure levels with and without the adjacent cylindrical fuselage. Results are shown for the blade passing frequency fan tone radiated at a supersonic fan operating condition.

  10. Effect of combined pressure and temperature distortion orientation on high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, R. H.; Mehalic, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Total-temperature, static-pressure and total-pressure distributions were measured in the inlet duct upstream of the engine inlet and within the fan and compressor of a YTF34 turbofan engine. Free-stream and boundary layer yaw angle variations were measured between a rotable screen assembly and the engine inlet. Total pressure distortions were generated using three 180 deg extent screens and total temperature distortions were generated using a rotatable hydrogen burner. Reynolds number index upstream of the rotatable screen assembly was maintained at 0.5 (based on the undistorted sectors at station 1, the inlet flow measuring station). The engine mechanical fan speed at sea level condition was rated at 7005 rpm. The engine was tested at a corrected fan speed of 90 percent of rated condition. Yaw angle increased between the rotatable screen assembly and the engine inlet. The largest variation in free-stream and boundary layer yaw angle occurs when the combined distortions are 180 deg out-of-phase. Static-pressure distortion increased exponentially as flow approached the engine. Total-pressure distortions were attenuated between the engine inlet and the compressor exit. Total-temperature distortion persisted through the compressor for all four combined distortions investigated.

  11. Possible Mechanisms for Turbofan Engine Ice Crystal Icing at High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Struk, Peter M.; Oliver, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented to describe possible mechanisms of ice formation on unheated surfaces inside a turbofan engine compression system from fully glaciated ice crystal clouds often formed at high altitude near deep convective weather systems. It is shown from the analysis that generally there could be two distinct types of ice formation: (1) when the "surface freezing fraction" is in the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the freezing of water melt from fully or partially melted ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accretion with strong adhesion to the surface, and (2) when the "surface melting fraction" is the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the further melting of ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accumulation of un-melted ice crystals with relatively weak bonding to the surface. The model captures important qualitative trends of the fundamental ice-crystal icing phenomenon reported earlier1,2 from the research collaboration work by NASA and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. Further, preliminary analysis of test data from the 2013 full scale turbofan engine ice crystal icing test3 conducted in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) has also suggested that (1) both types of ice formation occurred during the test, and (2) the model has captured some important qualitative trend of turning on (or off) the ice crystal ice formation process in the tested engine low pressure compressor (LPC) targeted area under different icing conditions that ultimately would lead to (or suppress) an engine core roll back (RB) event.

  12. Possible Mechanisms for Turbofan Engine Ice Crystal Icing at High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Struk, Peter M.; Oliver, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented to describe possible mechanisms of ice formation on unheated surfaces inside a turbofan engine compression system from fully glaciated ice crystal clouds often formed at high altitude near deep convective weather systems. It is shown from the analysis that generally there could be two distinct types of ice formation: (1) when the "surface freezing fraction" is in the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the freezing of water melt from fully or partially melted ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accretion with strong adhesion to the surface, and (2) when the "surface melting fraction" is the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the further melting of ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accumulation of un-melted ice crystals with relatively weak bonding to the surface. The model captures important qualitative trends of the fundamental ice-crystal icing phenomenon reported earlier (Refs. 1 and 2) from the research collaboration work by NASA and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. Further, preliminary analysis of test data from the 2013 full scale turbofan engine ice crystal icing test (Ref. 3) conducted in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) has also suggested that (1) both types of ice formation occurred during the test, and (2) the model has captured some important qualitative trend of turning on (or off) the ice crystal ice formation process in the tested engine low pressure compressor (LPC) targeted area under different icing conditions that ultimately would lead to (or suppress) an engine core roll back (RB) event.

  13. A Demonstration of a Retrofit Architecture for Intelligent Control and Diagnostics of a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Turso, James A.; Shah, Neerav; Sowers, T. Shane; Owen, A. Karl

    2005-01-01

    A retrofit architecture for intelligent turbofan engine control and diagnostics that changes the fan speed command to maintain thrust is proposed and its demonstration in a piloted flight simulator is described. The objective of the implementation is to increase the level of autonomy of the propulsion system, thereby reducing pilot workload in the presence of anomalies and engine degradation due to wear. The main functions of the architecture are to diagnose the cause of changes in the engine s operation, warning the pilot if necessary, and to adjust the outer loop control reference signal in response to the changes. This requires that the retrofit control architecture contain the capability to determine the changed relationship between fan speed and thrust, and the intelligence to recognize the cause of the change in order to correct it or warn the pilot. The proposed retrofit architecture is able to determine the fan speed setting through recognition of the degradation level of the engine, and it is able to identify specific faults and warn the pilot. In the flight simulator it was demonstrated that when degradation is introduced into an engine with standard fan speed control, the pilot needs to take corrective action to maintain heading. Utilizing the intelligent retrofit control architecture, the engine thrust is automatically adjusted to its expected value, eliminating yaw without pilot intervention.

  14. Investigation of HP Turbine Blade Failure in a Military Turbofan Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Thomas, Johny; Srinivasan, K.; Nandi, Vaishakhi; Bhatt, R. Raghavendra

    2017-04-01

    Failure of a high pressure (HP) turbine blade in a military turbofan engine is investigated to determine the root cause of failure. Forensic and metallurgical investigations are carried out on the affected blades. The loss of coating and the presence of heavily oxidized intergranular fracture features including substrate material aging and airfoil curling in the trailing edge of a representative blade indicate that the coating is not providing adequate oxidation protection and the blade material substrate is not suitable for the application at hand. Coating spallation followed by substrate oxidation and aging leading to intergranular cracking and localized trailing edge curling is the root cause of the blade failure. The remaining portion of the blade fracture surface showed ductile overload features in the final failure. The damage observed in downstream components is due to secondary effects.

  15. Conditioned pressure spectra and coherence measurements in the core of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A.

    1981-01-01

    Multiple and partial coherence functions and the corresponding conditioned coherent output spectra are computed between fluctuating pressures measured at two locations within the tailpipe of a turbofan engine and far-field acoustic pressure. The results are compared with the ordinary coherent output spectrum as obtained between a single tailpipe pressure measurement and the far-field acoustic pressure. The comparison indicates apparent additional "coherent output" (i.e., core-noise) beyond that detectable with an ordinary coherent measurement, thus suggesting the tailpipe as a core-noise source region. Further evidence suggests, however, that these differences may be attributed to the presence of transverse acoustic modes in the tailpipe and that the tailpipe is not, in fact, a significant source region.

  16. Analytical investigation of adaptive control of radiated inlet noise from turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risi, John D.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the resulting far field radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. A feedforward control algorithm was simulated to predict the controlled far field radiation from the destructive combination of fan noise and secondary control sources. Numerical results were developed for two system configurations, with the resulting controlled far field radiation patterns showing varying degrees of attenuation and spillover. With one axial station of twelve control sources and error sensors with equal relative angular positions, nearly global attenuation is achieved. Shifting the angular position of one error sensor resulted in an increase of spillover to the extreme sidelines. The complex control inputs for each configuration was investigated to identify the structure of the wave pattern created by the control sources, giving an indication of performance of the system configuration. It is deduced that the locations of the error sensors and the control source configuration are equally critical to the operation of the active noise control system.

  17. Altitude calibration of an F100, S/N P680063, turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, T. J.; Lee, D.; Rodriguez, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    An airflow and thrust calibration of an F100 engine was conducted in coordination with a flight test program to study airframe-propulsion system integration characteristics of turbofan-powered high-performance aircraft. The tests were conducted with and without augmentation for a variety of simulated flight conditions with emphasis on the transonic regime. Test results for all conditions are presented in terms of corrected airflow and corrected gross thrust as functions of corrected fan speed for nonaugmented power and an augmented thrust ratio as a function of fuel-air ratio for augmented power. Comparisons of measured and predicted data are presented along with the results of an uncertainty analysis for both corrected airflow and gross thrust.

  18. Exhaust emission survey of an F100 afterburning turbofan engine at simulated altitude flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. E.; Cullom, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Emissions of carbon monoxide, total oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide from an F100, afterburning, two spool turbofan engine at simulated flight conditions are reported. For each flight condition emission measurements were made for two or three power levels from intermediate power (nonafterburning) through maximum afterburning. The data showed that emissions vary with flight speed, altitude, power level, and radial position across the nozzle. Carbon monoxide emissions were low for intermediate power (nonafterburning) and partial afterburning, but regions of high carbon monoxide were present downstream of the flame holder at maximum afterburning. Unburned hydrocarbon emissions were low for most of the simulated flight conditions. The local NOX concentrations and their variability with power level increased with increasing flight Mach number at constant altitude, and decreased with increasing altitude at constant Mach number. Carbon dioxide emissions were proportional to local fuel air ratio for all conditions.

  19. Improved Finite Element Modeling of the Turbofan Engine Inlet Radiation Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Indranil Danda; Eversman, Walter; Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    Improvements have been made in the finite element model of the acoustic radiated field from a turbofan engine inlet in the presence of a mean flow. The problem of acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet is difficult to model numerically because of the large domain and high frequencies involved. A numerical model with conventional finite elements in the near field and wave envelope elements in the far field has been constructed. By employing an irrotational mean flow assumption, both the mean flow and the acoustic perturbation problem have been posed in an axisymmetric formulation in terms of the velocity potential; thereby minimizing computer storage and time requirements. The finite element mesh has been altered in search of an improved solution. The mean flow problem has been reformulated with new boundary conditions to make it theoretically rigorous. The sound source at the fan face has been modeled as a combination of positive and negative propagating duct eigenfunctions. Therefore, a finite element duct eigenvalue problem has been solved on the fan face and the resulting modal matrix has been used to implement a source boundary condition on the fan face in the acoustic radiation problem. In the post processing of the solution, the acoustic pressure has been evaluated at Gauss points inside the elements and the nodal pressure values have been interpolated from them. This has significantly improved the results. The effect of the geometric position of the transition circle between conventional finite elements and wave envelope elements has been studied and it has been found that the transition can be made nearer to the inlet than previously assumed.

  20. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limit protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside of the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  1. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limited protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  2. Effects of bleed air extraction on thrust levels on the F404-GE-400 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, Andrew J.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A ground test was performed to determine the effects of compressor bleed flow extraction on the performance of F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engines. The two engines were installed in the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. A specialized bleed ducting system was installed onto the aircraft to control and measure engine bleed airflow while the aircraft was tied down to a thrust measuring stand. The test was conducted on each engine and at various power settings. The bleed air extraction levels analyzed included flow rates above the manufacturer's maximum specification limit. The measured relationship between thrust and bleed flow extraction was shown to be essentially linear at all power settings with an increase in bleed flow causing a corresponding decrease in thrust. A comparison with the F404-GE-400 steady-state engine simulation showed the estimation to be within +/- 1 percent of measured thrust losses for large increases in bleed flow rate.

  3. Effects of bleed air extraction of thrust levels on the F404-GE-400 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, Andrew J.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A ground test was performed to determine the effects of compressor bleed flow extraction on the performance of F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engines. The two engines were installed in the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. A specialized bleed ducting system was installed onto the aircraft to control and measure engine bleed airflow while the aircraft was tied down to a thrust measuring stand. The test was conducted on each engine and at various power settings. The bleed air extraction levels analyzed included flow rates above the manufacturer's maximum specification limit. The measured relationship between thrust and bleed flow extraction was shown to be essentially linear at all power settings with an increase in bleed flow causing a corresponding decrease in thrust. A comparison with the F404-GE-400 steady-state engine simulation showed the estimation to be within +/- 1 percent of measured thrust losses for large increases is bleed flow rate.

  4. Gaseous exhaust emissions from a JT8D-109 turbofan engine at simulated cruise flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, L. A.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous emissions from a JT8D-109 turbofan engine were measured in an altitude facility at four simulated cruise flight conditions: Mach 0.8 at altitudes of 9.1, 10, 7, and 12.2 km and Mach 0.9 at 10.7 km. Engine inlet air temperature was held constant at 283 K for all tests. Emissions measurements were made at nominally 6 cm intervals across the horizontal diameter of the engine exhaust nozzle with a single-point traversing gas sample probe. Measured emissions of decreased with increasing altitude from an emission index of 10.4 to one of 8.3, while carbon monoxide increased with increasing altitude from an emission index of 1.6 to one of 4.4. Unburned hydrocarbon emissions were essentially negligible for all flight conditions. Since the engine inlet air temperatures were not correctly simulated, the NOx emission indices were corrected to true altitude conditions by using correlating parameters for changes in combustor inlet temperature, pressure, and temperature rise. The correction was small at the lowest altitude. At the 10.7 and 12.2 km, Mach 0.8 test conditions the correction decreased the measured values by 1 emission index.

  5. Noise-Reduction Benefits Analyzed for Over-the-Wing-Mounted Advanced Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    As we look to the future, increasingly stringent civilian aviation noise regulations will require the design and manufacture of extremely quiet commercial aircraft. Also, the large fan diameters of modern engines with increasingly higher bypass ratios pose significant packaging and aircraft installation challenges. One design approach that addresses both of these challenges is to mount the engines above the wing. In addition to allowing the performance trend towards large diameters and high bypass ratio cycles to continue, this approach allows the wing to shield much of the engine noise from people on the ground. The Propulsion Systems Analysis Office at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field conducted independent analytical research to estimate the noise reduction potential of mounting advanced turbofan engines above the wing. Certification noise predictions were made for a notional long-haul commercial quadjet transport. A large quad was chosen because, even under current regulations, such aircraft sometimes experience difficulty in complying with certification noise requirements with a substantial margin. Also, because of its long wing chords, a large airplane would receive the greatest advantage of any noise-shielding benefit.

  6. A sensitivity analysis for the F100 turbofan engine using the multivariable Nyquist array. [feedback control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.; Borysiak, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    In the feedback control design of multivariable systems, closed loop performance evaluations must include the dynamic behavior of variables unavailable to the feedback controller. For the multivariable Nyquist array method, a set of sensitivity functions are proposed to simplify the adjustment of compensator parameters when the dynamic response of the unmeasurable output variables is unacceptable. A sensitivity study to improve thrust and turbine temperature responses for the Pratt-Whitney F100 turbofan engine demonstrates the utility of the proposed method.

  7. 76 FR 255 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PW305A and PW305B Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... the engine type in the subject heading and paragraph (c) in the Summary section and the Regulatory... engines. As published, the agency docket No. in the Summary section and the engine type in the Summary... Canada Corp. (P&WC) PW305A and PW305B Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  8. A Comparison of Multivariable Control Design Techniques for a Turbofan Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Watts, Stephen R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper compares two previously published design procedures for two different multivariable control design techniques for application to a linear engine model of a jet engine. The two multivariable control design techniques compared were the Linear Quadratic Gaussian with Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR) and the H-Infinity synthesis. The two control design techniques were used with specific previously published design procedures to synthesize controls which would provide equivalent closed loop frequency response for the primary control loops while assuring adequate loop decoupling. The resulting controllers were then reduced in order to minimize the programming and data storage requirements for a typical implementation. The reduced order linear controllers designed by each method were combined with the linear model of an advanced turbofan engine and the system performance was evaluated for the continuous linear system. Included in the performance analysis are the resulting frequency and transient responses as well as actuator usage and rate capability for each design method. The controls were also analyzed for robustness with respect to structured uncertainties in the unmodeled system dynamics. The two controls were then compared for performance capability and hardware implementation issues.

  9. Full-Scale Turbofan Engine Noise-Source Separation Using a Four-Signal Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Arechiga, Rene O.

    2016-01-01

    Contributions from the combustor to the overall propulsion noise of civilian transport aircraft are starting to become important due to turbofan design trends and expected advances in mitigation of other noise sources. During on-ground, static-engine acoustic tests, combustor noise is generally sub-dominant to other engine noise sources because of the absence of in-flight effects. Consequently, noise-source separation techniques are needed to extract combustor-noise information from the total noise signature in order to further progress. A novel four-signal source-separation method is applied to data from a static, full-scale engine test and compared to previous methods. The new method is, in a sense, a combination of two- and three-signal techniques and represents an attempt to alleviate some of the weaknesses of each of those approaches. This work is supported by the NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, Aircraft Noise Reduction Subproject and the NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program.

  10. High-response measurements of a turbofan engine during nonrecoverable stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D.

    1981-01-01

    High response measurements of a Pratt and Whitney F100(3) turbofan engine at a simulated Mach number and altitude of 1.2 and 3000 m (10,000 ft) respectively were recorded during a nonrecoverable stall. The nonrecoverable stall occurred as a result of incorrect scheduling of the high compressor variable vanes (RCVV) during an experimental engine control investigation. Recorded data indicates rotating stall originating in the high pressure compressor. From this region the disturbance propagates upstream into the fan and downstream throughout the core compressor. The rotating stall remained in the core compressor until the engine was shutdown. The fan exhibited some rotating stall, but the amplitude of the pressure oscillations were less severe. Data indicates that the fan was able to recover from the stall. Fan turbine inlet temperature (FTIT) had been decreasing until stall developed in the high-pressure compressor. From this time, FTIT increased towards its maximum temperature limit. The rising FTIT during nonrecoverable stall may be the result of incomplete combustion in the combustor and additional combustion occurring through the turbine.

  11. Estimation of Signal Coherence Threshold and Concealed Spectral Lines Applied to Detection of Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2010-01-01

    Combustion noise from turbofan engines has become important, as the noise from sources like the fan and jet are reduced. An aligned and un-aligned coherence technique has been developed to determine a threshold level for the coherence and thereby help to separate the coherent combustion noise source from other noise sources measured with far-field microphones. This method is compared with a statistics based coherence threshold estimation method. In addition, the un-aligned coherence procedure at the same time also reveals periodicities, spectral lines, and undamped sinusoids hidden by broadband turbofan engine noise. In calculating the coherence threshold using a statistical method, one may use either the number of independent records or a larger number corresponding to the number of overlapped records used to create the average. Using data from a turbofan engine and a simulation this paper shows that applying the Fisher z-transform to the un-aligned coherence can aid in making the proper selection of samples and produce a reasonable statistics based coherence threshold. Examples are presented showing that the underlying tonal and coherent broad band structure which is buried under random broadband noise and jet noise can be determined. The method also shows the possible presence of indirect combustion noise. Copyright 2011 Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

  12. Estimation of signal coherence threshold and concealed spectral lines applied to detection of turbofan engine combustion noise.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-05-01

    Combustion noise from turbofan engines has become important, as the noise from sources like the fan and jet are reduced. An aligned and un-aligned coherence technique has been developed to determine a threshold level for the coherence and thereby help to separate the coherent combustion noise source from other noise sources measured with far-field microphones. This method is compared with a statistics based coherence threshold estimation method. In addition, the un-aligned coherence procedure at the same time also reveals periodicities, spectral lines, and undamped sinusoids hidden by broadband turbofan engine noise. In calculating the coherence threshold using a statistical method, one may use either the number of independent records or a larger number corresponding to the number of overlapped records used to create the average. Using data from a turbofan engine and a simulation this paper shows that applying the Fisher z-transform to the un-aligned coherence can aid in making the proper selection of samples and produce a reasonable statistics based coherence threshold. Examples are presented showing that the underlying tonal and coherent broad band structure which is buried under random broadband noise and jet noise can be determined. The method also shows the possible presence of indirect combustion noise.

  13. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 3: Noise measurement addendum. [CF6-50 high bypass turbofan engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, V. L.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic characteristics of the double annular combustor in a CF6-50 high bypass turbofan engine were investigated. Internal fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the combustor region and in the core exhaust. The transmission loss across the turbine and nozzle was determined from the measurements and compared to previous component results and present theory. The primary noise source location in the combustor was investigated. Spectral comparisons of test rig results were made with the engine results. The measured overall power level was compared with component and engine correlating parameters.

  14. Time Delay Analysis of Turbofan Engine Direct and Indirect Combustion Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2008-01-01

    The core noise components of a dual spool turbofan engine were separated by the use of a coherence function. A source location technique based on adjusting the time delay between the combustor pressure sensor signal and the far-field microphone signal to maximize the coherence and remove as much variation of the phase angle with frequency as possible was used. The discovery was made that for the 130o microphone a 90.027 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 0 to 200 Hz while a 86.975 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 200 to 400 Hz. Hence, the 0 to 200 Hz band signal took more time than the 200 to 400 Hz band signal to travel the same distance. This suggests the 0 to 200 Hz coherent cross spectral density band is partly due to indirect combustion noise attributed to entropy fluctuations, which travel at the flow velocity, interacting with the turbine. The signal in the 200 to 400 Hz frequency band is attributed mostly to direct combustion noise. Results are presented herein for engine power settings of 48, 54, and 60 percent of the maximum power setting

  15. Measurements and predictions of flyover and static noise of a TF30 afterburning turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Lasagna, P. L.; Oas, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    The noise of the TF30 afterburning turbofan engine in an F-111 airplane was determined from static (ground) and flyover tests. A survey was made to measure the exhaust temperature and velocity profiles for a range of power settings. Comparisons were made between predicted and measured jet mixing, internal, and shock noise. It was found that the noise produced at static conditions was dominated by jet mixing noise, and was adequately predicted by current methods. The noise produced during flyovers exhibited large contributions from internally generated noise in the forward arc. For flyovers with the engine at nonafterburning power, the internal noise, shock noise, and jet mixing noise were accurately predicted. During flyovers with afterburning power settings, however, additional internal noise believed to be due to the afterburning process was evident; its level was as much as 8 decibels above the nonafterburning internal noise. Power settings that produced exhausts with inverted velocity profiles appeared to be slightly less noisy than power settings of equal thrust that produced uniform exhaust velocity profiles both in flight and in static testing.

  16. 3D Multistage Simulation of Each Component of the GE90 Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark; Topp, Dave; Veres, Joe

    1999-01-01

    A 3D multistage simulation of each component of the GE90 Turbofan engine has been made. This includes 49 blade rows. A coupled simulation of all blade rows will be made very soon. The simulation is running using two levels of parallelism. The first level is on a blade row basis with information shared using files. The second level is using a grid domain decomposition with information shared using MPI. Timings will be shown for running on the SP2, an SGI Origin and a distributed system of HP workstations. On the HP workstations, the CHIMP version of MPI is used, with queuing supplied by LSF (Load Sharing Facility). A script-based control system is used to ensure reliability. An MPEG movie illustrating the flow simulation of the engine has been created using PV3, a parallel visualization library created by Bob Haimes of MIT. PVM is used to create a virtual machine from 10 HP workstations and display on an SGI workstation. A representative component simulation will be compared to rig data to demonstrate its usefulness in turbomachinery design and analysis.

  17. A Novel Approach for Reducing Rotor Tip-Clearance Induced Noise in Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2001-01-01

    Rotor tip-clearance induced noise, both in the form of rotor self noise and rotor-stator interaction noise , constitutes a significant component of total fan noise. Innovative yet cost effective techniques to suppress rotor-generated noise are, therefore, of foremost importance for improving the noise signature of turbofan engines. To that end, the feasibility of a passive porous treatment strategy to positively modify the tip-clearance flow field is addressed. The present study is focused on accurate viscous flow calculations of the baseline and the treated rotor flow fields. Detailed comparison between the computed baseline solution and experimental measurements shows excellent agreement. Tip-vortex structure, trajectory, strength, and other relevant aerodynamic quantities are extracted from the computed database. Extensive comparison between the untreated and treated tip-clearance flow fields is performed. The effectiveness of the porous treatment for altering the rotor-tip vortex flow field in general and reducing the intensity of the tip vortex, in particular, is demonstrated. In addition, the simulated flow field for the treated tip clearly shows that substantial reduction in the intensity of both the shear layer roll-up and boundary layer separation on the wall is achieved.

  18. Application of the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy for Turbofan Engine Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowers, T. Shane; Kopasakis, George; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    The data acquired from available system sensors forms the foundation upon which any health management system is based, and the available sensor suite directly impacts the overall diagnostic performance that can be achieved. While additional sensors may provide improved fault diagnostic performance there are other factors that also need to be considered such as instrumentation cost, weight, and reliability. A systematic sensor selection approach is desired to perform sensor selection from a holistic system-level perspective as opposed to performing decisions in an ad hoc or heuristic fashion. The Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy is a methodology that optimally selects a sensor suite from a pool of sensors based on the system fault diagnostic approach, with the ability of taking cost, weight and reliability into consideration. This procedure was applied to a large commercial turbofan engine simulation. In this initial study, sensor suites tailored for improved diagnostic performance are constructed from a prescribed collection of candidate sensors. The diagnostic performance of the best performing sensor suites in terms of fault detection and identification are demonstrated, with a discussion of the results and implications for future research.

  19. Core Noise Diagnostics of Turbofan Engine Noise Using Correlation and Coherence Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Cross-correlation and coherence functions are used to look for periodic acoustic components in turbofan engine combustor time histories, to investigate direct and indirect combustion noise source separation based on signal propagation time delays, and to provide information on combustor acoustics. Using the cross-correlation function, time delays were identified in all cases, clearly indicating the combustor is the source of the noise. In addition, unfiltered and low-pass filtered at 400 Hz signals had a cross-correlation time delay near 90 ms, while the low-pass filtered at less than 400 Hz signals had a cross-correlation time delay longer than 90 ms. Low-pass filtering at frequencies less than 400 Hz partially removes the direct combustion noise signals. The remainder includes the indirect combustion noise signal, which travels more slowly because of the dependence on the entropy convection velocity in the combustor. Source separation of direct and indirect combustion noise is demonstrated by proper use of low-pass filters with the cross-correlation function for a range of operating conditions. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting direct and indirect combustion noise.

