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Sample records for ag volume fraction

  1. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility, artifact volume in MRI, and tensile properties of swaged Zr-Ag composites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Imai, Haruki; Tanaka, Yoji; Nomura, Naoyuki; Doi, Hisashi; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Ono, Takashi; Hanawa, Takao

    2017-02-01

    Zr-Ag composites were fabricated to decrease the magnetic susceptibility by compensating for the magnetic susceptibility of their components. The Zr-Ag composites with a different Zr-Ag ratio were swaged, and their magnetic susceptibility, artifact volume, and mechanical properties were evaluated by magnetic balance, three-dimensional (3-D) artifact rendering, and a tensile test, respectively. These properties were correlated with the volume fraction of Ag using the linear rule of mixture. We successfully obtained the swaged Zr-Ag composites up to the reduction ratio of 96% for Zr-4, 16, 36, 64Ag and 86% for Zr-81Ag. However, the volume fraction of Ag after swaging tended to be lower than that before swaging, especially for Ag-rich Zr-Ag composites. The magnetic susceptibility of the composites linearly decreased with the increasing volume fraction of Ag. No artifact could be estimated with the Ag volume fraction in the range from 93.7% to 95.4% in three conditions. Young's modulus, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and 0.2% yield strength of Zr-Ag composites showed slightly lower values compared to the estimated values using a linear rule of mixture. The decrease in magnetic susceptibility of Zr and Ag by alloying or combining would contribute to the decrease of the Ag fraction, leading to the improvement of mechanical properties.

  3. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Lizio, D.; Baldari, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as 90Y and to 131I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  4. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes.

    PubMed

    Amato, E; Lizio, D; Baldari, S

    2011-01-21

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as (90)Y and to (131)I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  5. In situ X-ray diffraction study of the growth of silver nanoparticles embedded in silica film by ion irradiation: The effect of volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Fouran; Gautam, Subodh K.; Kulriya, Pawan Kumar; Pivin, Jean Claude

    2013-09-01

    The effect of volume fraction of silver (Ag) on the growth of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) embedded in ion-irradiated silica films is reported. Films with low volume fraction (LVF) and high volume fraction (HVF) of Ag in silica matrix were prepared by magnetron co-sputtering. The growth of AgNPs under 120 MeV Ag ion irradiation is monitored in situ using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD). It is observed that the film with LVF shows the growth of AgNPs in a nearly single ion impact region, while the film with HVF shows a monotonous growth even in the region of multiple ion impacts. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) experiments are also performed to determine the exact volume fraction of Ag in the silica matrix and to understand the role of sputtering and diffusion processes on the growth of AgNPs. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is carried out to obtain further evidence of the mechanisms of growth. Our study reveals that the growth of embedded nanoparticles strongly depends on the volume fraction of metal in the matrices and affects the dipolar interactions among such noble metal NPs.

  6. Ag-nanoparticle fractionation by low melting point agarose gel electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarrotxena, Nekane; Braun, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The separation of surface-enhanced raman scattering (SERS)-active Ag-multi-nanoparticle (NP) assemblies by low melting point agarose gel electrophoresis was accomplished here by controlling surface charge using NP capping agents, and the pore size of agarose gel matrix. Detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis of excised gel fractions showed dimers and small clusters to have the greatest SERS activity and a mobility in between the monomers and large aggregates. This strategy enables one to: (1) stabilize small multispherical Ag clusters against further aggregation during purification; (2) fractionate and recover spherical assemblies by nuclearity; and (3) analyze SERS-enhancements for each fraction to optimize purification conditions.

  7. Lamb Wave Assessment of Fiber Volume Fraction in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.; Prosser, W. H.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Among the various techniques available, ultrasonic Lamb waves offer a convenient method of examining composite materials. Since the Lamb wave velocity depends on the elastic properties of a material, an effective tool exists to evaluate composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. Lamb waves can propagate over long distances and are sensitive to the desired in-plane elastic properties of the material. This paper discusses a study in which Lamb waves were used to examine fiber volume fraction variations of approximately 0.40-0.70 in composites. The Lamb wave measurements were compared to fiber volume fractions obtained from acid digestion tests. Additionally, a model to predict the fiber volume fraction from Lamb wave velocity values was evaluated.

  8. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOEpatents

    Jandrasits, Walter G.; Kikta, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction.

  9. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOEpatents

    Jandrasits, W.G.; Kikta, T.J.

    1998-03-17

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction. 9 figs.

  10. Estimation of liquid volume fraction using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qahtani, Saeed M.; Langton, Christian M.

    2016-12-01

    It has recently been proposed that the propagation of an ultrasound wave through complex structures, consisting of two-materials of differing ultrasound velocity, may be considered as an array of parallel ‘sonic rays’, the transit time of each determined by their relative proportion; being a minimum (t min) in entire higher velocity material, and a maximum (t max) in entire lower velocity material. An ultrasound transit time spectrum (UTTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays at an individual transit time. It has previously been demonstrated that the solid volume fraction of a solid:liquid composite, specifically acrylic step-wedges immersed in water, may be reliably estimated from the UTTS. The aim of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that the volume fraction of a two-component liquid mixture, of unequal ultrasound velocity, may also be estimated by UTTS. A through-transmission technique incorporating two 1 MHz ultrasound transducers within a horizontally-aligned cylindrical tube-housing was utilised, the proportion of silicone oil to water being varied from 0% to 100%. The liquid volume fraction was estimated from the UTTS at each composition, the coefficient of determination (R 2%) being 98.9  ±  0.7%. The analysis incorporated a novel signal amplitude normalisation technique to compensate for absorption within the silicone oil. It is therefore envisaged that the parallel sonic ray concept and the derived UTTS may be further applied to the quantification of liquid mixture composition assessment.

  11. Absorbed fractions for alpha particles in ellipsoidal volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Baldari, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    Internal dosimetry of alpha particles is gaining attention due to the increasing applications in cancer treatment and also for the assessment of environmental contamination from radionuclides. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic alpha particles in the energy interval between 0.1 and 10 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made of soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, three oblate and three prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a ‘generalized radius’ was found; and the dependence of the fit parameters on the alpha energy is discussed and fitted by parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for alpha particles in the energy range explored can be calculated for volumes and for ellipsoidal shapes of practical interest. This method can be applied to the evaluation of absorbed fraction from alpha-emitting radionuclides. The contribution to the deposited energy coming from electron and photon emissions can be accounted for exploiting the specific formulations previously introduced. As an example of application, the dosimetry of 213Bi and its decay chain in ellipsoids is reported.

  12. Volume Fraction of Graphene Platelets in Copper-Graphene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-graphene composite films were deposited on copper foil using electrochemical deposition. Four electrolyte solutions that each consist of 250 mL of graphene oxide suspension in distilled water and increasing volume of 0.2 M solution of CuSO4 in steps of 250 mL were used to deposit the composite films with and without a magnetic stirrer. Graphene oxide in the films was reduced to graphene by hydrogen treatment for 6 hours at 673 K (400 °C). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction for identification of phases, scanning electron microscopy for distribution of graphene, energy dispersive spectrometry for evaluation of elemental composition, electrical resistivity and temperature coefficient of electrical resistance and thermal conductivity. Effective mean field analysis (EMA) was used to determine the volume fraction and electrical conductivity of graphene and interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and copper. The electrical resistivity was reduced from 2.031 to 1.966 μΩ cm and the thermal conductivity was improved from 3.8 to 5.0 W/cm K upon addition of graphene platelets to electrolytic copper. The use of stirrer during deposition of the films increased the average size and the thickness of the graphene platelets and as a result the improvement in electrical conductivity was lower compared to the values obtained without the stirrer. Using the EMA, the volume fraction of graphene platelets that was responsible for the improvement in the electrical conductivity was found to be lower than that for the improvement in the thermal conductivity. The results of the analysis are used to determine the volume fraction of the thinner and the thicker graphene platelets in the composite films.

  13. Trabecular bone volume fraction mapping by low-resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Seara, M A; Song, H K; Wehrli, F W

    2001-07-01

    Trabecular bone volume fraction (TBVF) is highly associated with the mechanical competence of trabecular bone. TBVF is ordinarily measured by histomorphometry from bone biopsies or, noninvasively, by means of high-resolution microcomputed tomography and, more recently, by micro-MRI. The latter methods require spatial resolution sufficient to resolve trabeculae, along with segmentation techniques that allow unambiguous assignment of the signal to bone or bone marrow. In this article it is shown that TBVF can be measured under low-resolution conditions by exploiting the attenuation of the MR signal resulting from fractional occupancy of the imaging voxel by bone and bone marrow, provided that a reference signal is available from a marrow volume devoid of trabeculation. The method requires accurate measurement of apparent proton density, which entails correction for various sources of error. Key among these are the spatial nonuniformity in the RF field amplitude and effects of the slice profile, which are determined by B(1) field mapping and numerical integration of the Bloch equations, respectively. By contrast, errors from variations in bone marrow composition (hematopoietic vs. fatty) between trabecular and reference site are predicted to be small and usually negligible. The method was evaluated in phantoms and in vivo in the distal radius and found to be accurate to 1% in marrow volume fraction. Finally, in a group of 12 patients of varying skeletal status, TBVF in the calcaneus was found to strongly correlate with integral bone mineral density of the lumbar vertebrae (r(2) = 0.83, p < 0.0001). The method may fail in large imaging objects such as the human trunk at high magnetic field where standing wave and RF penetration effects cause intensity variations that cannot be corrected. Magn Reson Med 46:103-113, 2001.

  14. Efficient emulsification of viscous oils at high drop volume fraction.

    PubMed

    Tcholakova, Slavka; Lesov, Ivan; Golemanov, Konstantin; Denkov, Nikolai D; Judat, Sonja; Engel, Robert; Danner, Thomas

    2011-12-20

    It is shown experimentally in this study that the increase of drop volume fraction can be used as an efficient tool for emulsification of viscous oils in turbulent flow. In a systematic series of experiments, the effects of drop volume fraction and viscosity of the dispersed phase on the mean, d(32), and maximum, d(V95), diameters of the drops, formed during emulsification, are quantified. The volume fraction, Φ, of the dispersed oily phase is varied between 1% and 90%, and oils with viscosity varying between 3 and 10,000 mPa.s are studied. All experiments are performed at sufficiently high surfactant concentration, as to avoid possible drop-drop coalescence during emulsification. The analysis of the experimental data shows that there is a threshold drop volume fraction, Φ(TR), at which a transition from inertial turbulent regime into viscous turbulent regime of emulsification occurs, due to the increased overall viscosity of the emulsion. At Φ < Φ(TR), d(32) and d(V95) depend weakly on Φ and are well described by known theoretical expression for emulsification in inertial turbulent regime (Davies, Chem. Eng. Sci. 1985, 40, 839), which accounts for the effects of oil viscosity and interfacial tension. At Φ > Φ(TR), both d(32) and polydispersity of the formed emulsions decrease very significantly with the increase of Φ (for the oils with η(D) > 10 mPa.s). Thus, very efficient emulsification of the viscous oils is realized. Very surprisingly, a third regime of emulsification is observed in the range of concentrated emulsions with Φ > 75%, where the mean drop size and emulsion polydispersity are found experimentally to be very similar for all oils and surfactants studied-an experimental fact that does not comply with any of the existing models of drop breakup during emulsification. Possible mechanistic explanations of this result are discussed. The experimental data for semiconcentrated and concentrated emulsions with Φ > Φ(TR) are described by a simple

  15. VOFI - A library to initialize the volume fraction scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bnà, S.; Manservisi, S.; Scardovelli, R.; Yecko, P.; Zaleski, S.

    2016-03-01

    The VOFI library has been developed to accurately calculate the volume fraction field demarcated by implicitly-defined fluid interfaces in Cartesian grids with cubic cells. The method enlists a number of algorithms to compute the integration limits and the local height function, that is the integrand of a double Gauss-Legendre integration with a variable number of nodes. Tests in two and three dimensions are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and are provided in the software distribution with C/C++ and FORTRAN interfaces.

  16. Effect of volume fraction on granular avalanche dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I

    2014-09-01

    We study the evolution and failure of a granular slope as a function of prepared volume fraction, ϕ(0). We rotated an initially horizontal layer of granular material (0.3-mm-diam glass spheres) to a 45° angle while we monitor the motion of grains from the side and top with high-speed video cameras. The dynamics of grain motion during the tilt process depended sensitively on ϕ(0)∈[0.58-0.63] and differed above or below the granular critical state, ϕ(c), defined as the onset of dilation as a function of increasing volume fraction. For ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)<0, slopes experienced short, rapid, precursor compaction events prior to the onset of a sustained avalanche. Precursor compaction events began at an initial angle θ(0)=7.7±1.4° and occurred intermittently prior to the onset of an avalanche. Avalanches occurred at the maximal slope angle θ(m)=28.5±1.0°. Granular material at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0 did not experience precursor compaction prior to avalanche flow, and instead experienced a single dilational motion at θ(0)=32.1±1.5° prior to the onset of an avalanche at θ(m)=35.9±0.7°. Both θ(0) and θ(m) increased with ϕ(0) and approached the same value in the limit of random close packing. The angle at which avalanching grains came to rest, θ(R)=22±2°, was independent of ϕ(0). From side-view high-speed video, we measured the velocity field of intermittent and avalanching flow. We found that flow direction, depth, and duration were affected by ϕ(0), with ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)<0 precursor flow extending deeper into the granular bed and occurring more rapidly than precursor flow at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0. Our study elucidates how initial conditions-including volume fraction-are important determinants of granular slope stability and the onset of avalanches.

  17. Influence of volume fraction on the dynamics of granular impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; Yang, Ding; Goldman, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Variation of the volume fraction φ of non-cohesive granular media causes disproportionate changes in the forces exerted on impacting objects and, consequently, the impact kinematics. In our experiments, a computer controlled air fluidized granular bed is used to vary φ from 0.58 (low) to 0.62 (high) for 0.3 mm diameter glass spheres and 1̃ mm poppy seeds. An accelerometer attached to a 4.0 cm diameter steel sphere measures collision forces for initial impact velocities ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 m/s. As an example of the dramatic changes produced by varying φ, time series of the force during impact with poppy seeds at an impact velocity of 1 m/s change from monotonically increasing with slope 100 N/s at φ=0.59 to monotonically decreasing with slope -100 N/s at φ=0.62; glass beads show similar behavior. Increasing φ from low to high at fixed collision velocity causes the penetration depth to decrease monotonically by approximately 50%. However, for the same parameters, the collision duration changes little, decreasing by 10% as φ is increased from 0.58 to 0.6 and then increasing by about 3% as φ is increased to 0.63. Our impact simulations exhibit the same collision dynamics vs. φ and reveal qualitative differences in grain velocity fields and local volume fraction changes between low and high φ states. Support by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and the Army Research Lab MAST CTA.

  18. Synthesis, fractionation, and optical characterization of Au-Ag composite nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseeva, Anna V.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Trachuk, Lyubov A.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2005-06-01

    We report on a synthesis procedure and optical properties of composite Au-Ag spherical and rod-like nanoparticles. The synthesis protocol is based on a seed-mediated growth in the presence of soft templates in micellar aqueous solution of ionic surfactant (CTAB). Variation of Au/Ag molar ratio allows one to produce nanorods (NRs) with different aspect ratio. The disadvantage of the method is formation of appreciable amount of spherical nanoparticles. To separate rod-like particles from spheres and surfactant, we used a fractionation procedure that involves centrifugatiori of samples in the density gradient of glycerol. The separated NRs were suspended in water or 25% glycerol solutions and their extinction and differential light scattering (at 900) spectra were recorded for 450-850 ni-n wavelengths. Theoretical spectra were calculated by T-matrix method as applied to randomly oriented gold cylinders with semispherical ends. The simulated spectra for water and glycerol suspensions can be brought in close agreement with experimental observations if the aspect ratio is used as a fitting parameter. We discuss also the absorption and light scattering contribution to the total extinction spectra and deviation of the exact solution from the classical electrostatic approximation by Gans.

  19. Probing the molecular weight distributions of non-boiling petroleum fractions by Ag+ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roussis, Stilianos G; Proulx, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This work explores the possibility of Ag+ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to determine the molecular weight distributions of non-boiling petroleum fractions. Information about the molecular weight distributions is needed for fundamental studies on the nature of heavy crude oils and bitumens and for the development of novel recovery and processing methods. The method does not depend on thermal processes for the introduction of the fractions into the gas phase of the mass spectrometer, which is a considerable advantage over most other ionization methods. The Ag+ electrospray mass spectra of the fractions analyzed by using a toluene/methanol/cyclohexane (60:28:12%) solvent system display bimodal distributions in the ranges m/z approximately 300 to approximately 3000 and m/z 3000 to approximately 20,000. The abundances of the high molecular weight peak distributions can be reduced by in-source collisional activation experiments. Comparisons with the results obtained for model heteroatom-containing compounds (molecular weight < 600 Da) and high molecular weight polystyrene standards (up to one million Da) indicate that the majority of the structures in the saturate, naphthenoaromatic and polar aromatic fractions, and a significant portion of the asphaltenes, are small molecules. However, a considerable portion of the asphaltenes and some portion of the other fractions contain high molecular weight structures bound by covalent or strong non-covalent bonds. The results obtained by the Ag+ ESI method in this study for the saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions in a bitumen are in qualitative agreement with published molecular weight average results obtained for Cold Lake bitumen fractions analyzed by conventional gel permeation chromatography and field desorption mass spectrometry. Further work is needed to study the nature of the bonds and the interactions of the molecules in the asphaltene fractions by Ag+ ESI-MS.

  20. Tutorial for Collecting and Processing Images of Composite Structures to Determine the Fiber Volume Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conklin, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite structures have become more common in aerospace components due to their light weight and structural efficiency. In general, the strength and stiffness of a composite structure are directly related to the fiber volume fraction, which is defined as the fraction of fiber volume to total volume of the composite. The most common method to measure the fiber volume fraction is acid digestion, which is a useful method when the total weight of the composite, the fiber weight, and the total weight can easily be obtained. However, acid digestion is a destructive test, so the material will no longer be available for additional characterization. Acid digestion can also be difficult to machine out specific components of a composite structure with complex geometries. These disadvantages of acid digestion led the author to develop a method to calculate the fiber volume fraction. The developed method uses optical microscopy to calculate the fiber area fraction based on images of the cross section of the composite. The fiber area fraction and fiber volume fraction are understood to be the same, based on the assumption that the shape and size of the fibers are consistent in the depth of the composite. This tutorial explains the developed method for optically determining fiber area fraction performed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  1. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabeck, Odile; Galley, Ryan; Delille, Bruno; Else, Brent; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Lemes, Marcos; Des Roches, Mathieu; Francus, Pierre; Tison, Jean-Louis; Rysgaard, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate images of air volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air volume fractions < 2 %, the ice-air interface (top 2 cm) systematically showed values up to 5 %. We suggest that the air volume fraction is a function of both the bulk ice gas saturation factor and the brine volume fraction. We differentiate micro bubbles (Ø < 1 mm), large bubbles (1 mm < Ø < 5 mm) and macro bubbles (Ø > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of gas bubbles, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice texture (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration.

  2. Variability in the fractionation of Cu, Ag, and Zn among cytosolic proteins in the bivalve Macoma balthica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johansson, C.; Cain, Daniel J.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1986-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatographs of cytosols from the clam Macorna balthica analysed from both field and laboratory treated specimens showed that uptake of Cu, Ag, and Zn in the metallothionein-like protein (MLP) pool follows exposure both in nature and in the laboratory. Specimens collected from San Francisco Bay over 18 mo showed strong temporal variability in the fractionation of the metals among cytosolic proteins. A marked increase in Cu, Ag, and Zn in a very low molecular weight pool occurred when concentrations were highest In the MLP pool. The correlation between total cytosollc metal and MLP-metal also appeared to approach a hyperbolic character at the highest concentrations.

  3. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  4. Fractional volume integration in two-dimensional NMR spectra: CAKE, a Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Romano, Rocco; Paris, Debora; Acernese, Fausto; Barone, Fabrizio; Motta, Andrea

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative information from multi-dimensional NMR experiments can be obtained by peak volume integration. The standard procedure (selection of a region around the chosen peak and addition of all values) is often biased by poor peak definition because of peak overlap. Here we describe a simple method, called CAKE, for volume integration of (partially) overlapping peaks. Assuming the axial symmetry of two-dimensional NMR peaks, as it occurs in NOESY and TOCSY when Lorentz-Gauss transformation of the signals is carried out, CAKE estimates the peak volume by multiplying a volume fraction by a factor R. It represents a proportionality ratio between the total and the fractional volume, which is identified as a slice in an exposed region of the overlapping peaks. The volume fraction is obtained via Monte Carlo Hit-or-Miss technique, which proved to be the most efficient because of the small region and the limited number of points within the selected area. Tests on simulated and experimental peaks, with different degrees of overlap and signal-to-noise ratios, show that CAKE results in improved volume estimates. A main advantage of CAKE is that the volume fraction can be flexibly chosen so as to minimize the effect of overlap, frequently observed in two-dimensional spectra.

  5. A fast finite volume method for conservative space-fractional diffusion equations in convex domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    We develop a fast finite volume method for variable-coefficient, conservative space-fractional diffusion equations in convex domains via a volume-penalization approach. The method has an optimal storage and an almost linear computational complexity. The method retains second-order accuracy without requiring a Richardson extrapolation. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  6. The coupled effect of fiber volume fraction and void fraction on hydraulic fluid absorption of quartz/BMI laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdelbrink, Keith R.; Anderson, Jacob P.; Siddique, Zahed; Altan, M. Cengiz

    2016-03-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resin with quartz (AQ581) fiber reinforcement is a composite material frequently used in aerospace applications, such as engine cowlings and radomes. Various composite components used in aircrafts are exposed to different types of hydraulic fluids, which may lead to anomalous absorption behavior over the service life of the composite. Accurate predictive models for absorption of liquid penetrants are particularly important as the composite components are often exposed to long-term degradation due to absorbed moisture, hydraulic fluids, or similar liquid penetrants. Microstructural features such as fiber volume fraction and void fraction can have a significant effect on the absorption behavior of fiber-reinforced composites. In this paper, hydraulic fluid absorption characteristics of quartz/BMI laminates fabricated from prepregs preconditioned at different relative humidity and subsequently cured at different pressures are presented. The composite samples are immersed into hydraulic fluid at room temperature, and were not subjected to any prior degradation. To generate process-induced microvoids, prepregs were conditioned in an environmental chamber at 2% or 99% relative humidity at room temperature for a period of 24 hours prior to laminate fabrication. To alter the fiber volume fraction, the laminates were fabricated at cure pressures of 68.9 kPa (10 psi) or 482.6 kPa (70 psi) via a hot-press. The laminates are shown to have different levels of microvoids and fiber volume fractions, which were observed to affect the absorption dynamics considerably and exhibited clear non-Fickian behavior. A one-dimensional hindered diffusion model (HDM) was shown to be successful in predicting the hydraulic fluid absorption. Model prediction indicates that as the fabrication pressure increased from 68.9 kPa to 482.6 kPa, the maximum fluid content (M∞) decreased from 8.0% wt. to 1.0% wt. The degree of non-Fickian behavior, measured by hindrance coefficient (

  7. Performance enhancement of direct ethanol fuel cell using Nafion composites with high volume fraction of titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, B. R.; Isidoro, R. A.; Santiago, E. I.; Fonseca, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    The present study reports on the performance enhancement of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at 130 °C with Nafion-titania composite electrolytes prepared by sol-gel technique and containing high volume fractions of the ceramic phase. It is found that for high volume fractions of titania (>10 vol%) the ethanol uptake of composites is largely reduced while the proton conductivity at high-temperatures is weakly dependent on the titania content. Such tradeoff between alcohol uptake and conductivity resulted in a boost of DEFC performance at high temperatures using Nafion-titania composites with high fraction of the inorganic phase.

  8. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabeck, O.; Galley, R. J.; Delille, B.; Else, B. G. T.; Geilfus, N.-X.; Lemes, M.; Des Roches, M.; Francus, P.; Tison, J.-L.; Rysgaard, S.

    2015-09-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate 3-D images of air-volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air-volume fractions < 2 %, the ice-air interface (top 2 cm) systematically showed values up to 5 %. We suggest that the air volume fraction is a function of both the bulk ice gas saturation factor and the size of the brine channel. We differentiate micro bubbles (∅ < 1 mm), large bubbles (1 < ∅ < 5 mm) and macro bubbles (∅ > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of air inclusions, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice microstructure (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration and can help considerably improving parameterization of these processes in sea ice biogeochemical models.

  9. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  10. Measuring local volume fraction, long-wavelength correlations, and fractionation in a phase-separating polydisperse fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J. J.; Evans, R. M. L.

    2014-10-28

    We dynamically simulate fractionation (partitioning of particle species) during spinodal gas-liquid separation of a size-polydisperse colloid, using polydispersity up to ∼40% and a skewed parent size distribution. We introduce a novel coarse-grained Voronoi method to minimise size bias in measuring local volume fraction, along with a variety of spatial correlation functions which detect fractionation without requiring a clear distinction between the phases. These can be applied whether or not a system is phase separated, to determine structural correlations in particle size, and generalise easily to other kinds of polydispersity (charge, shape, etc.). We measure fractionation in both mean size and polydispersity between the phases, its direction differing between model interaction potentials which are identical in the monodisperse case. These qualitative features are predicted by a perturbative theory requiring only a monodisperse reference as input. The results show that intricate fractionation takes place almost from the start of phase separation, so can play a role even in nonequilibrium arrested states. The methods for characterisation of inhomogeneous polydisperse systems could in principle be applied to experiment as well as modelling.

  11. A facile electron microscopy method for measuring precipitate volume fractions in AlCuMg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.Q.; Shi, M.J.; Chen, J.H. Wang, S.B.; Liu, C.H.; Wu, C.L.

    2012-07-15

    Precipitate volume fraction is an important parameter to estimate the strength of precipitation-hardened metals. In this study, a facile method was applied to measure the precipitate volume fractions in an age-hardened AlCuMg alloy. In this method, the precipitate volume fraction values can be obtained by multiplying the volume precipitate number densities with the averaged precipitate volumes, which can be easily measured in scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Compared with the conventional method, in which the specimen thickness has to be measured in transmission electron microscopy, the method proposed in this study is more facile to perform. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have proposed a facile method to measure precipitate volume fractions for precipitation-hardened metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique works well for the square-shaped {theta} Prime -phase nano-precipitates in 2xxx aluminum alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interesting is that the proposed method is easy for materials scientists and engineers to perform.

  12. Structural Effects of Biodiesel on Soot Volume Fraction in a Laminar Co-Flow Diffusion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Jason

    An experimental study was performed to determine the structural effects of biodiesel on soot volume fraction in a laminar co-flow diffusion flame. These include the effects of the ester function group, the inclusion of a double bond, and its positional effect. The soot volume fraction and temperature profiles of a biodiesel surrogate, n-Decane, 1-Decene, and 5-Decene fuels were measured. Improvements were made to existing laser extinction and rapid thermocouple insertion apparatus and were used to measure soot volume fraction and temperature profiles respectively. Flow rates of each fuel were determined in order to keep the temperature effects on soot negligible. Using n-Decane as a baseline, the double bond increased soot production and was further increased with a more centrally located double bond. The ester function group containing oxygen decreased soot production. The order of most to least sooting fuels were as follows 5-Decene > 1-Decene > n-Decane > Biodiesel Surrogate.

  13. Soot volume fraction fields in unsteady axis-symmetric flames by continuous laser extinction technique.

    PubMed

    Kashif, Muhammad; Bonnety, Jérôme; Guibert, Philippe; Morin, Céline; Legros, Guillaume

    2012-12-17

    A Laser Extinction Method has been set up to provide two-dimensional soot volume fraction field time history at a tunable frequency up to 70 Hz inside an axis-symmetric diffusion flame experiencing slow unsteady phenomena preserving the symmetry. The use of a continuous wave laser as the light source enables this repetition rate, which is an incremental advance in the laser extinction technique. The technique is shown to allow a fine description of the soot volume fraction field in a flickering flame exhibiting a 12.6 Hz flickering phenomenon. Within this range of repetition rate, the technique and its subsequent post-processing require neither any method for time-domain reconstruction nor any correction for energy intrusion. Possibly complemented by such a reconstruction method, the technique should support further soot volume fraction database in oscillating flames that exhibit characteristic times relevant to the current efforts in the validation of soot processes modeling.

  14. Effect of Thickness and Fibre Volume Fraction on Impact Resistance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete (SFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Usman, Fathoni; Syamsir, Agusril; Shao Yang, Chen; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and fibre volume fraction (VF) on the impact performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.57 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance SFRC against slab thickness and volume fraction. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistances of SFRC against slab thickness. However the impact resistance of SFRC against percentage of volume fraction exhibit a non-linear relationship.

  15. A finite volume method for two-sided fractional diffusion equations on non-uniform meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Alex; Yang, Qianqian; Moroney, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    We derive a finite volume method for two-sided fractional diffusion equations with Riemann-Liouville derivatives in one spatial dimension. The method applies to non-uniform meshes, with arbitrary nodal spacing. The discretisation utilises the integral definition of the fractional derivatives, and we show that it leads to a diagonally dominant matrix representation, and a provably stable numerical scheme. Being a finite volume method, the numerical scheme is fully conservative, and the ability to locally refine the mesh can produce solutions with more accuracy for the same number of nodes compared to a uniform mesh, as we demonstrate numerically.

  16. Effect of a bimodal initial particle volume fraction perturbation in an explosive dispersal of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Rollin, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that has yet to be fully understood. As the particle cloud disperses at high speed, it experiences multiphase instabilities related to Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities when interacting with the blast-wave structure. This paper reports the results of a numerical experiment where the effect of bimodal perturbations in the initial particle volume fraction is studied. Results indicate that a signature of the initial perturbation profile remains in the particle cloud throughout the observed time, and that adding a bimodal perturbation increases the width of the cloud when compared to a uniform volume fraction distribution.

  17. Left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction derived from apical two-dimensional echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Sidney K.; Rowe, Dennis W.; Pechacek, Leonard W.; Garcia, Efrain

    1981-01-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiographic data in orthogonal apical projections were used to calculate left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes in 18 patients, 10 of whom had asynergy. The left ventricular chamber was modeled as a stack of 20 elliptical discs in order to minimize errors associated with assumptions of regular geometry. Calculations were compared to data from biplane angiography and yielded correlation coefficients of 0.91 for ejection fraction and 0.90 for volumes. The technique significantly underestimated volumes; the average ventricular volume was 161 ± 23 ml from cineangiography and 104 ± 25 ml from echocardiography (p < 0.001). Since this technique utilizes the most readily obtained echocardiographic views and allows for variations in ventricular architecture, its potential utility in long-term, serial evaluation of cardiac function appears promising. Images PMID:15216191

  18. Two-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction in children

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, J.C.; DiSessa, T.G.; Jarmakani, J.M.; Nakanishi, T.; Hiraishi, S.; Isabel-Jones, J.; Friedman, W.F.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of two-dimensional echocardiography to measure left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction was evaluated in 25 children with congenital heart disease. Dimensions and planimetered areas were obtained in the short-axis view at the mitral valve and high and low papillary muscle levels and in the apical two- and four-chamber views. Eight algorithms using five geometric models were assessed. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and ejection fraction were compared with data from biplane cineangiocardiograms. The correlation varied with the algorithm used. Algorithms using short-axis views appeared superior to those using only apical long-axis views. Four algorithms estimated left ventricular volumes with equal accuracy (Simpson's rule, assuming the ventricle to be a truncated cone; Simpson's rule, algorithm that best estimated left ventricular ejection fraction was the ellipsoid biplane formula using the short-axis view at the papillary muscle level (r = 0.91, slope = 0.94, SEE = 6.7%). Thus, two-dimensional echocardiography can accurately assess left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction in children with congenital heart disease.

  19. Subchannel Thermal Hydraulic Experimental Program (STEP). Volume 2. Void fraction by gamma scattering. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Zielke, L.A.; Grant, K.W.; MacKinnon, J.G.

    1980-08-01

    This volume provides a description of the gamma-scattering technique for the measurement of local void fraction within complex geometries. The technique was applied to measurements in the center subchannel of a 4 x 4 array of electrically heated rods with four heated walls. Over 300 data points were obtained covering thermal-hydraulic conditions typical of light water reactors. Results indicate a large variation of void fraction within the center subchannel and a measured-average void fraction higher than predicted by the COBRA IV computer code.

  20. Initiation of Submarine Granular Avalanches: Role of the Initial Volume Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pailha, Mickaël; Pouliquen, Olivier; Nicolas, Maxime

    2008-07-01

    Many geophysical flows involve a mixture of grains and fluids in a dense regime where contacts between grains are important. In order to better understand the dynamics of such complex systems, we perform laboratory experiments on the initiation of submarine granular avalanches. The experiment consists in preparing a uniform static layer of glass beads in a long box full of liquid. The initial volume fraction of the layer can be precisely controlled by tapping on the set up. The box is then suddenly inclined from horizontal. The motion of the layer, the evolution of the pore pressure and the evolution of the volume fraction are then recorded. The avalanche dynamics is shown to strongly depend on the initial volume fraction of the granular material, its initiation being dramatically delayed when the granular layer is initially slightly compacted. In parallel to this experimental work, a theoretical model based on two phase-flow equations is developed. The model relies on recent advances in the rheology of dense granular media and takes into account the change of volume fraction and the associated pore pressure variation. The theoretical approach gives quantitative predictions when compared with the experimental measurements.

  1. Planar measurements of soot volume fraction and OH in a JP-8 pool fire

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, Tara L.; Ring, Terry A.; Eddings, Eric G.; Nathan, Graham J.; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.; Qamar, Nader

    2009-07-15

    The simultaneous measurement of soot volume fraction by laser induced incandescence (LII) and qualitative imaging of OH by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was performed in a JP-8 pool fire contained in a 152 mm diameter pan. Line of sight extinction was used to calibrate the LII system in a laminar flame, and to provide an independent method of measuring average soot volume fraction in the turbulent flame. The presence of soot in the turbulent flame was found to be approximately 50% probable, resulting in high levels of optical extinction, which increased slightly through the flame from approximately 30% near the base, to approximately 50% at the tip. This high soot loading pushes both techniques toward their detection limit. Nevertheless, useful accuracy was obtained, with the LII measurement of apparent extinction in the turbulent flame being approximately 21% lower than a direct measurement, consistent with the influence of signal trapping. The axial and radial distributions of soot volume fraction are presented, along with PDFs of volume fraction, and new insight into the behavior of soot sheets in pool fires are sought from the simultaneous measurements of OH and LII. (author)

  2. Fabrication and characterization of ultrahigh-volume- fraction aligned carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Brian L; Saito, Diego S; García, Enrique J; Hart, A John; de Villoria, Roberto Guzmán; Verploegen, Eric A

    2008-07-17

    Aligned CNT nanocomposites with variable volume fraction, up to 20%, are demonstrated. Biaxial mechanical densification of aligned CNT forests, followed by capillarity-driven wetting using unmodified aerospace-grade polymers, creates centimeter-scale specimens. Characterizations confirm CNT alignment and dispersion in the thermosets, providing a useful platform for controlled nanoscale interaction and nanocomposite property studies that emphasize anisotropy.

  3. Fractionation of Saprolegnia diclina (Oomycetes) satelite DNAs by AgNO3/Cs2SO4 density gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Neish, G A; Green, B R

    1977-12-14

    Saprolegnia diclina DNA has been fractionated using preparative AgNO3/Cs2SO4 and CsCl density gradients. In addition to the previously identified major satellite DNA, there are two minor DNA components banding at 1.682 and 1.701 g - cm(-3) in CsCl. Purified major satellite DNA bands at 1.707 g - cm(-3) giving a base composition of 48% G + C in good agreement with 47% G + C calculated from its Tm value. The nuclear DNA base composition is 58% G + C by both methods. The base composition of the major satellite DNA suggests that it may represent ribosomal DNA cistrons.

  4. Volume Fraction Determination in Cast Superalloys and DS Eutectic Alloys by a New Practice for Manual Point Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    Volume fraction of a constituent or phase was estimated in six specimens of conventional and DS-eutectic superalloys, using ASTM E562-76, a new standard recommended practice for determining volume fraction by systematic manual point count. Volume fractions determined ranged from 0.086 to 0.36, and with one exception, the 95 percent relative confidence limits were approximately 10 percent of the determined volume fractions. Since the confidence-limit goal of 10 percent, which had been arbitrarily chosen previously, was achieved in all but one case, this application of the new practice was considered successful.

  5. Soot Volume Fraction Maps for Normal and Reduced Gravity Laminar Acetylene Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1997-01-01

    The study of soot particulate distribution inside gas jet diffusion flames is important to the understanding of fundamental soot particle and thermal radiative transport processes, as well as providing findings relevant to spacecraft fire safety, soot emissions, and radiant heat loads for combustors used in air-breathing propulsion systems. Compared to those under normal gravity (1-g) conditions, the elimination of buoyancy-induced flows is expected to significantly change the flow field in microgravity (O g) flames, resulting in taller and wider flames with longer particle residence times. Work by Bahadori and Edelman demonstrate many previously unreported qualitative and semi-quantitative results, including flame shape and radiation, for sooting laminar zas jet diffusion flames. Work by Ku et al. report soot aggregate size and morphology analyses and data and model predictions of soot volume fraction maps for various gas jet diffusion flames. In this study, we present the first 1-g and 0-g comparisons of soot volume fraction maps for laminar acetylene and nitrogen-diluted acetylene jet diffusion flames. Volume fraction is one of the most useful properties in the study of sooting diffusion flames. The amount of radiation heat transfer depends directly on the volume fraction and this parameter can be measured from line-of-sight extinction measurements. Although most Soot aggregates are submicron in size, the primary particles (20 to 50 nm in diameter) are in the Rayleigh limit, so the extinction absorption) cross section of aggregates can be accurately approximated by the Rayleigh solution as a function of incident wavelength, particles' complex refractive index, and particles' volume fraction.

  6. The surface tells it all: relationship between volume and surface fraction of liquid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Forel, Emilie; Rio, Emmanuelle; Schneider, Maxime; Beguin, Sebastien; Weaire, Denis; Hutzler, Stefan; Drenckhan, Wiebke

    2016-09-28

    The properties of liquid dispersions, such as foams or emulsions, depend strongly on the volume fraction ϕ of the continuous phase. Concentrating on the example of foams, we show experimentally and theoretically that ϕ may be related to the fraction ϕs of the surface at a wall which is wetted by the continuous phase - given an expression for the interfacial energy or osmotic pressure of the bulk system. Since the surface fraction ϕs can be readily determined from optical measurement and since there are good general approximations available for interfacial energy and osmotic pressure we thus arrive at an advantageous method of estimating ϕ. The same relationship between ϕ and ϕs is also expected to provide a good approximation of the fraction of the bubble or drop surface which is wetted by the continuous phase. This is a parameter of great importance for the rheology and ageing of liquid dispersions.

  7. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Sinha, Dipen N.; Osterhoudt, Curtis F.

    2012-08-15

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  8. Automatic analysis of left ventricular ejection fraction using stroke volume images.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T R; Verba, J W; Bhargava, V; Shabetai, R; Slutsky, R

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze, validate, and report on an automatic computer algorithm for analyzing left ventricular ejection fraction and to indicate future applications of the technique to other chambers and more advanced measurements. Thirty-eight patients were studied in the cardiac catheterization laboratory by equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography and concurrent contrast ventriculography. The temporal and spatial behavior of each picture element in a filtered stroke volume image series was monitored throughout the cardiac cycle. Pixels that met specific phase, amplitude, and derivative criteria were assigned to the appropriate chamber. Volume curves were generated from regions of interest for each chamber to enable calculation of the left ventricular ejection fraction. Left ventricular ejection fractions showed a good correlation (r = 0.89) between the two techniques. Ejection fractions ranged between 0.12 and 0.88, showing a wide range of application. It is concluded that automatic analysis of left ventricular ejection fraction is possible using the present algorithm and will be useful in improving the reproducibility and providing more accurate information during exercise protocols, pharmaceutical interventions, and routine clinical studies.

  9. Plasticity in mesophyll volume fraction modulates light-acclimation in needle photosynthesis in two pines.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ulo; Lukjanova, Aljona; Turnbull, Matthew H; Sparrow, Ashley D

    2007-08-01

    Acclimation potential of needle photosynthetic capacity varies greatly among pine species, but the underlying chemical, anatomical and morphological controls are not entirely understood. We investigated the light-dependent variation in needle characteristics in individuals of Pinus patula Schlect. & Cham., which has 19-31-cm long pendulous needles, and individuals of P. radiata D. Don., which has shorter (8-17-cm-long) stiffer needles. Needle nitrogen and carbon contents, mesophyll and structural tissue volume fractions, needle dry mass per unit total area (M(A)) and its components, volume to total area ratio (V/A(T)) and needle density (D = M(A)/(V/A(T))), and maximum carboxylase activity of Rubisco (V(cmax)) and capacity of photosynthetic electron transport (J(max)) were investigated in relation to seasonal mean integrated irradiance (Q(int)). Increases in Q(int) from canopy bottom to top resulted in proportional increases in both needle thickness and width such that needle total to projected surface area ratio, characterizing the efficiency of light interception, was independent of Q(int). Increased light availability also led to larger M(A) and nitrogen content per unit area (N(A)). Light-dependent modifications in M(A) resulted from increases in both V/A(T) and D, whereas N(A) changed because of increases in both M(A) and mass-based nitrogen content (N(M)) (N(A) = N(M)M(A)). Overall, the volume fraction of mesophyll cells increased with increasing irradiance and V/A(T) as the fraction of hypodermis and epidermis decreased with increasing needle thickness. Increases in M(A) and N(A) resulted in enhanced J(max) and V(cmax) per unit area in both species, but mass-based photosynthetic capacity increased only in P. patula. In addition, J(max) and V(cmax) showed greater plasticity in response to light in P. patula. Species differences in mesophyll volume fraction explained most of the variation in mass-based needle photosynthetic capacity between species

  10. Sparger Effects on Gas Volume Fraction Distributions in Vertical Bubble-Column Flows as Measured by Gamma-Densitometry Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-01-18

    Gamma-densitometry tomography is applied to study the effect of sparger hole geometry, gas flow rate, column pressure, and phase properties on gas volume fraction profiles in bubble columns. Tests are conducted in a column 0.48 m in diameter, using air and mineral oil, superficial gas velocities ranging from 5 to 30 cm s{sup -1}, and absolute column pressures from 103 to 517 kPa. Reconstructed gas volume fraction profiles from two sparger geometries are presented. The development length of the gas volume fraction profile is found to increase with gas flow rate and column pressure. Increases in gas flow rate increase the local gas volume fraction preferentially on the column axis, whereas increases in column pressure produce a uniform rise in gas volume fraction across the column. A comparison of results from the two spargers indicates a significant change in development length with the number and size of sparger holes.

  11. The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

    2005-07-01

    Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

  12. The workability of 'XD' titanium aluminide alloys with low volume fractions of TiB2

    SciTech Connect

    Szaruga, A.; Rothenflue, L.; Srinivasan, R.; Lipsitt, H.A. )

    1992-05-01

    A determination is made of the effect of lowering the volume fraction of titanium diboride on the workability of the Ti-48Al-2Mn-2Nb titanium aluminide alloy. It is found that the workability of the low-TiB2 alloys is similar to that of alloys containing 7.5 TiB2; the improved workability of these alloys is accordingly considered to be due to the control of grain size that is achieved by the dispersion of a hard stable phase. While a volume fraction of 0.5 percent was insufficient for consistent retention of fine grain size, alloys with 1-2 vol pct TiB2 deformed uniformly at high temperatures. 6 refs.

  13. Non-contact spectroscopic determination of large blood volume fractions in turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Bremmer, Rolf H.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Laan, Nick; Amelink, Arjen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a non-contact method to quantitatively determine blood volume fractions in turbid media by reflectance spectroscopy in the VIS/NIR spectral wavelength range. This method will be used for spectral analysis of tissue with large absorption coefficients and assist in age determination of bruises and bloodstains. First, a phantom set was constructed to determine the effective photon path length as a function of μa and μs′ on phantoms with an albedo range: 0.02-0.99. Based on these measurements, an empirical model of the path length was established for phantoms with an albedo > 0.1. Next, this model was validated on whole blood mimicking phantoms, to determine the blood volume fractions ρ = 0.12-0.84 within the phantoms (r = 0.993; error < 10%). Finally, the model was proved applicable on cotton fabric phantoms. PMID:21339884

  14. Digital camera measurements of soot temperature and soot volume fraction in axisymmetric flames.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiqing; Castillo, Jose A; Sunderland, Peter B

    2013-11-20

    New diagnostics are presented that use a digital camera to measure full-field soot temperatures and soot volume fractions in axisymmetric flames. The camera is a Nikon D700 with 12 megapixels and 14 bit depth in each color plane, which was modified by removing the infrared and anti-aliasing filters. The diagnostics were calibrated with a blackbody furnace. The flame considered here was an 88 mm long ethylene/air co-flowing laminar jet diffusion flame on a round 11.1 mm burner. The resolution in the flame plane is estimated at between 0.1 and 0.7 mm. Soot temperatures were measured from soot radiative emissions, using ratio pyrometry at 450, 650, and 900 nm following deconvolution. These had a range of 1600-1850 K, a temporal resolution of 125 ms, and an estimated uncertainty of ±50  K. Soot volume fractions were measured two ways: from soot radiative emissions and from soot laser extinction at 632.8 nm, both following deconvolution. Soot volume fractions determined from emissions had a range of 0.1-10 ppm, temporal resolutions of 125 ms, and an estimated uncertainty of ±30%. Soot volume fractions determined from laser extinction had a range of 0.2-10 ppm, similar temporal resolutions, and an estimated uncertainty of ±10%. The present measurements agree with past measurements in this flame using traversing optics and probes; however, they avoid the long test times and other complications of such traditional methods.

  15. On the mixture flow problem in lubrication of hydrodynamic bearings - Small solid volume fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khonsari, M. M.; Dai, Fuling

    1992-01-01

    The lubrication problem of infinitely long slider bearings with a mixture of fluid and particulate solid at small volume fraction level is studied. Closed-form analytical solutions for pressure and shear stress are obtained for a class of solid aggregates. The results reduce to those of pure fluid in the limiting case. A parametric study of the bearing performance with particulate solid is presented.

  16. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  17. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixun; Liu, Songtao; Nacif, Marcelo S.; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use. PMID:24089934

  18. Experimental study on the rheology of anisotropic, flocculated and low volume fraction colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Burcu Genc; Orum, Aslihan; Yildiz, Mehmet; Menceloglu, Yusuf Z.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we have investigated rheological behavior of colloids with a low particle volume fraction, and anisotropic and flocculated microstructures through measuring their viscosity and electrical resistance under varying shear rates together with utilizing several relevant characterization methods ( i.e., Dynamic Light Scattering, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Capacitance and Electrical resistance measurements). The colloids are formed through the suspension of hydrophilic/phobic fumed silica particle with attractive/repulsive interaction in polyethylene glycol and/or ethylene oxide-propylene oxide copolymer. It is observed that studied suspensions display shear thickening/thinning flow behavior depending on their microstructure (the spatial distribution and arrangements of particles in continuous media) and associated changes in cluster sizes, which are controlled by the break down of densified clusters (due to the shear induced mechanical and hydrodynamical forces) and the interaction forces among particleparticle and particles-polymers (owing to physicochemical effects). The detailed evaluation of the experimental results indicates that the shear thickening phenomena in low volume fraction, anisotropic and flocculated systems can be mainly attributed to the increase in the effective volume fraction of particles due to both hydrodynamic and physicochemical forces.

  19. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  20. Physical aging and structural recovery in a colloidal glass subjected to volume-fraction jump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2016-04-01

    Three important kinetic phenomena have been cataloged by Kovacs in the investigation of molecular glasses during structural recovery or physical aging. These are responses to temperature-jump histories referred to as intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach, and memory effect. Here we use a thermosensitive polystyrene-poly (N -isopropylacrylamide)-poly (acrylic acid) core-shell particle-based dispersion as a colloidal model and by working at a constant number concentration of particles we use temperature changes to create volume-fraction changes. This imposes conditions similar to those defined by Kovacs on the colloidal system. We use creep experiments to probe the physical aging and structural recovery behavior of colloidal glasses in the Kovacs-type histories and compare the results with those seen in molecular glasses. We find that there are similarities in aging dynamics between molecular glasses and colloidal glasses, but differences also persist. For the intrinsic isotherms, the times teq needed for relaxing or evolving into the equilibrium (or stationary) state are relatively insensitive to the volume fraction and the values of teq are longer than the α -relaxation time τα at the same volume fraction. On the other hand, both of these times grow at least exponentially with decreasing temperature in molecular glasses. For the asymmetry of approach, similar nonlinear behavior is observed for both colloidal and molecular glasses. However, the equilibration time teq is the same for both volume-fraction up-jump and down-jump experiments, different from the finding in molecular glasses that it takes longer for the structure to evolve into equilibrium for the temperature up-jump condition than for the temperature down-jump condition. For the two-step volume-fraction jumps, a memory response is observed that is different from observations of structural recovery in two-step temperature histories in molecular glasses. The concentration dependence of the dynamics

  1. A novel optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Luca; Nicolina Papa, Maria; Carleo, Luigi; Tai, Yih-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical phenomena, such as debris flows, pyroclastic flows and rock avalanches, involve the rapid flow of granular mixtures. Today the dynamics of these flows is far from being deeply understood, due to their huge complexity compared to clear water or monophasic fluids. To this regard, physical models at laboratory scale represent important tools for understanding the still unclear properties of granular flows and their constitutive laws, under simplified experimental conditions. Beside the velocity and the shear rate, the volume fraction is also strongly interlinked with the rheology of granular materials. Yet, a reliable estimation of this quantity is not easy through non-invasive techniques. In this work a novel cost-effective optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction is presented and, then, applied to a laboratory study on steady-state granular flows. A preliminary numerical investigation, through Monte-Carlo generations of grain distributions under controlled illumination conditions, allowed to find the stochastic relationship between the near-wall volume fraction, c3D, and a measurable quantity (the two-dimensional volume fraction), c2D, obtainable through an appropriate binarization of gray-scale images captured by a camera placed in front of the transparent boundary. Such a relation can be well described by c3D = aexp(bc2D), with parameters only depending on the angle of incidence of light, ζ. An experimental validation of the proposed approach is carried out on dispersions of white plastic grains, immersed in various ambient fluids. The mixture, confined in a box with a transparent window, is illuminated by a flickering-free LED lamp, placed so as to form a given ζ with the measuring surface, and is photographed by a camera, placed in front of the same window. The predicted exponential law is found to be in sound agreement with experiments for a wide range of ζ (10° <ζ<45°). The technique is, then, applied to steady-state dry

  2. Nuclear volume effects in equilibrium stable isotope fractionations of mercury, thallium and lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sha; Liu, Yun

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear volume effects (NVEs) of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems are investigated with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac’s formalism of full-electron wave function. Equilibrium 202Hg/198Hg, 205Tl/203Tl, 207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb isotope fractionations are found can be up to 3.61‰, 2.54‰, 1.48‰ and 3.72‰ at room temperature, respectively, larger than fractionations predicted by classical mass-dependent isotope fractionations theory. Moreover, the NVE can cause mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes and even-mass isotopes. The plot of vs. for Hg-bearing species falls into a straight line with the slope of 1.66, which is close to previous experimental results. For the first time, Pb4+-bearing species are found can enrich heavier Pb isotopes than Pb2+-bearing species to a surprising extent, e.g., the enrichment can be up to 4.34‰ in terms of 208Pb/206Pb at room temperature, due to their NVEs are in opposite directions. In contrast, fractionations among Pb2+-bearing species are trivial. Therefore, the large Pb fractionation changes provide a potential new tracer for redox conditions in young and closed geologic systems. The magnitudes of NVE-driven even-mass MIFs of Pb isotopes (i.e., ) and odd-mass MIFs (i.e., ) are almost the same but with opposite signs.

  3. Nuclear volume effects in equilibrium stable isotope fractionations of mercury, thallium and lead.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sha; Liu, Yun

    2015-07-30

    The nuclear volume effects (NVEs) of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems are investigated with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac's formalism of full-electron wave function. Equilibrium (202)Hg/(198)Hg, (205)Tl/(203)Tl, (207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope fractionations are found can be up to 3.61‰, 2.54‰, 1.48‰ and 3.72‰ at room temperature, respectively, larger than fractionations predicted by classical mass-dependent isotope fractionations theory. Moreover, the NVE can cause mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes and even-mass isotopes. The plot of [formula in text] for Hg-bearing species falls into a straight line with the slope of 1.66, which is close to previous experimental results. For the first time, Pb(4+)-bearing species are found can enrich heavier Pb isotopes than Pb(2+)-bearing species to a surprising extent, e.g., the enrichment can be up to 4.34‰ in terms of (208)Pb/(206)Pb at room temperature, due to their NVEs are in opposite directions. In contrast, fractionations among Pb(2+)-bearing species are trivial. Therefore, the large Pb fractionation changes provide a potential new tracer for redox conditions in young and closed geologic systems. The magnitudes of NVE-driven even-mass MIFs of Pb isotopes (i.e., [formula in text]) and odd-mass MIFs (i.e., [formula in text) are almost the same but with opposite signs.

