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Sample records for ag x-ray laser

  1. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  2. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  3. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  4. Recent Progress on the Understanding of the Transient Ni-like Ag X-ray Laser at 13.9 nm at LULI facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, D.; Klisnick, A.; Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D.; Guilbaud, O.; Kuba, J.; Carillon, A.; Jamelot, G.; Smith, R.; Edwards, M.

    2002-11-01

    This paper summarises our recent progress achieved in the characterisation and understanding of the Ni-like Ag transient X-ray laser pumped under traveling wave irradiation. We carried out two experiments at the LULI CPA laser facility. Several diagnostics of the plasma emission at the XRL wavelength or in the keV range indicate the presence of small-scale spatial structures in the emitting XRL source. Single-shot Fresnel interference patterns at 13.9 nm were successfully obtained with a good fringe visibility. For the first time we obtained plasma images with a high spatial resolution about 1 mum, showing the effects of pumping parameters on the X-ray laser far-field.

  5. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  6. Imaging with x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, B.; Frieders, G.; Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35--300 {Angstrom}. These sources have high peak brightness and are now being utilized for x-ray imaging and plasma interferometry. In this paper we will describe our efforts to probe long scalelength plasmas using Moire deflectrometry and soft x-ray imaging. The progress in the development of short pulse x-ray lasers using a double pulse irradiation technique which incorporates a travelling wave pump will also be presented.

  7. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  8. Coherent x-ray lasers for applications

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Amendt, P.; Rosen, M.D.; Feit, M.D.; Fleck, J.A. ); Strauss, M. )

    1990-12-01

    Many of the projected applications of x-ray lasers require high quality output radiation with properties such as short wavelength, high power, good focusability, short pulse, and high degree of coherence. We discuss the requirements of an x-ray laser for the application of holography of biological samples. We present ideas for achieving these properties. Given that population inversions can be established to provide laser gain, we discuss how the propagation and amplification of x-rays within the lasing medium affect the quality of the output radiation. Particular attention is given toward the development of transverse coherence. Results are presented from several methods for calculating the coherence, including a modal analysis and a numerical-wave propagation code. Calculations of the expected degree of coherence of standard x-ray lasers are given, as well as designs for more coherent lasers. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. X-ray laser program at MBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickles, P. V.; Janulewicz, K. A.; Lucianetti, A.; Priebe, G.; Zigler, A.; Rocca, J. J.; Sandner, W.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of the Max Born Institute (MBI) activities in the field of X-ray lasers (XRLs) is presented. The main interest is focused on the transient soft X-ray lasers. Additionally, much work is put to look for new, efficient, compact (table-top) pumping schemes with a prospect to be applied in practice. The current state of the research and the plans for the future are described as well.

  10. Simulation study of 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3-5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (˜nc/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using Hydra, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from Cretin, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ˜100-150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (˜20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3-5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  11. Simulation study of 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, G. E. Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-05-15

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3–5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (∼n{sub c}/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ∼100–150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (∼20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3–5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  12. X-ray lasers for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.; Kalantar, D.H.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.E.; Wan, A.S.; Weber, F.

    1997-12-31

    Soft x-ray lasers have evolved from the early demonstration phase to becoming reliable xuv sources. They operate over a wide wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ns pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup {minus}4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this talk the authors describe their use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beam splitters they have constructed and sued a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {angstrom} to probe 1--3 mm size laser produced plasmas. They have also used x-ray lasers and a multilayer mirror imaging system to study hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1--2 {micro}m spatial resolution. They are now planning a moire deflectometry to measure the electron density profile in ICF hohlraums. The results of these experiments and the limitations of these techniques will be presented. The prospects for short wavelength (10 {angstrom}) x-ray lasers which are better suited to higher density probing will also be discussed.