  20. Spatial correlation in the ambient core noise field of a turbofan engine.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic transfer function relating combustion noise and turbine exit noise in the presence of enclosed ambient core noise is investigated using a dynamic system model and an acoustic system model for the particular turbofan engine studied and for a range of operating conditions. Measurements of cross-spectra magnitude and phase between the combustor and turbine exit and auto-spectra at the turbine exit and combustor are used to show the presence of indirect and direct combustion noise over the frequency range of 0-400 Hz. The procedure used evaluates the ratio of direct to indirect combustion noise. The procedure used also evaluates the post-combustion residence time in the combustor which is a factor in the formation of thermal NO(x) and soot in this region. These measurements are masked by the ambient core noise sound field in this frequency range which is observable since the transducers are situated within an acoustic wavelength of one another. An ambient core noise field model based on one and two dimensional spatial correlation functions is used to replicate the spatially correlated response of the pair of transducers. The spatial correlation function increases measured attenuation due to destructive interference and masks the true attenuation of the turbine.

  1. Spatial Correlation in the Ambient Core Noise Field of a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic transfer function relating combustion noise and turbine exit noise in the presence of enclosed ambient core noise is investigated using a dynamic system model and an acoustic system model for the particular turbofan engine studied and for a range of operating conditions. Measurements of cross-spectra magnitude and phase between the combustor and turbine exit and auto-spectra at the turbine exit and combustor are used to show the presence of indirect and direct combustion noise over the frequency range of 0 400 Hz. The procedure used evaluates the ratio of direct to indirect combustion noise. The procedure used also evaluates the post-combustion residence time in the combustor which is a factor in the formation of thermal NOx and soot in this region. These measurements are masked by the ambient core noise sound field in this frequency range which is observable since the transducers are situated within an acoustic wavelength of one another. An ambient core noise field model based on one and two dimensional spatial correlation functions is used to replicate the spatially correlated response of the pair of transducers. The spatial correlation function increases measured attenuation due to destructive interference and masks the true attenuation of the turbine.

  2. Application of the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy for Turbofan Engine Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowers, T. Shane; Kopasakis, George; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    The data acquired from available system sensors forms the foundation upon which any health management system is based, and the available sensor suite directly impacts the overall diagnostic performance that can be achieved. While additional sensors may provide improved fault diagnostic performance, there are other factors that also need to be considered such as instrumentation cost, weight, and reliability. A systematic sensor selection approach is desired to perform sensor selection from a holistic system-level perspective as opposed to performing decisions in an ad hoc or heuristic fashion. The Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy is a methodology that optimally selects a sensor suite from a pool of sensors based on the system fault diagnostic approach, with the ability of taking cost, weight, and reliability into consideration. This procedure was applied to a large commercial turbofan engine simulation. In this initial study, sensor suites tailored for improved diagnostic performance are constructed from a prescribed collection of candidate sensors. The diagnostic performance of the best performing sensor suites in terms of fault detection and identification are demonstrated, with a discussion of the results and implications for future research.

  3. Acoustic theory of axisymmetric multisectioned ducts. [reduction of turbofan engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Equations are developed for the acoustic field in a duct system which is made up of a number of connected circular and annular ducts. These equations are suitable for finding the acoustic field inside of and radiated from an aircraft turbofan engine. Acoustic modes are used as generalized coordinates in order to develop a set of matrix equations for the acoustic field. Equations for these modes are given for circular and annular ducts with uniform flow. Modal source equations are derived for point acoustic sources. General equations for mode transmission and reflection are developed and detailed equations are derived for ducts with multiple sections of acoustic treatment and for ducts with circumferential splitter rings. The general theory is applied to the special case of a uniform area circular duct with multisection liners and it is shown that the mode reflection effects are proportional to differences of the acoustic admittances of adjacent liners. A numerical example is given which shows that multisection liners may provide greater noise suppression than uniform liners.

  4. Attenuation of FJ44 Turbofan Engine Noise with a Foam-Metal Liner Installed Over-the-Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Elliott, Dave M.; Jones, Michael G.; Hartley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was used as a demonstrator for a Foam-Metal Liner (FML) installed in close proximity to the fan. Two FML designs were tested and compared to the hardwall baseline. Traditional single degree-of-freedom liner designs were also evaluated to provide a comparison. Farfield acoustic levels and limited engine performance results are presented in this paper. The results show that the FML achieved up to 5 dB Acoustic Power Level (PWL) overall attenuation in the forward quadrant, equivalent to the traditional liner design. An earlier report presented the test set-up and conditions.

  5. Robust fault detection of turbofan engines subject to adaptive controllers via a Total Measurable Fault Information Residual (ToMFIR) technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chowdhury, Fahmida N; Djuric, Ana; Yeh, Chih-Ping

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides a new design of robust fault detection for turbofan engines with adaptive controllers. The critical issue is that the adaptive controllers can depress the faulty effects such that the actual system outputs remain the pre-specified values, making it difficult to detect faults/failures. To solve this problem, a Total Measurable Fault Information Residual (ToMFIR) technique with the aid of system transformation is adopted to detect faults in turbofan engines with adaptive controllers. This design is a ToMFIR-redundancy-based robust fault detection. The ToMFIR is first introduced and existing results are also summarized. The Detailed design process of the ToMFIRs is presented and a turbofan engine model is simulated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed ToMFIR-based fault-detection strategy.

  6. Tests and analysis of a vented D thrust deflecting nozzle on a turbofan engine. [conducted at the outdoor aerodynamic research facility of the Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseberg, E. W.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives were to: obtain nozzle performance characteristics in and out of ground effects; demonstrate the compatibility of the nozzle with a turbofan engine; obtain pressure and temperature distributions on the surface of the D vented nozzle; and establish a correlation of the nozzle performance between small scale and large scale models. The test nozzle was a boilerplate model of the MCAIR D vented nozzle configured for operation with a General Electric YTF-34-F5 turbofan engine. The nozzle was configured to provide: a thrust vectoring range of 0 to 115 deg; a yaw vectoring range of 0 to 10 deg; variable nozzle area control; and variable spacing between the core exit and nozzle entrance station. Compatibility between the YTF-34-T5 turbofan engine and the D vented nozzle was demonstrated. Velocity coefficients of 0.96 and greater were obtained for 90 deg of thrust vectoring. The nozzle walls remained cool during all test conditions.

  7. Design and evaluation of a sensor fail-operational control system for a digitally controlled turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrach, F. J.; Arpasi, D. J.; Bruton, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    A self-learning, sensor fail-operational, control system for the TF30-P-3 afterburning turbofan engine was designed and evaluated. The sensor fail-operational control system includes a digital computer program designed to operate in conjunction with the standard TF30-P-3 bill-of-materials control. Four engine measurements and two compressor face measurements are tested. If any engine measurements are found to have failed, they are replaced by values synthesized from computer-stored information. The control system was evaluated by using a realtime, nonlinear, hybrid computer engine simulation at sea level static condition, at a typical cruise condition, and at several extreme flight conditions. Results indicate that the addition of such a system can improve the reliability of an engine digital control system.

  8. Investigation of performance deterioration of the CF6/JT9D, high-bypass ratio turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemianski, J. A.; Mehalic, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The aircraft energy efficiency program within NASA is developing technology required to improve the fuel efficiency of commercial subsonic transport aricraft. One segment of this program includes engine diagnostics which is directed toward determining the sources and causes of performance deterioration in the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT9D and General Electric CF6 high-bypass ratio turbofan engines and developing technology for minimizing the performance losses. Results of engine performance deterioration investigations based on historical data, special engine tests, and specific tests to define the influence of flight loads and component clearances on performance are presented. The results of analysis of several damage mechanisms that contribute to performance deterioration such as blade tip rubs, airfoil surface roughness and erosion, and thermal distortion are also included. The significance of these damage mechanisms on component and overall engine performance is discussed.

  9. 76 FR 64293 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S. A. Model CFM56-5B Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ...) This AD applies to CFM International, S.A. CFM56-5B1/3, CFM56-5B2/3, CFM56-5B3/3, CFM56-5B4/3, CFM56-5B5/3, CFM56-5B6/3, CFM56-5B7/3, CFM56-5B8/3, CFM56-5B9/3, CFM56-5B3/3B1, and CFM56-5B4/ 3B1 engines..., S. A. Model CFM56-5B Series Turbofan......

  10. Potential disturbance interactions with a single IGV in an F109 turbofan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Joel F.

    A common cause of aircraft engine failure is the high cycle fatigue of engine blades and stators. One of the primary causes of these failures is due to blade row interactions, which cause an aerodynamic excitation to be resonant with a mechanical natural frequency. Traditionally, the primary source of such aerodynamic excitations has been practically limited to viscous wakes from upstream components. However, more advanced designs require that blade rows be very highly loaded and closely spaced. This results in aerodynamic excitation from potential fields of down stream engine components, in addition to the known wake excitations. An experimental investigation of the potential field from the fan of a Honeywell F109 turbofan engine has been completed. The investigation included velocity measurements upstream of the fan, addition of an airfoil shaped probe upstream of the fan on which surface pressure measurements were acquired, and measurement of the velocity in the interaction region between the probe and the fan. This investigation sought to characterize the response on the upstream probe due to the fan potential field and the interaction between a viscous wake and the potential field; as such, all test conditions were for subsonic fan speeds. The results from the collected data show that fan-induced potential disturbances propagate upstream at acoustic velocities, to produce vane surface-pressure amplitudes as high as 40 percent Joel F. Kirk of the inlet, mean total pressure. Further, these fan-induced pressure amplitudes display large variations between the two vane surfaces. An argument is made that the structure of the pressure response is consistent with the presence of two distinct sources of unsteady forcing disturbances. The disturbances on the incoming-rotation-facing surface of the IGV propagated upstream at a different speed than those on the outgoing-rotation-facing surface, indicating that one originated from a rotating source and the other from a

  11. Preliminary Study of the Fuel Saving Potential of Regenerative Turbofans for Commercial Subsonic Transports. [engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    The fuel savings potential of regenerative turbofans was calculated and compared with that of a reference turbofan. At the design altitude of 10.67 km and Mach 0.80, the turbine-inlet-temperature of the regenerative turbofan was fixed at 1700 K while the overall pressure ratio was varied from 10 to 20. The fan pressure ratio was fixed at 1.6 and the bypass ratio varied from 8 to 10. The heat exchanger design parameters such as pressure drop and effectiveness varied from 4 to 8 percent and from 0.80 to 0.90, respectively. Results indicate a fuel savings due to regeneration of 4.1 percent and no change in takeoff gross weight.

  12. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over-The-Wing (OTW) propulsion system test report. Volume 2: Aerodynamics and performance. [engine performance tests to define propulsion system performance on turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and testing of the over the wing engine, a high bypass, geared turbofan engine, are discussed. The propulsion system performance is examined for uninstalled performance and installed performance. The fan aerodynamic performance and the D nozzle and reverser thrust performance are evaluated.

  13. Acoustic Database for Turbofan Engine Core-Noise Sources. I; Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Grant

    2015-01-01

    In this program, a database of dynamic temperature and dynamic pressure measurements were acquired inside the core of a TECH977 turbofan engine to support investigations of indirect combustion noise. Dynamic temperature and pressure measurements were recorded for engine gas dynamics up to temperatures of 3100 degrees Fahrenheit and transient responses as high as 1000 hertz. These measurements were made at the entrance of the high pressure turbine (HPT) and at the entrance and exit of the low pressure turbine (LPT). Measurements were made at two circumferential clocking positions. In the combustor and inter-turbine duct (ITD), measurements were made at two axial locations to enable the exploration of time delays. The dynamic temperature measurements were made using dual thin-wire thermocouple probes. The dynamic pressure measurements were made using semi-infinite probes. Prior to the engine test, a series of bench, oven, and combustor rig tests were conducted to characterize the performance of the dual wire temperature probes and to define and characterize the data acquisition systems. A measurement solution for acquiring dynamic temperature and pressure data on the engine was defined. A suite of hardware modifications were designed to incorporate the dynamic temperature and pressure instrumentation into the TECH977 engine. In particular, a probe actuation system was developed to protect the delicate temperature probes during engine startup and transients in order to maximize sensor life. A set of temperature probes was procured and the TECH977 engine was assembled with the suite of new and modified hardware. The engine was tested at four steady state operating speeds, with repeats. Dynamic pressure and temperature data were acquired at each condition for at least one minute. At the two highest power settings, temperature data could not be obtained at the forward probe locations since the mean temperatures exceeded the capability of the probes. The temperature data

  14. 78 FR 2195 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ...; AD 2012-26-14] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan.... SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG... Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde- Mahlow, Germany; telephone: 49 0...

  15. An experimental investigation of potential-disturbance aerodynamic forcing in the F109 turbofan engine compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Eric Andrew

    Aerodynamic forcing experiments were performed within the single-stage axial compressor of an AlliedSignal F109 turbofan engine. Unsteady velocity was measured both forward and aft of the F109 fan at several locations, with unsteady surface pressure also measured along sixteen, transducer-instrumented stator vanes. Three fan RPM were considered, with time-resolution of the unsteady data obtained through a photoelectric sensor coupled to the fan rotation. The velocity data collected forward of the fan exhibited evidence of upstream-propagating disturbances in the engine inlet flow, where these disturbances were potential in nature, emanating from the fan, and traveling acoustically in a helical pattern. The disturbance peak-to-peak unsteady amplitudes, in the swirl direction, reached nearly 50% of the mean-axial velocity at the fan face, dropping to 2--5% at one blade chord upstream. Such large velocity fluctuations may be important in terms of component high-cycle-fatigue, particularly in closely spaced, axial compressor stages. Aft of the fan, the average unsteady velocity waveforms measured across five azimuthal locations demonstrated characteristics indicative of a strong vortical and potential disturbance interaction, where the interacting disturbances had the same forcing frequency, but different amplitudes and propagation speeds. Further reduction of the fan-aft velocity data also produced evidence of upstream-propagating disturbances. These disturbances were found to be potential in nature and emanating from the F109 stator vanes; thus creating a cumulative, unsteady aerodynamic field upstream of the stators comprised of multiple interacting disturbances. The amplitudes of the stator-induced disturbances were on the order of 20--40% of the measured, downstream-propagating vortical wake amplitudes. Finally, results from stator-vane surface-pressure measurements compared favorably in both magnitude and phase to similar results collected in previous cascade

  16. Effect on fuel efficiency of parameter variations in the cost function for multivariable control of a turbofan engine. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, B.L.

    1981-09-01

    In modern turbofan engines, variable geometry has been incorporated to improve some off-design performance. Most control designs ignore this variable geometry and use fuel metering as the primary control input. This thesis investigates the use of variable geometry to control the engine and, thereby, reduce fuel consumption due to transients. Additionally, steady-state trim conditions are altered to reduce the static fuel consumption. The non-linear transient simualtion program is used to analyze the steady-state operating condition and develop small perturbation control limitations. Linear models, both large and reduced order, are used in analyzing the effect of controllers on system response. A computer program was generated to reduce a large order linear model to a usable size for control system development. This analysis shows the reduced-order regime dependent controllers to be viable and to favorably enhance the quest for reducing specific fuel consumption in existing engines.

  17. Noise predictions of a high bypass turbofan engine using the Lockheed Near-Field Noise Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawls, J. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The prediction of engine noise during cruise using the Near-Field Noise Prediction Program developed by Lockheed is examined. Test conditions were established which simulate the operation of a high bypass turbofan engine under a wide range of operating conditions. These test conditions include variations in altitude, flight Mach number and thrust setting. Based on the results of noise prediction made using the Lockheed program, an evaluation of the impact of these test conditions on the overall sound pressure level(OASPL)and the one-third octave band spectra is made. An evaluation of the sensitivity of flight condition parameters is also made. The primary noise source from a high bypass turbofan was determined to be fan broadband shock noise. This noise source can be expected to be present during normal cruising conditions. When present, fan broadband shock noise usually dominates at all frequencies and all directivity angles. Other noise sources of importance are broadband shock noise from the primary jet, fan noise, fan mixing noise and turbine noise.

  18. 75 FR 52435 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) PW530A, PW545A, and PW545B Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Canada (P&WC) PW530A, PW545A, and PW545B Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...: Discussion Transport Canada, which is the aviation authority for Canada, has issued Canada Airworthiness... This AD This product has been approved by the aviation authority of Canada, and is approved...

  19. Aerothermodynamic cycle analysis of a dual-spool, separate-exhaust turbofan engine with an interstage turbine burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Ka Heng

    This study focuses on a specific engine, i.e., a dual-spool, separate-flow turbofan engine with an Interstage Turbine Burner (ITB). This conventional turbofan engine has been modified to include a secondary isobaric burner, i.e., ITB, in a transition duct between the high-pressure turbine and the low-pressure turbine. The preliminary design phase for this modified engine starts with the aerothermodynamics cycle analysis is consisting of parametric (i.e., on-design) and performance ( i.e., off-design) cycle analyses. In parametric analysis, the modified engine performance parameters are evaluated and compared with baseline engine in terms of design limitation (maximum turbine inlet temperature), flight conditions (such as flight Mach condition, ambient temperature and pressure), and design choices (such as compressor pressure ratio, fan pressure ratio, fan bypass ratio etc.). A turbine cooling model is also included to account for the effect of cooling air on engine performance. The results from the on-design analysis confirmed the advantage of using ITB, i.e., higher specific thrust with small increases in thrust specific fuel consumption, less cooling air, and less NOx production, provided that the main burner exit temperature and ITB exit temperature are properly specified. It is also important to identify the critical ITB temperature, beyond which the ITB is turned off and has no advantage at all. With the encouraging results from parametric cycle analysis, a detailed performance cycle analysis of the identical engine is also conducted for steady-state engine performance prediction. The results from off-design cycle analysis show that the ITB engine at full throttle setting has enhanced performance over baseline engine. Furthermore, ITB engine operating at partial throttle settings will exhibit higher thrust at lower specific fuel consumption and improved thermal efficiency over the baseline engine. A mission analysis is also presented to predict the fuel

  20. Applications of finite element and wave envelope element approximations to turbofan engine noise radiation including flight effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrett, A. V.; Eversman, W.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation from turbofan engine inlets in flow has not lent itself fully to analysis by numerical means because of the large domains and high frequencies involved. The current work has extended the use of finite elements and wave envelope elements, elements which simulate decay and wavelike behaviour in their interpolation functions, from the no-flow case in which they have been proven, to cases incorporating mean flow. By employing an irrotational mean flow assumption, the acoustics problem has been posed in an axisymmetric formulation in terms of acoustic velocity potential, thus minimizing computer solution storage requirements. The results obtained from the numerical procedures agree well with known analytical solutions, static experimental jet engines inflow data, and also with flight test results.

  1. An analytical study on the performance of the organic Rankine cycle for turbofan engine exhaust heat recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadon, S.; Abu Talib, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    Due to energy shortage and global warming, issues of energy saving have become more important. To increase the energy efficiency and reduce the fuel consumption, waste heat recovery is a significant method for energy saving. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) has great potential to recover the waste heat from the core jet exhaust of a turbofan engine and use it to produce power. Preliminary study of the design concept and thermodynamic performance of this ORC system would assist researchers to predict the benefits of using the ORC system to extract the exhaust heat engine. In addition, a mathematical model of the heat transfer of this ORC system is studied and developed. The results show that with the increment of exhaust heat temperature, the mass flow rate of the working fluid, net power output and the system thermal efficiency will also increase. Consequently, total consumption of jet fuel could be significantly saved as well.

  2. Parametric (On-Design) Cycle Analysis for a Separate-Exhaust Turbofan Engine With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Siow, Y. K.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    Today s modern aircraft is based on air-breathing jet propulsion systems, which use moving fluids as substances to transform energy carried by the fluids into power. Throughout aero-vehicle evolution, improvements have been made to the engine efficiency and pollutants reduction. The major advantages associated with the addition of ITB are an increase in thermal efficiency and reduction in NOx emission. Lower temperature peak in the main combustor results in lower thermal NOx emission and lower amount of cooling air required. This study focuses on a parametric (on-design) cycle analysis of a dual-spool, separate-flow turbofan engine with an Interstage Turbine Burner (ITB). The ITB considered in this paper is a relatively new concept in modern jet engine propulsion. The ITB serves as a secondary combustor and is located between the high- and the low-pressure turbine, i.e., the transition duct. The objective of this study is to use design parameters, such as flight Mach number, compressor pressure ratio, fan pressure ratio, fan bypass ratio, and high-pressure turbine inlet temperature to obtain engine performance parameters, such as specific thrust and thrust specific fuel consumption. Results of this study can provide guidance in identifying the performance characteristics of various engine components, which can then be used to develop, analyze, integrate, and optimize the system performance of turbofan engines with an ITB. Visual Basic program, Microsoft Excel macrocode, and Microsoft Excel neuron code are used to facilitate Microsoft Excel software to plot engine performance versus engine design parameters. This program computes and plots the data sequentially without forcing users to open other types of plotting programs. A user s manual on how to use the program is also included in this report. Furthermore, this stand-alone program is written in conjunction with an off-design program which is an extension of this study. The computed result of a selected design

  3. Conceptual study of an advanced supersonic technology transport (AST-107) for transpacific range using low-bypass-ratio turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, S. J., Jr.; Foss, W. E., Jr.; Neubauer, M. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced supersonic technology configuration concept designated the AST-107, using a low bypass ratio turbofan engine, is described and analyzed. The aircraft had provisions for 273 passengers arranged five abreast. The cruise Mach number was 2.62. The mission range for the AST-107 was 8.48 Mm (4576 n.mi.) and an average lift drag ratio of 9.15 during cruise was achieved. The available lateral control was not sufficient for the required 15.4 m/s (30 kt) crosswind landing condition, and a crosswind landing gear or a significant reduction in dihedral effect would be necessary to meet this requirement. The lowest computed noise levels, including a mechanical suppressor noise reduction of 3 EPNdB at the flyover and sideline monitoring stations, were 110.3 EPNdB (sideline noise), 113.1 EPNdB (centerline noise) and 110.5 EPNdB (approach noise).

  4. A brief study of the effects of turbofan-engine bypass ratio on short and long haul cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, A. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A brief study of the effects of turbofan-engine bypass ratio on Breguet cruise range and take-off distance for subsonic cruise aircraft showed significant differences between short- and long-haul aircraft designs. Large thrust lapse rates at high bypass ratios caused severe reductions in cruise range for short-haul aircraft because of increases in propulsion system weight. Long-haul aircraft, with a higher fuel fraction (ratio of propulsion weight plus total fuel weight to gross take-off weight), are less sensitive to propulsion-system weight and, accordingly, were not significantly affected by bypass-ratio variations. Both types of aircraft have shorter take-off distances at higher bypass ratios because of higher take-off thrust-weight ratios.

  5. Advanced Engine Cycles Analyzed for Turbofans With Variable-Area Fan Nozzles Actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced, large commercial turbofan engines using low-fan-pressure-ratio, very high bypass ratio thermodynamic cycles can offer significant fuel savings over engines currently in operation. Several technological challenges must be addressed, however, before these engines can be designed. To name a few, the high-diameter fans associated with these engines pose a significant packaging and aircraft installation challenge, and a large, heavy gearbox is often necessary to address the differences in ideal operating speeds between the fan and the low-pressure turbine. Also, the large nacelles contribute aerodynamic drag penalties and require long, heavy landing gear when mounted on conventional, low wing aircraft. Nevertheless, the reduced fuel consumption rates of these engines are a compelling economic incentive, and fans designed with low pressure ratios and low tip speeds offer attractive noise-reduction benefits. Another complication associated with low-pressure-ratio fans is their need for variable flow-path geometry. As the design fan pressure ratio is reduced below about 1.4, an operational disparity is set up in the fan between high and low flight speeds. In other words, between takeoff and cruise there is too large a swing in several key fan parameters-- such as speed, flow, and pressure--for a fan to accommodate. One solution to this problem is to make use of a variable-area fan nozzle (VAFN). However, conventional, hydraulically actuated variable nozzles have weight, cost, maintenance, and reliability issues that discourage their use with low-fan-pressure-ratio engine cycles. United Technologies Research, in cooperation with NASA, is developing a revolutionary, lightweight, and reliable shape memory alloy actuator system that can change the on-demand nozzle exit area by up to 20 percent. This "smart material" actuation technology, being studied under NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program and Revolutionary Concepts in Aeronautics (Rev

  6. Identification and measurement of combustion noise from a turbofan engine using correlation and coherence techniques. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure measurements within the combustor and tailpipe of a turbofan engine are made simultaneously with far field acoustic measurements. The pressure measurements within the engine are accomplished with cooled semi-infinite waveguide probes utilizing conventional condenser microphones as the transducers. The measurements are taken over a broad range of engine operating conditions and for 16 far field microphone positions between 10 deg and 160 deg relative to the engine inlet axis. Correlation and coherence techniques are used to determine the relative phase and amplitude relationships between the internal pressures and far field acoustic pressures. The results indicate that the combustor is a low frequency source region for acoustic propagation through the tailpipe and out to the far field. Specifically, it is found that the relation between source pressure and the resulting sound pressure involves a 180 deg phase shift. The latter result is obtained by Fourier transforming the cross correlation function between the source pressure and acoustic pressure after removing the propagation delay time. Further, it is found that the transfer function between the source pressure and acoustic pressure has a magnitude approximately proportional to frequency squared. These results are shown to be consistent with a model using a modified source term in Lighthill's turbulence stress tensor, wherein the fluctuating Reynolds stresses are replaced with the pressure fluctuations due to fluctuating entropy.