  4. Nuclear Volume Effects in Equilibrium Stable Isotope Fractionations of Hg, Tl and Pb Isotope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Many evidences showed that heavy isotope systems could be significantly fractionated as the consequence of the nuclear volume effect (NVE) or so-called nuclear field shift effect. Here we investigate NVEs of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems by using quantum chemistry computational methods with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac's formalism of full-electron wavefunction. Our results generally agree with previous studies but with noticeable differences in many cases. With the unique NVE driving force, equilibrium 202Hg/198Hg and 205Tl/203Tl isotopes can be fractionated up to 3.94‰ and 2.78‰ at 0℃, respectively, showing potentially large equilibrium isotope fractionations can be expected for future studies of these two isotope systems. Moreover, the NVE causes large mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes (e.g., ∆199NVHg and ∆201NVHg) and small MIFs for even-mass isotopes (e.g., ∆200NVHg). For Pb isotope system, NVEs induce isotope fractionations up to 1.62‰ (207Pb/206Pb) and 4.06‰ (208Pb/206Pb) at 0℃. However, contributions from classical mass-dependent driving force are small, about 0.1-0.5‰ for 207Pb/206Pb and 0.2-0.9‰ for 208Pb/206Pb. We find that Pb4+-bearing species can be significantly enriched heavy isotopes than Pb2+-bearing species. Comparing to Pb0, Pb2+-bearing species even enrich lighter Pb isotopes. A very strange and interesting thing is that the beta value of Pb2+-bearing species can be smaller than the unity (1.000). Similar thing has been found on Tl+-bearing species. This is an impossible and unexplained situation if only based on classical mass-dependent isotope fractionation theory (e.g., Bigeleisen-Mayer equation). The consequence is that the different direction of beta values of Pb2+-bearing species will let the Pb isotope fractionation even larger when they fractionate with Pb4+-bearing species. Moreover, NVEs also cause mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of odd 207Pb

  5. Constructing Material Interfaces from Data Sets with Volume-Fraction Information

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnell, K.; Duchaineau, M.A.; Schikore, D.R.; Hamann, B.; Joy, K.I.

    2000-03-29

    We present a new algorithm for material boundary interface reconstruction from data sets containing volume fractions. We transform the reconstruction problem to a problem that analyzes the dual data set, where each vertex in the dual mesh has an associated barycentric coordinate tuple that represents the fraction of each material present. After constructing the dual tetrahedral mesh from the original mesh, we construct material boundaries by mapping a tetrahedron into barycentric space and calculating the intersections with Voronoi cells in barycentric space. These intersections are mapped back to the original physical space and triangulated to form the boundary surface approximation. This algorithm can be applied to any grid structure and can treat any number of materials per element/vertex.

  6. Mapping mean axon diameter and axonal volume fraction by MRI using temporal diffusion spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Harkins, Kevin D; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Does, Mark D; Gore, John C

    2014-12-01

    Mapping mean axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction may have significant clinical potential because nerve conduction velocity is directly dependent on axon diameter, and several neurodegenerative diseases affect axons of specific sizes and alter axon counts. Diffusion-weighted MRI methods based on the pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence have been reported to be able to assess axon diameter and volume fraction non-invasively. However, due to the relatively long diffusion times used, e.g. >20ms, the sensitivity to small axons (diameter<2μm) is low, and the derived mean axon diameter has been reported to be overestimated. In the current study, oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) diffusion sequences with variable frequency gradients were used to assess rat spinal white matter tracts with relatively short effective diffusion times (1-5ms). In contrast to previous PGSE-based methods, the extra-axonal diffusion cannot be modeled as hindered (Gaussian) diffusion when short diffusion times are used. Appropriate frequency-dependent rates are therefore incorporated into our analysis and validated by histology-based computer simulation of water diffusion. OGSE data were analyzed to derive mean axon diameters and intra-axonal volume fractions of rat spinal white matter tracts (mean axon diameter of ~1.27-5.54μm). The estimated values were in good agreement with histology, including the small axon diameters (<2.5μm). This study establishes a framework for the quantification of nerve morphology using the OGSE method with high sensitivity to small axons.

  7. Mapping mean axon diameter and axonal volume fraction by MRI using temporal diffusion spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Harkins, Kevin D.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Mapping mean axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction may have significant clinical potential because nerve conduction velocity is directly dependent on axon diameter, and several neurodegenerative diseases affect axons of specific sizes and alter axon counts. Diffusion-weighted MRI methods based on the pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence have been reported to be able to assess axon diameter and volume fraction non-invasively. However, due to the relatively long diffusion times used, e.g. > 20 ms, the sensitivity to small axons (diameter < 2 µm) is low, and the derived mean axon diameter has been reported to be overestimated. In the current study, oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) diffusion sequences with variable frequency gradients were used to assess rat spinal white matter tracts with relatively short effective diffusion times (1 – 5 ms). In contrast to previous PGSE-based methods, the extra-axonal diffusion cannot be modeled as hindered (Gaussian) diffusion when short diffusion times are used. Appropriate frequency-dependent rates are therefore incorporated into our analysis and validated by histology-based computer simulation of water diffusion. OGSE data were analyzed to derive mean axon diameters and intra-axonal volume fractions of rat spinal white matter tracts (mean axon diameter ~ 1.27 – 5.54 µm). The estimated values were in good agreement with histology, including the small axon diameters (< 2.5 µm). This study establishes a framework for quantification of nerve morphology using the OGSE method with high sensitivity to small axons. PMID:25225002

  8. Assessment of volume fraction and fabric in the distal radius using HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Varga, P; Zysset, P K

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capabilities of the state of the art HR-pQCT technique to predict mineral content, volume fraction and fabric of trabecular bone structure compared to the gold standard microCT. Four cadaveric human forearms were scanned with HR-pQCT and the dissected radius epiphyses with microCT. After registering the images, bone mineral density (BMD), volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric were computed on corresponding cubical regions of interest for both image sources. In particular, the effect of the segmentation procedure on BV/TV was analyzed. Assessment of fabric was performed with three different methods comparing their efficiency and robustness against resolution change. The results showed that in order to achieve optimal results at the lower image resolution, different filtering and thresholding approaches needed to be selected for different tasks. Therefore, to preserve BV/TV, the BMD-based volume fraction provided best match with the reference values of microCT, while in case of Mean Intercept Length (MIL) fabric a Gaussian filter and a histogram-based threshold were optimal. Using the latter, MIL was found to be more robust against resolution change than the other approaches. Additionally, we proposed a linear model for describing the mathematical transformation that the second order fabric tensor undergoes when the resolution of the input images changes. As a conclusion, we found that the investigated properties of trabecular bone structure can be adequately predicted from the lower resolution technique that is available in vivo for peripheral bones, when proper image processing and corrections are applied.

  9. Non-Destructive Inspection and Volume Fraction Determination of CFRP Using an Eddy Current Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    thickness 9 4.3 Edge effect 11 4.4 Response to volume fraction 12 5 RESULTS FROM DIRECTIONAL PROBE 13 6 DISCUSSION 14 7 CONCLUSIONS 15 Acknowledgment...use of one unique probe. 4.3 Edge effect It has been demonstrated in section 4.1 that the important part of the eddy current path covers an area 7.5mm...in diameter on cross ply and 15 x 7.5mm on unidirectional CFRP. As might be expected, this results in an edge effect which arises when part of the

  10. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  11. Cup-Drawing Behavior of High-Strength Steel Sheets Containing Different Volume Fractions of Martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Wan; Yang, Hoe-Seok; Han, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2010-06-15

    Planar anisotropy and cup-drawing behavior were investigated for high-strength steel sheets containing different volume fractions of martensite. Macrotexture analysis using XRD was conducted to capture the effect of crystallographic orientation on the planar anisotropy of high-strength steel sheets. A phenomenological yield function, Yld96, which accounts for the anisotropy of yield stress and r-values, was implemented into ABAQUS using the user subroutine UMAT. Cup drawing of high-strength steel sheets was simulated using the FEM code. The profiles of earing and thickness strain were compared with the experimentally measured results.

  12. Influence of a reduced gravity on the volume fraction of a monolayer of spherical grains.

    PubMed

    Dorbolo, S; Scheller, T; Ludewig, F; Lumay, G; Vandewalle, N

    2011-10-01

    Centrifuge force is used to study granular materials in low gravity conditions. We consider a monolayer of noncohesive spherical grains placed on a plate. Reduced gravity conditions can be simulated in the plane by tilting or by rotating the plate. We compare both approaches experimentally. The volume fraction is found to increase with the apparent gravity and saturates. A model based on the exponential distribution of the Voronoi cell areas has been built and is in excellent agreement with the experimental data by extrapolating the fits of the data. Moreover, numerical simulations exhibit that more arches can be maintained at low apparent gravities than at high.

  13. Numerical simulation of the effect of solid-volume fraction on induction force of screw centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Ma, W.; Li, R. N.; Gao, Y.; Gao, H.

    2012-11-01

    The solid-liquid two-phase unsteady flow in a screw centrifugal pump was simulated with unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations and sliding mesh technology. The distribution of the pressure at volute outlet, radial force, axial force and total moment are presented in this paper. The effects of solid-phase volume fractions on the value and direction of the induction thrust are analyzed. Seven monitor points are arranged on the inner surface of volute along the impeller rotation. The characters of the induced force on the monitor points with different solid-phase volume fractions are investigated. The results indicated that different solid-volume fractions have litter effects on the trend and direction of pressure at volute, radial force, axial force and total moment during one period, but the value of induction forces increase with the increasing of solid-volume fraction; The pressure fluctuation on the monitor points has with different trends during one period, which depends on the direction of the monitor points and the rotor-stator interaction strength of impeller and volute. With the rotation of impeller, the values of pressure in the whole passage are further increased along the rotation direction with the role of impeller vane. Solid-phase volume fraction has few effects on change trend of induced thrust as radial force and axial force on the monitor points, but the values of pressure on the monitor points increase with the increasing of solid-volume fraction.

  14. Solid volume fraction estimation of bone:marrow replica models using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2016-02-01

    The acceptance of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the assessment of osteoporosis suffers from a limited understanding of both ultrasound wave propagation through cancellous bone and its exact dependence upon the material and structural properties. It has recently been proposed that ultrasound wave propagation in cancellous bone may be described by a concept of parallel sonic rays; the transit time of each ray defined by the proportion of bone and marrow propagated. A Transit Time Spectrum (TTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays having a particular transit time, effectively describing the lateral inhomogeneity of transit times over the surface aperture of the receive ultrasound transducer. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the solid volume fraction (SVF) of simplified bone:marrow replica models may be reliably estimated from the corresponding ultrasound transit time spectrum. Transit time spectra were derived via digital deconvolution of the experimentally measured input and output ultrasonic signals, and compared to predicted TTS based on the parallel sonic ray concept, demonstrating agreement in both position and amplitude of spectral peaks. Solid volume fraction was calculated from the TTS; agreement between true (geometric calculation) with predicted (computer simulation) and experimentally-derived values were R(2)=99.9% and R(2)=97.3% respectively. It is therefore envisaged that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) offers the potential to reliably estimate bone mineral density and hence the established T-score parameter for clinical osteoporosis assessment.

  15. Prediction of Shrinkage Pore Volume Fraction Using a Dimensionless Niyama Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Kent D.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to use a dimensionless form of the well-known Niyama criterion to directly predict the amount of shrinkage porosity that forms during solidification of metal alloy castings. The main advancement offered by this method is that it avoids the need to know the threshold Niyama value below which shrinkage porosity forms; such threshold values are generally unknown and alloy dependent. The dimensionless criterion accounts for both the local thermal conditions (as in the original Niyama criterion) and the properties and solidification characteristics of the alloy. Once a dimensionless Niyama criterion value is obtained from casting simulation results, the corresponding shrinkage pore volume fraction can be determined knowing only the solid fraction-temperature curve and the total solidification shrinkage of the alloy. Curves providing the shrinkage pore volume percentage as a function of the dimensionless Niyama criterion are given for WCB steel, aluminum alloy A356, and magnesium alloy AZ91D. The present method is used in a general-purpose casting simulation software package to predict shrinkage porosity in three-dimensional (3-D) castings. Comparisons between simulated and experimental shrinkage porosity results for a WCB steel plate casting demonstrate that this method can reasonably predict shrinkage. Additional simulations for magnesium alloy AZ91D illustrate that this method is applicable to a wide variety of alloys and casting conditions.

  16. Effects of Mass and Volume Fraction Skewness in Variable Density Mixing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtor, Adam J.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    Among the parameters characterizing mixing by variable density turbulence of fluids involving density variations of a factor of 5 to 10 are the Atwood, Froude, Schmidt, and Reynolds numbers. There is evidence that the amount of each fluid present when the two pure fluids mix, as described by the probability density function of the mass or molar (volume) fraction, also strongly affects the mixing process. To investigate this phenomena, implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) are performed for binary fluid mixtures in statistically homogenous environments under constant acceleration. These coarse grained simulations are used as data for theory validation and mix model development. ILES has been demonstrated to accurately capture the mixing behavior of a passive scalar field through stirring and advection by a turbulent velocity field. The present work advances that research and studies the extent to which an under-resolved active scalar drives the subsequent fluid motion and determines the nature of the mixing process. Effects of initial distributions of the mass and molar (volume) fraction probability density function on the resulting variable density turbulence and mixing are investigated and compared to direct numerical simulations from the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Database. Funded by the LANL LDRD-ER on ``Inserting Nonlinear N-Material Coupling PDF Information into Turbulent Mixing Models'' through exploratory research project number 20150498ER.

  17. Left ventricular volume regulation in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhof, Peter L M; Yasha Kresh, J; Li, John K-J; Heyndrickx, Guy R

    2013-01-01

    Ejection Fraction (EF) has attained the recognition as indicator of global ventricular performance. Remarkably, precise historical origins promoting the apparent importance of EF are scant. During early utilization EF has been declared a gold standard for the evaluation of the heart as a pump. In contrast, during the last two decades, clinicians have developed a measure of doubt in the universal applicability of EF. This reluctance lead to the introduction of a new and prevalent syndrome in which heart failure (HF) is diagnosed as having a preserved EF (pEF). We examine the existing criticism regarding EF, and describe a novel avenue to characterize ventricular function within the unifying framework of cardiac input–output volume regulation. This approach relates end-systolic volume (ESV) to end-diastolic volume (EDV), and derives for a subgroup matching pEF criteria a distinct pattern in the ESV–EDV domain. In patients with pEF (n = 34), a clear difference (P < 0.0004) in the slope of the regression line for ESV versus EDV was demonstrated compared to control patients with EF < 50% (n = 29). These findings are confirmed by analysis of data presented in two independent publications. The volume regulation approach proposed employs primary end-point determinants (such as ESV and EDV) rather than derived quantities (e.g., the ratio EF or its differential parameter, that is, stroke volume) and confirms a distinct advantage over the classical Starling curve. Application of the ESV-EDV-construct provides the basis and clarifies why some patients present as HFpEF, while others have reduced EF. PMID:24303121

  18. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    .3, and thus more than one mass-independent isotope effect is inferred. MIF of mercury can be caused by the nuclear volume effect. Schauble, 2007 has calculated nuclear volume fractionation scaling factors for a number of common mercury chemical species in equilibrium with Hg° vapor. From his calculations the nuclear field shift effect is larger in Δ199Hg than in Δ201Hg by approximately a factor of two. The predominant mercury chemical species in fish is methylmercury cysteine. From the experimental studies of Buchachenko and others (2004) on the reaction of methylmercury chloride with creatine kinase it seems reasonable to predicted that the thiol functional groups of cysteine gets enriched in 199Hg and 201Hg. Here the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) produces a kinetic partial separation of isotopes with non-zero nuclear spin quantum numbers from the even-N isotopes. The ratio of enrichment of Δ201Hg /Δ199Hg is predicted from theory to be 1.11, which is the ratio of the magnetic moments of 199Hg and 201Hg. Because mercury possesses two odd-N isotopes, it is possible to detect and evaluate the effects of two distinct, mass-independent isotope fractionating processes. From the data obtained on fish samples, we can deconvolute the contributions of the isotope effects of nuclear mass, spin and volume. For these samples the role of spin or the magnetic isotope effect is the most dominant.

  19. Microchemostat array with small-volume fraction replenishment for steady-state microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaewon; Wu, Jianzhang; Polymenis, Michael; Han, Arum

    2013-11-07

    A chemostat is a bioreactor in which microorganisms can be cultured at steady-state by controlling the rate of culture medium inflow and waste outflow, thus maintaining media composition over time. Even though many microbial studies could greatly benefit from studying microbes in steady-state conditions, high instrument cost, complexity, and large reagent consumption hamper the routine use of chemostats. Microfluidic-based chemostats (i.e. microchemostats) can operate with significantly smaller reagent consumption while providing accurate chemostatic conditions at orders of magnitude lower cost compared to conventional chemostats. Also, microchemostats have the potential to significantly increase the throughput by integrating arrays of microchemostats. We present a microchemostat array with a unique two-depth culture chamber design that enables small-volume fraction replenishment of culture medium as low as 1% per replenishment cycle in a 250 nl volume. A system having an array of 8 microchemostats on a 40 × 60 mm(2) footprint could be automatically operated in parallel by a single controller unit as a demonstration for potential high throughput microbial studies. The model organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, successfully reached a stable steady-state of different cell densities as a demonstration of the chemostatic functionality by programming the dilution rates. Chemostatic functionality of the system was further confirmed by quantifying the budding index as a function of dilution rate, a strong indicator of growth-dependent cell division. In addition, the small-volume fraction replenishment feature minimized the cell density fluctuation during the culture. The developed system provides a robust, low-cost, and higher throughput solution to furthering studies in microbial physiology.

  20. Acute toxicity of Ag and CuO nanoparticle suspensions against Daphnia magna: the importance of their dissolved fraction varying with preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hun Je; Choi, Jae Woo; Lee, Sang Hyup; Hong, Seok Won

    2012-08-15

    A variety of methods to prepare nanoparticle suspensions have been employed for aquatic toxicity tests, although they can influence the dispersion property and subsequent toxicity of nanoparticles. Thus, in this study, we prepared stock suspensions of silver (Ag) and copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles using different methods and compared their acute toxicity against Daphnia magna. The results showed that the dispersion method, filtration and initial concentration largely affected their toxicity, when the toxicity was expressed as the total concentrations of Ag and Cu. In case of Ag nanoparticles, the toxicity was also influenced by their different particle size. However, negligible differences in 24h-median effect concentration (EC(50)) values, which were calculated in terms of their dissolved concentrations, were observed. When expressing toxicity on the basis of dissolved concentrations, 24h-EC(50) values of the Ag and CuO nanoparticles were also found to be similar to those of the counterpart ionic species, i.e., Ag (as AgNO(3)) and Cu (as CuCl(2)·2H(2)O). These findings indicate that the dissolved fraction of nanoparticles largely contributes to their acute toxicity. Our results may help in establishing a useful guideline for preparing nanoparticle suspensions with reproducible toxicity.

  1. Applying Linear and Non-Linear Methods for Parallel Prediction of Volume of Distribution and Fraction of Unbound Drug

    PubMed Central

    del Amo, Eva M.; Ghemtio, Leo; Xhaard, Henri; Yliperttula, Marjo; Urtti, Arto; Kidron, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Volume of distribution and fraction unbound are two key parameters in pharmacokinetics. The fraction unbound describes the portion of free drug in plasma that may extravasate, while volume of distribution describes the tissue access and binding of a drug. Reliable in silico predictions of these pharmacokinetic parameters would benefit the early stages of drug discovery, as experimental measuring is not feasible for screening purposes. We have applied linear and nonlinear multivariate approaches to predict these parameters: linear partial least square regression and non-linear recursive partitioning classification. The volume of distribution and fraction of unbound drug in plasma are predicted in parallel within the model, since the two are expected to be affected by similar physicochemical drug properties. Predictive models for both parameters were built and the performance of the linear models compared to models included in the commercial software Volsurf+. Our models performed better in predicting the unbound fraction (Q2 0.54 for test set compared to 0.38 with Volsurf+ model), but prediction accuracy of the volume of distribution was comparable to the Volsurf+ model (Q2 of 0.70 for test set compared to 0.71 with Volsurf+ model). The nonlinear classification models were able to identify compounds with a high or low volume of distribution (sensitivity 0.81 and 0.71, respectively, for test set), while classification of fraction unbound was less successful. The interrelationship between the volume of distribution and fraction unbound is investigated and described in terms of physicochemical descriptors. Lipophilicity and solubility descriptors were found to have a high influence on both volume of distribution and fraction unbound, but with an inverse relationship. PMID:24116008

  2. RESOLVE Survey Photometry and Volume-limited Calibration of the Photometric Gas Fractions Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Hoversten, Erik A.

    2015-09-01

    We present custom-processed ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry for the REsolved Spectroscopy of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey, a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass within two subvolumes of the nearby universe (RESOLVE-A and RESOLVE-B). RESOLVE is complete down to baryonic mass ˜ {10}9.1-9.3 {M}⊙ , probing the upper end of the dwarf galaxy regime. In contrast to standard pipeline photometry (e.g., SDSS), our photometry uses optimal background subtraction, avoids suppressing color gradients, and employs multiple flux extrapolation routines to estimate systematic errors. With these improvements, we measure brighter magnitudes, larger radii, bluer colors, and a real increase in scatter around the red sequence. Combining stellar mass estimates based on our optimized photometry with the nearly complete H i mass census for RESOLVE-A, we create new z = 0 volume-limited calibrations of the photometric gas fractions (PGF) technique, which predicts gas-to-stellar mass ratios (G/S) from galaxy colors and optional additional parameters. We analyze G/S-color residuals versus potential third parameters, finding that axial ratio is the best independent and physically meaningful third parameter. We define a “modified color” from planar fits to G/S as a function of both color and axial ratio. In the complete galaxy population, upper limits on G/S bias linear and planar fits. We therefore model the entire PGF probability density field, enabling iterative statistical modeling of upper limits and prediction of full G/S probability distributions for individual galaxies. These distributions have two-component structure in the red color regime. Finally, we use the RESOLVE-B 21 cm census to test several PGF calibrations, finding that most systematically under- or overestimate gas masses, but the full probability density method performs well.

  3. The influence of ferrite volume fraction on Rayleigh wave propagation in A572 grade 50 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Zeynab; Tehrani, Niloofar; Ozevin, Didem; Indacochea, J. E.

    2017-02-01

    The acoustoelastic effect is the interaction between ultrasonic wave velocity and stress. To estimate the stress a perturbation signal is introduced and the shift in time of flight is measured at the receiving location. In addition to the stress, the wave velocity can be affected by the volume fraction of the phases in the material's microstructure. This study investigates the changes in Rayleigh wave velocity as a function of stress and microstructure obtained in A572 grade 50 steel following heat treatments. The steel was heat treated to homogenize the microstructure of as-received steel that showed banding; the samples are heat treated at 970 °C for 0.5, 1, and 4 hours, furnace cooled and metallographically characterized. The acoustoelastic coefficient for 1 MHz perturbation frequency is calculated by uniaxial loading of each heat treated plate while measuring ultrasonic wave velocity. The results are discussed in relation to the reduction of banding obtained from optical microscopy.

  4. Determination of volume fraction in multiphase systems using incomplete pole figures. [X ray diffraction metallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houska, C. R.; Rao, V.

    1978-01-01

    The determination of the volume fraction of a second phase in a multiphase sample by X-ray diffraction becomes more difficult if the diffracting planes have a preferred orientation. Lopata and Kula have described a method of treating this problem using complete pole figures for each of the phases. With some samples, it is not always possible or convenient to obtain data over the full hemisphere. Equations and an example are given which require X-ray data over a limited range of approximately 0 to 75 deg. This can be obtained by reflection without a specially cut sample or transmission data. A series of Legendre polynomials are fitted to data collected while spinning the sample about its normal. An extrapolation is made possible by introducing two conditions on the end points which must be satisfied if the extrapolation functions are to be valid.

  5. Applicability of ultrasonic testing for the determination of volume fraction of particulates in alumina-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.K.; Fang, R.L.; Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1999-10-01

    An ultrasonic testing technique was employed to determine the volume fraction of alumina particulate reinforcement in 6061 aluminum matrix composites. this study was performed on various composites with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nominal volume fractions of 10, 15, and 20%. For comparison, other techniques were employed as well, including the Archimedes method, metallographic image analysis, X-ray diffraction, and acid dissolution. Observations indicated that ultrasonic testing and acid dissolution methods are more reliable than the other techniques, while ultrasonic testing is faster than the acid dissolution method.

  6. A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Infusion Processes Such as VARTM , VAP, and Compression RTM . SAMPE Proceedings, 38 th ISTC, Texas, 2006. 21. Li, W.; Krehl, J.; Gillespie, J.; Heider...increasing the fiber-volume fraction by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) in order to produce composite structures with aerospace-grade...processed composites. Using a combination of viscosity control, ARL- based VARTM techniques, and a pressure control system, we increased the fiber-volume

  7. Quantification of Left Ventricular Volumes, Mass and Ejection Fraction using Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Christopher M.; Kramer, Sage P.; Skrinjar, Oskar; Binkley, Cassi M.; Powell, David K.; Mattingly, Andrea C.; Epstein, Frederick H.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that magnitude images from cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI can accurately quantify left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction. Materials and Methods Thirteen mice (C57BL/6J) were imaged using a 7T ClinScan MRI. A short-axis stack of cine T2-weighted black blood (BB) images was acquired for calculation of left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF) using the gold standard sum-of-slices methodology. DENSE images were acquired during the same imaging session in three short-axis (basal, mid, apical) and two long-axis orientations. A custom surface fitting algorithm was applied to epicardial and endocardial borders from the DENSE magnitude images to calculate volumes, mass, and EF. Agreement between the DENSE-derived measures and BB-derived measures was assessed via coefficient of variation (CoV). Results 3D surface reconstruction was completed on the order of seconds from segmented images, and required fewer slices to be segmented. Volumes, mass, and EF from DENSE-derived surfaces matched well with BB data (CoVs ≤11%). Conclusion LV mass, volumes, and ejection fraction in mice can be quantified through sparse (5 slices) sampling with DENSE. This consolidation significantly reduces the time required to assess both mass/volume-based measures of cardiac function and advanced cardiac mechanics. PMID:24923710

  8. Enlarged thalamic volumes and increased fractional anisotropy in the thalamic radiations in veterans with suicide behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Larson, Melissa; King, Jace B; McGlade, Erin; Bueler, Elliott; Stoeckel, Amanda; Epstein, Daniel J; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem studies have suggested a link between the thalamus, psychiatric disorders, and suicide. We evaluated the thalamus and anterior thalamic radiations (ATR) in a group of Veterans with and without a history of suicidal behavior (SB) to determine if thalamic abnormalities were associated with an increased risk of SB. Forty Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and no SB (TBI-SB), 19 Veterans with mild TBI and a history of SB (TB + SB), and 15 healthy controls (HC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning including a structural and diffusion tensor imaging scan. SBs were evaluated utilizing the Columbia Suicide Rating Scale and impulsivity was measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Differences in thalamic volumes and ATR fractional anisotropy (FA) were examined between (1) TBI + SB versus HC and (2) TBI + SB versus combined HC and TBI-SB and (3) between TBI + SB and TBI-SB. Left and right thalamic volumes were significantly increased in those with TBI + SB compared to the HC, TBI-SB, and the combined group. Veterans with TBI + SB had increased FA bilaterally compared to the HC, HC and TBI-SB group, and the TBI-SB only group. Significant positive associations were found for bilateral ATR and BIS in the TBI + SB group. Our findings of thalamic enlargement and increased FA in individuals with TBI + SB suggest that this region may be a biomarker for suicide risk. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence indicating that suicide may be associated with behavioral disinhibition and frontal-thalamic-limbic dysfunction and suggest a neurobiologic mechanism that may increase vulnerability to suicide.

  9. Enlarged Thalamic Volumes and Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Thalamic Radiations in Veterans with Suicide Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Larson, Melissa; King, Jace B.; McGlade, Erin; Bueler, Elliott; Stoeckel, Amanda; Epstein, Daniel J.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem studies have suggested a link between the thalamus, psychiatric disorders, and suicide. We evaluated the thalamus and anterior thalamic radiations (ATR) in a group of Veterans with and without a history of suicidal behavior (SB) to determine if thalamic abnormalities were associated with an increased risk of SB. Forty Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and no SB (TBI-SB), 19 Veterans with mild TBI and a history of SB (TB + SB), and 15 healthy controls (HC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning including a structural and diffusion tensor imaging scan. SBs were evaluated utilizing the Columbia Suicide Rating Scale and impulsivity was measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Differences in thalamic volumes and ATR fractional anisotropy (FA) were examined between (1) TBI + SB versus HC and (2) TBI + SB versus combined HC and TBI-SB and (3) between TBI + SB and TBI-SB. Left and right thalamic volumes were significantly increased in those with TBI + SB compared to the HC, TBI-SB, and the combined group. Veterans with TBI + SB had increased FA bilaterally compared to the HC, HC and TBI-SB group, and the TBI-SB only group. Significant positive associations were found for bilateral ATR and BIS in the TBI + SB group. Our findings of thalamic enlargement and increased FA in individuals with TBI + SB suggest that this region may be a biomarker for suicide risk. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence indicating that suicide may be associated with behavioral disinhibition and frontal-thalamic-limbic dysfunction and suggest a neurobiologic mechanism that may increase vulnerability to suicide. PMID:23964245

  10. Spinal Cord Tolerance to Single-Fraction Partial-Volume Irradiation: A Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation in swine. Methods and Materials: A 5-cm-long cervical segment was irradiated in 38-47-week-old Yucatan minipigs using a dedicated, image-guided radiosurgery linear accelerator. The radiation was delivered to a cylindrical volume approximately 5 cm in length and 2 cm in diameter that was positioned lateral to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in a dose distribution with the 90%, 50%, and 10% isodose lines traversing the ipsilateral, central, and contralateral spinal cord, respectively. The dose was prescribed to the 90% isodose line. A total of 26 pigs were stratified into eight dose groups of 12-47 Gy. The mean maximum spinal cord dose was 16.9 {+-} 0.1, 18.9 {+-} 0.1, 21.0 {+-} 0.1, 23.0 {+-} 0.2, and 25.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy in the 16-, 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-Gy dose groups, respectively. The mean percentage of spinal cord volumes receiving {>=}10 Gy for the same groups were 43% {+-} 3%, 48% {+-} 4%, 51% {+-} 2%, 57% {+-} 2%, and 59% {+-} 4%. The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait during a 1-year follow-up period. Results: A steep dose-response curve was observed with a median effective dose for the maximum dose point of 20.0 Gy (95% confidence interval, 18.3-21.7). Excellent agreement was observed between the occurrence of neurologic change and the presence of histologic change. All the minipigs with motor deficits showed some degree of demyelination and focal white matter necrosis on the irradiated side, with relative sparing of the gray matter. The histologic findings were unremarkable in the minipigs with normal neurologic status. Conclusions: Our results have indicated that for a dose distribution with a steep lateral gradient, the pigs had a lower median effective dose for paralysis than has been observed in rats and more closely resembles that for rats, mice, and guinea pigs receiving uniform spinal cord irradiation.

  11. Properties of High Volume Fraction Fly Ash/Al Alloy Composites Produced by Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kountouras, D. T.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsouknidas, A.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Skolianos, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, pressure infiltration is employed to synthesize aluminum alloy 7075-fly ash composites. The microstructure and chemical composition of the fly ash and the produced composite material was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Several properties of the produced composite material were examined and evaluated including macro-hardness, wear, thermal expansion, and corrosion behavior. The wear characteristics of the composite, in the as-cast conditions, were studied by dry sliding wear tests. The corrosion behavior of composite material was evaluated by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite specimens exhibit a homogeneous distribution of fly ash particles and present enhanced hardness values, compared to the matrix material. The high volume fraction of the fly ash reinforcement (>40%) in the composite material led to increased wear rates, attributed to the fragmentation of the fly ash particles. However, the presence of fly ash particles in the Al alloy matrix considerably decreased the coefficiency of thermal expansion, while resulting in an altered corrosion mechanism of the composite material with respect to the matrix alloy.

  12. Surface area and volume fraction of random open-pore systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, H.; Elsner, A.; Stoyan, D.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, explicit approximate formulas are presented for the volume fraction and specific surface area of random open-pore systems with poly-disperse pore size distributions. It is shown that the formulas are valid for broad classes of models for porous media characterized by tunable pore size distributions and a variable degree of inter-penetrability of pores. The formulas for the poly-disperse case are based on expressions derived previously for mono-disperse penetrable-sphere models. The results are obtained by analysis of a series of open-pore models, which are prepared by computer simulation of systems of randomly packed partially penetrable spheres with various poly-disperse size distributions such as gamma, lognormal, and Gaussian. The formulas are applied in a study of atomic layer deposition processes on open-pore systems, and the effective Young's modulus and the effective thermal conductivity of Al2O3 coated porous polypropylene electrodes for lithium ion batteries are predicted.

  13. Non-monotonic dependence of Pickering emulsion gel rheology on particle volume fraction.

    PubMed

    Kaganyuk, M; Mohraz, A

    2017-03-29

    The microstructure of Pickering emulsion gels features a tenuous network of faceted droplets, bridged together by shared monolayers of particles. In this investigation, we use standard oscillatory rheometry in conjunction with confocal microscopy to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the role particle bridged interfaces have on the rheology of Pickering emulsion gels. The zero-shear elastic modulus of Pickering emulsion gels shows a non-monotonic dependence on particle loading, with three separate regimes of power-law and linear gel strengthening, and subsequent gel weakening. The transition from power-law to linear scaling is found to coincide with a peak in the volume fraction of particles that participate in bridging, which we indirectly calculate using measureable quantities, and the transition to gel weakening is shown to result from a loss in network connectivity at high particle loadings. These observations are explained via a simple representation of how Pickering emulsion gels arise from an initial population of partially-covered droplets. Based on these considerations, we propose a combined variable related to the initial droplet coverage, to be used in reporting and rationalizing the rheology of Pickering emulsion gels. We demonstrate the applicability of this variable with Pickering emulsions prepared at variable fluid ratios and with different-sized colloidal particles. The results of our investigation have important implications for many technological applications that utilize solid stabilized multi-phase emulsions and require a priori knowledge or engineering of their flow characteristics.

  14. A Volume-Fraction Based Two-Phase Constitutive Model for Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Rui; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Hund, S.J.; •Antaki, J.F.

    2008-06-01

    Mechanically-induced blood trauma such as hemolysis and thrombosis often occurs at microscopic channels, steps and crevices within cardiovascular devices. A predictive mathematical model based on a broad understanding of hemodynamics at micro scale is needed to mitigate these effects, and is the motivation of this research project. Platelet transport and surface deposition is important in thrombosis. Microfluidic experiments have previously revealed a significant impact of red blood cell (RBC)-plasma phase separation on platelet transport [5], whereby platelet localized concentration can be enhanced due to a non-uniform distribution of RBCs of blood flow in a capillary tube and sudden expansion. However, current platelet deposition models either totally ignored RBCs in the fluid by assuming a zero sample hematocrit or treated them as being evenly distributed. As a result, those models often underestimated platelet advection and deposition to certain areas [2]. The current study aims to develop a two-phase blood constitutive model that can predict phase separation in a RBC-plasma mixture at the micro scale. The model is based on a sophisticated theory known as theory of interacting continua, i.e., mixture theory. The volume fraction is treated as a field variable in this model, which allows the prediction of concentration as well as velocity profiles of both RBC and plasma phases. The results will be used as the input of successive platelet deposition models.

  15. Monomer volume fraction profiles in pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Yang, Yubo; Deodhar, Chaitra V.; Ankner, John Francis; Lokitz, Bradley S.; Kilbey, II, S. Michael; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-03-06

    Spatial dependencies of monomer volume fraction profiles of pH responsive polyelectrolyte brushes were investigated using field theories and neutron reflectivity experiments. In particular, planar polyelectrolyte brushes in good solvent were studied and direct comparisons between predictions of the theories and experimental measurements are presented. The comparisons between the theories and the experimental data reveal that solvent entropy and ion-pairs resulting from adsorption of counterions from the added salt play key roles in affecting the monomer distribution and must be taken into account in modeling polyelectrolyte brushes. Furthermore, the utility of this physics-based approach based on these theories for the prediction and interpretation of neutron reflectivity profiles in the context of pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes such as polybasic poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and polyacidic poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes is demonstrated. The approach provides a quantitative way of estimating molecular weights of the polymers polymerized using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

  16. Determination of particle sedimentation rate by ultrasonic interferometry: role of particle size, density and volume fraction.

    PubMed

    Razavian, S M; Wenby, R B; Fisher, T C; Meiselman, J H

    1997-01-01

    The sedimentation rate (SR) of non-aggregated spherical particles in suspension was determined using an ultrasonic interferometry technique (Echo-Cell); this method is based on A-mode echography and measures the rate of formation of a sediment on a solid plate during settling. The particle accumulation rate, which is related to SR, is obtained from the interference of two waves reflected by two interfaces: one between the plate and the sediment and the other between the sediment and the suspension. Studies were carried out at 25 degrees C using latex spheres of different diameters (7 to 20 micron) and densities (1.062 to 1.190 g/cm3) suspended in distilled water at various volume fractions (1% to 5%). As anticipated by the Stokes model, linear relations were found between SR and both particle density and the square of particle radius. Experimental SR values decreased with increasing suspension particle concentration; these concentration effects were in good agreement with those predicted by the Steinour model. Our results thus serve to validate the theoretical aspects of the Echo-Cell method and suggest its usefulness as a tool for studies of RBC interaction and RBC aggregation.

  17. Monomer volume fraction profiles in pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes

    DOE PAGES

    Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Yang, Yubo; Deodhar, Chaitra V.; ...

    2016-03-06

    Spatial dependencies of monomer volume fraction profiles of pH responsive polyelectrolyte brushes were investigated using field theories and neutron reflectivity experiments. In particular, planar polyelectrolyte brushes in good solvent were studied and direct comparisons between predictions of the theories and experimental measurements are presented. The comparisons between the theories and the experimental data reveal that solvent entropy and ion-pairs resulting from adsorption of counterions from the added salt play key roles in affecting the monomer distribution and must be taken into account in modeling polyelectrolyte brushes. Furthermore, the utility of this physics-based approach based on these theories for the predictionmore » and interpretation of neutron reflectivity profiles in the context of pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes such as polybasic poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and polyacidic poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes is demonstrated. The approach provides a quantitative way of estimating molecular weights of the polymers polymerized using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.« less

  18. The effect of graphene nanoplatelet volume fraction on water graphene nanofluid thermal conductivity and viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahaya, Bernard

    The aim of this thesis is to study the improvement of heat transfer in graphene-water nanofluids. Experiments were conducted with graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) to study the relative benefit of the thermal conductivity improvement in relationship to the potential detriment when considering the effect that more GNP dispersed in the water increases the viscosity of the resulting suspension relative to that of the water. A maximum enhancement ratio for GNP nanofluid thermal conductivity over water was 1.43 at a volume fraction of 0.014. Based upon GNP aspect ratios confirmed in sizing measurements, the DEM model presented by Chu et al., (2012) appears to describe the experimental results of this study when using a fitted interfacial resistance value of 6.25 E -8 m2 K W-1. The well-known Einstein viscosity model for spheres dispersed in fluids was shown to under predict the experimental data. Adjusting the intrinsic model term for spheres from a value of 2.5 to a fitted value of 1938 representative for the GNP of this study provided much closer agreement between measured and predicted values. Heat transfer is a nonlinear function of viscosity and thermal conductivity and heat transfer is predicted to decrease for GNP nanofluids when compared to water alone. Hence the use of nanofluids to enhance heat transfer processes appears not to be viable.

  19. Pitch Fractionation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-15

    13 3. Solvent Fractionation Experiments .................................... 15 4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra for A240 Petrolem Pitch AG 12...34 and Mesophase Pitch AG 164B ............................... 21 5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra ................................... 23 6...compared by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis using a Digilab Model FTS 14 spectrophotometer (Rockwell International, Anaheim, California

  20. Effect of β volume fraction on the dynamic grain growth during superplastic deformation of Ti3Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Sik; Nam, Won Jong; Lee, Chong Soo

    1998-10-01

    The superplastic deformation behavior of Ti3Al based (α 2+β alloy was studied with respect to the volume fraction of α2/β. Three alloys containing 21, 50 and 77% in volume fractions of β exhibited large tensile elongations of over 500% at 970°C with a strain rate of 2.5x10-4 sec-1. The largest elongation was observed in the alloy with 21% of β. As the volume fraction of β phase increased, the flow stress and correspondingly, the strain-rate sensitivity values decreased. Due to the higher diffusivity of Ti in,β phase than in α2 phase, the increase in β volume fraction from 21 % to 77% accelerated the dynamic grain growth, and degraded the superplasticity of the Ti3Al-based alloys. The strain-based grain growth behavior was quantitatively analyzed and incorporated into a constitutive equation. The calculated flow curves are in agreement with the experimental ones in the stable deformation region.

  1. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: implications for ash dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Scarlato, P.; Andronico, D.; Scollo, S.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first report of experimental measurements of the enhanced settling velocity of volcanic particles as function of particle volume fraction. In order to investigate the differences in the aerodynamic behavior of ash particles when settling individually or in mass, we performed systematic large-scale ash settling experiments using natural basaltic and phonolitic ash. By releasing ash particles at different, controlled volumetric flow rates, in an unconstrained open space and at minimal air movement, we measured their terminal velocity, size, and particle volume fraction with a high-speed camera at 2000 fps. Enhanced settling velocities of individual particles increase with increasing particle volume fraction. This suggests that particle clustering during fallout may be one reason explaining larger than theoretical depletion rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. We provide a quantitative empirical model that allows to calculate, from a given particle size and density, the enhanced velocity resulting from a given particle volume fraction. The proposed model has the potential to serve as a simple tool for the prediction of the terminal velocity of ash of an hypothetical distribution of ash of known particle size and volume fraction. This is of particular importance for advection-diffusion transport model of ash where generally a one-way coupling is adopted, considering only the flow effects on particles. To better quantify the importance of the enhanced settling velocity in ash dispersal, we finally introduced the new formulation in a Lagrangian model calculating for realistic eruptive conditions the resulting ash concentration in the atmosphere and on the ground.

  2. Influence of bone volume fraction and architecture on computed large-deformation failure mechanisms in human trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Bevill, Grant; Eswaran, Senthil K; Gupta, Atul; Papadopoulos, Panayiotis; Keaveny, Tony M

    2006-12-01

    Large-deformation bending and buckling have long been proposed as failure mechanisms by which the strength of trabecular bone can be affected disproportionately to changes in bone density, and thus may represent an important aspect of bone quality. We sought here to quantify the contribution of large-deformation failure mechanisms on strength, to determine the dependence of these effects on bone volume fraction and architecture, and to confirm that the inclusion of large-deformation effects in high-resolution finite element models improves predictions of strength versus experiment. Micro-CT-based finite element models having uniform hard tissue material properties were created from 54 cores of human trabecular bone taken from four anatomic sites (age = 70+/-11; 24 male, 27 female donors), which were subsequently biomechanically tested to failure. Strength predictions were made from the models first including, then excluding, large-deformation failure mechanisms, both for compressive and tensile load cases. As expected, strength predictions versus experimental data for the large-deformation finite element models were significantly improved (p < 0.001) relative to the small deformation models in both tension and compression. Below a volume fraction of about 0.20, large-deformation failure mechanisms decreased trabecular strength from 5-80% for compressive loading, while effects were negligible above this volume fraction. Step-wise nonlinear multiple regression revealed that structure model index (SMI) and volume fraction (BV/TV) were significant predictors of these reductions in strength (R2 = 0.83, p < 0.03). Even so, some low-density specimens having nearly identical volume fraction and SMI exhibited up to fivefold differences in strength reduction. We conclude that within very low-density bone, the potentially important biomechanical effect of large-deformation failure mechanisms on trabecular bone strength is highly heterogeneous and is not well explained by

  3. Effects of an artificial gravity countermeasure on orthostatic tolerance, blood volumes and aerobic power after short-term bed rest (BR-AG1).

    PubMed

    Linnarsson, Dag; Hughson, Richard L; Fraser, Katelyn S; Clément, Gilles; Karlsson, Lars L; Mulder, Edwin; Paloski, William H; Rittweger, Jörn; Wuyts, Floris L; Zange, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial gravity (AG) in a short-arm centrifuge has potential benefits for maintaining human performance during long-term space missions. Eleven subjects were investigated during three campaigns of 5 days head-down bed rest: 1) bed rest without countermeasures (control), 2) bed rest and 30 min of AG (AG1) daily, and 3) bed rest and six periods of 5 min AG (AG2) daily. During centrifugation, the supine subjects were exposed to AG in the head-to-feet direction with 1 G at the center of mass. Subjects participated in the three campaigns in random order. The cardiovascular effects of bed rest and countermeasures were determined from changes in tolerance to a head-up tilt test with superimposed lower body negative pressure (HUT), from changes in plasma volume (PV) and from changes in maximum aerobic power (V̇o2 peak) during upright work on a cycle ergometer. Complete data sets were obtained in eight subjects. After bed rest, HUT tolerance times were 36, 64, and 78% of pre-bed rest baseline during control, AG1 and AG2, respectively, with a significant difference between AG2 and control. PV and V̇o2 peak decreased to 85 and 95% of pre-bed rest baseline, respectively, with no differences between the treatments. It was concluded that the AG2 countermeasure should be further investigated during future long-term bed rest studies, especially as it was better tolerated than AG1. The superior effect of AG2 on orthostatic tolerance could not be related to concomitant changes in PV or aerobic power.

  4. In vivo gastroprotective effect of nanoparticles: influence of chemical composition and volume fraction.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Kelly; Adorne, Marcia D; Jornada, Denise S; da Fonseca, Francisco Noé; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2013-01-01

    In nanomedicine, different nanomaterials and nanoparticles have been proposed as therapeutic agents or adjuvants, as well as diagnosis devices. Considering that the principal cause of the ulcerations is the imbalance among the gastric juice secretion and the protection provided by the mucosal barrier and the neutralization of the gastric acid, as well as that nanoparticles are able to accumulate in the gastro-intestinal tissues, we proposed a 2(2) factorial design to evaluate the influence of the chemical composition and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase on the gastric protective effect against ulceration induced by ethanol. Cocoa-theospheres (CT) and lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) (two different kinds of surfaces: lipid and polymeric, respectively) prepared at two different concentrations of soft materials: 4% and 12% (w/v) were produced by high pressure homogenization and solvent displacement methods, respectively. Laser diffraction showed volume-weighted mean diameters ranging from 133 to 207 nm, number median diameters lower than 100 nm and specific surfaces between 41.2 and 51.2 m(2) g(-1). The formulations had pH ranging from 4.7 to 6.3; and zeta potential close to -9 mV due to their coating with polysorbate 80. The ulcer indexes were 0.40 (LNC(4)) and 0.48 (CT(4)) for the lower total administered areas (3.3 and 4.1 m(2)g(-1), respectively), and 0.09 (LNC(12) and CT(12)) for the higher administered areas (10.0 and 12.0 m(2) g(-1), respectively). LNC(4), LNC(12) and CT(12) showed lower levels in the lipid peroxidation assay when compared either to the negative control (saline) or to CT(4). LNC(12) and CT(12) showed similar TBARS levels, as well as CT(4) was similar to the negative control. SEM analysis of the stomach mucosa showed coatings more homogenous and cohesive when LNC formulations were administered compared to the correspondent CT formulations. The higher total area of administered nanoparticles showed film formation. Moreover, LNC(12

  5. SU-E-T-429: Uncertainties of Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties of cell surviving fraction reconstructed from tumor-volume variation curves during radiation therapy using sensitivity analysis based on linear perturbation theory. Methods: The time dependent tumor-volume functions V(t) have been calculated using a twolevel cell population model which is based on the separation of entire tumor cell population in two subpopulations: oxygenated viable and lethally damaged cells. The sensitivity function is defined as S(t)=[δV(t)/V(t)]/[δx/x] where δV(t)/V(t) is the time dependent relative variation of the volume V(t) and δx/x is the relative variation of the radiobiological parameter x. The sensitivity analysis was performed using direct perturbation method where the radiobiological parameter x was changed by a certain error and the tumor-volume was recalculated to evaluate the corresponding tumor-volume variation. Tumor volume variation curves and sensitivity functions have been computed for different values of cell surviving fractions from the practically important interval S{sub 2}=0.1-0.7 using the two-level cell population model. Results: The sensitivity functions of tumor-volume to cell surviving fractions achieved a relatively large value of 2.7 for S{sub 2}=0.7 and then approached zero as S{sub 2} is approaching zero Assuming a systematic error of 3-4% we obtain that the relative error in S{sub 2} is less that 20% in the range S2=0.4-0.7. This Resultis important because the large values of S{sub 2} are associated with poor treatment outcome should be measured with relatively small uncertainties. For the very small values of S2<0.3, the relative error can be larger than 20%; however, the absolute error does not increase significantly. Conclusion: Tumor-volume curves measured during radiotherapy can be used for evaluation of cell surviving fractions usually observed in radiation therapy with conventional fractionation.

  6. Extracellular volume fraction mapping in the myocardium, part 1: evaluation of an automated method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disturbances in the myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECV), such as diffuse or focal myocardial fibrosis or edema, are hallmarks of heart disease. Diffuse ECV changes are difficult to assess or quantify with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), or pre- or post-contrast T1-mapping alone. ECV measurement circumvents factors that confound T1-weighted images or T1-maps, and has been shown to correlate well with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate an automated method for producing a pixel-wise map of ECV that would be adequately robust for clinical work flow. Methods ECV maps were automatically generated from T1-maps acquired pre- and post-contrast calibrated by blood hematocrit. The algorithm incorporates correction of respiratory motion that occurs due to insufficient breath-holding and due to misregistration between breath-holds, as well as automated identification of the blood pool. Images were visually scored on a 5-point scale from non-diagnostic (1) to excellent (5). Results The quality score of ECV maps was 4.23 ± 0.83 (m ± SD), scored for n = 600 maps from 338 patients with 83% either excellent or good. Co-registration of the pre-and post-contrast images improved the image quality for ECV maps in 81% of the cases. ECV of normal myocardium was 25.4 ± 2.5% (m ± SD) using motion correction and co-registration values and was 31.5 ± 8.7% without motion correction and co-registration. Conclusions Fully automated motion correction and co-registration of breath-holds significantly improve the quality of ECV maps, thus making the generation of ECV-maps feasible for clinical work flow. PMID:22963517

  7. Estimation of Nuclear Volume Dependent Fractionation of Mercury Isotopes Using Octanol- Water Partitioning of Inorganic Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Bergquist, B. A.; Schauble, E. A.; Blum, J. D.

    2009-05-01

    Mercury is a globally distributed pollutant; the toxicity and biomagnifications in aquatic food chains, even in remote areas, makes it a serious worldwide problem. Similar to other stable isotope systems, the isotopic composition of environmental Hg is potentially a new tool to better understand the biogeochemical cycling, fluxes and anthropogenic impacts of Hg. The promise of Hg isotopes is even more exciting with the recent discovery of large mass independent fractionation (MIF) displayed by the odd Hg isotopes (199Hg and 201Hg). Based on current theory MIF of Hg isotopes can arise either from the non-linear scaling of nuclear volume with mass for heavy isotopes (Nuclear Volume Effect, NVE) or from the magnetic isotope effect (MIE), which is due to the non-zero nuclear spin and nuclear magnetic moments of odd-mass isotopes. In order to interpret and use Hg MIF signatures in nature, both experimental and theoretical work is needed to better understand the controls and expression of MIF along with the underlying mechanisms of MIF. The goal of the current study was to design an experiment that would express the NVE in order to confirm theoretical predictions of the isotopic signature of the NVE for Hg. Unfortunately, both NVE and MIE predict MIF for only the odd isotopes. However since MIE is a kinetic phenomenon only, MIF observed in equilibrium reactions should be attributable to the NVE only. Thus it should be possible to isolate NVE driven MIF from MIE driven MIF. A laboratory experiment was designed on equilibrium octanol-water partitioning of different Hg chloride species. Octanol-water partitioning of Hg depends on the hydrophobicity of the Hg species, so non polar lipophilic species partition into the octanol phase while polar species remain in water phase. At 25 degree Celsius, a Cl- concentration of 1 molar and pH <2, the dominant aqueous phase is HgCl42- while non polar HgCl2 will partition into the octanol phase. Since HgCl42- has a stronger ionic

  8. A preconditioned fast finite volume scheme for a fractional differential equation discretized on a locally refined composite mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Numerical methods for fractional differential equations generate full stiffness matrices, which were traditionally solved via Gaussian type direct solvers that require O (N3) of computational work and O (N2) of memory to store where N is the number of spatial grid points in the discretization. We develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace iterative method for the efficient and faithful solution of finite volume schemes defined on a locally refined composite mesh for fractional differential equations to resolve boundary layers of the solutions. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  9. AgRISTARS: Foreign Commodity production forecasting. Project procedures designation and description document, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, J. T.; Phinney, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The crop estimation analysis procedures documentation of the AgRISTARS - Foreign Commodity Production Forecasting Project (FCPF) is presented. Specifically it includes the technical/management documentation of the remote sensing data analysis procedures prepared in accordance with the guidelines provided in the FCPF communication/documentation standards manual. Standard documentation sets are given arranged by procedural type and level then by crop types or other technically differentiating categories.

  10. [Dynamic expression profile of HBsAg according to hepatic parenchyma cells' volume at different liver fibrosis stages in the immune clearance phase].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe-bin; Cao, Hong; Liu, Ting; Wu, Ze-qian; Ke, Wei-min; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dynamic expression profile of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) according to hepatic parenchyma cells' volume at different stages of liver fibrosis during the immune clearance phase. Eighty-nine patients with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in the immune clearance stage were recruited for study. Each patient's serum HBsAg levels were detected by electrochemiluminescence. The serum HBsAg levels were apportioned according to hepatic parenchyma cells' volume at liver fibrosis stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 and compared by ANOVA. The unapportioned serum HBsAg levels (IU/mL) at liver fibrosis stages 1 (227.2+/-237.7), 2 (211.0+/-131.4), 3(300.1+/-144.6), and 4 (278.7+/-148.8) were not significantly different (all comparisons, P range: 0.061 to 0.759). However, when the serum HBsAg levels were apportioned by the same hepatic parenchyma cells' volume at liver fibrosis stages 1 (343.9+/-359.8), 2 (336.4+/-209.5), 3 (508.7+/-245.1), and 4 (525.2+/-274.8), the levels were significantly different (all comparisons, F = 3.045 and P = 0.033; stage 1 vs. 3, P = 0.041; stage 1 vs. 4, P = 0.046; stage 2 vs. 3, P = 0.028; stage 2 vs. 4, P = 0.034). During the immune clearance phase of chronic hepatitis B, increased HBsAg expression is associated with increased hepatic parenchyma cells' volume and progressive liver fibrosis stage.