  13. A tumor-targeting near-infrared laser-triggered drug delivery system based on GO@Ag nanoparticles for chemo-photothermal therapy and X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinjin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Rou; Gao, Jun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chaofeng; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a GO@Ag nanocomposite was synthesized by chemical deposition of Ag nanoparticles onto graphene oxide (GO) through a hydro thermal reaction, and doxorubicin (DOX), one of the most effective drugs against a wide range of cancers, was employed as the model drug and linked to GO@Ag via ester bonds with a very high drug loading efficiency (∼82.0%, weight ratio of DOX/GO@Ag), then GO@Ag-DOX was functionalized by DSPE-PEG2000-NGR, giving GO@Ag-DOX with active tumor-targeting capacity and excellent stability in physiological solutions. The release profiles of DOX from GO@Ag-DOX-NGR showed strong dependences on near-infrared (NIR) laser and the SPR effect of Ag nanoparticles. Compared with free DOX in an in vivo murine tumor model, GO@Ag-DOX-NGR afforded much higher antitumor efficacy without obvious toxic effects to normal organs owing to 8.4-fold higher DOX uptake of tumor and 1.7-fold higher DOX released in tumor with NIR laser than the other tissues. Besides, in this work, GO@Ag-DOX-NGR not only served as a powerful tumor diagnostic X-ray contrast agent, but also as a strong agent for photothermal ablation of tumor, the ability of GO@Ag-DOX-NGR nanoparticles to combine the local specific chemotherapy with external photothermal therapy (PTT) significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy. GO@Ag-DOX-NGR showed excellent chem-photothermal therapeutic efficacy, tumor-targeting property, NIR laser-controlled drug releasing function and X-ray imaging ability, demonstrating that there is a great potential of GO@Ag-DOX-NGR for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:24746963

  14. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  15. X-ray lasers at MBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janulewicz, Karol A.; Lucianetti, Antonio; Priebe, Gerd; Sandner, Wolfgang; Nickles, Peter-Viktor

    2003-10-01

    The state-of-the-art and the trends in development of table-top soft x-ray lasers (XRLs) with a special emphasis on the work of the Max Born Institute (MBI) are presented. Both, basic physics and some features of the output radiation crucial for applications are discussed as well.

  16. Soft x-ray laser microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL's 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  17. Soft x-ray laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D.; Meixler, L.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Hirschberg, J.; Kohen, E.

    1987-12-31

    Microscopes based on soft X-ray lasers possess unique advantages in bridging the gap between high resolution electron microscopy of dehydrated, stained cells and light microscopy at comparatively low resolution of unaltered live cells. The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft X-ray lasers make them ideal for flash imaging of live specimens. The Princeton soft X-ray laser is based on a magnetically confined laser produced carbon plasma. Radiation cooling after the laser pulse produces rapid recombination which produces a population inversion and high gain. A full account is given in a companion paper in this volume. The important characteristics of the laser beam produced by this device are 1 to 3 mJ of 18.2 nm radiation in a 10 to 30 nsec pulse with a divergence of 5 mrad. The 18.2 nm wavelength, while outside the water window, does provide a factor of 3 difference in absorption coefficients between oxygen and carbon.

  18. Soft x-ray laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D. ); Meixler, L.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Hirschberg, J.; Kohen, E. . Dept. of Physics)

    1987-01-01

    Microscopes based on soft X-ray lasers possess unique advantages in bridging the gap between high resolution electron microscopy of dehydrated, stained cells and light microscopy at comparatively low resolution of unaltered live cells. The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft X-ray lasers make them ideal for flash imaging of live specimens. The Princeton soft X-ray laser is based on a magnetically confined laser produced carbon plasma. Radiation cooling after the laser pulse produces rapid recombination which produces a population inversion and high gain. A full account is given in a companion paper in this volume. The important characteristics of the laser beam produced by this device are 1 to 3 mJ of 18.2 nm radiation in a 10 to 30 nsec pulse with a divergence of 5 mrad. The 18.2 nm wavelength, while outside the water window, does provide a factor of 3 difference in absorption coefficients between oxygen and carbon.

  19. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOEpatents

    London, Richard A.; Rosen, Mordecai D.; Strauss, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.

  20. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  2. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  3. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  4. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  5. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  6. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  7. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  8. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  9. Status of MBI activities: Will a transient collisional x-ray laser with high repetition rate come soon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickles, Peter V.; Janulewicz, Karol A.; Priebe, Gerd; Lucianetti, Antonio; Kroemer, Robert K.; Gerlitzke, Anne-Kathrin; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2003-12-01

    Some prospects for development of collisional X-ray lasers with a high repetition rate based on the output characteristics of a transient Ni-like Ag soft X-ray laser pumped by a single picosecond laser pulse are analysed. Such problems as target technology, new driver development and the active medium parameters are discussed.