  7. Modeling of Highly Instrumented Honeywell Turbofan Engine Tested with Ice Crystal Ingestion in the NASA Propulsion System Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Jones, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL), an altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center, has been used to test a highly instrumented turbine engine at simulated altitude operating conditions. This is a continuation of the PSL testing that successfully duplicated the icing events that were experienced in a previous engine (serial LF01) during flight through ice crystal clouds, which was the first turbofan engine tested in PSL. This second model of the ALF502R-5A serial number LF11 is a highly instrumented version of the previous engine. The PSL facility provides a continuous cloud of ice crystals with controlled characteristics of size and concentration, which are ingested by the engine during operation at simulated altitudes. Several of the previous operating points tested in the LF01 engine were duplicated to confirm repeatability in LF11. The instrumentation included video cameras to visually illustrate the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor (LPC) exit guide vane region in order to confirm the ice accretion, which was suspected during the testing of the LF01. Traditional instrumentation included static pressure taps in the low pressure compressor inner and outer flow path walls, as well as total pressure and temperature rakes in the low pressure compressor region. The test data was utilized to determine the losses and blockages due to accretion in the exit guide vane region of the LPC. Multiple data points were analyzed with the Honeywell Customer Deck. A full engine roll back point was modeled with the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code. The mean line compressor flow analysis code with ice crystal modeling was utilized to estimate the parameters that indicate the risk of accretion, as well as to estimate the degree of blockage and losses caused by accretion during a full engine roll back point. The analysis provided additional validation of the icing risk parameters within the LPC, as well as the creation of models for

  8. Airflow calibration and exhaust pressure/temperature survey of an F404, S/N 215-109, turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Maureen E.; Kirchgessner, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    A General Electric F-404 turbofan engine was calibrated for thrust and airflow at the NASA Lewis Propulsion System Laboratory in support of future flight tests of the X-29 aircraft. Tests were conducted with and without augmentation, over a range of flight conditions, including the two design points of the airplane. Data obtained during the altitude tests will be used to correct two independent gross thrust calculation routines which will be installed and operated on the airplane to determine in-flight gross thrust. Corrected airflow data as a function of corrected fan speed collapsed onto a single curve. Similarly, trends were observed and defined for both augmented and dry thrust. Overall agreement between measured data and F-404 Engine Spec Deck data was within 2 percent for airflow and 6 percent for thrust. The results of an uncertainty analysis for thrust and airflow is presented. In addition to the thrust calibration, the exhaust gas boundary layer pressure and temperatures were surveyed at selected condition and engine power levels to obtain data for another NASA F-404 program. Test data for these surveys are presented.

  9. Installation effects of wing-mounted turbofan nacelle-pylons on a 1/17-scale, twin-engine, low-wing transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Ingraldi, Anthony M.; Re, Richard J.; Kariya, Timmy T.

    1992-01-01

    A twin-engine, low-wing transport model, with a supercritical wing of aspect ratio 10.8 designed for a cruise Mach number of 0.77 and a lift coefficient of 0.55, was tested in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The purpose of this test was to compare the wing-nacelle interference effects of flow-through nacelles simulating superfan engines (very high bypass ratio (BPR is approx. = 18) turbofan engines) with the wing-nacelle interference effects of current-technology turbofans (BPR is approx. = 6). Forces and moments on the complete model were measured with a strain-gage balance, and extensive external static-pressure measurements (383 orifice locations) were made on the wing, nacelles, and pylons of the model. Data were taken at Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.80 and at model angles of attack from -4 deg to 8 deg. Test results indicate that flow-through nacelles with a very high bypass ratio can be installed on a low-wing transport model with a lower installation drag penalty than for a conventional turbofan nacelle at a design cruise Mach number of 0.77 and lift coefficient of 0.55.

  10. The Use of Probabilistic Methods to Evaluate the Systems Impact of Component Design Improvements on Large Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Michael H.

    2002-01-01

    Probabilistic Structural Analysis (PSA) is now commonly used for predicting the distribution of time/cycles to failure of turbine blades and other engine components. These distributions are typically based on fatigue/fracture and creep failure modes of these components. Additionally, reliability analysis is used for taking test data related to particular failure modes and calculating failure rate distributions of electronic and electromechanical components. How can these individual failure time distributions of structural, electronic and electromechanical component failure modes be effectively combined into a top level model for overall system evaluation of component upgrades, changes in maintenance intervals, or line replaceable unit (LRU) redesign? This paper shows an example of how various probabilistic failure predictions for turbine engine components can be evaluated and combined to show their effect on overall engine performance. A generic model of a turbofan engine was modeled using various Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) tools (Quantitative Risk Assessment Software (QRAS) etc.). Hypothetical PSA results for a number of structural components along with mitigation factors that would restrict the failure mode from propagating to a Loss of Mission (LOM) failure were used in the models. The output of this program includes an overall failure distribution for LOM of the system. The rank and contribution to the overall Mission Success (MS) is also given for each failure mode and each subsystem. This application methodology demonstrates the effectiveness of PRA for assessing the performance of large turbine engines. Additionally, the effects of system changes and upgrades, the application of different maintenance intervals, inclusion of new sensor detection of faults and other upgrades were evaluated in determining overall turbine engine reliability.

  11. Aircraft turbofan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; Rice, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Turbofan noise generation and suppression in aircraft engines are reviewed. The chain of physical processes which connect unsteady flow interactions with fan blades to far field noise is addressed. Mechanism identification and description, duct propagation, radiation and acoustic suppression are discussed. The experimental technique of fan inflow static tests are discussed. Rotor blade surface pressure and wake velocity measurements aid in the determination of the types and strengths of the generation mechanisms. Approaches to predicting or measuring acoustic mode content, optimizing treatment impedance to maximize attenuation, translating impedance into porous wall structure and interpreting far field directivity patterns are illustrated by comparisons of analytical and experimental results. The interdependence of source and acoustic treatment design to minimize far field noise is emphasized. Area requiring further research are discussed and the relevance of aircraft turbofan results to quieting other turbomachinery installations is addressed.

  12. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage "FOD" Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/ health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite-element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  13. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage (FOD) Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  14. The Potential Benefits of Advanced Casing Treatment for Noise Attenuation in Utra-High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David

    2007-01-01

    In order to increase stall margin in a high-bypass ratio turbofan engine, an advanced casing treatment was developed that extracted a small amount of flow from the casing behind the fan and injected it back in front of the fan. Several different configurations of this casing treatment were designed by varying the distance of the extraction and injection points, as well as varying the amount of flow. These casing treatments were tested on a 55.9 cm (22 in.) scale model of the Pratt & Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor in the NASA Glenn 9 by 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel. While all of the casing treatment configurations showed the expected increase in stall margin, a few of the designs showed a potential noise benefit for certain engine speeds. This paper will show the casing treatments and the results of the testing as well as propose further research in this area. With better prediction and design techniques, future casing treatment configurations could be developed that may result in an optimized casing treatment that could conceivably reduce the noise further.

  15. Exhaust emissions survey of a turbofan engine for flame holder swirl type augmentors at simulated altitude flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, total oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide from an F100 afterburning two spool turbofan engine at simulated flight conditions are reported. Tests were run at Mach 0.8 at altitudes of 10.97 and 13.71 km (36,000 and 45,000 ft), and at Mach 1.2 at 13.71 km (45,000 ft). Emission measurements were made from intermediate power (nonafterburning) through maximum afterburning, using a single point gas sample probe traversed across the horizontal diameter of the exhaust nozzle. The data show that emissions vary with flight speed, altitude, power level, and radial position across the nozzle. Carbon monoxide emissions were low for intermediate and partial afterburning power. Unburned hydrocarbons were near zero for most of the simulated flight conditions. At maximum afterburning, there were regions of NOx deficiency in regions of high CO. The results suggest that the low NOx levels observed in the tests are a result of interaction with high CO in the thermal converter. CO2 emissions were proportional to local fuel air ratio for all test conditions.

  16. Aircraft turbofans: new economic and environmental benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Sampl, F.R.; Shank, M.E.

    1985-09-01

    This article describes turbofan and turboprop engines. Advanced turbofans and turboprop engines, by continuing to reduce the velocities of the jet exhaust and fan tip speed, can provide significant noise reductions. New combustors incorporated into these engines have reduced smoke, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide to levels below the current requirements. The third generation of turbofans will continue to increase fuel efficiency and reduce aircraft operating costs. They are more modular in design and consist of half as many parts as the earlier engines, reducing maintenance time by half. Some of the key features of the new turbofan concept include: a very high bypass ratio/compression ratio cycle; swept fan blades; a thin, low-loss nacelle; low-loss reduction gearing; new materials; advanced compressor/turbine airfoils; and high-speed rotors with improved clearance control.

  17. 77 FR 16916 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW)Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... engine models. We agree. In addition to the JT9D-7R4G2 and -7R4H1 engines, the NPRM (76 FR 72348... chapter 05 of the PW engine manual. We do not agree. We removed the JT9D-7R4E1 and -7R4E1H engine models... 16, 2012. Peter A. White, Manager, Engine & Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification...

  18. Analysis of turbofan engine performance deterioration and proposed follow-on tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.; Kruckenberg, H. D.; Toomey, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    Data and engine parts on in-service JT3D and JT8D engines were analyzed and documented relative to engine deterioration. It is concluded that the fan-compressor system of these engines contributes to the long term engine deterioration. An engine test and instrumentation plan was formulated for a proposed follow-on program. The goal of this program is to verify the above conclusion and to attempt to identify more precisely which components of the fan-compressor system are at fault.

  19. 77 FR 10950 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... inclement weather conditions, eight reports of engine in- flight shutdown (IFSD) events caused by dual... flight in inclement weather conditions; and (2) Eight reports of engine in-flight shutdown (IFSD)...

  20. 78 FR 37703 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... blade airfoil separations, engine damage, and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective... prevent LP compressor blade airfoil separations, engine damage, and damage to the airplane. (e)...

  1. 77 FR 56760 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc, Corporate Communications, P.O. Box 31, Derby... substantive verbal contact with FAA personnel concerning this AD. Using the search function of the Web site... Propulsion Systems Non-Modification Service Bulletin No. RB.211-72-AG795, dated October 28, 2011. (2)...

  2. 78 FR 6749 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Green, Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine...-238-7199; email: Robert.Green@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited We invite you to... signed the comment on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review the...

  3. Digital integrated control of a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression supersonic inlet and an augmented mixed-flow turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.; Arpasi, D. J.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A digitally implemented integrated inlet-engine control system was designed and tested on a mixed-compression, axisymmetric, Mach 2.5, supersonic inlet with 45 percent internal supersonic area contraction and a TF30-P-3 augmented turbofan engine. The control matched engine airflow to available inlet airflow. By monitoring inlet terminal shock position and over-board bypass door command, the control adjusted engine speed so that in steady state, the shock would be at the desired location and the overboard bypass doors would be closed. During engine-induced transients, such as augmentor light-off and cutoff, the inlet operating point was momentarily changed to a more supercritical point to minimize unstarts. The digital control also provided automatic inlet restart. A variable inlet throat bleed control, based on throat Mach number, provided additional inlet stability margin.

  4. Intelligent, Robust Control of Deteriorated Turbofan Engines via Linear Parameter Varying Quadratic Lyapunov Function Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    A method for accommodating engine deterioration via a scheduled Linear Parameter Varying Quadratic Lyapunov Function (LPVQLF)-Based controller is presented. The LPVQLF design methodology provides a means for developing unconditionally stable, robust control of Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) systems. The controller is scheduled on the Engine Deterioration Index, a function of estimated parameters that relate to engine health, and is computed using a multilayer feedforward neural network. Acceptable thrust response and tight control of exhaust gas temperature (EGT) is accomplished by adjusting the performance weights on these parameters for different levels of engine degradation. Nonlinear simulations demonstrate that the controller achieves specified performance objectives while being robust to engine deterioration as well as engine-to-engine variations.

  5. On the estimation algorithm used in adaptive performance optimization of turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espana, Martin D.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1993-01-01

    The performance seeking control algorithm is designed to continuously optimize the performance of propulsion systems. The performance seeking control algorithm uses a nominal model of the propulsion system and estimates, in flight, the engine deviation parameters characterizing the engine deviations with respect to nominal conditions. In practice, because of measurement biases and/or model uncertainties, the estimated engine deviation parameters may not reflect the engine's actual off-nominal condition. This factor has a necessary impact on the overall performance seeking control scheme exacerbated by the open-loop character of the algorithm. The effects produced by unknown measurement biases over the estimation algorithm are evaluated. This evaluation allows for identification of the most critical measurements for application of the performance seeking control algorithm to an F100 engine. An equivalence relation between the biases and engine deviation parameters stems from an observability study; therefore, it is undecided whether the estimated engine deviation parameters represent the actual engine deviation or whether they simply reflect the measurement biases. A new algorithm, based on the engine's (steady-state) optimization model, is proposed and tested with flight data. When compared with previous Kalman filter schemes, based on local engine dynamic models, the new algorithm is easier to design and tune and it reduces the computational burden of the onboard computer.

  6. Identification of multivariable high performance turbofan engine dynamics from closed loop data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W.

    1983-01-01

    The multivariable instrumental variable/approximate maximum likelihood (IV/AML) method of recursive time-series analysis is used to identify the multivariable (four inputs-three outputs) dynamics of the Pratt and Whitney F100 engine. A detailed nonlinear engine simulation is used to determine linear engine model structures and parameters at an operating point using open loop data. Also, the IV/AML method is used in a direct identification made to identify models from actual closed loop engine test data. Models identified from simulated and test data are compared to determine a final model structure and parameterization that can predict engine response for a wide class of inputs. The ability of the IV/AML algorithm to identify useful dynamic models from engine test data is assessed. Previously announced in STAR as N82-20339

  7. Identification of multivariable high performance turbofan engine dynamics from closed loop data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W.

    1982-01-01

    The multivariable instrumental variable/approximate maximum likelihood (IV/AML) method or recursive time-series analysis is used to identify the multivariable (four inputs-three outputs) dynamics of the Pratt and Whitney F100 engine. A detailed nonlinear engine simulation is used to determine linear engine model structures and parameters at an operating point using open loop data. Also, the IV/AML method is used in a direct identification mode to identify models from actual closed loop engine test data. Models identified from simulated and test data are compared to determine a final model structure and parameterization that can predict engine response for a wide class of inputs. The ability of the IV/AML algorithm to identify useful dynamic models from engine test data is assessed.

  8. Collaboration with Williams International to Demonstrate the Characteristics of a Foam-Metal-Liner Installed Over-the-Rotor of a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel; Elliott, Dave; Jones, Mike; Hartley, Tom

    2008-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was used as a demonstrator for foam-metal liner installed in close proximity to the fan. Two foam metal liner designs were tested and compared to the hardwall. Traditional Single-Degree-of-Freedom liner designs were also evaluated to provide a comparison. Normalized information on farfield acoustics is presented in this paper. The results show that up to 5 dB PWL overall attenuation was achieved in the forward quadrant. In general, the foam-metal liners performed better when the fan tip speed was below sonic.

  9. CFD simulations of the flow control performance applied for inlet of low drag high-bypass turbofan engine at cross flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursakov, I. A.; Kazhan, E. V.; Lysenkov, A. V.; Savelyev, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Paper describes the optimization procedure for low cruise drag inlet of high-bypass ratio turbofan engine (HBRE). The critical cross-flow velocity when the flow separation on the lee side of the inlet channel occurs is determined. The effciency of different flow control devices used to improve the flow parameters at inlet section cross flow regime is analyzed. Boundary layer suction, bypass slot and vortex generators are considered. It is shown that flow control devices enlarge the stability range of inlet performance at cross flow regimes.

  10. Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System for Turbofan Engines. Volume 2; BFaNS User's Manual and Developer's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney has developed a Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) for turbofan engines. This system computes the noise generated by turbulence impinging on the leading edges of the fan and fan exit guide vane, and noise generated by boundary-layer turbulence passing over the fan trailing edge. BFaNS has been validated on three fan rigs that were tested during the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST). The predicted noise spectra agreed well with measured data. The predicted effects of fan speed, vane count, and vane sweep also agreed well with measurements. The noise prediction system consists of two computer programs: Setup_BFaNS and BFaNS. Setup_BFaNS converts user-specified geometry and flow-field information into a BFaNS input file. From this input file, BFaNS computes the inlet and aft broadband sound power spectra generated by the fan and FEGV. The output file from BFaNS contains the inlet, aft and total sound power spectra from each noise source. This report is the second volume of a three-volume set documenting the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System: Volume 1: Setup_BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; Volume 2: BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; and Volume 3: Validation and Test Cases. The present volume begins with an overview of the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System, followed by step-by-step instructions for installing and running BFaNS. It concludes with technical documentation of the BFaNS computer program.

  11. Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System for Turbofan Engines. Volume 1; Setup_BFaNS User's Manual and Developer's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney has developed a Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) for turbofan engines. This system computes the noise generated by turbulence impinging on the leading edges of the fan and fan exit guide vane, and noise generated by boundary-layer turbulence passing over the fan trailing edge. BFaNS has been validated on three fan rigs that were tested during the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST). The predicted noise spectra agreed well with measured data. The predicted effects of fan speed, vane count, and vane sweep also agreed well with measurements. The noise prediction system consists of two computer programs: Setup_BFaNS and BFaNS. Setup_BFaNS converts user-specified geometry and flow-field information into a BFaNS input file. From this input file, BFaNS computes the inlet and aft broadband sound power spectra generated by the fan and FEGV. The output file from BFaNS contains the inlet, aft and total sound power spectra from each noise source. This report is the first volume of a three-volume set documenting the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System: Volume 1: Setup_BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; Volume 2: BFaNS User's Manual and Developer s Guide; and Volume 3: Validation and Test Cases. The present volume begins with an overview of the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System, followed by step-by-step instructions for installing and running Setup_BFaNS. It concludes with technical documentation of the Setup_BFaNS computer program.

  12. 78 FR 5 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... who also melted steel in the same furnaces. Initial engineering evaluation concluded that the lives of... the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons... induction into the shop where the IP and low pressure (LP) turbine module is removed from the engine,...

  13. 78 FR 17075 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... material properties may have been installed in some engines. We are issuing this AD to prevent uncontained turbine disc fracture and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective April 24, 2013..., bolts with reduced material properties may have been installed in some engines. This condition, if...

  14. A simulation study of turbofan engine deterioration estimation using Kalman filtering techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Heather H.

    1991-01-01

    Deterioration of engine components may cause off-normal engine operation. The result is an unecessary loss of performance, because the fixed schedules are designed to accommodate a wide range of engine health. These fixed control schedules may not be optimal for a deteriorated engine. This problem may be solved by including a measure of deterioration in determining the control variables. These engine deterioration parameters usually cannot be measured directly but can be estimated. A Kalman filter design is presented for estimating two performance parameters that account for engine deterioration: high and low pressure turbine delta efficiencies. The delta efficiency parameters model variations of the high and low pressure turbine efficiencies from nominal values. The filter has a design condition of Mach 0.90, 30,000 ft altitude, and 47 deg power level angle (PLA). It was evaluated using a nonlinear simulation of the F100 engine model derivative (EMD) engine, at the design Mach number and altitude over a PLA range of 43 to 55 deg. It was found that known high pressure turbine delta efficiencies of -2.5 percent and low pressure turbine delta efficiencies of -1.0 percent can be estimated with an accuracy of + or - 0.25 percent efficiency with a Kalman filter. If both the high and low pressure turbine are deteriorated, the delta efficiencies of -2.5 percent to both turbines can be estimated with the same accuracy.

  15. Study of the costs and benefits of composite materials in advanced turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhagen, C. A.; Stotler, C. L.; Neitzel, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Composite component designs were developed for a number of applicable engine parts and functions. The cost and weight of each detail component was determined and its effect on the total engine cost to the aircraft manufacturer was ascertained. The economic benefits of engine or nacelle composite or eutectic turbine alloy substitutions was then calculated. Two time periods of engine certification were considered for this investigation, namely 1979 and 1985. Two methods of applying composites to these engines were employed. The first method just considered replacing an existing metal part with a composite part with no other change to the engine. The other method involved major engine redesign so that more efficient composite designs could be employed. Utilization of polymeric composites wherever payoffs were available indicated that a total improvement in Direct Operating Cost (DOC) of 2.82 to 4.64 percent, depending on the engine considered, could be attained. In addition, the percent fuel saving ranged from 1.91 to 3.53 percent. The advantages of using advanced materials in the turbine are more difficult to quantify but could go as high as an improvement in DOC of 2.33 percent and a fuel savings of 2.62 percent. Typically, based on a fleet of one hundred aircraft, a percent savings in DOC represents a savings of four million dollars per year and a percent of fuel savings equals 23,000 cu m (7,000,000 gallons) per year.

  16. 76 FR 68634 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CF6 Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ..., 2010). The commenter states that MD-10-30F airplanes are equipped with CF6-50C2 model engines. We agree..._regulations/ibr_locations.html . Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on October 26, 2011. Peter A....

  17. 77 FR 9869 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... 39-15860 (74 FR 12086, March 23, 2009): Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (formerly BMW Rolls-Royce GmbH, formerly BMW Rolls-Royce Aero Engines): Docket No. FAA-2008-0224; Directorate Identifier...

  18. 75 FR 67253 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Models PW4074 and PW4077 Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... effective date of this AD using a drawdown plan that includes a borescope inspection (BSI) or eddy current... installed in the engine and exceed 12,000 CSN, perform a borescope inspection (BSI) or eddy...

  19. Multidisciplinary and Multiobjective Optimization in Conceptual Design for Mixed-Stream Turbofan Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    AFIT/GAE/ENY/96D-6 Abstract Despite major advances in design tools such as engine cycle analysis software and computer-aided design, conceptual gas...Ratio of specific heat for turbine flow etaAB = =iAB Efficiency of afterburner etab = 1lb = Efficiency of burner etacprime = l, = Efficiency of fan...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Despite major advances in design tools such as engine cycle analysis software and computer-aided design, conceptual gas

  20. Core noise investigation of the CF6-50 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, V. L.; Moore, M. T.

    1980-01-01

    The contribution of the standard production annular combustor to the far-field noise signature of the CF6-50 engine was investigated. Internal source locations were studied. Transfer functions were determined for selected pairs of combustor sensors and from two internal sensors to the air field. The coherent output power was determined in the far-field measurements, and comparisons of measured overall power level were made with component and engine correlating parameters.

  1. Parallel Hybrid Gas-Electric Geared Turbofan Engine Conceptual Design and Benefits Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lents, Charles; Hardin, Larry; Rheaume, Jonathan; Kohlman, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual design of a parallel gas-electric hybrid propulsion system for a conventional single aisle twin engine tube and wing vehicle has been developed. The study baseline vehicle and engine technology are discussed, followed by results of the hybrid propulsion system sizing and performance analysis. The weights analysis for the electric energy storage & conversion system and thermal management system is described. Finally, the potential system benefits are assessed.

  2. Flight effects on exhaust noise for turbojet and turbofan engines: Comparison of experimental data with prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    It was demonstrated that static and in flight jet engine exhaust noise can be predicted with reasonable accuracy when the multiple source nature of the problem is taken into account. Jet mixing noise was predicted from the interim prediction method. Provisional methods of estimating internally generated noise and shock noise flight effects were used, based partly on existing prediction methods and partly on recent reported engine data.

  3. 76 FR 41430 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... available in the AD docket shortly after receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James Gray, Aerospace... PW4ENG 73-150, or Engineering Change Number EC92KK322G, H, I, J, and K, as indicated with a (-3), or (-3A...-504, or PW4ENG 72-512, or PW4ENG 72- 572, or PW4ENG 72-588, or PW4ENG 73-150, or Engineering...

  4. 75 FR 31330 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... No. 3 bearing oil pressure tube, part number (P/N) 51J041-01, P/N 50J604-01, or P/N 50J924-01. Tubes... repaired No. 3 bearing oil tube that caused an engine in- flight shutdown, seven reports of repaired No. 3 bearing oil pressure tubes found cracked that led to unscheduled engine removals, and one report of a...

  5. Dynamic and Transient Performance of Turbofan/Turboshaft Convertible Engine With Variable Inlet Guide Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McArdle, Jack G.; Barth, Richard L.; Wenzel, Leon M.; Biesiadny, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    A convertible engine called the CEST TF34, using the variable inlet guide vane method of power change, was tested on an outdoor stand at the NASA Lewis Research Center with a waterbrake dynamometer for the shaft load. A new digital electronic system, in conjunction with a modified standard TF34 hydromechanical fuel control, kept engine operation stable and safely within limits. All planned testing was completed successfully. Steady-state performance and acoustic characteristics were reported previously and are referenced. This report presents results of transient and dynamic tests. The transient tests measured engine response to several rapid changes in thrust and torque commands at constant fan (shaft) speed. Limited results from dynamic tests using the pseudorandom binary noise technique are also presented. Performance of the waterbrake dynamometer is discussed in an appendix.

  6. Noise Reduction Potential of Large, Over-the-Wing Mounted, Advanced Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    As we look to the future, increasingly stringent civilian aviation noise regulations will require the design and manufacture of extremely quiet commercial aircraft. Indeed, the noise goal for NASA's Aeronautics Enterprise calls for technologies that will help to provide a 20 EPNdB reduction relative to today's levels by the year 2022. Further, the large fan diameters of modem, increasingly higher bypass ratio engines pose a significant packaging and aircraft installation challenge. One design approach that addresses both of these challenges is to mount the engines above the wing. In addition to allowing the performance trend towards large, ultra high bypass ratio cycles to continue, this over-the-wing design is believed to offer noise shielding benefits to observers on the ground. This paper describes the analytical certification noise predictions of a notional, long haul, commercial quadjet transport with advanced, high bypass engines mounted above the wing.