  11. Theoretical and experimental analysis of a multiphase screw pump, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Raebiger, K.; Maksoud, T.M.A.; Ward, J.; Hausmann, G.

    2008-09-15

    In the investigation of the pumping behaviour of multiphase screw pumps, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions, theoretical and experimental analyses were performed. A new theoretical screw pump model was developed, which calculates the time-dependent conditions inside the several chambers of a screw pump as well as the exchange of mass and energy between these chambers. By means of the performed experimental analysis, the screw pump model was verified, especially at very high gas volume fractions from 90% to 99%. The experiments, which were conducted with the reference fluids water and air, can be divided mainly into the determination of the steady state pumping behaviour on the one hand and into the analysis of selected transient operating conditions on the other hand, whereas the visualisation of the leakage flows through the circumferential gaps was rounded off the experimental analysis. (author)

  12. Dependence of microwave absorption properties on ferrite volume fraction in MnZn ferrite/rubber radar absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, Adriana M.; Rezende, Mirabel C.; Dantas, Christine C.

    2011-11-01

    We report the analysis of measurements of the complex magnetic permeability ( μr) and dielectric permittivity ( ɛr) spectra of a rubber radar absorbing material (RAM) with various MnZn ferrite volume fractions. The transmission/reflection measurements were carried out in a vector network analyzer. Optimum conditions for the maximum microwave absorption were determined by substituting the complex permeability and permittivity in the impedance matching equation. Both the MnZn ferrite content and the RAM thickness effects on the microwave absorption properties, in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, were evaluated. The results show that the complex permeability and permittivity spectra of the RAM increase directly with the ferrite volume fraction. Reflection loss calculations by the impedance matching degree (reflection coefficient) show the dependence of this parameter on both thickness and composition of RAM.

  13. The transition from columnar to equiaxed dendritic growth in proeutectic, low-volume fraction copper, Pb-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Shinwoo; Grugel, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    Lead, 17.1, 11.2, and 5 volume fraction copper (14, 9, and 4 wt pct Cu) alloys have been directionally solidified at constant growth velocities ranging from 1 to 100 microns/s. Serially increasing the growth velocity within this range results in a graded microstructural transition from fully columnar, albeit segregated, copper dendrites in a lead matrix to one consisting only of equiaxed grains. The imposed velocity necessary to effect fully equiaxed growth is found to drop rapidly as the volume fraction of copper is decreased. Factors which complicate the controlled, directional solidification of these alloys are discussed and the experimental results are interpreted in view of, and seen to be in qualitative agreement with, Hunt's theory on the transition from columnar to equiaxed growth of dendrites.

  14. Effects of Retained Austenite Volume Fraction, Morphology, and Carbon Content on Strength and Ductility of Nanostructured TRIP-assisted Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Qiu, LN; Sun, Xin; Zuo, Liang; Liaw, Peter K.; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-06-01

    With a suite of multi-modal and multi-scale characterization techniques, the present study unambiguously proves that a substantially-improved combination of ultrahigh strength and good ductility can be achieved by tailoring the volume fraction, morphology, and carbon content of the retained austenite (RA) in a transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steel with the nominal chemical composition of 0.19C-0.30Si-1.76Mn-1.52Al (weight percent, wt.%). After intercritical annealing and bainitic holding, a combination ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 1,100 MPa and true strain of 50% has been obtained, as a result of the ultrafine RA lamellae, which are alternately arranged in the bainitic ferrite around junction regions of ferrite grains. For reference, specimens with a blocky RA, prepared without the bainitic holding, yield a low ductility (35%) and a low UTS (800 MPa). The volume fraction, morphology, and carbon content of RA have been characterized using various techniques, including magnetic probing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-backscatter-diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Interrupted tensile tests, mapped using EBSD in conjunction with the kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis, reveal that the lamellar RA is the governingmicrostructure component responsible for the higher mechanical stability, compared to the blocky one. By coupling these various techniques, we quantitatively demonstrate that in addition to the RA volume fraction, its morphology and carbon content are equally important in optimizing the strength and ductility of TRIP-assisted steels.

  15. Rheological Characterisation of the Flow Behaviour of Wood Plastic Composites in Consideration of Different Volume Fractions of Wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, N.; Hansmann, H.; Koch, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the rheological properties of wood plastic composites (WPC) with different polymeric matrices (LDPE, low-density polyethylene and PP, polypropylene) and with different types of wood filler (hardwood flour and softwood flour) have been investigated by means of high pressure capillary rheometry. The volume fraction of wood was varied between 0 and 60 %. The shear thinning behaviour of the WPC melts can be well described by the Ostwald - de Waele power law relationship. The flow consistency index K of the power law shows a good correlation with the volume fraction of wood. Interparticular interaction effects of wood particles can be mathematically taken into account by implementation of an interaction exponent (defined as the ratio between flow exponent of WPC and flow exponent of polymeric matrix). The interaction exponent shows a good correlation with the flow consistency index. On the basis of these relationships the concept of shear-stress-equivalent inner shear rate has been modified. Thus, the flow behaviour of the investigated wood filled polymer melts could be well described mathematically by the modified concept of shear-stress-equivalent inner shear rate. On this basis, the shear thinning behaviour of WPC can now be estimated with good accuracy, taking into account the volume fraction of wood.

  16. Determination of the steam volume fraction in the event of loss of cooling of the spent fuel storage pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sledkov, R. M.; Galkin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, O. E.; Strebnev, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    When one solves engineering problems related to the cooling of fuel assemblies (FAs) in a spent fuel storage pool (SFSP) and the assessment of nuclear safety of FA storage in an SFSP in the initial event of loss of SFSP cooling, it is essential to determine the coolant density and, consequently, steam volume fractions φ in bundles of fuel elements at a pressure of 0.1-0.5 MPa. Such formulas for calculating φ that remain valid in a wide range of operating parameters and geometric shapes of channels and take the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling into account are currently almost lacking. The results of systematization and analysis of the available formulas for φ are reported in the present study. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained in the process of simulating the conditions of FA cooling in an SFSP in the event of loss of its cooling. Six formulas for calculating the steam volume fraction, which were used in this comparison, were chosen from a total of 11 considered relations. As a result, the formulas producing the most accurate values of φ in the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling were selected. In addition, a relation that allows one to perform more accurate calculations of steam volume fractions in the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling was derived based on the Fedorov formula in the two-group approximation.

  17. High-speed, three-dimensional tomographic laser-induced incandescence imaging of soot volume fraction in turbulent flames.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Terrence R; Halls, Benjamin R; Jiang, Naibo; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

    2016-12-26

    High-speed, laser-based tomographic imaging of the three-dimensional time evolution of soot volume fraction in turbulent jet diffusion flames is demonstrated to be feasible at rates of 10 kHz or higher. The fundamental output of a burst-mode Nd:YAG laser with 1 J/pulse is utilized for volumetric impulsive heating of soot particles with a laser fluence of 0.1 J/cm2, enabling signal-to-noise ratios of ~100:1 in images of the resulting incandescence. The three-dimensional morphology of the soot distribution is captured with a spatial resolution of <1.5 mm using as few as four viewing angles, with convergence of the soot volume fraction to within ~95% occurring with seven or more viewing angles. Uniqueness of the solution is demonstrated using two sets of eight images captured at the same time instant, with agreement to >90% in peak values between the two sets. These data establish parameters for successful high-speed, three-dimensional imaging of the soot volume fraction within highly transient combustion environments.

  18. The Effect of Fiber Strength Stochastics and Local Fiber Volume Fraction on Multiscale Progressive Failure of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Jr., Thomas E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous fiber unidirectional polymer matrix composites (PMCs) can exhibit significant local variations in fiber volume fraction as a result of processing conditions that can lead to further local differences in material properties and failure behavior. In this work, the coupled effects of both local variations in fiber volume fraction and the empirically-based statistical distribution of fiber strengths on the predicted longitudinal modulus and local tensile strength of a unidirectional AS4 carbon fiber/ Hercules 3502 epoxy composite were investigated using the special purpose NASA Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC); local effective composite properties were obtained by homogenizing the material behavior over repeating units cells (RUCs). The predicted effective longitudinal modulus was relatively insensitive to small (8%) variations in local fiber volume fraction. The composite tensile strength, however, was highly dependent on the local distribution in fiber strengths. The RUC-averaged constitutive response can be used to characterize lower length scale material behavior within a multiscale analysis framework that couples the NASA code FEAMAC and the ABAQUS finite element solver. Such an approach can be effectively used to analyze the progressive failure of PMC structures whose failure initiates at the RUC level. Consideration of the effect of local variations in constituent properties and morphologies on progressive failure of PMCs is a central aspect of the application of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) principles for composite materials.

  19. Effective thermal conductivity of metal and non-metal particulate composites with interfacial thermal resistance at high volume fraction of nano to macro-sized spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Faroughi, Salah Aldin; Huber, Christian

    2015-02-07

    In this study, we propose a theoretical model to compute the effective thermal conductivity of metal and dielectric spherical particle reinforced composites with interfacial thermal resistance. We consider a wide range of filler volume fraction with sizes ranging from nano- to macro-scale. The model, based on the differential effective medium theory, accounts for particle interactions through two sets of volume fraction corrections. The first correction accounts for a finite volume of composite and the second correction introduces a self-crowding factor that allows us to develop an accurate model for particle interaction even for high volume fraction of fillers. The model is examined to other published models, experiments, and numerical simulations for different types of composites. We observe an excellent agreement between the model and published datasets over a wide range of particle volume fractions and material properties of the composite constituents.

  20. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, Yasutaka; Mizuta, Masahiro; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L.; Date, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation.

  1. Effects of porosity distribution and porosity volume fraction on the electromechanical properties of 3-3 piezoelectric foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, B. V.; Challagulla, K. S.; Venkatesh, T. A.; Hadjiloizi, D. A.; Georgiades, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Unit-cell based finite element models are developed to completely characterize the role of porosity distribution and porosity volume fraction in determining the elastic, dielectric and piezoelectric properties as well as relevant figures of merit of 3-3 type piezoelectric foam structures. Eight classes of foam structures which represent structures with different types and degrees of uniformity of porosity distribution are identified; a Base structure (Class I), two H-type foam structures (Classes II, and III), a Cross-type foam structure (Class IV) and four Line-type foam structures (Classes V, VI, VII, and VIII). Three geometric factors that influence the electromechanical properties are identified: (i) the number of pores per face, pore size and the distance between the pores; (ii) pore orientation with respect to poling direction; (iii) the overall symmetry of the pore distribution with respect to the center of the face of the unit cell. To assess the suitability of these structures for such applications as hydrophones, bone implants, medical imaging and diagnostic devices, five figures of merit are determined via the developed finite element model; the piezoelectric coupling constant (K t ), the acoustic impedance (Z), the piezoelectric charge coefficient (d h ), the hydrostatic voltage coefficient (g h ), and the hydrostatic figure of merit (d h g h ). At high material volume fractions, foams with non-uniform Line-type porosity (Classes V and VII) where the pores are preferentially distributed perpendicular to poling direction, are found to exhibit the best combination of desirable piezoelectric figures of merit. For example, at about 50% volume fraction, the d h , g h , and d h g h figures of merit are 55%, 1600% and 2500% higher, respectively, for Classes V and VII of Line-like foam structures compared with the Base structure.

  2. Right atrial volume by cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts mortality in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexander; Mohamed, Ambreen; Asfour, Ahmed; Ho, Jean; Khan, Saadat A.; Chen, Onn; Klem, Igor; Ramasubbu, Kumudha; Brener, Sorin J.; Heitner, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Right Atrial Volume Index (RAVI) measured by echocardiography is an independent predictor of morbidity in patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The aim of this study is to evaluate the predictive value of RAVI assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for all-cause mortality in patients with HFrEF and to assess its additive contribution to the validated Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic heart failure (MAGGIC) score. Methods and results We identified 243 patients (mean age 60 ± 15; 33% women) with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 35% measured by CMR. Right atrial volume was calculated based on area in two- and four -chamber views using validated equation, followed by indexing to body surface area. MAGGIC score was calculated using online calculator. During mean period of 2.4 years 33 patients (14%) died. The mean RAVI was 53 ± 26 ml/m2; significantly larger in patients with than without an event (78.7±29 ml/m2 vs. 48±22 ml/m2, p<0.001). RAVI (per ml/m2) was an independent predictor of mortality [HR = 1.03 (1.01–1.04), p = 0.001]. RAVI has a greater discriminatory ability than LVEF, left atrial volume index and right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) (C-statistic 0.8±0.08 vs 0.55±0.1, 0.62±0.11, 0.68±0.11, respectively, all p<0.02). The addition of RAVI to the MAGGIC score significantly improves risk stratification (integrated discrimination improvement 13%, and category-free net reclassification improvement 73%, both p<0.001). Conclusion RAVI by CMR is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with HFrEF. The addition of RAVI to MAGGIC score improves mortality risk stratification. PMID:28369148

  3. Fractional watt Vuillemier cryogenic refrigerator program engineering notebook. Volume 1: Thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    The cryogenic refrigerator thermal design calculations establish design approach and basic sizing of the machine's elements. After the basic design is defined, effort concentrates on matching the thermodynamic design with that of the heat transfer devices (heat exchangers and regenerators). Typically, the heat transfer device configurations and volumes are adjusted to improve their heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics. These adjustments imply that changes be made to the active displaced volumes, compensating for the influence of the heat transfer devices on the thermodynamic processes of the working fluid. Then, once the active volumes are changed, the heat transfer devices require adjustment to account for the variations in flows, pressure levels, and heat loads. This iterative process is continued until the thermodynamic cycle parameters match the design of the heat transfer devices. By examing several matched designs, a near-optimum refrigerator is selected.

  4. An improved method for simultaneous determination of frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in vertical flow boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, J. F.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in the vertical boiling and adiabatic flow of the refrigerant, R11, have been simultaneously measured by a liquid balancing column and differential magnetic reluctance pressure transducers. An account is given of the experimental apparatus and procedure, data acquisition and analysis, and error estimation employed. All values of two-phase multipliers evaluated on the basis of the measured frictional pressure drop data in vertical upflow fall in the range bounded by the predictions of the Chisholm correlation and the homogeneous model.

  5. Theoretical Model for Volume Fraction of UC, 235U Enrichment, and Effective Density of Final U 10Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Joshi, Vineet V.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; McGarrah, Eric J.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-04-12

    The purpose of this document is to provide a theoretical framework for (1) estimating uranium carbide (UC) volume fraction in a final alloy of uranium with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo) as a function of final alloy carbon concentration, and (2) estimating effective 235U enrichment in the U 10Mo matrix after accounting for loss of 235U in forming UC. This report will also serve as a theoretical baseline for effective density of as-cast low-enriched U 10Mo alloy. Therefore, this report will serve as the baseline for quality control of final alloy carbon content

  6. Integer, fractional, and anomalous quantum Hall effects explained with Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2017-02-22

    The Hall effects, especially the integer, fractional and anomalous quantum Hall effects, have been addressed using Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept. The basic assumptions are that the conduction process is a common rate controlled "reaction" process that can be described with Eyring's absolute rate process theory; the mobility of electrons should be dependent on the free volume available for conduction electrons. The obtained Hall conductivity is clearly quantized as with prefactors related to both the magnetic flux quantum number and the magnetic quantum number via the azimuthal quantum number, with and without an externally applied magnetic field. This article focuses on two dimensional (2D) systems, but the approaches developed in this article can be extended to 3D systems.

  7. Dose-Volume Response Relationship for Brain Metastases Treated with Frameless Single-Fraction Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianmin; Yusuf, Mehran B; Dragun, Anthony; Dunlap, Neal; Guan, Timothy; Boling, Warren; Rai, Shesh; Woo, Shiao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to identify a dose-volume response relationship for brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent frameless single-fraction linear accelerator SRS for brain metastases between 2007 and 2013 from an institutional database. Proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of outcome. A ratio of maximum lesion dose per mm-diameter (Gy/mm) was constructed to establish a dose-volume relationship. Results: There were 316 metastases evaluated in 121 patients (2 - 33 mm in the largest diameter). The median peripheral dose was 18.0 Gy (range: 10.0 – 24.0 Gy). Local control was 84.8% for all lesions and was affected by location, peripheral dose, maximum dose, and lesion size (p values < 0.050). A dose-volume response relationship was constructed using the maximum dose and lesion size. A unit increase in Gy/mm was associated with decreased local failure (p = 0.005). Local control of 80%, 85%, and 90% corresponded to maximum doses per millimeter of 1.67 Gy/mm, 2.86 Gy/mm, and 4.4 Gy/mm, respectively. Toxicity was uncommon and only 1.0% of lesions developed radionecrosis requiring surgery. Conclusions: For brain metastases less than 3 cm, a dose-volume response relationship exists between maximum radiosurgical dose and lesion size, which is predictive of local control. PMID:27284495

  8. Cerebral radionecrosis: incidence and risk in relation to dose, time, fractionation and volume

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.E.; Baglan, R.J.; Prassad, S.C.; Blank, W.F.

    1981-02-01

    The authors irradiated 152 patients with primary brain and pituitary tumors from 1974 to 1976. Seven of 139 patients (5%) who received 4500 rad or grater using 180 to 200 rad fractions, developed pathologically documented cerebral radioecrosis within a median time of 14 months after completion of irradiation. The necrosis was documented by autopsy in four patients, at reoperation in two and after needle biopsy in one. It was located in the brain, distant from the original tumor in three patients, adjacent to tumor in two, and within the tumor bed in two. The latter two were classified as radionecrosis because one patient died with only minimal tumor remaining and the other patient deteriorated neurologically and stabilized after removal of the necrotic mass. On clinical grounds, we suspect that two additional patients had radiation damage to the brain, because they deteriorated neurologically without neuroradiologic evidence of tumor. Study of computerized tomography (CT) scans and superimposed dose distributions showed that necrosis was not always within the zone of highest dose (3 patients). Risk of radionecrosis was greatest in the upper regions of dose but could not be associated with shorter time, larger fractions, or larger field size. Pathologically documented radionecrosis of brain did not develop below doses that were biologically equivalent to 5400 rad in 30 fractions over 42 days.

  9. Effects of volume fraction of tempered martensite on dynamic deformation properties of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy having a bimodal microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Geun; Lee, You Hwan; Lee, Chong Soo; Lee, Sunghak

    2005-03-01

    The effects of the volume fraction of tempered martensite on the tensile and dynamic deformation properties of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy having a bimodal microstructure were investigated in this study. Five microstructures having various tempered-martensite volume fractions were obtained by varying heat-treatment conditions. Dynamic torsional tests were conducted on them using a torsional Kolsky bar. The test data were analyzed in relation to microstructures, tensile properties, and adiabatic shear-band formation. Under a dynamic loading condition, the maximum shear stress increased with increasing tempered-martensite volume fraction, whereas the fracture shear strain decreased. Observation of the deformed area after the dynamic torsional test indicated that a number of voids initiated mainly at α-phase/tempered-martensite interfaces, and that the number of voids increased with increasing martensite volume fraction. Adiabatic shear bands of 6 to 10 μm in width were formed in the specimens having lower martensite volume fractions, while they were not formed in those having higher martensite volume fractions. The possibility of adiabatic shear-band formation was explained by concepts of absorbed deformation energy and void initiation.

  10. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multifrequency EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Hunkeler, Priska A.; Hendricks, Stefan; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise, accumulate beneath nearby sea ice, and subsequently form a several meter thick, porous sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator of the health of an ice shelf. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions within the platelet layer using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drillhole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction yielded results comparable to other studies. Both parameters together enable an estimation of the total ice volume within the platelet layer, which was found to be comparable to the volume of landfast sea ice in this region, and corresponded to more than a quarter of the annual basal melt volume of the nearby Ekström Ice Shelf. Our findings show that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties, with important implications for research into ocean/ice-shelf/sea-ice interactions. However, a successful application of this

  11. Rheological Properties of Nanoparticle Silica-Surfactant Stabilized Crude Oil Emulsions: Influence of Temperature, Nanoparticle Concentration and Water Volume Fraction"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Erin; Pales, Ashley; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Oil in water emulsions occur during oil extraction due to the presence of water, naturally-occurring surface-active agents and mechanical mixing in pipelines or from oil spillage. Emulsions present difficulties for use of oil in fuel and their rheological properties are important to treat environmental impacts of spills. The objective of this study is to assess the rheological characteristics of oil in water emulsions stabilized by 5% NaCl brine, Tween 20 surfactant and silica nanoparticles to gain knowledge about the behavior of oil flow in pipelines and characterize them for environmental applications. Rheological behaviors such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity of Prudhoe Bay crude oil emulsions were analyzed with varying percent of water volume fractions (12.5, 25 and 50%), varying weight percent of silica nanoparticles (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 weight %), with and without 2 CMC Tween 20 nonionic surfactant. Emulsions with varying water volume fractions were analyzed at 20, 40 and 60 degrees Celsius. Flow curve analysis of the emulsions was performed using an Anton-Paar rheometer. Preliminary findings indicate that increased temperature and increasing the concentration of nanoparticles both produced lower shear stress and that the addition of surfactant decreased the viscosity and shear stress of the emulsions.

  12. A Review of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer Matrix Syntactic Foams—Effect of Hollow Particle Wall Thickness and Volume Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Pinisetty, Dinesh

    2013-02-01

    Hollow-particle-filled composites called syntactic foams are lightweight particulate composites that are useful in weight-sensitive applications such as aerospace and marine structures. Extensive literature is now available on the mechanical properties of syntactic foams. The upcoming applications for syntactic foams in aerospace structures require understanding of their thermal properties, such as the thermal conductivity. The present review article summarizes the available experimental results and theoretical models related to the thermal conductivity of syntactic foams. Experimental results are available for only a few compositions of syntactic foams. Basic understating of the relationship between thermal conductivity of syntactic foams and the material parameters, such as hollow particle volume fraction and wall thickness, is not available through experimental results at this point. Four theoretical models are tested with the experimental data and found to provide close predictions. These models are used to conduct parametric studies. It is observed that the thermal conductivity of syntactic foams decreases as the volume fraction of thin-walled particles is increased. An inverse relationship is observed for thick-walled, hollow-particle-filled syntactic foams. These models can help in designing syntactic foams with required thermal conductivity.

  13. A probabilistic method for determining the volume fraction of pre-embedded capsules in self-healing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhong; Chen, Huisu

    2014-10-01

    Autonomous healing of cracks using pre-embedded capsules containing healing agent is becoming a promising approach to restore the strength of damaged structures. In addition to the material properties, the size and volume fraction of capsules influence crack healing in the matrix. Understanding the crack and capsule interaction is critical in the development and design of structures made of self-healing materials. Assuming that the pre-embedded capsules are randomly dispersed we theoretically model flat ellipsoidal crack interaction with capsules and determine the probability of a crack intersecting the pre-embedded capsules i.e. the self-healing probability. We also develop a probabilistic model of a crack simultaneously meeting with capsules and catalyst carriers in two-component self-healing system matrix. Using a risk-based healing approach, we determine the volume fraction and size of the pre-embedded capsules that are required to achieve a certain self-healing probability. To understand the effect of the shape of the capsules on self-healing we theoretically modeled crack interaction with spherical and cylindrical capsules. We compared the results of our theoretical model with Monte-Carlo simulations of crack interaction with capsules. The formulae presented in this paper will provide guidelines for engineers working with self-healing structures in material selection and sustenance.

  14. Effect of patient imaging angle on apparent cardiac volumes and the potential impact on measurement of valvular regurgitant fractions.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T R; Slutsky, R A; Verba, J W

    1983-01-01

    The accurate measurement of cardiac chamber volume is of major importance in assessing cardiac performance. Accurate equilibrium radionuclide volume estimations are difficult to obtain, due to the geometry of the chambers, and the physical characteristics of the imaging system. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of imaging projections on relative cardiac chamber volumes, indexes, and stroke volume ratios. Twenty-two male patients, free of clinical evidence of disease, were studied. A series of four 2-minute acquisitions were made with the patient successively imaged in the anterior, 30 degrees left anterior oblique (LAO), 45 degrees LAO, and 60 degrees LAO projections with 15 degrees of caudal inclination. Filtered stroke volume and original images were used by the operator to assign right ventricular (RV), left ventricular (LV), and a combined right and left ventricular (TOT) regions-of-interest. From the data we determined end-diastolic counts (EDC), end-systolic counts (ESC), stroke counts (SC), ejection fractions (EF), and R/L stroke count ratios. The following changes were observed as the projection was moved from the anterior to 60 degrees LAO: 1) all RV parameters decreased in value, including, RVEDC (P less than .001), RVESC (P less than .01), RVESC (P less than .01) and RVEF (P less than .001); 2) LVEDC and LVESC (both P less than .01) increased while LVEF decreased (P less than .004); and 3) the R/L stroke count ratio decreased (P less than .001). Variability could be explained by 1) chamber overlap and geometry; 2) patient variability; and 3) intrachamber, interchamber and chest wall photon attenuation and scatter. We suggest that close attention to detail, with computer assistance, to optimally position the patient may reduce the effect of inherent limitations in radionuclide volumetric measurements, thus improving the reliability and usefulness of existing studies.

  15. SU-E-T-480: Radiobiological Dose Comparison of Single Fraction SRS, Multi-Fraction SRT and Multi-Stage SRS of Large Target Volumes Using the Linear-Quadratic Formula

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, C; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Meyer, J; Timmerman, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the radiobiological effect on large tumors and surrounding normal tissues from single fraction SRS, multi-fractionated SRT, and multi-staged SRS treatment. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with a centrally located large volume target (18.2 cm{sup 3}) was scanned using a 16 slice large bore CT simulator. Scans were imported to the Multiplan treatment planning system where a total prescription dose of 20Gy was used for a single, three staged and three fractionated treatment. Cyber Knife treatment plans were inversely optimized for the target volume to achieve at least 95% coverage of the prescription dose. For the multistage plan, the target was segmented into three subtargets having similar volume and shape. Staged plans for individual subtargets were generated based on a planning technique where the beam MUs of the original plan on the total target volume are changed by weighting the MUs based on projected beam lengths within each subtarget. Dose matrices for each plan were export in DICOM format and used to calculate equivalent dose distributions in 2Gy fractions using an alpha beta ratio of 10 for the target and 3 for normal tissue. Results: Singe fraction SRS, multi-stage plan and multi-fractionated SRT plans had an average 2Gy dose equivalent to the target of 62.89Gy, 37.91Gy and 33.68Gy, respectively. The normal tissue within 12Gy physical dose region had an average 2Gy dose equivalent of 29.55Gy, 16.08Gy and 13.93Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The single fraction SRS plan had the largest predicted biological effect for the target and the surrounding normal tissue. The multi-stage treatment provided for a more potent biologically effect on target compared to the multi-fraction SRT treatments with less biological normal tissue than single-fraction SRS treatment.

  16. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N; Yartsev, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume

  17. NiAl-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan (Inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAlY, and FeAl.

  18. Determination of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and myocardial mass by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, J. X.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Reconstructed three-dimensional (3-D) echocardiography is an accurate and reproducible method of assessing left ventricular (LV) functions. However, it has limitations for clinical study due to the requirement of complex computer and echocardiographic analysis systems, electrocardiographic/respiratory gating, and prolonged imaging times. Real-time 3-D echocardiography has a major advantage of conveniently visualizing the entire cardiac anatomy in three dimensions and of potentially accurately quantifying LV volumes, ejection fractions, and myocardial mass in patients even in the presence of an LV aneurysm. Although the image quality of the current real-time 3-D echocardiographic methods is not optimal, its widespread clinical application is possible because of the convenient and fast image acquisition. We review real-time 3-D echocardiographic image acquisition and quantitative analysis for the evaluation of LV function and LV mass.

  19. Nial-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor); Whittenberger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 mm to about 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAY and FeAl.

  20. Quantifying axon diameter and intra-cellular volume fraction in excised mouse spinal cord with q-space imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Henry H.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2010-01-01

    Q-space magnetic resonance imaging (QSI) can quantify white matter (WM) axonal architecture at the cellular level non-destructively, unlike histology, but currently has several limitations. First, current methodology does not differentiate between diffusing molecules occupying extra- or intra-cellular spaces (ECS and ICS, respectively). Second, accurate assessment of axonal architecture requires high-gradient amplitudes not clinically available. Third, the only direct QSI marker of axonal architecture has been mean axon diameter (MAD), even though other direct markers would be valuable as well. The objective was to investigate three QSI-based methods that address the above limitations. Method 1 employs a two-compartment model to account for signal from ECS and ICS. Method 2 uses data only from low q-values thereby obviating the need for high-gradient amplitudes. Method 3 empirically estimates ICS volume fraction and provides an additional metric of axonal architecture. We implemented each method on data from excised healthy adult mouse spinal cords collected previously using a home-built 50T/m z-gradient yielding sub-micron displacement resolution. Through comparison with histology, each method was evaluated for accuracy in assessing axonal architecture. MAD measured with Methods 1 and 2 showed good correlation with histology (R2=0.99 (p<0.0001), and 0.77 (p<0.01), respectively) and Bland-Altman analysis indicates that measurements from the two methods are not significantly different from histology. The third method measured ICS volume fractions (0.64±0.07) that were highly correlated (R2=0.92, p<0.05) with measurements from histology (0.68±0.07). These methods may provide insight into axonal architecture in normal and abnormal WM tissue but additional validation with more samples will be needed. PMID:20350604

  1. On the surviving fraction in irradiated multicellular tumour spheroids: calculation of overall radiosensitivity parameters, influence of hypoxia and volume effects.

    PubMed

    Horas, Jorge A; Olguin, Osvaldo R; Rizzotto, Marcos G

    2005-04-21

    We model the heterogeneous response to radiation of multicellular tumour spheroids assuming position- and volume-dependent radiosensitivity. We propose a method to calculate the overall radiosensitivity parameters to obtain the surviving fraction of tumours. A mathematical model of a spherical tumour with a hypoxic core and a viable rim which is a caricature of a real tumour is constructed. The model is embedded in a two-compartment linear-quadratic (LQ) model, assuming a mixed bivariated Gaussian distribution to attain the radiosensitivity parameters. Ergodicity, i.e., the equivalence between ensemble and volumetric averages is used to obtain the overall radiosensitivities for the two compartments. We obtain expressions for the overall radiosensitivity parameters resulting from the use of both a linear and a nonlinear dependence of the local radiosensitivity with position. The model's results are compared with experimental data of surviving fraction (SF) for multicellular spheroids of different sizes. We make one fit using only the smallest spheroid data and we are able to predict the SF for the larger spheroids. These predictions are acceptable particularly using bounded sensitivities. We conclude with the importance of taking into account the contribution of clonogenic hypoxic cells to radiosensitivity and with the convenience of using bounded local sensitivities to predict overall radiosensitivity parameters.

  2. End-systolic Pressure-Volume Relation, Ejection Fraction, and Heart Failure: Theoretical Aspect and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Shoucri, Rachad M

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical formalism describing the nonlinear end-systolic pressure-volume relation (ESPVR) is used to derive new indexes that can be used to assess the performance of the heart left ventricle by using the areas under the ESPVR (units of energy), the ordinates of the ESPVR (units of pressure), or from slopes of the curvilinear ESPVR. New relations between the ejection fraction (EF) and the parameters describing the ESPVR give some insight into the problem of heart failure (HF) with normal or preserved ejection fraction. Relations between percentage occurrence of HF and indexes derived from the ESPVR are also discussed. When ratios of pressures are used, calculation can be done in a noninvasive way with the possibility of interesting applications in routine clinical work. Applications to five groups of clinical data are given and discussed (normal group, aortic stenosis, aortic valvular regurgitation, mitral valvular regurgitation, miscellaneous cardiomyopathies). No one index allows a perfect segregation between all clinical groups, it is shown that appropriate use of two indexes (bivariate analysis) can lead to better separation of different clinical groups.

  3. The Fractions of Inner- and Outer-halo Stars in the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Deokkeun; Beers, Timothy C.; Santucci, Rafael M.; Carollo, Daniela; Placco, Vinicius M.; Lee, Young Sun; Rossi, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    We obtain a new determination of the metallicity distribution function (MDF) of stars within ˜5-10 kpc of the Sun, based on recently improved co-adds of ugriz photometry for Stripe 82 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our new estimate uses the methodology developed previously by An et al. to study in situ halo stars, but is based on a factor of two larger sample than available before, with much-improved photometric errors and zero-points. The newly obtained MDF can be divided into multiple populations of halo stars, with peak metallicities at [Fe/H] ≈ -1.4 and -1.9, which we associate with the inner-halo and outer-halo populations of the Milky Way, respectively. We find that the kinematics of these stars (based on proper-motion measurements at high Galactic latitude) supports the proposed dichotomy of the halo, as stars with retrograde motions in the rest frame of the Galaxy are generally more metal-poor than stars with prograde motions, consistent with previous claims. In addition, we generate mock catalogs of stars from a simulated Milk Way halo system, and demonstrate for the first time that the chemically and kinematically distinct properties of the inner- and outer-halo populations are qualitatively in agreement with our observations. The decomposition of the observed MDF and our comparison with the mock catalog results suggest that the outer-halo population contributes on the order of ˜35%-55% of halo stars in the local volume.

  4. Quantification of Regional Interstitial Lung Disease from CT-derived Fractional Tissue Volume: A Lung Tissue Research Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Watharkar, Snehal S.; de Leon, Alberto Diaz; Garcia, Christine K.; Patel, Nova C.; Jordan, Kirk G.; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Evaluation of chest CT is usually qualitative or semi-quantitative, resulting in subjective descriptions often by different observers over time and imprecise determinations of disease severity within distorted lobes. There is a need for standardized imaging biomarkers to quantify regional disease, maximize diagnostic yield, and facilitate multi-center comparisons. We applied lobe-based voxelwise image analysis to derive regional air (Vair) and tissue (Vtissue) volumes and fractional tissue volume (FTV=tissue/[tissue+air] volume) as internally standardized parameter for assessing interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and Methods High-resolution CT was obtained at supine and prone end-inspiration and supine end-expiration in 29 patients with ILD and 20 normal subjects. Lobar Vair, Vtissue, and FTV were expressed along standard coordinate axes. Results In normal subjects from end-inspiration to end-expiration, total Vair declined 43%, FTV increased ~80% while Vtissue remained unchanged. With increasing ILD, Vair declined and Vtissue rose in all lobes; FTV increased with a peripheral-to-central progression inversely correlated to spirometry and lung diffusing capacity (R2=0.57–0.75, prone end-inspiration). Inter- and intra-lobar coefficients of variation (CVs) of FTV increased 84–148% in mild-to-moderate ILD, indicating greater spatial heterogeneity, then normalized in severe ILD. Analysis of discontinuous images incurs <3% error compared to consecutive images. Conclusions These regional attenuation-based biomarkers could quantify heterogeneous parenchymal disease in distorted lobes, detect mild ILD involvement in all lobes and describe the pattern of disease progression. The next step would be to study a larger series, examine reproducibility and follow longitudinal changes in correlation with clinical and functional indices. PMID:21596593

  5. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume I. Bulletin 1690-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the first volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Three instructional areas are profiled in this volume: orientation to vocational agriculture, agricultural leadership, and soil science. The three units of the orientation area cover introducing beginning…

  6. Lipid volume fraction in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms classified under saline conditions by multispectral angioscopy at near-infrared wavelengths around 1200 nm.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-05-01

    To identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions, we require detailed information on the stability of atherosclerotic plaques. In this study, we quantitatively classified the lipid volume fractions in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms by a novel angioscope combined with near-infrared multispectral imaging. The multispectral angioscope was operated at peak absorption wavelengths of lipid in vulnerable plaques (1150, 1200, and 1300 nm) and at lower absorption wavelengths of water. The potential of the multispectral angioscope was demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms containing 10-60 vol.% lipid and immersed in saline solution. The acquired multispectral data were processed by a spectral angle mapper algorithm, which enhanced the simulated plaque areas. Consequently, we classified the lipid volume fractions into five categories (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-50, and 50-60 vol.%). Multispectral angioscopy at wavelengths around 1200 nm is a powerful tool for quantitatively evaluating the stability of atherosclerotic plaques based on the lipid volume fractions.

  7. Evolution of volume fractions and droplet sizes by analysis of electrical conductance curves during destabilization of oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kostoglou, M; Varka, E-M; Kalogianni, E P; Karapantsios, T D

    2010-09-01

    Destabilization of hexane-in-water emulsions is studied by a continuous, non-intrusive, multi-probe, electrical conductance technique. Emulsions made of different oil fractions and surfactant (C(10)E(5)) concentrations are prepared in a stirred vessel using a Rushton turbine to break and agitate droplets. During the separation of phases, electrical signals from pairs of ring electrodes mounted at different heights onto the vessel wall, are recorded. The evolution of the local water volume fractions at the locations of the electrodes is estimated from these signals. It is found that in the absence of coalescence, the water fraction evolution curve from the bottom pair of electrodes is compatible with a bidisperse oil droplet size distribution. The sizes and volume fractions of the two droplet modes are estimated using theoretical arguments. The electrically determined droplet sizes are compared to data from microscopy image analysis. Results are discussed in detail.

  8. USE OF FRACTIONAL DOSE-VOLUME HISTOGRAMS TO MODEL RISK OF ACUTE RECTAL TOXICITY AMONG PATIENTS TREATED ON RTOG 94-06

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Susan L.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Bosch, Walter R.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong, Lei; Winter, Kathryn; Purdy, James A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose For toxicities occurring during the course of radiotherapy, it is conceptually inaccurate to perform normal-tissue complication probability analyses using the complete dose-volume histogram. The goal of this study was to analyze acute rectal toxicity using a novel approach in which the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model is based on the fractional rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH). Materials and Methods Grade ≥2 acute rectal toxicity was analyzed in 509 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 94-06. These patients had no field reductions or treatment-plan revisions during therapy, allowing the fractional rectal DVH to be estimated from the complete rectal DVH based on the total number of dose fractions delivered. Results The majority of patients experiencing Grade ≥2 acute rectal toxicity did so before completion of radiotherapy (70/80=88%). Acute rectal toxicity depends on fractional mean rectal dose, with no significant improvement in the LKB model fit when the volume parameter differs from n=1. The incidence of toxicity was significantly lower for patients who received hormone therapy (P=0.024). Conclusions Variations in fractional mean dose explain the differences in incidence of acute rectal toxicity, with no detectable effect seen here for differences in numbers of dose fractions delivered. PMID:22673726

  9. Research Update for: A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites (ARL-TR-6057)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    increasing the fiber-volume fraction by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) in order to produce composite structures with aerospace grade...processed composites. Using a combination of viscosity control, U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) based VARTM techniques, and a pressure control...system, we have shown an increase in fiber-volume content from 50% (ARL’s normal processing range for a particular material system and VARTM process) to

  10. Optical properties of Ag nanoparticles embedded Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 films prepared by alternating pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Suk; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Sang Sub

    2006-11-01

    Nanocomposite thin films consisting of nanometer-sized Ag particles embedded in amorphous Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 matrix were prepared on fused silica substrates by an alternating pulsed laser deposition method. Their optical nonlinearities have been studied using the Z-scan method. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak shifts to red and increases with the increasing the volume fraction of Ag in the nanocomposite films. The magnitude of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility of the nanocomposite with an Ag volume fraction of 3.3% was calculated to be approximately 2 x 10(-8) esu at the SPR wavelength.

  11. Quality-assured evaluation of effective porosity using fit-for-purpose estimates of clay-mineral volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Paul F.

    2010-05-01

    Reservoirs that contain dispersed clay minerals traditionally have been evaluated petrophysically using either the effective or the total porosity system. The major weakness of the former is its reliance on "shale" volume fraction ( Vsh) as a clay-mineral indicator in the determination of effective porosity from well logs. Downhole clay-mineral indicators have usually delivered overestimates of fractional clay-mineral volume ( Vcm) because they use as a reference nearby shale beds that are often assumed to comprise clay minerals exclusively, whereas those beds also include quartzitic silts and other detritus. For this reason, effective porosity is often underestimated significantly, and this shortfall transmits to computed hydrocarbons in place and thence to estimates of ultimate recovery. The problem is overcome here by using, as proxy groundtruths, core porosities that have been upscaled to match the spatial resolutions of porosity logs. Matrix and fluid properties are established over clean intervals in the usual way. Log-derived values of Vsh are tuned so that, on average, the resulting log-derived porosities match the corresponding core porosities over an evaluation interval. In this way, Vsh is rendered fit for purpose as an indicator of clay-mineral content Vcm for purposes of evaluating effective porosity. The method is conditioned to deliver a value of effective porosity that shows overall agreement with core porosity to within the limits of uncertainty of the laboratory measurements. This is achieved through function-, reservoir- and tool-specific Vsh reduction factors that can be applied to downhole estimates of clay-mineral content over uncored intervals of similar reservoir character. As expected, the reduction factors can also vary for different measurement conditions. The reduction factors lie in the range of 0.29-0.80, which means that in its raw form, log-derived Vsh can overestimate the clay-mineral content by more than a factor of three. This

  12. Volume fraction and location of voids and gaps in ultraconservative restorations by X-ray computed micro-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lagouvardos, Panagiotis; Nikolinakos, Nick; Oulis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volume fraction (Vf) and location of internal voids and gaps in relation to material type and cavity dimensions in ultraconservative restorations were investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight round cavities of 1.3 mm mean diameter and 2.6 mm mean depth were made on buccal and lingual surfaces of recently extracted human teeth. These were filled and thermocycled with two low viscosity composites (AeliteFlo LV [AF], PermaFlo [PF]), one high viscosity composite (Aelite aesthetic enamel [AA]) and one glass-ionomer (GCFuji IX GP). X-ray microtomography, following a specific procedure, was applied to all cavities before and after their restoration, using SkyScan-1072 microtomographer. Vf percent (Vf%) and location of voids and gaps were recorded and analysed statistically at a = 0.05. Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance, post-hoc analysis, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's correlation analysis were used to analyze data. Results: Cavities filled with AF and PF showed significantly lower Vf % of voids and gaps than all other restorations (P < 0.05). Only for the cavities filled with AA, cavity width and depth was significantly correlated with Vf % (P < 0.05). 50-75% of the filled cavities contained internal voids regardless of the restorative material (P > 0.05). The proportion of cavities with gaps at the bottom and side walls was lower in those filled with AF and PF (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Cavities filled with low viscosity composites presented the lowest amount of internal voids and gaps. Glass-ionomer and high viscosity composite restorative materials showed the highest amount of interfacial gaps. Only in the high viscosity composite restorations the amount of voids and gaps correlated with the cavity depth, width and volume. PMID:26759587

  13. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: insights from joint experimental and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; De' Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ricci, Tullio

    2017-01-03

    Most of the current ash transport and dispersion models neglect particle-fluid (two-way) and particle-fluid plus particle-particle (four-way) reciprocal interactions during particle fallout from volcanic plumes. These interactions, a function of particle concentration in the plume, could play an important role, explaining, for example, discrepancies between observed and modelled ash deposits. Aiming at a more accurate prediction of volcanic ash dispersal and sedimentation, the settling of ash particles at particle volume fractions (ϕp) ranging 10(-7)-10(-3) was performed in laboratory experiments and reproduced by numerical simulations that take into account first the two-way and then the four-way coupling. Results show that the velocity of particles settling together can exceed the velocity of particles settling individually by up to 4 times for ϕp ~ 10(-3). Comparisons between experimental and simulation results reveal that, during the sedimentation process, the settling velocity is largely enhanced by particle-fluid interactions but partly hindered by particle-particle interactions with increasing ϕp. Combining the experimental and numerical results, we provide an empirical model allowing correction of the settling velocity of particles of any size, density, and shape, as a function of ϕp. These corrections will impact volcanic plume modelling results as well as remote sensing retrieval techniques for plume parameters.

  14. Effect of CNT volume fraction on wear properties of hybrid CNT+SiCsf/AS52 Mg matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Woo; Cho, Dae Hyun; Nam, Ji Hoon; Park, Ik Min

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the carbon nanotube (CNT) volume fraction on the wear properties of hybrid Mg composites was investigated. The hybrid x vol% CNT + 15 vol% SiCsf-reinforced Mg-5Al-2Si alloy (AS52) matrix composites (x=0, 5 and 10 vol%) were fabricated in two steps involving preform fabrication and squeeze infiltration. The wear rate of the hybrid CNT+SiCsf/AS52 Mg metal matrix composites (MMCs) was evaluated using ballon-disk wear testing, and the roughness was measured using confocal laser 3D microscopy. Additionally, the worn surfaces were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The adhesive wear and worn surface roughness of the hybrid CNT+SiCsf/AS52 Mg MMCs were reduced with increasing CNT addition. The CNTs hindered pull-out or cracking of the SiCsfs and matrix deformation. The wear resistance of the hybrid CNT+SiCsf/AS52 Mg MMCs was improved by the CNT additions, causing self-lubricant and strengthening effects compared with the single SiCsf/AS52 Mg MMCs.

  15. Soot volume fraction measurements in aero-engine exhausts using extinction-calibrated backward laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhay, J.; Desgroux, P.; Therssen, E.; Bladh, H.; Bengtsson, P.-E.; Hönen, H.; Black, J. D.; Vallet, I.

    2009-06-01

    Control and reduction of soot particle emissions from aeronautic turbines requires a monitoring system suitable for quantification of these emissions. Currently, such emissions are estimated using the technique of smoke number. This is an extractive method, which is not sensitive enough for the low emission levels of modern gas turbines. Within a recent European project, AEROTEST, part of the project aimed at investigating an alternative soot monitoring technique, laser-induced incandescence (LII) as an in-situ optical diagnostic for quantification of soot emissions. For aero-engine applications, especially those involving large-scale turbines, it is necessary to perform the measurements at long distance from the turbine. The LII technique is favourable in this respect as it provides for non-intrusive measurements and, by detecting the isotropic LII signal along the same axis as the incoming laser beam (so called backward LII), both the laser and the detector can be built inside one system located several meters from the turbine. The concept was initiated in the previous European projects, AEROJET I and II. This paper describes the modified version of the system and the procedure developed to achieve reliable and quantitative soot volume fraction measurements in the exhausts of aero-engines. Application of the backward LII technique is demonstrated in the exhaust of a military turbojet engine for different engine speeds.

  16. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: insights from joint experimental and numerical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; de’ Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ricci, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Most of the current ash transport and dispersion models neglect particle-fluid (two-way) and particle-fluid plus particle-particle (four-way) reciprocal interactions during particle fallout from volcanic plumes. These interactions, a function of particle concentration in the plume, could play an important role, explaining, for example, discrepancies between observed and modelled ash deposits. Aiming at a more accurate prediction of volcanic ash dispersal and sedimentation, the settling of ash particles at particle volume fractions (ϕp) ranging 10−7-10−3 was performed in laboratory experiments and reproduced by numerical simulations that take into account first the two-way and then the four-way coupling. Results show that the velocity of particles settling together can exceed the velocity of particles settling individually by up to 4 times for ϕp ~ 10−3. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results reveal that, during the sedimentation process, the settling velocity is largely enhanced by particle-fluid interactions but partly hindered by particle-particle interactions with increasing ϕp. Combining the experimental and numerical results, we provide an empirical model allowing correction of the settling velocity of particles of any size, density, and shape, as a function of ϕp. These corrections will impact volcanic plume modelling results as well as remote sensing retrieval techniques for plume parameters. PMID:28045056

  17. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: insights from joint experimental and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; de’ Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ricci, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Most of the current ash transport and dispersion models neglect particle-fluid (two-way) and particle-fluid plus particle-particle (four-way) reciprocal interactions during particle fallout from volcanic plumes. These interactions, a function of particle concentration in the plume, could play an important role, explaining, for example, discrepancies between observed and modelled ash deposits. Aiming at a more accurate prediction of volcanic ash dispersal and sedimentation, the settling of ash particles at particle volume fractions (ϕp) ranging 10‑7-10‑3 was performed in laboratory experiments and reproduced by numerical simulations that take into account first the two-way and then the four-way coupling. Results show that the velocity of particles settling together can exceed the velocity of particles settling individually by up to 4 times for ϕp ~ 10‑3. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results reveal that, during the sedimentation process, the settling velocity is largely enhanced by particle-fluid interactions but partly hindered by particle-particle interactions with increasing ϕp. Combining the experimental and numerical results, we provide an empirical model allowing correction of the settling velocity of particles of any size, density, and shape, as a function of ϕp. These corrections will impact volcanic plume modelling results as well as remote sensing retrieval techniques for plume parameters.

  18. The flow past a circular patch of vegetation with a low submergence depth and low solid volume fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkil, Gokhan

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the Solid Volume Fraction (SVF) on the flow structure within and past a circular array of surface-mounted cylinders that extends over 75% of the water depth, h is investigated using Detached Eddy Simulation (DES). This set up mimics the case of a submerged patch of rigid vegetation in a channel. The diameter of the cylinders in the array is d = 0.02D, where D is the diameter of the circular array. The channel Reynolds number is close to 20,000 and the Reynolds number defined with D is around 24,000. DES is conducted for SVF = 10% and 25%. It is found that as the SVF increases, fairly strong horseshoe vortex system forms around the upstream face of the vegetation patch, the strength of the separated shear layers on the sides of the vegetation patch increases and the length of the recirculation region behind the patch decreases. While an increase of the SVF results in a large increase of the turbulent kinetic energy in the wake, the opposite is observed within the porous vegetation patch.

  19. Improvement of wear and adherence properties of composite coatings by a gradual increase in particle volume fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X.M.; Merk, N.

    1997-09-01

    Electrodeposited composites (ECs) are thin composite deposits made of a base metal or alloy which is reinforced by second phase particles of ceramic, polymer or graphite. ECs are produced rather inexpensively at temperatures below 60 C, where no strong interfacial reaction may occur and residual thermal stresses are negligible. Electrodeposited composites play an important role in tailoring the surface properties of bulk materials. Indeed, ECs containing particle volume fractions (PVF) up to 30% of hard ceramic particles exhibit superior hardness and wear resistance compared with pure metallic deposits and are therefore used as wear-resistant coatings. However, as the inert particles are not adhesive to the substrates, an increase in PVF is often accompanied by a decrease in adherence of the coating to the substrate. Furthermore, a high PVF is often accompanied by a dramatic loss of functional property, gradient composite coatings having a lower PVF at the substrate side and a higher PVF at the surface side of ECs is produced. In this work the authors present the wear and adhesion behavior of such gradient coatings. The matrix was either Cu or Ni and the second phase particles were alumina and silicon carbide.

  20. Influence of Ag contents on structure and tribological properties of TiSiN-Ag nanocomposite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Chaoqun; Li, Jinlong; Wang, Yue; Yang, Yitao; Wang, Yongxin; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-02-01

    TiSiN-Ag nanocomposite coatings with different Ag contents were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V using reactive co-sputtering in multi-arc ion plating system. Influence of Ag contents on structure and tribological properties of TiSiN-Ag nanocomposite coatings was investigated. The TiSiN-Ag coatings were found to have unique nanocomposite structures composed of nanocrystallite and amorphous nc-TiN/nc-Ag/a-Si3N4. When the silver content was 1.4 at.%, the coating exhibited high hardness (36 GPa), but poor wear resistance. When the silver content was increased from 5.3 to 8.7 at.%, the coatings possessed homogeneous distribution and small variation in hardness. Although these coatings revealed obvious decrease in hardness, significantly reduced in the friction coefficient and possessed excellent tribological properties, besides, the coating with the Ag content of 5.3 at.% showed best wear resistance in artificial seawater and the coating (7.9 at.% Ag) revealed the best wear resistance in ambient air. However, with a further increased incorporation of Ag into the TiSiN-Ag coating (17.0 at.%) resulted in the formation of a large volume fraction of metallic silver, which caused a decrease both in hardness and wear resistance. The coating containing highest Ag concentration (21.0 at.%) exhibited low friction coefficient both in ambient air and artificial seawater, although possessing low hardness.

  1. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume III. Bulletin 1690-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide, the third volume of the series, outlines the basic program of vocational agriculture for Louisiana students in the ninth and tenth grades. Covered in the five units on plant science are growth processes of plants, cultural practices for plants, insects affecting plants, seed and plant selection, and diseases that affect…

  2. The influence of SiC particle size and volume fraction on the thermal conductivity of spark plasma sintered UO2-SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Sunghwan; Baney, Ronald; Subhash, Ghatu; Tulenko, James

    2013-11-01

    This study examines the influence of Silicon Carbide (SiC) particle addition on thermal conductivity of UO2-SiC composite pellets. UO2 powder and β-SiC particles of different sizes and of different volume fractions were mechanically mixed and sintered at 1350-1450 °C for 5 min by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The particle size (0.6-55 μm diameter) and volume fraction (5-20%) of SiC were systematically varied to investigate their influence on the resulting UO2-SiC composite pellet microstructure and the thermal properties. It was found that SiC particle size less than 16.9 μm with larger volume fraction is more effective for improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellets. Scanning Electron Microscopy examination revealed micro-cracking and interfacial debonding in the composites containing larger size SiC particles (16.9 and 55 μm) which resulted in reduced thermal conductivity. For the UO2-SiC composite pellets containing 1 μm diameter SiC particles, the thermal conductivity increased almost linearly with volume fraction of particles. However, the addition of a larger volume fraction of SiC reduces the amount of heavy metal in the composite pellet and therefore a higher U-235 enrichment is necessary to compensate for the heavy metal loss. The experimental thermal conductivity values of the UO2-SiC composite pellets are in good agreement with the theoretical values based on the available model in the literature.

  3. Advanced fractional crystallisation and homogenization of large-volume rhyolite before the Oraefajokull 1362 AD plinian eruption, SE Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selbekk, R. S.; Tronnes, R. G.