  10. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  11. All-laser-driven Thomson X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald P.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the development of a new generation of accelerator-based hard X-ray sources driven exclusively by laser light. High-intensity laser pulses serve the dual roles: first, accelerating electrons by laser-driven plasma wakefields, and second, generating X-rays by inverse Compton scattering. Such all-laser-driven X-rays have recently been demonstrated to be energetic, tunable, relatively narrow in bandwidth, short pulsed and well collimated. Such characteristics, especially from a compact source, are highly advantageous for numerous advanced X-ray applications - in metrology, biomedicine, materials, ultrafast phenomena, radiology and fundamental physics.

  12. Vanderbilt University free-electron laser x-ray facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Perry A.; Andrews, Weiwei D.; Brau, Charles A.; Waters, James A.; Carroll, Frank E.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Roos, Carlton F.

    1993-02-01

    The Vanderbilt University Free-Electron Laser Program is developing the capability to create near-monochromatic x rays for medical imaging and other purposes. For this experiment we feed-back the normal infrared FEL light to collide with the electron beam. This causes Compton backscattering of the incident photons which creates x rays. These x rays cannot feed an x-ray laser, but they have a collimated intensity and tunability which make them highly suitable for medical imaging. This paper is particularly focused on the x-ray beam transport to be used with this experiment. This transport must collimate the x-ray beam and re-direct it to match a beam chase located in the vault ceiling at a 40 degree angle to the electron beam axis. A brief description of the creation mechanism and x-ray beam properties are included.

  13. Recent X-Ray Laser Experiments on the COMET Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Nilsen, J; Hunter, J R; Barbee, T W; Shlyaptsev, V N; Filevich, J; Rocca, J J; Marconi, M C; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A

    2001-09-22

    The development of the transient collisional excitation x-ray laser scheme using tabletop laser systems with multiple pulse capability has progressed rapidly in the last three years. The high small-signal gain and strong x-ray output have been demonstrated for laser drive energies of typically less than 10 J. We report recent x-ray laser experiments on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) tabletop facility using this technique. In particular, the saturated output from the Ni-like Pd ion 4d - 4p x-ray laser at 146.8 {angstrom} has been well characterized and has potential towards a useable x-ray source in a number of applications. One important application of a short wavelength x-ray laser beam with picosecond pulse duration is the study of a high density laser-produced plasma. We report the implementation of a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer using diffraction grating optics as beam splitters designed for the Ni-like Pd laser and show results from probing a 600 ps heated plasma. In addition, gas puff targets are investigated as an x-ray laser gain medium and we report results of strong lasing on the n = 3 - 3 transitions of Ne-like Ar.

  14. Lasers, extreme UV and soft X-ray

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nilsen, Joseph

    2015-09-20

    Three decades ago, large ICF lasers that occupied entire buildings were used as the energy sources to drive the first X-ray lasers. Today X-ray lasers are tabletop, spatially coherent, high-repetition rate lasers that enable many of the standard optical techniques such as interferometry to be extended to the soft X-ray regime between wavelengths of 10 and 50 nm. Over the last decade X-ray laser performance has been improved by the use of the grazing incidence geometry, diode-pumped solid-state lasers, and seeding techniques. The dominant X-ray laser schemes are the monopole collisional excitation lasers either driven by chirped pulse amplification (CPA)more » laser systems or capillary discharge. The CPA systems drive lasing in neon-like or nickel-like ions, typically in the 10 – 30 nm range, while the capillary system works best for neon-like argon at 46.9 nm. Most researchers use nickel-like ion lasers near 14 nm because they are well matched to the Mo:Si multilayer mirrors that have peak reflectivity near 13 nm and are used in many applications. As a result, the last decade has seen the birth of the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) that can reach wavelengths down to 0.15 nm and the inner-shell Ne laser at 1.46 nm.« less

  15. Lasers, extreme UV and soft X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, Joseph

    2015-09-20

    Three decades ago, large ICF lasers that occupied entire buildings were used as the energy sources to drive the first X-ray lasers. Today X-ray lasers are tabletop, spatially coherent, high-repetition rate lasers that enable many of the standard optical techniques such as interferometry to be extended to the soft X-ray regime between wavelengths of 10 and 50 nm. Over the last decade X-ray laser performance has been improved by the use of the grazing incidence geometry, diode-pumped solid-state lasers, and seeding techniques. The dominant X-ray laser schemes are the monopole collisional excitation lasers either driven by chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems or capillary discharge. The CPA systems drive lasing in neon-like or nickel-like ions, typically in the 10 – 30 nm range, while the capillary system works best for neon-like argon at 46.9 nm. Most researchers use nickel-like ion lasers near 14 nm because they are well matched to the Mo:Si multilayer mirrors that have peak reflectivity near 13 nm and are used in many applications. As a result, the last decade has seen the birth of the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) that can reach wavelengths down to 0.15 nm and the inner-shell Ne laser at 1.46 nm.