  7. Particle Trajectory and Icing Analysis of the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Particle trajectory and ice shape calculations were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The particle trajectory and icing computations were performed using the new "block-to-block" collection efficiency method which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for three drop sizes and two drop distributions typically used in aircraft design and certification. Particle trajectory computations were made for water drop sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns. Particle trajectory and ice shape predictions were made for a 20 micron Langmuir-D distribution and for a 92 mm Super-cooled Large Droplet (SLD) distribution with and without splashing effects for a Liquid Water Content (LWC) of 0.3 g/cu m and an icing time of 30 min. The E3 fan and spinner combination proved to be an effective ice removal mechanism as they removed greater than 36 percent of the mass entering the inlet for the icing cases. The maximum free stream catch fraction for the fan and spinner combination was 0.60 while that on the elements downstream of the fan was 0.03. The non-splashing trajectory and collection efficiency results showed that as drop size increased impingement rates increased on the spinner and fan leaving less mass to impinge on downstream components. The SLD splashing case yielded more mass downstream of the fan than the SLD non-splashing case due to mass being splashed from the upstream inlet lip, spinner and fan components. The ice shapes generated downstream of the fan were either small or nonexistent due to the small available mass

  8. Full-Scale Turbofan-Engine Turbine-Transfer Function Determination Using Three Internal Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    Noise-source separation techniques, using three engine-internal sensors, are applied to existing static-engine test data to determine the turbine transfer function for the currently subdominant combustion noise. The results are used to assess the combustion-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) and an improvement to the combustion-noise module GECOR is suggested. The work was carried out in response to the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Program s Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge.

  9. An assessment of the use of antimisting fuel in turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorentino, A. J.; Planell, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation was made on the effects of using antimisting kerosene (AMK) on the performance of the components from the fuel system and the combustor of current in service JT8D aircraft engines. The objectives were to identify if there were any problems associated with using antimisting kerosene and to determine the extent of shearing or degradation required to allow the engine components to achieve satisfactory operation. The program consisted of a literature survey and a test program which evaluated the antimisting kerosene fuel in laboratory and bench component testing, and assessed the performance of the combustor in a high pressure facility and in an altitude relight/cold ignition facility.

  10. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. Part 3: Application to augment engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.; Moore, G. C.; Blatt, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Military engines frequently need large quantities of thrust for short periods of time. The addition of an augmentor can provide such thrust increases but with a penalty of increased duct length and engine weight. The addition of a forced mixer to the augmentor improves performance and reduces the penalty, as well as providing a method for siting the required flame holders. In this report two augmentor concepts are investigated: a swirl-mixer augmentor and a mixer-flameholder augmentor. Several designs for each concept are included and an experimental assessment of one of the swirl-mixer augmentors is presented.

  11. An assessment of the use of antimisting fuel in turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorentino, A.; Desaro, R.; Franz, T.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of antimisting kerosene on the performance of the components from the fuel system and the combustor of a JT8D aircraft engine were evaluated. The problems associated with antimisting kerosene were identified and the extent of shearing or degradation required to allow the engine components to achieve satisfactory operation were determined. The performance of the combustor was assessed in a high pressure facility and in an altitude relight/cold ignition facility. The performance of the fuel pump and control system was evaluated in an open loop simulation.

  12. 78 FR 54152 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... determine if it is made from N75 material and, if so, replacing it with an FCL made from C263 material. This... N75 material. We are issuing this AD to prevent hot gases from burning through the engine casing, which could result in an under-cowl fire and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes...

  13. 78 FR 5712 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S.A. Turbofan Engines Modified by Supplemental Type...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... requires removal from service of certain high-pressure turbine (HPT) disks manufactured by Global Material... of multiple turbine blades, damage to the engine, and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD is... Executive Park, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call...

  14. 78 FR 17300 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ..., Corporate Communications, P.O. Box 31, Derby, England, DE248BJ; phone: 011 44 1332 242424; fax: 011 44 1332... substantive verbal contact we receive about this proposed AD. Discussion On May 15, 2012, we issued AD 2012-10... the cracking may also exist in Trent 900 engines. Relevant Service Information We reviewed RR...

  15. 77 FR 26216 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ...) compressor blades identified by serial number (S/N). This proposed AD would require the same actions but expands the population of blades. We are proposing this AD to prevent LP compressor blades from failing due to blade root cracks, which could lead to uncontained engine failure and damage to the...

  16. An Optimal Orthogonal Decomposition Method for Kalman Filter-Based Turbofan Engine Thrust Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    A new linear point design technique is presented for the determination of tuning parameters that enable the optimal estimation of unmeasured engine outputs, such as thrust. The engine s performance is affected by its level of degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters related to each major engine component. Accurate thrust reconstruction depends on knowledge of these health parameters, but there are usually too few sensors to be able to estimate their values. In this new technique, a set of tuning parameters is determined that accounts for degradation by representing the overall effect of the larger set of health parameters as closely as possible in a least-squares sense. The technique takes advantage of the properties of the singular value decomposition of a matrix to generate a tuning parameter vector of low enough dimension that it can be estimated by a Kalman filter. A concise design procedure to generate a tuning vector that specifically takes into account the variables of interest is presented. An example demonstrates the tuning parameters ability to facilitate matching of both measured and unmeasured engine outputs, as well as state variables. Additional properties of the formulation are shown to lend themselves well to diagnostics.

  17. An Optimal Orthogonal Decomposition Method for Kalman Filter-Based Turbofan Engine Thrust Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    A new linear point design technique is presented for the determination of tuning parameters that enable the optimal estimation of unmeasured engine outputs, such as thrust. The engine's performance is affected by its level of degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters related to each major engine component. Accurate thrust reconstruction depends on knowledge of these health parameters, but there are usually too few sensors to be able to estimate their values. In this new technique, a set of tuning parameters is determined that accounts for degradation by representing the overall effect of the larger set of health parameters as closely as possible in a least squares sense. The technique takes advantage of the properties of the singular value decomposition of a matrix to generate a tuning parameter vector of low enough dimension that it can be estimated by a Kalman filter. A concise design procedure to generate a tuning vector that specifically takes into account the variables of interest is presented. An example demonstrates the tuning parameters ability to facilitate matching of both measured and unmeasured engine outputs, as well as state variables. Additional properties of the formulation are shown to lend themselves well to diagnostics.

  18. 78 FR 70489 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...). This AD was prompted by reports of erosion of the leading edge profile of the LP compressor blade set... specified products. The MCAI states: Erosion of the leading edge profile of Trent 500 engines' low pressure... erosion of the leading edge profile of the low-pressure (LP) compressor blade set contributing to...

  19. Application of composite materials to turbofan engine fan exit guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    A program was conducted by NASA with the JT9D engine manufacturer to develop a lightweight, cost effective, composite material fan exit guide vane design having satisfactory structural durability for commerical engine use. Based on the results of a previous company supported program, eight graphite/epoxy and graphite-glass/epoxy guide vane designs were evaluated and four were selected for fabrication and testing. Two commercial fabricators each fabricated 13 vanes. Fatigue tests were used to qualify the selected design configurations under nominally dry, 38 C (100 F) and fully wet and 60 C (140 F) environmental conditions. Cost estimates for a production rate of 1000 vanes per month ranged from 1.7 to 2.6 times the cost of an all aluminum vane. This cost is 50 to 80 percent less than the initial program target cost ratio which was 3 times the cost of an aluminum vane. Application to the JT9D commercial engine is projected to provide a weight savings of 236 N (53 lb) per engine.

  20. 76 FR 64291 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov ; or in person at the Docket Management Facility..., customers reported several nonconforming No. 3 bearing packings, various P/Ns, found installed on engines in... proposed AD would not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between...

  1. An Optimal Orthogonal Decomposition Method for Kalman Filter-Based Turbofan Engine Thrust Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2005-01-01

    A new linear point design technique is presented for the determination of tuning parameters that enable the optimal estimation of unmeasured engine outputs such as thrust. The engine s performance is affected by its level of degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters related to each major engine component. Accurate thrust reconstruction depends upon knowledge of these health parameters, but there are usually too few sensors to be able to estimate their values. In this new technique, a set of tuning parameters is determined which accounts for degradation by representing the overall effect of the larger set of health parameters as closely as possible in a least squares sense. The technique takes advantage of the properties of the singular value decomposition of a matrix to generate a tuning parameter vector of low enough dimension that it can be estimated by a Kalman filter. A concise design procedure to generate a tuning vector that specifically takes into account the variables of interest is presented. An example demonstrates the tuning parameters ability to facilitate matching of both measured and unmeasured engine outputs, as well as state variables. Additional properties of the formulation are shown to lend themselves well to diagnostics.

  2. 77 FR 60288 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (P&W) Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    .... This AD was prompted by reports of 3rd and 4th stage vane fractures in the low-pressure turbine (LPT... prevent 3rd and 4th stage vane fractures in the LPT, damage to the LPT rotor, uncontained engine failure...) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by reports of 3rd and 4th stage vane fractures in the...

  3. 77 FR 12444 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    .... We are issuing this AD to prevent an uncontained failure of the high-pressure compressor (HPC) rotor or the low-pressure turbine (LPT) rotor, or both, which could cause damage to the airplane. DATES.... Commenter TES Aviation Group requested clarification regarding whether the AD applied only to engines...

  4. 75 FR 12663 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. TFE731 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... found during a fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) of the disc bore. We are issuing this AD to... the bore, which could result in damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective April 21..., Washington, DC 20590- 0001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joseph Costa, Aerospace Engineer, Los...

  5. A reflection mechanism for aft fan tone noise from turbofan engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topol, D. A.; Holhubner, S. C.; Mathews, D. C.

    1987-10-01

    A fan tone noise mechanism is proposed which results from reflections from the fan of forward propagating rotor wake/fan exit guide vane interaction tone noise. These fan noise tones are often more dominant out of the rear than out of the front of an engine. To simulate this effect a simple qualitative prediction model was formulated and a scaled model test program was conducted. Results from each of these investigations are compared with each other and with full-scale engine data. These comparisons substantiate the potential importance of this mechanism. Further support is provided by mode measurement data from full-scale testing. This study concluded that for certain vane/blade ratios and tip Mach numbers the contribution of the reflection noise mechanism is significant.

  6. Further Calculations of the Performance of Turbofan Engines Incorporating a Wave Rotor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    altitude table was incorporated to automate ambient conditions using Reference 13; (4) A graphics plotting Loutine was added using GRAFkit software ...initialize GRAFkit software Suis ................ sends plots to screen $run ENGINElA ........... runs ENGINE program ........... select options from screen...i***II SUBFOUTrNE COMPPRPPN,TIN,po~r,Tois,riN,ro.IDc) COMMON/ ETAB /ETALC,ETANlC,ETACC,ETAUTETALT,ETALAS,vcoxrr CONION/LOSSES/DIFLOS,CCLOSS,ABLOSS

  7. Analytical evaluation of the impact of broad specification fuels on high bypass turbofan engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Szetela, E. J.; Vranos, A.

    1978-01-01

    The impact of the use of broad specification fuels on the design, performance durability, emissions and operational characteristics of combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines was assessed. Single stage, vorbix and lean premixed prevaporized combustors, in the JT9D and an advanced energy efficient engine cycle were evaluated when operating on Jet A and ERBS (Experimental Referee Broad Specification) fuels. Design modifications, based on criteria evolved from a literature survey, were introduced and their effectiveness at offsetting projected deficiencies resulting from the use of ERBS was estimated. The results indicate that the use of a broad specification fuel such as ERBS, will necessitate significant technology improvements and redesign if deteriorated performance, durability and emissions are to be avoided. Higher radiant heat loads are projected to seriously compromise liner life while the reduced thermal stability of ERBS will require revisions to the engine-airframe fuel system to reduce the thermal stress on the fuel. Smoke and emissions output are projected to increase with the use of broad specification fuels. While the basic geometry of the single stage and vorbix combustors are compatible with the use of ERBS, extensive redesign of the front end of the lean premixed prevaporized burner will be required to achieve satisfactory operation and optimum emissions.

  8. Computer Program for the Design and Off-Design Performance of Turbojet and Turbofan Engine Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rapid computer program is designed to be run in a stand-alone mode or operated within a larger program. The computation is based on a simplified one-dimensional gas turbine cycle. Each component in the engine is modeled thermo-dynamically. The component efficiencies used in the thermodynamic modeling are scaled for the off-design conditions from input design point values using empirical trends which are included in the computer code. The engine cycle program is capable of producing reasonable engine performance prediction with a minimum of computer execute time. The current computer execute time on the IBM 360/67 for one Mach number, one altitude, and one power setting is about 0.1 seconds. about 0.1 seconds. The principal assumption used in the calculation is that the compressor is operated along a line of maximum adiabatic efficiency on the compressor map. The fluid properties are computed for the combustion mixture, but dissociation is not included. The procedure included in the program is only for the combustion of JP-4, methane, or hydrogen.

  9. High Bypass Turbofan Component Development. Phase II. Detailed Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    Selecting Blade Thickness for Bird Strike 46 27. Method for Selecting Blade Airfoil Attachment 49 AIRCRAF ENGINE GROUP IV GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY...reserves, the replacement aircraft must have a fuel efficient engine as the propulsion system, i. e., * modern turbofan engine . Technology in the large... turbofan engines has been well demonstrated, but little has been done in the size applicable to a twin- engine primary trainer aircraft . Today, there is

  10. Aeroelastic characteristics of a cascade of mistuned blades in subsonic and supersonic flows. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, R. E.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of mistuning on flutter and forced response of a cascade in subsonic in subsonic and supersonic flow were investigated. The aerodynamic and structural coupling between the bending and torsional motions and the aerodynamic coupling between the blades were studied. It is shown that frequency mistuning always has a beneficial effect on flutter. For the cascade considered, the potential for raising flutter speed is greater in subsonic than in supersonic flow. Preliminary results for structural damping mistuning show that there are no additional benefits over adding damping mistuning may have either a beneficial or an adverse effect on forced response, depending on the engine order of the excitation and Mach number.

  11. Validation of an Integrated Airframe and Turbofan Engine Simulation for Evaluation of Propulsion Control Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T Shane; Liu, Yuan; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed independent airframe and engine models that have been integrated into a single real-time aircraft simulation for piloted evaluation of propulsion control algorithms. In order to have confidence in the results of these evaluations, the integrated simulation must be validated to demonstrate that its behavior is realistic and that it meets the appropriate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requirements for aircraft. The paper describes the test procedures and results, demonstrating that the integrated simulation generally meets the FAA requirements and is thus a valid testbed for evaluation of propulsion control modes.

  12. Extending the Operational Envelope of a Turbofan Engine Simulation into the Sub-Idle Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Jeffryes Walter; Hamley, Andrew J.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    In many non-linear gas turbine simulations, operation in the sub-idle region can lead to model instability. This paper lays out a method for extending the operational envelope of a map based gas turbine simulation to include the sub-idle region. This method develops a multi-simulation solution where the baseline component maps are extrapolated below the idle level and an alternate model is developed to serve as a safety net when the baseline model becomes unstable or unreliable. Sub-idle model development takes place in two distinct operational areas, windmilling/shutdown and purge/cranking/startup. These models are based on derived steady state operating points with transient values extrapolated between initial (known) and final (assumed) states. Model transitioning logic is developed to predict baseline model sub-idle instability, and transition smoothly and stably to the backup sub-idle model. Results from the simulation show a realistic approximation of sub-idle behavior as compared to generic sub-idle engine performance that allows the engine to operate continuously and stably from shutdown to full power.

  13. Extending the Operational Envelope of a Turbofan Engine Simulation into the Sub-Idle Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Hamley, Andrew J.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    In many non-linear gas turbine simulations, operation in the sub-idle region can lead to model instability. This paper lays out a method for extending the operational envelope of a map based gas turbine simulation to include the sub-idle region. This method develops a multi-simulation solution where the baseline component maps are extrapolated below the idle level and an alternate model is developed to serve as a safety net when the baseline model becomes unstable or unreliable. Sub-idle model development takes place in two distinct operational areas, windmilling/shutdown and purge/cranking/ startup. These models are based on derived steady state operating points with transient values extrapolated between initial (known) and final (assumed) states. Model transitioning logic is developed to predict baseline model sub-idle instability, and transition smoothly and stably to the backup sub-idle model. Results from the simulation show a realistic approximation of sub-idle behavior as compared to generic sub-idle engine performance that allows the engine to operate continuously and stably from shutdown to full power.

  14. The effects of compressor seventh-stage bleed air extraction on performance of the F100-PW-220 afterburning turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Alison B.

    1991-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of seventh-stage compressor bleed on the performance of the F100 afterburning turbofan engine. The effects of bleed on thrust, specific fuel consumption, fan turbine inlet temperature, bleed total pressure, and bleed total temperature were obtained from the engine manufacturer's status deck computer simulation. These effects were determined for power settings of intermediate, partial afterburning, and maximum afterburning for Mach numbers between 0.6 and 2.2 and for altitudes of 30,000, 40,000, and 50,000 ft. It was found that thrust loss and specific fuel consumption increase were approximately linear functions of bleed flow and, based on a percent-thrust change basis, were approximately independent of power setting.

  15. Full-Scale Turbofan-Engine Turbine-Transfer Function Determination Using Three Internal Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    Existing NASA/Honeywell EVNERT full-scale static engine test data is analyzed by using source-separation techniques in order to determine the turbine transfer of the currently sub-dominant combustor noise. The results are used to assess the combustor-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). Time-series data from three sensors internal to the Honeywell TECH977 research engine is used in the analysis. The true combustor-noise turbine-transfer function is educed by utilizing a new three-signal approach. The resulting narrowband gain factors are compared with the corresponding constant values obtained from two empirical acoustic-turbine-loss formulas. It is found that a simplified Pratt & Whitney formula agrees better with the experimental results for frequencies of practical importance. The 130 deg downstream-direction far-field 1/3-octave sound-pressure levels (SPL) results of Hultgren & Miles are reexamined using a post-correction of their ANOPP predictions for both the total noise signature and the combustion-noise component. It is found that replacing the standard ANOPP turbine-attenuation function for combustion noise with the simplified Pratt & Whitney formula clearly improves the predictions. It is recommended that the GECOR combustion-noise module in ANOPP be updated to allow for a user-selectable switch between the current transmission-loss model and the simplified Pratt & Whitney formula. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic.

  16. Coupling of Helmholtz resonators to improve acoustic liners for turbofan engines at low frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted to evaluate means for increasing the effectiveness of low frequency sound absorbing liners for aircraft turbine engines. Three schemes for coupling low frequency absorber elements were considered. These schemes were analytically modeled and their impedance was predicted over a frequency range of 50 to 1,000 Hz. An optimum and two off-optimum designs of the most promising, a parallel coupled scheme, were fabricated and tested in a flow duct facility. Impedance measurements were in good agreement with predicted values and validated the procedure used to transform modeled parameters to hardware designs. Measurements of attenuation for panels of coupled resonators were consistent with predictions based on measured impedance. All coupled resonator panels tested showed an increase in peak attenuation of about 50% and an increase in attenuation bandwidth of one one-third octave band over that measured for an uncoupled panel. These attenuation characteristics equate to about 35% greater reduction in source perceived noise level (PNL), relative to the uncoupled panel, or a reduction in treatment length of about 24% for constant PNL reduction. The increased effectiveness of the coupled resonator concept for attenuation of low frequency broad spectrum noise is demonstrated.

  17. Development of a Twin-Spool Turbofan Engine Simulation Using the Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) is a tool that has been developed to allow a user to build custom models of systems governed by thermodynamic principles using a template to model each basic process. Validation of this tool in an engine model application was performed through reconstruction of the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) (v2) using the building blocks from the T-MATS (v1) library. In order to match the two engine models, it was necessary to address differences in several assumptions made in the two modeling approaches. After these modifications were made, validation of the engine model continued by integrating both a steady-state and dynamic iterative solver with the engine plant and comparing results from steady-state and transient simulation of the T-MATS and C-MAPSS models. The results show that the T-MATS engine model was accurate within 3% of the C-MAPSS model, with inaccuracy attributed to the increased dimension of the iterative solver solution space required by the engine model constructed using the T-MATS library. This demonstrates that, given an understanding of the modeling assumptions made in T-MATS and a baseline model, the T-MATS tool provides a viable option for constructing a computational model of a twin-spool turbofan engine that may be used in simulation studies.

  18. Development of a Twin-spool Turbofan Engine Simulation Using the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Johathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) is a tool that has been developed to allow a user to build custom models of systems governed by thermodynamic principles using a template to model each basic process. Validation of this tool in an engine model application was performed through reconstruction of the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) (v2) using the building blocks from the T-MATS (v1) library. In order to match the two engine models, it was necessary to address differences in several assumptions made in the two modeling approaches. After these modifications were made, validation of the engine model continued by integrating both a steady-state and dynamic iterative solver with the engine plant and comparing results from steady-state and transient simulation of the T-MATS and C-MAPSS models. The results show that the T-MATS engine model was accurate within 3 of the C-MAPSS model, with inaccuracy attributed to the increased dimension of the iterative solver solution space required by the engine model constructed using the T-MATS library. This demonstrates that, given an understanding of the modeling assumptions made in T-MATS and a baseline model, the T-MATS tool provides a viable option for constructing a computational model of a twin-spool turbofan engine that may be used in simulation studies.

  19. Large Engine Technology (LET) Task XXXVII Low-Bypass Ratio Mixed Turbofan Engine Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction Program Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Joseph R.; Zysman, Steven H.; Barber, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center supported a three year effort to develop the technology for reducing jet noise from low-bypass ratio engines. This effort concentrated on both analytical and experimental approaches using various mixer designs. CFD and MGB predictions are compared with LDV and noise data, respectively. While former predictions matched well with data, experiment shows a need for improving the latter predictions. Data also show that mixing noise can be sensitive to engine hardware upstream of the mixing exit plane.

  20. Development in Geared Turbofan Aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Tobi, A. L.; Ismail, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper looks into the implementation of epicyclic gear system to the aeroengine in order to increase the efficiency of the engine. The improvement made is in the direction of improving fuel consumption, reduction in pollutant gasses and perceived noise. Introduction of epicyclic gear system is capable to achieve bypass ratio of up to 15:1 with the benefits of weight and noise reduction. Radical new aircraft designs and engine installation are being studied to overcome some of the challenges associated with the future geared turbofan and open-rotor engine.

  1. Altitude test of several afterburner configurations on a turbofan engine with a hydrogen heater to simulate an elevated turbine discharge temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R. L.; Cullom, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    A performance test of several experimental afterburner configurations was conducted with a mixed-flow turbofan engine in an altitude facility. The simulated flight conditions were for Mach 1.4 at two altitudes, 12,190 and 14,630 meters. Turbine discharge temperatures of 889 and 1056 K were used. A production afterburner was tested for comparison. The research afterburners included partial forced mixers with V-gutter flameholders, a carburetted V-gutter flameholder, and a triple ring V-gutter flameholder with four swirl-can fuel mixers. Fuel injection variations were included. Performance data shown include augmented thrust ratio, thrust specific fuel consumption, combustion efficiency, and total pressure drop across the afterburner.

  2. Experimental evaluation of a TF30-P-3 turbofan engine in an altitude facility: Effect of steady-state temperature distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braithwaite, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of circumferential distortion of the total temperature entering 25, 50, and 75 percent of the inlet circumferential annulus of a turbofan engine were determined. Complete compressor stall resulted from distortions of from 14 to 20 percent of the face averaged temperature. Increasing the temperature level in one sector resulted in that sector moving toward stall by decreasing the equivalent rotor speeds while the pressure ratio remained approximately constant. Stall originated as a rotating zone in the low-pressure compressor which resulted as a terminal stall in the high-pressure compressor. Decreasing the Reynolds number index to 0.25 from 0.5 reduced the required distortion for stall by 50 percent for the conditions investigated.

  3. Separating Direct and Indirect Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise While Estimating Post-Combustion (Post-Flame) Residence Time Using the Correlation Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-01-01

    A previous investigation on the presence of direct and indirect combustion noise for a full-scale turbofan engine using a far-field microphone at 130 is extended by also examining signals obtained at two additional downstream directions using far-field microphones at 110 deg and 160 deg. A generalized cross-correlation function technique is used to study the change in propagation time to the far field of the combined direct and indirect combustion noise signal as a sequence of low-pass filters are applied. The filtering procedure used produces no phase distortion. As the low-pass filter frequency is decreased, the travel time increases because the relative amount of direct combustion noise is reduced. The indirect combustion noise signal travels more slowly because in the combustor entropy fluctuations move with the flow velocity, which is slow compared to the local speed of sound. The indirect combustion noise signal travels at acoustic velocities after reaching the turbine and being converted into an acoustic signal. The direct combustion noise is always propagating at acoustic velocities. The results show that the estimated indirect combustion noise time delay values (post-combustion residence times) measured at each angle are fairly consistent with one another for a relevant range of operating conditions and demonstrate source separation of a mixture of direct and indirect combustion noise. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting turbofan engine core noise.

  4. Transport of engineered silver (Ag) nanoparticles through partially fractured sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Christoph; Braun, Anika; Azzam, Rafig

    2014-08-01

    Transport behavior and fate of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in the subsurface is of major interest concerning soil and groundwater protection in order to avoid groundwater contamination of vital resources. Sandstone aquifers are important groundwater resources which are frequently used for public water supply in many regions of the world. The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of AgNP transport behavior in partially fractured sandstones. We executed AgNP transport studies on partially fissured sandstone drilling cores in laboratory experiments. The AgNP concentration and AgNP size in the effluent were analyzed using flow field-flow fractionation mainly. We employed inverse mathematical models on the measured AgNP breakthrough curves to identify and quantify relevant transport processes. Physicochemical filtration, time-dependent blocking due to filling of favorable attachment sites and colloid-facilitated transport were identified as the major processes for AgNP mobility. Physicochemical filtration was found to depend on solute chemistry, mineralogy, pore size distribution and probably on physical and chemical heterogeneity. Compared to AgNP transport in undisturbed sandstone matrix reported in the literature, their mobility in partially fissured sandstone is enhanced probably due to larger void spaces and higher hydraulic conductivity.