    2007-12-01

    In the 50 km wide Icelandic rift zones rhyolite magma is generated by partial melting of hydrated metabasaltic crust, subsiding under the weight of the growing volcanic pile. This mechanism of silicic melt formation is indicated by the basalt-rhyolite bimodality and rhyolite O-isotope composition. The low 18/16O-isotope ratios of rift zone rhyolites trace the high-latitude meteoric water component of the subsiding hydrated basalts [1]. The rhyolites of the volcanic flank zones (VFZ), however, have generally as heavy oxygen as the associated alkaline to transitional basalts and intermediate volcanics [2,3]. The minor volcanic loading of the older, thicker and stronger VFZ crust is insufficient for significant subsidence, and less pronounced basalt-rhyolite bimodality combined with other geochemical features support silicic melt generation by fractional crystallization. An extreme case in Icelandic, as well as global, perspective is the rhyolite magma of the plinian eruption from the large VFZ-volcano, Oraefajokull, in 1362 AD [4]. Glass, mineral and bulk tephra analyses show no chemical variation exceeding the analytical precision for the entire erupted volume of 2 km3 DRE. This applies even to the glass shards from distant locations in Greenland, Norway and Ireland. The total phenocryst content is 0.5-1 wt percent, with oligoclase (An14 Ab81 Or5.5), fayalite (Fa99.7 Fo0.3) and hedenbergite (Wo44.7 En2.6 Fs52.7) constituting 50- 80, 10-25 and 10-25 percent of the total phenocrysts, respectively. The extreme mineral compositions (especially pure fayalite and hedenbergite) resemble those of the granophyres in the Skaergaard and Bushveld complexes and differ from all other investigated rhyolites. The advanced fractionation and homogenisation to form the erupted 2 km3 DRE rhyolite is petrogenetically challenging, and a parental magma chamber of 20-40 km3 seems like a conservative estimate. The time-scale of the historic magma chamber evolution under Oraefajokull is

  4. The Fractional Free Volume of the Sorbed Vapor in Modeling the Viscoelastic Contribution to Polymer-Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Vapor Sensor Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W. ); Zellers, Edward T.

    1999-12-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors with polymeric sorbent layers can respond to vapors based on mass-loading and modulus decreases of the polymer film. The modulus changes are associated with volume changes that occur as vapor is sorbed by the film. A factor based on the fractional free volume of the vapor as a liquid has been incorporated into a model for the contribution of swelling-induced modulus changes to observed SAW vapor sensor responses. In this model, it is not the entire volume added to the film by the vapor molecules that causes the modulus to decrease. The free volume effect is calibrated from thermal expansion experiments. The amplification of the SAW vapor sensor response due to modulus effects that are predicted by this model have been compared to amplification factors determined by comparing the responses of polymer-coated SAW vapor sensors with the responses of similarly-coated thickness shear mode (TSM) vapor sensors, the latter being gravimetric. Results for six vapors on each of two polymers, poly(isobutylene) and poly(epichlorohydrin), were examined. The model correctly predicts amplification factors are related to the specific volume of the vapor as a liquid. The fractional free volume factor provides a physically meaningful addition to the model and is consistent with conventional polymer physics treatments of the effects of temperature and plasticization on polymer modulus.

  5. Tensile properties of rat femoral bone as functions of bone volume fraction, apparent density and volumetric bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Ara; Araiza Arroyo, Francisco J; Rosso, Claudio; Aran, Shima; Snyder, Brian D

    2011-09-02

    Mechanical testing has been regarded as the gold standard to investigate the effects of pathologies on the structure-function properties of the skeleton. Tensile properties of cancellous and cortical bone have been reported previously; however, no relationships describing these properties for rat bone as a function of volumetric bone mineral density (ρ(MIN)), apparent density or bone volume fraction (BV/TV) have been reported in the literature. We have shown that at macro level, compression and torsion properties of rat cortical and cancellous bone can be well described as a function of BV/TV, apparent density or ρ(MIN) using non-destructive micro-computed tomographic imaging and mechanical testing to failure. Therefore, the aim of this study is to derive a relationship expressing the tensile properties of rat cortical bone as a function of BV/TV, apparent density or ρ(MIN) over a range of normal and pathologic bones. We used bones from normal, ovariectomized and osteomalacic animals. All specimens underwent micro-computed tomographic imaging to assess bone morphometric and densitometric indices and uniaxial tension to failure. We obtained univariate relationships describing 74-77% of the tensile properties of rat cortical bone as a function of BV/TV, apparent density or ρ(MIN) over a range of density and common skeletal pathologies. The relationships reported in this study can be used in the structural rigidity to provide a non-invasive method to assess the tensile behavior of bones affected by pathology and/or treatment options.

  6. Bone volume fraction explains the variation in strength and stiffness of cancellous bone affected by metastatic cancer and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Ara; von Stechow, Dietrich; Zurakowski, David; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian D

    2008-12-01

    Preventing nontraumatic fractures in millions of patients with osteoporosis or metastatic cancer may significantly reduce the associated morbidity and reduce health-care expenditures incurred by these fractures. Predicting fracture occurrence requires an accurate understanding of the relationship between bone structure and the mechanical properties governing bone fracture that can be readily measured. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a single analytic relationship with either bone tissue mineral density or bone volume fraction (BV/TV) as independent variables could predict the strength and stiffness of normal and pathologic cancellous bone affected by osteoporosis or metastatic cancer. After obtaining institutional review board approval and informed consent, 15 patients underwent excisional biopsy of metastatic prostate, breast, lung, ovarian, or colon cancer from the spine and/or femur to obtain 41 metastatic cancer specimens. In addition, 96 noncancer specimens were excised from 43 age- and site-matched cadavers. All specimens were imaged using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and backscatter emission imaging and tested mechanically by uniaxial compression and nanoindentation. The minimum BV/TV, measured using quantitative micro-CT, accounted for 84% of the variation in bone stiffness and strength for all cancellous bone specimens. While relationships relating bone density to strength and stiffness have been derived empirically for normal and osteoporotic bone, these relationships have not been applied to skeletal metastases. This simple analytic relationship will facilitate large-scale screening and prediction of fracture risk for normal and pathologic cancellous bone using clinical CT systems to determine the load capacity of bones altered by metastatic cancer, osteoporosis, or both.

  7. Effects of Heat Flux, Oxygen Concentration and Glass Fiber Volume Fraction on Pyrolysate Mass Flux from Composite Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, D. B.; Lautenberger, C. W.; Yuan, Z.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental work on the effects of heat flux, oxygen concentration and glass fiber volume fraction on pyrolysate mass flux from samples of polypropylene/glass fiber composite (PP/G) is underway. The research is conducted as part of a larger project to develop a test methodology for flammability of materials, particularly composites, in the microgravity and variable oxygen concentration environment of spacecraft and space structures. Samples of PP/G sized at 30x30x10 mm are flush mounted in a flow tunnel, which provides a flow of oxidizer over the surface of the samples at a fixed value of 1 m/s and oxygen concentrations varying between 18 and 30%. Each sample is exposed to a constant external radiant heat flux at a given value, which varies between tests from 10 to 24 kW/m2. Continuous sample mass loss and surface temperature measurements are recorded for each test. Some tests are conducted with an igniter and some are not. In the former case, the research goal is to quantify the critical mass flux at ignition for the various environmental and material conditions described above. The later case generates a wider range of mass flux rates than those seen prior to ignition, providing an opportunity to examine the protective effects of blowing on oxidative pyrolysis and heating of the surface. Graphs of surface temperature and sample mass loss vs. time for samples of 30% PPG at oxygen concentrations of 18 and 21% are presented in the figures below. These figures give a clear indication of the lower pyrolysis rate and extended time to ignition that accompany a lower oxygen concentration. Analysis of the mass flux rate at the time of ignition gives good repeatability but requires further work to provide a clear indication of mass flux trends accompanying changes in environmental and material properties.

  8. Effects of Heat Flux, Oxygen Concentration and Glass Fiber Volume Fraction on Pyrolysate Mass Flux from Composite Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, D. B.; Lautenberger, C. W.; Yuan, Z.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental work on the effects of heat flux, oxygen concentration and glass fiber volume fraction on pyrolysate mass flux from samples of polypropylene/glass fiber composite (PP/G) is underway. The research is conducted as part of a larger project to develop a test methodology for flammability of materials, particularly composites, in the microgravity and variable oxygen concentration environment of spacecraft and space structures. Samples of PP/G sized at 30 x 30 x 10 mm are flush mounted in a flow tunnel, which provides a flow of oxidizer over the surface of the samples at a fixed value of 1 m/s and oxygen concentrations varying between 18 and 30%. Each sample is exposed to a constant external radiant heat flux at a given value, which varies between tests from 10 to 24 kW/sq m. Continuous sample mass loss and surface temperature measurements are recorded for each test. Some tests are conducted with an igniter and some are not. In the former case, the research goal is to quantify the critical mass flux at ignition for the various environmental and material conditions described above. The later case generates a wider range of mass flux rates than those seen prior to ignition, providing an opportunity to examine the protective effects of blowing on oxidative pyrolysis and heating of the surface. Graphs of surface temperature and sample mass loss vs. time for samples of 30% PPG at oxygen concentrations of 18 and 21% are presented in the figures below. These figures give a clear indication of the lower pyrolysis rate and extended time to ignition that accompany a lower oxygen concentration. Analysis of the mass flux rate at the time of ignition gives good repeatability but requires further work to provide a clear indication of mass flux trends accompanying changes in environmental and material properties.

  9. Bone volume fraction and fabric anisotropy are better determinants of trabecular bone stiffness than other morphological variables.

    PubMed

    Maquer, Ghislain; Musy, Sarah N; Wandel, Jasmin; Gross, Thomas; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-06-01

    As our population ages, more individuals suffer from osteoporosis. This disease leads to impaired trabecular architecture and increased fracture risk. It is essential to understand how morphological and mechanical properties of the cancellous bone are related. Morphology-elasticity relationships based on bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric anisotropy explain up to 98% of the variation in elastic properties. Yet, other morphological variables such as individual trabeculae segmentation (ITS) and trabecular bone score (TBS) could improve the stiffness predictions. A total of 743 micro-computed tomography (μCT) reconstructions of cubic trabecular bone samples extracted from femur, radius, vertebrae, and iliac crest were analyzed. Their morphology was assessed via 25 variables and their stiffness tensor (CFE) was computed from six independent load cases using micro finite element (μFE) analyses. Variance inflation factors were calculated to evaluate collinearity between morphological variables and decide upon their inclusion in morphology-elasticity relationships. The statistically admissible morphological variables were included in a multiple linear regression model of the dependent variable CFE. The contribution of each independent variable was evaluated (ANOVA). Our results show that BV/TV is the best determinant of CFE(r(2) adj  = 0.889), especially in combination with fabric anisotropy (r(2) adj  = 0.968). Including the other independent predictors hardly affected the amount of variance explained by the model (r(2) adj  = 0.975). Across all anatomical sites, BV/TV explained 87% of the variance of the bone elastic properties. Fabric anisotropy further described 10% of the bone stiffness, but the improvement in variance explanation by adding other independent factors was marginal (<1%). These findings confirm that BV/TV and fabric anisotropy are the best determinants of trabecular bone stiffness and show, against common belief, that other

  10. A study of fiber volume fraction effects in notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite of three different fiber volume fractions (vf = 0.15, 0.37, and 0.41) was investigated for various room temperature microstructural and material properties including: fatigue crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. While the matrix hardness is similar for all fiber volume fractions, the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and matrix residual stress increases with fiber volume fraction. The composite fatigue crack initiation stress is shown to be matrix controlled and occurs when the net maximum matrix stress approaches the endurance limit stress of the matrix. A model is presented which includes residual stresses and presents the composite initiation stress as a function of fiber volume fraction. This model predicts a maximum composite initiation stress at vf approximately 0.15 which agrees with the experimental data. The applied composite stress levels were increased as necessary for continued crack growth. The applied Delta(K) values at crack arrest increase with fiber volume fraction by an amount better approximated using an energy based formulation rather than when scaled linear with modulus. After crack arrest, the crack growth rate exponents for vf37 and vf41 were much lower and toughness much higher, when compared to the unreinforced matrix, because of the bridged region which parades with the propagating fatigue crack. However, the vf15 material exhibited a higher crack growth rate exponent and lower toughness than the unreinforced matrix because once the bridged fibers nearest the crack mouth broke, the stress redistribution broke all bridged fibers, leaving an unbridged crack. Degraded, unbridged behavior is modeled using the residual stress state in the matrix ahead of the crack tip. Plastic zone sizes were directly measured using a metallographic technique and allow prediction of an effective matrix stress intensity which agrees with the fiber pressure model if residual stresses

  11. Nanoparticle volume fraction with heat and mass transfer on MHD mixed convection flow in a nanofluid in the presence of thermo-diffusion under convective boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Jeyabalan, C.; Sivagnana Prabhu, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    This article examines the influence of thermophoresis, Brownian motion of the nanoparticles with variable stream conditions in the presence of magnetic field on mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer region of a semi-infinite porous vertical plate in a nanofluid under the convective boundary conditions. The transformed boundary layer ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Maple 18 software with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Numerical results are presented both in tabular and graphical forms illustrating the effects of these parameters with magnetic field on momentum, thermal, nanoparticle volume fraction and solutal concentration boundary layers. The numerical results obtained for the velocity, temperature, volume fraction, and concentration profiles reveal interesting phenomenon, some of these qualitative results are presented through plots. It is interesting to note that the magnetic field plays a dominant role on nanofluid flow under the convective boundary conditions.

  12. Characterization of the evolution of the volume fraction of precipitates in aged AlMgSiCu alloys using DSC technique

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaeili, Shahrzad . E-mail: shahrzad@mecheng1.uwaterloo.ca; Lloyd, David J.

    2005-11-15

    Differential scanning calorimetry is used to quantify the evolution of the volume fraction of precipitates during age hardening in AlMgSiCu alloys. The calorimetry tests are run on alloy samples after aging for various times at 180 deg. C and the change in the collective heat effects from the major precipitation and dissolution processes in each run are used to determine the precipitation state of the samples. The method is implemented on alloys with various thermal histories prior to artificial aging, including commercial pre-aging histories. The estimated values for the relative volume fraction of precipitates are compared with the results from a newly developed analytical method using isothermal calorimetry and a related quantitative transmission electron microscopy work. Excellent agreement is obtained between the results from various methods.

  13. Myocardial extravascular extracellular volume fraction measurement by gadolinium cardiovascular magnetic resonance in humans: slow infusion versus bolus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myocardial extravascular extracellular volume fraction (Ve) measures quantify diffuse fibrosis not readily detectable by conventional late gadolinium (Gd) enhancement (LGE). Ve measurement requires steady state equilibrium between plasma and interstitial Gd contrast. While a constant infusion produces steady state, it is unclear whether a simple bolus can do the same. Given the relatively slow clearance of Gd, we hypothesized that a bolus technique accurately measures Ve, thus facilitating integration of myocardial fibrosis quantification into cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) workflow routines. Assuming equivalence between techniques, we further hypothesized that Ve measures would be reproducible across scans. Methods In 10 volunteers (ages 20-81, median 33 yr, 3 females), we compared serial Ve measures from a single short axis slice from two scans: first, during a constant infusion, and second, 12-50 min after a bolus (0.2 mmol/kg gadoteridol) on another day. Steady state during infusion was defined when serial blood and myocardial T1 data varied <5%. We measured T1 on a 1.5 T Siemens scanner using a single-shot modified Look Locker inversion recovery sequence (MOLLI) with balanced SSFP. To shorten breath hold times, T1 values were measured with a shorter sampling scheme that was validated with spin echo relaxometry (TR = 15 sec) in CuSO4-Agar phantoms. Serial infusion vs. bolus Ve measures (n = 205) from the 10 subjects were compared with generalized estimating equations (GEE) with exchangeable correlation matrices. LGE images were also acquired 12-30 minutes after the bolus. Results No subject exhibited LGE near the short axis slices where Ve was measured. The Ve range was 19.3-29.2% and 18.4-29.1% by constant infusion and bolus, respectively. In GEE models, serial Ve measures by constant infusion and bolus did not differ significantly (difference = 0.1%, p = 0.38). For both techniques, Ve was strongly related to age (p < 0.01 for both) in GEE

  14. Adjustable magnetoelectric effect of self-assembled vertical multiferroic nanocomposite films by the in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huaping; Chai, Guozhong; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Zheng; Kitamura, Takayuki; Zhou, Haomiao

    2014-03-21

    The strain-mediated magnetoelectric (ME) property of self-assembled vertical multiferroic nanocomposite films epitaxially grown on cubic substrates was calculated by a nonlinear thermodynamic theory combined with the elastic theory. The dependent relations of phase state of ferroelectric films with the in-plane misfit strain, out-of-plane misfit strain, temperature, and volume fraction of ferromagnetic phase were confirmed. The effects of in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction on the polarization and dielectric constant of ferroelectric films at room temperature were elaborately analyzed for the vertical BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and PbTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films. Our calculated results confirmed the relationship among ME effect and in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction in the nanocomposite films. The ME voltage coefficients of vertical BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and PbTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films displayed various maximums and abrupt points at special phases and phase transition boundaries. The ME voltage coefficients of lead-free BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films epitaxially grown on different substrates could reach a comparative value of ∼2 V·cm{sup −1}·Oe{sup −1} under the controllable in-plane misfit strain induced by substrate clamping. Our results provided an available method for the optimal design of vertical multiferroic nanocomposites with adjustable ME effect by optimizing the ferromagnetic volume fraction and substrate type.

  15. Soot volume fraction measurement in low-pressure methane flames by combining laser-induced incandescence and cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Effect of pressure on soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.; Lefort, B.; Lemaire, R.; Therssen, E.; Pauwels, J.F.

    2008-10-15

    Soot volume fraction (f{sub v}) profiles are recorded in low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen flat flames using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Experiments are performed from 20 to 28 kPa in flames having the same equivalence ratio (2.32). Calibration is performed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and indicates a very weak soot volume fraction (0.066 ppb at 21.33 kPa and 0.8 ppb at 26.66 kPa in the burnt gases). Soot volume fraction is found to increase continuously after a given distance above the burner (HAB) and tends to level off in the burnt gases. The reaction time resolution available in low-pressure flames makes it possible to examine the early steps of soot formation. The variation of the LII signal with laser energy before the LII ''plateau'' region is much weaker at the beginning of soot formation than after a given reaction time. The LII time decays are nearly constant within the first millimetres, whereas an increase in the decay, correlated with the growth of the primary soot particle, is observed later. The growth of soot volume fraction is then analysed by considering the variation of the derivative function df{sub v}/dt with f{sub v}. Three regimes having respectively a positive slope, a constant slope, and a negative slope are observed and are interpreted with respect to the soot inception process. Finally, a very important sensitivity of f{sub v} with pressure P (at 30 mm HAB) is observed, leading to a power law, f{sub v}=KP{sup 11}, confirmed by extinction measurements (by CRDS). The observed dependence of f{sub v} with pressure could be a result of the prominence of the early soot inception process in the investigated low-pressure flames. (author)

  16. A simple model to predict the effect of volume fraction, diameter, and length of fibres on strength of fibre reinforced brittle matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, T.; Jang, H. S.; Cha, Y. H.; Desai, C. S.

    2000-06-01

    A simplified model is presented to predict the strength variations of brittle matrix composites, reinforced by steel fibres, with the variations of fibre parameters - length, diameter and volume fraction. This model predicts that its tensile and flexural strength increase non-linearly with the fibre volume fraction. It also predicts that similar non-linear behaviour should be observed with the reduction of the fibre diameter when other parameters are kept constant. The experimental results support both these theoretical predictions. It is also explained why an increase in the fibre length does not always significantly increase the fracture toughness. The objective of this paper is not to explain and understand in great detail the science of all phenomena responsible for the strength increase of fibre reinforced brittle matrix composites, but to provide a simple engineering explanation as to why its strength increases with the fibre addition, and how this increase can be quantitatively related to the variations in fibre parameters - fibre volume fraction, fibre length and diameter. These simplifying steps are needed to provide a tool that the practicing engineers can use to predict the brittle matrix strength variation with the fibre parameters. In the area of geomechanics, the results presented here can be used to assess and predict the behaviour of fibre-reinforced earth.

  17. The effects of temperature, volume fraction and vibration time on the thermo-physical properties of a carbon nanotube suspension (carbon nanofluid).

    PubMed

    Amrollahi, A; Hamidi, A A; Rashidi, A M

    2008-08-06

    In this investigation, nanofluids of carbon nanotubes are prepared and the thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of these fluids are measured using a thin layer technique as a function of time of ultrasonication, temperature, and volume fraction. It has been observed that after using the ultrasonic disrupter, the size of agglomerated particles and number of primary particles in a particle cluster was significantly decreased and that the thermal conductivity increased with elapsed ultrasonication time. The clustering of carbon nanotubes was also confirmed microscopically. The strong dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on temperature and volume fraction of nanofluids was attributed to Brownian motion and the interparticle potential, which influences the particle motion. The effect of temperature will become much more evident with an increase in the volume fraction and the agglomeration of the nanoparticles, as observed experimentally. The data obtained from this work have been compared with those of other studies and also with mathematical models at present proven for suspensions. Using a 2.5% volumetric concentration of carbon nanotubes resulted in a 20% increase in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid (ethylene glycol).The volumetric heat capacity also showed a pronounced increase with respect to that of the pure base fluid.

  18. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 8; Tile Small Targets A-1, Ag-1, B-1, and Bg-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Targets A-1, Ag-1, B-1, and Bg-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts on the reinforced Shuttle Heat Shield Tiles of the Wing. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  19. Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Determination of Fractional Tumor Blood Volume: A Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Response to the Vascular Disrupting Agent ZD6126

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Simon P. Howe, Franklyn A.; Griffiths, John R.; Ryan, Anderson J.; Waterton, John C.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess tumor fractional blood volume ({xi}), determined in vivo by susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a noninvasive imaging biomarker of tumor response to the vascular disrupting agent ZD6126. Methods and Materials: The transverse MRI relaxation rate R{sub 2}* of rat GH3 prolactinomas was quantified prior to and following injection of 2.5 mgFe/kg feruglose, an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide intravascular contrast agent, and {xi} (%) was determined from the change in R{sub 2}*. The rats were then treated with either saline or 50 mg/kg ZD6126, and {xi} measured again 24 hours later. Following posttreatment MRI, Hoechst 33342 (15 mg/kg) was administered to the rats and histological correlates from composite images of tumor perfusion and necrosis sought. Results: Irrespective of treatment, tumor volume significantly increased over 24 hours. Saline-treated tumors showed no statistically significant change in {xi}, whereas a significant (p = 0.002) 70% reduction in {xi} of the ZD6126-treated cohort was determined. Hoechst 33342 uptake was associated with viable tumor tissue and was significantly (p = 0.004) reduced and restricted to the rim of the ZD6126-treated tumors. A significant positive correlation between posttreatment {xi} and Hoechst 33342 uptake was obtained (r = 0.83, p = 0.002), providing validation of the MRI-derived measurements of fractional tumor blood volume. Conclusions: These data clearly highlight the potential of susceptibility contrast MRI with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents to provide quantitative imaging biomarkers of fractional tumor blood volume at high spatial resolution to assess tumor vascular status and response to vascular disrupting agents.

  20. Microcomputed tomographic analysis of human condyles in unilateral condylar hyperplasia: increased cortical porosity and trabecular bone volume fraction with reduced mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Karssemakers, L H E; Nolte, J W; Tuinzing, D B; Langenbach, G E J; Raijmakers, P G; Becking, A G

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral condylar hyperplasia or hyperactivity is a disorder of growth that affects the mandible, and our aim was to visualise the 3-dimensional bony microstructure of resected mandibular condyles of affected patients. We prospectively studied 17 patients with a clinical presentation of progressive mandibular asymmetry and an abnormal single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scan. All patients were treated by condylectomy to arrest progression. The resected condyles were scanned with micro-CT (18 μm resolution). Rectangular volumes of interest were selected in 4 quadrants (lateromedial and superoinferior) of the trabecular bone of each condyle. Variables of bone architecture (volume fraction, trabecular number, thickness, and separation, degree of mineralisation, and degree of structural anisotrophy) were calculated with routine morphometric software. Eight of the 17 resected condyles showed clear destruction of the subchondral layer of cortical bone. There was a significant superoinferior gradient for all trabecular variables. Mean (SD) bone volume fraction (25.1 (6) %), trabecular number (1.69 (0.26) mm(-1)), trabecular thickness (0.17 (0.03) mm), and degree of mineralisation (695.39 (39.83) mg HA/cm(3)) were higher in the superior region. Trabecular separation (0.6 (0.16) mm) and structural anisotropy (1.84 (0.28)) were higher in the inferior region. The micro-CT analysis showed increased cortical porosity in many of the condyles studied. It also showed a higher bone volume fraction, greater trabecular thickness and trabecular separation, greater trabecular number, and less mineralisation in the condyles of the 17 patients compared with the known architecture of unaffected mandibular condyles.

  1. Global fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity together with segmented brain volumes assemble a predictive discriminant model for young and elderly healthy brains: a pilot study at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Becerra-Laparra, Ivonne; Cortez-Conradis, David; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several parameters of brain integrity can be derived from diffusion tensor imaging. These include fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Combination of these variables using multivariate analysis might result in a predictive model able to detect the structural changes of human brain aging. Our aim was to discriminate between young and older healthy brains by combining structural and volumetric variables from brain MRI: FA, MD, and white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. This was a cross-sectional study in 21 young (mean age, 25.71±3.04 years; range, 21–34 years) and 10 elderly (mean age, 70.20±4.02 years; range, 66–80 years) healthy volunteers. Multivariate discriminant analysis, with age as the dependent variable and WM, GM and CSF volumes, global FA and MD, and gender as the independent variables, was used to assemble a predictive model. The resulting model was able to differentiate between young and older brains: Wilks’ λ = 0.235, χ2 (6) = 37.603, p = .000001. Only global FA, WM volume and CSF volume significantly discriminated between groups. The total accuracy was 93.5%; the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91.30%, 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. Global FA, WM volume and CSF volume are parameters that, when combined, reliably discriminate between young and older brains. A decrease in FA is the strongest predictor of membership of the older brain group, followed by an increase in WM and CSF volumes. Brain assessment using a predictive model might allow the follow-up of selected cases that deviate from normal aging. PMID:27027893

  2. Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [Glass beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.

    1986-08-01

    The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. glass beads used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.

  3. {sup 11}C-methionine PET improves the target volume delineation of meningiomas treated with stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia . E-mail: anca-ligia.grosu@lrz.tum.de; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Astner, Sabrina T.; Adam, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of {sup 11}C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) in target volume delineation for meningiomas and to determine the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Two independent observers performed treatment planning in 10 patients according to a prospective written protocol. In the first step, they used coregistered computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the second step, MET-PET was added to CT/MRI (image fusion based on mutual information). Results: The correlation between gross tumor volume (GTVs) delineated by the two observers based on CT/MRI was r = 0.855 (Spearman's correlation coefficient, p = 0.002) and r = 0.988 (p = 0.000) when MET-PET/CT/MRI were used. The number of patients with agreement in more then 80% of the outlined volume increased with the availability of MET-PET from 1 in 10 to 5 in 10. The median volume of intersection between the regions delineated by two observers increased significantly from 69% (from the composite volume) to 79%, by the addition of MET-PET (p = 0.005). The information of MET-PET was useful to delineate GTV in the area of cavernous sinus, orbit, and base of the skull. Conclusions: The hypothesis-generating findings of potential normal tissue sparing and reduced interobserver variability provide arguments for invasive studies of the correlation between MET-PET images and histologic tumor extension and for prospective trials of target volume delineation with CT/MRI/MET-PET image fusion.

  4. Soot volume fractions and primary particle size estimate by means of the simultaneous two-color-time-resolved and 2D laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarciuc, A.; Foucher, F.; Mounaïm-Rousselle, C.

    2006-06-01

    An original approach of laser-induced incandescence consisting in the simultaneous recording of the two-color-time-resolved and 2D LII signal is described in this paper. The application of this approach in an atmospheric pressure diffusion flame fueled with isooctane as well as inside the combustion chamber of a diesel engine is presented. Soot volume fraction and primary particle diameters are calculated, and the results are discussed. The mean diameter estimated by fitting the LII modeled curve on the experimental one is compared with the results obtained through soot sampling and microscope analyzing. The influence of the thermal accommodation coefficient and soot refractive index function is also discussed.

  5. In situ determination of {gamma}{prime} phase volume fraction and of relations between lattice parameters and precipitate morphology in Ni-based single crystal superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, A.; Bastie, P.; Veron, M.

    1998-09-18

    Diffraction profiles of single crystal Ni-based superalloy samples with different microstructures were measured in situ up to the complete solutionizing of the {gamma}{prime} phase, using a high resolution triple crystal diffactometer and high energy synchrotron radiation (150 keV, {lambda} = 0.08 {angstrom}). A comparison between an undeformed sample and creep-deformed specimens with various resultant microstructures evidenced a relation between the lattice parameter distribution, the {gamma}{prime} precipitate microstructure and the sign of the connectivity. It was shown that a deformation induces a change in the relative volume cell of {gamma} and {gamma}{prime} phases. Moreover, the high resolution of the experimental set-up allows in many cases the {gamma}{prime} phase volume fraction to be measured with a good accuracy.

  6. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  7. Development of high volume fraction SiCP/Al composite-bismuthate glass metal plus dielectric films optics Au-mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Qu, Shengguan; Li, Xiang-Long

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the development of high volume fraction SiCP/Al composite-bismuthate glass multilayer films optics Au-mirror with high reflectivity in a wavelength range of 760 to 1000 nm. Multilayer films were fabricated using an radio frequency-magnetron sputtering deposition system. The measured reflectivity of Ta2O5/SiO2/Au/Cr metal plus dielectric films optics Au-mirror could reach up to ≥97%. Then, on the basis of experiments, a Φ75-mm high volume fraction SiCP/Al composite-bismuthate glass multilayer optical Au-mirror for a wavelength range of 760 to 1000 nm was manufactured. The tested results indicate that a peak-to-valley value of 0.854λ (λ=632.8 nm) was achieved on the Au-mirror surface, and the slope deviation error for the flat surface was lower than 0.153λ root mean square. The surface roughness of Ta2O5/SiO2/Au/Cr multilayer thin films was 1.30 nm (Ra).

  8. Effect of microstructure (particulate size and volume fraction) and counterface material on the sliding wear resistance of particulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpas, A. T.; Zhang, J.

    1994-05-01

    The effects of microstructure (namely, particulate volume fraction and particulate size) and the counterface materials on the dry-sliding wear resistance of the aluminum matrix composites 2014A1-SiC and 6061Al-Al2O3 were studied. Experiments were performed within a load range of 0.9 to 350 N at a constant sliding velocity of 0.2 ms-1. Two types of counterface materials, SAE 52100 bearing steel and mullite, were used. At low loads, where particles act as loadbearing constituents, the wear resistance of the 2014A1 reinforced with 15.8 µm diameter SiC was superior to that of the alloy with the same volume fraction of SiC but with 2.4 µm diameter. The wear rates of the composites worn against a steel slider were lower compared with those worn against a mullite slider because of the formation of iron-rich layers that act as in situ solid lubricants in the former case. With increasing the applied load, SiC and A12O3 particles fractured and the wear rates of the composites increased to levels comparable to those of unreinforced matrix alloys. The transition to this regime was delayed to higher loads in the composites with a higher volume percentage of particles. Concurrent with particle fracture, large strains and strain gradients were generated within the aluminum layers adjacent to contact surfaces. This led to the subsurface crack growth and delamination. Because the particles and interfaces provided preferential sites for subsurface crack initiation and growth and because of the propensity of the broken particles to act as third-body abrasive elements at the contact surfaces, no improvement of the wear resistance was observed in the composites in this regime relative to unreinforced aluminum alloys. A second transition, to severe wear, occurred at higher loads when the contact surface temperature exceeded a critical value. The transition loads (and temperatures) were higher in the composites. The alloys with higher volume fraction of reinforcement provided better

  9. 3-D Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Complex Fiber Geometry RaFC Materials with High Volume Fraction and High Aspect Ratio based on ABAQUS PYTHON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, BoCheng

    2011-12-01

    Organic and inorganic fiber reinforced composites with innumerable fiber orientation distributions and fiber geometries are abundantly available in several natural and synthetic structures. Inorganic glass fiber composites have been introduced to numerous applications due to their economical fabrication and tailored structural properties. Numerical characterization of such composite material systems is necessitated due to their intrinsic statistical nature, which renders extensive experimentation prohibitively time consuming and costly. To predict various mechanical behavior and characterizations of Uni-Directional Fiber Composites (UDFC) and Random Fiber Composites (RaFC), we numerically developed Representative Volume Elements (RVE) with high accuracy and efficiency and with complex fiber geometric representations encountered in uni-directional and random fiber networks. In this thesis, the numerical simulations of unidirectional RaFC fiber strand RVE models (VF>70%) are first presented by programming in ABAQUS PYTHON. Secondly, when the cross sectional aspect ratios (AR) of the second phase fiber inclusions are not necessarily one, various types of RVE models with different cross sectional shape fibers are simulated and discussed. A modified random sequential absorption algorithm is applied to enhance the volume fraction number (VF) of the RVE, which the mechanical properties represents the composite material. Thirdly, based on a Spatial Segment Shortest Distance (SSSD) algorithm, a 3-Dimentional RaFC material RVE model is simulated in ABAQUS PYTHON with randomly oriented and distributed straight fibers of high fiber aspect ratio (AR=100:1) and volume fraction (VF=31.8%). Fourthly, the piecewise multi-segments fiber geometry is obtained in MATLAB environment by a modified SSSD algorithm. Finally, numerical methods including the polynomial curve fitting and piecewise quadratic and cubic B-spline interpolation are applied to optimize the RaFC fiber geometries

  10. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multi-frequency EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, S.; Hoppmann, M.; Hunkeler, P. A.; Kalscheuer, T.; Gerdes, R.

    2015-12-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise and accumulate beneath nearby sea ice to form a several meter thick sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator for ice - ocean interactions. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and sub-ice platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions from platelet-layer conductivities using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drill-hole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction also yielded plausible results. Our findings imply that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties. However, we emphasize that the successful application of this technique requires a break with traditional EM sensor calibration strategies due to the need of absolute calibration with respect to a physical forward model.

  11. Fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume is reliably related to absolute depth during vertical displacements in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Holbrook, Robert Iain; de Perera, Theresa Burt

    2010-09-06

    Fish must orient in three dimensions as they navigate through space, but it is unknown whether they are assisted by a sense of depth. In principle, depth can be estimated directly from hydrostatic pressure, but although teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to changes in pressure, they appear unable to measure absolute pressure. Teleosts sense changes in pressure via changes in the volume of their gas-filled swim-bladder, but because the amount of gas it contains is varied to regulate buoyancy, this cannot act as a long-term steady reference for inferring absolute pressure. In consequence, it is generally thought that teleosts are unable to sense depth using hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overturn this received wisdom by showing from a theoretical physical perspective that absolute depth could be estimated during fast, steady vertical displacements by combining a measurement of vertical speed with a measurement of the fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume. This mechanism works even if the amount of gas in the swim-bladder varies, provided that this variation occurs over much longer time scales than changes in volume during displacements. There is therefore no a priori physical justification for assuming that teleost fish cannot sense absolute depth by using hydrostatic pressure cues.

  12. How do jet time, pressure and bone volume fraction influence the drilling depth when waterjet drilling in porcine bone?

    PubMed

    den Dunnen, Steven; Dankelman, Jenny; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M

    2016-09-01

    Using water jets for orthopedic procedures that require bone drilling can be beneficial due to the absence of thermal damage and the always sharp cut. Previously, the influence of the water jet diameter and bone architectural properties on the drilling depth have been determined. To develop water jet instruments that can safely drill in orthopedic surgery, the impact of the two remaining primary factors were determined: the jet time (tjet [s]) and pressure (P [MPa]). To this end, 84 holes were drilled in porcine tali and femora with water jets using Ø 0.4mm nozzle. tjet was varied between 1, 3 and 5s and P between 50 and 70MPa. Drilling depths Lhole (mm), diameters Dhole (mm) and the volume of mineralized bone per unit volume (BV/TV) were determined with microCT scans. A non-linear regression analysis resulted in the predictive equation: Lhole= 0.22 * tjet(0.18) * (1.2-BV/TV) * (P-29) (R(2)=0.904). The established relation between the machine settings and drilling depth allows surgeons to adjust jet time and pressure for the patient׳s BV/TV to drill holes at a predetermined depth. For developers, the relation allows design decisions to be made that influence the dimensions, flexibility and accuracy of water jet instruments. For a pressure of 50MPa, the potential hole depth spread indicated by the 95% confidence interval is <1.6mm for all tested jet times. This maximum variance is smaller than the accuracy required for bone debridement treatments (2-4mm deep), which confirms that water jet drilling can be applied in orthopedic surgery to drill holes in bone with controlled depth.

  13. Temperature, Oxygen, and Soot-Volume-Fraction Measurements in a Turbulent C2H4-Fueled Jet Flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, Sean P.; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Winters, Caroline; Farias, Paul Abraham; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed set of measurements from a piloted, sooting, turbulent C 2 H 4 - fueled diffusion flame. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to monitor temperature and oxygen, while laser-induced incandescence (LII) is applied for imaging of the soot volume fraction in the challenging jet-flame environment at Reynolds number, Re = 20,000. Single-laser shot results are used to map the mean and rms statistics, as well as probability densities. LII data from the soot-growth region of the flame are used to benchmark the soot source term for one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) modeling of this turbulent flame. The ODT code is then used to predict temperature and oxygen fluctuations higher in the soot oxidation region higher in the flame.

  14. In vivo assessment of the gastric mucosal tolerance dose after single fraction, small volume irradiation of liver malignancies by computed tomography-guided, high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Streitparth, Florian; Pech, Maciej; Boehmig, Michael; Ruehl, Ricarda; Peters, Nils; Wieners, Gero; Steinberg, Johannes; Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter; Ricke, Jens . E-mail: jens.ricke@medizin.uni-magdeburg.de

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the tolerance dose of gastric mucosa for single-fraction computed tomography (CT)-guided, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 patients treated by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy of liver malignancies in segments II and/or III were included. Dose planning was performed upon a three-dimensional CT data set acquired after percutaneous applicator positioning. All patients received gastric protection post-treatment. For further analysis, the contours of the gastric wall were defined in every CT slice using Brachyvision Software. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for each treatment and correlated with clinical data derived from questionnaires assessing Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). All patients presenting symptoms of upper GI toxicity were examined endoscopically. Results: Summarizing all patients the minimum dose applied to 1 ml of the gastric wall (D{sub 1ml}) ranged from 6.3 to 34.2 Gy; median, 14.3 Gy. Toxicity was present in 18 patients (55%). We found nausea in 16 (69%), emesis in 9 (27%), cramping in 13 (39%), weight loss in 12 (36%), gastritis in 4 (12%), and ulceration in 5 patients (15%). We found a threshold dose D{sub 1ml} of 11 Gy for general gastric toxicity and 15.5 Gy for gastric ulceration verified by an univariate analysis (p = 0.01). Conclusions: For a single fraction, small volume irradiation we found in the upper abdomen a threshold dose D{sub 1ml} of 15.5 Gy for the clinical endpoint ulceration of the gastric mucosa. This in vivo assessment is in accordance with previously published tolerance data.

  15. Compressive axial mechanical properties of rat bone as functions of bone volume fraction, apparent density and micro-ct based mineral density.

    PubMed

    Cory, Esther; Nazarian, Ara; Entezari, Vahid; Vartanians, Vartan; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian D

    2010-03-22

    Mechanical testing has been regarded as the gold standard to investigate the effects of pathologies on the structure-function properties of the skeleton. With recent advances in computing power of personal computers, virtual alternatives to mechanical testing are gaining acceptance and use. We have previously introduced such a technique called structural rigidity analysis to assess mechanical strength of skeletal tissue with defects. The application of this technique is predicated upon the use of relationships defining the strength of bone as a function of its density for a given loading mode. We are to apply this technique in rat models to assess their compressive skeletal response subjected to a host of biological and pharmaceutical stimulations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to derive a relationship expressing axial compressive mechanical properties of rat cortical and cancellous bone as a function of equivalent bone mineral density, bone volume fraction or apparent density over a range of normal and pathologic bones. We used bones from normal, ovariectomized and partially nephrectomized animals. All specimens underwent micro-computed tomographic imaging to assess bone morphometric and densitometric indices and uniaxial compression to failure. We obtained univariate relationships describing 71-78% of the mechanical properties of rat cortical and cancellous bone based on equivalent mineral density, bone volume fraction or apparent density over a wide range of density and common skeletal pathologies. The relationships reported in this study can be used in the structural rigidity analysis introduced by the authors to provide a non-invasive method to assess the compressive strength of bones affected by pathology and/or treatment options.

  16. Measurement of Mechanical Coherency Temperature and Solid Volume Fraction in Al-Zn Alloys Using In Situ X-ray Diffraction During Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, Jean-Marie; Mireux, Bastien; Kurtuldu, Güven; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-09-01

    During solidification of metallic alloys, coalescence leads to the formation of solid bridges between grains or grain clusters when both solid and liquid phases are percolated. As such, it represents a key transition with respect to the mechanical behavior of solidifying alloys and to the prediction of solidification cracking. Coalescence starts at the coherency point when the grains begin to touch each other, but are unable to sustain any tensile loads. It ends up at mechanical coherency when the solid phase is sufficiently coalesced to transmit macroscopic tensile strains and stresses. Temperature at mechanical coherency is a major input parameter in numerical modeling of solidification processes as it defines the point at which thermally induced deformations start to generate internal stresses in a casting. This temperature has been determined for Al-Zn alloys using in situ X-ray diffraction during casting in a dog-bone-shaped mold. This setup allows the sample to build up internal stress naturally as its contraction is prevented. The cooling on both extremities of the mold induces a hot spot at the middle of the sample which is irradiated by X-ray. Diffraction patterns were recorded every 0.5 seconds using a detector covering a 426 × 426 mm2 area. The change of diffraction angles allowed measuring the general decrease of the lattice parameter of the fcc aluminum phase. At high solid volume fraction, a succession of strain/stress build up and release is explained by the formation of hot tears. Mechanical coherency temperatures, 829 K to 866 K (556 °C to 593 °C), and solid volume fractions, ca. 98 pct, are shown to depend on solidification time for grain refined Al-6.2 wt pct Zn alloys.

  17. Structural and nonlinear optical behavior of Ag-doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming-Yue; Yao, Cheng-Bao; Yan, Xiao-Yan; Li, Jin; Qu, Shu-Yang; Hu, Jun-Yan; Sun, Wen-Jun; Li, Qiang-Hua; Yang, Shou-Bin

    2016-01-01

    We present the structural and nonlinear optical behavior of Ag-doped ZnO (AZO) films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The structural of AZO films are systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results show that AZO films can still retain a wurtzite structure, although the c-axis as preferred orientation is decreased by Ag doping. As the amounts of the Ag dopant were increased, the crystallinity as well as the absorptivity and optical band gap were increased. Moreover, the nonlinear optical characterized of the AZO films was studied using Z-scan technique. These samples show self-defocusing nonlinearity and good nonlinear absorption behavior which increases with increasing Ag volume fraction. AZO is a potential nanocomposite material for the development of nonlinear optical devices with a relatively small limiting threshold.

  18. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  19. Different nano-particles volume fraction and Hartmann number effects on flow and heat transfer of water-silver nanofluid under the variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forghani-Tehrani, Pezhman; Karimipour, Arash; Afrand, Masoud; Mousavi, Sayedali

    2017-01-01

    Nanofluid flow and heat transfer composed of water-silver nanoparticles is investigated numerically inside a microchannel. Finite volume approach (FVM) is applied and the effects of gravity are ignored. The whole length of Microchannel is considered in three sections as l1=l3=0.151 and l2=0.71. The linear variable heat flux affects the microchannel wall in the length of l2 while a magnetic field with strength of B0 is considered over the whole domain of it. The influences of different values of Hartmann number (Ha=0, 10, 20), volume fraction of the nanoparticles (ɸ=0, 0.02, 0.04) and Reynolds number (Re=10, 50, 200) on the hydrodynamic and thermal properties of flow are reported. The investigation of slip velocity variations under the effects of a magnetic field are presented for the first time (to the best knowledge of author) while the non-dimensional slip coefficient are selected as B=0.01, 0.05, 0.1 at different states.

  20. Impact of epoetin alfa on left ventricular structure, function, and pressure volume relations as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance: the heart failure preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) anemia trial.

    PubMed

    Green, Philip; Babu, Benson A; Teruya, Sergio; Helmke, Stephen; Prince, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S

    2013-01-01

    Anemia, a common comorbidity in older adults with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is associated with worse outcomes. The authors quantified the effect of anemia treatment on left ventricular (LV) structure and function as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. A prospective, randomized single-blind clinical trial (NCT NCT00286182) comparing the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa vs placebo for 24 weeks in which a subgroup (n=22) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and after 3 and 6 months to evaluate changes in cardiac structure and function. Pressure volume (PV) indices were derived from MRI measures of ventricular volume coupled with sphygmomanometer-measured pressure and Doppler estimates of filling pressure. The end-systolic and end-diastolic PV relations and the area between them as a function of end-diastolic pressure, the isovolumic PV area (PVAiso), were calculated. Patients (75±10 years, 64% women) with HFPEF (EF=63%±15%) with an average hemoglobin of 10.3±1.1 gm/dL were treated with epoetin alfa using a dose-adjusted algorithm that increased hemoglobin compared with placebo (P<.0001). As compared with baseline, there were no significant changes in end-diastolic (-7±8 mL vs -3±8 mL, P=.81) or end-systolic (-0.4±2 mL vs -0.7±5 mL, P=.96) volumes at 6-month follow-up between epoetin alfa compared with placebo. LV function as measured based on EF (-1.5%±1.6% vs -2.6%±3.3%, P=.91) and pressure volume indices (PVAiso-EDP at 30 mm Hg, -5071±4308 vs -1662±4140, P=.58) did not differ between epoetin alfa and placebo. Administration of epoetin alfa to older adult patients with HFPEF resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin, without evident change in LV structure, function, or pressure volume relationships as measured quantitatively using CMR imaging.

  1. Accelerating MRI fat quantification using a signal model-based dictionary to assess gastric fat volume and distribution of fat fraction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dian; Steingoetter, Andreas; Parker, Helen L; Curcic, Jelena; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    To quantify intragastric fat volume and distribution with accelerated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using signal model-based dictionaries (DICT) in comparison to conventional parallel imaging (CG-SENSE). This study was approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects were imaged after intake of a lipid emulsion and data at three different time points during the gastric emptying process was acquired in order to cover a range of fat fractions. Fully sampled and prospectively undersampled image data at a reduction factor of 4 were acquired using a multi gradient echo sequence at 1.5T. Retrospectively and prospectively undersampled data were reconstructed with DICT and CG-SENSE. Image quality of the retrospectively undersampled data was assessed relative to the fully sampled reference using the root mean square error (RMSE). In order to assess the agreement of fat volumes and intragastric fat distribution, Bland-Altman analysis and linear regression were performed on the data. The RMSE in intragastric content (ΔRMSE=0.10±0.01, P<0.001) decreased significantly with DICT relative to CG-SENSE. CG-SENSE overestimated fat volumes (bias 2.1±1.3mL; confidence limits 5.4 and -1.1mL) in comparison to the prospective DICT reconstruction (bias -0.1±0.7mL; confidence limits 1.8 and -2.0mL). There was a good agreement in fat distribution between the images reconstructed by retrospective DICT and the reference images (regression slope: 1.01, R(2)=0.961). Accelerating gastric MRI by integrating a dictionary-based signal model allows for improved image quality and increases accuracy of fat quantification during breathholds.

  2. A bench evaluation of fraction of oxygen in air delivery and tidal volume accuracy in home care ventilators available for hospital use

    PubMed Central

    Baboi, Loredana; Subtil, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Background Turbine-powered ventilators are not only designed for long-term ventilation at home but also for hospital use. It is important to verify their capabilities in delivering fraction of oxygen in air (FIO2) and tidal volume (VT). Methods We assessed the FIO2 accuracy and the VT delivery in four home care ventilators (HCV) on the bench. The four HCV were Astral 150, Elisée 150, Monnal T50 and Trilogy 200 HCV, which were connected to a lung model (ASL 5000). For assessing FIO2 accuracy, lung model was set to mimic an obstructive lung and HCV were set in volume controlled mode (VC). They supplied with air, 3 or 15 L/min oxygen and FIO2 was measured by using a ventilator tester (Citrex H4TM). For the VT accuracy, the lung model was set in a way to mimic three adult configurations (normal, obstructive, or restrictive respiratory disorder) and one pediatric configuration. Each HCV was set in VC. Two VT (300 and 500 mL) in adult lung configuration and one 50 mL VT in pediatric lung configuration, at two positive end expiratory pressures 5 and 10 cmH2O, were tested. VT accuracy was measured as volume error (the relative difference between set and measured VT). Statistical analysis was performed by suing one-factor ANOVA with a Bonferroni correction for multiple tests. Results For Astral 150, Elisée 150, Monnal T50 and Trilogy 200, FIO2 averaged 99.2%, 93.7%, 86.3%, and 62.1%, respectively, at 15 L/min oxygen supplementation rate (P<0.001). Volume error was 0.5%±0%, −38%±0%, −9%±0%, −29%±0% and −36%±0% for pediatric lung condition (P<0.001). In adult lung configurations, Monnal T50 systematically over delivered VT and Trilogy 150 was sensitive to lung configuration when VT was set to 300 mL at either positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Conclusions HCV are different in terms of FIO2 efficiency and VT delivery. PMID:28149559

  3. The effects of bone and pore volume fraction on the mechanical properties of PMMA/bone biopsies extracted from augmented vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Kinzl, M; Boger, A; Zysset, P K; Pahr, D H

    2011-10-13

    Vertebroplasty forms a porous PMMA/bone composite which was shown to be weaker and less stiff than pure PMMA. It is not known what determines the mechanical properties of such composites in detail. This study investigated the effects of bone volume fraction (BV/TV), cement porosity (PV/(TV-BV), PV…pore volume) and cement stiffness. Nine human vertebral bodies were augmented with either standard or low-modulus PMMA cement and scanned with a HR-pQCT system before and after augmentation. Fourteen cylindrical PMMA/bone biopsies were extracted from the augmented region, scanned with a micro-CT system and tested in compression until failure. Micro-finite element (FE) models of the complete biopsies, of the trabecular bone alone as well as of the porous cement alone were generated from CT images to gain more insight into the role of bone and pores. PV/(TV-BV) and experimental moduli of standard/low-modulus cement (R(2)=0.91/0.98) as well as PV/(TV-BV) and yield stresses (R(2)=0.92/0.83) were highly correlated. No correlation between BV/TV (ranging from 0.057 to 0.138) and elastic moduli was observed (R(2)< 0.05). Interestingly, the micro-FE models of the porous cement alone reproduced the experimental elastic moduli of the standard/low-modulus cement biopsies (R(2)=0.75/0.76) more accurately than the models with bone (R(2)=0.58/0.31). In conclusion, the mechanical properties of the biopsies were mainly determined by the cement porosity and the cement material properties. The study showed that bone tissue inside the biopsies was mechanically "switched off" such that load was carried essentially by the porous PMMA.

  4. Significantly enhanced creep resistance of low volume fraction in-situ TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites by architectured network reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Huang, L. J.; Geng, L.; Scarpa, F.; Jiao, Y.; Peng, H. X.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new class of TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites with a network reinforcement architecture that exhibits a significant creep resistance compared to monolithic Ti6Al4V alloys. Creep tests performed at temperatures between 773 K and 923 K and stress range of 100 MPa-300 MPa indicate both a significant improvement of the composites creep resistance due to the network architecture made by the TiB whiskers (TiBw), and a decrease of the steady-state creep rates by augmenting the local volume fractions of TiBw in the network region. The deformation behavior is driven by a diffusion-controlled dislocation climb process. Moreover, the activation energies of these composites are significantly higher than that of Ti6Al4V alloys, indicating a higher creep resistance. The increase of the activation energy can be attributed to the TiBw architecture that severely impedes the movements of dislocation and grain boundary sliding and provides a tailoring of the stress transfer. These micromechanical mechanisms lead to a remarkable improvement of the creep resistance of these networked TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites featuring the special networked architecture.

  5. Simultaneous changes in gray matter volume and white matter fractional anisotropy in Alzheimer's disease revealed by multimodal CCA and joint ICA.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, X; Chen, K; Yao, L; Hu, B; Wu, X; Ye, Q; Guo, X

    2015-08-20

    The prominent morphometric alterations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) occur both in gray matter and in white matter. Multimodal fusion can examine joint information by combining multiple neuroimaging datasets to identify the covariant morphometric alterations in AD in greater detail. In the current study, we conducted a multimodal canonical correlation analysis and joint independent component analysis to identify the covariance patterns of the gray and white matter by fusing structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data of 39 AD patients (23 males and 16 females, mean age: 74.91±8.13years) and 41 normal controls (NCs) (20 males and 21 females, mean age: 73.97±6.34years) derived from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. The results revealed 25 joint independent components (ICs), of which three joint ICs exhibited strong links between the gray matter volume and the white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and significant differences between the AD and NC group. The joint IC maps revealed that the simultaneous changes in the gray matter and FA values primarily involved the following areas: (1) the temporal lobe/hippocampus-cingulum, (2) the frontal/cingulate gyrus-corpus callosum, and (3) the temporal/occipital/parietal lobe-corpus callosum/corona radiata. Our findings suggest that gray matter atrophy is associated with reduced white matter fiber integrity in AD and possibly expand the understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms in AD.