  16. Development of small scale soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Suckewer, S. . Plasma Physics Lab. Princeton Univ., NJ . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering); Skinner, C.H.; Voorhees, D. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-05-01

    At present rapid progress is being made in the application of soft x-ray lasers to fields such as microscopy and microlithography. A critical factor in the range of suitable applications is the scale and hence cost of the soft x-ray lasers. At Princeton, gain at 183{angstrom} has been obtained with relatively low pump laser energies (as low as 6J) in a portable'' small-scale soft x-ray laser system. We will also discuss aspects of data interpretation and pitfalls to be avoided in measurements of gain in such systems. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  17. X-ray laser `` oscillator-amplifier`` experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shimkaveg, G.M.; Carter, M.R.; Young, B.K.F.; Walling, R.S.; Osterheld, A.L.; Trebes, J.E.; London, R.A.; Ratowsky, R.P.; Stewart, R.E.; Craxton, R.S.

    1993-03-19

    We present results from experiments directed toward increasing the degree of transverse coherence in x-ray laser beams. We have concentrated on the neon-like yttrium (Z=39) collisionally-pumped x-ray laser as the test system for these studies because of its unique combination of brightness, monochromaticity, and high-reflectivity optics availability. Attempts at improving laser performance using proximate feedback optics failed. Modest success has been found to date in ``double foil`` experiments, involving two x-ray lasers spatially separated by 29 cm and shot sequentially in an ``oscillator-amplifier`` configuration.

  18. Development of short pulse soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Koch, J.A.; Mrowka, S.; Matthews, D.L.; Eder, D.; London, R.

    1993-02-01

    X-ray lasers with pulse duration shorter than 20 ps allow the possibility of imaging laser produced plasmas with {mu}m resolution. In addition, the high peak brightness of these new sources will allow us to study nonlinear optics in the xuv region. In this paper we will describe our efforts to produce collisionally pumped short pulse x-ray lasers. Initial results, which have produced {approximately} 45 ps (FWHM) x-ray lasers, using a double pulse irradiation technique are presented along with a discussion of the prospects for reducing the pulse width.

  19. ZAP! The X-Ray Laser is Born

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel

    2009-11-17

    SLAC has converted its giant particle accelerator into the world's first X-ray laser. By a billion fold the world's brightest X-ray source, the laser packs a trillion photons into pulses as short as a millionth of a billionth of a second. The ultra-bright, ultra-short X-ray pulses will drive a wide range of new experiments, as scientists strip electrons from atoms, photograph single molecules and make movies of chemical reactions. How has SLAC accomplished such feats of X-ray wizardry? Attend this public lecture to learn about the basics of an X-ray laser, the technologies at SLAC that make it possible, and the exciting new experiments now underway.

  20. Continuous high-repetition-rate operation of collisional soft-x-ray lasers with solid targets.

    PubMed

    Weith, A; Larotonda, M A; Wang, Y; Luther, B M; Alessi, D; Marconi, M C; Rocca, J J; Dunn, J

    2006-07-01

    We have generated a laser average output power of 2 microW at a wavelength of 13.9 nm by operating a tabletop laser-pumped Ni-like Ag laser at a 5 Hz repetition rate, using a solid helicoidal target that is continuously rotated and advanced to renew the target surface between shots. More than 2 x 10(4) soft-x-ray laser shots were obtained by using a single target. Similar results were obtained at 13.2 nm in Ni-like Cd with a Cd-coated target. This scheme will allow uninterrupted operation of laser-pumped tabletop collisional soft-x-ray lasers at a repetition rate of 10 Hz for a period of hours, enabling the generation of continuous high average soft-x-ray powers for applications. PMID:16770410

  1. Laser-Produced Coherent X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Umstadter

    2007-01-31

    We study the generation of x-rays from the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultra-intense laser pulse either directly or via laser generated ion channels. The laser pulse acts as the accelerator and wiggler leading to an all-optical synchrotron-like x-ray source. The mm sized accelerator and micron-sized wiggler leads to a compact source of high brightness, ultrafast x-rays with applications in relativistic nonlinear optics, ultrafast chemistry, biology, inner-shell electronic processes and phase transitions.