  5. Multi-Fidelity Simulation of a Turbofan Engine With Results Zoomed Into Mini-Maps for a Zero-D Cycle Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark G.; Reed, John A.; Ryder, Robert; Veres, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    A Zero-D cycle simulation of the GE90-94B high bypass turbofan engine has been achieved utilizing mini-maps generated from a high-fidelity simulation. The simulation utilizes the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) thermodynamic cycle modeling system coupled to a high-fidelity full-engine model represented by a set of coupled 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) component models. Boundary conditions from the balanced, steady state cycle model are used to define component boundary conditions in the full-engine model. Operating characteristics of the 3D component models are integrated into the cycle model via partial performance maps generated from the CFD flow solutions using one-dimensional mean line turbomachinery programs. This paper highlights the generation of the high-pressure compressor, booster, and fan partial performance maps, as well as turbine maps for the high pressure and low pressure turbine. These are actually "mini-maps" in the sense that they are developed only for a narrow operating range of the component. Results are compared between actual cycle data at a take-off condition and the comparable condition utilizing these mini-maps. The mini-maps are also presented with comparison to actual component data where possible.

  6. Turbofan engine with a low pressure turbine driven supercharger in a bypass duct operated by a fuel rich combustor and an afterburner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, James W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A multiple bypass turbofan engine includes a core Brayton Cycle gas generator with a fuel rich burning combustor and is provided with a variable supercharged bypass duct around the gas generator with a supercharging means in the supercharged bypass duct powered by a turbine not mechanically connected to the gas generator. The engine further includes a low pressure turbine driven forward fan upstream and forward of an aft fan and drivingly connected to a low pressure turbine by a low pressure shaft, the low pressure turbine being aft of and in serial flow communication with the core gas generator. A fan bypass duct is disposed radially outward of the core engine assembly and has first and second inlets disposed between the forward and aft fans. An inlet duct having an annular duct wall is disposed radially inward of the bypass duct and connects the second inlet to the bypass duct. A supercharger means for compressing air is drivingly connected to the low pressure turbine and is disposed in the inlet duct. A secondary combustor or augmentor is disposed in an exhaust duct downstream of and in fluid flow communication with the bypass duct and the gas generator.

  7. Application of rotor mounted pressure transducers to analysis of inlet turbulence. [flow distortion in turbofan engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Miniature pressure transducers installed near the leading edge of a fan blade were used to diagnose the non-uniform flow entering a subsonic tip speed turbofan on a static test stand. The pressure response of the blade to the inlet flow variations was plotted in a form which shows the space-time history of disturbances ingested by the rotor. Also, periodically sampled data values were auto- and cross-correlated as if they had been acquired from fixed hot wire anemometers at 150 equally spaced angles around the inlet. With a clean inlet and low wind, evidence of long, narrow turbulence eddies was easily found both in the boundary layer of the fan duct and outside the boundary layer. The role of the boundary layer was to follow and amplify disturbances in the outer flow. These eddies frequently moved around the inlet with a corkscrew motion as they passed through.

  8. Finite element-integral simulation of static and flight fan noise radiation from the JT15D turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Horowitz, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    An iterative finite element integral technique is used to predict the sound field radiated from the JT15D turbofan inlet. The sound field is divided into two regions: the sound field within and near the inlet which is computed using the finite element method and the radiation field beyond the inlet which is calculated using an integral solution technique. The velocity potential formulation of the acoustic wave equation was employed in the program. For some single mode JT15D data, the theory and experiment are in good agreement for the far field radiation pattern as well as suppressor attenuation. Also, the computer program is used to simulate flight effects that cannot be performed on a ground static test stand.

  9. Ice Particle Transport Analysis With Phase Change for the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ice Particle trajectory calculations with phase change were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The particle trajectory computations were performed using the new Glenn Ice Particle Phase Change Model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for ice particle sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns and a free stream particle concentration of 0.3 g/cu m. The impingement efficiency results showed that as particle size increased average impingement efficiencies and scoop factors increased for the various components. The particle analysis also showed that the amount of mass entering the inner core decreased with increased particle size because the larger particles were less able to negotiate the turn into the inner core due to particle inertia. The particle phase change analysis results showed that the larger particles warmed less as they were transported through the low pressure compressor. Only the smallest 5 micron particles were warmed enough to produce melting and the amount of melting was relatively small with a maximum average melting fraction of 0.836. The results also showed an appreciable amount of particle sublimation and evaporation for the 5 micron particles entering the engine core (22 percent).

  10. Canadian Forces Experience with Turbofan HCF - Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Canadian Forces Experience with Turbofan HCF – Case Study Corey Kinart, P. Eng. Magellan Aerospace Corporation 3160 Derry Road East Mississauga...Ontario Canada , L4T 1A9 ckinart@orenda.com Maj. Pierre Theriault National Defence Headquarters 101 Colonel By Drive Ottawa, Ontario Canada ...K1A 0K2 theriault.pg@forces.gc.ca SUMMARY High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) cracking of a Canadian Forces (CF) turbofan engine fuel tube resulted in a six

  11. 76 FR 40217 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-524 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for comments... stubshaft fracture and the subsequent repair of the fixed structure to Engine Manual repair No. FRS5887... failure of the attachment rivets resulting in loss of engine structural integrity, which may result...

  12. 75 FR 17630 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211 Trent 700 and Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... Engine Manual repair/acceptance limits for titanium compressor shafts, Rolls-Royce has found the... completing a review of Engine Manual repair/acceptance limits for titanium compressor shafts, Rolls-Royce has... limits for titanium compressor shafts by RR. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of...

  13. A proposed Kalman filter algorithm for estimation of unmeasured output variables for an F100 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alag, Gurbux S.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1990-01-01

    To develop advanced control systems for optimizing aircraft engine performance, unmeasurable output variables must be estimated. The estimation has to be done in an uncertain environment and be adaptable to varying degrees of modeling errors and other variations in engine behavior over its operational life cycle. This paper represented an approach to estimate unmeasured output variables by explicitly modeling the effects of off-nominal engine behavior as biases on the measurable output variables. A state variable model accommodating off-nominal behavior is developed for the engine, and Kalman filter concepts are used to estimate the required variables. Results are presented from nonlinear engine simulation studies as well as the application of the estimation algorithm on actual flight data. The formulation presented has a wide range of application since it is not restricted or tailored to the particular application described.

  14. 77 FR 4648 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535 Series Turbofan Engine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... repetitive visual and fluorescent penetrant inspections (FPI) of the low-pressure (LP) turbine stage 1, 2... Inspection Requirements At the next engine shop visit after the effective date of this AD, perform a...

  15. Modeling the Effects of Ice Accretion on the Low Pressure Compressor and the Overall Turbofan Engine System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Wright, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is on utilizing a mean line compressor flow analysis code coupled to an engine system thermodynamic code, to estimate the effects of ice accretion on the low pressure compressor, and quantifying its effects on the engine system throughout a notional flight trajectory. In this paper a temperature range in which engine icing would occur was assumed. This provided a mechanism to locate potential component icing sites and allow the computational tools to add blockages due to ice accretion in a parametric fashion. Ultimately the location and level of blockage due to icing would be provided by an ice accretion code. To proceed, an engine system modeling code and a mean line compressor flow analysis code were utilized to calculate the flow conditions in the fan-core and low pressure compressor and to identify potential locations within the compressor where ice may accrete. In this study, an "additional blockage" due to the accretion of ice on the metal surfaces, has been added to the baseline aerodynamic blockage due to boundary layer, as well as the blade metal blockage. Once the potential locations of ice accretion are identified, the levels of additional blockage due to accretion were parametrically varied to estimate the effects on the low pressure compressor blade row performance operating within the engine system environment. This study includes detailed analysis of compressor and engine performance during cruise and descent operating conditions at several altitudes within the notional flight trajectory. The purpose of this effort is to develop the computer codes to provide a predictive capability to forecast the onset of engine icing events, such that they could ultimately help in the avoidance of these events.

  16. Noise-Source Separation Using Internal and Far-Field Sensors for a Full-Scale Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Miles, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Noise-source separation techniques for the extraction of the sub-dominant combustion noise from the total noise signatures obtained in static-engine tests are described. Three methods are applied to data from a static, full-scale engine test. Both 1/3-octave and narrow-band results are discussed. The results are used to assess the combustion-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). A new additional phase-angle-based discriminator for the three-signal method is also introduced.

  17. 76 FR 6323 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6-45 and CF6-50 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... damage, including excessive airfoil material loss. That AD also requires fluorescent-penetrant inspection... result in an uncontained engine failure and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD is effective February... the HPT rotor stage 1 and stage 2 blades for wear and damage, including excessive airfoil...

  18. Compound cycle turbofan engine (CCTE). Task IX. Carbon-slurry fuel combustion evaluation program. Final report June-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, T.W.; Mongia, H.

    1980-03-01

    The carbon-slurry fuel evaluation program demonstrated the feasibility of running a currently available carbon-slurry fuel in a combustion rig and a turbine engine. This program also established the preliminary design criteria for operating on carbon-slurry fuels. Subcontracts work was performed by Pennsylvania State for fuel droplet measurements and by Suntech, Inc. for fuel development and manufacture.

  19. 75 FR 58290 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211 Trent 700 and Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... Engine Manual. This AD identifies shafts for which such dressing operations have been known to have been.... Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to issue... of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and...

  20. 76 FR 14797 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 900 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... the Engine Electronic Controller (EEC) software, featuring an IPT Overspeed Protection System (IPTOS... relevant data, views, or arguments about this AD. Send your comments to an address listed under the... applies to RR model RB211-Trent 970-84, 970B-84, 972-84, 972B-84, 977-84, 977B-84, and 980-84...

  1. Quiet Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) technology study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design of an engine which satisfies the requirements of a quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) engine is described. Also an experimental program to demonstrate performance is suggested. The T700 QCGAT engine preliminary design indicates that it will radiate noise at the same level as an aircraft without engine noise, have exhaust emissions within the EPA 1981 Standards, have lower fuel consumption than is available in comparable size engines, and have sufficient life for five years between overhauls.

  2. Flight evaluation of a simplified gross thrust calculation technique using an F100 turbofan engine in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtenbach, F. J.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A simplified gross thrust calculation technique was evaluated in flight tests on an F-15 aircraft using prototype F100-PW-100 engines. The technique relies on afterburner duct pressure measurements and empirical corrections to an ideal one-dimensional analysis to determine thrust. In-flight gross thrust calculated by the simplified method is compared to gross thrust calculated by the engine manufacturer's gas generator model. The evaluation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.5 and at altitudes from 6000 meters to 13,700 meters. The flight evaluation shows that the simplified gross thrust method and the gas generator method agreed within plus or minus 3 percent. The discrepancies between the data generally fell within an uncertainty band derived from instrumentation errors and recording system resolution.

  3. 76 FR 14796 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6-45 and CF6-50 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Executive Park, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 781... CF6-50C2-F and CF6-50C2- R. (2) These engines are installed on, but not limited to, Airbus A300 series...-238-7735; fax: 781-238-7199; e- mail: tomasz.rakowski@faa.gov . (h) For service information...

  4. Rotating Rake Turbofan Duct Mode Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental measurement system was developed and implemented by the NASA Glenn Research Center in the 1990s to measure turbofan duct acoustic modes. The system is a continuously rotating radial microphone rake that is inserted into the duct. This Rotating Rake provides a complete map of the acoustic duct modes present in a ducted fan and has been used on a variety of test articles: from a low-speed, concept test rig, to a full-scale production turbofan engine. The Rotating Rake has been critical in developing and evaluating a number of noise reduction concepts as well as providing experimental databases for verification of several aero-acoustic codes. More detailed derivation of the unique Rotating Rake equations are presented in the appendix.

  5. Altitude performance of a low-noise-technology fan in a turbofan engine with and without a sound suppressing nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, T. J.; Grey, R. E.; Abdelwahah, M.

    1976-01-01

    Test variables were inlet Reynolds number index (0.2 to 0.5), flight Mach number (0.2 to 0.8), and flow distortion (tip radial and combined circumferential - tip radial patterns). Results are limited to fan bypass and overall engine performance. There were no discernible effects of Reynolds number on fan performance. Increasing flight Mach number shifted the fan operating line such that pressure ratio decreased and airflow increased. Inlet flow distortion lowered stall margin. For a Reynolds number index of 0.2 and flight Mach number of 0.54, the sound suppressing nacelle lowered fan efficiency three points and increased specific fuel consumption about 10 percent.

  6. Experimental Program for the Evaluation of Turbofan/Turboshaft Conversion Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Wenzel National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lewis Research Center Cleveland, Ohio 44135 SUMMARY -A TF34 turbofan engine is being modified to...of a Part-Span Variable Inlet Guide Vane on the Performance of a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine . NASA TM 82617, 1981. 5. Nieberding, W. C.; and Pollack...produce shaft power from an output coupling on the fan disk when variable inlet guide vanes are closed to reduce fan airflow. The engine , called a

  7. Effects of mistuning on bending-torsion flutter and response of a cascade in incompressible flow. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kielb, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of small differences between the individual blades (mistuning) on the aeroelastic stability and response of a cascade were studied. The aerodynamic, inertial, and structural coupling between the bending and torsional motions of each blade and the aerodynamic coupling between the blades was considered. A digital computer program was developed to conduct parametric studies. Results indicate that the mistuning has a beneficial effect on the coupled bending torsion and uncoupled torsion flutter. On forced response, however, the effect may be either beneficial or adverse, depending on the engine order of the forcing function. The results also illustrate that it may be feasible to utilize mistuning as a passive control to increase flutter speed while maintaining forced response at an acceptable level.

  8. Noise reduction as affected by the extent and distribution of acoustic treatment in a turbofan engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Homyak, L.

    1976-01-01

    An inlet noise suppressor for a TF-34 engine designed to have three acoustically treated rings was tested with several different ring arrangements. The configurations included: all three rings; two outer rings; single outer ring; single intermediate ring, and finally no rings. It was expected that as rings were removed, the acoustic performance would be degraded considerably. While a degradation occurred, it was not as large as predictions indicated. In fact, the prediction showed good agreement with the data only for the full-ring inlet configuration. The under-predictions which occurred with ring removal were believed a result of ignoring the presence of spinning modes which are known to damp more rapidly in cylindrical ducts than would be predicted by least attenuated mode or plane wave analysis.

  9. Noise reduction as affected by the extent and distribution of acoustic treatment in a turbofan engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Homyak, L.

    1976-01-01

    An inlet noise suppressor for a TF-34 engine designed to have three acoustically treated rings was tested with several different ring arrangements. The configurations included: all three rings; two outer rings; single outer ring; single intermediate ring, and finally no rings. It was expected that as rings were removed, the acoustic performance would be degraded considerably. While a degradation occurred, it was not as large as predictions indicated. The prediction showed good agreement with the data only for the full-ring inlet configuration. The underpredictions which occurred with ring removal were believed a result of ignoring the presence of spinning modes which are known to damp more rapidly in cylindrical ducts than would be predicted by least attenuated mode or plane wave analysis.

  10. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  11. 75 FR 64681 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CF6-45 Series and CF6-50 Series Turbofan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ..., Massachusetts, on October 8, 2010. Peter A. White, Assistant Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft... Company (GE) CF6-45 Series and CF6-50 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... airworthiness directive (AD) for GE CF6-45 and CF6-50 series turbofan engines. This proposed AD would...

  12. Design and verification of a turbofan swirl augmentor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. J., Jr.; Shadowen, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the details of the design and verification testing of a full-scale turbofan 'swirl' augmentor at sea level and altitude. No flameholders are required in the swirl augmentor since the radial motion of the hot pilot gases and subsequent combustion products provides a continuous ignition front across the stream. Results of rig testing of this full-scale swirl augmentor on an F100 engine, which are very encouraging, and future development plans are presented. The results validate the application of the centrifugal-force swirling flow concept to a turbofan augmentor.

  13. Analysis of an advanced technology subsonic turbofan incorporating revolutionary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, Gerald, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Successful implementation of revolutionary composite materials in an advanced turbofan offers the possibility of further improvements in engine performance and thrust-to-weight ratio relative to current metallic materials. The present analysis determines the approximate engine cycle and configuration for an early 21st century subsonic turbofan incorporating all composite materials. The advanced engine is evaluated relative to a current technology baseline engine in terms of its potential fuel savings for an intercontinental quadjet having a design range of 5500 nmi and a payload of 500 passengers. The resultant near optimum, uncooled, two-spool, advanced engine has an overall pressure ratio of 87, a bypass ratio of 18, a geared fan, and a turbine rotor inlet temperature of 3085 R. Improvements result in a 33-percent fuel saving for the specified misssion. Various advanced composite materials are used throughout the engine. For example, advanced polymer composite materials are used for the fan and the low pressure compressor (LPC).

  14. Distributed Control of Turbofan Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    processing, supports open standards and modularity, and provides an opportunity for self- diagnosis . This however is still a somewhat limited use of...connected by a shaft that also provides torque to the fan by way of a reduction gearbox . The thrust from the fan can be controlled by varying the pitch...in the cycle. For instance, the gear ratio of the gearbox is not required in this representation. The power output of each of those components is

  15. NASA/GE quiet engine C acoustic test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Pass, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic investigation and evaluation of the C propulsion turbofan engine are discussed. The engine was built as a part of the Quiet Engine Program. The objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to determine the noise levels produced turbofan bypass engines, (2) to demonstrate the technology and innovations which will reduce the production and radiation of noise in turbofan engines, and (3) to acquire experimental acoustic and aerodynamic data for high bypass turbofan engines to provide a better understanding of noise production mechanisms. The goals of the program called for a turbofan engine 15 to 20 PNdB quieter than currently available engines in the same thrust class.

  16. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  17. Parameterization of a Conventional and Regenerated UHB Turbofan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Fábio; Brójo, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    The attempt to improve aircraft engines efficiency resulted in the evolution from turbojets to the first generation low bypass ratio turbofans. Today, high bypass ratio turbofans are the most traditional type of engine in commercial aviation. Following many years of technological developments and improvements, this type of engine has proved to be the most reliable facing the commercial aviation requirements. In search of more efficiency, the engine manufacturers tend to increase the bypass ratio leading to ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system like reducing the specific fuel consumption. This study is aimed at a parametric analysis of a UHB turbofan engine focused on short haul flights. Two cycle configurations (conventional and regenerated) were studied, and estimated values of their specific fuel consumption (TSFC) and specific thrust (Fs) were determined. Results demonstrate that the regenerated cycle may contribute towards a more economic and friendly aero engines in a higher range of bypass ratio.

  18. Analysis of turbofan propulsion system weight and dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, M. H.; Schairer, E. T.

    1977-01-01

    Weight and dimensional relationships that are used in aircraft preliminary design studies are analyzed. These relationships are relatively simple to prove useful to the preliminary designer, but they are sufficiently detailed to provide meaningful design tradeoffs. All weight and dimensional relationships are developed from data bases of existing and conceptual turbofan engines. The total propulsion system is considered including both engine and nacelle, and all estimating relations stem from physical principles, not statistical correlations.

  19. A program for calculating turbofan-driven lift-fan propulsion system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M. E.; Fuhs, A. E.; Paterson, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of a turbofan-powered lift fan propulsion system for vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft is calculated. The program formulation consists of taking bleed air from a turbofan engine, heating the bleed air in an interburner, and passing it through a tip turbine to drive a lift fan. Two options are available: bleed air from the engine exhaust, or bleed air that has passed through the engine fan only. This computer program will benefit persons unfamiliar with the thermodynamics of engine cycle analysis.

  20. Utilizing numerical techniques in turbofan inlet acoustic suppressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical theories in conjunction with previously published analytical results are used to augment current analytical theories in the acoustic design of a turbofan inlet nacelle. In particular, a finite element-integral theory is used to study the effect of the inlet lip radius on the far field radiation pattern and to determine the optimum impedance in an actual engine environment. For some single mode JT15D data, the numerical theory and experiment are found to be in a good agreement.

  1. Surface-engineered growth of AgIn₅S₈ crystals.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chia-Hung; Chiang, Ching-Yeh; Lin, Po-Chang; Yang, Kai-Yu; Hua, Chi Chung; Lee, Tai-Chou

    2013-05-01

    The growth of semiconductor crystals and thin films plays an essential role in industry and academic research. Considering the environmental damage caused by energy consumption during their fabrication, a simpler and cheaper method is desired. In fact, preparing semiconductor materials at lower temperatures using solution chemistry has potential in this research field. We found that solution chemistry, the physical and chemical properties of the substrate surface, and the phase diagram of the multicomponent compound semiconductor have a decisive influence on the crystal structure of the material. In this study, we used self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to modify the silicon/glass substrate surface and effectively control the density of the functional groups and surface energy of the substrates. We first employed various solutions to grow octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS), 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS), and mixed OTS-MPS SAMs. The surface energy can be adjusted between 24.9 and 50.8 erg/cm(2). Using metal sulfide precursors in appropriate concentrations, AgIn5S8 crystals can be grown on the modified substrates without any post-thermal treatment. We can easily adjust the nucleation in order to vary the density of AgIn5S8 crystals. Our current process can achieve AgIn5S8 crystals of a maximum of 1 μm in diameter and a minimum crystal density of approximately 0.038/μm(2). One proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that the material prepared from this low temperature process showed positive photocatalytic activity. This method for growing crystals can be applied to the green fabrication of optoelectronic materials.

  2. A study to estimate and compare the total particulate matter emission indices (EIN) between traditional jet fuel and two blends of Jet A/Camelina biofuel used in a high by-pass turbofan engine: A case study of Honeywell TFE-109 engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shila, Jacob Joshua Howard

    and JT15D engines' families as representatives of other engines with rated thrust of 6000 pounds or below. The results of this study may be used to add to the knowledge of PM emission data that has been collected in other research studies. This study was quantitative in nature. Three factors were designated which were the types of fuels studied. The TFE-109 turbofan engine was the experimental subject. The independent variable was the engine thrust setting while the response variable was the emission index. Four engine runs were conducted for each fuel. In each engine run, four engine thrust settings were observed. The four engine thrust levels were 10%, 30%, 85%, and 100% rated thrusts levels. Therefore, for each engine thrust settings, there four replicates. The experiments were conducted using a TFE-109 engine test cell located in the Niswonger Aviation Technology building at the Purdue University Airport. The testing facility has the capability to conduct the aircraft PM emissions tests. Due to the equipment limitations, the study was limited to observe total PM emissions instead of specifically measuring the non-volatile PM emissions. The results indicate that the emissions indices of the blended biofuels were not statistically significantly lower compared to the emissions of the traditional jet fuel at rated thrust levels of 100% and 85% of TFE-109 turbofan engine. However, the emission indices for the 50%Jet A - 50%Camelina biofuel blend were statistically significantly lower compared to the emission indices of the 100% Jet A fuel at 10% and 30% engine rated thrusts levels of TFE-109 engine. The emission indices of the 50%-50% biofuel blend were lower by reductions of 15% and 17% at engine rated thrusts of 10% and 30% respectively compared to the emissions indices of the traditional jet fuel at the same engine thrust levels. Experimental modifications in future studies may provide estimates of the emissions indices range for this particular engine these

  3. Performance and surge limits of a TF30-P-3 turbofan engine/axisymmetric mixed-compression inlet propulsion system at Mach 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, J. F.; Neumann, H. E.; Shaw, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state performance and inlet-engine compatibility were investigated with a low-bleed inlet. The inlet had minimum internal contraction, consistent with high total pressure recovery and low cowl drag. The inlet-engine combination displayed good performance with only about 2% of inlet performance bleed. The inlet-engine combination had 5.58 deg angle-of-attack capability with 6% bleed.

  4. Extended frequency turbofan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Park, J. W.; Jaekel, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The fan model was developed using two dimensional modeling techniques to add dynamic radial coupling between the core stream and the bypass stream of the fan. When incorporated into a complete TF-30 engine simulation, the fan model greatly improved compression system frequency response to planar inlet pressure disturbances up to 100 Hz. The improved simulation also matched engine stability limits at 15 Hz, whereas the one dimensional fan model required twice the inlet pressure amplitude to stall the simulation. With verification of the two dimensional fan model, this program formulated a high frequency F-100(3) engine simulation using row by row compression system characteristics. In addition to the F-100(3) remote splitter fan, the program modified the model fan characteristics to simulate a proximate splitter version of the F-100(3) engine.

  5. A Model to Assess the Risk of Ice Accretion Due to Ice Crystal Ingestion in a Turbofan Engine and its Effects on Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Wright, William B.; Struk, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that were attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was one or more of the following anomalies: degraded engine performance, engine roll back, compressor surge and stall, and flameout of the combustor. The main focus of this research is the development of a computational tool that can estimate whether there is a risk of ice accretion by tracking key parameters through the compression system blade rows at all engine operating points within the flight trajectory. The tool has an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, coupled with a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor blade rows. Assumptions are made to predict the complex physics involved in engine icing. Specifically, the code does not directly estimate ice accretion and does not have models for particle breakup or erosion. Two key parameters have been suggested as conditions that must be met at the same location for ice accretion to occur: the local wet-bulb temperature to be near freezing or below and the local melt ratio must be above 10%. These parameters were deduced from analyzing laboratory icing test data and are the criteria used to predict the possibility of ice accretion within an engine including the specific blade row where it could occur. Once the possibility of accretion is determined from these parameters, the degree of blockage due to ice accretion on the local stator vane can be estimated from an empirical model of ice growth rate and time spent at that operating point in the flight trajectory. The computational tool can be used to assess specific turbine engines to their susceptibility to

  6. 75 FR 34924 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S.A. CFM56-5, -5B, and -7B Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... discovery of a material nonconformity requiring removal of the disk before the certified disk life of... and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective July 26, 2010. ADDRESSES: The Docket... the Airbus A340 airplane from the applicability paragraph, as the engines used on that airplane...