  6. Performance of a hydrogen burner to simulate air entering scramjet combustors. [simulation of total temperature, total pressure, and volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russin, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the performance of a hydrogen burner used to produce a test gas that simulates air entering a scramjet combustor at various flight conditions. The test gas simulates air in that it duplicates the total temperature, total pressure, and the volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions. The main objective of the tests was to determine the performance of the burner as a function of the effective exhaust port area. The conclusions were: (1) pressure oscillations of the chugging type were reduced in amplitude to plus or minus 2 percent of the mean pressure level by proper sizing of hydrogen, oxygen, and air injector flow areas; (2) combustion efficiency remained essentially constant as the exhaust port area was increased by a factor of 3.4; (3) the mean total temperature determined from integrating the exit radial gas property profiles was within plus or minus 5 percent of the theoretical bulk total temperature; (4) the measured exit total temperature profile had a local peak temperature more than 30 percent greater than the theoretical bulk total temperature; and (5) measured heat transfer to the burner liner was 75 percent of that predicted by theory based on a flat radial temperature profile.

  7. Significantly enhanced creep resistance of low volume fraction in-situ TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites by architectured network reinforcements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S.; Huang, L. J.; Geng, L.; Scarpa, F.; Jiao, Y.; Peng, H. X.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new class of TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites with a network reinforcement architecture that exhibits a significant creep resistance compared to monolithic Ti6Al4V alloys. Creep tests performed at temperatures between 773 K and 923 K and stress range of 100 MPa-300 MPa indicate both a significant improvement of the composites creep resistance due to the network architecture made by the TiB whiskers (TiBw), and a decrease of the steady-state creep rates by augmenting the local volume fractions of TiBw in the network region. The deformation behavior is driven by a diffusion-controlled dislocation climb process. Moreover, the activation energies of these composites are significantly higher than that of Ti6Al4V alloys, indicating a higher creep resistance. The increase of the activation energy can be attributed to the TiBw architecture that severely impedes the movements of dislocation and grain boundary sliding and provides a tailoring of the stress transfer. These micromechanical mechanisms lead to a remarkable improvement of the creep resistance of these networked TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites featuring the special networked architecture. PMID:28094350

  8. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the permanent dent depth and energy absorption of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  9. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the maximum deflection and impact load of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  10. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hindel, Stefan; Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, [Formula: see text], where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians

  11. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, π(d2)2, where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians (interquartile range

  12. Correction to "What is a fractional derivative?" by Ortigueira and Machado [Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 293, 15 July 2015, Pages 4-13. Special issue on Fractional PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katugampola, Udita N.

    2016-09-01

    There is a debate among contemporary mathematicians about what it really means by a fractional derivative. The question arose as a consequence of introducing a 'new' definition of a fractional derivative in [1]. In a reply, Ortigueira and Machado [2] came up with several very important criteria to determine whether a given derivative is a fractional derivative. According to their criterion, the new fractional derivative, called conformable fractional derivative, introduced by Khalil et al. [1] turns out not to be a fractional derivative, but rather a controlled or conformable derivative. In proving the claim the authors in [2] use an example [2, p. 6]. It turns out that the explanation given there needs some corrections and it is the sole purpose of this note.

  13. Nanostructural and functional properties of Ag-TiO2 coatings prepared by co-sputtering deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Chakravadhanula, V S K; Hrkac, T; Zaporojtchenko, V; Podschun, R; Kotnur, V G; Kulkarni, A; Strunskus, T; Kienle, L; Faupel, F

    2011-06-01

    Ag-TiO2 nanocomposite coatings with varying Ag content were prepared by co-sputtering from two separate sputter sources. This technique allows to prepare coatings not only with a large variation of Ag content and different gradient but also allows much better control of nanocomposite thickness and nanostructure compared with mostly used techniques based on wet chemical approaches. Various thicknesses of nanocomposite layers with different deposition parameters were studied to obtain a better understanding on the growth of Ag nanostructures in the TiO2 films. The metal-volume-fraction was varied between 15% and 47%. Structural and microstructural investigations of the nanocomposite films were carried out by transmission electron microscopy. Special attention was paid to surface segregation of Ag and its suppression. The observed segregation on TiO2 contrasts sharply with the well known embedding tendency of Ag clusters on polymers. Functionality of the Ag-TiO2 nanocomposites was demonstrated via UV-Vis spectroscopy and antibacterial tests. It was shown that a thin layer of TiO2 can be used as an effective barrier to tailor the release behaviour of Ag ions.

  14. Relation between giant volume magnetostriction, colossal magnetoresistance, and crystal lattice softening in manganites La{sub 1-x}A{sub y}MnO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Ag, Ba, Sr)

    SciTech Connect

    Koroleva, L. I. Demin, R. V.; Kozlov, A. V.; Zashchirinskii, D. M.; Mukovskii, Ya. M.

    2007-02-15

    Giant volume magnetostriction (GVM) is detected near the Curie temperature T{sub C} in La{sub 1-x}A{sub x}MnO{sub 3} single crystals (A = Ca, Sr, Ba, 0.1 {<=} x {<=} 0.3) and above T{sub C} in La{sub 1-x}Ag{sub y}MnO{sub 3} (x = y = 0.15, 0.2 and x = 0.2, y = 0.1) ceramics (in the latter system, giant volume magnetostriction attains a value of 6.5 x 10{sup -4} in a magnetic field of 8.2 kOe). The behavior of GVM and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) is found to be the same: both quantities have negative values, the temperature dependences of their absolute values pass through a peak, and the isotherms do not exhibit saturation up to the maximal measuring fields of 130 kOe. In compounds with compositions La{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.85}Ag{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3}, GVM and CMR were observed at room temperatures (in a magnetic field of 8.2 kOe, GVM attains values of 2.54 x 10{sup -4} and 2 x 10{sup -4} and CMR is equal to 11.6 and 11.2%, respectively). Both phenomena are attributed to the presence of a magnetic (ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic) two-phase state in these systems, which is associated with a strong s-d exchange. It is found that the maximum value of the GVM in single crystals of La{sub 1-x}A{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (A = Ba, Sr, Ca, Ag) depends on the radius R{sub A} of cation A (it is the higher, the larger the difference |R{sub A}-R{sub LA{sup 3}{sup +}}|). The only exception is the compound with A = Ag, in which the pattern is complicated by additional defectiveness. Local disorder in the La{sub 1-x}A{sub x} sublattice, which is associated with the presence of cations with different radii, leads to a displacement of oxygen ions and to crystal lattice softening. The exchange s-d interactions in La{sub 1-x}A{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Ag) are found to be comparable with electrostatic interactions ensuring the existence of the crystal; this facilitates manifestation of the GVM.

  15. Assessment of changes in vascularity and blood volume in canine sarcomas and squamous cell carcinomas during fractionated radiation therapy using quantified contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bley, Carla Rohrer; Laluhová, Dagmar; Roos, Malgorzata; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    Radiation therapy does not only target tumour cells but also affects tumour vascularity. In the present study, changes in tumour vascularity and blood volume were investigated in five grade 1 oral fibrosarcomas, eight other sarcomas (non-oral soft tissue and bone sarcomas) and 12 squamous cell carcinomas in dogs during fractionated radiation therapy (total dose, 45-56 Gy). Contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound was performed before fraction 1, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 15 or 16 (sarcomas) or 17 (squamous cell carcinomas). Prior to treatment, median vascularity and blood volume were significantly higher in squamous cell carcinomas (P=0.0005 and 0.001), whereas measurements did not differ between oral fibrosarcomas and other sarcomas (P=0.88 and 0.999). During the course of radiation therapy, only small, non-significant changes in vascularity and blood volume were observed in all three tumour histology groups (P=0.08 and P=0.213), whereas median tumour volume significantly decreased until the end of treatment (P=0.04 for fibrosarcomas and other sarcomas, P=0.008 for squamous cell carcinomas). It appeared that there was a proportional decrease in tumour volume, vascularity and blood volume. Doppler measurements did not predict progression free interval or survival in any of the three tumour groups (P=0.06-0.86). However, the number of tumours investigated was small and therefore, the results can only be considered preliminary.

  16. Ag-Pd-Si (009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Pd-Si (009)' with the content:

  17. Temperature-dependent volume fraction of polar nanoregions in lead-free (1 -x ) (B i0.5N a0.5) Ti O3-x BaTi O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vögler, M.; Novak, N.; Schader, F. H.; Rödel, J.

    2017-01-01

    The formation and temperature evolution of polar nanoregions (PNRs) in relaxor ferroelectrics is an intriguing issue that is still under debate. Therefore, we present an approach to estimate the volume fraction of PNRs by the example of the relaxor ferroelectric, (1 -x ) (B i0.5N a0.5) Ti O3-x BaTi O3 (BNT-x BT ). A detailed analysis of the Young's modulus, which is highly sensitive to small structural distortions, at temperatures 25 ∘Cvolume fraction of the PNRs and the increasing Young's modulus above the formerly suggested Burns temperature indicate that the formation of the PNRs does not occur at a defined temperature but rather in a broad temperature range starting around ˜720 ∘C .

  18. Influence of T-semi attached rib on turbulent flow and heat transfer parameters of a silver-water nanofluid with different volume fractions in a three-dimensional trapezoidal microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Habibollah; Karimipour, Arash; Safaei, Mohammad Reza; Semiromi, Davood Toghraie; Akbari, Omid Ali

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed at exploring influence of T-semi attached rib on the turbulent flow and heat transfer parameters of a silver-water nanofluid with different volume fractions in a three-dimensional trapezoidal microchannel. For this purpose, convection heat transfer of the silver-water nanofluid in a ribbed microchannel was numerically studied under a constant heat flux on upper and lower walls as well as isolated side walls. Calculations were done for a range of Reynolds numbers between 10,000 and 16,000, and in four different sorts of serrations with proportion of rib width to hole of serration width (R/W). The results of this research are presented as the coefficient of friction, Nusselt number, heat transfer coefficient and thermal efficiency, four different R/W microchannels. The results of numerical modeling showed that the fluid's convection heat transfer coefficient is increased as the Reynolds number and volume fraction of solid nanoparticle are increased. For R/W=0.5, it was also maximum for all the volume fractions of nanoparticle and different Reynolds numbers in comparison to other similar R/W situations. That's while friction coefficient, pressure drop and pumping power is maximum for serration with R/W=0 compared to other serration ratios which lead to decreased fluid-heat transfer performance.

  19. Fetal cardiac ventricular volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction determined with four-dimensional ultrasound using Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™)

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Neil; Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S.; Myers, Stephen A.; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Vaisbuch, Edi; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Goncalves, Luis F.; Lee, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify fetal cardiovascular parameters with Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™) utilizing the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”. Study Design A cross-sectional study was designed consisting of patients with normal pregnancies between 19 and 40 weeks of gestation. After STIC datasets were acquired, analysis was performed offline (4DView) and the following cardiovascular parameters were evaluated: ventricular volume in end systole and end diastole, stroke volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction. To account for fetal size, cardiac output was also expressed as a function of head circumference, abdominal circumference, or femoral diaphysis length. Regression models were fitted for each cardiovascular parameter to assess the effect of gestational age and paired comparisons were made between the left and right ventricles. Results 1) Two hundred and seventeen patients were retrospectively identified, of whom 184 had adequate STIC datasets (85% acceptance); 2) ventricular volume, stroke volume, cardiac output, and adjusted cardiac output increased with gestational age; whereas, the ejection fraction decreased as gestation advanced; 3) the right ventricle was larger than the left in both systole (Right: 0.50 ml, IQR: 0.2 – 0.9; vs. Left: 0.27 ml, IQR: 0.1 – 0.5; p<0.001) and diastole (Right: 1.20 ml, IQR: 0.7 – 2.2; vs. Left: 1.03 ml, IQR: 0.5 – 1.7; p<0.001); 4) there were no differences between the left and right ventricle with respect to stroke volume, cardiac output, or adjusted cardiac output; and 5) the left ventricular ejection fraction was greater than the right (Left: 72.2%, IQR: 64 – 78; vs. Right: 62.4%, IQR: 56 – 69; p<0.001). Conclusion Fetal echocardiography, utilizing STIC and VOCAL™ with the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”, allows assessment of fetal cardiovascular parameters. Normal fetal cardiovascular physiology is characterized by ventricular

  20. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP.

  1. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Robert Y.; McDonald, Nancy Laamanen, Curtis; LeClair, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup −5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the

  2. AGS 20th anniversary celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Baggett, N.V.

    1980-05-22

    On May 22, 1980, a symposium was held at Brookhaven to celebrate the 20th birthday of the AGS, to recall its beginnings, and to review major discoveries that have been made with its beams. The talks at the symposium are recorded in this volume.

  3. Prediction of volume of distribution values in human using immobilized artificial membrane partitioning coefficients, the fraction of compound ionized and plasma protein binding data.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xiaofan; Sun, Jin; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Jianfang; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Wenping; Chen, Lijiang; He, Zhonggui

    2009-11-01

    We developed an improved Lombardeo's method (J. Med. Chem., 2004) for prediction of VD(ss) in human. With ElogD substituted by logk(IAM), together with f(i (7.4)) (the fraction of compound ionized at pH 7.4) and logf(u) (logarithmic fraction of compound unbound in plasma), the predictive equation of f(ut) (the fraction of the compound unbound in tissues) for the 121 compounds was built, predictive VD(ss) was further obtained from the Øie-Tozer equation. Our model could be applicable to structurally diverse compounds, including acids, bases, neutrals, and ampholytes. Interior and exterior validation results indicated the model had a robust predictive ability. Compared to the Lombardeo's and Hollósy's (J. Med. Chem., 2006) methods, our model can be generally applicable with better predictive accuracy.

  4. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  5. Shaping of the axial power density distribution in the core to minimize the vapor volume fraction at the outlet of the VVER-1200 fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savander, V. I.; Shumskiy, B. E.; Pinegin, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of decreasing the vapor fraction at the VVER-1200 fuel assembly outlet by shaping the axial power density field is considered. The power density field was shaped by axial redistribution of the concentration of the burnable gadolinium poison in the Gd-containing fuel rods. The mathematical modeling of the VVER-1200 core was performed using the NOSTRA computer code.

  6. 40 CFR 63.2854 - How do I determine the weighted average volume fraction of HAP in the actual solvent loss?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Solvent Extraction for Vegetable Oil Production Compliance Requirements § 63.2854... fraction of HAP in extraction solvent received for use in your vegetable oil production process. By the end... recovered from off-site oil. To determine the HAP content of the material in each delivery of solvent,...

  7. 40 CFR 63.2854 - How do I determine the weighted average volume fraction of HAP in the actual solvent loss?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Solvent Extraction for Vegetable Oil Production Compliance Requirements § 63.2854... fraction of HAP in extraction solvent received for use in your vegetable oil production process. By the end... recovered from off-site oil. To determine the HAP content of the material in each delivery of solvent,...

  8. Derivation of extracellular fluid volume fraction and equivalent dielectric constant of the cell membrane from dielectric properties of the human body. Part 2: A preliminary study for tracking the progression of surgical tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Tatara, T; Tsuzaki, K

    2000-07-01

    A study is conducted to determine whether the extracellular fluid (ECF) volume fraction and equivalent dielectric constant of the cell membrane epsilon m, derived from the dielectric properties of the human body can track the progression of surgical tissue injury. Frequency-dependent dielectric constants and electrical conductivities of body segments are obtained at surgical (trunk) and non-surgical sites (arm and leg) from five patients who have undergone oesophageal resections, before and at the end of surgery and on the day after the operation. The ECF volume fraction and the equivalent epsilon m of body segments are estimated by fitting the dielectric data for body segments to the cell suspension model incorporating fat tissue, and their time-course changes are compared between body segments. By the day after the operation, the estimated ECF volume fraction has increased in all body segments compared with that before surgery, by 0.13 in the arm, 0.16 in the trunk and 0.14 in the leg (p < 0.05), indicating postoperative fluid accumulation in the extracellular space. In contrast, the estimated equivalent epsilon m shows a different time course between body segments on the day after the operation, characterised by a higher change ratio of epsilon m of the trunk (1.34 +/- 0.66, p < 0.05), from that of the arm (0.66 +/- 0.34) and leg (0.61 +/- 0.11). The results suggest that the equivalent epsilon m of a body segment at a surgical site can track pathophysiological cell changes following surgical tissue injury.

  9. Changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry before the 25th fraction during the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Ding Weijun; Shan Guoping; Wang Wei; Yu Changhui; Wang Biyun; Shao Minghai; Wang Jianhua; Yang Weifang

    2012-07-01

    To quantify changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry, and to illustrate the inferiority of non-replanning during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Fifty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled in this prospective trial. Before the 25th fraction, a new simulation computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for all patients. The dose-volume histograms of the phantom plan were compared with the initial plan. Significant reduction of the transverse diameter of the nasopharyngeal, the neck, and 2 parotid glands volume was observed on second CT compared with the first CT (mean reduction 7.48 {+-} 4.45 mm, 6.80 {+-} 15.14 mm, 5.70 {+-} 6.26 mL, and 5.04 {+-} 5.85 mL, respectively; p < 0.01). The maximum dose and V-40 of the spinal cord, mean dose, and V30 of the left and right parotid, and V-50 of the brain stem were increased significantly in the phantom plan compared with the initial plan (mean increase 4.75 {+-} 5.55 Gy, 7.18 {+-} 10.07%, 4.51 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 6.59 {+-} 17.82%, 5.33 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 11.68 {+-} 17.11% and 1.48 {+-} 3.67%, respectively; p < 0.01). On the basis of dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, the dose of the normal critical structures for 52.83% (28/53) of the phantom plans were out of limit compared with 1.89% (1/53) of the initial plans (p < 0.0001). Because of the significant change in anatomy and dose before the 25th fraction during IMRT, replanning should be necessary during IMRT with NPC.

  10. Thermal stability and crystallization kinetics of Cu-Zr-Al-Ag BMGs investigated with isothermal electrical resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Fang; Cui, Xiao; Zhang, Qi-Dong; Zu, Fang-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    The thermal stability and crystallization kinetics of the Cu x Zr84- x Al8Ag8 ( x = 42, 40, 38, and 36) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were studied by measurement of isothermal electrical-resistance. As the composition becomes richer in Zr, the longer incubation time at the same relative annealing temperature, and the larger local activation energy needed to achieve the same crystallized volume-fraction, indicate improved thermal stability, which resists crystallization. The improved thermal stability is attributed to a denser atomic random-stacking structure and larger negative heat-of-mixing. During isothermal annealing processes, the four BMGs exhibited the same nucleation mechanism, which is a decreasing rate of nucleation over time. However, the crystal growth mechanisms of the four BMGs are different. The crystallization of the Cu36Zr48Al8Ag8 and Cu38Zr46Al8Ag8 BMGs is interface-controlled growth, contrasting with diffusion-controlled growth for the Cu40Zr44Al8Ag8 and Cu42Zr42Al8Ag8 alloys. The different growth modes may be caused by fluctuations in composition due to changes in the quantity and distribution of Cu-rich and Ag-rich regions.

  11. Investigation of difficult component effects on finite element model vibration prediction for the Bell AG-1G helicopter. Volume 2: Correlation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS) program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Previous correlations of the AG-1G showed good agreement between NASTRAN and tests through 15 to 20 Hz, but poor agreement in the higher frequency range of 20 to 30 Hz. Thus, this effort emphasized the higher frequency airframe vibration response correlations and identified areas that need further R and T work. To conduct the investigations, selected difficult components (main rotor pylon, secondary structure, nonstructural doors/panels, landing gear, engine, furl, etc.) were systematically removed to quantify their effects on overall vibratory response of the airframe. The entire effort was planned and documented, and the results reviewed by NASA and industry experts in order to ensure scientific control of the testing, analysis, and correlation exercise. In particular, secondary structure and damping had significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. Also, the nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomer mounts were significant on the low frequency pylon modes below main rotor 1p (5.4 Hz). The results of the NASTRAN FEM correlations are given.

  12. Results of volume-staged fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery for large complex arteriovenous malformations: obliteration rates and clinical outcomes of an evolving treatment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Franzin, Alberto; Panni, Pietro; Spatola, Giorgio; Vecchio, Antonella Del; Gallotti, Alberto L; Gigliotti, Carmen R; Cavalli, Andrea; Donofrio, Carmine A; Mortini, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE There are few reported series regarding volume-staged Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for the treatment of large, complex, cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The object of this study was to report the results of using volume-staged Gamma Knife radiosurgery for patients affected by large and complex AVMs. METHODS Data from 20 patients with large AVMs were prospectively included in the authors' AVM database between 2004 and 2012. A staging strategy was used when treating lesion volumes larger than 10 cm(3). Hemorrhage and seizures were the presenting clinical feature for 6 (30%) and 8 (40%) patients, respectively. The median AVM volume was 15.9 cm(3) (range 10.1-34.3 cm(3)). The mean interval between stages (± standard deviation) was 15 months (± 9 months). The median margin dose for each stage was 20 Gy (range 18-25 Gy). RESULTS Obliteration was confirmed in 8 (42%) patients after a mean follow-up of 45 months (range 19-87 months). A significant reduction (> 75%) of the original nidal volume was achieved in 4 (20%) patients. Engel Class I-II seizure status was reported by 75% of patients presenting with seizures (50% Engel Class I and 25% Engel Class II) after radiosurgery. After radiosurgery, 71.5% (5/7) of patients who had presented with a worsening neurological deficit reported a complete resolution or amelioration. None of the patients who presented acutely because of hemorrhage experienced a new bleeding episode during follow-up. One (5%) patient developed radionecrosis that caused sensorimotor hemisyndrome. Two (10%) patients sustained a bleeding episode after GKRS, although only 1 (5%) was symptomatic. High nidal flow rate and a time interval between stages of less than 11.7 months were factors significantly associated with AVM obliteration (p = 0.021 and p = 0.041, respectively). Patient age younger than 44 years was significantly associated with a greater than 75% reduction in AVM volume but not with AVM obliteration (p = 0

  13. A study of the microstructure, thermal properties and wetting kinetics of Sn-3Ag- xZn lead-free solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Yu, Xiao; Sekulic, Dusan P.; Hu, Xiaowu; Yan, Ming; Hu, Ronghua

    2016-06-01

    Microstructure, thermal properties and wetting kinetics of Sn-3Ag- xZn solders ( x = 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1, 2 and 4 wt%) were systematically investigated. The results indicate that a small amount of Zn (Zn wt% ≤ 1 wt%) has a rather moderate effect on the microstructure morphology of the Sn-3Ag- xZn solders. The microstructures are composed of a β-Sn phase and the mixture of Ag3Sn and ζ-AgZn particles. However, the β-Sn phase reduces its volume fraction in the entire microstructure and the intermetallic compounds population increases with the increasing of Zn content. The microstructure is dramatically changed with a further increase in the Zn content. The γ-AgZn phase is formed in a Sn-3Ag-2Zn solder. The ɛ-AgZn phase is formed in a Sn-3Ag-4Zn solder. The melting temperature and the undercooling of the Sn-3Ag- xZn solder alloys decrease with the increase in Zn content, reach to a minimum value when the content of Zn is 1 wt%, and then increase with further increase in Zn content. The Sn-3Ag-1Zn demonstrates the minimum value of 228.13 °C in the melting temperature and 13.87 °C in undercooling. The wetting kinetics of the main spreading stage features the power law of R n ~ t ( n = 1), which is controlled by chemical reactions at the triple line.

  14. Influence of Left Ventricular Stroke Volume on Incident Heart Failure in a Population With Preserved Ejection Fraction (from the Strong Heart Study).

    PubMed

    De Marco, Marina; Gerdts, Eva; Mancusi, Costantino; Roman, Mary J; Lønnebakken, Mai Tone; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B; de Simone, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    At a given level of left ventricular (LV) systolic function, LV pump performance (assessed by stroke index [SVi]) may differ, depending on LV size. We evaluated whether low SVi may be considered a marker of risk for incident congestive heart failure (HF), independent of LV geometry and systolic function, assessed by ejection fraction (EF) or midwall fractional shortening (MFS), in a large population-based sample with normal EF. Clinical and echocardiographic data from the second Strong Heart Study (SHS) examination, including 2,885 American Indians (59 ± 8 years; 63% women) with normal EF (EF ≥51% in men and EF ≥55% in women) and without prevalent HF or significant valve disease, were analyzed. Low SVi was defined as SVi ≤22 ml/m(2.04). Low SVi was more common among men and associated with lower body mass index, systolic blood pressure, LV mass index, left atrial dimension, EF, and MFS and with higher relative wall thickness. During a mean 12-year follow-up, 209 participants developed HF and 246 had acute myocardial infarction. In Cox regression analysis, low SVi was associated with higher risk of incident HF (hazard ratio 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.80), independently of age, gender, body mass index, heart rate, hypertension, prevalent cardiovascular disease, left atrial dimension index, LV mass index, LV concentric geometry, EF or MFS, and abnormal wall motion, also accounting for myocardial infarction as a competing risk event. In conclusion, in the SHS, low SVi was associated with higher incident rate of HF, independently of LV geometry and systolic function and other major confounders.

  15. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  16. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Lung Cancer at a Dose of 50 Gy Total in Five Fractions to the Periphery of the Planning Target Volume Calculated Using a Superposition Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo Ohashi, Toshio; Oku, Yohei; Takeda, Toshiaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with Stages 1A and 1B non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with curative intent between Dec 2001 and May 2007. All patients had histopathologically or cytologically confirmed disease, increased levels of tumor markers, and/or positive findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Staging studies identified their disease as Stage 1A or 1B. Performance status was 2 or less according to World Health Organization guidelines in all cases. The prescribed dose of 50 Gy total in five fractions, calculated by using a superposition algorithm, was defined for the periphery of the planning target volume. Results: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent SBRT during the study period, and 63 were eligible for this analysis. Thirty-eight patients had Stage 1A (T1N0M0) and 25 had Stage 1B (T2N0M0). Forty-nine patients were not appropriate candidates for surgery because of chronic pulmonary disease. Median follow-up of these 49 patients was 31 months (range, 10-72 months). The 3-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates in patients with Stages 1A and 1B were 93% and 96% (p = 0.86), 76% and 77% (p = 0.83), and 90% and 63% (p = 0.09), respectively. No acute toxicity was observed. Grade 2 or higher radiation pneumonitis was experienced by 3 patients, and 1 of them had fatal bacterial pneumonia. Conclusions: The SBRT at 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated by using a superposition algorithm is feasible. High local control rates were achieved for both T2 and T1 tumors.

  18. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jerome, N P; d'Arcy, J A; Feiweier, T; Koh, D-M; Leach, M O; Collins, D J; Orton, M R

    2016-12-21

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm(-2)s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm(-2)s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm(-2)s at TE  =  80, 100 ms; scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms); T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  19. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerome, N. P.; d'Arcy, J. A.; Feiweier, T.; Koh, D.-M.; Leach, M. O.; Collins, D. J.; Orton, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm-2s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm-2s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm-2s at TE  =  80, 100 ms scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms) T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  20. Mystery Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  1. Nanoporous Au structures by dealloying Au/Ag thermal- or laser-dewetted bilayers on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffino, F.; Torrisi, V.; Grillo, R.; Cacciato, G.; Zimbone, M.; Piccitto, G.; Grimaldi, M. G.

    2017-03-01

    Nanoporous Au attracts great technological interest and it is a promising candidate for optical and electrochemical sensors. In addition to nanoporous Au leafs and films, recently, interest was focused on nanoporous Au micro- and nano-structures on surfaces. In this work we report on the study of the characteristics of nanoporous Au structures produced on surfaces. We developed the following procedures to fabricate the nanoporous Au structures: we deposited thin Au/Ag bilayers on SiO2 or FTO (fluorine-doped tin oxide) substrates with thickness xAu and xAg of the Au and Ag layers; we induced the alloying and dewetting processes of the bilayers by furnace annealing processes of the bilayers deposited on SiO2 and by laser irradiations of the bilayers deposited on FTO; the alloying and dewetting processes result in the formation of AuxAgy alloy sub-micron particles being x and y tunable by xAu and xAg. These particles are dealloyed in HNO3 solution to remove the Ag atoms. We obtain, so, nanoporous sub-micron Au particles on the substrates. Analyzing the characteristics of these particles we find that: a) the size and shape of the particles depend on the nature of the dewetting process (solid-state dewetting on SiO2, molten-state dewetting on FTO); b) the porosity fraction of the particles depends on how the alloying process is reached: about 32% of porosity for the particles fabricated by the furnace annealing at 900 °C, about 45% of porosity for the particles fabricated by the laser irradiation at 0.5 J/cm2, in both cases independently on the Ag concentration in the alloy; c) After the dealloying process the mean volume of the Au particles shrinks of about 39%; d) After an annealing at 400 °C the nanoporous Au particles reprise their initial volume while the porosity fraction is reduced. Arguments to justify these behaviors are presented.

  2. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  3. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  4. Automated segmentation of the lamina cribrosa using Frangi's filter: a novel approach for rapid identification of tissue volume fraction and beam orientation in a trabeculated structure in the eye.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian C; Coudrillier, Baptiste; Mensah, Johanne; Abel, Richard L; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-03-06

    The lamina cribrosa (LC) is a tissue in the posterior eye with a complex trabecular microstructure. This tissue is of great research interest, as it is likely the initial site of retinal ganglion cell axonal damage in glaucoma. Unfortunately, the LC is difficult to access experimentally, and thus imaging techniques in tandem with image processing have emerged as powerful tools to study the microstructure and biomechanics of this tissue. Here, we present a staining approach to enhance the contrast of the microstructure in micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging as well as a comparison between tissues imaged with micro-CT and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. We then apply a modified version of Frangi's vesselness filter to automatically segment the connective tissue beams of the LC and determine the orientation of each beam. This approach successfully segmented the beams of a porcine optic nerve head from micro-CT in three dimensions and SHG microscopy in two dimensions. As an application of this filter, we present finite-element modelling of the posterior eye that suggests that connective tissue volume fraction is the major driving factor of LC biomechanics. We conclude that segmentation with Frangi's filter is a powerful tool for future image-driven studies of LC biomechanics.

  5. Measurement and Modeling of Resistivity as a Microscale Tool to Quantify the Volume Fraction of Lenticular (alpha)' Particles in a Partially Transformed (delta)-phase Pu-Ga Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Johnson, D L; Mayhall, D J; Schwartz, A J

    2005-07-13

    We have measured and modeled the change in electrical resistivity due to partial transformation to the martensitic {alpha}{prime}-phase in a {delta}-phase Pu-Ga matrix. The primary objective is to relate the change in resistance, measured with a 4-probe technique during the transformation, to the volume fraction of the {alpha}{prime} phase created in the microstructure. Analysis by finite element methods suggests that considerable differences in the resistivity may be anticipated depending on the orientational and morphological configurations of the {alpha}{prime} particles. Finite element analysis of the computed resistance of an assembly of lenticular shaped particles indicates that series resistor or parallel resistor approximations are inaccurate and can lead to an underestimation of the predicted amount of {alpha}{prime} in the sample by 15% or more. Comparison of the resistivity of a simulated network of partially transformed grains or portions of grains suggests that a correction to the measured resistivity allows quantification of the amount of {alpha}{prime} phase in the microstructure with minimal consideration of how the {alpha}{prime} morphology may evolve. It is found that the average of the series and parallel resistor approximations provide the most accurate relationship between the measured resistivity and the amount of {alpha}{prime} phase. The methods described here are applicable to any evolving two-phase microstructure in which the resistance difference between the two phases is measurable.

  6. The influence of buoyant forces and volume fraction of particles on the particle pushing/entrapment transition during directional solidification of Al/SiC and Al/graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Moitra, Avijit; Kacar, A. Sedat; Dhindaw, Brij K.

    1990-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments in a Bridgman-type furnace were used to study particle behavior at the liquid/solid interface in aluminum metal matrix composites. Graphite or silicon-carbide particles were first dispersed in aluminum-base alloys via a mechanically stirred vortex. Then, 100-mm-diameter and 120-mm-long samples were cast in steel dies and used for directional solidification. The processing variables controlled were the direction and velocity of solidification and the temperature gradient at the interface. The material variables monitored were the interface energy, the liquid/particle density difference, the particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio, and the volume fraction of particles. These properties were changed by selecting combinations of particles (graphite or silicon carbide) and alloys (Al-Cu, Al-Mg, Al-Ni). A model which consideres process thermodynamics, process kinetics (including the role of buoyant forces), and thermophysical properties was developed. Based on solidification direction and velocity, and on materials properties, four types of behavior were predicted. Sessile drop experiments were also used to determine some of the interface energies required in calculation with the proposed model. Experimental results compared favorably with model predictions.

  7. The influence of buoyant forces and volume fraction of particles on the particle pushing/entrapment transition during directional solidification of Al/SiC and Al/graphite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Moitra, Avijit; Kacar, A. Sedat; Dhindaw, Brij K.

    1990-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments in a Bridgman-type furnace were used to study particle behavior at the liquid/solid interface in aluminum metal matrix composites. Graphite or siliconcarbide particles were first dispersed in aluminum-base alloys via a mechanically stirred vortex. Then, 100-mm-diameter and 120-mm-long samples were cast in steel dies and used for directional solidification. The processing variables controlled were the direction and velocity of solidification and the temperature gradient at the interface. The material variables monitored were the interface energy, the liquid/particle density difference, the particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio, and the volume fraction of particles. These properties were changed by selecting combinations of particles (graphite or silicon carbide) and alloys (Al-Cu, Al-Mg, Al-Ni). A model which considers process thermodynamics, process kinetics (including the role of buoyant forces), and thermophysical properties was developed. Based on solidification direction and velocity, and on materials properties, four types of behavior were predicted. Sessile drop experiments were also used to determine some of the interface energies required in calculation with the proposed model. Experimental results compared favorably with model predictions.

  8. Automated segmentation of the lamina cribrosa using Frangi's filter: a novel approach for rapid identification of tissue volume fraction and beam orientation in a trabeculated structure in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian C.; Coudrillier, Baptiste; Mensah, Johanne; Abel, Richard L.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    The lamina cribrosa (LC) is a tissue in the posterior eye with a complex trabecular microstructure. This tissue is of great research interest, as it is likely the initial site of retinal ganglion cell axonal damage in glaucoma. Unfortunately, the LC is difficult to access experimentally, and thus imaging techniques in tandem with image processing have emerged as powerful tools to study the microstructure and biomechanics of this tissue. Here, we present a staining approach to enhance the contrast of the microstructure in micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging as well as a comparison between tissues imaged with micro-CT and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. We then apply a modified version of Frangi's vesselness filter to automatically segment the connective tissue beams of the LC and determine the orientation of each beam. This approach successfully segmented the beams of a porcine optic nerve head from micro-CT in three dimensions and SHG microscopy in two dimensions. As an application of this filter, we present finite-element modelling of the posterior eye that suggests that connective tissue volume fraction is the major driving factor of LC biomechanics. We conclude that segmentation with Frangi's filter is a powerful tool for future image-driven studies of LC biomechanics. PMID:25589572

  9. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  10. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  11. Electromigration Behaviors of Cu Reinforced Sn-3.5Ag Composite Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Han, Jing; Ma, Limin; Zuo, Yong; Guo, Fu

    2016-12-01

    The composite approach, by incorporating small amounts of reinforcement particles in the solder matrix, has proven to be one of the effective ways to improve the reliability of solder joints. The effects of Cu addition on electromigration were investigated in this study by incorporating 2% volume fraction Cu particles into Sn-3.5Ag eutectic solder paste by the in situ process. The one-dimensional solder joints, designed to prevent the current crowding effect, were stressed under a constant current density of 104 A/cm2 at room temperature, and the temperature of the sample could reach 105 ± 5°C due to the Joule heating effect. Doping 2 vol.% Cu was found to retard the electromigration phenomenon effectively. After electric current stressing for 528 h, the growth rate of an interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) layer at the anode decreased 73% in contrast to that of Sn-3.5Ag solder joints, and the IMC layer at the cathode was almost unchanged. The polarization effect of Cu reinforced composite solder joints was also apparently mitigated. In addition, the surface damage of the composite solder joints was relieved by incorporating 2 vol.% Cu particles. Compared to Sn-3.5Ag solder joints, which had protruded Cu6Sn5 and wrinkles of Sn-solder matrix on the surface, the solder joints with Cu addition had a more even surface.

  12. A Convenient Method for Comparison of Efficiency of Fractionating Columns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a method for demonstrating the use of various fractionating columns to resolve mixtures into individual components and to correlate the resolving powers of column packings to their "hold-up" volumes. Fractions were analyzed using refractive indices. (KR)

  13. Rapidly solidified Ag-Cu eutectics: A comparative study using drop-tube and melt fluxing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Mullis, A. M.; Cochrane, R. F.

    2016-03-01

    A comparative study of rapid solidification of Ag-Cu eutectic alloy processed via melt fluxing and drop-tube techniques is presented. A computational model is used to estimate the cooling rate and undercooling of the free fall droplets as this cannot be determined directly. SEM micrographs show that both materials consist of lamellar and anomalous eutectic structures. However, below the critical undercooling the morphologies of each are different in respect of the distribution and volume of anomalous eutectic. The anomalous eutectic in flux- undercooled samples preferentially forms at cell boundaries around the lamellar eutectic in the cell body. In drop-tube processed samples it tends to distribute randomly inside the droplets and at much smaller volume fractions. That the formation of the anomalous eutectic can, at least in part, be suppressed in the drop-tube is strongly suggestive that the formation of anomalous eutectic occurs via remelting process, which is suppressed by rapid cooling during solidification.

  14. AgRISTARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    An introduction to the overall AgRISTARS program, a general statement on progress, and separate summaries of the activities of each project, with emphasis on the technical highlights are presented. Organizational and management information on AgRISTARS is included in the appendices, as is a complete bibliography of publication and reports.

  15. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition.

  16. Ramification of variable thickness on MHD TiO2 and Ag nanofluid flow over a slendering stretching sheet using NDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Nilankush; Das, Kalidas; Kumar Kundu, Prabir

    2016-09-01

    The present investigation reveals the effect of variable thickness on the steady two-dimensional boundary layer flows of a TiO2-water and Ag-water nanofluid through a slendering stretching sheet. The whole analysis has been performed in the presence of variable magnetic field and variable surface temperature. Similarity transformation has been introduced to renovate the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones and then they were solved using the innovative technique of Natural decomposition method (NDM). The influence of pertinent parameters on velocity and temperature distribution has been illustrated by means of graphs and tables approach. Our analysis conveys that the temperature of the nanofluid reduces due to enhancing of the variable thickness parameter. The rate of heat transfer is significantly reduced for the Ag-water nanofluid with the positive impact of nanoparticle volume fraction.

  17. Microstructure analyses and thermoelectric properties of Ag{sub 1-x}Pb{sub 18}Sb{sub 1+y}Te{sub 20}

    SciTech Connect

    Perlt, S.; Hoeche, Th.; Dadda, J.; Mueller, E.; Bauer Pereira, P.; Hermann, R.; Sarahan, M.; Pippel, E.; Brydson, R.

    2012-09-15

    This study reports microstructural investigations of long-term annealed Ag{sub 1-x}Pb{sub m}Sb{sub 1+y}Te{sub 2+m} (m=18, x=y=0, hereinafter referred to as AgPb{sub 18}SbTe{sub 20}) (Lead-Antimony-Silver-Tellurium, LAST-18) as well as of Ag{sub 1-x}Pb{sub 18}Sb{sub 1+y}Te{sub 20}, i.e. Ag-deficient and Sb-excess LAST-18 (x{ne}0,y{ne}0), respectively. Two different length scales are explored. The micrometer scale was evaluated by SEM to analyze the volume fraction and the number of secondary phases as well as the impact of processing parameters on the homogeneity of bulk samples. For AgPb{sub 18}SbTe{sub 20}, site-specific FIB liftout of TEM lamellae from thermoelectrically characterized samples was accomplished to investigate the structure on the nanometer scale. High-resolution TEM and energy-filtered TEM were performed to reveal shape and size distribution of nanoprecipitates, respectively. A hypothesis concerning the structure-property relationship is set out within the frame of a gradient annealing experiment. This study is completed by results dealing with inhomogeneities on the micrometer scale of Ag{sub 1-x}Pb{sub 18}Sb{sub 1+y}Te{sub 20} and its electronic properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM and TEM microstructure investigation of long-term annealed AgPb{sub 18}SbTe{sub 20}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM and thermoelectric studies on Ag{sub 1-x}Pb{sub 18}Sb{sub 1+y}Te{sub 20}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussion concerning structure-property relationship in long-term annealed AgPb{sub 18}SbTe{sub 20}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between Ag{sub 1-x}Pb{sub 18}Sb{sub 1+y}Te{sub 20} microscale structure and electronic properties.

  18. @AuAg nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    Bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention in recent times due to their enhanced electrochemical and catalytic properties compared to monometallic nanoparticles. The numerical calculations using Mie theory has been carried out for three-layered metal nanoshell dielectric-metal-metal (DMM) system consisting of a particle with a dielectric core (Al@Al2O3), a middle metal Ag (Au) layer and an outer metal Au (Ag) shell. The results have been interpreted using plasmon hybridization theory. We have also prepared Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au and Al@Al2O3@AgAu triple-layered core-shell or alloy nanostructure by two-step laser ablation method and compared with calculated results. The synthesis involves temporal separations of Al, Ag, and Au deposition for step-by-step formation of triple-layered core-shell structure. To form Al@Ag nanoparticles, we ablated silver for 40 min in aluminium nanoparticle colloidal solution. As aluminium oxidizes easily in water to form alumina, the resulting structure is core-shell Al@Al2O3. The Al@Al2O3 particle acts as a seed for the incoming energetic silver particles for multilayered Al@Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles is formed. The silver target was then replaced by gold target and ablation was carried out for different ablation time using different laser energy for generation of Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au core-shell or Al@Al2O3@AgAu alloy. The formation of core-shell and alloy nanostructure was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show shift in plasmon resonance peak of silver to gold in the range 400-520 nm with increasing ablation time suggesting formation of Ag-Au alloy in the presence of alumina particles in the solution.

  19. Fractionating nanosilver: importance for determining toxicity to aquatic test organisms.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan J; Hull, Matthew S; Bednar, Anthony J; Goss, Jennifer D; Gunter, Jonas C; Bouldin, Jennifer L; Vikesland, Peter J; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2010-12-15

    This investigation applied novel techniques for characterizing and fractionating nanosilver particles and aggregates and relating these measurements to toxicological endpoints. The acute toxicity of eight nanosilver suspensions of varying primary particle sizes (10-80 nm) and coatings (citrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone, EDTA, proprietary) was assessed using three aquatic test organisms (Daphnia magna, Pimephales promelas, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). When 48-h lethal median concentrations (LC50) were expressed as total silver, both D. magna and P. promelas were significantly more sensitive to ionic silver (Ag(+)) as AgNO(3) (mean LC50 = 1.2 and 6.3 μg/L, respectively) relative to a wide range in LC50 values determined for the nanosilver suspensions (2 -126 μg/L). However, when LC50 values for nanosilver suspensions were expressed as fractionated nanosilver (Ag(+) and/or <4 nm particles), determined by ultracentrifugation of particles and confirmed field-flow-fractograms, the LC50 values (0.3-5.6 μg/L) were comparable to the values obtained for ionic Ag(+) as AgNO(3). These results suggest that dissolved Ag(+) plays a critical role in acute toxicity and underscores the importance of characterizing dissolved fractions in nanometal suspensions.

  20. Advances of Ag, Cu, and Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles synthesized via chemical reduction route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kim Seah; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2013-04-01

    Silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) nanoparticles have shown great potential in variety applications due to their excellent electrical and thermal properties resulting high demand in the market. Decreasing in size to nanometer scale has shown distinct improvement in these inherent properties due to larger surface-to-volume ratio. Ag and Cu nanoparticles are also shown higher surface reactivity, and therefore being used to improve interfacial and catalytic process. Their melting points have also dramatically decreased compared with bulk and thus can be processed at relatively low temperature. Besides, regularly alloying Ag into Cu to create Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles could be used to improve fast oxidizing property of Cu nanoparticles. There are varieties methods have been reported on the synthesis of Ag, Cu, and Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles. This review aims to cover chemical reduction means for synthesis of those nanoparticles. Advances of this technique utilizing different reagents namely metal salt precursors, reducing agents, and stabilizers, as well as their effects on respective nanoparticles have been systematically reviewed. Other parameters such as pH and temperature that have been considered as an important factor influencing the quality of those nanoparticles have also been reviewed thoroughly.

  1. Marangoni flow of Ag nanoparticles from the fluid-fluid interface.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Donald D; Kang, Barry; Vigorita, John L; Amram, Alec; Spain, Eileen M

    2008-10-02

    Fluid flow is observed when a volume of passivated Ag nanoparticles suspended in chloroform is mixed with a water/ethanol (v/v) mixture containing acidified 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid. Following mechanical agitation, Ag nanoparticles embedded in a film are driven from the organic-aqueous interface. A reddish-brown colored film, verified by transmission electron microscopy to contain uniformly dispersed Ag nanoparticles, is observed to spontaneously climb the interior surface of an ordinary, laboratory glass vial. This phenomenon is recorded by a digital video recorder, and a measurement of the distance traveled by the film front versus time is extracted. Surface (interfacial) tension gradients due to surfactant concentration, temperature, and electrostatic potential across immiscible fluids are known to drive interface motion; this well-known phenomenon is termed Marangoni flow or the Marangoni effect. Experimental results are presented that show the observed mass transfer is dependent on an acid surfactant concentration and on the volume fraction of water in the aqueous phase, consistent with fluid flow induced by interfacial tension gradients. In addition, an effective desorption rate constant for the Marangoni flow is measured in the range of approximately 0.01 to approximately 1 s(-1) from a fit to the relative film front distance traveled versus time data. The fit is based on a time-dependent expression for the surface (interface) excess for desorption kinetics. Such flow suggests that purposeful creation of interfacial tension gradients may aid in the transfer of 2- and 3-dimensional assemblies, made with nanostructures at the liquid-liquid interface, to solid surfaces.

  2. Transport of engineered silver (Ag) nanoparticles through partially fractured sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Christoph; Braun, Anika; Azzam, Rafig

    2014-08-01

    Transport behavior and fate of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in the subsurface is of major interest concerning soil and groundwater protection in order to avoid groundwater contamination of vital resources. Sandstone aquifers are important groundwater resources which are frequently used for public water supply in many regions of the world. The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of AgNP transport behavior in partially fractured sandstones. We executed AgNP transport studies on partially fissured sandstone drilling cores in laboratory experiments. The AgNP concentration and AgNP size in the effluent were analyzed using flow field-flow fractionation mainly. We employed inverse mathematical models on the measured AgNP breakthrough curves to identify and quantify relevant transport processes. Physicochemical filtration, time-dependent blocking due to filling of favorable attachment sites and colloid-facilitated transport were identified as the major processes for AgNP mobility. Physicochemical filtration was found to depend on solute chemistry, mineralogy, pore size distribution and probably on physical and chemical heterogeneity. Compared to AgNP transport in undisturbed sandstone matrix reported in the literature, their mobility in partially fissured sandstone is enhanced probably due to larger void spaces and higher hydraulic conductivity.

  3. AgSTAR Partners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    AgSTAR’s Partner Program builds stronger relationships with state and non-governmental stakeholders to support all phases of anaerobic digester projects: planning, deployment, and long-term success.

  4. T1 mapping of the myocardium: intra-individual assessment of post-contrast T1 time evolution and extracellular volume fraction at 3T for Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial T1 relaxation time (T1 time) and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) are altered in patients with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to perform an intra-individual assessment of normal T1 time and ECV for two different contrast agents. Methods A modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI) sequence was acquired at 3 T in 24 healthy subjects (8 men; 28 ± 6 years) at mid-ventricular short axis pre-contrast and every 5 min between 5-45 min after injection of a bolus of 0.15 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; Magnevist®) (exam 1) and 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA; Multihance®) (exam 2) during two separate scanning sessions. T1 times were measured in myocardium and blood on generated T1 maps. ECVs were calculated as ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood*1−hematocrit. Results Mean pre-contrast T1 relaxation times for myocardium and blood were similar for both the first and second CMR exam (p > 0.5). Overall mean post-contrast myocardial T1 time was 15 ± 2 ms (2.5 ± 0.7%) shorter for Gd-DTPA at 0.15 mmol/kg compared to Gd-BOPTA at 0.1 mmol/kg (p < 0.01) while there was no significant difference for T1 time of blood pool (p > 0.05). Between 5 and 45 minutes after contrast injection, mean ECV values increased linearly with time for both contrast agents from 0.27 ± 0.03 to 0.30 ± 0.03 (p < 0.0001). Mean ECV values were slightly higher (by 0.01, p < 0.05) for Gd-DTPA compared to Gd-BOPTA. Inter-individual variation of ECV was higher (CV 8.7% [exam 1, Gd-DTPA] and 9.4% [exam 2, Gd-BOPTA], respectively) compared to variation of pre-contrast myocardial T1 relaxation time (CV 4.5% [exam 1] and 3.0% [exam 2], respectively). ECV with Gd-DTPA was highly correlated to ECV by Gd-BOPTA (r = 0.803; p < 0.0001). Conclusion In comparison to pre-contrast myocardial T1 relaxation time, variation in ECV values of normal subjects is larger. However, absolute differences in ECV

  5. Mechanistic Prediction of the Effect of Microstructural Coarsening on Creep Response of SnAgCu Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Chauhan, P.; Osterman, M.; Dasgupta, A.; Pecht, M.

    2016-07-01

    Mechanistic microstructural models have been developed to capture the effect of isothermal aging on time dependent viscoplastic response of Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu (SAC305) solders. SnAgCu (SAC) solders undergo continuous microstructural coarsening during both storage and service because of their high homologous temperature. The microstructures of these low melting point alloys continuously evolve during service. This results in evolution of creep properties of the joint over time, thereby influencing the long term reliability of microelectronic packages. It is well documented that isothermal aging degrades the creep resistance of SAC solder. SAC305 alloy is aged for (24-1000) h at (25-100)°C (~0.6-0.8 × T melt). Cross-sectioning and image processing techniques were used to periodically quantify the effect of isothermal aging on phase coarsening and evolution. The parameters monitored during isothermal aging include size, area fraction, and inter-particle spacing of nanoscale Ag3Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and the volume fraction of micronscale Cu6Sn5 IMCs, as well as the area fraction of pure tin dendrites. Effects of microstructural evolution on secondary creep constitutive response of SAC305 solder joints were then modeled using a mechanistic multiscale creep model. The mechanistic phenomena modeled include: (1) dispersion strengthening by coarsened nanoscale Ag3Sn IMCs in the eutectic phase; and (2) load sharing between pro-eutectic Sn dendrites and the surrounding coarsened eutectic Sn-Ag phase and microscale Cu6Sn5 IMCs. The coarse-grained polycrystalline Sn microstructure in SAC305 solder was not captured in the above model because isothermal aging does not cause any significant change in the initial grain size and orientation of SAC305 solder joints. The above mechanistic model can successfully capture the drop in creep resistance due to the influence of isothermal aging on SAC305 single crystals. Contribution of grain boundary sliding to the creep strain of

  6. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  7. Object-oriented programming techniques for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.F.

    1991-12-31

    The applications software developed for the control system of the AGS Booster Project was written in the object-oriented language, C++. A the start of the Booster Project, the programming staff of the AGS Controls Section comprised some dozen programmer/analysts, all highly fluent in C but novices in C++. During the coarse of this project, nearly the entire staff converted to using C++ for a large fraction of their assignments. Over 100 C++ software modules are now available for Booster and general AGS use, of which a large fraction are broadly applicable tools. The transition from C to C++ from a managerial perspective is discussed and an overview is provided of the ways in which object classes have been applied in Booster software development.

  8. Object-oriented programming techniques for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The applications software developed for the control system of the AGS Booster Project was written in the object-oriented language, C++. A the start of the Booster Project, the programming staff of the AGS Controls Section comprised some dozen programmer/analysts, all highly fluent in C but novices in C++. During the coarse of this project, nearly the entire staff converted to using C++ for a large fraction of their assignments. Over 100 C++ software modules are now available for Booster and general AGS use, of which a large fraction are broadly applicable tools. The transition from C to C++ from a managerial perspective is discussed and an overview is provided of the ways in which object classes have been applied in Booster software development.

  9. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  10. Anopheles gambiae Cadherin AgCad1 Binds the Cry4Ba Toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis and a Fragment of AgCad1 Synergizes Toxicity†

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Gang; Zhang, Rui; Abdullah, Mohd Amir F.; Adang, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    A midgut cadherin AgCad1 cDNA was cloned from Anopheles gambiae larvae and analyzed for its possible role as a receptor for the Cry4Ba toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis strain israelensis. The AgCad1 cadherin encodes a putative 1735-residue protein organized into an extracellular region of 11 cadherin repeats (CR) and a membrane-proximal extracellular domain (MPED). AgCad1 mRNA was detected in midgut of larvae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The AgCad1 protein was localized, by immunochemistry of sectioned larvae, predominately to the microvilli in posterior midgut. The localization of Cry4Ba binding was determined by the same technique, and toxin bound microvilli in posterior midgut. The AgCad1 protein was present in brush border membrane fractions prepared from larvae, and Cry4Ba toxin bound the same-sized protein on blots of those fractions. The AgCad1 protein was expressed transiently in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells. 125I-Cry4Ba toxin bound AgCad1 from S2 cells in a competitive manner. Cry4Ba bound to beads extracted 200 kDa AgCad1 and a 29 kDa fragment of AgCad1 from S2 cells. A peptide containing the AgCad1 region proximal to the cell (CR11-MPED) was expressed in Escherichia coli. Although Cry4Ba showed limited binding to CR11-MPED, the peptide synergized the toxicity of Cry4Ba to larvae. AgCad1 in the larval brush border is a binding protein for Cry4Ba toxin. On the basis of binding results and CR11-MPED synergism of Cry4Ba toxicity, AgCad1 is probably a Cry4Ba receptor. PMID:18407662

  11. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  12. Dependence of SERS enhancement on the chemical composition and structure of Ag/Au hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffin, Elise; O'Connor, Ryan T.; Barr, James; Huang, Xiaohua; Wang, Yongmei

    2016-08-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) such as silver (Ag) and gold (Au) have unique plasmonic properties that give rise to surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Generally, Ag NPs have much stronger plasmonic properties and, hence, provide stronger SERS signals than Au NPs. However, Ag NPs lack the chemical stability and biocompatibility of comparable Au NPs and typically exhibit the most intense plasmonic resonance at wavelengths much shorter than the optimal spectral region for many biomedical applications. To overcome these issues, various experimental efforts have been devoted to the synthesis of Ag/Au hybrid NPs for the purpose of SERS detections. However, a complete understanding on how the SERS enhancement depends on the chemical composition and structure of these nanoparticles has not been achieved. In this study, Mie theory and the discrete dipole approximation have been used to calculate the plasmonic spectra and near-field electromagnetic enhancements of Ag/Au hybrid NPs. In particular, we discuss how the electromagnetic enhancement depends on the mole fraction of Au in Ag/Au alloy NPs and how one may use extinction spectra to distinguish between Ag/Au alloyed NPs and Ag-Au core-shell NPs. We also show that for incident laser wavelengths between ˜410 nm and 520 nm, Ag/Au alloyed NPs provide better electromagnetic enhancement than pure Ag, pure Au, or Ag-Au core-shell structured NPs. Finally, we show that silica-core Ag/Au alloy shelled NPs provide even better performance than pure Ag/Au alloy or pure solid Ag and pure solid Au NPs. The theoretical results presented will be beneficial to the experimental efforts in optimizing the design of Ag/Au hybrid NPs for SERS-based detection methods.