  2. Inner-shell photoionized x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S.J.

    1998-06-01

    The inner-shell photoionized x-ray lasing scheme is an attractive method for achieving x-ray lasing at short wavelengths, via population inversion following inner-shell photoionization (ISPI). This scheme promises both a short wavelength and a short pulse source of coherent x rays with high average power. In this dissertation a very complete study of the ISPI x-ray laser scheme is done concerning target structure, filter design and lasant medium. An investigation of the rapid rise time of x-ray emission from targets heated by an ultra-short pulse high-intensity optical laser was conducted for use as the x-ray source for ISPI x-ray lasing. Lasing by this approach in C at a wavelength of 45 {angstrom} requires a short pulse (about 50 fsec) driving optical laser with an energy of 1-5 J and traveling wave optics with an accuracy of {approximately} 15 {micro}m. The optical laser is incident on a high-Z target creating a high-density plasma which emits a broadband spectrum of x rays. This x-ray source is passed through a filter to eliminate the low-energy x rays. The remaining high-energy x rays preferentially photoionize inner-shell electrons resulting in a population inversion. Inner-shell photoionized x-ray lasing relies on the large energy of a K-{alpha} transition in the initially neutral lasant. The photo energy required to pump this scheme is only slightly greater than the photon energy of the lasing transition yielding a lasing scheme with high quantum efficiency. However, the overall efficiency is reduced due to low x-ray conversion efficiency and the large probability of Auger decay yielding an overall efficiency of {approximately} 10{sup {minus}7} resulting in an output energy of {micro}J's. They calculate that a driving laser with a pulse duration of 40 fs, a 10{micro}m x 1 cm line focus, and an energy of 1 J gives an effective gain length product (gl) of 10 in C at 45 {angstrom}. At saturation (gl {approximately} 18) they expect an output of {approximately

  3. X-ray-pumped Cr,Nd:GSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Paul J.; Hedemann, M. A.; Weichman, Louis S.

    1996-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that x rays alone can be used to pump a 1061 nm Cr,Nd:GSGG laser. Lasing action has been observed when the laser rod absorbs greater than 27 krad of 2 MeV x rays. The laser cavity consists of a corner cube and an output mirror with a reflectivity of 67%. The x rays are delivered in a 20 ns pulse, and laser action is observed several microseconds after the x ray pulse. This delay suggests that chromium is important in the laser pumping process since it is known that an excited chromium ion takes about 10 microseconds to transfer its energy to a neodymium ion.

  4. Using short pulse lasers to drive X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J

    2009-07-27

    Nearly four decades ago H-like and He-like resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. However, demonstrating these schemes in the laboratory has proved to be elusive. One challenge has been the difficulty of finding an adequate resonance between a strong pump line and a line in the laser plasma that drives the laser transition. Given a good resonance, a second challenge has been to create both the pump and laser plasma in close proximity so as to allow the pump line to transfer its energy to the laser material. With the advent of the X-FEL at LCLS we now have a tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow researchers to study the physics and feasibility of photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we model the Na-pumped Ne X-ray laser scheme that was proposed and studied many years ago by replacing the Na He-{alpha} pump line at 1127 eV with the X-FEL at LCLS. We predict gain on the 4f - 3d transition at 231 {angstrom}. We also examine the feasibility of photo-pumping He-like V and lasing on the 4f - 3d transition at 38.7 {angstrom}, which would be within the water-window. In addition we look at the possibility of photo-pumping Ne-like Fe and creating gain on the 4d - 3p transition at 53 {angstrom} and the 3p - 3s transition at 255 {angstrom}.

  5. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating

  6. X-ray laser microscopy of rat sperm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B. ); Trebes, J.E.; Balhorn, R.; Mrowka, S.; Barbee, T.W.Jr.; Brase, J.; Corzett, M.; Koch, J.A.; Lee, C.; London, R.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Stone, G. ); Anderson, E.; Attwood, D.T. ); Gray, J. ); Kern, D. )

    1992-10-09

    The development of high brightness and short pulse width x-ray lasers now offers biologists the possibility of high-resolution imaging of specimens in an aqueous environment without the blurring effects associated with natural motions and chemical erosion. As a step toward developing the capabilities of this type of x-ray microscopy, a tantalum x-ray laser at 44.83 angstrom wavelength was used together with an x-ray zone plate lens to image both unlabeled and selectively gold-labeled dried rat sperm nuclei. The observed images show {approximately}500 angstrom features, illustrate the importance of x-ray microscopy in determining chemical composition, and provide information about the uniformity of sperm chromatin organization and the extent of sperm chromatin hydration.