  7. Phase 2 program on ground test of refanned JT8D turbofan engines and nacelles for the 727 airplane. Volume 3: Ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The NASA Refan Program included full-scale performance and noise ground tests of both a current production (JT8D-15) and a refanned (JT8D-115) engine. A description of the two ground tests including detailed propulsion, noise, and structural test results is presented. The primary objectives of the total test program were comparison of JT8D-15 and JT8D-115 overall propulsion system performance and noise characteristics and determination of incremental component noise levels. Other objectives of the test program included: (1) determination of acoustic treatment effectiveness; (2) measurement of internal sound pressure levels; (3) measurement of inlet and exhaust hardware performance; (4) determination of center-engine surge margin; and (5) evaluation of certain structural characteristics associated with the 727 refan center-engine inlet duct and JT8D refan engine exhaust system. The JT8D-15 and -115 tests were conducted during September 1974 and January to March 1975, respectively. Analyses of the test data indicated that the JT8D-115, as compared to the JT8D-15, demonstrates a 12.5 percent to 13.2 percent reduction in static specific fuel consumption, and a reduction of 6 to 7 PNdB in a weighted average value of static tone corrected perceived noise level. Separated into noise components, a significant reduction was shown for the inlet fan, aft fan, exhaust duct flow, turbine, and jet noises. However, core noise was increased. Photographs of test stands and test equipment are shown.

  8. Full 3D Analysis of the GE90 Turbofan Primary Flowpath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark G.

    2000-01-01

    The multistage simulations of the GE90 turbofan primary flowpath components have been performed. The multistage CFD code, APNASA, has been used to analyze the fan, fan OGV and booster, the 10-stage high-pressure compressor and the entire turbine system of the GE90 turbofan engine. The code has two levels of parallel, and for the 18 blade row full turbine simulation has 87.3 percent parallel efficiency with 121 processors on an SGI ORIGIN. Grid generation is accomplished with the multistage Average Passage Grid Generator, APG. Results for each component are shown which compare favorably with test data.

  9. Aero-acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several exhaust systems suitable for duct burning turbofan engines are evaluated. Scale models representing unsuppressed coannular exhaust systems are examined statically under varying exhaust conditions. Ejectors with both hardwall and acoustically treated inserts are investigated.

  10. 76 FR 75735 - Certification of Part 23 Turbofan- and Turbojet-Powered Airplanes and Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ...This action enhances safety by amending the applicable standards for part 23 turbofan- and turbojet-powered airplanes--which are commonly referred to as ``part 23 jets,'' or ``jets''--as well as turbopropeller-driven and reciprocating-engine airplanes, to reflect the current needs of industry, accommodate future trends, address emerging technologies, and provide for future airplane operations.......

  11. Aerodynamic Performance of Scale-Model Turbofan Outlet Guide Vanes Designed for Low Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on an understanding of the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine. In order to more fully understand the physics of noise in a turbofan engine, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test programs was conducted called the 'Source Diagnostic Test.' The text was cooperative effort between NASA and General Electric Aircraft Engines, as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. A 1/5-scale model simulator representing the bypass stage of a current technology high bypass ratio turbofan engine was used in the test. The test article consisted of the bypass fan and outlet guide vanes in a flight-type nacelle. The fan used was a medium pressure ratio design with 22 individual, wide chord blades. Three outlet guide vane design configurations were investigated, representing a 54-vane radial Baseline configuration, a 26-vane radial, wide chord Low Count configuration and a 26-vane, wide chord Low Noise configuration with 30 deg of aft sweep. The test was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9 by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at velocities simulating the takeoff and approach phases of the aircraft flight envelope. The Source Diagnostic Test had several acoustic and aerodynamic technical objectives: (1) establish the performance of a scale model fan selected to represent the current technology turbofan product; (2) assess the performance of the fan stage with each of the three distinct outlet guide vane designs; (3) determine the effect of the outlet guide vane configuration on the fan baseline performance; and (4) conduct detailed flowfield diagnostic surveys, both acoustic and aerodynamic, to characterize and understand the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan engine. This paper addresses the fan and stage aerodynamic performance results from the Source Diagnostic Test.

  12. Phase 2 program on ground test of refanned JT8D turbofan engines and nacelles for the 727 airplane. Volume 4: Airplane evaluation and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The retrofit of JT8D-109 (refan) engines are evaluated on a 727-200 airplane in terms of airworthiness, performance, and noise. Design of certifiable hardware, manufacture, and ground testing of the essential nacelle components is included along with analysis of the certifiable airplane design to ensure airworthiness compliance and to predict the in-flight performance and noise characteristics of the modified airplane. The analyses confirm that the 727 refan airplane is certifiable. The refan airplane range would be 15% less that of the baseline airplane and block fuel would be increased by 1.5% to 3%. However, with this particular 727-200 model, with a brake release gross weight of 172,500 lb (78,245 kg), it is possible to operate the airplane (with minor structural modifications) at higher gross weights and increase the range up to 15% over the 727-200 (baseline) airplane. The refan airplane FAR Part 36 noise levels would be 6 to 8 EPNdB (effective perceived noise in decibels) below the baseline. Noise footprint studies showed that approach noise contour areas are small compared to takeoff areas. The 727 refan realizes a 68% to 83% reduction in annoyance-weighted area when compared to the 727-200 over a range of gross weights and operational procedures.

  13. Enhanced and tunable optical quantum efficiencies from plasmon bandwidth engineering in bimetallic CoAg nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Ehrsam, M.; Goodwin, J.; Garcia, H.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-10-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles are amongst the most effective ways to resonantly couple optical energy into and out of nanometer sized volumes. However, controlling and/or tuning the transfer of this incident energy to the surrounding near and far field is one of the most interesting challenges in this area. Due to the dielectric properties of metallic silver (Ag), its nanoparticles have amongst the highest radiative quantum efficiencies (η), i.e., the ability to radiatively transfer the incident energy to the surrounding. Here we report the discovery that bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag made with immiscible and plasmonically weak Co metal can show comparable and/or even higher η values. The enhancement is a result of the narrowing of the plasmon bandwidth from these bimetal systems. The phenomenological explanation of this effect based on the dipolar approximation points to the reduction in radiative losses within the Ag nanoparticles when in contact with cobalt. This is also supported by a model of coupling between poor and good conductors based on the surface to volume ratio. This study presents a new type of bandwidth engineering, one based on using bimetal nanostructures, to tune and/or enhance the quality factor and quantum efficiency for near and far-field plasmonic applications.

  14. Quiet engine program flight engine design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klapproth, J. F.; Neitzel, R. E.; Seeley, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of a preliminary flight engine design study based on the Quiet Engine Program high-bypass, low-noise turbofan engines. Engine configurations, weight, noise characteristics, and performance over a range of flight conditions typical of a subsonic transport aircraft were considered. High and low tip speed engines in various acoustically treated nacelle configurations were included.

  15. Analysis of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. It is possible that future designs will continue this trend, leading to very-high or ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. Regardless of the engine architecture chosen, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  16. GENENG 2: A program for calculating design and off-design performance of two- and three-spool turbofans with as many as three nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.; Koenig, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program which calculates steady-state design and off-design jet engine performance for two- or three-spool turbofans with one, two, or three nozzles is described. Included in the report are complete FORTRAN 4 listings of the program with sample results for nine basic turbofan engines that can be calculated: (1) three-spool, three-stream engine; (2) two-spool, three-stream, boosted-fan engine; (3) two-spool, three-stream, supercharged-compressor engine; (4) three-spool, two-stream engine; (5) two-spool, two-stream engine; (6) three-spool, three-stream, aft-fan engine; (7) two-spool, three-stream, aft-fan engine; (8) two-spool, two-stream, aft-engine; and (9) three-spool, two-stream, aft-fan engine. The simulation of other engines by using logical variables built into the program is also described.

  17. Investigation of the stall-induced shock wave (hammershock) at the inlet to the engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, A. P.; Soeder, R. H.; Moss, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The peak static pressures measured at the inlet to the engine during stall are presented for a turbojet and two turbofan engines. It is shown for one turbofan and the turbojet that the static pressure ratio across the hammershock does not exceed significantly the normal shock pressure ratio necessary to stop the flow. The second turbofan engine did not follow this rule. Possible reasons for the departure are discussed. For the two turbofan engines the influence of the stall method on the hammershock intensity was investigated. Data related to the spatial distribution of pressure in the hammershock are also presented.

  18. Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielak, Gerald W.; Premo, John W.; Hersh, Alan S.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program goal is to reduce aircraft noise by 10 EPNdB by the year 2000 relative, to 1992 technology. The improvement goal for nacelle attenuation is 25% relative to 1992 technology by 1997 and 50% by 2000. The Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts Task work by Boeing presented in this document was in support of these goals. The basis for the technical approach was a Boeing study conducted in 1993-94 under NASA/FAA contract NAS1-19349, Task 6, investigating broadband acoustic liner concepts. As a result of this work, it was recommended that linear double layer, linear and perforate triple layer, parallel element, and bulk absorber liners be further investigated to improve nacelle attenuations. NASA LaRC also suggested that "adaptive" liner concepts that would allow "in-situ" acoustic impedance control also be considered. As a result, bias flow and high-temperature liner concepts were also added to the investigation. The major conclusion from the above studies is that improvements in nacelle liner average acoustic impedance characteristics alone will not result in 25% increased nacelle noise reduction relative to 1992 technology. Nacelle design advancements currently being developed by Boeing are expected to add 20-40% more acoustic lining to hardwall regions in current inlets, which is predicted to result in and additional 40-80% attenuation improvement. Similar advancements are expected to allow 10-30% more acoustic lining in current fan ducts with 10-30% more attenuation expected. In addition, Boeing is currently developing a scarf inlet concept which is expected to give an additional 40-80% attenuation improvement for equivalent lining areas.

  19. Supersonic fan engines for military aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Engine performance and mission studies were performed for turbofan engines with supersonic through-flow fans. A Mach 2.4 CTOL aircraft was used in the study. Two missions were considered: a long range penetrator mission and a long range intercept mission. The supersonic fan engine is compared with an augmented mixed flow turbofan in terms of mission radius for a fixed takeoff gross weight of 75,000 lbm. The mission radius of aircraft powered by supersonic fan engines could be 15 percent longer than aircraft powered with conventional turbofan engines at moderate thrust to gross weight ratios. The climb and acceleration performance of the supersonic fan engines is better than that of the conventional turbofan engines.

  20. Impacts of Pristine and Transformed Ag and Cu Engineered Nanomaterials on Surficial Sediment Microbial Communities Appear Short-Lived.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joe D; Stegemeier, John P; Bibby, Kyle; Marinakos, Stella M; Lowry, Gregory V; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory-based studies have shown that many soluble metal and metal oxide engineered nanomaterials (ENM) exert strong toxic effects on microorganisms. However, laboratory-based studies lack the complexity of natural systems and often use "as manufactured" ENMs rather than more environmentally relevant transformed ENMs, leaving open the question of whether natural ligands and seasonal variation will mitigate ENM impacts. Because ENMs will accumulate in subaquatic sediments, we examined the effects of pristine and transformed Ag and Cu ENMs on surficial sediment microbial communities in simulated freshwater wetlands. Five identical mesocosms were dosed through the water column with either Ag(0), Ag2S, CuO or CuS ENMs (nominal sizes of 4.67 ± 1.4, 18.1 ± 3.2, 31.1 ± 12, and 12.4 ± 4.1, respectively) or Cu(2+). Microbial communities were examined at 0, 7, 30, 90, 180, and 300 d using qPCR and high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results suggest differential short-term impacts of Ag(0) and Ag2S, similarities between CuO and CuS, and differences between Cu ENMs and Cu(2+). PICRUSt-predicted metagenomes displayed differential effects of Ag treatments on photosynthesis and of Cu treatments on methane metabolism. By 300 d, all metrics pointed to reconvergence of ENM-dosed mesocosm microbial community structure and composition, suggesting that the long-term microbial community impacts from a pulse of Ag or Cu ENMs are limited.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of a heat pipe heat exchanger on a regenerative turbofan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation was made of a regenerative turbofan engine using a heat pipe heat exchanger. The heat exchanger had an effectiveness of 0.70, a pressure drop of 3 percent on each side, and used sodium for the working fluid in the stainless steel heat pipes. The engine was compared to a reference turbofan engine originally designed for service in 1979. Both engines had a bypass ratio of 4.5 and a fan pressure ratio of 2.0. The design thrust of the engines was in the 4000 N range at a cruise condition of Mach 0.98 and 11.6 km. It is shown that heat pipe heat exchangers of this type cause a large weight and size problem for the engine. The penalties were too severe to be overcome by the small uninstalled fuel consumption advantage. The type of heat exchanger should only be considered for small airflow engines in flight applications. Ground applications might prove more suitable and flexible.

  2. Statistical Turbofan Architecture Management for Use in a Supercirculation Wing Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drãgan, Valeriu

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents an attempt to determine weather the architecture difference between the two spool and three spool turbofan engines can have any significant effect uppon their use in super circulation wing (SCW) aircraft. Such aircraft have been experimented with since 1970's and have been revived because of growing interest in silent STOL aircraft. The approach used is statistical, i.e. actual data provided by engine manufacturers and regulating authorities such as ICAO and EASA was used to derive certain relevant parameters which were then analyzed and conclusions were formulated.

  3. Computational aero-acoustics for fan duct propagation and radiation. Current status and application to turbofan liner optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, R. J.; Sugimoto, R.; Mustafi, P.

    2011-08-01

    Novel techniques are presented to reduce noise from turbofan aircraft engines by optimising the acoustic treatment in engine ducts. The application of Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA) to predict acoustic propagation and absorption in turbofan ducts is reviewed and a critical assessment of performance indicates that validated and accurate techniques are now available for realistic engine predictions. A procedure for integrating CAA methods with state of the art optimisation techniques is proposed in the remainder of the article. This is achieved by embedding advanced computational methods for noise prediction within automated and semi-automated optimisation schemes. Two different strategies are described and applied to realistic nacelle geometries and fan sources to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach for industry scale problems.

  4. Technologies for Turbofan Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's engine noise research since 1992 is given for subsonic commercial aircraft applications. Highlights are included from the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project with emphasis on engine source noise reduction. Noise reduction goals for 10 EPNdB by 207 and 20 EPNdB by 2022 are reviewed. Fan and jet noise technologies are highlighted from the AST program including higher bypass ratio propulsion, scarf inlets, forward-swept fans, swept/leaned stators, chevron nozzles, noise prediction methods, and active noise control for fans. Source diagnostic tests for fans and jets that have been completed over the past few years are presented showing how new flow measurement methods such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) have played a key role in understanding turbulence, the noise generation process, and how to improve noise prediction methods. Tests focused on source decomposition have helped identify which engine components need further noise reduction. The role of Computational AeroAcoustics (CAA) for fan noise prediction is presented. Advanced noise reduction methods such as Hershel-Quincke tubes and trailing edge blowing for fan noise that are currently being pursued n the QAT program are also presented. Highlights are shown form engine validation and flight demonstrations that were done in the late 1990's with Pratt & Whitney on their PW4098 engine and Honeywell on their TFE-731-60 engine. Finally, future propulsion configurations currently being studied that show promise towards meeting NASA's long term goal of 20 dB noise reduction are shown including a Dual Fan Engine concept on a Blended Wing Body aircraft.

  5. Preliminary study of advanced turbofans for low energy consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, G.

    1975-01-01

    This analysis determines the effect of higher overall engine pressure ratios (OPR's), bypass ratios (BPR's), and turbine rotor-inlet temperature on a Mach-0.85 transport having a range of 5556 km (3000 nmi) and carrying a payload of 18144 kg (40,000 lbs-200 passengers). Sideline noises (jet plus fan) of between 91 and 106 EPNdB (FAR36) are considered. Takeoff gross weight (TOGW), fuel consumption (kg/pass. km) and direct operating cost (DOC) are used at the figures of merit. Based on predicted 1985 levels of engine technology and a noise goal of 96 EPNdB, the higher-OPR engine results in an airplane that is 18 percent lighter in terms of TOGW, uses 22.3 percent less fuel, and has a 14.7 percent lower DOC than a comparable airplane powered by a current turbofan. Cooling the compressor bleed air and lowering the cruise Mach number appear attractive in terms of further improving the figures of merit.

  6. Plasmonic effect of Ag nanoparticles in a SiON antireflective coating: engineering rules and physical barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecler, S.; Bastide, S.; Tan, J.; Qu, M.; Slaoui, A.; Fix, T.

    2016-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been proposed in the architectures of several solar cells as a way to enhance light collection and thus to increase their efficiency. Here, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are embedded in a SiON antireflective layer using an electroless technique. The plasmonic effects are modeled and observed experimentally for NPs 5 to 200 nm in size. The systematic comparison of scattering and extinction efficiencies computed as a function of the NPs and surrounding medium properties allows establishing engineering rules, validated by the experimental measurements. The fact that Ag NPs larger than 30 nm mainly contribute to light scattering and therefore to optical path enlargement (green-red light), whereas those smaller than 15 nm absorb light by light trapping (blue-green), is demonstrated and physically explained. A physical barrier making it impossible to shift the dominant resonance beyond 650 nm is pointed out.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPERSONIC TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT ENGINE - PHASE II-A.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    JET TRANSPORT PLANES, *SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT ) (U) TURBOJET ENGINES , PERFORMANCE( ENGINEERING ), TURBOFAN ENGINES , AFTERBURNING, SPECIFICATIONS...COMPRESSORS, GEOMETRY, TURBOJET INLETS, COMBUSTION, TEST EQUIPMENT, TURBINE BLADES , HEAT TRANSFER, AIRFOILS , CASCADE STRUCTURES, EVAPOTRANSPIRATION, PLUG NOZZLES, ANECHOIC CHAMBERS, BEARINGS, SEALS, DESIGN, FATIGUE(MECHANICS)

  8. Performance Cycle Analysis of a Two-Spool, Separate-Exhaust Turbofan With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Mattingly, J. D.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the performance cycle analysis of a dual-spool, separate-exhaust turbofan engine, with an Interstage Turbine Burner serving as a secondary combustor. The ITB, which is located at the transition duct between the high- and the low-pressure turbines, is a relatively new concept for increasing specific thrust and lowering pollutant emissions in modern jet engine propulsion. A detailed performance analysis of this engine has been conducted for steady-state engine performance prediction. A code is written and is capable of predicting engine performances (i.e., thrust and thrust specific fuel consumption) at varying flight conditions and throttle settings. Two design-point engines were studied to reveal trends in performance at both full and partial throttle operations. A mission analysis is also presented to assure the advantage of saving fuel by adding ITB.

  9. Fuel conservative aircraft engine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nored, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technology developments for more fuel-efficiency subsonic transport aircraft are reported. Three major propulsion projects were considered: (1) engine component improvement - directed at current engines; (2) energy efficient engine - directed at new turbofan engines; and (3) advanced turboprops - directed at technology for advanced turboprop-powered aircraft. Each project is reviewed and some of the technologies and recent accomplishments are described.

  10. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Turbofan for an Advanced, Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest surrounds the design of the next generation of single-aisle commercial transports in the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 class. Aircraft designers will depend on advanced, next-generation turbofan engines to power these airplanes. The focus of this study is to apply single- and multi-objective optimization algorithms to the conceptual design of ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines for this class of aircraft, using NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project metrics as multidisciplinary objectives for optimization. The independent design variables investigated include three continuous variables: sea level static thrust, wing reference area, and aerodynamic design point fan pressure ratio, and four discrete variables: overall pressure ratio, fan drive system architecture (i.e., direct- or gear-driven), bypass nozzle architecture (i.e., fixed- or variable geometry), and the high- and low-pressure compressor work split. Ramp weight, fuel burn, noise, and emissions are the parameters treated as dependent objective functions. These optimized solutions provide insight to the ultrahigh bypass engine design process and provide information to NASA program management to help guide its technology development efforts.

  11. System for Centering a Turbofan in a Nacelle During Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Cameron C.; Thompson, William K.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Shook, Tony D.

    2003-01-01

    A feedback position-control system has been developed for maintaining the concentricity of a turbofan with respect to a nacelle during acoustic and flow tests in a wind tunnel. The system is needed for the following reasons: Thermal and thrust loads can displace the fan relative to the nacelle; In the particular test apparatus (see Figure 1), denoted as a rotor-only nacelle (RAN), the struts, vanes, and other stator components of a turbofan engine that ordinarily maintain the required concentricity in the face of thermal and thrust loads are not present; and The struts and stator components are not present because it is necessary to provide a flow path that is acoustically clean in the sense that the measured noise can be attributed to the fan alone. The system is depicted schematically in Figure 2. The nacelle is supported by two struts attached to a two-axis traverse table located outside the wind-tunnel wall. Two servomotors acting through 100:1 gearboxes drive the table along the Y and Z axes, which are perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The Y and Z components of the deviation from concentricity are measured by four laser displacement sensors mounted on the nacelle and aimed at reflective targets on the center body, which is part of the fan assembly. The outputs of the laser displacement sensors are digitized and processed through a personal computer programmed with control software. The control output of the computer commands the servomotors to move the table as needed to restore concentricity. Numerous software and hardware travel limits and alarms are provided to maximize safety. A highly ablative rub strip in the nacelle minimizes the probability of damage in the event that a deviation from concentricity exceeds the radial clearance [<0.004 in. (<0.1 mm)] between the inner surface of the nacelle and the tips of the fan blades. To be able to prevent an excursion in excess of the tip clearance, the system must be accurate enough to control X and Y

  12. Ice crystal ingestion by turbofans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Pabon, Manuel A.

    This Thesis will present the problem of inflight icing in general and inflight icing caused by the ingestion of high altitude ice crystals produced by high energy mesoscale convective complexes in particular, and propose a new device to prevent it based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Inflight icing is known to be the cause of 583 air accidents and more than 800 deaths in more than a decade. The new ice crystal ingestion problem has caused more than 100 flights to lose engine power since the 1990's, and the NTSB identified it as one of the causes of the Air France flight 447 accident in 1-Jun2008. The mechanics of inflight icing not caused by ice crystals are well established. Aircraft surfaces exposed to supercooled liquid water droplets will accrete ice in direct proportion of the droplet catch and the freezing heat transfer process. The multiphase flow droplet catch is predicted by the simple sum of forces on each spherical droplet and a droplet trajectory calculation based on Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis. The most widely used freezing heat transfer model for inflight icing caused by supercooled droplets was established by Messinger. Several computer programs implement these analytical models to predict inflight icing, with LEWICE being based on Lagrangian analysis and FENSAP being based on Eulerian analysis as the best representatives among them. This Thesis presents the multiphase fluid mechanics particular to ice crystals, and explains how it differs from the established droplet multiphase flow, and the obstacles in implementing the former in computational analysis. A new modification of the Messinger thermal model is proposed to account for ice accretion produced by ice crystal impingement. Because there exist no computational and experimental ways to fully replicate ice crystal inflight icing, and because existing ice protections systems consume vast amounts of energy, a new ice protection device based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma is

  13. NOx abatement in the exhaust of lean-burn natural gas engines over Ag-supported γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Y.; Kambolis, A.; Boréave, A.; Giroir-Fendler, A.; Retailleau-Mevel, L.; Guiot, B.; Marchand, O.; Walter, M.; Desse, M.-L.; Marchin, L.; Vernoux, P.

    2016-04-01

    A series of Ag catalysts supported on γ-Al2O3, including two different γ-Al2O3 supports and various Ag loadings (2-8 wt.%), was prepared, characterized (SEM, TEM, BET, physisorption, TPR, NH3-TPD) and tested for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by CH4 for lean-burn natural gas engines exhausts. The catalysts containing 2 wt.% Ag supported on γ-Al2O3 were found to be most efficient for the NOx reduction into N2 with a maximal conversion of 23% at 650 °C. This activity was clearly linked with the ability of the catalyst to concomitantly produce CO, via the methane steam reforming, and NO2. The presence of small AgOx nanoparticles seems to be crucial for the methane activation and NOx reduction.

  14. Comparison of advanced turboprop and turbofan airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a parametric study to determine the effects of design variables and penalties on the fuel efficiency of Mach 0.8, 125-passenger, advanced turboprop airplanes show that propeller-wing interference penalty has a major effect. Propeller tip speed has a minor effect, and could be decreased to alleviate the noise problem without significant effects on fuel efficiency. The anticipated noise levels produced by the propfan will require additional acoustical treatment for the fuselage; this additional weight can have a significant effect on fuel efficiency. The propfan advantage over an equivalent technology turbofan is strongly dependent on the interference penalty and acoustical treatment weight. Lowering the cruise Mach number to around 0.73 would result in greatly increased fuel efficiency.

  15. Deployable Engine Air Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    On approach, next-generation aircraft are likely to have airframe noise levels that are comparable to or in excess of engine noise. ATA Engineering, Inc. (ATA) is developing a novel quiet engine air brake (EAB), a device that generates "equivalent drag" within the engine through stream thrust reduction by creating a swirling outflow in the turbofan exhaust nozzle. Two Phase II projects were conducted to mature this technology: (1) a concept development program (CDP) and (2) a system development program (SDP).

  16. The design and development of a mixer compound exhaust system for a quiet clean general aviation turbofan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, W. L.; Thompson, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    Lower engine fuel consumption has become a dominant factor in turbofan engine design due to rapidly increasing fuel costs. One engine component with a large impact on engine performance is the exhaust system. Previous exhaust system studies have demonstrated the significant exhaust system efficiency gains available through mixing of the core and bypass flows. Typically, a large, costly rig and engine program are required to develop and optimize these gains. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the low-cost design system used for the quiet, clean general aviation turbofan mixer nozzle design and development. The scale model and full-scale engine test results confirm the predicted 3 to 5% reduction in cruise fuel consumption. This unique design system, which is based on integrating advanced three-dimensional viscous numerical methods with empirical optimization techniques, is summarized and detailed comparisons with test data are presented. The ability to accurately predict relative performance of mixer systems with substantially reduced development time and cost savings is demonstrated.