  13. Restructuring hollow Au-Ag nanostructures for improved SERS activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiji, S. G.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2016-10-01

    Hollow Au-Ag nanostructures with improved SERS performance were prepared by using a modified galvanic replacement reaction. The plasmon characteristics of the hollow structures are found to be highly sensitive to the volume of cathode, whether or not a co-reductant was used in the synthesis. It is found that the presence of a co-reductant viz., ascorbic acid (AA) during the reaction make the hollow structures capable to maintain its physical structure even after addition of excess cathode and also it transformes sacrificial templates into highly efficient hollow Au-Ag SERS substrates. In the galvanic replacement reaction conducted in presence of AA, where on one side the removal of Ag atoms make cavities to occur and on the other side a coating on the surface with Au and Ag atoms due to co-reduction take place simultaneously. Morphological observations indicated that it is possible to control the competition between these two mechanisms and to make Au-Ag hollow structures in tune with applications by optimizing the volume of cathode or AA. The SERS activity of these substrates were tested with crystal violet molecule as probe, using two different laser lines, 514 and 784.8 nm. In this report, the enhancement observed for hollow structures fabricated under optimum conditions are in the order of 106. SERS measurements have shown that for a specific volume of cathode, substrates fabricated in presence of AA are superior to the other type and also the increase in enhancement factor is ˜10 fold.

  14. Heterostructured Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag plasmonic photocatalyst with enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability under visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wan-Sheng; Du, Hong; Wang, Rui-Xia; Wen, Tao; Xu, An-Wu

    2013-03-01

    A heterostructured Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag plasmonic photocatalyst was prepared by a rational in situ ion exchange reaction between Ag3PO4 micro-cubes and Br- in aqueous solution followed by photoreduction. The photocatalytic activities of obtained photocatalysts were measured by the degradation of methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation (λ >= 400 nm). Compared to AgBr/Ag, Ag3PO4/AgBr heterocrystals and pure Ag3PO4 crystals, the heterostructured Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag plasmonic photocatalysts exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity and stability. This enhanced photocatalytic activity suggests that the synergetic effects of the heterostructured Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag and the strong SPR of Ag NPs on the surface result in the high efficiencies of the photocatalytic activity and the improved stability. With the assistance of Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag heterostructures, only 8 min and 12 min are taken to completely decompose MO and MB molecules under visible-light irradiation, respectively. Furthermore, the photodegradation rate does not show an obvious decrease during ten successive cycles, indicating that our heterostructured Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag plasmonic photocatalysts are extremely stable under visible-light irradiation.A heterostructured Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag plasmonic photocatalyst was prepared by a rational in situ ion exchange reaction between Ag3PO4 micro-cubes and Br- in aqueous solution followed by photoreduction. The photocatalytic activities of obtained photocatalysts were measured by the degradation of methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation (λ >= 400 nm). Compared to AgBr/Ag, Ag3PO4/AgBr heterocrystals and pure Ag3PO4 crystals, the heterostructured Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag plasmonic photocatalysts exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity and stability. This enhanced photocatalytic activity suggests that the synergetic effects of the heterostructured Ag3PO4/AgBr/Ag and the strong SPR of Ag NPs on the surface result in the high

  15. Effect of Ag nanoparticle concentration on the electrical and ferroelectric properties of Ag/P(VDF-TrFE) composite films

    DOE PAGES

    Paik, Haemin; Choi, Yoon -Young; Hong, Seungbum; ...

    2015-09-04

    We investigated the effect of the Ag nanoparticles on the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of Ag/poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) composite films. We found that the remanent polarization and direct piezoelectric coefficient increased up to 12.14 μC/cm2 and 20.23 pC/N when the Ag concentration increased up to 0.005 volume percent (v%) and decreased down to 9.38 μC/cm2 and 13.45 pC/N when it increased up to 0.01 v%. Further increase in Ag concentration resulted in precipitation of Ag phase and significant leakage current that hindered any meaningful measurement of the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. 46% increase of the remanent polarization value and 27% increasemore » of the direct piezoelectric coefficient were observed in the film with the 0.005 v% of the Ag nanoparticles added without significant changes to the crystalline structure confirmed by both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) experiments. The enhancements of both the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties are attributed to the increase in the effective electric field induced by the reduction in the effective volume of P(VDF-TrFE) that results in more aligned dipoles.« less

  16. Effect of Ag nanoparticle concentration on the electrical and ferroelectric properties of Ag/P(VDF-TrFE) composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, Haemin; Choi, Yoon -Young; Hong, Seungbum; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-09-04

    We investigated the effect of the Ag nanoparticles on the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of Ag/poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) composite films. We found that the remanent polarization and direct piezoelectric coefficient increased up to 12.14 μC/cm2 and 20.23 pC/N when the Ag concentration increased up to 0.005 volume percent (v%) and decreased down to 9.38 μC/cm2 and 13.45 pC/N when it increased up to 0.01 v%. Further increase in Ag concentration resulted in precipitation of Ag phase and significant leakage current that hindered any meaningful measurement of the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. 46% increase of the remanent polarization value and 27% increase of the direct piezoelectric coefficient were observed in the film with the 0.005 v% of the Ag nanoparticles added without significant changes to the crystalline structure confirmed by both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) experiments. The enhancements of both the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties are attributed to the increase in the effective electric field induced by the reduction in the effective volume of P(VDF-TrFE) that results in more aligned dipoles.

  17. Fraction Sense: Foundational Understandings.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Francis Skip; Karp, Karen

    2016-08-09

    The intent of this commentary is to identify elements of fraction sense and note how the research studies provided in this special issue, in related but somewhat different ways, validate the importance of such understandings. Proficiency with fractions serves as a prerequisite for student success in higher level mathematics, as well as serving as a gateway to many occupations and varied contexts beyond the mathematics classroom. Fraction sense is developed through instructional opportunities involving fraction equivalence and magnitude, comparing and ordering fractions, using fraction benchmarks, and computational estimation. Such foundations are then extended to operations involving fractions and decimals and applications involving proportional reasoning. These components of fraction sense are all addressed in the studies provided in this issue, with particular consideration devoted to the significant importance of the use of the number line as a central representational tool for conceptually understanding fraction magnitude.

  18. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  19. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  20. Long-term transformation and fate of manufactured ag nanoparticles in a simulated large scale freshwater emergent wetland.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Gregory V; Espinasse, Benjamin P; Badireddy, Appala Raju; Richardson, Curtis J; Reinsch, Brian C; Bryant, Lee D; Bone, Audrey J; Deonarine, Amrika; Chae, Soryong; Therezien, Mathieu; Colman, Benjamin P; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Bernhardt, Emily S; Matson, Cole W; Wiesner, Mark R

    2012-07-03

    Transformations and long-term fate of engineered nanomaterials must be measured in realistic complex natural systems to accurately assess the risks that they may pose. Here, we determine the long-term behavior of poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in freshwater mesocosms simulating an emergent wetland environment. AgNPs were either applied to the water column or to the terrestrial soils. The distribution of silver among water, solids, and biota, and Ag speciation in soils and sediment was determined 18 months after dosing. Most (70 wt %) of the added Ag resided in the soils and sediments, and largely remained in the compartment in which they were dosed. However, some movement between soil and sediment was observed. Movement of AgNPs from terrestrial soils to sediments was more facile than from sediments to soils, suggesting that erosion and runoff is a potential pathway for AgNPs to enter waterways. The AgNPs in terrestrial soils were transformed to Ag(2)S (~52%), whereas AgNPs in the subaquatic sediment were present as Ag(2)S (55%) and Ag-sulfhydryl compounds (27%). Despite significant sulfidation of the AgNPs, a fraction of the added Ag resided in the terrestrial plant biomass (~3 wt % for the terrestrially dosed mesocosm), and relatively high body burdens of Ag (0.5-3.3 μg Ag/g wet weight) were found in mosquito fish and chironomids in both mesocosms. Thus, Ag from the NPs remained bioavailable even after partial sulfidation and when water column total Ag concentrations are low (<0.002 mg/L).

  1. Pitch fractionation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, V.L.; White, J.L.

    1981-12-15

    Petroleum pitch (Ashland A240) has been subjected to thermal treatment and solvent fractionation to produce refined pitches to be evaluated as impregnants for carbon-carbon composites. The solvent fractions were obtained by sequential Soxhlet extraction with solvents such as hexane, cyclohexane, toluene, and pyridine. The most severe thermal treatment produced a mesophase pitch (approximately 50% mesophase); an appreciable portion of the mesophase was soluble in strong solvents. There were substantial differences in chemical composition and in pyrolysis behavior of the fractions. As the depth of fraction increased, the pyrolysis yield and bloating increased, and the microstructure of the coke became finer until glassy microconstituents were formed in the deepest fractions.

  2. AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993. Tenth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments {ge} FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments.

  3. AGS experiments -- 1995, 1996 and 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.; Presti, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains (1) FY 1995 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; (3) FY 1997 AGS schedule as run; (4) FY 1998--1999 AGS schedule (proposed); (5) AGS beams 1997; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program; (9) AGS experimental area FY 1998--1999 physics program (proposed); (10) a listing of experiments by number; (11) two-page summaries of each experiment, in order by number; and (12) listing of publications of AGS experiments.

  4. Particle coating-dependent interaction of molecular weight fractionated natural organic matter: impacts on the aggregation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Shen, Mohai; Tan, Zhiqiang; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-06-02

    Ubiquitous natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in the aggregation state of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aquatic environment, which determines the transport, transformation, and toxicity of AgNPs. As various capping agents are used as coatings for nanoparticles and NOM are natural polymer mixture with wide molecular weight (MW) distribution, probing the particle coating-dependent interaction of MW fractionated natural organic matter (Mf-NOM) with various coatings is helpful for understanding the differential aggregation and transport behavior of engineered AgNPs as well as other metal nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the role of pristine and Mf-NOM on the aggregation of AgNPs with Bare, citrate, and PVP coating (Bare-, Cit-, and PVP-AgNP) in mono- and divalent electrolyte solutions. We observed that the enhanced aggregation or dispersion of AgNPs in NOM solution highly depends on the coating of AgNPs. Pristine NOM inhibited the aggregation of Bare-AgNPs but enhanced the aggregation of PVP-AgNPs. In addition, Mf-NOM fractions have distinguishing roles on the aggregation and dispersion of AgNPs, which also highly depend on the AgNPs coating as well as the MW of Mf-NOM. Higher MW Mf-NOM (>100 kDa and 30-100 kDa) enhanced the aggregation of PVP-AgNPs in mono- and divalent electrolyte solutions, whereas lower MW Mf-NOM (10-30 kDa, 3-10 kDa and <3 kDa) inhibited the aggregation of PVP-AgNPs. However, all the Mf-NOM fractions inhibited the aggregation of Bare-AgNPs. For PVP- and Bare-AgNPs, the stability of AgNPs in electrolyte solution was significantly correlated to the MW of Mf-NOM. But for Cit-AgNPs, pristine NOM and Mf-NOM has minor influence on the stability of AgNPs. These findings about significantly different roles of Mf-NOM on aggregation of engineered AgNPs with various coating are important for better understanding of the transport and subsequent transformation of AgNPs in aquatic environment.

  5. A hexane fraction of american ginseng suppresses mouse colitis and associated colon cancer: anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Poudyal, Deepak; Le, Phuong Mai; Davis, Tia; Hofseth, Anne B.; Chumanevich, Alena; Chumanevich, Alexander A.; Wargovich, Michael J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J.

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with a high colon cancer risk. We have previously reported that American Ginseng (AG) extract significantly reduced the inflammatory parameters of chemically induced colitis. The aim of this study was to further delineate the components of AG that suppress colitis and prevent colon cancer. Among five different fractions of AG (Butanol, Hexane, Ethylacetate, Dicholoromethane and Water), a Hexane Fraction has particularly potent anti-oxidant and pro-apoptotic properties. The effects of this fraction were shown in a mouse macrophage cell line (ANA-1 cells), in a human lymphoblastoid cell line (TK6), and in an ex-vivo model (CD4+/CD25− primary effector T cells). A key in vivo finding was that compared with the whole AG extract, the Hexane Fraction of AG was more potent in treating colitis in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model, as well as suppressing azoxymethane (AOM)/DSS-induced colon cancer. Furthermore, TUNEL labeling of inflammatory cells within the colonic mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) was elevated in mice consuming DSS + the Hexane Fraction of AG. Results are consistent with our in vitro data, and with the hypothesis that the Hexane Fraction of AG has antiinflammatory properties, and drives inflammatory cell apoptosis in vivo, providing a mechanism by which this fraction protects from colitis in this DSS mouse model. This study moves us closer to understanding the molecular components of AG that suppress colitis, and prevent colon cancer associated with colitis. PMID:22293630

  6. Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01

    This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

  7. Activity and stability studies of titanates and titanate-carbon nanotubes supported Ag anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Mokhtar; Khairy, M.; Eid, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Titanate-SWCNT; synthesized via exploiting the interaction between TiO2 anatase with oxygen functionalized SWCNT, supported Ag nanoparticles and Ag/titanate are characterized using XRD, TEM-EDX-SAED, N2 adsorption, Photoluminescence, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. These samples are tested for methanol electrooxidation via using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurements. It is shown that Ag/titanate nanotubes exhibited superior electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation (4.2 mA cm-2) than titanate-SWCNT, Ag/titanate-SWCNT and titanate. This study reveals the existence of a strong metal-support interaction in Ag/titanate as explored via formation of Ti-O-Ag bond at 896 cm-1 and increasing surface area and pore volume (103 m2 g-1, 0.21 cm3 g-1) compared to Ag/titanate-SWCNT (71 m2 g-1, 0.175 cm3 g-1) that suffers perturbation and defects following incorporation of SWCNT and Ag. Embedding Ag preferably in SWCNT rather than titanate in Ag/titanate-SWCNT disturbs the electron transfer compared to Ag/titanate. Charge transfer resistance depicted from Nyquist impedance plots is found in the order of titanate > Ag/titanate-SWCNT > titanate-SWCNT > Ag/titanate. Accordingly, Ag/titanate indicates a slower current degradation over time compared to rest of catalysts. Conductivity measurements indicate that it follows the order Ag/titanate > Ag/titanate-SWCNT > titanate > titanate-SWCNT declaring that SWCNT affects seriously the conductivity of Ag(titanate) due to perturbations caused in titanate and sinking of electrons committed by Ago through SWCNT.

  8. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  9. Biotic and abiotic interactions in aquatic microcosms determine fate and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles. Part 1. Aggregation and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Unrine, Jason M; Colman, Benjamin P; Bone, Audrey J; Gondikas, Andreas P; Matson, Cole W

    2012-07-03

    To better understand their fate and toxicity in aquatic environments, we compared the aggregation and dissolution behavior of gum arabic (GA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated Ag nanoparticles (NPs) in aquatic microcosms. There were four microcosm types: surface water; water and sediment; water and aquatic plants; or water, sediment, and aquatic plants. Dissolution and aggregation behavior of AgNPs were examined using ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration, and asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation coupled to ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dynamic and static laser light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Plants released dissolved organic matter (DOM) into the water column either through active or passive processes in response to Ag exposure. This organic matter fraction readily bound Ag ions. The plant-derived DOM had the effect of stabilizing PVP-AgNPs as primary particles, but caused GA-AgNPs to be removed from the water column, likely by dissolution and binding of released Ag ions on sediment and plant surfaces. The destabilization of the GA-AgNPs also corresponded with X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy results which suggest that 22-28% of the particulate Ag was associated with thiols and 5-14% was present as oxides. The results highlight the potential complexities of nanomaterial behavior in response to biotic and abiotic modifications in ecosystems, and may help to explain differences in toxicity of Ag observed in realistic exposure media compared to simplified laboratory exposures.

  10. Study on aggregation behavior of Cytochrome C-conjugated silver nanoparticles using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Yong-Ju; Hwang, Yu-Sik; Lee, Seungho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 40 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using the citrate reduction method and then the surface of AgNPs was modified by conjugating Cytochrome C (Cyto C) to improve stability and to enhance bioactivity and biocompatibility of AgNPs. It is known that Cyto C may undergo conformational changes under various conditions of pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc., resulting in aggregation of the particles. These parameters also affect the size and size distribution of Cyto C-conjugated AgNPs (Cyto C-AgNP). ζ-potential measurement revealed that the adsorption of Cyto C on the surface of AgNPs is saturated at the molar ratio [Cyto C]/[AgNPs] above about 300. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) analysis showed that hydrodynamic diameter of AgNPs increases by about 4 nm when the particle is saturated by Cyto C. The aggregation behavior of Cyto C-AgNP at various conditions of pH, temperature and ionic strength were investigated using AsFlFFF and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was found that the aggregation of Cyto C-AgNP increases with decreasing pH, increasing temperature and ionic strength due to denaturation of Cyto C on AgNPs and reduction in the thickness of electrostatic double layer on the surface of Cyto C-AgNP.

  11. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  12. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  13. Preparation and antibacterial activities of Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites made by pomegranate (Punica granatum) rind extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Ren, Yan-yu; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chuang

    Nano-silver and its composite materials are widely used in medicine, food and other industries due to their strong conductivity, size effect and other special performances. So far, more microbial researches have been applied, but a plant method is rarely reported. In order to open up a new way to prepare AgNP composites, pomegranate peel extract was used in this work to reduce Ag+ to prepare Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. UV-Vis was employed to detect and track the reduction of Ag+ and the forming process of AgNPs. The composition, structure and size of the crystal were analyzed by XRD and TEM. Results showed that, under mild conditions, pomegranate peel extract reacted with dilute AgNO3 solution to produce Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. At pH = 8 and 10 mmol/L of AgNO3 concentration, the size of the achieved composites ranged between 15 and 35 nm with spherical shapes and good crystallinity. The bactericidal experiment indicated that the prepared Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles had strong antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. FTIR analysis revealed that biological macromolecules with groups of sbnd NH2, sbnd OH, and others were distributed on the surface of the newly synthesized Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles. This provided a useful clue to further study the AgNP biosynthesis mechanism.

  14. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  15. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  16. On fractional programming

    SciTech Connect

    Bajona-Xandri, C.; Martinez-Legaz, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper studies the minimax fractional programming problem, assuming quasiconvexity of the objective function, under the lower subdifferentiability viewpoint. Necessary and sufficient optimality conditions and dual properties are found. We present applications of this theory to find the Pareto efficient solutions of a multiobjective fractional problem and to solve several economic models.

  17. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  18. Bipolar Ag-Zn battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giltner, L. John

    1994-01-01

    The silver-zinc (AgZn) battery system has been unique in its ability to safely satisfy high power demand applications with low mass and volume. However, a new generation of defense, aerospace, and commercial applications will impose even higher power demands. These new power demands can be satisfied by the development of a bipolar battery design. In this configuration the power consuming, interelectrode current conductors are eliminated while the current is then conducted via the large cross-section electrode substrate. Negative and positive active materials are applied to opposite sides of a solid silver foil substrate. In addition to reducing the weight and volume required for a specified power level, the output voltage performance is also improved as follows. Reduced weight through: elimination of the plastic cell container; elimination of plate leads and intercell connector; and elimination of internal plate current collector. Increased voltage through: elimination of resistance of current collector; elimination of resistance of plate lead; and elimination of resistance of intercell connector. EPI worked previously on development of a secondary bipolar silver zinc battery. This development demonstrated the electrical capability of the system and manufacturing techniques. One difficulty with this development was mechanical problems with the seals. However, recent improvements in plastics and adhesives should eliminate the major problem of maintaining a seal around the periphery of the bipolar module. The seal problem is not as significant for a primary battery application or for a requirement for only a few discharge cycles. A second difficulty encountered was with activation (introducing electrolyte into the cell) and with venting gas from the cell without loss of electrolyte. During previous work, the following projections for energy density were made from test data for a high power system which demonstrated in excess of 50 discharge/charge cycles. Projected

  19. Bipolar Ag-Zn battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giltner, L. John

    1994-02-01

    The silver-zinc (AgZn) battery system has been unique in its ability to safely satisfy high power demand applications with low mass and volume. However, a new generation of defense, aerospace, and commercial applications will impose even higher power demands. These new power demands can be satisfied by the development of a bipolar battery design. In this configuration the power consuming, interelectrode current conductors are eliminated while the current is then conducted via the large cross-section electrode substrate. Negative and positive active materials are applied to opposite sides of a solid silver foil substrate. In addition to reducing the weight and volume required for a specified power level, the output voltage performance is also improved as follows. Reduced weight through: elimination of the plastic cell container; elimination of plate leads and intercell connector; and elimination of internal plate current collector. Increased voltage through: elimination of resistance of current collector; elimination of resistance of plate lead; and elimination of resistance of intercell connector. EPI worked previously on development of a secondary bipolar silver zinc battery. This development demonstrated the electrical capability of the system and manufacturing techniques. One difficulty with this development was mechanical problems with the seals. However, recent improvements in plastics and adhesives should eliminate the major problem of maintaining a seal around the periphery of the bipolar module. The seal problem is not as significant for a primary battery application or for a requirement for only a few discharge cycles. A second difficulty encountered was with activation (introducing electrolyte into the cell) and with venting gas from the cell without loss of electrolyte. During previous work, the following projections for energy density were made from test data for a high power system which demonstrated in excess of 50 discharge/charge cycles. Projected

  20. Fractional dissipative standard map.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Vasily E; Edelman, M

    2010-06-01

    Using kicked differential equations of motion with derivatives of noninteger orders, we obtain generalizations of the dissipative standard map. The main property of these generalized maps, which are called fractional maps, is long-term memory. The memory effect in the fractional maps means that their present state of evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. Already a small deviation of the order of derivative from the integer value corresponding to the regular dissipative standard map (small memory effects) leads to the qualitatively new behavior of the corresponding attractors. The fractional dissipative standard maps are used to demonstrate a new type of fractional attractors in the wide range of the fractional orders of derivatives.

  1. Accurate measurement of silver isotopic compositions in geological materials including low Pd/Ag meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodland, S. J.; Rehkämper, M.; Halliday, A. N.; Lee, D.-C.; Hattendorf, B.; Günther, D.

    2005-04-01

    Very precise silver (Ag) isotopic compositions have been determined for a number of terrestrial rocks, and high and low Pd/Ag meteorites by utilizing multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The meteorites include primitive chondrites, the Group IAB iron meteorites Canyon Diablo and Toluca, and the Group IIIAB iron meteorite Grant. Silver isotopic measurements are primarily of interest because 107Ag was produced by decay of the short-lived radionuclide 107Pd during the formation of the solar system and hence the Pd-Ag chronometer has set constraints on the timing of early planetesimal formation. A 2σ precision of ±0.05‰ can be obtained for analyses of standard solutions when Ag isotopic ratios are normalized to Pd, to correct for instrumental mass discrimination, and to bracketing standards. Caution must be exercised when making Ag isotopic measurements because isotopic artifacts can be generated in the laboratory and during mass spectrometry. The external reproducibility for geological samples based on replicate analyses of rocks is ±0.2‰ (2σ). All chondrites analyzed have similar Ag isotopic compositions that do not differ significantly (>0.3‰) from the 'terrestrial' value of the NIST SRM 978a Ag isotope standard. Hence, they show no evidence of excess 107Ag derived from 107Pd decay or, of stable Ag isotope fractionation associated with volatile element depletion within the accretion disk or from parent body metamorphism. The Group IAB iron meteorite samples analyzed show evidence of complex behavior and disturbance of Ag isotope systematics. Therefore, care must be taken when using this group of iron meteorites to obtain chronological information based on the Pd-Ag decay scheme.

  2. Ag/AgCl reference electrode in thionyl chloride electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnick, F. M.; Cieslak, W. R.

    1985-07-01

    Thionyl chloride is the active cathode and electrolyte solvent in Li/SOCl2 primary battery systems. To evaluate charge-transfer reactions in this solvent system, a reference electrode is required. This report describes the fabrication and characterization of Ag/AgCl microreference electrodes that can be used in SOCl2 battery electrolytes.

  3. Ag-Air Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Econ, Inc.'s agricultural aerial application, "ag-air," involves more than 10,000 aircraft spreading insecticides, herbicides, fertilizer, seed and other materials over millions of acres of farmland. Difficult for an operator to estimate costs accurately and decide what to charge or which airplane can handle which assignment most efficiently. Computerized service was designed to improve business efficiency in choice of aircraft and determination of charge rates based on realistic operating cost data. Each subscriber fills out a detailed form which pertains to his needs and then receives a custom-tailored computer printout best suited to his particular business mix.

  4. Construction of Ag/AgCl nanostructures from Ag nanoparticles as high-performance visible-light photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Dongzhi; Wang, Tianyang; Li, Wei; Hu, Wenping; Zhou, Xueqin

    2016-11-01

    A combined strategy of in situ oxidation and assembly is developed to prepare Ag/AgCl nanospheres and nanocubes from Ag nanoparticles under room temperature. It is a new facile way to fabricate Ag/AgCl with small sizes and defined morphologies. Ag/AgCl nanospheres with an average size of 80 nm were achieved without any surfactants, while Ag/AgCl nanocubes with a mean edge length of 150 nm were obtained by introduction of N-dodecyl- N, N-dimethyl-2-ammonio-acetate. The possible formation mechanism involves the self-assembly of AgCl nanoparticles, Ostwald ripening and photoreduction of Ag+ into Ag0 by the room light. The as-prepared Ag/AgCl nanospheres and nanocubes exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity and stability toward degradation of organic pollutants under visible-light irradiation. It is demonstrated that Ag/AgCl nanocubes display enhanced photocatalytic activity in comparison with Ag/AgCl nanospheres due to the more efficient charge transfer. This work may pave an avenue to construct various functional materials via the assembly strategy using nanoparticles as versatile building blocks.

  5. Hollow Au-Ag Nanoparticles Labeled Immunochromatography Strip for Highly Sensitive Detection of Clenbuterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyun; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Youju; Dandapat, Anirban; Dai, Liwei; Zhang, Ganggang; Lu, Xuefei; Zhang, Jiawei; Lai, Weihua; Chen, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The probe materials play a significant role in improving the detection efficiency and sensitivity of lateral-flow immunochromatographic test strip (ICTS). Unlike conventional ICTS assay usually uses single-component, solid gold nanoparticles as labeled probes, in our present study, a bimetallic, hollow Au-Ag nanoparticles (NPs) labeled ICTS was successfully developed for the detection of clenbuterol (CLE). The hollow Au-Ag NPs with different Au/Ag mole ratio and tunable size were synthesized by varying the volume ratio of [HAuCl4]:[Ag NPs] via the galvanic replacement reaction. The surface of hollow Ag-Au NPs was functionalized with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) for further covalently bonded with anti-CLE monoclonal antibody. Overall size of the Au-Ag NPs, size of the holes within individual NPs and also Au/Ag mole ratio have been systematically optimized to amplify both the visual inspection signals and the quantitative data. The sensitivity of optimized hollow Au-Ag NPs probes has been achieved even as low as 2 ppb in a short time (within 15 min), which is superior over the detection performance of conventional test strip using Au NPs. The optimized hollow Au-Ag NPs labeled test strip can be used as an ideal candidate for the rapid screening of CLE in food samples.

  6. Hollow Au-Ag Nanoparticles Labeled Immunochromatography Strip for Highly Sensitive Detection of Clenbuterol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyun; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Youju; Dandapat, Anirban; Dai, Liwei; Zhang, Ganggang; Lu, Xuefei; Zhang, Jiawei; Lai, Weihua; Chen, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The probe materials play a significant role in improving the detection efficiency and sensitivity of lateral-flow immunochromatographic test strip (ICTS). Unlike conventional ICTS assay usually uses single-component, solid gold nanoparticles as labeled probes, in our present study, a bimetallic, hollow Au-Ag nanoparticles (NPs) labeled ICTS was successfully developed for the detection of clenbuterol (CLE). The hollow Au-Ag NPs with different Au/Ag mole ratio and tunable size were synthesized by varying the volume ratio of [HAuCl4]:[Ag NPs] via the galvanic replacement reaction. The surface of hollow Ag-Au NPs was functionalized with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) for further covalently bonded with anti-CLE monoclonal antibody. Overall size of the Au-Ag NPs, size of the holes within individual NPs and also Au/Ag mole ratio have been systematically optimized to amplify both the visual inspection signals and the quantitative data. The sensitivity of optimized hollow Au-Ag NPs probes has been achieved even as low as 2 ppb in a short time (within 15 min), which is superior over the detection performance of conventional test strip using Au NPs. The optimized hollow Au-Ag NPs labeled test strip can be used as an ideal candidate for the rapid screening of CLE in food samples. PMID:28134263

  7. Communication: Structure, formation, and equilibration of ensembles of Ag-S complexes on an Ag surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Selena M.; Kim, Yousoo; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2013-02-15

    We have utilized conditions of very low temperature (4.7 K) and very low sulfur coverage to isolate and identify Ag-S complexes that exist on the Ag(111) surface. The experimental conditions are such that the complexes form at temperatures above the temperature of observation. These complexes can be regarded as polymeric chains of varying length, with an Ag4S pyramid at the core of each monomeric unit. Steps may catalyze the formation of the chains and this mechanism may be reflected in the chain length distribution.

  8. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  9. Bioaccumulation of Zn and Ag Nanoparticles in the Earthworms (Eisenia fetida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Lee Seung; Sung-Dae, Kim; Yi, Yang Song; Byeong-Gweon, Lee

    2014-05-01

    present mainly in HSP (heat-sensitive protein) while cellullar Ag from Ag ion and AgNPs (Ag/PVP, Ag/citrate) treatments were found mostly in cellular debris. No statistical difference in partitioning of metals among different subcelluar pools was found between the metal forms. Zn from ZnO contaminated solis was found largely in carbonate fraction (41%), while Zn from Zn ion treatment was found in Fe-Mn Oxide (29%). Association of Zn to mobile fractions (ZnO; 65%, Zn ion; 35%) suggest that Zn from ZnO contaminated soil would be more bioavailable than that from Zn ion treatment. However, the BAFs for Zn in the animals did not follow this prediction. Majority of Ag from AgNPs or Ag ion contaminated soil was bound mainly to biologically inert fractions mainly in organic matter, surphide fractions, and residual fractions. Consistent with these findings, the BAFs of Ag in the worms exposed to Ag contaminated soils were generally lower than those for Zn treatments.

  10. Antinociceptive activity of the ethanolic extract, fractions, and aggregatin D isolated from Sinningia aggregata tubers.

    PubMed

    Souza, Geórgea V; Simas, Alex S; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda L; Frois, Gisele R A; Ribas, João L C; Verdan, Maria H; Kassuya, Cândida A L; Stefanello, Maria E; Zampronio, Aleksander R

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of the ethanolic extract (ESa), fractions, and compounds isolated from Sinningia aggregata in male Swiss mice on carrageenan-induced paw edema, neutrophil migration, mechanical hyperalgesia, formalin-induced nociception, and lipopolysaccharide-induced fever. The ESa did not alter edema, neutrophil migration, or fever at any of the doses tested. However, the ESa reduced phase II of formalin-induced nociception and carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. The petroleum ether (PE) and ethyl acetate (EA) fractions and aggregatin D (AgD; isolated from the EA fraction) reduced formalin-induced nociception. Anthraquinones from the PE fraction were ineffective. AgD also inhibited carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Neither the ESa nor AgD altered thermal nociception or motor performance. Local administration of AgD also reduced hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, bradykinin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, prostaglandin E2, and dopamine but not hyperalgesia induced by forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate. The positive control dipyrone reduced the response induced by all of the stimuli. Additionally, glibenclamide abolished the analgesic effect of dipyrone but not the one induced by AgD. AgD did not change lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production by macrophages or the nociception induced by capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, acidified saline, or menthol. These results suggest that the ESa has important antinociceptive activity, and this activity results at least partially from the presence of AgD. AgD reduced mechanical hyperalgesia induced by several inflammatory mediators through mechanisms that are different from classic analgesic drugs.

  11. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  12. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  13. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Judy

    Ag-Ed is an agricultural education project aimed at upper primary students, held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show (similar to a county fair) in Queensland, Australia. The program achieves its purpose of helping children understand the impact and relevance that agriculture has on their everyday lives through two components, an Ag-Ed day and a…

  14. Fractional market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2000-12-01

    A new extension of a fractality concept in financial mathematics has been developed. We have introduced a new fractional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation that differs from the standard Langevin equation: (i) by replacing the first-order derivative with respect to time by the fractional derivative of order μ; and (ii) by replacing “white noise” Gaussian stochastic force by the generalized “shot noise”, each pulse of which has a random amplitude with the α-stable Lévy distribution. As an application of the developed fractional non-Gaussian dynamical approach the expression for the probability distribution function (pdf) of the returns has been established. It is shown that the obtained fractional pdf fits well the central part and the tails of the empirical distribution of S&P 500 returns.

  15. Catalytic reforming of naphtha fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, K.C.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1980-09-16

    Production of motor gasoline and a btx-enriched reformate by fractionating a naphtha feedstock into a mid-boiling btxprecursor fraction, a relatively high-boiling fraction and a relatively low-boiling fraction; catalytically reforming the btxprecursor fraction in a first reforming zone; combining the relatively high-boiling and low-boiling fractions and catalytically reforming the combined fractions in a second reforming zone.

  16. Plasmonic Ag2MoO4/AgBr/Ag composite: Excellent photocatalytic performance and possible photocatalytic mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongliao; Zhang, Jinfeng; Lv, Jiali; Dai, Kai; Liang, Changhao

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic Ag2MoO4/AgBr/Ag composite is fabricated by in-situ ion exchange and reduction methods at room temperature. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance (DRS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The results show that butterfly-like Ag2MoO4 nanosheets served as the precursor, and Ag2MoO4/AgBr/Ag is formed in phase transformation with MoO42- displaced by Br-. The ternary Ag2MoO4/AgBr/Ag composite photocatalysts show greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity in photodegrading methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation compared with AgBr and Ag2MoO4. The pseudo-first-order rate constant kapp of Ag2MoO4/AgBr/Ag is 0.602 min-1, which is 11.6 and 18.3 times as high as that of AgBr and Ag2MoO4, respectively. Meanwhile, the efficiency of degradation still kept 90% after ten times cyclic experiments. Eventually, possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed.

  17. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  18. Thermodynamics in Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilanov, R. P.; Magomedov, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    A generalization of thermodynamics in the formalism of fractional-order derivatives is given. Results of the traditional thermodynamics of Carnot, Clausius, and Helmholtz are obtained in the particular case where the exponent of a fractional-order derivative is equal to unity. A one-parametric "fractal" equation of state is obtained with account of the second virial coefficient. The application of the resulting equation of state in the case of the gas argon is considered.

  19. Symmetric continued fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat

    2010-11-11

    Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

  20. Interfacial magnetic coupling between Fe nanoparticles in Fe–Ag granular alloys.

    PubMed

    Alonso, J; Fdez-Gubieda, M L; Sarmiento, G; Chaboy, J; Boada, R; García Prieto, A; Haskel, D; Laguna-Marco, M A; Lang, J C; Meneghini, C; Fernández Barquín, L; Neisius, T; Orue, I

    2012-01-20

    The role of the interface in mediating interparticle magnetic interactions has been analysed in Fe50Ag50 and Fe55Ag45 granular thin films deposited by the pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD). These samples are composed of crystalline bcc Fe (2–4 nm) nanoparticles and fcc Ag (10–12 nm) nanoparticles, separated by an amorphous Fe50Ag50 interface, occupying around 20% of the sample volume, as determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Interfacial magnetic coupling between Fe nanoparticles is studied by dc magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at the Fe K and Ag L2,3 edges. This paper reveals that these thin films present two magnetic transitions, at low and high temperatures, which are strongly related to the magnetic state of the amorphous interface, which acts as a barrier for interparticle magnetic coupling.

  1. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  2. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  3. Oxygen isotope fractionation in phosphates: the role of dissolved complex anions in isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation factors for phosphates were calculated by means of the increment method. The results suggest that Ag3PO4 and BiPO4 are enriched in (18)O relative to AgPO4, and the three phosphates are consistently depleted in (18)O relative to Ba3[PO4]2; fluorapatite and chlorapatite exhibit a similar behaviour of oxygen isotope fractionation with consistent enrichment of (18)O relative to hydroxyapatite. The valence, radii and coordination of metal cations play a quantitative role in dictating the (18)O/(16)O partitioning in these phosphates of different compositions. The calculated fractionation factors for the Ag3PO4-H2O system are in agreement with experimental determinations derived from enzyme-catalysed isotope exchange between dissolved inorganic phosphate and water at the longest reaction durations at low temperatures. This demonstrates that the precipitated Ag3PO4 has completely captured the oxygen isotope fractionation in the dissolved inorganic phosphate. The calculated fractionation factors for the F/Cl-apatite-water systems are in agreement with the enzyme-catalysed experimental fractionations for the dissolved phosphate-water system at the longest reaction durations but larger than fractionations derived from bacteria-facilitated exchange and inorganic precipitation experiments as well as natural observations. For the experimental calibrations of oxygen isotope fractionation involving the precipitation of dissolved phosphate species from aqueous solutions, the fractionation between precipitate and water is primarily dictated by the isotope equilibration between the dissolved complex anions and water prior to the precipitation. Therefore, the present results provide a quantitative means to interpret the temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionation in inorganic and biogenic phosphates.

  4. Hydrophobic interactions increase attachment of gum Arabic- and PVP-coated Ag nanoparticles to hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Jee Eun; Phenrat, Tanapon; Marinakos, Stella; Xiao, Yao; Liu, Jie; Wiesner, Mark R; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2011-07-15

    A fundamental understanding of attachment of surface-coated nanoparticles (NPs) is essential to predict the distribution and potential risks of NPs in the environment. Column deposition studies were used to examine the effect of surface-coating hydrophobicity on NP attachment to collector surfaces in mixtures with varying ratios of octadecylichlorosilane (OTS)-coated (hydrophobic) glass beads and clean silica (hydrophilic) glass beads. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) coated with organic coatings of varying hydrophobicity, including citrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and gum arabic (GA), were used. The attachment efficiencies of GA and PVP AgNPs increased by 2- and 4-fold, respectively, for OTS-coated glass beads compared to clean glass beads. Citrate AgNPs showed no substantial change in attachment efficiency for hydrophobic compared to hydrophilic surfaces. The attachment efficiency of PVP-, GA-, and citrate-coated AgNPs to hydrophobic collector surfaces correlated with the relative hydrophobicity of the coatings. The differences in the observed attachment efficiencies among AgNPs could not be explained by classical DLVO, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions between AgNPs and OTS-coated glass beads were responsible for the increase in attachment of surface-coated AgNPs with greater hydrophobicity. This study indicates that the overall attachment efficiency of AgNPs will be influenced by the hydrophobicity of the NP coating and the fraction of hydrophobic surfaces in the environment.

  5. AgH, Ag/sub 2/, and AgO revisited: Basis set extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    An extended basis set has been developed for Ag which significantly improves the agreement between theoretical and experimental spectroscopic parameters for AgH, AgO, and Ag/sub 2/. The major improvement comes about as a result of the improved treatment of electron correlation in the Ag d shell upon the introduction of f functions. Their inclusion produces very slight differences at the SCF level, but significant reductions in r/sub e/ and increases in ..omega../sub e/ and D/sub e/ in the Mo-dash-barller--Plesset perturbation theory expansion. At the MP4(SDTQ) level, typical results are 0.02 A too long for r/sub e/, 4% too low for ..omega../sub e/, and 10 kcal too small for D/sub e/. From a pragmatic standpoint, MP2 give results very similar to this at a much reduced level of effort.

  6. Carbon monoxide fractions in cigarette and hookah (hubble bubble) smoke.

    PubMed

    Sajid, K M; Akhter, M; Malik, G Q

    1993-09-01

    We studied the carbon monoxide (CO) fractions in hookah and cigarette smoke, using a carbon monoxide micro smokerlyzer (model EC50, BEDFONT, U.K.). Mean carbon monoxide fractions (% by volume) of hookah smoke, using domestic charcoal were 0.38 +/- 0.07 (large hookah; unfiltered); 1.40 +/- 0.43 (small hookah; unfiltered); 0.34 +/- 0.06 (large hookah; filtered); 1.36 +/- 0.35 (small hookah; filtered) and 0.41 +/- 0.08 (cigarette smoke). The highest fractions were obtained with small size hookah and increase in size of hookah (i.e., volume of air in water base, fire bowl volume, pipe length, etc.) reduced the CO fraction significantly (P < 0.001). The fractions of cigarette lie between large and small hookah. The fractions vary slightly with different varieties of tobacco, e.g., CO fractions with Dera wala tobacco are significantly low (P < 0.05). Use of commercial charcoal gives significant rise in CO fractions (P < 0.001). Comparison of filtered and unfiltered smoke shows no significant difference in values. We conclude that the CO hazard is as high with hookah smoking as with cigarette smoking.

  7. THE AGS ELECTROSTATIC SEPTUM.

    SciTech Connect

    HOCK,J.RUSSO,T.GLEN,J.BROWN,K.

    2003-05-12

    The previous slow beam extraction electro static septum in the AGS was designed in 1981. Research documented at the Fermi Laboratory was used as the base line for this design. The septum consisted of a ground plane of .002 inch diameter wire tungsten-rhenium alloy (75%W 25%Re) with a hollow welded titanium cathode assembly. The vacuum chamber is stationary and the septum is moved with a pair of high vacuum linear feed throughs. After years of beam time, the frequency of failures increased. The vacuum system design was poor by today's standards and resulted in long pump down times after repairs. The failures ranged from broken septum wires to a twisted cathode. In addition to the failures, the mechanical drive system had too much backlash, making the operating position difficult to repeat. The new septum needed to address all of these issues in order to become a more reliable septum.

  8. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  9. Fractional Brownian motion and motion governed by the fractional Langevin equation in confined geometries.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Metzler, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by subdiffusive motion of biomolecules observed in living cells, we study the stochastic properties of a non-Brownian particle whose motion is governed by either fractional Brownian motion or the fractional Langevin equation and restricted to a finite domain. We investigate by analytic calculations and simulations how time-averaged observables (e.g., the time-averaged mean-squared displacement and displacement correlation) are affected by spatial confinement and dimensionality. In particular, we study the degree of weak ergodicity breaking and scatter between different single trajectories for this confined motion in the subdiffusive domain. The general trend is that deviations from ergodicity are decreased with decreasing size of the movement volume and with increasing dimensionality. We define the displacement correlation function and find that this quantity shows distinct features for fractional Brownian motion, fractional Langevin equation, and continuous time subdiffusion, such that it appears an efficient measure to distinguish these different processes based on single-particle trajectory data.

  10. Identifying Fractions on Number Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, George W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the ways students represented fractions on number lines and the effects of instruction on those representations. The instruction primarily concerned representing fractions and ordering fractions on number lines. (Author/PK)

  11. Studies on polishing of Ti and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy with five dental abrasives.

    PubMed

    Hirata, T; Nakamura, T; Takashima, F; Maruyama, T; Taira, M; Takahashi, J

    2001-08-01

    Titanium (Ti) and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy were examined for their polishing behaviour by conducting manually controlled polishing tests using five dental abrasives [carborundum point (CR) and silicone points (R1 and R2)] driven by a high torque micromotor with rotational speeds ranging from 2000 to 15 000 r.p.m. Polishing of Ti resulted in less volume of removal upon polishing, a rougher surface and larger loss of abrasives, compared with polishing of Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. Polishing of Ti with a rotational speed of 15 000 r.p.m. led to the largest volume of removal upon polishing, whilst that of 10 000 r.p.m. produced the optimal volume for Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. It was concluded that Ti was much more difficult to polish, requiring special care (e.g. frequent exchange of abrasives). Development of new abrasives for polishing Ti is required.

  12. Structural evolution of NiAg heterogeneous alloys upon annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proux, O.; Mimault, J.; Revenant-Brizard, C.; Regnard, J. R.; Mevel, B.

    1999-01-01

    NiAg heterogeneous alloys were studied by x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ni K-edge using a total electron yield detection. In the as-deposited 0953-8984/11/1/013/img8 alloys of 0.10 and 0.15 Ni atomic fraction, most of the Ni atoms are in substitutional sites in the Ag matrix. At higher Ni concentration, the Ni atoms outside the Ag-rich phase become numerous enough to group together in small clusters. An important disorder in the neighbourhood of Ni atoms is demonstrated. At low annealing temperature (up to 0953-8984/11/1/013/img9C), in 0953-8984/11/1/013/img10 and 0953-8984/11/1/013/img11, some Ni atoms are still present in substitutional sites in the Ag matrix and the small Ni particles are under strain. A very short-range order exists in this state. After a 0953-8984/11/1/013/img9C annealing, the Ni particles grow, and the Ag-rich phase remains in a steady structural state. After a higher annealing (0953-8984/11/1/013/img13C), the local Ni atomic environment becomes well ordered and typical of the pure Ni FCC phase. The Ag-rich crystallites are impoverished in Ni atoms and grow with elimination of defects. Ni grains are generally smaller than 1 nm for as-deposited alloys and reach several nanometres after a 0953-8984/11/1/013/img13C annealing for 10 min.

  13. Stable silver isotope fractionation in the natural transformation process of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dawei; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Tuoya; Cai, Yong; Yin, Yongguang; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-08-01

    Nanoparticles in the environment can form by natural processes or be released due to human activities. Owing to limited analytical methods, the behaviour of nanoparticles in the natural environment is poorly understood and until now they have only been described by the variations in the nanoparticle size or the concentration of the element of interest. Here we show that by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to measure silver (Ag) isotope ratios it is possible to understand the transformation processes of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the environment. We found that the formation and dissolution of AgNPs under natural conditions caused significant variations in the ratio of natural Ag isotopes (107Ag and 109Ag) with an isotopic enrichment factor (ε) up to 0.86‰. Furthermore, we show that engineered AgNPs have distinctly different isotope fractionation effects to their naturally formed counterparts. Further studies will be needed to understand whether isotope analysis can be used to reveal the sources of AgNPs in the environment.

  14. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  15. Software Master Plan. Volume 2. Background (Annexes A-G)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-09

    Management Roles ANNEX B Existing Policies , Standards, and Guidance Regarding Software and Systems ANNEX C Current Software Research and Development...Software related responsibilities include: - Developing policy and guidance for software acquisition programs. - Validating software acquisition...Advanced Technology) (DDDRE(R&AT)) Software related responsibilities include: - Providing review, management oversight, policy guidance, and coordination

  16. Fire-through Ag contact formation for crystalline Si solar cells using single-step inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Gang; Cho, Sung-Bin; Chung, Bo-Mook; Huh, Joo-Youl; Yoon, Sam S

    2012-04-01

    Inkjet-printed Ag metallization is a promising method of forming front-side contacts on Si solar cells due to its non-contact printing nature and fine grid resolution. However, conventional Ag inks are unable to punch through the SiN(x) anti-reflection coating (ARC) layer on emitter Si surfaces. In this study, a novel formulation of Ag ink is examined for the formation of fire-through contacts on a SiN(x)-coated Si substrate using the single-step printing of Ag ink, followed by rapid thermal annealing at 800 degrees C. In order to formulate Ag inks with fire-through contact formation capabilities, a liquid etching agent was first formulated by dissolving metal nitrates in an organic solvent and then mixing the resulting solution with a commercial Ag nanoparticle ink at various volume ratios. During the firing process, the dissolved metal nitrates decomposed into metal oxides and acted in a similar manner to the glass frit contained in Ag pastes for screen-printed Ag metallization. The newly formulated ink with a 1 wt% loading ratio of metal oxides to Ag formed finely distributed Ag crystallites on the Si substrate after firing at 800 degrees C for 1 min.

  17. Fractionated elution using the TEKCIS technetium-99m generator.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Jonathan; De Mil, Rémy; Peyronnet, Damien; Hecquard, Claudine; Agostini, Denis; Lemonnier, Françoise

    2016-06-01

    The TEKCIS technetium-99m (Tc) generator was designed to allow dry column shipment and automatized conception. A high Tc radioactive concentration is required in a subset of radiopharmacy procedures. Fractionated elution can be a useful tool to meet this requirement, especially when current elution is close to the generator expiration date. The aim of our study was to assess TEKCIS generator elution kinetics and to determine the optimal fractionated elution time to fit with procedures requiring the highest Tc radioactive concentration in clinical use. After duplicate elution at several predetermined elution times, the volume and activity of each eluate were measured. Two optimal time points were selected to perform fractionated elution and repeatability (n=34 and 33) assessed on TEKCIS generators calibrated at 6 or 8 GBq. The complete eluate volume (5 ml) was collected after 60 s of elution. A logarithmic equation was established between eluate volume (v, ml) from elapsed elution time (t, s): v=1.8335ln(t)-2.5965. Using the reciprocal equation, elution times required to obtain some commonly eluted volumes were calculated. Fractionated elutions during 15 and 20 s were selected and an average elution volume from 2.74 to 3.27 ml was collected, with an average elution yield of approximately 90 and 100%, respectively. Our work provides a simple and reliable methodology for the use of fractionated elution with the new TEKCIS generator.

  18. Spin dynamics simulations at AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    To preserve proton polarization through acceleration, it is important to have a correct model of the process. It has been known that with the insertion of the two helical partial Siberian snakes in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the MAD model of AGS can not deal with a field map with offset orbit. The stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi provides a tool to represent the real electromagnetic fields in the modeling of the optics and spin dynamics for the AGS. Numerical experiments of resonance crossing, including spin dynamics in presence of the snakes and Q-jump, have been performed in AGS lattice models, using Zgoubi. This contribution reports on various results so obtained.

  19. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Taularides, L. L.; Sangani, A.

    2001-06-01

    The principal objective of the project is to develop an acoustic probe for determining the volume fraction of particles in a flowing suspension. This will include testing the theory of acoustic wave propagation in suspensions and demonstrating the application of the probe by installing it on a flow loop through which a suspension is flowing and determining the particle volume fraction. The signal from the probe must be processed such that the noise arising from the presence of the gas bubbles, if present in the system, is removed to yield an accurate estimate of the particle volume fraction. Once the probe is developed and tested successfully at Syracuse University, it is to be installed and tested in the flow loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratories for surrogate slurries for the Hanford Nuclear site. Particular attention is to be given to testing suspensions with low particle volume fractions since slurries to be transported in nuclear waste processing will have low particle volume fractions.

  20. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  1. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    DOE PAGES

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; ...

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifoldmore » singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.« less

  2. Sweet Work with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  3. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  4. Fraction collector for electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1977-01-01

    Rotating-tube electrophoresis apparatus employs rotating jet of eluting buffer to reduce effects of convection during separation. Designed for separation of microorganisms and biological species, system combines gravity/gradient compensating of lumen with buffer flush at fraction outlet to increase separation efficiency.

  5. A Computer-Interfaced Drop Counter as an Inexpensive Fraction Collector for Column Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2008-01-01

    A computer-interfaced drop counter is described that serves as an inexpensive alternative to a fraction collector for column chromatography experiments. Undergraduate biochemistry laboratories frequently do not have the budget to purchase fraction collectors. Protocols that call for the manual measurement of fraction volumes as well as the manual…

  6. Facile synthesis, structure, and properties of Ag2S/Ag heteronanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    Ag2S/Ag heteronanostructure has been produced by a simple one-stage chemical deposition from aqueous solutions of silver nitrate, sodium sulfide, and sodium citrate with the use of monochromatic light irradiation. For simultaneous synthesis of Ag2S and Ag nanoparticles, deposition has been performed from reaction mixtures with reduced sodium sulfide concentration. The size of Ag2S and Ag nanoparticles is 45-50 and 15-20 nm, respectively. It is established that in the contact layer between silver sulfide and silver, nonconducting α-Ag2S acanthite transforms into superionic β-Ag2S argentite under the action of external electric field. The scheme of the operation of a resistive switch based on an Ag2S/Ag heteronanostructure is proposed. The UV-Vis optical absorption spectra of colloidal solutions of Ag2S/Ag heteronanostructures have been studied.

  7. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of Ag-TiO2/Ag heterogeneous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Wang, ShaoHua; Guo, PengFeng

    2015-11-01

    Ag-deposited TiO2 and Ag (Ag-TiO2/Ag) films coated on glass substrates were prepared using a simple sol-gel and dip-coating method. The Ag chemical state was investigated through X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results showed that the Ag mainly exists in metallic state in the Ag-TiO2 film. Ag-TiO2/Ag exhibits higher photocatalytic activity than individual Ag-TiO2 and TiO2/Ag films. This enhanced photocatalytic activity was attributed to high surface plasmon resonance effects and separation rates of photoinduced electron-hole pairs of Ag nanoparticles. Results were verified by photoluminescence and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  8. Separation of silver nanoparticles by hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation: Addition of tannic acid into carrier liquid as a modifier.

    PubMed

    Saenmuangchin, Rattaporn; Mettakoonpitak, Jaruwan; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2015-10-09

    A homemade hollow fiber flow-field fractionation (Hf-FlFFF) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was set-up for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) separation by using polysulfone hollow fiber membrane (30,000 MW cutoff) as a separation channel. Tannic acid and citrate stabilized AgNPs were synthesized and introduced into Hf-FlFFF. The effects of carrier liquid and stabilizing agent on retention behavior of AgNPs were investigated. Different elution behaviors were observed as follows: with 0.02% (w/v) FL-70, all of AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF but differences in retention behaviors were observed for AgNPs with tannic acid and citrate stabilizing agents; and with 30mM TRIS buffer, only tannic acid stabilized AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF, whereas citrate stabilized AgNPs were not eluted. In this work, tannic acid addition into carrier liquid was proposed to modify the surface of AgNPs and the surface of the membrane, and thereby adjusting the retention behaviors of AgNPs. Various concentrations of tannic acid were added into FL-70 and TRIS buffer. With the use of 0.1mM tannic acid in 30mM TRIS buffer as the carrier liquid, retention behaviors of both tannic acid stabilized- and citrate stabilized-AgNPs were similar and with similar fractionation recovery.

  9. Young Children's Notations for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brizuela, Barbara M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the kinds of notations young children make for fractional numbers. The extant literature in the area of fractional numbers acknowledges children's difficulties in conceptualizing fractional numbers. Some of the research suggests possibly delaying an introduction to conventional notations for algorithms and fractions until…

  10. Creating, Naming, and Justifying Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Daniel; Gaskin, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    For students to develop meaningful conceptions of fractions and fraction operations, they need to think of fractions in terms other than as just whole-number combinations. In this article, we suggest two powerful images for thinking about fractions that move beyond whole-number reasoning. (Contains 5 figures.)

  11. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Reported nanoscale mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suggest that their use may enable the fabrication of significantly lighter structures for use in space applications. To be useful in the fabrication of large structures, however, their attractive nanoscale properties must be retained as they are scaled up to bulk materials and converted into practically useful forms. Advances in CNT production have significantly increased the quantities available for use in manufacturing processes, but challenges remain with the retention of nanoscale properties in larger assemblies of CNTs. This work summarizes recent progress in producing carbon nanotube composites with tensile properties approaching those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. These advances were achieved in nanocomposites with CNT content of 70% by weight. The processing methods explored to yield these CNT composite properties will be discussed, as will the characterization and test methods that were developed to provide insight into the factors that contribute to the enhanced tensile properties. Technology maturation was guided by parallel advancements in computational modeling tools that aided in the interpretation of experimental data.

  12. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  13. Arbitrage with fractional Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xili; Xiao, Weilin

    2017-04-01

    While the arbitrage opportunity in the Black-Scholes model driven by fractional Brownian motion has a long history, the arbitrage strategy in the Black-Scholes model driven by general fractional Gaussian processes is in its infancy. The development of stochastic calculus with respect to fractional Gaussian processes allowed us to study such models. In this paper, following the idea of Shiryaev (1998), an arbitrage strategy is constructed for the Black-Scholes model driven by fractional Gaussian processes, when the stochastic integral is interpreted in the Riemann-Stieltjes sense. Arbitrage opportunities in some fractional Gaussian processes, including fractional Brownian motion, sub-fractional Brownian motion, bi-fractional Brownian motion, weighted-fractional Brownian motion and tempered fractional Brownian motion, are also investigated.

  14. Study of the oxygen transport through Ag (110), Ag (poly), and Ag 2.0 Zr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Wu, D.; Davidson, M. R.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of oxygen through high-purity membranes of Ag (110), Ag (poly), Ag (nano), and Ag 2.0 Zr has been studied by an ultrahigh vacuum permeation method over the temperature range of 400-800 C. The data show that there are substantial deviations from ordinary diffusion-controlled transport. A surface limitation has been confirmed by glow-discharge studies where the upstream O2 supply has been partially converted to atoms, which, for the same temperature and pressure, gave rise to over an order of magnitude increase in transport flux. Further, the addition of 2.0 wt percent Zr to the Ag has provided increased dissociative adsorption rates, which, in turn, increased the transport flux by a factor of 2. It was also observed that below a temperature of 630 C, the diffusivity exhibits an increase in activation energy of over 4 kcal/mol, which has been attributed to trapping of the atomic oxygen and/or kinetic barriers at the surface and subsurface of the vacuum interface. Above 630 C, the activation barrier decreases to the accepted value of about 11 kcal/mol for Ag (poly), consistent with zero concentration at the vacuum interface.

  15. Pd-Ag chronology of volatile depletion, crystallization and shock in the Muonionalusta IVA iron meteorite and implications for its parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, M. F.; Carlson, R. W.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2012-10-01

    Muonionalusta, a Group IVA iron meteorite, was analyzed for its 107Pd-107Ag isotope systematics by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) in order to better constrain the initial Solar System abundance of 107Pd and to provide high resolution chronology of the evolution of its parent body. Six metal samples from Muonionalusta yield Ag abundances between 0.1012 and 1.461 ng/g, 107Ag/109Ag between 1.131 and 1.805, with 108Pd/109Ag ratios of 2201 to 52,300. The metal Pd/Ag and Ag isotopic data are correlated with a slope corresponding to a 107Pd/108Pd of (2.15±0.30)×10-5. If the Pd-Ag and Pb-Pb isotope systems closed at the same time in Muonionalusta, i.e., 2-3 Ma after CAI formation, then an initial Solar System ratio of 107Pd/108Pd=(2.8±0.5)×10-5 can be inferred. One troilite sample contains 8.478 ng/g Ag and has a 107Ag/109Ag ratio of 1.0833; its Pd concentration is 205.2 ng/g corresponding to a low 108Pd/109Ag of 13.56. The Pd-Ag results for this troilite plot near the extrapolation of the line passing through the metal points and define an initial 107Ag/109Ag that is substantially higher than chondritic, indicating that Muonionalusta formed from a precursor with high Pd/Ag. Pd and Ag concentrations in Muonionalusta metal suggest fractional crystallization from a source having Pd/Ag>4500, but the initial Ag isotopic composition for Muonionalusta troilite limits the duration of the high Pd/Ag to an interval of ≤0.6 Ma before cooling to closure of the Pd-Ag system. This result suggests that depletion of Ag and other volatile elements occurred shortly before accretion and cooling of the IVA parent body, and may have been associated with violent disruption of a progenitor to the IVA parent. Another troilite sample, its chromite inclusions and adjacent metal were isotopically homogenized locally after 107Pd had decayed, possibly by a later episode of shock >50 Ma after Solar System formation.

  16. Tyrphostin AG 556 improves survival and reduces multiorgan failure in canine Escherichia coli peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sevransky, J E; Shaked, G; Novogrodsky, A; Levitzki, A; Gazit, A; Hoffman, A; Elin, R J; Quezado, Z M; Freeman, B D; Eichacker, P Q; Danner, R L; Banks, S M; Bacher, J; Thomas, M L; Natanson, C

    1997-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase-dependent cell signaling is postulated to be a pivotal control point in inflammatory responses initiated by bacterial products and TNF. Using a canine model of gram-negative septic shock, we investigated the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tyrphostins) on survival. Animals were infected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli 0111: B4, and then, in a randomized, blinded fashion, were treated immediately with one of two tyrphostins, AG 556 (n = 40) or AG 126 (n = 10), or with control (n = 50), and followed for 28 d or until death. All animals received supplemental oxygen, fluids, and antibiotics. Tyrphostin AG 556 improved survival times when compared to controls (P = 0.05). During the first 48 h after infection, AG 556 also improved mean arterial pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac output, oxygen delivery, and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient compared to controls (all P < or = 0.05). These improvements in organ injury were significantly predictive of survival. Treatment with AG 556 had no effect on clearance of endotoxin or bacteria from the blood (both P = NS); however, AG 556 did significantly lower serum TNF levels (P = 0.03). These data are consistent with the conclusion that AG 556 prevented cytokine-induced multiorgan failure and death during septic shock by inhibiting cell-signaling pathways without impairing host defenses as determined by clearance of bacteria and endotoxin. PMID:9109441

  17. Claudin-6 enhances cell invasiveness through claudin-1 in AGS human adenocarcinoma gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martínez, A C; Gallardo-Vera, J F; Lara-Holguin, A N; Montaño, L F; Rendón-Huerta, E P

    2017-01-01

    Claudins participate in tissue barrier function. The loss of this barrier is associated to metalloproteases-related extracellular matrix and basal membranes degradation. Claudin-1 is a pro-MMP-2 activator and claudin-6 transfected AGS (AGS-Cld6) cells are highly invasive. Our aim was to determine if claudin-6 was direct or indirectly associated with MMP-2 activation and cell invasiveness. Cytofluorometry, cell fractioning, immunoprecipitation, gelatin-zymography, cell migration and invasiveness assays were performed, claudin-2, -6, -7 and -9 transfected AGS cells, anti-MMP-2, -9 and -14, anti-claudins specific antibodies and claudin-1 small interfering RNA were used. The results showed a significant (p<0.001) overexpression of claudin-1 in AGS-Cld6 cell membranes. A strong MMP-2 activity was identified in culture supernatants of AGS-Cld6. Claudin-1 co-localized with MMP-2 and MMP-14; interestingly a significant increase in cell membrane and cytosol MMP-14 expression was detected in AGS-Cld6 cells (p<0.05). Silencing of claudin-1 in AGS-Cld6 cells showed a 60% MMP-2 activity decrease in culture supernatants and a significant decrease (p<0.05) in cell migration and invasiveness. Our results suggest that claudin-6 induces MMP-2 activation through claudin-1 membrane expression, which in turn promotes cell migration and invasiveness.

  18. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  19. Fractional lattice charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  20. Floquet Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushin, Adolfo G.; Gómez-León, Álvaro; Neupert, Titus

    2014-04-01

    We show theoretically that periodically driven systems with short range Hubbard interactions offer a feasible platform to experimentally realize fractional Chern insulator states. We exemplify the procedure for both the driven honeycomb and the square lattice, where we derive the effective steady state band structure of the driven system by using the Floquet theory and subsequently study the interacting system with exact numerical diagonalization. The fractional Chern insulator state equivalent to the 1/3 Laughlin state appears at 7/12 total filling (1/6 filling of the upper band). The state also features spontaneous ferromagnetism and is thus an example of the spontaneous breaking of a continuous symmetry along with a topological phase transition. We discuss light-driven graphene and shaken optical lattices as possible experimental systems that can realize such a state.

  1. Fractional Trajectories: Decorrelation Versus Friction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-27

    from the integration of fractional differential equations in time. In Section 2 we provide a general demonstration of the new perspective on fractional ...section we demonstrate the equivalence between a fractional trajectory that is the solution of a Caputo fractional differential equation , and the... fractional differential equation dα dtα V(t) = OV(t), (1) where 0 < α < 1 and O is an operator, either linear or nonlinear, acting on the vector V(t

  2. Fractional Galilean symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Ali; Rouhani, Shahin

    2016-09-01

    We generalize the differential representation of the operators of the Galilean algebras to include fractional derivatives. As a result a whole new class of scale invariant Galilean algebras are obtained. The first member of this class has dynamical index z = 2 similar to the Schrödinger algebra. The second member of the class has dynamical index z = 3 / 2, which happens to be the dynamical index Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation.

  3. New Dry Fractionation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes new fractionation methods that are used to create dust that is respirable for testing the effects of inhalation of lunar dust in preparation for future manned lunar exploration. Because lunar dust is a very limited commodity, a method that does not result in loss of the material had to be developed. The dust separation system that is described incorporates some traditional methods, while preventing the dust from being contaminated or changed in reactivity properties while also limiting losses.

  4. Model Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2016-05-01

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators—Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν =k /(C +1 ) and (ii) nematic states at ν =k /2 , where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k +1 ) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  5. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  6. Mechanism of high dielectric performance of polymer composites induced by BaTiO3-supporting Ag hybrid fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Yang, Wenhu; Yu, Shuhui; Luo, Suibin; Sun, Rong

    2014-03-01

    BaTiO3-supporting Ag hybrid particles (BT-Ag) with varied fraction of Ag were synthesized by reducing silver nitrate in the glycol solution containing BaTiO3 (BT) suspensions. The Ag nano particles with a size of about 20 nm were discretely grown on the surface of the BT. The dielectric performance of the composites containing the BT-Ag as fillers in the matrix of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was investigated. The relative permittivity (ɛr) of the BT-Ag/PVDF composites increased prominently with the increase of BT-Ag loading amount, and the typical conductive path of the conductor/polymer system was not observed even with a high loading of BT-Ag. The ɛr at 100 Hz for the three BT-(0.31, 0.49, 0.61)Ag/PVDF composites at room temperature were 283, 350, and 783, respectively. The ɛr of the composites was enhanced by more than 3 times compared with that of the composite containing untreated BT nanoparticles at frequencies over 1 kHz and the loss tangent (tan δ) was less than 0.1 which should be attributed to the low conductivity of the composites. Theoretical calculations based on the effective medium percolation theory model and series-parallel model suggested that the enhanced permittivity of BT-Ag/PVDF composites should arise from the ultrahigh permittivity of BT-Ag fillers, which was over 104 and associated with the content of Ag deposited on the surface of BT.

  7. Extracts and Fractions from Edible Roots of Sechium edule (Jacq.) Sw. with Antihypertensive Activity.

    PubMed

    Lombardo-Earl, Galia; Roman-Ramos, Rubén; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Rosas-Salgado, Gabriela; Tortoriello, Jaime; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Sechium edule is traditionally used in Mexico as a therapeutic resource against renal diseases and to control high blood pressure. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the antihypertensive effect of the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the roots of this plant, including its fractions and subfractions, on different hypertension models induced with angiotensin II (AG II). The hydroalcoholic extract was tested on an in vitro study of isolated aorta rings denuded of endothelial cells, using AG II as the agonist; this assay proved the vasorelaxant effect of this extract. Vagotomized rats were administered different doses of AG II as well as the Hydroalcoholic extract, which reduced blood pressure in 30 mmHg approximately; subsequently this extract was separated into two fractions (acetone and methanol) which were evaluated in the acute hypertension mouse model induced with AG II, where the acetone fraction was identified as the most effective one and was subsequently subfractioned using an open chromatographic column packed with silica gel. The subfractions were also evaluated in the acute hypertension model. Finally, the extract, fraction, and active subfraction were analyzed by MS-PDA-HPLC, identifying cinnamic derivative compounds like cinnamic acid methyl ester.

  8. Extracts and Fractions from Edible Roots of Sechium edule (Jacq.) Sw. with Antihypertensive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo-Earl, Galia; Roman-Ramos, Rubén; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Rosas-Salgado, Gabriela; Tortoriello, Jaime; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Sechium edule is traditionally used in Mexico as a therapeutic resource against renal diseases and to control high blood pressure. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the antihypertensive effect of the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the roots of this plant, including its fractions and subfractions, on different hypertension models induced with angiotensin II (AG II). The hydroalcoholic extract was tested on an in vitro study of isolated aorta rings denuded of endothelial cells, using AG II as the agonist; this assay proved the vasorelaxant effect of this extract. Vagotomized rats were administered different doses of AG II as well as the Hydroalcoholic extract, which reduced blood pressure in 30 mmHg approximately; subsequently this extract was separated into two fractions (acetone and methanol) which were evaluated in the acute hypertension mouse model induced with AG II, where the acetone fraction was identified as the most effective one and was subsequently subfractioned using an open chromatographic column packed with silica gel. The subfractions were also evaluated in the acute hypertension model. Finally, the extract, fraction, and active subfraction were analyzed by MS-PDA-HPLC, identifying cinnamic derivative compounds like cinnamic acid methyl ester. PMID:24812568

  9. Probing the rupture of a Ag atomic junction in a Ag-Au mixed electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We probed that the atomic junction in Ag part ruptures during stretching of atomic sized contacts of Ag-Au mixed electrodes, resulting in Ag-Ag electrodes through a scanning tunneling microscope breaking junction (STM-BJ) technique. We observed that the conductance and tunneling decay constant for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions are essentially the same for the Ag-Au mixed and the Ag-Ag electrodes. We also found the molecular plateau length and the evolution patterns with the Ag-Au mixed electrodes are similar to those with Ag-Ag electrodes rather than the Au-Au electrodes in the molecular junction elongation. This result is attributed to the smaller binding energy of Ag atoms compared to that of Au atoms, so the Ag junction part is more easily broken than that of Au part in stretching of Ag-Au mixed electrodes. Furthermore, we successfully observed that the rupture force of the atomic junction for the Ag-Au mixed electrodes was identical to that for the Ag-Ag electrodes and smaller than that for the Au-Au electrodes. This study may advance the understanding of the electrical and the mechanical properties in molecular devices with Ag and Au electrodes in future.

  10. Preparation of Ag/TiO2-zeolite adsorbents, their desulfurization performance, and benzothiophene adsorption isotherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hua; Yang, Gang; Song, Hua-Lin; Wang, Deng; Wang, Xue-Qin

    2017-02-01

    A series of Ag/TiO2-NaY (TY) composite adsorbents were successfully prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, BET, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The effects of TiO2 and Ag contents on the structure and desulfurization performance of NaY zeolite were studied. The results show that anatase phase is the main form of TiO2 in AgTY adsorbent, and the Y-zeolite framework remained unchanged. AgTY with 6 wt % of Ag and 50 wt % of TiO2 exhibited the best desulfurization performance with the effluent volume of 63.2 mL/g at 10 mg/L sulfur breakthrough level (desulfurization rate of 95%). The benzothiophene (BT) removal performance of the various adsorbents follows the order: NaY < TiO2 < TY-50 < AgTY-50-6. The equilibrium data were modeled by Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The Langmuir model can describe well the adsorption isotherms of BT over AgTY.

  11. Surface plasmon resonance in nanostructured Ag incorporated ZnS films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalana, S. R.; Ganesan, V.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.

    2015-10-01

    Silver incorporated zinc sulfide thin films are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique and the influence of silver incorporation on the structural, optical and luminescence properties is analyzed using techniques like grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and laser photoluminescence spectroscopy. XRD analysis presents hexagonal wurtzite structure for the films. A reduction of crystallinity of the films is observed due to Ag incorporation. The Raman spectral analysis confirms the reduction of crystallinity and increase of strain due to the Ag incorporation. AFM analysis reveals a rough surface morphology for the undoped film and Ag incorporation makes the films uniform, dense and smooth. A blue shift of band gap energy with increase in Ag incorporation is observed due to quantum confinement effect. An absorption band (450-650 nm region) due to surface plasmon resonance of the Ag clusters present in the ZnS matrix is observed for the samples with higher Ag incorporation. The complex dielectric constant, loss factor and distribution of volume and surface energy loss of the ZnS thin films are calculated. Laser photoluminescence measurements gives an intense bluish green emission from the ZnS films and a quenching of the PL emission is observed which can be due to the metal plasmonic absorption and non-radiative energy transfer due to Ag incorporation.

  12. Surface plasmon resonance in nanostructured Ag incorporated ZnS films

    SciTech Connect

    Chalana, S. R.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Ganesan, V.

    2015-10-15

    Silver incorporated zinc sulfide thin films are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique and the influence of silver incorporation on the structural, optical and luminescence properties is analyzed using techniques like grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and laser photoluminescence spectroscopy. XRD analysis presents hexagonal wurtzite structure for the films. A reduction of crystallinity of the films is observed due to Ag incorporation. The Raman spectral analysis confirms the reduction of crystallinity and increase of strain due to the Ag incorporation. AFM analysis reveals a rough surface morphology for the undoped film and Ag incorporation makes the films uniform, dense and smooth. A blue shift of band gap energy with increase in Ag incorporation is observed due to quantum confinement effect. An absorption band (450-650 nm region) due to surface plasmon resonance of the Ag clusters present in the ZnS matrix is observed for the samples with higher Ag incorporation. The complex dielectric constant, loss factor and distribution of volume and surface energy loss of the ZnS thin films are calculated. Laser photoluminescence measurements gives an intense bluish green emission from the ZnS films and a quenching of the PL emission is observed which can be due to the metal plasmonic absorption and non-radiative energy transfer due to Ag incorporation.

  13. In situ study of defect migration kinetics in nanoporous Ag with enhanced radiation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C.; Bufford, D.; Chen, Y.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, M.; Wang, H.; Maloy, S. A.; Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    Defect sinks, such as grain boundaries and phase boundaries, have been widely accepted to improve the irradiation resistance of metallic materials. However, free surface, an ideal defect sink, has received little attention in bulk materials as surface-to-volume ratio is typically low. Here by using in situ Kr ion irradiation technique in a transmission electron microscope, we show that nanoporous (NP) Ag has enhanced radiation tolerance. Besides direct evidence of free surface induced frequent removal of various types of defect clusters, we determined, for the first time, the global and instantaneous diffusivity of defect clusters in both coarse-grained (CG) and NP Ag. Opposite to conventional wisdom, both types of diffusivities are lower in NP Ag. Such a surprise is largely related to the reduced interaction energy between isolated defect clusters in NP Ag. Determination of kinetics of defect clusters is essential to understand and model their migration and clustering in irradiated materials. PMID:24435181

  14. Label free detection of DNA on Au/ZnO/Ag hybrid structure based SERS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Anil Kumar; Mohan, D. Bharathi

    2016-04-01

    Au/ZnO/Ag based SERS substrate was fabricated for the label free detection of DNA of Escherichia Coli bacteria. The SERS substrate was fabricated by growing ZnO nanorod arrays on thermally evaporated ultrathin Ag film of 5 nm thickness using hydrothermal process. Non-spherical like Au nanoparticles were decorated on ZnO nanorod arrays by sputtering technique with sputtering time of 45 sec. The surface of Au/ZnO/Ag was observed to be nearly superhydrophobic exhibiting the contact angle of 144 °. A low volume (5 µl) of aqueous solution of DNA of laboratory strain Escherichia Coli with very low concentration was adsorbed on fabricated SERS substrate by drop casting. The SERS detection of DNA molecules was achieved up to lower concentration of 10-8 M due to strong local electric field enhancement at the nanometer gap among Au nanoparticles and superhydrophobic nature of Au/ZnO/Ag surface.

  15. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  16. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  17. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  18. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  19. Experimental status of the AGS Relativistic Heavy Ion Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. Craig

    1994-10-01

    The universal motivation for colliding large nuclei at relativistic energies is the expectation that a small volume of the primordial quark soup, generally referred to as the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), can be created and studied. The QGP is formed via a phase transition caused by either the extreme baryon densities and/or the extreme temperatures achieved in the overlap zone of the two colliding nuclei. Experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) using a beam of Si nuclei at 14.6 GeV per nucleon on various nuclear targets have been completed. These same experiments are now actively searching for signatures of QGP formation using a beam of Au nuclei at 11.7 GeV per nucleon. This paper briefly summarizes some of the key results from the Si beam program and the current status of the experimental Au beam program at the AGS.

  20. Body Fractions: A Physical Approach to Fraction Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Many students experience great difficulty understanding the meaning of fractions. For many students who have spent their early mathematics lessons focusing on counting (whole) numbers, recognising that there are many numbers between those whole numbers called fractional numbers, is quite revolutionary. The foundation of understanding fractions is…

  1. AG Draconis - a symbiotic mystery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galis, R.; Hric, L.; Smelcer, L.

    2015-02-01

    Symbiotic system AG Draconis regularly undergoes quiescent and active stages which consist of the series of individual outbursts. The period analysis of new and historical photometric data, as well as radial velocities, confirmed the presence of the two periods. The longer one (~550 d) is related to the orbital motion and the shorter one (~355 d) could be due to pulsation of the cool component of AG Dra. In addition, the active stages change distinctively, but the outbursts are repeated with periods from 359 - 375 d.

  2. Studies of induced radioactivity at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Tanaka, M.

    1987-01-01

    With the goals of higher proton intensities, along with the many modes the AGS now runs and those being commissioned to run, we have begun detailed studies of the beam induced radioactivity in the AGS.

  3. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOEpatents

    Torget, Robert W.; Padukone, Nandan; Hatzis, Christos; Wyman, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4

  4. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction (EF) is an important measurement in determining how well your heart is pumping ...

  5. Relative importance of the humic and fulvic fractions of natural organic matter in the aggregation and deposition of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Furman, Olha; Usenko, Sascha; Lau, Boris L T

    2013-02-05

    As engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used, their entry into the environment has become an important topic for water sustainability. Recent investigations point to the critical role of natural organic matter (NOM) in altering the persistence of NPs by complexing with their surfaces. The NP-NOM complex, in turn, is the new entity that may potentially influence subsequent fate of NPs. To understand the relative impact of humic (HA) and fulvic fraction of NOM on the stability and mobility of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), a combination of dynamic light scattering and quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation monitoring was used. In the absence of unbound NOM, (1) surface modification on either AgNP or silica substrate by different NOM fractions could lead to substantial changes in the extent and kinetics of AgNP aggregation and deposition, and (2) HA has a greater capability to enhance the transport of AgNPs by reducing their aggregation and deposition. With unbound NOM, HA seems to compete more successfully for binding sites on the substrate under electrostatically favorable conditions and formed a steric layer to prevent subsequent deposition of AgNPs. These findings highlighted the importance of NOM fraction in the overall environmental partitioning of AgNPs.

  6. Preclinical pharmacokinetics and distribution to tissue of AG1343, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed

    Shetty, B V; Kosa, M B; Khalil, D A; Webber, S

    1996-01-01

    AG1343, a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (Ki = 2 nM), was designed by protein structure-based drug design techniques. AG1343 has potent antiviral activity (95% effective dose = 0.04 microgram/ml) against a number of HIV-1 strains in acute and chronic models of infection. As part of its preclinical development, the oral bioavailability of AG1343 in rats, dogs, monkeys, and marmosets was determined and its tissue distribution in rats was evaluated. There were no major interspecies differences in AG1343 pharmacokinetics. Following intravenous administration, the elimination half-life of AG1343 ranged from 1 to 1.4 hr. The total volume of distribution (2 to 7 liters/kg) exceeded the volume of total body water, indicating extensive tissue distribution. Systemic clearance of AG1343 (1 to 4 liters/kg) in the different species corresponded to hepatic blood flow, suggesting possible hepatic involvement in the elimination of AG1343. Following oral administration, peak levels in plasma ranged from 0.34 microgram/ml after treatment with 10 mg/kg of body weight in the dog to 1.7 micrograms/ml after dosing with 50 mg/kg in the rat. Because of the slow absorption of AG1343, plasma concentrations of AG1343 exceeding that required for 95% inhibition of HIV-1 replication were maintained for up to 7 h after a single oral dose in all species evaluated. Average oral bioavailability of AG1343 ranged from 17% in the marmoset to 47% in the dog. Studies of distribution to tissue in the rat after oral administration of 14C-AG1343 established extensive distribution with concentrations in most tissues exceeding that found in plasma. Of particular significance were high levels of AG1343 equivalent in mesenteric lymph nodes (32.05 micrograms/g) and spleen tissue (9.33 micrograms/g). The major excretory route for AG1343 was via feces, with 100% of the dose recovered by 48 h. Results from these studies demonstrate that AG1343 is orally bioavailable and

  7. Preclinical pharmacokinetics and distribution to tissue of AG1343, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, B V; Kosa, M B; Khalil, D A; Webber, S

    1996-01-01

    AG1343, a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (Ki = 2 nM), was designed by protein structure-based drug design techniques. AG1343 has potent antiviral activity (95% effective dose = 0.04 microgram/ml) against a number of HIV-1 strains in acute and chronic models of infection. As part of its preclinical development, the oral bioavailability of AG1343 in rats, dogs, monkeys, and marmosets was determined and its tissue distribution in rats was evaluated. There were no major interspecies differences in AG1343 pharmacokinetics. Following intravenous administration, the elimination half-life of AG1343 ranged from 1 to 1.4 hr. The total volume of distribution (2 to 7 liters/kg) exceeded the volume of total body water, indicating extensive tissue distribution. Systemic clearance of AG1343 (1 to 4 liters/kg) in the different species corresponded to hepatic blood flow, suggesting possible hepatic involvement in the elimination of AG1343. Following oral administration, peak levels in plasma ranged from 0.34 microgram/ml after treatment with 10 mg/kg of body weight in the dog to 1.7 micrograms/ml after dosing with 50 mg/kg in the rat. Because of the slow absorption of AG1343, plasma concentrations of AG1343 exceeding that required for 95% inhibition of HIV-1 replication were maintained for up to 7 h after a single oral dose in all species evaluated. Average oral bioavailability of AG1343 ranged from 17% in the marmoset to 47% in the dog. Studies of distribution to tissue in the rat after oral administration of 14C-AG1343 established extensive distribution with concentrations in most tissues exceeding that found in plasma. Of particular significance were high levels of AG1343 equivalent in mesenteric lymph nodes (32.05 micrograms/g) and spleen tissue (9.33 micrograms/g). The major excretory route for AG1343 was via feces, with 100% of the dose recovered by 48 h. Results from these studies demonstrate that AG1343 is orally bioavailable and

  8. Catalytic liquid marbles: Ag nanowire-based miniature reactors for highly efficient degradation of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yue-E; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Chew, Wee Shern; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi; Ling, Xing Yi

    2014-06-04

    Ag nanowire-based catalytic liquid marbles are fabricated as miniature reactors, which demonstrate highly efficient, support-free and rate-controllable heterogeneous degradation of methylene blue, with catalytic efficiency close to 100%. Our miniature catalytic liquid marbles are essential for reactions involving highly toxic/hazardous or costly reactants, where small volume preliminary reactions are preferred.

  9. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2011-04-15

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses.

  10. Loading effect of Ag/AgO on the photocatalytic performance of ZnO rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsuddin, Aida Fitri; Aziz, Siti Nor Qurratu Aini Abd; Pung, Swee-Yong

    2017-01-01

    The photocatalytic performance of ZnO rods in degradation of Rhodamine B dye under UV light was improved by 7.3% via deposition of Ag/AgO using 1.0 × 10-3 g mL-1 of silver nitrate solution. However, its photodegradation efficiency decreased with the increase in silver nitrate concentration which was used to prepare the Ag/AgO-ZnO rods. This result suggests that the loading of Ag/AgO on the surface of ZnO rods affected the photocatalytic performance differently. The scavenger study indicates that the main reactive species responsible for the degradation of Rhodamine B dye by Ag-/AgO-deposited ZnO rods were holes, followed by superoxide anion free radicals, hydroxyl free radicals and electrons. Based on these findings, a refined photodegradation mechanism of Rhodamine B by Ag/AgO-ZnO rods is proposed.

  11. AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992. Ninth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ``as run``; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters.

  12. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2016-07-14

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  13. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  14. The random continued fraction transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalle, Charlene; Kempton, Tom; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a random dynamical system related to continued fraction expansions. It uses random combinations of the Gauss map and the Rényi (or backwards) continued fraction map. We explore the continued fraction expansions that this system produces, as well as the dynamical properties of the system.

  15. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  16. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Bentzen, Soren M. D.Sc.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Kong, F.-M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Vogelius, Ivan S.; El Naqa, Issam; Hubbs, Jessica L. M.S.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Timmerman, Robert D.; Martel, Mary K.; Jackson, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold 'tolerance dose-volume' levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects.

  17. Numerical approaches to fractional calculus and fractional ordinary differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changpin; Chen, An; Ye, Junjie

    2011-05-01

    Nowadays, fractional calculus are used to model various different phenomena in nature, but due to the non-local property of the fractional derivative, it still remains a lot of improvements in the present numerical approaches. In this paper, some new numerical approaches based on piecewise interpolation for fractional calculus, and some new improved approaches based on the Simpson method for the fractional differential equations are proposed. We use higher order piecewise interpolation polynomial to approximate the fractional integral and fractional derivatives, and use the Simpson method to design a higher order algorithm for the fractional differential equations. Error analyses and stability analyses are also given, and the numerical results show that these constructed numerical approaches are efficient.

  18. Activation properties of Ag+-ion conduction in bulk amorphous AgI: estimation from extrapolation of the AgI composition dependence in AgI Ag2O P2O5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaya, M.; Hatate, A.; Oguni, M.

    2003-06-01

    AgI-based fast-ion conducting glasses with very high AgI compositions from the (AgI)x(AgPO3)1-x, (AgI)x(Ag2PO3.5)1-x, and (AgI)x(Ag3PO4)1-x systems were prepared successfully by using a rapid-press quenching and a twin-roller quenching method. The ac dielectric measurements showed common relaxation properties of Ag+-ion conduction in the glasses independently of the species of the glass network formers of AgPO3, Ag2PO3.5, and Ag3PO4, and the activation energies, Δɛa, for Ag+-ion conduction were observed to converge upon the same magnitude of ~26 kJ mol-1 at the AgI composition limit of x = 1. This indicates the formation of amorphous AgI regions in the glasses, and the value of Δɛa = 26 +/- 1 kJ mol-1 estimated at x = 1 was concluded to correspond to that for bulk amorphous AgI which has never been obtained experimentally.

  19. AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

  20. AGS experiments: 1985, 1986, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout, table of beam parameters and fluxes, experiment schedule ''as run,'' experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, two-page summaries of each experiment, also ordered by number, and publications of AGS experiments, 1982-1987.

  1. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  2. Trace elements in ocean ridge basalt glasses - Implications for fractionations during mantle evolution and petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertogen, J.; Janssens, M.-J.; Palme, H.

    1980-01-01

    Seven documented and fresh glassy selvages from ocean floor basalt pillows were analyzed for trace elements including Ag, Au, Bi, Br, Ni, Pd, and Zn using radiochemical activation analysis. Glasses from DSDP leg 24, site 238 in the Indian Ocean have a trace element pattern which reflects secondary processes at a shallow depth. Chemical fractionations in petrogenesis of tholeiitic basalts indicate that (Ir, Os), Au, Pd, Ni, and Re are strongly fractionated in igneous processes; the unfractionated chondritic mantle pattern thus imposes constraints on mantle evolution models. Finally, the limited Rb/Cs fractionation in oceanic tholeiites reflects the low abundance of volatiles and hydrous silicates in normal ocean ridge basalts.

  3. Functional fractionation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Haver, V M; Gear, A R

    1981-02-01

    Studies of platelet populations suggest that they are heterogeneous in size, age, and metabolic parameters. In an attempt to correlate these parameters with efficiency of aggregation, a new technique, functional fractionation, was developed. Platelet populations are separated by their differential reactivity to aggregating agents. For example, low doses of ADP (0.1 to 0.7 microM) are added to stirred PRP, after which gentle centrifugation is used to remove aggregates from single unreacted platelets. The loose aggregates can be readily dispersed for comparison of the physical or biochemical properties of the reacted versus unreacted platelets. It was found that reactive platelets were larger (6.5 micrometer3) than unreacted platelets (5.51 micrometer3). No significant difference in density existed between the two populations, and no release of [14C]serotonin from prelabeled platelets occurred during functional fractionation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size difference and revealed that in both populations platelets were structurally intact with a normal discoid shape and no significant difference in organelle content. Human platelets most reactive to ADP were also enriched in glycogen (3.6-fold), ATP (1.6-fold), and ADP (twofold), compared with less reactive cells. These "reactive" cells took up more 51[Cr] and contained 1.9 times more surface sialic acid. In an in vivo aging experiment, rats were injected with 75[Se]methionine. Shortly after labeling (1 day), the most reactive platelets possessed the highest amount of 75[Se]. These results reveal that functionally active platelets, which are also larger, are more active metabolically than less reactive platelets, possess a higher negative surface charge, and may be a younger population.

  4. Removal of transuranics from Johnston Island soil by fractional classification

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderland, N.R.

    1987-06-07

    The following conclusions were reached as a result of the research conducted with the TRUclean process on Johnston Island: Processed materials will have a total TRU activity of less than 500 Bq/Kg. Approximately 90% of the TRU activity in coral/soil is removed by a single pass through the fractional classification process. A volume reduction of greater than 90% of the original contaminated volume can be achieved with the returned ''clean'' volume less than or equal to the cleanup criteria. Reprocessing or multiple staging of the process units will yield overall efficiencies of greater than 90%. Continued testing at Nevada Test Site confirmed these conclusions.

  5. Fraction Reduction in Membrane Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction. PMID:24772037

  6. Antibacterial activity and reusability of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Yun, Hyosuk; Kim, Gwui Cheol; Lee, Chul Won; Choi, Hyun Chul

    2013-10-01

    A facile approach to the synthesis of novel CNT-Ag and GO-Ag antibacterial materials, in which thiol groups are utilized as linkers to secure silver (Ag) nanoparticles to the CNT and GO surfaces without agglomeration, is reported. The resulting CNT-Ag and GO-Ag samples were characterized by performing TEM, XRD, Auger, XPS, and Raman measurements, which revealed that in these antibacterial materials size-similar and quasi-spherical Ag nanoparticles are anchored to the CNT and GO surfaces. The Ag nanoparticles in CNT-Ag and GO-Ag have narrow size distributions with average diameters of 2.6 and 3.5 nm respectively. The antibacterial activities of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag against Escherichia coli were assessed with the paper-disk diffusion method and by determining the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). CNT-Ag was found to have higher antibacterial activity than the reference Ag colloid. Moreover, both CNT-Ag and GO-Ag retain more than 50% of their original antibacterial activities after 20 washes with detergent, which indicates their potential as antibacterial materials for laboratory and medical purposes.

  7. Comparative Study of Antimicrobial Activity of AgBr and Ag Nanoparticles (NPs)

    PubMed Central

    Suchomel, Petr; Kvitek, Libor; Panacek, Ales; Prucek, Robert; Hrbac, Jan; Vecerova, Renata; Zboril, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The diverse mechanism of antimicrobial activity of Ag and AgBr nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and also against several strains of candida was explored in this study. The AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by simple precipitation of silver nitrate by potassium bromide in the presence of stabilizing polymers. The used polymers (PEG, PVP, PVA, and HEC) influence significantly the size of the prepared AgBr NPs dependently on the mode of interaction of polymer with Ag+ ions. Small NPs (diameter of about 60–70 nm) were formed in the presence of the polymer with low interaction as are PEG and HEC, the polymers which interact with Ag+ strongly produce nearly two times bigger NPs (120–130 nm). The prepared AgBr NPs were transformed to Ag NPs by the reduction using NaBH4. The sizes of the produced Ag NPs followed the same trends – the smallest NPs were produced in the presence of PEG and HEC polymers. Prepared AgBr and Ag NPs dispersions were tested for their biological activity. The obtained results of antimicrobial activity of AgBr and Ag NPs are discussed in terms of possible mechanism of the action of these NPs against tested microbial strains. The AgBr NPs are more effective against gram-negative bacteria and tested yeast strains while Ag NPs show the best antibacterial action against gram-positive bacteria strains. PMID:25781988

  8. Next generation Er:YAG fractional ablative laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Vizhanyo, A.; Krammer, P.; Summer, S.; Gross, S.; Bragagna, T.; Böhler, C.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Biosolutions AG presents a portable fractional ablative laser system based on a miniaturized diode pumped Er:YAG laser. The system can operate at repetition rates up to 500 Hz and has an incorporated beam deflection unit. It is smaller, lighter and cost efficient compared to systems based on lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers and incorporates a skin layer detection to guarantee precise control of the microporation process. The pulse parameters enable a variety of applications in dermatology and in general medicine, as demonstrated by first results on transdermal drug delivery of FSH (follicle stimulating hormone).

  9. Characterization of spark plasma sintered Ag nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Fu, Y Q; Shearwood, C; Xu, B; Yu, L G; Khor, K A

    2010-03-19

    The low temperature sintering behaviour of nanocrystalline Ag powder (with an average size of 70 nm) was characterized. Using spark plasma sintering (SPS), the Ag nanopowders can be successfully sintered at low pressure for only 5 min without external heating, and the sintering density increases and porosity decreases significantly with increase in the sintering temperature. Nanoindentation has been used to characterize the SPS sintered Ag samples. The mechanisms of the low sintering temperature behaviour of the nano-Ag powder and the nanoscale mechanical performance have been discussed. Compression tests were also used to characterize the mechanical properties of the sintered Ag sample with a maximum strain up to 15%.

  10. Synergistic effect of interfacial lattice Ag(+) and Ag(0) clusters in enhancing the photocatalytic performance of TiO2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liming; Zhang, Dandan; Ming, Lufei; Jiao, Yanchao; Chen, Feng

    2014-09-28

    An interfacial lattice Ag(+) doped on TiO2 (Ag(+)/TiO2) was prepared by eluting Ag(0) clusters from a hydrothermally prepared Ag(0)/Ag(+)/TiO2 composite. An Ag(+)/TiO2@Ag(0) composite photocatalyst was subsequently obtained via a secondary Ag(0) clusters loading process to the Ag(+)/TiO2. The photocatalytic activity of Ag(+)/TiO2@Ag(0) was greatly improved compared to Ag(0)/Ag(+)/TiO2 and Ag(+)/TiO2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) testing verified that Ag(+) ions occur as an interfacial lattice Ag(+) species in the composites. The enhancement effect of the interfacial lattice Ag(+) species is exhibited by the newly-formed Ag(+)/TiO2@Ag(0) as the interfacial lattice Ag(+) is fully exposed but not overlapped with the re-loaded Ag(0) clusters. The interfacial lattice Ag(+) ions and Ag(0) clusters are both responsible for the photocatalytic performance improvement of the catalyst, in either the photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange or photocurrent measurement.

  11. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W.; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range: 46.8–54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10–75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  12. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  13. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  14. Size determination and quantification of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles by flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, L; Bolea, E; Laborda, F; Cubel, C; Ferrer, P; Gianolio, D; da Silva, I; Castillo, J R

    2016-03-18

    Facing the lack of studies on characterization and quantification of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs), whose consumption and release is greatly increasing, this work proposes a method for their sizing and quantification by Flow Field-flow Fractionation (FFFF) coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two modalities of FFFF (Asymmetric Flow- and Hollow Fiber-Flow Field Flow Fractionation, AF4 and HF5, respectively) are compared, and their advantages and limitations discussed. Experimental conditions (carrier composition, pH, ionic strength, crossflow and carrier flow rates) are studied in detail in terms of NP separation, recovery, and repeatability. Size characterization of CeO2 NPs was addressed by different approaches. In the absence of feasible size standards of CeO2 NPs, suspensions of Ag, Au, and SiO2 NPs of known size were investigated. Ag and Au NPs failed to show a comparable behavior to that of the CeO2 NPs, whereas the use of SiO2 NPs provided size estimations in agreement to those predicted by the theory. The latter approach was thus used for characterizing the size of CeO2 NPs in a commercial suspension. Results were in adequate concordance with those achieved by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and dynamic light scattering. The quantification of CeO2 NPs in the commercial suspension by AF4-ICP-MS required the use of a CeO2 NPs standards, since the use of ionic cerium resulted in low recoveries (99 ± 9% vs. 73 ± 7%, respectively). A limit of detection of 0.9 μg L(-1) CeO2 corresponding to a number concentration of 1.8 × 1012 L(-1) for NPs of 5 nm was achieved for an injection volume of 100 μL.

  15. Effects of Ag doping on the photocatalytic disinfection of E. coli in bioaerosol by Ag-TiO₂/GF under visible light.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thanh-Dong; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2014-08-15

    Ag doped TiO2/glass fibers (Ag-TiO2/GF) were prepared and used for photocatalytic disinfection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in an indoor air environment. The prepared photocatalysts were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphology, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for microstructure, UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) for optical properties and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine elemental state. The optimized weight fraction of TiO2 in the TiO2/glass fiber (TiO2/GF) was 3%. The silver content in Ag/TiO2 was altered from 1% to 10% to investigate the optimal ratio of Ag doped on the TiO2/GF for the photocatalytic disinfection of E. coli. Doped Ag enhanced the electron-hole separation as well as charge transfer efficiency between the valance band and the conduction band of TiO2. The generated electron-hole pairs reacted with water and molecular oxygen to form strong oxidative radicals, which participated in the oxidation of organic components of E. coli, resulting in bacterial death. The photocatalytic disinfection activity under visible light increased with the increase in silver content up to 7.5% and then decreased slightly with further increasing Ag content. Among the three humidity conditions used in this study (40±5%, 60±5%, 80±5%), the highest disinfection ratio of E. coli by the photocatalytic system was observed in the intermediate humidity level followed by the high humidity level. Using the 7.5% Ag-TiO2/GF and the intermediate level of humidity (60±5%), the highest disinfection ratio and disinfection capacity of E. coli were 93.53% and 26 (CFU/s cm(2)), respectively.

  16. Enhancing the ag precipitation by surface mechanical attrition treatment on Cu-Ag alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiabin; Zhang, Lehao; Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Liuyi; Gu, Hao; Fang, Youtong; Meng, Liang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The influence of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) on Ag precipitation in Cu-Ag alloys was investigated. Cu-6 wt% Ag was melt, cold rolled and solution treated to be Cu-Ag solid solution, which was either aged at 250 and 350 °C for 24 h directly or SMAT-ed before aging. Ag precipitates were hard be found in the directly aged Cu-Ag sample while they were observed clearly in the SMAT-ed counterpart at 250 °C. The Ag precipitates formed in the surface layer by SMAT are much coarser than those in the un-SMAT-ed sample. It is obvious that the precipitating behavior of Ag was promoted significantly by SMAT approach. A large number of defects were generated by SMAT and they were acting as fast atomic diffusion channels that facilitated the atomic diffusion of Ag.

  17. Fractional variational calculus in terms of Riesz fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, O. P.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents extensions of traditional calculus of variations for systems containing Riesz fractional derivatives (RFDs). Specifically, we present generalized Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems (FVPs) defined in terms of RFDs. We consider two problems, a simple FVP and an FVP of Lagrange. Results of the first problem are extended to problems containing multiple fractional derivatives, functions and parameters, and to unspecified boundary conditions. For the second problem, we present Lagrange-type multiplier rules. For both problems, we develop the Euler-Lagrange-type necessary conditions which must be satisfied for the given functional to be extremum. Problems are considered to demonstrate applications of the formulations. Explicitly, we introduce fractional momenta, fractional Hamiltonian, fractional Hamilton equations of motion, fractional field theory and fractional optimal control. The formulations presented and the resulting equations are similar to the formulations for FVPs given in Agrawal (2002 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272 368, 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 10375) and to those that appear in the field of classical calculus of variations. These formulations are simple and can be extended to other problems in the field of fractional calculus of variations.

  18. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Zhang, Yiqi

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  19. Polymorphism of LiAg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuk, V. V.; Dmytriv, G. S.; Tarasiuk, I. I.; Chumak, I. V.; Pauly, H.; Ehrenberg, H.

    2010-02-01

    A phase transition from the cubic CsCl-type structure (Pm-3m space group) into a tetragonal UPb-type structure (I4 1/amd) is observed for the LiAg binary compound at ambient conditions. The crystal structure of the tetragonal modification of the LiAg binary compound was solved by direct methods in SHELXS on the base of structure factors which were extracted from a powder diffraction pattern and refined by SHELXL and the Rietveld method ( a = 3.9605(1), c = 8.2825(2) Å, Bragg R-factor = 4.81, Rf-factor = 4.87). Elevated temperatures and/or a small Li-excess versus the equimolar composition favour the cubic structure whereas ambient and lower temperatures and/or a small Li-deficiency stabilize the tetragonal structure. This reconstructive transition is reversible but proceeds slowly.

  20. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  1. Fractional-time quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iomin, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    Application of the fractional calculus to quantum processes is presented. In particular, the quantum dynamics is considered in the framework of the fractional time Schrödinger equation (SE), which differs from the standard SE by the fractional time derivative: partial differential/partial differentialt --> partial differential(alpha)/partial differentialt(alpha). It is shown that for alpha=1/2 the fractional SE is isospectral to a comb model. An analytical expression for the Green's functions of the systems are obtained. The semiclassical limit is discussed.

  2. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-01

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating-melting-vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process.

  3. Synthesis and formation mechanism of Ag-Ni alloy nanoparticles at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi; Sun, Dongbai; Tan, Yuanyuan; Xing, Xueqing; Yu, Hongying; Wu, Zhonghua

    2016-11-01

    Ag-Ni nanoparticles were prepared with a chemical reduction method in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) used as a stabilizing agent. During the synthesis of Ag-Ni nanoparticles, silver nitrate was used as the Ag+ source while nickel sulfate hexahydrate was used as Ni2+ source. Mixed solutions of Ag+ source and Ni2+ source were used as the precursors and sodium borohydride was used as the reducing agent. Five ratios of Ag+/Ni2+ (9:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, and 1:9) suspensions were prepared in the corresponding precursors. Ag-Ni alloy nanoparticles were obtained with this method at room temperature. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) were used to characterize the morphology, composition and crystal structure of the nanoparticles. The crystal structure was also investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD). In all five Ag/Ni ratios, two kinds of particle structures were observed that are single crystal structure and five-fold twinned structure respectively. Free energy of nanoparticles with different crystal structures were calculated at each Ag/Ni ratio. Calculated results revealed that, with identical volume, free energy of single crystal particle is lower than multi-twinned particle and the difference becomes smaller with the increase of particle size; increase of Ni content will lead the increase of free energy for both structures. Formation of different crystal structures are decided by the structure of the original nuclei at the very early stage of the reduction process.

  4. Nootropic Effects of Filipendula Vulgaris Moench Water Extract Fractions.

    PubMed

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I; Amelchenko, V P

    2015-07-01

    Nootropic activity of water extract fractions from aerial parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench was demonstrated on the models of hermetic volume hypoxia, conditioned passive avoidance response, open field test, and forced swimming with a load. The fractions stimulated hypoxic resistance, normalized orientation and exploratory behavior, improved conditioned response reproduction during testing after hypoxic injury, and increased exercise tolerance. Fractionation of the extract led to dissociation of the effect components, which suggests that individual constituents have specific characteristics. Ethylacetate fraction exhibited most pronounced nootropic activity and was superior to plant extract by some characteristics. The detected effects seemed to be caused by modulation of the hippocampus activity the under the effects of phenol and triterpene compounds.

  5. Characterization and mechanical properties investigation of TiN-Ag films onto Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Dongxing; Liu, Daoxin; Zhang, Xiaohua; Tang, Jingang; Xiang, Dinggen

    2016-03-01

    To investigate their effect on fretting fatigue (FF) resistance of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy, hard solid lubricating composite films of TiN with varying silver contents (TiN-Ag) were deposited on a Ti-6Al-4V alloy using ion-assisted magnetron sputtering. The surface morphology and structure were analyzed by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness, bonding strength, and toughness of films were tested using a micro-hardness tester, scratch tester, and a repeated press-press test system that was manufactured in-house, respectively. The FF resistance of TiN-Ag composite films was studied using self-developed devices. The results show that the FF resistance of a titanium alloy can be improved by TiN-Ag composite films, which were fabricated using hard TiN coating doped with soft Ag. The FF life of Ag0.5, Ag2, Ag5, Ag10 and Ag20 composite films is 2.41, 3.18, 3.20, 2.94 and 2.87 times as great as that of the titanium alloy, respectively. This is because the composite films have the better toughness, friction lubrication, and high bonding strength. When the atomic fraction of Ag changes from 2% to 5%, the FF resistance of the composite films shows the best performance. This is attributed to the surface integrity of the composite film is sufficiently fine to prevent the initiation and early propagation of FF cracks.

  6. Capacitive deionization of seawater effected by nano Ag and Ag@C on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cai, P-F; Su, C-J; Chang, W-T; Chang, F-C; Peng, C-Y; Sun, I-W; Wei, Y-L; Jou, C-J; Wang, H Paul

    2014-08-30

    Drinking water shortage has become worse in recent decades. A new capacitive deionization (CDI) method for increasing water supplies through the effective desalination of seawater has been developed. Silver as nano Ag and Ag@C which was prepared by carbonization of the Ag(+)-β-cyclodextrin complex at 573 K for 30 min can add the antimicrobial function into the CDI process. The Ag@C and Ag nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (Ag@C/rGO and nano Ag/rGO) were used as the CDI electrodes. The nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can reduce the charging resistant, and enhance the electrosorption capability. Better CDI efficiencies with the nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can therefore be obtained. When reversed the voltage, the electrodes can be recovered up to 90% within 5 min. This work presents the feasibility for the nano Ag and Ag@C on rGO electrodes applied in CDI process to produce drinking water from seawater or saline water.

  7. Facile synthesis of S-Ag nanocomposites and Ag2S short nanorods by the interaction of sulfur with AgNO3 in PEG400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Xie, Xin-Yuan; Liang, Ming; Xie, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jie-Mei; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    A facile, eco-friendly and inexpensive method to prepare Ag2S short nanorods and S-Ag nanocomposites using sublimed sulfur, AgNO3, PVP and PEG400 was studied. According to x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the Ag2S, the products are highly crystalline and pure Ag2S nanorods with diameters of 70-160 nm and lengths of 200-360 nm. X-ray diffraction of the S-Ag nanocomposites shows that we obtained cubic Ag and S nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ plays an important role in controlling the size and morphology of the S-Ag nanocomposites. When the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ was 10:1, smaller sizes, better dispersibility and narrower distribution of S-Ag nanocomposites with diameters of 10-40 nm were obtained. The formation mechanism of the S-Ag nanocomposites was studied by designing a series of experiments using ultraviolet-visible measurement, and it was found that S nanoparticles are produced first and act as seed crystals; then Ag+ becomes Ag nanocrystals on the surfaces of the S nanoparticles by the reduction of PVP. PEG400 acts as a catalyzer, accelerating the reaction rate, and protects the S-Ag nanocomposites from reacting to produce Ag2S. The antimicrobial experiments show that the S-Ag nanocomposites have greater antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and blue mold than Ag nanoparticles.