  17. Computation of noise radiation from turbofans: A parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, M.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents the results of a parametric study of the turbofan far-field noise radiation using a finite element technique. Several turbofan noise radiation characteristics of both the inlet and the aft ducts have been examined through the finite element solutions. The predicted far-field principal lobe angle variations with duct Mach number and cut-off ratio compare very well with the available analytical results. The solutions also show that the far-field lobe angle is only a function of cut-off ratio, and nearly independent of the mode number. These results indicate that the finite element codes are well suited for the prediction of noise radiation characteristics of a turbofan. The effects of variations in the aft duct geometry are examined. The ability of the codes to handle ducts with acoustic treatments is also demonstrated.

  18. Computation of noise radiation from turbofans: A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of a parametric study of the turbofan far-field noise radiation using a finite element technique. Several turbofan noise radiation characteristics of both the inlet and the aft ducts have been examined through the finite element solutions. The predicted far-field principal lobe angle variations with duct Mach number and cut-off ratio compare very well with the available analytical results. The solutions also show that the far-field lobe angle is only a function of cut-off ratio, and nearly independent of the mode number. These results indicate that the finite element codes are well suited for the prediction of noise radiation characteristics of a turbofan. The effects of variations in the aft duct geometry are examined. The ability of the codes to handle ducts with acoustic treatments is also demonstrated.

  19. Acoustic scattering by a spliced turbofan inlet duct liner at supersonic fan speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, A.; Wright, M. C. M.

    2006-05-01

    Fan noise is one of the principal noise sources generated by a turbofan aero-engine. At supersonic fan speeds, fan tones are generated by the "rotor-alone" pressure field. In general, these tones can be well absorbed by an inlet duct acoustic liner, apart from at high supersonic fan speeds. However, in practice inlet duct liners contain acoustically hard longitudinal splices which cause scattering. This leads to acoustic energy being scattered into a range of different azimuthal mode orders, similar to the modal content resulting from rotor-stator interactions. The effectiveness of an inlet duct lining is reduced because acoustic energy is scattered into modes that are poorly absorbed by the liner. In this article, the effect of this acoustic scattering is examined by three-dimensional finite-element simulations of sound transmission in a turbofan inlet duct. Results include predictions of the sound power transmission loss with different splice widths, and at different supersonic fan speeds. These results demonstrate how acoustic scattering by liner splices can adversely affect fan tone noise levels at low supersonic fan speeds, but have little adverse affect on noise levels at high supersonic fan speeds. The potential noise benefit that could be achieved by manufacturing thinner splices is also examined.

  20. Band gap-engineered ZnO and Ag/ZnO by ball-milling method and their photocatalytic and Fenton-like photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young In; Jung, Hye Jin; Shin, Weon Gyu; Sohn, Youngku

    2015-11-01

    The hybridization of ZnO with Ag has been performed extensively to increase the efficiency of ZnO in various applications, including catalysis. In this study, a wet (w) and dry (d) ball-milling method was used to hybridize Ag with ZnO nanoparticles, and their physicochemical properties were examined. Visible light absorption was enhanced and the band gap was engineered by ball-milling and Ag hybridization. Their photocatalytic activities were tested with rhodamine B (RhB) and a mixed dye (methyl orange + RhB + methylene blue) under visible light irradiation. For pure RhB, the photocatalytic activity was decreased by ball-milling and was observed in the order of ZnO(d) < Ag/ZnO(d) < ZnO(w) < Ag/ZnO(w) ≤ ZnO(ref). For the degradation of RhB and methylene blue (MB) in the mixed dye (or the simulated real contaminated water), the photocatalytic activity was observed in the order of Ag/ZnO(d) < ZnO(d) < ZnO(w) < Ag/ZnO(w) ≤ ZnO(ref). When the photodegradation tested with H2O2 addition, however, the Fenton-like photocatalytic activity was reversed and the ZnO(ref) showed the poorest activity for the degradation of RhB and methylene blue (MB). In the mixed dye over all the catalysts, methyl orange (MO) was degraded most rapidly. The relative degradation rates of RhB and MB were found to be dependent on the catalyst and reaction conditions.

  1. Aircraft Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the detailed simulation of Aircraft Turbofan Engine. The objectives were to develop a detailed flow model of a full turbofan engine that runs on parallel workstation clusters overnight and to develop an integrated system of codes for combustor design and analysis to enable significant reduction in design time and cost. The model will initially simulate the 3-D flow in the primary flow path including the flow and chemistry in the combustor, and ultimately result in a multidisciplinary model of the engine. The overnight 3-D simulation capability of the primary flow path in a complete engine will enable significant reduction in the design and development time of gas turbine engines. In addition, the NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) multidisciplinary integration and analysis are discussed.

  2. Bidirectional threshold switching in engineered multilayer (Cu{sub 2}O/Ag:Cu{sub 2}O/Cu{sub 2}O) stack for cross-point selector application

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jeonghwan; Prakash, Amit; Lee, Daeseok; Woo, Jiyong; Cha, Euijun; Lee, Sangheon; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we achieved bidirectional threshold switching (TS) for selector applications in a Ag-Cu{sub 2}O-based programmable-metallization-cell device by engineering the stack wherein Ag was intentionally incorporated in the oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) layer by a simple approach comprising co-sputtering and subsequent optimized annealing. The distribution of the Ag was directly confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy line profiling. The observed TS occurred because of the spontaneous self-rupturing of the unstable Ag filament that formed in the oxide layer.

  3. Aircraft and Engine Development Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Control in Flight * Integrated Inlet- engine * Power/weight Exceeds Unity F-lll * Advanced Engines * Augmented Turbofan * High Turbine Temperature...residence times). Also, fabrication of a small scale "hot" engine with rotating components such as compressors and turbines with cooled blades , is...capabil- ities are essential to meet the needs of current and projected aircraft and engine programs. The required free jet nozzles should be capable of

  4. Energy efficient engine component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The design of an energy efficient commercial turbofan engine is examined with emphasis on lower fuel consumption and operating costs. Propulsion system performance, emission standards, and noise reduction are also investigated. A detailed design analysis of the engine/aircraft configuration, engine components, and core engine is presented along with an evaluation of the technology and testing involved.

  5. Computer Jet-Engine-Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disbrow, James D.; Duke, Eugene L.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    "Intelligent Computer Assistant for Engine Monitoring" (ICAEM), computer-based monitoring system intended to distill and display data on conditions of operation of two turbofan engines of F-18, is in preliminary state of development. System reduces burden on propulsion engineer by providing single display of summary information on statuses of engines and alerting engineer to anomalous conditions. Effective use of prior engine-monitoring system requires continuous attention to multiple displays.

  6. Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P. K.; Harbour, L.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify component technology requirements for small, expendable gas turbine engines that would result in substantial improvements in performance and cost by the year 2000. A subsonic, 2600 nautical mile (4815 km) strategic cruise missile mission was selected for study. A baseline (state-of-the-art) engine and missile configuration were defined to evaluate the advanced technology engines. Two advanced technology engines were configured and evaluated using advanced component efficiencies and ceramic composite materials; a 22:1 overall pressure ratio, 3.85 bypass ratio twin-spool turbofan; and an 8:1 overall pressure, 3.66 bypass ratio, single-spool recuperated turbofan with 0.85 recuperator effectiveness. Results of mission analysis indicated a reduction in fuel burn of 38 and 47 percent compared to the baseline engine when using the advanced turbofan and recuperated turbofan, respectively. While use of either advanced engine resulted in approximately a 25 percent reduction in missile size, the unit life cycle (LCC) cost reduction of 56 percent for the advanced turbofan relative to the baseline engine gave it a decisive advantage over the recuperated turbofan with 47 percent LCC reduction. An additional range improvement of 10 percent results when using a 56 percent loaded carbon slurry fuel with either engine. These results can be realized only if significant progress is attained in the fields of solid lubricated bearings, small aerodynamic component performance, composite ceramic materials and integration of slurry fuels. A technology plan outlining prospective programs in these fields is presented.

  7. Ultra-high speed vacuum pump system with first stage turbofan and second stage turbomolecular pump

    SciTech Connect

    Jostlein, Hans

    2006-04-04

    An ultra-high speed vacuum pump evacuation system includes a first stage ultra-high speed turbofan and a second stage conventional turbomolecular pump. The turbofan is either connected in series to a chamber to be evacuated, or is optionally disposed entirely within the chamber. The turbofan employs large diameter rotor blades operating at high linear blade velocity to impart an ultra-high pumping speed to a fluid. The second stage turbomolecular pump is fluidly connected downstream from the first stage turbofan. In operation, the first stage turbofan operates in a pre-existing vacuum, with the fluid asserting only small axial forces upon the rotor blades. The turbofan imparts a velocity to fluid particles towards an outlet at a high volume rate, but moderate compression ratio. The second stage conventional turbomolecular pump then compresses the fluid to pressures for evacuation by a roughing pump.

  8. Performance Prediction and Simulation of Gas Turbine Engine Operation (La presision des performances et la simulation du fonctionnement des turbomoteurs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    destructive acoustic frequencies. The screech damper is part of the liner that protects the case from high temperatures. Downstream of the afterburner ...fabrication and thus costly mistakes can be prevented. Special flow-path design considerations in fast-response twin-spool- afterburning -turbofan engines can be... afterburning turbofan fighter engine with fast rotor response and augmentor transient requirements. Under transient conditions, the engine components can

  9. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL): Altitude Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test in the NASA Glenn Research Centers Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) Facility in February 2013. Honeywell Engines supplied the test article, an obsolete, unmodified Lycoming ALF502-R5 turbofan engine serial number LF01 that experienced an un-commanded loss of thrust event while operating at certain high altitude ice crystal icing conditions. These known conditions were duplicated in the PSL for this testing.

  10. 78 FR 47235 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... of those LLPs to account for the additional low cycle fatigue (LCF) life consumed during flight tests... in Boeing 747-8 flight tests had consumed more cyclic life than they would have in revenue flight... Boeing 747-8 flight tests had consumed more cyclic life than they would have in revenue flight...

  11. Sensor/actuator failure detection for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behbehani, K.; Leininger, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for sensor/actuator failure detection using a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test is described. The GLR concept can provide a reliable evaluation of failure occurence when associated with a feedback control design which does not require sensor outputs to provide data estimates. A GLR detector was developed and tested.

  12. 77 FR 51695 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... of a quality escape of about 8,000 2nd stage low-pressure turbine (LPT2) rotor blades, manufactured... certain LPT2 rotor blades. We are issuing this AD to correct an unsafe condition caused by these blades... LPT2 rotor blades. Comments We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing this AD....

  13. Augmentor emissions reduction technology program. [for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colley, W. C.; Kenworthy, M. J.; Bahr, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Technology to reduce pollutant emissions from duct-burner-type augmentors for use on advanced supersonic cruise aircraft was investigated. Test configurations, representing variations of two duct-burner design concepts, were tested in a rectangular sector rig at inlet temperature and pressure conditions corresponding to takeoff, transonic climb, and supersonic cruise flight conditions. Both design concepts used piloted flameholders to stabilize combustion of lean, premixed fuel/air mixtures. The concepts differed in the flameholder type used. High combustion efficiency (97%) and low levels of emissions (1.19 g/kg fuel) were achieved. The detailed measurements suggested the direction that future development efforts should take to obtain further reductions in emission levels and associated improvements in combustion efficiency over an increased range of temperature rise conditions.

  14. 78 FR 50320 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... requires initial and repetitive visual inspections of the BAI air duct, removal from service of the BAI air... require initial and repetitive visual inspections of the BAI air duct, removal from service of the BAI air... Duct (1) Perform an initial visual inspection of the BAI air duct, P/ N 2469M32G01, for cracks prior...

  15. 78 FR 21578 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... reports of cracks in the BAI air duct. This proposed AD would require initial and repetitive visual... are needed. This proposed AD would require initial visual inspection of the BAI air duct before it reaches 400 cycles since new (CSN), and repetitive visual inspections every 100 cycles thereafter. If...

  16. Rate-Based Model Predictive Control of Turbofan Engine Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    An innovative model predictive control strategy is developed for control of nonlinear aircraft propulsion systems and sub-systems. At the heart of the controller is a rate-based linear parameter-varying model that propagates the state derivatives across the prediction horizon, extending prediction fidelity to transient regimes where conventional models begin to lose validity. The new control law is applied to a demanding active clearance control application, where the objectives are to tightly regulate blade tip clearances and also anticipate and avoid detrimental blade-shroud rub occurrences by optimally maintaining a predefined minimum clearance. Simulation results verify that the rate-based controller is capable of satisfying the objectives during realistic flight scenarios where both a conventional Jacobian-based model predictive control law and an unconstrained linear-quadratic optimal controller are incapable of doing so. The controller is evaluated using a variety of different actuators, illustrating the efficacy and versatility of the control approach. It is concluded that the new strategy has promise for this and other nonlinear aerospace applications that place high importance on the attainment of control objectives during transient regimes.

  17. 78 FR 49111 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... high-pressure turbine (HPT) air seal part number installed. This AD was prompted by discovery of cracks in second-stage HPT air seals. This AD requires inspection and removal from service of HPT air seals that fail inspection. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the second-stage HPT air seal,...

  18. Sensor failure detection system. [for the F100 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, E. C.; Laprad, R. F.; Mcglone, M. E.; Rock, S. M.; Akhter, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced concepts for detecting, isolating, and accommodating sensor failures were studied to determine their applicability to the gas turbine control problem. Five concepts were formulated based upon such techniques as Kalman filters and a screening process led to the selection of one advanced concept for further evaluation. The selected advanced concept uses a Kalman filter to generate residuals, a weighted sum square residuals technique to detect soft failures, likelihood ratio testing of a bank of Kalman filters for isolation, and reconfiguring of the normal mode Kalman filter by eliminating the failed input to accommodate the failure. The advanced concept was compared to a baseline parameter synthesis technique. The advanced concept was shown to be a viable concept for detecting, isolating, and accommodating sensor failures for the gas turbine applications.

  19. 77 FR 16139 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... from PW that fan blade leading edge erosion can result in a fan thrust deterioration mode (FTDM... repair that removes erosion damage and restores the leading edge contour on fan blades with cutback... edge erosion can result in a fan thrust deterioration mode (FTDM) condition, a condition that cannot...

  20. 78 FR 38195 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... available in the AD docket shortly after receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jason Yang, Aerospace..., Burlington, MA 01803; phone: 781-238-7747; fax: 781-238-7199; email: jason.yang@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY... Information We reviewed GE GE90-100 Series Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) No. GE90-100 S/B 72-A0558, Revision...

  1. 78 FR 56594 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... distress of certain stage 1 high-pressure turbine (HPT) stator shrouds due to accelerated corrosion and... AD requires initial and repetitive on-wing 360-degree borescope inspections (BSIs) for corrosion and... corrosion and oxidation of stage 1 HPT stator shrouds. If a shroud failed the inspection, the NPRM...

  2. 76 FR 73489 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... limit. A disc fracture could result in an uncontained failure of the disc and damage to the airplane... limit. A disc fracture could result in an uncontained failure of the disc and damage to the airplane....

  3. 77 FR 67763 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... by 16 reports of damaged or failed 3rd stage low-pressure turbine (LPT) duct segments. This AD requires removing from service certain part numbers (P/Ns) of 3rd stage LPT duct segments. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the 3rd stage LPT duct segments, which could lead to LPT rotor...

  4. 78 FR 64419 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ...) case flange. This proposed AD would require a one-time eddy current inspection (ECI) of affected... the effective date of this AD, whichever is earlier, eddy current inspect the diffuser case and the... paragraph (e) of this AD. (g) Credit for Previous Actions If you performed an eddy current inspection of...

  5. Refined Exploration of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of the turbofan engine design space for an advanced technology single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) was conducted previously by the authors and is documented in a prior report. Through the course of that study and in a subsequent evaluation of the approach and results, a number of enhancements to the engine design ground rules and assumptions were identified. A follow-on effort was initiated to investigate the impacts of these changes on the original study results. The fundamental conclusions of the prior study were found to still be valid with the revised engine designs. The most significant impact of the design changes was a reduction in the aircraft weight and block fuel penalties incurred with low fan pressure ratio, ultra-high bypass ratio designs. This enables lower noise levels to be pursued (through lower fan pressure ratio) with minor negative impacts on aircraft weight and fuel efficiency. Regardless of the engine design selected, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  6. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    A study of quiet turbofan short takeoff aircraft for short haul air transportation was conducted. The objectives of the study were to: (1) define representative aircraft configurations, characteristics, and costs associated with their development, (2) identify critical technology and technology related problems to be resolved in successful introduction of representative short haul aircraft, (3) determine relationships between quiet short takeoff aircraft and the economic and social viability of short haul, and (4) identify high payoff technology areas.

  7. The Effect of Bypass Nozzle Exit Area on Fan Aerodynamic Performance and Noise in a Model Turbofan Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary, G.; Woodward, Richard P.; Jeracki, Robert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on identifying and understanding the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine, as well as determining their contribution to the overall aircraft noise signature. Therefore, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test program was conducted called the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test as part of the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology program. The test was performed in the anechoic NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a 1/5 scale model turbofan simulator which represented a current generation, medium pressure ratio, high bypass turbofan aircraft engine. The investigation focused on simulating in model scale only the bypass section of the turbofan engine. The test objectives were to: identify the noise sources within the model and determine their noise level; investigate several component design technologies by determining their impact on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan stage; and conduct detailed flow diagnostics within the fan flow field to characterize the physics of the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan model. This report discusses results obtained for one aspect of the Source Diagnostic Test that investigated the effect of the bypass or fan nozzle exit area on the bypass stage aerodynamic performance, specifically the fan and outlet guide vanes or stators, as well as the farfield acoustic noise level. The aerodynamic performance, farfield acoustics, and Laser Doppler Velocimeter flow diagnostic results are presented for the fan and four different fixed-area bypass nozzle configurations. The nozzles simulated fixed engine operating lines and encompassed the fan stage operating envelope from near stall to cruise. One nozzle was selected as a baseline reference, representing the nozzle area which would achieve the design point operating conditions and fan stage performance. The total area change from

  8. Turbine bypass turbofan with mid-turbine reingestion and method of operating the same

    SciTech Connect

    Klees, G.W.

    1984-03-13

    A supersonic two spool turbofan engine is disclosed capable not only of developing sufficient power to accelerate up to supersonic cruise and maintain efficient operation at supersonic cruise, but also arranged to cruise at subsonic velocities with a relatively low specific fuel consumption. The engine is provided with a variable bypass passageway downstream of the compressor. Flow into the bypass passageway is controlled so that during low power setting the bypass passageway is closed so that all the gaseous flow is directed through the turbine. During higher power settings, the bypass passageway is opened to the extent that a selected portion of the gaseous flow is directed through the bypass passageway to bypass the first stage of the turbine section so that the corrected flow to the first turbine stage remains substantially constant for high and low power setting of the engine. The bypass flow is then directed into the area between the first and second turbine to combine with the gaseous flow passing through the first turbine and pass through the second turbine.

  9. Design of a TF34 turbofan mixer for reduction of flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamay, A.; Edkins, D. P.; Mishler, R. B.; Clapper, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    This portion of the TF-34 turbofan quiet engine studies has been devoted to the selection and design of a special mixer exhaust nozzle system to reduce the maximum 150 m (500 foot) sideline noise generated by the impingement of four engine exhausts on a STOL wing flap system to less than 92 PNdB. The design concept selected consists of a 12-lobe internal mixer and a 12-lobe external mixer mounted in series. The internal mixer reduces maximum exhaust velocities by mixing the fan and turbine streams. The external mixer is designed to reduce the velocity of the exhaust stream striking the wing flap surfaces. A ground test version of this concept has been designed to be installed and tested on an acoustically treated TF-34 engine nacelle, with flexibility to simulate a flight version of this concept which has also been defined. Estimated noise levels are 2 PNdB below the objective at approach and 2 PNdB above the objective at takeoff, with an uncertainty band of +3, -2 PNdB.

  10. Feasibility study for convertible engine torque converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility study has shown that a dump/fill type torque converter has excellent potential for the convertible fan/shaft engine. The torque converter space requirement permits internal housing within the normal flow path of a turbofan engine at acceptable engine weight. The unit permits operating the engine in the turboshaft mode by decoupling the fan. To convert to turbofan mode, the torque converter overdrive capability bring the fan speed up to the power turbine speed to permit engagement of a mechanical lockup device when the shaft speed are synchronized. The conversion to turbofan mode can be made without drop of power turbine speed in less than 10 sec. Total thrust delivered to the aircraft by the proprotor, fan, and engine during tansient can be controlled to prevent loss of air speed or altitude. Heat rejection to the oil is low, and additional oil cooling capacity is not required. The turbofan engine aerodynamic design is basically uncompromised by convertibility and allows proper fan design for quiet and efficient cruise operation. Although the results of the feasibility study are exceedingly encouraging, it must be noted that they are based on extrapolation of limited existing data on torque converters. A component test program with three trial torque converter designs and concurrent computer modeling for fluid flow, stress, and dynamics, updated with test results from each unit, is recommended.

  11. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    Conceptual designs of Quiet Turbofan STOL Short-Haul Transport Aircraft for the mid-1980 time period are developed and analyzed to determine their technical, operational, and economic feasibility. A matrix of aircraft using various high-lift systems and design parameters are considered. Variations in aircraft characteristics, airport geometry and location, and operational techniques are analyzed systematically to determine their effects on the market, operating economics, and community acceptance. In these studies, the total systems approach is considered to be critically important in analyzing the potential of STOL aircraft to reduce noise pollution and alleviate the increasing air corridor and airport congestion.

  12. Factors which influence the behavior of turbofan forced mixer nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    A finite difference procedure was used to compute the mixing for three experimentally tested mixer geometries. Good agreement was obtained between analysis and experiment when the mechanisms responsible for secondary flow generation were properly modeled. Vorticity generation due to flow turning and vorticity generated within the centerbody lobe passage were found to be important. Results are presented for two different temperature ratios between fan and core streams and for two different free stream turbulence levels. It was concluded that the dominant mechanisms in turbofan mixers is associated with the secondary flows arising within the lobe region and their development within the mixing section.

  13. Surface plasmon dispersion engineering via double-metallic AU/AG layers for nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Zhao, Hongping; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Guangyu

    2014-04-01

    A double-metallic deposition process is used whereby adjacent layers of different metals are deposited on a substrate. The surface plasmon frequency of a base layer of a first metal is tuned by the surface plasmon frequency of a second layer of a second metal formed thereon. The amount of tuning is dependent upon the thickness of the metallic layers, and thus tuning can be achieved by varying the thicknesses of one or both of the metallic layers. In a preferred embodiment directed to enhanced LED technology in the green spectrum regime, a double-metallic Au/Ag layer comprising a base layer of gold (Au) followed by a second layer of silver (Ag) formed thereon is deposited on top of InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) on a sapphire/GaN substrate.

  14. Enzymatic plasmonic engineering of Ag/Au bimetallic nanoshells and their use for sensitive optical glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Wu, Haoxi; Jin, Yongdong

    2012-04-03

    Enzyme works for plasmonic nanostructure: an interesting enzyme-responsive hybrid Ag/Au-GOx bimetallic nanoshell (NS) system is reported, in which control over the enzyme reaction of glucose oxidase (GOx) can automatically fine-tune the morphology (from complete NS to porous NS) and optical properties of the hybrid nanostructure. The phenomenon is further exploited as a new platform for sensitive optical glucose sensing.

  15. Dual output variable pitch turbofan actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, R. H., Jr.; Broman, C. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved actuating mechanism was provided for a gas turbine engine incorporating fan blades of the variable pitch variety, the actuator adapted to rotate the individual fan blades within apertures in an associated fan disc. The actuator included means such as a pair of synchronizing ring gears, one on each side of the blade shanks, and adapted to engage pinions disposed thereon. Means were provided to impart rotation to the ring gears in opposite directions to effect rotation of the blade shanks in response to a predetermined input signal. In the event of system failure, a run-away actuator was prevented by an improved braking device which arrests the mechanism.

  16. Effectiveness of combined aircraft engine noise suppressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaletskiy, Yu. D.

    2012-07-01

    We consider the design features of fan noise suppressors in application to air intakes and the bypass duct of a turbofan engine. A combined liner is developed that has increased acoustic efficiency in comparison to conventional honeycomb liner. We demonstrate the important role of the area of the sound-absorbing liner between fan Rotor and Stator ensuring significant noise reduction.

  17. QCSEE task 2: Engine and installation preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, R. E.; Lee, R.; Chamay, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    High-bypass turbofan engines with features required for commercial short haul powered lift transports were designed. Two engines were configured for each of the externally blown flap installations, under-the-wing and over-the-wing. Estimates of installed and uninstalled performance, noise, and weight were defined for each propulsion system.

  18. Research and Development of the Aeroturbine Engine,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-15

    whether the selection of a turbojet or turbofan carries increased power. Afterwards, the engine cycle parameters (such as the pressurized ratio of the gns...into production. Conclusion The emergence of a new model aviation turbine engine is the achievement of the collective labors of a multitude of people...under unified organiza- tional leadership. Each organization and individual engaged in aviation turbine engine research and development resemble each

  19. Experience with low cost jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A summary is given of the results of a NASA program for reducing the cost of turbojet and turbofan engines. The design, construction, and testing of a simple turbojet, designed for use in missiles, is described. Low cost axial stage fabrication, the design of a fan jet engine suitable for propulsion of light aircraft, and application of such engines to provide higher flight speeds, are discussed.