  8. Serodiagnosis of fasciolosis by fast protein liquid chromatography-fractionated excretory/secretory antigens.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarian, Kobra; Akhlaghi, Lame; Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Razmjou, Elham; Manouchehri Naeini, Kourosh; Gholami, Samaneh; Najafi Samei, Masoomeh; Falak, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In several studies, different antigenic preparations and diverse immunological tests were applied for serodiagnosis of Fasciola hepatica infections. Most of these preparations showed cross-reactivity with proteins of other parasites. Application of purified antigens might reduce these cross-reactivities. Here, we used fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-fractionated extracts of F. hepatica excretory/secretory antigens (E/S Ags) for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis. To develop an improved diagnostic method, we fractionated F. hepatica E/S Ags by anion exchange chromatography on a Sepharose CL-6B column and then tested the serodiagnostic values of the fractions. We used sera from F. hepatica-infected human and sheep as positive controls. Sera from patients with hydatidosis and strongyloidiasis were used for cross-reactivity studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) of the second FPLC peak, containing 20, 25, and 70 kDa proteins, discriminated between F. hepatica-infected and uninfected human and sheep samples. Fractionation of F. hepatica E/S Ags by FPLC is a fast and reproducible way of obtaining antigens useful for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  9. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelitsch, T. M.; Collet, B. A.; Riascos, A. P.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze time-discrete and time-continuous ‘fractional’ random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in n  =  1, 2, 3,.. dimensions. The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving fractional powers of Laplacian matrices {{L}\\fracα{2}}} where α =2 recovers the normal walk. First we demonstrate that the interval 0<α ≤slant 2 is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for the transition matrix of the fractional random walk and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} , and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk. The representation for the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} relates fractional random walks with normal random walks. We show that the matrix elements of the transition matrix of the fractional random walk exihibit for large cubic n-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an n-dimensional infinite space Riesz fractional derivative type indicating emergence of Lévy flights. As a further footprint of Lévy flights in the n-dimensional space, the transition matrix and return probabilities of the fractional random walk are dominated for large times t by slowly relaxing long-wave modes leading to a characteristic {{t}-\\frac{n{α}} -decay. It can be concluded that, due to long range moves of fractional random walk, a small world property is emerging increasing the efficiency to explore the lattice when instead of a normal random walk a fractional random walk is chosen.

  10. AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids with highly efficient visible-light driven photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Masanao; Suzuki, Tohru; Kaneco, Satoshi

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid was prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} displays the excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transforms to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system. • h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization over AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The activity enhancement is ascribed to a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI. - Abstract: Highly efficient visible-light-driven AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid photocatalysts with different mole ratios of AgI were prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) technique. Under visible light irradiation (>420 nm), the AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} photocatalysts displayed the higher photocatalytic activity than pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and AgI for the decolorization of acid orange 7 (AO 7). Among the hybrid photocatalysts, AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 80% of AgI exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for the decolorization of AO 7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transformed to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system while the photocatalytic activity of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} remained after 5 recycling runs. In addition, the quenching effects of different scavengers displayed that the reactive h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization. The photocatalytic activity enhancement of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids can be ascribed to the efficient separation of electron–hole pairs through a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI, in which Ag nanoparticles act as the charge separation center.

  11. Unwrapping Students' Ideas about Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rebecca M.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Kazemi, Elham; Lind, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Supporting students to develop an understanding of the meaning of fractions is an important goal of elementary school mathematics. This involves developing partitioning strategies, creating representations, naming fractional quantities, and using symbolic notation. This article describes how teachers can use a formative assessment problem to…

  12. Rational Exponentials and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Using continued fraction expansions, we can approximate constants, such as pi and e, using an appropriate integer n raised to the power x[superscript 1/x], x a suitable rational. We review continued fractions and give an algorithm for producing these approximations.

  13. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  14. Improving performance, stability, and processability of OFETs with printed Ag electrodes by means of a novel, multipurpose self-assembled monolayer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, Milan; Jesper, Malte; Schinke, Janusz; Hillebrandt, Sabina; Reiser, Patrick; Rödlmeier, Tobias; Angelova, Iva; Hamburger, Manuel; Lemmer, Ulrich; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo; Lovrincic, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel SAM-forming molecule bisjulolidyldisulfide that reduces the WF of metal surfaces by 1.2 eV and can lower the barrier for electron injection to organic semiconductors. Applied to Au and Ag surfaces, including inkjet-printed Ag on PET, we characterized bisjulolidyldisulfide monolayers by means of photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and sessile drop technique, as well as their influence on the performance of n-type OFETs. Next a strong reduction of the contact resistance by two orders of magnitude, we found that this SAM treatment extends the shelf lifetime of ambient-stored OFET devices. Also, it improves the wettability and thereby facilitates solution processing of a subsequent layer with respect to the untreated surface. The full electrical functionality of bisjulolidyldisulfide SAMs was found to become manifest with only one minute of immersion in ethanol solution. PES measurements suggests that the surface coverage is thorough on Au, but only fractional on Ag, especially on printed Ag. However, the quality of SAM-treated bottom contacts in n-type OFETs is very similar for all three investigated metal surfaces (Au and Ag evaporated and printed Ag). This is especially important for printed Ag-electrodes, as their surface was found to be significantly worse for device performance in comparison to their evaporated Ag counterpart. Using this surface treatment we realized integrated unipolar n-type ring oscillators with inkjet printed Ag electrodes.

  15. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in human lung cells: the role of cellular uptake, agglomeration and Ag release

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are currently one of the most manufactured nanomaterials. A wide range of toxicity studies have been performed on various AgNPs, but these studies report a high variation in toxicity and often lack proper particle characterization. The aim of this study was to investigate size- and coating-dependent toxicity of thoroughly characterized AgNPs following exposure of human lung cells and to explore the mechanisms of toxicity. Methods BEAS-2B cells were exposed to citrate coated AgNPs of different primary particle sizes (10, 40 and 75 nm) as well as to 10 nm PVP coated and 50 nm uncoated AgNPs. The particle agglomeration in cell medium was investigated by photon cross correlation spectroscopy (PCCS); cell viability by LDH and Alamar Blue assay; ROS induction by DCFH-DA assay; genotoxicity by alkaline comet assay and γH2AX foci formation; uptake and intracellular localization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and cellular dose as well as Ag release by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Results The results showed cytotoxicity only of the 10 nm particles independent of surface coating. In contrast, all AgNPs tested caused an increase in overall DNA damage after 24 h assessed by the comet assay, suggesting independent mechanisms for cytotoxicity and DNA damage. However, there was no γH2AX foci formation and no increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reasons for the higher toxicity of the 10 nm particles were explored by investigating particle agglomeration in cell medium, cellular uptake, intracellular localization and Ag release. Despite different agglomeration patterns, there was no evident difference in the uptake or intracellular localization of the citrate and PVP coated AgNPs. However, the 10 nm particles released significantly more Ag compared with all other AgNPs (approx. 24 wt% vs. 4–7 wt%) following 24 h in cell medium. The released fraction in cell medium did not induce any

  16. The cardiovascular response to the AGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David; Mctaggart, Wesley G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of experiments on human subjects conducted to study the cardiovascular response to various g-levels and exposure times using an artificial gravity simulator (AGS). The AGS is a short arm centrifuge consisting of a turntable, a traction system, a platform and four beds. Data collection hardware is part of the communication system. The AGS provides a steep acceleration gradient in subjects in the supine position.

  17. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, J.; Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  18. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, J. Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  19. A new fractional wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a potent tool to analyze the time-varying signal. However, it fails in locating the fractional Fourier domain (FRFD)-frequency contents which is required in some applications. A novel fractional wavelet transform (FRWT) is proposed to solve this problem. It displays the time and FRFD-frequency information jointly in the time-FRFD-frequency plane. The definition, basic properties, inverse transform and reproducing kernel of the proposed FRWT are considered. It has been shown that an FRWT with proper order corresponds to the classical wavelet transform (WT). The multiresolution analysis (MRA) associated with the developed FRWT, together with the construction of the orthogonal fractional wavelets are also presented. Three applications are discussed: the analysis of signal with time-varying frequency content, the FRFD spectrum estimation of signals that involving noise, and the construction of fractional Harr wavelet. Simulations verify the validity of the proposed FRWT.

  20. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  1. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) fraction and hemicelluloses were calculated using a curve subtraction. The fermentation rate of whole was the highest for the LE (p < 0.05). For all citrus by-products lag time was longer for hemicellulose than other carbohydrate fractions. There was no significant difference among potential gas production (A) volumes of whole test feeds (p < 0.16). Dry matter (DM) digestibility contents of LE and LI were the highest (p < 0.02). The NDF digestibility was the highest (p < 0.05) in LI and GP, while the lowest (p < 0.03) values of ADF digestibility were observed in LI and LE. According to the results of the present study, carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have high potential for degradability. It could also be concluded that carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have remarkable difference in digestion kinetics and digestive behavior.

  2. A comparison of anatomical and dosimetric variations in the first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haihua; Tu, Yu; Wang, Wei; Hu, Wei; Ding, Weijun; Yu, Changhui; Zhou, Chao

    2013-11-04

    The purpose of this study was to compare anatomical and dosimetric variations in first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled. Each patient had two repeat computed tomography (CT) scans before the 16th and 25th fraction. Hybrid IMRT plans were generated to evaluate the dosimetric changes. There was a significant decrease of the transverse diameter of nasopharyngeal and neck as well as gross tumor volume (GTV) in the primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (GTVnx) and involved lymph nodes (GTVnd) during the first 15 fractions, and between fraction 16 and 25 (p < 0.05). Consequently, there was a significant reduction of the percentage of the volume receiving the prescribed dose (V100) of CTV1 and GTVnd, which was more prominent after the first 15 fractions treatment compared to that between fraction 16 and 25 (p < 0.05). Additionally, there was a significant increase in the mean dose (Dmean) and percentage of volume receiving ≥ 30 Gy (V30) to the bilateral parotid in the first 15 fractions (p < 0.05), but not between fraction 16 and 25. While the maximum dose to the spinal cord was significantly increased both in the first 15 fractions, and between fraction 16 and 25 (p < 0.05), the increase of the percent of spinal cord volume receiving ≥ 40 Gy (V40) was significantly higher in the first 15 fractions compared to that between fraction 16 and 25 (p < 0.05). Based on the dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, a total 39.1% (9/23) of phantom plan 1 (generated by applying the beam configurations of the original IMRT treatment plan to the anatomy of the second CT scan) and 17.4% (4/23) of phantom 2 (generated by applying the beam configurations of the replan 1 to the anatomy of the third CT scan) were out of limit for the dose to the normal critical structures. In conclusion, our data indicated that

  3. Rapid Biosynthesis of AgNPs Using Soil Bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii With Promising Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, Gopalu; Jagathambal, Matheswaran; Gusev, Alexander; Torres, Juan Antonio Lopez; Kolesnikov, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Denis

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are applied in various fields from electronics to biomedical applications as a result of their high surface-to-volume ratio. Even though different approaches are available for synthesis of AgNPs, a nontoxic method for the synthesis has not yet been developed. Thus, this study focused on developing an easy and ecofriendly approach to synthesize AgNPs using Azotobacter vinelandii culture extracts. The biosynthesized nanoparticles were further characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive spectrum, particle size distribution (PSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). UV absorption noticed at 435 nm showed formation of AgNPs. The XRD pattern showed a face-centered cubic structure with broad peaks of 28.2°, 32.6°, 46.6°, 55.2°, 57.9°, and 67.8°. The FTIR confirmed the involvement of various functional groups in the biosynthesis of AgNPs. The PSD and TEM analyses showed spherical, well-distributed nanoparticles with an average size of 20-70 nm. The elemental studies confirmed the existence of pure AgNPs. The bacterial extract containing extracellular enzyme nitrate reductase converted silver nitrate into AgNPs. AgNPs significantly inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria such as Streptomyces fradiae (National Collection of Industrial Microorganisms (NCIM) 2419), Staphylococcus aureus (NCIM 2127), Escherichia coli (NCIM 2065), and Serratia marcescens (NCIM 2919). In addition, biosynthesized AgNPs were found to possess strong antioxidant activity. Thus, the results of this study revealed that biosynthesized AgNPs could serve as a lead in the development of nanomedicine.

  4. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Hattori, T.; Huang, H.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2007-06-01

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  5. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Hattori, T.; Lin, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  6. Transformation from Ag@Ag3PO4 to Ag@Ag2SO4 hybrid at room temperature: preparation and its visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ting; Gao, Shanmin; Wang, Qingyao; Xu, Hui; Wang, Zeyan; Huang, Baibiao; Dai, Ying

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, Ag/Ag2SO4 hybrid photocatalysts were obtained via a facile redox-precipitation reaction approach by using Ag@Ag3PO4 nanocomposite as the precursor and KMnO4 as the oxidant. Multiple techniques, such as X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), photocurrent and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), were applied to investigate the structures, morphologies, optical, and electronic properties of as-prepared samples. The photocatalytic activities were evaluated by photodegradation of organic rhodamine B (RhB) and methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation. It was found that pure Ag2SO4 can partially transform into metallic Ag during the photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants, but the Ag/Ag2SO4 hybrids can maintain its structure stability and show enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity because of the surface plasma resonance effect of the metallic Ag.

  7. Tarnish resistance evaluation of experimental Pd-free Ag-Au-Pt-Cu dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Takuma, Yasuko; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Fujita, Takeshi; Hisatsune, Kunihiro

    2010-05-01

    This study evaluated the tarnish resistance of eight experimental Pd-free Ag-Au-Pt-Cu dental alloys in a 0.1% Na(2)S aqueous solution at 37 degrees C. Color measurements of the plate samples were made using a computerized spectrophotometer before and after immersion in the test solution for up to 72 hours. Tarnish discoloration was evaluated using the color difference vector, DeltaE*, in the CIELAB color space. Microstructural observation of each sample through an optical microscope revealed the matrix phase as the major constituent and second-phase small grains in the matrix phase. Selective tarnish discoloration occurred in the matrix, and fractional area of the matrix to the whole surface area was influenced by the sum of Au and Ag concentrations. The DeltaE* value significantly decreased with increasing Au/(Au+Ag) atomic ratio. In conclusion, the Au/(Au+Ag) ratio in an alloy and the fractional area of the matrix were found to be primary and auxiliary factors affecting the tarnish resistance of the experimental alloys.

  8. Effect of Mg or Ag addition on the evaporation field of Al.

    PubMed

    Aruga, Yasuhiro; Nako, Hidenori; Tsuneishi, Hidemasa; Hasegawa, Yuki; Tao, Hiroaki; Ichihara, Chikara; Serizawa, Ai

    2013-09-01

    It is known that the distribution of the charge-states as well as the evaporation field shift to higher values as the specimen temperature is decreased at a constant rate of evaporation. This study has explored the effect of Mg or Ag addition on the evaporation field of Al in terms of the charge state distribution of the field evaporated Al ions. The fractional abundance of Al(2+) ions with respect to the total Al ions in Al-Mg alloy is lower than that in pure Al, whereas it shows higher level in the Al-Ag alloy at lower temperatures. The temperature dependence of the fractional abundance of Al(2+) ions has been also confirmed, suggesting that Al atoms in the Al-Mg alloy need lower evaporation field, while higher field is necessary to evaporate Al atoms in the Al-Ag alloy, compared with pure Al. This tendency is in agreement with that of the evaporation fields estimated theoretically by means of measurements of the work function and calculations of the binding energy of the pure Al, Al-Mg and Al-Ag alloys.

  9. Electrical transport properties of Co-based skutterudites filled with Ag and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Maria; Lo, Cynthia S.

    2012-09-01

    This work presents theoretical calculations of the electrical transport properties of the Ag, Au, and La fractionally filled bulk skutterudites: CoSb3, CoAs3, and CoP3. Density functional theory, along with projector augmented wave potentials, was used to calculate bulk band structures and partial density of states. The Seebeck coefficient (S), electrical conductivity (σ), and power factor (S2σ) were calculated as a function of temperature and filling fraction using the momentum matrix method along the entire first Brillouin zone. Calculated trends in the electrical transport properties agree with previously published experimental measurements for p-type unfilled and La-filled CoSb3. The calculated S and σ values for the Ag- and Au-filled compounds indicate that the most promising electronic properties are exhibited by p-type Au0.125(CoSb3)4, Au0.25(CoSb3)4, and Au(CoSb3)4. Au is therefore recommended as a promising filler for improved thermoelectric properties in cobalt antimonides. Ag is also a good filler for cobalt phosphides; the creation of a negative indirect band gap is observed in Ag(CoP3)4, which indicates semimetallic behavior, so this compound may possibly exhibit lower thermal conductivity than metallic CoP3. Finally, we recommend future directions for improving the thermoelectric figure of merit of these materials.

  10. Silver(I) complexes of the weakly coordinating solvents SO(2) and CH(2)Cl(2): crystal structures, bonding, and energetics of [Ag(OSO)][Al{OC(CF(3))(3)}(4)], [Ag(OSO)(2/2)][SbF(6)], and [Ag(CH(2)Cl(2))(2)][SbF(6)].

    PubMed

    Decken, Andreas; Knapp, Carsten; Nikiforov, Grigori B; Passmore, Jack; Rautiainen, J Mikko; Wang, Xinping; Zeng, Xiaoqing

    2009-06-22

    -binding energies of [Ag(L)(n)](+) (L=SO(2), CH(2)Cl(2); n=1, 2) and solid-state enthalpies obtained from Born-Fajans-Haber cycles by using the volume-based thermodynamics (VBT) approach. Bonding analysis (VB, NBO, MO) of [Ag(L)(n)](+) suggests that these complexes are almost completely stabilized by electrostatic interaction, that is, monopole-dipole interaction, with almost no covalent contribution by electron donation from the ligand orbitals into the vacant 5s orbital of Ag(+). All experimental findings and theoretical considerations demonstrate that SO(2) is less covalently bound to Ag(+) than CH(2)Cl(2) and support the thesis that SO(2) is a polar but non-coordinating solvent towards Ag(+).

  11. Toxicokinetics of Ag in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to Ag NPs and AgNO₃ via soil and food.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been used in numerous consumer products and may enter the soil through the land application of biosolids. However, little is known about the relationship between Ag NP exposure and their bioavailability for soil organisms. This study aims at comparing the uptake and elimination kinetics of Ag upon exposures to different Ag forms (NPs and ionic Ag (as AgNO3)) in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus. Isopods were exposed to contaminated Lufa 2.2 soil or alder leaves as food. Uptake and elimination rate constants for soil exposure did not significantly differ between Ag NPs and ionic Ag at 30 and 60 mg Ag/kg. For dietary exposure, the uptake rate constant was up to 5 times higher for Ag NPs than for AgNO3, but this was related to feeding activity and exposure concentrations, while no difference in the elimination rate constants was found. When comparing both routes, dietary exposure resulted in lower Ag uptake rate constants but elimination rate constants did not differ. A fast Ag uptake was observed from both routes and most of the Ag taken up seemed not to be eliminated. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence showed Ag in the S-cells of the hepatopancreas, thus supporting the observations from the kinetic experiment (i.e. low elimination). In addition, our results show that isopods have an extremely high Ag accumulation capacity, suggesting the presence of an efficient Ag storage compartment.

  12. Single step electrochemical synthesis of hydrophilic/hydrophobic Ag5 and Ag6 blue luminescent clusters.

    PubMed

    Santiago González, Beatriz; Blanco, M C; López-Quintela, M Arturo

    2012-12-21

    Well-defined Ag(5) and Ag(6) dodecanethiol/tetrabutyl ammonium-protected clusters were prepared by a one-pot electrochemical method. Ag clusters show bright and photostable emissions. The presence of a dual capping renders the silver clusters soluble in both organic and aqueous solvents.

  13. Synthesis of Cu-Ag@Ag particles using hyperbranched polyester as template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen-Song

    2015-07-01

    In this manuscript, the third-generation hyperbranched polyester was synthesized with 2, 2-dimethylol propionic acid as AB2 monomer and pentaerythrite as core molecule by using step by step polymerization process at first. Then, the Cu-Ag particles were prepared by co-reduction of silver nitrate and copper nitrate with ascorbic acid in the aqueous solution using hyperbranched polyester as template. Finally, the Cu-Ag@Ag particles were prepared by coating silver on the surface of Cu-Ag particles by reduction of silver nitrate. The synthesized hyperbranched polyester and Cu-Ag@Ag particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV-vis spectra, x-ray diffraction, Laser light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and SEM. UV-vis spectra results showed that the Cu-Ag@Ag particles had a strong absorption band at around 420 nm. Laser light scattering and SEM studies confirmed that the most frequent particle sizes of Cu-Ag@Ag particles were 1.2 um. TGA results indicated that the Cu-Ag@Ag particles had good thermal stability. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. An Au/AgBr-Ag heterostructure plasmonic photocatalyst with enhanced catalytic activity under visible light.

    PubMed

    Purbia, Rahul; Paria, Santanu

    2017-01-17

    This study reports an easy synthesis protocol of a novel bimetallic silver halide (Au/AgBr-Ag) plasmonic heterostructure as a visible light induced photocatalyst. In this process, first CTAB capped Au NPs were coated with AgBr, and then Ag nanoparticles were formed on the surface of AgBr by photoreduction, while exposing to daylight at room temperature. The presence of Au and Ag improves the visible absorption ability of NPs and avoids charge recombination of the semiconductor AgBr during photoexcitation, which in turn enhances 16 and 8.9 fold the photocatalytic efficiency of Rhodamine B dye degradation under visible light irradiation compared to that of pure AgBr and AgBr/Ag, respectively. The recycling tests of the photocatalyst show only ∼8.7% decrease in efficiency after the 5(th) cycle of reuse without changing the morphology. During the photocatalytic process, active superoxide radicals (O2˙(-)) play a major role, proved through scavenger trapping and photoluminescence experiments. The presence of two plasmonic metals (Au and Ag) in the heterostructure helps to improve visible light absorption as well as avoid charge recombination of the semiconductor AgBr to act as a better photocatalyst. Since this heteronanostructure can be easily synthesized by a one-step method, this study could provide a new approach for the development of efficient bimetallic/semiconductor halide plasmonic photocatalysts with enhanced visible absorption and better charge separation.

  15. Highly efficient visible light plasmonic photocatalyst Ag@Ag(Br,I).

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Huang, Baibiao; Zhang, Qianqian; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Qin, Xiaoyan; Dai, Ying; Zhan, Jie; Yu, Jiaoxian; Liu, Haixia; Lou, Zaizhu

    2010-09-03

    The new plasmonic photocatalyst Ag@Ag(Br,I) was synthesized by the ion-exchange process between the silver bromide and potassium iodide, then by reducing some Ag(+) ions in the surface region of Ag(Br,I) particles to Ag(0) species. Ag nanoparticles are formed from Ag(Br,I) by the light-induced chemical reduction reaction. The Ag@Ag(Br,I) particles have irregular shapes with their sizes varying from 83 nm to 1 mum. The as-grown plasmonic photocatalyst shows strong absorption in the visible light region because of the plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles. The ability of this compound to reduce Cr(VI) under visible light was compared with those of other reference photocatalyst. The plasmonic photocatalyst is shown to be highly efficient under visible light. The stability of the photocatalyst was examined by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The XRD pattern and XPS spectra prove the stability of the plasmonic photocatalyst Ag@Ag(Br,I).

  16. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-→1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-←1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(υ)→1Ag-(υ) emission and the 3Ag-(υ)←1Ag-(υ) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of υ = 2 → 1 → 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  17. Ab initio calculation of structural stability, electronic and optical properties of Ag2Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameshkumar, S.; Jaiganesh, G.; Jayalakshmi, V.; Palanivel, B.

    2015-06-01

    The structural stability, electronic and optical properties of Ag2Se compound is studied using ab initio packages. Ag2Se is found to crystallize in orthorhombic structure with two different space groups i.e. P212121 (No. 19) and P2221 (No. 17). For this compound in these two space groups, the total energy has been computed as a function of volume. Our calculated results suggest that the P212121-phase is more stable than that of the P2221-phase. The band structure calculation show that Ag2Se is semimetallic with an overlap of about 0.014 eV in P212121-phase whereas is metallic in nature in P2221-phase. Moreover, the optical properties including the dielectric fuction, energy loss spectrum are obtained and analysed.

  18. Optimal synthesis and characterization of Ag nanofluids by electrical explosion of wires in liquids.

    PubMed

    Ju Park, Eun; Won Lee, Seung; Bang, In Cheol; Park, Hyung Wook

    2011-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles were produced by electrical explosion of wires in liquids with no additive. In this study, we optimized the fabrication method and examined the effects of manufacturing process parameters. Morphology and size of the Ag nanoparticles were determined using transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Size and zeta potential were analyzed using dynamic light scattering. A response optimization technique showed that optimal conditions were achieved when capacitance was 30 μF, wire length was 38 mm, liquid volume was 500 mL, and the liquid type was deionized water. The average Ag nanoparticle size in water was 118.9 nm and the zeta potential was -42.5 mV. The critical heat flux of the 0.001-vol.% Ag nanofluid was higher than pure water.

  19. Optimal synthesis and characterization of Ag nanofluids by electrical explosion of wires in liquids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were produced by electrical explosion of wires in liquids with no additive. In this study, we optimized the fabrication method and examined the effects of manufacturing process parameters. Morphology and size of the Ag nanoparticles were determined using transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Size and zeta potential were analyzed using dynamic light scattering. A response optimization technique showed that optimal conditions were achieved when capacitance was 30 μF, wire length was 38 mm, liquid volume was 500 mL, and the liquid type was deionized water. The average Ag nanoparticle size in water was 118.9 nm and the zeta potential was -42.5 mV. The critical heat flux of the 0.001-vol.% Ag nanofluid was higher than pure water. PMID:21711757

  20. Half-life determination for 108Ag and 110Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the half-life of the short-lived silver radionuclides 108Ag and 110Ag were measured by following the activity of samples after they were irradiated in the IEA-R1 reactor. The results were then fitted using a non-paralizable dead time correction to the regular exponential decay and the individual half-life values obtained were then analyzed using both the Normalized Residuals and the Rajeval techniques, in order to reach the most exact and precise final values. To check the validity of dead-time correction, a second correction method was also employed by means of counting a long-lived 60Co radioactive source together with the samples as a livetime chronometer. The final half-live values obtained using both dead-time correction methods were in good agreement, showing that the correction was properly assessed. The results obtained are partially compatible with the literature values, but with a lower uncertainty, and allow a discussion on the last ENSDF compilations' values.

  1. The effect of gas fraction on centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z. T.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, L. F.; Ning, C.; Xie, S. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the multiphase flow field in M125 centrifugal pump, three-dimensional modeling was used for internal flow through three-dimensional software Pro/E. Then based on SST turbulence model combining with Rayleigh-Plesset cavitation model, and structured grid to simulate the hydraulic characteristics of volute and impeller within different gas conditions. The velocity, pressure and gas volume fraction distributions of the interior flow field of volute and impeller were obtained and analyzed, which revealed the effect of gas fractions on the flow characteristic of the centrifugal pump.

  2. Progress with the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demands that a rapid- cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues needing special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  3. TiO2 nanofibers coated with rGO and Ag2O for promoting visible light photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun; Wang, Yuan; OuYang, Xiaoping; Liu, Lixin; Zhu, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    Due to the increase in environmental pollution, highly efficient photocatalysts with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity have attracted considerable attention. In this work, TiO2/reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/Ag2O nanoheterostructures (NHs) based photocatalysts are successfully synthesized and a markedly higher visible light photocatalytic activity is achieved, of which at least 96% of Rhodamine B (RhB) molecules are decomposed by the TiO2/rGO/Ag2O NHs after 120 min visible light irradiation, but only 30% of RhB molecules are decomposed by pure TiO2 nanofibers (NFs). Furthermore, the influence of rGO volume ratio in TiO2/rGO/Ag2O NHs photocatalysts on visible light photocatalysis is studied, and the result shows that the sample with 5 vol% rGO exhibits the highest visible light photocatalytic activity. The much enhanced visible light photocatalytic performance of the ternary TiO2/rGO/Ag2O NHs can be ascribed to the intense visible light absorption of Ag2O, the excellent electron conductivity of 2D rGO and the matched energy level of TiO2, Ag2O, and rGO, for efficient boost of the photogenerated charge carriers transfer and separation at the interface of hierarchical TiO2/rGO/Ag2O NHs.

  4. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    DOE PAGES

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; ...

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeemanmore » energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.« less

  5. Recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon fractions.

    PubMed

    Hansell, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exhibits a spectrum of reactivity, from very fast turnover of the most bioavailable forms in the surface ocean to long-lived materials circulating within the ocean abyss. These disparate reactivities group DOC by fractions with distinctive functions in the cycling of carbon, ranging from support of the microbial loop to involvement in the biological pump to a hypothesized major source/sink of atmospheric CO(2) driving paleoclimate variability. Here, the major fractions constituting the global ocean's recalcitrant DOC pool are quantitatively and qualitatively characterized with reference to their roles in carbon biogeochemistry. A nomenclature for the fractions is proposed based on those roles.

  6. Visible light driven photocatalysis and antibacterial activity of AgVO{sub 3} and Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anamika; Dutta, Dimple P.; Ballal, A.; Tyagi, A.K.; Fulekar, M.H.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag/AgVO{sub 3} and pure AgVO{sub 3} nanowires synthesized by sonochemical process. • Characterization done using XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and BET analysis. • Visible light degradation of RhB by Ag/AgVO{sub 3} within 45 min. • Antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} demonstrated. - Abstract: Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires and AgVO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized in aqueous media via a facile sonochemical route. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy together with an energy dispersion X-ray spectrum analysis, transmission electron microscopy and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The results revealed that inert atmosphere promotes the formation of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires. The photocatalytic studies revealed that the Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires exhibited complete photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B within 45 min under visible light irradiation. The antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires was tested against Escherechia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The minimum growth inhibitory concentration value was found to be 50 and 10 folds lower than for the antibiotic ciprofloxacin for E. coli and B. subtilis, respectively. The antibacterial properties of the β-AgVO{sub 3} nanorods prove that in case of the Ag dispersed Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires, the enhanced antibacterial action is also due to contribution from the AgVO{sub 3} support.

  7. Effects of soil and dietary exposures to Ag nanoparticles and AgNO₃ in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Ag-NPs and AgNO3 on the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus were determined upon soil and dietary exposures. Isopods avoided Ag in soil, with EC50 values of ∼16.0 and 14.0 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. Feeding inhibition tests in soil showed EC50s for effects on consumption ratio of 127 and 56.7 mg Ag/kg, respectively. Although similar EC50s for effects on biomass were observed for nanoparticulate and ionic Ag (114 and 120 mg Ag/kg dry soil, respectively), at higher concentrations greater biomass loss was found for AgNO3. Upon dietary exposure, AgNO3 was more toxic, with EC50 for effects on biomass change being >1500 and 233 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. The difference in toxicity between Ag-NPs and AgNO3 could not be explained from Ag body concentrations. This suggests that the relation between toxicity and bioavailability of Ag-NPs differs from that of ionic Ag in soils.

  8. High-order fractional partial differential equation transform for molecular surface construction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Langhua; Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fractional derivative or fractional calculus plays a significant role in theoretical modeling of scientific and engineering problems. However, only relatively low order fractional derivatives are used at present. In general, it is not obvious what role a high fractional derivative can play and how to make use of arbitrarily high-order fractional derivatives. This work introduces arbitrarily high-order fractional partial differential equations (PDEs) to describe fractional hyperdiffusions. The fractional PDEs are constructed via fractional variational principle. A fast fractional Fourier transform (FFFT) is proposed to numerically integrate the high-order fractional PDEs so as to avoid stringent stability constraints in solving high-order evolution PDEs. The proposed high-order fractional PDEs are applied to the surface generation of proteins. We first validate the proposed method with a variety of test examples in two and three-dimensional settings. The impact of high-order fractional derivatives to surface analysis is examined. We also construct fractional PDE transform based on arbitrarily high-order fractional PDEs. We demonstrate that the use of arbitrarily high-order derivatives gives rise to time-frequency localization, the control of the spectral distribution, and the regulation of the spatial resolution in the fractional PDE transform. Consequently, the fractional PDE transform enables the mode decomposition of images, signals, and surfaces. The effect of the propagation time on the quality of resulting molecular surfaces is also studied. Computational efficiency of the present surface generation method is compared with the MSMS approach in Cartesian representation. We further validate the present method by examining some benchmark indicators of macromolecular surfaces, i.e., surface area, surface enclosed volume, surface electrostatic potential and solvation free energy. Extensive numerical experiments and comparison with an established surface model

  9. High-order fractional partial differential equation transform for molecular surface construction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Langhua; Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fractional derivative or fractional calculus plays a significant role in theoretical modeling of scientific and engineering problems. However, only relatively low order fractional derivatives are used at present. In general, it is not obvious what role a high fractional derivative can play and how to make use of arbitrarily high-order fractional derivatives. This work introduces arbitrarily high-order fractional partial differential equations (PDEs) to describe fractional hyperdiffusions. The fractional PDEs are constructed via fractional variational principle. A fast fractional Fourier transform (FFFT) is proposed to numerically integrate the high-order fractional PDEs so as to avoid stringent stability constraints in solving high-order evolution PDEs. The proposed high-order fractional PDEs are applied to the surface generation of proteins. We first validate the proposed method with a variety of test examples in two and three-dimensional settings. The impact of high-order fractional derivatives to surface analysis is examined. We also construct fractional PDE transform based on arbitrarily high-order fractional PDEs. We demonstrate that the use of arbitrarily high-order derivatives gives rise to time-frequency localization, the control of the spectral distribution, and the regulation of the spatial resolution in the fractional PDE transform. Consequently, the fractional PDE transform enables the mode decomposition of images, signals, and surfaces. The effect of the propagation time on the quality of resulting molecular surfaces is also studied. Computational efficiency of the present surface generation method is compared with the MSMS approach in Cartesian representation. We further validate the present method by examining some benchmark indicators of macromolecular surfaces, i.e., surface area, surface enclosed volume, surface electrostatic potential and solvation free energy. Extensive numerical experiments and comparison with an established surface model

  10. Photocatalytic oxidation removal of Hg0 using ternary Ag/AgI-Ag2CO3 hybrids in wet scrubbing process under fluorescent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Anchao; Zhang, Lixiang; Chen, Xiaozhuan; Zhu, Qifeng; Liu, Zhichao; Xiang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A series of ternary Ag/AgI-Ag2CO3 photocatalysts synthesized using a facile coprecipitation method were employed to investigate their performances of Hg0 removal in a wet scrubbing reactor. The hybrids were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, SEM-EDS, HRTEM, XPS, DRS and ESR. The photocatalytic activities of Hg0 removal were evaluated under fluorescent light. The results showed that AgI content, fluorescent light irradiation, reaction temperature all showed significant influences on Hg0 removal. NO exhibited significant effect on Hg0 removal in comparison to SO2. Among these ternary Ag/AgI-Ag2CO3 hybrids, Ag/AgI(0.1)-Ag2CO3 showed the highest Hg0 removal efficiency, which could be ascribed to the effective separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs between AgI and Ag2CO3 and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect in the visible region by metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag0 NPs). The trapping studies of reactive radicals showed that the superoxide radicals (rad O2-) may play a key role in Hg0 removal under fluorescent light. According to the experimental and characterization results, a possible photocatalytic oxidation mechanism for enhanced Hg0 removal over Ag/AgI(0.1)-Ag2CO3 hybrid under fluorescent light was proposed.

  11. Distribution and Xe129 NMR chemical shifts of Xen clusters in the alpha cages of zeolite AgA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Lim, Hyung-Mi

    1997-09-01

    The distributions and 129Xe NMR chemical shifts of xenon in zeolite AgA have been measured in a series of experiments by Moudrakovski, Ratcliffe, and Ripmeester [Proc. Internat. Zeolite Conference, Quebec, 1995; unpublished]. We carry out grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of xenon in a rigid zeolite AgA lattice to provide the average Xen cluster shifts, and the distributions Pn for comparison with their experiments. The GCMC results for the distributions, the fraction Pn of the alpha cages containing n Xe atoms, are compared with the experimental distributions in 12 samples and the agreement is excellent. The distributions in NaA and in AgA are very similar, as can be established from the comparison of the dispersion of the distributions, {-2}, and both are different from the idealized hypergeometric distribution, in which the component atoms occupy eight lattice sites per cage under mutual exclusion. The calculated chemical shift increments [σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]AgA are in good agreement with experiment. The differences between these and the increments in zeolite NaA, {[σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]AgA-[σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]NaA}, are fairly small and are in good agreement with experiment. The absolute 129Xe chemical shifts of Xen in the alpha cages of AgA are nearly uniformly shifted by about 40 ppm compared to the Xen clusters in NaA. This is attributed to the Fermi contact shifts arising from the Ag0 metal atoms that form the linear Ag32+ complexes that are found within the beta cages of AgA.

  12. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  13. AgRISTARS documents tracking list report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A quarterly listing of documents issued and placed in the AgRISTARS tracking system is provided. The technical publications are arranged by type of documents. The reference AgRISTARS document number, title and date of publication, the issuing organization, and the National Technical Information Service reference number is given.

  14. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  15. Surface Thiolation of Al Microspheres to Deposite Thin and Compact Ag Shells for High Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilong; Wen, Jianghong; Zhao, Suling; Chen, Zhihong; Ren, Ke; Sun, Jie; Guan, Jianguo

    2015-12-15

    In this work, we have demonstrated a method for controllable thiolated functionalization coupled with electroless silver plating to achieve aluminum@silver (Al@Ag) core-shell composite particles with thin and compact layers. First, Al microspheres were functionalized by a well-known polymerizable silane coupling agent, i.e., 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS). Decreasing the ethanol-to-water volume ratio (F) in silane solution produces modification films with high content of thiol groups on Al microspheres, owing to the dehydration of silane molecules with hydroxyl groups on Al microspheres and self-polymerization of silane molecules. Then, ethanol was used as one of the solvents to play a major role in the uniform dispersion of silane coupling agent in the solution, resulting in uniformly distributing and covalently attaching thiol groups on Al microspheres. In electroless silver plating, thiol groups being densely grafted on the surface of Al microspheres favor the heterogeneous nucleation of Ag, since the thiol group can firmly bind with Ag(+) and enable the in situ reduction by the reducing reagent. In this manner, dense Ag nuclei tend to produce thin and compact silver shells on the Al microspheres surfaces. The as-obtained Al@Ag core-shell composite particles show a resistivity as low as (8.58 ± 0.07) × 10(-5) Ω·cm even when the Ag content is as low as 15.46 wt %. Therefore, the as-obtained Al@Ag core-shell composite particles have advantages of low weight, low silver content and high conductivity, which could make it a promising candidate for application in conductive and electromagnetic shielding composite materials.

  16. Progress in Solving the Elusive Ag Transport Mechanism in TRISO Coated Particles: What is new?

    SciTech Connect

    Isabella Van Rooyen

    2014-10-01

    The TRISO particle for HTRs has been developed to an advanced state where the coating withstands internal gas pressures and retains fission products during irradiation and under postulated accidents. However, one exception is Ag that has been found to be released from high quality TRISO coated particles when irradiated and can also during high temperature accident heating tests. Although out- of- pile laboratory tests have never hither to been able to demonstrate a diffusion process of Ag in SiC, effective diffusion coefficients have been derived to successfully reproduce measured Ag-110m releases from irradiated HTR fuel elements, compacts and TRISO particles It was found that silver transport through SiC does not proceed via bulk volume diffusion. Presently grain boundary diffusion that may be irradiation enhanced either by neutron bombardment or by the presence of fission products such as Pd, are being investigated. Recent studies of irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), transmission kukuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used to further the understanding of Ag transport through TRISO particles. No silver was observed in SiC grains, but Ag was identified at triple-points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in some of the very same triple junctions, but this could be related to silver behavior as Ag-110m decays to Cd-110. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries and in most SiC grain boundaries and the potential role of Pd in the transport of Ag will be discussed.

  17. AgPO2F2 and Ag9(PO2F2)14: the first Ag(i) and Ag(i)/Ag(ii) difluorophosphates with complex crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Grochala, Wojciech

    2015-12-07

    The reaction of AgF2 with P2O3F4 yields a mixed valence Ag(I)/Ag(II) difluorophosphate salt with AgAg(PO2F2)14 stoichiometry - the first Ag(ii)-PO2F2 system known. This highly moisture sensitive brown solid is thermally stable up to 120 °C, which points at further feasible extension of the chemistry of Ag(ii)-PO2F2 systems. The crystal structure shows a very complex bonding pattern, comprising of polymeric Ag(PO2F2)14(4-) anions and two types of Ag(I) cations. One particular Ag(II) site present in the crystal structure of Ag9(PO2F2)14 is the first known example of square pyramidal penta-coordinated Ag(ii) in an oxo-ligand environment. Ag(i)PO2F2 - the product of the thermal decomposition of Ag9(PO2F2)14 - has also been characterized by thermal analysis, IR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. It has a complicated crystal structure as well, which consists of infinite 1D [Ag(I)O4/2] chains which are linked to more complex 3D structures via OPO bridges. The PO2F2(-) anions bind to cations in both compounds as bidentate oxo-ligands. The terminal F atoms tend to point inside the van der Waals cavities in the crystal structure of both compounds. All important structural details of both title compounds were corroborated by DFT calculations.

  18. Ligand and counterion control of Ag(I) architectures: assembly of a {Ag8} ring cluster mediated by hydrophobic and Ag...Ag interactions.

    PubMed

    Fielden, John; Long, De-liang; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Kögerler, Paul; Cronin, Leroy

    2007-10-29

    A strategy combining ligand design and counterion variation has been used to investigate the assembly of silver(I) complexes. As a result, dinuclear, octanuclear, and polymeric silver(I) species have been synthesized by complexation of the rigid aliphatic amino ligands cis-3,5-diamino-trans-hydroxycyclohexane (DAHC), cis-3,5-diamino-trans-methoxycyclohexane (DAMC), and cis-3,5-diamino-trans-tert-butyldimethylsilylanyloxycyclohexane (DATC) with silver(I) triflate, nitrate, and perchlorate. The compositions of these aggregates, established by X-ray crystallography and elemental analysis, are [{Ag(DAHC)}2](CF3SO3)2 (1), [{Ag(DAMC)}2](CF3SO3)2 (2), [{Ag(DAMC)}2](NO3)2 (3), [{Ag(DATC)}6{Ag(DAHC)}2](NO3)8 (4), and [{Ag(DATC}n](NO3)n (5), where the DAHC present in 4 is formed by in situ hydrolysis of the acid labile silyl ether group. The type of aggregate formed depends both upon the noncoordinating O-substituent of the ligand and the (also noncoordinating) counterion, with the normal preference of the ligand topology for forming Ag2L2 structures being broken by introduction of the bulky, lipophilic O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) group. Of particular note is the octanuclear silver ring structure 4, which is isolated only when both the O-TBDMS group and the nitrate counteranion are present and is formed from four Ag2L2 dimers connected by Ag...Ag and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Diffusion rate measurement of this {Ag8} complex by 1H NMR (DOSY) indicates dissociation in CD3OD and CD3CN, showing that this supramolecular ring structure is formed upon crystallization, and establishing a qualitative limit to the strength of Ag...Ag interactions in solution. When solutions of the {Ag8} cluster in methanol are kept for several days though, a new UV-vis absorption is observed at around 430 nm, consistent with the formation of silver nanoparticles.

  19. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  20. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K; Pollack, J B; Kasting, J F

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system.

  1. Influences of Ag-NPs doping chitosan/calcium silicate nanocomposites for optical and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    El-Nahrawy, Amany M; Ali, Ahmed I; Abou Hammad, Ali B; Youssef, Ahmed M

    2016-12-01

    Chitosan (CS)/calcium silicate nanocomposites pure and doped with Ag ions (1, 2mol%) were prepared via sol-gel method. The prepared CS/calcium silicate nanocomposites were investigated through X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results, indicating that after increasing the Ag ions in the CS/calcium silicate nanocomposite the crystallinity degree increased regularly in the prepared nanocomposites accompanying to the continuously rearrangement in the internal structure of nanocomposite under the effect of inorganic nanoparticles. Correspondingly, the optical properties of the prepared nanocomposites films were measured using UV/vis spectroscopy. The reflectance increased while the energy band gap decreased from 3.96eV to 2.43eV with Ag-ions concentration. More over the transition type changed from direct into indirect by adding Ag-ions, indicate that new band between valence and conduction band were formed. In addition, the optical parameters showed an increase in refractive indices and decrease in the surface and volume energies losses with increasing Ag-ions. Correspondingly, the prepared nanocomposites exhibited good antibacterial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria and fungi (Candidia albicans). The results suggested that the prepared CS/calcium silicate nanocomposites can be a promised candidate for optical sensors applications and smart packaging materials.

  2. Fluorescent DNA-bound Ag nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Patrick; Velazquez, Lourdes; Weirich, Kim; Fygenson, Deborah

    2009-03-01

    Few-atom fluorescent Ag nanoclusters self-assemble on short, synthetic DNA strands, and exhibit sequence and structure dependent fluorescence ranging from the blue to the near infrared. Here we report UV excitation as a ubiquitous feature of these emitters. Each emitter thus has two excitation peaks: a visible peak which is cluster-dependent, and a UV peak which has the same wavelength for all DNA-bound Ag clusters. This UV peak corresponds to resonant absorbance by the DNA bases, and produces the same emission spectra as visible excitation, suggesting energy transfer from the DNA bases to the Ag cluster. We make use of this UV excitation to image the emitters in unstained polyacrylamide gels, and show that electrophoresis can be used to create a pure solution of green DNA:Ag11 clusters from an inhomogeneous red solution of DNA:Ag>12 clusters.

  3. Direct electrospinning of Ag/polyvinylpyrrolidone nanocables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Chen, Menglin; Olesen, Mikkel Buster; Wang, Chenxuan; Havelund, Rasmus; Li, Qiang; Xie, Erqing; Yang, Rong; Bøggild, Peter; Wang, Chen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2011-12-01

    Core-sheath silver nanowire/polyvinylpyrrolidone (AgNW/PVP) nanocables have been fabricated via an efficient single-spinneret electrospinning method. The core-sheath structure is revealed by combining several characterization methods. A possible formation mechanism of the AgNW/PVP nanocable involving a strong stretching during the electrospinning process is proposed. Further, electrical measurements were performed on AgNW/PVP nanocables as well as bare AgNWs, which indicated the nanocables became insulating due to the isolation of highly conductive AgNWs by insulating PVP sheath. Therefore, the described fabrication method holds potential for the fabrication of low-cost metal/polymer composite materials for nanoelectronic applications in general.

  4. Free volume in contact lens polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Upchurch, Billy T.; Burns, Karen S.

    1990-01-01

    We have measured the free volume and gas permeability in several contact lens specimens as part of a Space Commercialization Program. Free volume was measured using positron lifetime spectroscopy, while permeability for O2, N2, and CO2 gases was measured using mass spectrometry and polarography. It has been noted that permeability for all gases increases with the mean free volume cell size in the test samples. As might be expected, the specimens with the highest free volume fraction also exhibit the lowest Rockwell Hardness Number. An interesting corollary of this study is the finding that the presence of fluorine atoms in the lens chemical structure inhibits filling up of their free volume cells. This is expected to allow the lenses to breathe freely while in actual use.

  5. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys.

    PubMed

    Tie, D; Feyerabend, F; Müller, W D; Schade, R; Liefeith, K; Kainer, K U; Willumeit, R

    2013-06-16

    The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4) and aging (T6) heat treatment. The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH)₂ and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7), revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269), and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  6. Fractional characteristic times and dissipated energy in fractional linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2016-08-01

    In fractional viscoelasticity the stress-strain relation is a differential equation with non-integer operators (derivative or integral). Such constitutive law is able to describe the mechanical behavior of several materials, but when fractional operators appear, the elastic and the viscous contribution are inseparable and the characteristic times (relaxation and retardation time) cannot be defined. This paper aims to provide an approach to separate the elastic and the viscous phase in the fractional stress-strain relation with the aid of an equivalent classical model (Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell). For such equivalent model the parameters are selected by an optimization procedure. Once the parameters of the equivalent model are defined, characteristic times of fractional viscoelasticity are readily defined as ratio between viscosity and stiffness. In the numerical applications, three kinds of different excitations are considered, that is, harmonic, periodic, and pseudo-stochastic. It is shown that, for any periodic excitation, the equivalent models have some important features: (i) the dissipated energy per cycle at steady-state coincides with the Staverman-Schwarzl formulation of the fractional model, (ii) the elastic and the viscous coefficients of the equivalent model are strictly related to the storage and the loss modulus, respectively.

  7. Photo- and thermo-chemical transformation of AgCl and Ag2S in environmental matrices and its implication.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Xu, Wei; Tan, Zhiqiang; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Weidong; Guo, Xiaoru; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-01-01

    AgCl and Ag2S prevalently exist in the environment as minerals and/or the chlorination and sulfidation products of ionic silver and elemental silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). In this work, we investigated the chemical transformation of AgCl and Ag2S under simulated sunlight (in water) and incineration (in sludge and simulated municipal solid waste, SMSW). In the presence of natural organic matter, AgCl in river water was observed to be transformed into AgNPs under simulated sunlight, while photo-reduction of Ag2S could not take place under the same experimental conditions. During the course of incineration, pure Ag2S was transformed into elemental silver while AgCl remained stable; however, both Ag2S in sludge and AgCl in SMSW can be transformed to elemental silver under incineration, evident by the results of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements. Incineration temperature played an important role in the transformation of Ag2S and AgCl into elemental silver. These results suggest that chemical transformations of Ag2S and AgCl into elemental silver could be a possible source of naturally occurring or unintentionally produced AgNPs, affecting the fate, transport, bioavailability and toxicity of silver. Therefore, it is necessary to include the contributions of this transformation process when assessing the risk of ionic silver/AgNPs and the utilization and management of incineration residues.

  8. An Archean Terrestrial Fractionation Line for Oxygen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Blake, R. E.; Bao, H.; Bowring, S.; Komiya, T.; Rosing, M.; Ueno, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Terrestrial Fractionation Line (TFL) for oxygen isotopes is defined by 17O/16O and 18O/16O analyses of meteoric waters, seawater, sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks and constituent minerals. Interlaboratory measurements of the slope of the TFL on a plot of d18O vs. d17O revealed eclogitic garnets with a slope of 0.526 and hydrothermal quartz of 0.524 from rocks younger than 0.8 Ga (Giga years before present). New measurements show Archean metamorphic rocks and minerals from Barberton, (3.2 Ga, S. Africa), Isua (3.8 Ga, Greenland), and Acasta (4.0 Ga, Canada) have a slope of 0.524 +/- 0.002 (95% confidence, MSWD = 0.66). Analysis of Ag3PO4 prepared from apatite mineral separates from Isua meta-sediments gives a slope of 0.509 +/- 0.022 (95% confidence, MSWD = 0.59). Taken at face value, steeper slopes on a d17O vs. d18O diagram indicate an approach towards isotope exchange equilibrium. Lower slopes are expected when isotope fractionation is kinetically controlled. The lower slope of 0.509 for Isua apatite suggests that the formation of orthophosphate was kinetically controlled. Kinetic fractionations are known to occur during catalysis of reactions by enzymes secreted by microbes. Enzymatic catalysis confers an advantage on organisms because energy-producing reactions may be induced to occur at lower temperature conditions more accessible to the organism. May it be definitively concluded that enzymatic catalysis was responsible for the measured 0.509 slope? No, abiotic kinetic fractionation cannot be disproven with existing data. The preparation of Ag3PO4 from apatite may have introduced kinetic fractionation as an analytical artifact. Conclusions fully supported by the data suggest: (1) Mixing accompanying the violent birth of the Earth- Moon system had already succeeded in establishing Earth's current oxygen isotope composition by 4.0 Ga; and (2) No trace of an episode of late heavy meteorite bombardment remains in the oxygen isotope compositions of

  9. Formation of AgGaS2 nano-pyramids from Ag2S nanospheres through intermediate Ag2S-AgGaS2 heterostructures and AgGaS2 sensitized Mn2+ emission.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Zhou, Jiangcong; Xu, Ju; Wang, Yuansheng

    2014-02-21

    A one-pot solution synthesis of monodisperse AgGaS2 nanocrystals with uniform pyramid-like shape is realized for the first time, in which an interesting phase and shape evolution from monodisperse Ag2S nanospheres to pure AgGaS2 nano-pyramids through an intermediate stage of Ag2S-AgGaS2 heterostructures, is revealed. Evidently, upon introducing Mn(2+) ions into the reaction system, they are incorporated into AgGaS2 nano-pyramids which act as efficient sensitization matrixes for the red emission of Mn(2+) d-d transition under blue excitation. Benefiting from their non-toxicity and facile fabrication, Mn:AgGaS2 nanocrystals may find potential applications in some fields such as blue chip excited LEDs and bio-labeling.

  10. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals.

    PubMed

    Schauble, Edwin A

    2013-10-29

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from (119)Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  11. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-10-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  12. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    PubMed Central

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac–Hartree–Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor–crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium

  13. Helical dipole partial Siberian snake for the AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Alforque, R.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Hattori, T.; Huang, H.; Jain, A.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Tepikian, S.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wood, J.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2006-11-01

    Overcoming depolarization resonances in medium class synchrotrons (3 to 50 GeV) is one of the key issues in accelerating a highly polarized proton beam up to very high energies. Since such synchrotrons, including the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and the J-PARC Main Ring, generally do not have sufficiently long straight sections to accommodate full Siberian snakes with reasonable beam excursions, the practical solution is to use partial Siberian snakes that rotate the particle spin about a horizontal axis by a fraction of 180 degrees. For the AGS, we designed and installed a new partial Siberian snake consisting of a helical dipole magnet with a double pitch structure. The helical structure reduced the amount of transverse coupling as compared to that achieved by the previous solenoidal partial snake. This coupling led to partial depolarization at certain energies from horizontal betatron oscillations. The helical magnetic field in the snake magnet was calculated using a 3D magnetic field code TOSCA, and was optimized by segmenting the helical pitch and varying the lengths of the segments. Fabrication errors were checked and verified to be within required tolerances. Finally, the transverse field was measured by rotating harmonic coils. After installation, we achieved a 37.5% improvement in polarization - from 40% with the old solenoid to 55% with the new helical snake, thereby demonstrating that the helical partial snake is an effective device to suppress depolarization resonances in medium-siz