  20. Operating condition and geometry effects on low-frequency afterburner combustion instability in a turbofan at altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullom, R. R.; Johnsen, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Three afterburner configurations were tested in a low-bypass-ratio turbofan engine to determine the effect of various fuel distributions, inlet conditions, flameholder geometry, and fuel injection location on combustion instability. Tests were conducted at simulated flight conditions of Mach 0.75 and 1.3 at altitudes from 11,580 to 14,020 m (38,000 to 46,000 ft). In these tests combustion instability with frequency from 28 to 90 Hz and peak-to-peak pressure amplitude up to 46.5 percent of the afterburner inlet total pressure level was encountered. Combustion instability was suppressed in these tests by varying the fuel distribution in the afterburner.

  1. Pollution reduction technology program for small jet aircraft engines: Class T1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, T. W.; Davis, F. G.; Mongia, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Small jet aircraft engines (EPA class T1, turbojet and turbofan engines of less than 35.6 kN thrust) were evaluated with the objective of attaining emissions reduction consistent with performance constraints. Configurations employing the technological advances were screened and developed through full scale rig testing. The most promising approaches in full-scale engine testing were evaluated.

  2. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over The Wing (OTW) design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of two experimental high bypass geared turbofan engines and propulsion systems for short haul passenger aircraft are described. The propulsion technology required for future externally blown flap aircraft with engines located both under the wing and over the wing is demonstrated. Composite structures and digital engine controls are among the topics included.

  3. Source Methodology for Turbofan Noise Prediction (SOURCE3D Technical Documentation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides the analytical documentation for the SOURCE3D Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. It derives the equations for the rotor scattering coefficients and stator source vector and scattering coefficients that are needed for use in the TFANS (Theoretical Fan Noise Design/Prediction System). SOURCE3D treats the rotor and stator as isolated source elements. TFANS uses this information, along with scattering coefficients for inlet and exit elements, and provides complete noise solutions for turbofan engines. SOURCE3D is composed of a collection of FORTRAN programs that have been obtained by extending the approach of the earlier V072 Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. Similar to V072, it treats the rotor and stator as a collection of blades and vanes having zero thickness and camber contained in an infinite, hardwall annular duct. SOURCE3D adds important features to the V072 capability-a rotor element, swirl flow and vorticity waves, actuator disks for flow turning, and combined rotor/actuator disk and stator/actuator disk elements. These items allow reflections from the rotor, frequency scattering, and mode trapping, thus providing more complete noise predictions than previously. The code has been thoroughly verified through comparison with D.B. Hanson's CUP2D two- dimensional code using a narrow annulus test case.

  4. Dispersion, dissipation and refraction of shock waves in acoustically treated turbofan inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Dilip; Li, Ding; A. Topol, David

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical investigation of the effects of the inlet duct liner on the acoustics of a high-bypass ratio turbofan rotor operating at supersonic tip relative flow conditions. The near field of the blade row is then composed of periodic shocks that evolve spatially both because of the varying mean flow and because of the presence of acoustic treatment. The evolution of this shock system is studied using a Computational Fluid Dynamics-based method incorporating a wall impedance boundary condition. The configuration examined is representative of a fan operating near the takeoff condition. The behavior of the acoustic power and the associated waveforms reveal that significant dispersion occurs to the extent that there are no shocks in the perturbation field leaving the entrance plane of the duct. The effect of wave refraction due to the high degree of shear in the mean flow near the entrance plane of the inlet is examined, and numerical experiments are conducted to show that the incorporation of liners in this region can be highly beneficial. The implications of these results for the design of aircraft engine acoustic liners are discussed.

  5. Acoustic scattering by an axially-segmented turbofan inlet duct liner at supersonic fan speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, A.; Astley, R. J.; Hii, V. J. T.; Baker, N. J.; Kempton, A. J.

    2006-07-01

    Fan noise is one of the principal noise sources in turbofan aero-engines. At supersonic fan speeds, fan tones are generated by the "rotor-alone" pressure field. In general, these tones can be well absorbed by an inlet duct acoustic liner, except at high supersonic fan speeds when the rotor-alone pressure field is well cut-on. In this article an axially segmented liner is proposed, which is predicted to improve the attenuation of tones at high supersonic fan speeds. The analysis is based on locally reacting cavity liners. The axially segmented liner is axisymmetric and consists of two circular sections of different linings joined together. The optimum design consists of two linings with the same face-sheet resistance, but with different cavity depths. The depth of the liner adjacent to the fan is very thin. This means that where the two liners are joined there is a wall impedance discontinuity that can cause acoustic scattering. Fan tones can be modelled in terms of spinning modes in a uniform circular-section duct. The liner is axisymmetric, so modal scattering will be only between different radial modes. The optimum design minimizes the acoustic energy scattered into the first radial mode. This improves the attenuation of fan tones at high supersonic fan speeds, because acoustic energy is scattered into high radial mode orders, which are better absorbed by the lining.

  6. Acoustic Performance of an Advanced Model Turbofan in Three Aeroacoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot-Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT), and in two other aeroacoustic facilities. The Universal Propulsion Simulator (UPS) fan was designed and manufactured by the General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) Company, and featured active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The reference test configurations were with the metal, M4, rotor with hardwall and treated bypass flow ducts. The UPS fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20 (limited flow data were also acquired at a Mach number of 0.25) which is representative of aircraft takeoff and approach conditions. Comparisons were made between data acquired within the airflow (9x15 LSWT and German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)) and outside of a free jet (Boeing Low Speed Aero acoustic Facility (LSAF) and DNW). Sideline data were acquired on an 89-in. (nominal 4 fan diameters) sideline using the same microphone assembly and holder in the 9x15 LSWT and DNW facilities. These data showed good agreement for similar UPS operating conditions and configurations. Distortion of fan spectra tonal content through a free jet shear layer was documented, suggesting that in-flow acoustic measurements are required for comprehensive fan noise diagnostics. However, there was good agreement for overall sound power level (PWL) fan noise measurements made both within and outside of the test facility airflow.

  7. Augmentor transient capability of an F100 engine equipped with a digital electronic engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Pai, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    An F100 augmented turbofan engine equipped with digital electronic engine control (DEEC) system was evaluated. The engine was equipped with a specially modified augmentor to provide improved steady state and transient augmentor capability. The combination of the DEEC and the modified augmentor was evaluated in sea level and altitude facility tests and then in four different flight phases in an F-15 aircraft. The augmentor configuration, logic, and test results are presented.

  8. Energy efficient aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, R.; Miller, B.

    1979-01-01

    The three engine programs that constitute the propulsion portion of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program are described, their status indicated, and anticipated improvements in SFC discussed. The three engine programs are: (1) engine component improvement, directed at current engines, (2) energy efficient engine, directed at new turbofan engines, and (3) advanced turboprops, directed at technology for advanced turboprop-powered aircraft with cruise speeds to Mach 0.8. Unique propulsion system interactive ties to the airframe resulting from engine design features to reduce fuel consumption are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advanced turboprop since it offers the largest potential fuel savings of the three propulsion programs and also has the strongest interactive ties to the airframe.

  9. Energy efficient aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, R.; Miller, B.

    1979-01-01

    The three engine programs that constitute the propulsion portion of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program are described, their status indicated, and anticipated improvements in SFC discussed. The three engine programs are (1) Engine Component Improvement--directed at current engines, (2) Energy Efficiency Engine directed at new turbofan engines, and (3) Advanced Turboprops--directed at technology for advanced turboprop--powered aircraft with cruise speeds to Mach 0.8. Unique propulsion system interactive ties to the airframe resulting from engine design features to reduce fuel consumption are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advanced turboprop since it offers the largest potential fuel savings of the three propulsion programs and also has the strongest interactive ties to the airframe.

  10. The energy efficient engine project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macioce, L. E.; Schaefer, J. W.; Saunders, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine Project is directed at providing, by 1984, the advanced technologies which could be used for a generation of fuel conservative turbofan engines. The project is conducted through contracts with the General Electric Company and Pratt and Whitney Aircraft. The scope of the entire project and the current status of these efforts are summarized. A description of the preliminary designs of the fully developed engines is included and the potential benefits of these advanced engines, as well as highlights of some of the component technology efforts conducted to date, are discussed.

  11. Hotspots engineering by grafting Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles on the Au film over slightly etched nanoparticles substrate for on-site paraquat sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoguang; Wu, Xuezhong; Dong, Peitao; Chen, Jian; Xiao, Rui

    2016-12-15

    Paraquat (PQ) pollutions are ultra-toxic to human beings and hard to be decomposed in the environment, thus requiring an on-site detection strategy. Herein, we developed a robust and rapid PQ sensing strategy based on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique. A hybrid SERS substrate was prepared by grafting the Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) on the Au film over slightly etched nanoparticles (Au FOSEN). Hotspots were engineered at the junctions as indicated by the finite difference time domain calculation. SERS performance of the hybrid substrate was explored using p-ATP as the Raman probe. The hybrid substrate gives higher enhancement factor comparing to either the Au FOSEN substrate or the Au@Ag core-shell NPs, and exhibits excellent reproducibility, homogeneity and stability. The proposed SERS substrates were prepared in batches for the practical PQ sensing. The total analysis time for a single sample, including the pre-treatment and measurement, was less than 5min with a PQ detection limit of 10nM. Peak intensities of the SERS signal were plotted as a function of the PQ concentrations to calibrate the sensitivity by fitting the Hill's equation. The plotted calibration curve showed a good log-log linearity with the coefficient of determination of 0.98. The selectivity of the sensing proposal was based on the "finger print" Raman spectra of the analyte. The proposed substrate exhibited good recovery when it applied to real water samples, including lab tap water, bottled water, and commercially obtained apple juice and grape juice. This SERS-based PQ detection method is simple, rapid, sensitive and selective, which shows great potential in pesticide residue and additives abuse monitoring.

  12. A status report on the Energy Efficient Engine Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macioce, L. E.; Schaefer, J. W.; Saunders, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) Project is directed at providing, by 1984, the advanced technologies which could be used for a new generation of fuel conservative turbofan engines. This paper summarizes the scope of the entire project and the current status of these efforts. Included is a description of the preliminary designs of the fully developed engines, the potential benefits of these advanced engines, and highlights of some of the component technology efforts conducted to date.

  13. Review of Aircraft Engine Fan Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft turbofan engines incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Both careful aerodynamic design of the fan and proper installation of the fan into the system are requirements for achieving the performance and acoustic objectives. The design and installation characteristics of high performance aircraft engine fans will be discussed along with some lessons learned that may be applicable to spaceflight fan applications.

  14. Parallel processor engine model program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Parallel Processor Engine Model Program is a generalized engineering tool intended to aid in the design of parallel processing real-time simulations of turbofan engines. It is written in the FORTRAN programming language and executes as a subset of the SOAPP simulation system. Input/output and execution control are provided by SOAPP; however, the analysis, emulation and simulation functions are completely self-contained. A framework in which a wide variety of parallel processing architectures could be evaluated and tools with which the parallel implementation of a real-time simulation technique could be assessed are provided.

  15. Energy efficient engine program contributions to aircraft fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    Significant advances in high bypass turbofan technologies that enhance fuel efficiency have been demonstrated in the NASA Energy Efficient Engine Program. This highly successful second propulsion element of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program included major contract efforts with both General Electric and Pratt & Whitney. Major results of these efforts will be presented including highlights from the NASA/General Electric E3 research turbofan engine test. Direct application of all the E3 technologies could result in fuel savings of over 18% compared to the CF6-50 and JT9D-7. Application of the E3 technologies to new and derivative engines such as the CF6-80C and PW 2037, as well as others, will be discussed. Significant portions of the fuel savings benefit for these new products can be directly related to the E3 technology program. Finally, results of a study looking at far term advanced turbofan engines will be briefly described. The study shows that substantial additional fuel savings over E3 are possible with additional turbofan technology programs.

  16. Energy efficient engine. Volume 1: Component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Technology for achieving lower installed fuel consumption and lower operating costs in future commercial turbofan engines are developed, evaluated, and demonstrated. The four program objectives are: (1) propulsion system analysis; (2) component analysis, design, and development; (3) core design, fabrication, and test; and (4) integrated core/low spoon design, fabrication, and test.

  17. Year 2000 small engine technology payoffs in cruise missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, B.; Benstein, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been conducted for advanced small (450-850 pounds thrust) gas turbine engines for a subsonic strategic cruise missile application, using projected year-2000 technology. Engine performance and configuration analyses were performed for two and three spool turbofan and propfan engine concepts. Mission and Life Cycle Cost (LCC) analyses were performed in which the candidate engines were compared to the baseline engine over a prescribed mission. The advanced technology engines reduced system LCC up to 41 percent relative to the baseline engine. The critical aerodynamic materials and mechanical systems necessary for turbine engine technology were identified.

  18. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  19. System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

  20. Integrated engine generator for aircraft secondary power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    An integrated engine-generator for aircraft secondary power generation is described. The concept consists of an electric generator located inside a turbojet or turbofan engine and both concentric with and driven by one of the main engine shafts. The electric power conversion equipment and generator controls are located in the aircraft. When properly rated, the generator serves as an engine starter as well as a source of electric power. This configuration reduces or eliminates the need for an external gear box on the engine and permits reduction in the nacelle diameter.

  1. Optimization of Turbine Engine Cycle Analysis with Analytic Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, Tristan; Hendricks, Eric; Chin, Jeffrey; Gray, Justin; Moore, Kenneth T.

    2016-01-01

    A new engine cycle analysis tool, called Pycycle, was built using the OpenMDAO framework. Pycycle provides analytic derivatives allowing for an efficient use of gradient-based optimization methods on engine cycle models, without requiring the use of finite difference derivative approximation methods. To demonstrate this, a gradient-based design optimization was performed on a turbofan engine model. Results demonstrate very favorable performance compared to an optimization of an identical model using finite-difference approximated derivatives.

  2. Suppression of fatigue inducing cavity acoustic modes on turbo fan engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, R. H.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses several methods of suppressing shear layer excitation of cavity acoustic modes on turbofan engines. The methods include the use of a Helmholtz resonator, reducing the cavity impingement length with vane-like dividers, and drawing the shear layer into the cavity. Empirical data and closed-form solutions were used to design baseline structures employed in each method. Full scale turbofan engine tests were used to measure their effectiveness. Each method significantly reduced the level to which cavity acoustic modes were excited by shear layer flow.

  3. Uptake and translocation of metals and nutrients in tomato grown in soil polluted with metal oxide (CeO₂, Fe₃O₄, SnO₂, TiO₂) or metallic (Ag, Co, Ni) engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vittori Antisari, Livia; Carbone, Serena; Gatti, Antonietta; Vianello, Gilmo; Nannipieri, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    The influence of exposure to engineered nanoparticles (NPs) was studied in tomato plants, grown in a soil and peat mixture and irrigated with metal oxides (CeO2, Fe3O4, SnO2, TiO2) and metallic (Ag, Co, Ni) NPs. The morphological parameters of the tomato organs, the amount of component metals taken up by the tomato plants from NPs added to the soil and the nutrient content in different tomato organs were also investigated. The fate, transport and possible toxicity of different NPs and nutrients in tomato tissues from soils were determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The tomato yield depended on the NPs: Fe3O4-NPs promoted the root growth, while SnO2-NP exposure reduced it (i.e. +152.6 and -63.1 % of dry matter, respectively). The NP component metal mainly accumulated in the tomato roots; however, plants treated with Ag-, Co- and Ni-NPs showed higher concentration of these elements in both above-ground and below-ground organs with respect to the untreated plants, in addition Ag-NPs also contaminated the fruits. Moreover, an imbalance of K translocation was detected in some plants exposed to Ag-, Co- and Fe3O4-NPs. The component metal concentration of soil rhizosphere polluted with NPs significantly increased compared to controls, and NPs were detected in the tissues of the tomato roots using electron microscopy (ESEM-EDS).

  4. NASA Quiet Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) program status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresnahan, D. L.; Sievers, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    The suitability of large engine technology to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel consumption of small turbine engines and develop new technology where required is determined. The design, fabrication, assembly, test, and delivery of the experimental engines to NASA are discussed.

  5. Recent Progress in Engine Noise Reduction for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2003-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the past ten years developing technologies for reducing aircraft noise. Engine noise continues to be a dominate source, particularly for aircraft departing from airports. Research efforts have concentrated on developing noise prediction methods, experimental validation, and developing noise reduction concepts that have been verified through model scale and static engine tests. Most of the work has concentrated on fan and jet components for commercial turbofan engines. In this seminar, an overview of the engine noise reduction work that was sponsored by NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program will be given, along with background information on turbofan noise sources and certification procedures. Concepts like "chevron" nozzles for jet noise reduction and swept stators for fan noise reduction will be highlighted. A preliminary assessment on how the new technologies will impact future engines will be given.

  6. Turbofan Volume Dynamics Model for Investigations of Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic Effects in a Supersonic Commercial Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Lemon, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan simulation has been developed for use in aero-propulso-servo-elastic coupling studies, on supersonic vehicles. A one-dimensional lumped volume approach is used whereby each component (fan, high-pressure compressor, combustor, etc.) is represented as a single volume using characteristic performance maps and conservation equations for continuity, momentum and energy. The simulation is developed in the MATLAB/SIMULINK (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment in order to facilitate controls development, and ease of integration with a future aero-servo-elastic vehicle model being developed at NASA Langley. The complete simulation demonstrated steady state results that closely match a proposed engine suitable for a supersonic business jet at the cruise condition. Preliminary investigation of the transient simulation revealed expected trends for fuel flow disturbances as well as upstream pressure disturbances. A framework for system identification enables development of linear models for controller design. Utilizing this framework, a transfer function modeling an upstream pressure disturbance s impacts on the engine speed is developed as an illustrative case of the system identification. This work will eventually enable an overall vehicle aero-propulso-servo-elastic model

  7. The convertible engine: A dual-mode propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.

    1988-01-01

    A variable inlet guide vane (VIGV) convertible engine that could be used to power future high-speed rotorcraft was tested on an outdoor stand. The engine ran stably and smoothly in the turbofan, turboshaft, and dual (combined fan and shaft) power modes. In the turbofan mode with the VIGV open, fuel consumption was comparable to that of a conventional turbofan engine. In the turboshaft mode with the VIGV closed, fuel consumption was higher than that of present turboshaft engines because power was wasted in churning fan-tip air flow. In dynamic performance tests with a specially built digital engine control and using a waterbrake dynamometer for shaft load, the engine responded effectively to large steps in thrust command and shaft torque. Previous mission analyses of a conceptual X-wing rotorcraft capable of 400-knot cruise speed were revised to account for more fan-tip churning power loss that was originally estimated. The calculations confirm that using convertible engines rather than separate life and cruise engines would result in a smaller, lighter craft with lower fuel use and direct operating cost.

  8. 75 FR 21161 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CJ610 Series Turbojet Engines and CF700...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    .... This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the...) for GE CJ610 series turbojet engines and CF700 turbofan engines with AFT Technologies combustion liners, part number (P/N) AFT-5016T30G02. This AD requires removing from service, AFT...

  9. Improved components for engine fuel savings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antl, R. J.; Mcaulay, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    NASA programs for developing fuel saving technology include the Engine Component Improvement Project for short term improvements in existing air engines. The Performance Improvement section is to define component technologies for improving fuel efficiency for CF6, JT9D and JT8D turbofan engines. Sixteen concepts were developed and nine were tested while four are already in use by airlines. If all sixteen concepts are successfully introduced the gain will be fuel savings of more than 6 billion gallons over the lifetime of the engines. The improvements include modifications in fans, mounts, exhaust nozzles, turbine clearance and turbine blades.

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Tri-Service Meeting for Aircraft Engine Monitoring and Diagnostics (7th) Held on 5-7 December 1978, at Arnold Engineering Development Center, Arnold AFS, Tennessee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Annual Tri-Service meeting on Aircraft Engine Monitoring and Diagnostics held last fall. 2. For all turbojet and turbofan engines , low cycle fatigue...7 December 1978. Each presentation contains an over-, view of the results and conclusions of the aircraft turbine engine diagnostic efforts that have... AIRCRAFT ENGINE 2-41 MONITORING AND DIAGNOSTIC MEETING T-38 EHMS UPDATE 2-43 A-10 TURBINE ENGINE EVALUATION (TEMS) 2-47 USAF TERMINOLOGY FOR SCORING

  11. Full scale technology demonstration of a modern counterrotating unducted fan engine concept: Component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The UDF trademark (Unducted Fan) engine is a new aircraft engine concept based on an ungeared, counterrotating, unducted, ultra-high-bypass turbofan configuration. This engine is being developed to provide a high thrust-to-weight ratio powerplant with exceptional fuel efficiency for subsonic aircraft application. This report covers the testing of pertinent components of this engine such as the fan blades, control and actuation system, turbine blades and spools, seals, and mixer frame.

  12. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Typical Turbofan Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Brown, Cliff; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14x22 wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8% scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8% rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft using the projected signature of the engine currently proposed for the HWB. The modal structures at the rating points were generated from inlet and exhaust nacelle configurations - a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface and vertical control surfaces with correct plan form shapes were also tested to determine their additional impact on shielding. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 inches. Two planes perpendicular, and two planes parallel, to the axis of the nacelle were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed 4 sweeps, for a total span of 168 inches acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Levels, and integrated Power Levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct mode power levels.

  13. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Typical Turbofan Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel l.; Brown, Clifford A.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14- by 22-ft wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8 percent scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8 percent rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft using the projected signature of the engine currently proposed for the HWB. The modal structures at the rating points were generated from inlet and exhaust nacelle configurations--a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface and vertical control surfaces with correct plan form shapes were also tested to determine their additional impact on shielding. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 in. Two planes perpendicular, and two planes parallel, to the axis of the nacelle were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed four sweeps, for a total span of 168 in. acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Levels, and integrated Power Levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct mode power levels

  14. Study of unconventional aircraft engines designed for low energy consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, R. E.; Hirschkron, R.; Johnston, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    A study of unconventional engine cycle concepts, which may offer significantly lower energy consumption than conventional subsonic transport turbofans, is described herein. A number of unconventional engine concepts were identified and parametrically studied to determine their relative fuel-saving potential. Based on results from these studies, regenerative, geared, and variable-boost turbofans, and combinations thereof, were selected along with advanced turboprop cycles for further evaluation and refinement. Preliminary aerodynamic and mechanical designs of these unconventional engine configurations were conducted and mission performance was compared to a conventional, direct-drive turofan reference engine. Consideration is given to the unconventional concepts, and their state of readiness for application. Areas of needed technology advancement are identified.

  15. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Altitude Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test using an obsolete Allied Signal ALF502-R5 engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test article used was the exact engine that experienced a loss of power event after the ingestion of ice crystals while operating at high altitude during a 1997 Honeywell flight test campaign investigating the turbofan engine ice crystal icing phenomena. The test plan included test points conducted at the known flight test campaign field event pressure altitude and at various pressure altitudes ranging from low to high throughout the engine operating envelope. The test article experienced a loss of power event at each of the altitudes tested. For each pressure altitude test point conducted the ambient static temperature was predicted using a NASA engine icing risk computer model for the given ambient static pressure while maintaining the engine speed.

  16. AiResearch QCGAT engine, airplane, and nacelle design features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan engine and nacelle system was designed and tested. The engine utilized the core of the AiResearch model TFE731-3 engine and incorporated several unique noise- and emissions-reduction features. Components that were successfully adapted to this core include the fan, gearbox, combustor, low-pressure turbine, and associated structure. A highly versatile workhorse nacelle incorporating interchangeable acoustic and hardwall duct liners, showed that large-engine attenuation technology could be applied to small propulsion engines. The application of the mixer compound nozzle demonstrated both performance and noise advantages on the engine. Major performance, emissions, and noise goals were demonstrated.

  17. Cruise performance of an isolated 1.15 pressure ratio turbofan propulsion system simulator at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    An isolated 1.15 pressure ratio turbofan engine simulator was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.85. At Mach 0.75 the net propulsive force of the fan and nacelle (excluding core thrust) was 73 percent of the ideal fan net thrust. Internal losses amounted to 7 percent, and external drag amounted to 20 percent of the ideal fan net thrust. External pressure and friction drag were about equal. The propulsive efficiency with a 90 percent efficient fan would have been 63 percent. For the aerodynamic characteristics of the nacelle that was tested, increasing the fan pressure ratio to approximately 1.35 would have resulted in a maximum propulsive efficiency of 67 percent.

  18. Turbine engine hot-part temperature measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.G.; Prufert, M.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The paper identifies altitude test facility techniques for nonintrusive acquisition of hot-part temperatures using IR radiance measurements. The techniques discussed are applicable for turbojet and low-bypass turbofan engines. Constraints limiting IR measurements in the altitude ground test facility are discussed. Methods for evaluating altitude ground test data are outlined including review of predictive capabilities which enable the determination of the influence of turbine engine hot-part temperatures on IR emissions. 7 refs.

  19. Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, B.

    1986-01-01

    Small advanced (450 to 850 pounds thrust, 2002 to 3781 N) gas turbine engines were studied for a subsonic strategic cruise missile application, using projected year 2000 technology. An aircraft, mission characteristics, and baseline (state-of-the-art) engine were defined to evaluate technology benefits. Engine performance and configuration analyses were performed for two and three spool turbofan and propfan engine concepts. Mission and Life Cycle Cost (LCC) analyses were performed in which the candidate engines were compared to the baseline engines over a prescribed mission. The advanced technology engines reduced system LCC up to 41 percent relative to the baseline engine. Critical aerodynamic, materials, and mechanical systems turbine engine technologies were identified and program plans were defined for each identified critical technology.

  20. Design of a turbojet engine controller via eigenvalue/eigenvector assignment - A new sensitivity formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liberty, S. R.; Maynard, R. A.; Mielke, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    This brief paper summarizes the approach the authors will take in designing a feedback controller for the F-100 turbofan engine. The technique to be utilized simultaneously realizes dominant closed-loop eigenvalues, approximates specified modal behavior, and achieves low eigensystem sensitivity with respect to certain plant parameter variations.