  7. High-average-power 100-Hz repetition rate table-top soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Jorge J.; Reagan, Brendan A.; Wernsing, Keith; Wang, Yong; Yin, Liang; Wang, Shoujun; Berrill, Mark; Woolston, Mark R.; Curtis, Alden H.; Furch, Federico J. A.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Luther, Brad M.; Patel, Dinesh; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2013-09-01

    The table-top generation of high average power coherent soft x-ray radiation in a compact set up is of high interest for numerous applications. We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses at 100 Hz repetition rate with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by an ultrafast diode-pumped solid state laser. Results of compact λ=18.9nm Ni-like Mo and λ=13.9nm Ni-like Ag lasers operating at 100 Hz repetition rate are discussed.

  8. Recent X-Ray Laser Characterization Experiments at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2002-02-26

    We report on a series of experiments, using the COMET picosecond facility, designed to characterize and develop different x-ray laser sources. This work encompasses collisional pumping of slab and gas puff targets.

  9. The role of EBIT in X-ray laser research

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J

    2007-01-25

    Back in the early 1980's the X-ray laser program required a new level of understanding and measurements of the atomic physics of highly charged ions. The electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) was developed and built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the effort to understand and measure the cross sections and wavelengths of highly charged ions. In this paper we will discuss some of the early history of EBIT and how it was used to help in the development of X-ray lasers. EBIT's capability was unique and we will show some of the experimental results obtained over the years that were done related to X-ray lasers. As X-ray lasers have now become a table-top tool we will show some new areas of research that involve understanding the index of refraction in partially ionized plasmas and suggest new areas where EBIT may be able to contribute.

  10. Review of soft x-ray lasers and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1991-03-01

    The emerging technology of soft x-ray lasers is in a transition phase between the first laboratory demonstrations of gain and the acceptance of soft x-ray lasers as practical tools for novel applications. Current research is focused on several fronts. The operational wavelength range has been extended to the water window'', important for applications in the life sciences. Gain has also been generated with substantially simpler technology (such as a 6J laser) and this augurs well for the commercially availability in the near future of soft x-ray lasers for a variety of applications. Advanced soft x-ray laser concepts are being developed from investigations into ultra-high intensity laser/matter interactions. The first paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray microscopy and holography have begun. In this paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray laser development will be followed by a review of recent advances in recombination, collisional and photo-pumped systems and applications. A summary of current gain-length performance achieved in laboratories worldwide is presented. Near term prospects for applications to novel fields are discussed. 81 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. X-ray laser interferometry: A new tool for AGEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Moreno, J.C.; Libby, S.B.

    1995-10-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4--40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beamsplitters in the soft x-ray regime, we can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. By employing a shorter wavelength x-ray laser, as compared to using conventional optical laser as the probe source, we can access a much higher density regime while reducing refractive effects which limit the spatial resolution and data interpretation. Using a neon-like yttrium x-ray laser which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 mn, we have performed a series of soft x-ray laser interferometry experiments, operated in the skewed Mach-Zehnder configuration, to characterize plasmas relevant to both weapons and inertial confinement fusion. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow us to validate and benchmark our numerical models used to study the physics in the high-energy density regime, relevant to both weapons and inertial confinement fusion.

  12. Ultrafast laser pump/x-ray probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, J.; Judd, E.; Schuck, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    In an ongoing project aimed at probing solids using x-rays obtained at the ALS synchrotron with a sub-picosecond time resolution following interactions with a 100 fs laser pulse, the authors have successfully performed pump-probe experiments limited by the temporal duration of ALS-pulse. They observe a drop in the diffraction efficiency following laser heating. They can attribute this to a disordering of the crystal. Studies with higher temporal resolution are required to determine the mechanism. The authors have also incorporated a low-jitter streakcamera as a diagnostic for observing time-dependant x-ray diffraction. The streakcamera triggered by a photoconductive switch was operated at kHz repetition rates. Using UV-pulses, the authors obtain a temporal response of 2 ps when averaging 5000 laser pulses. They demonstrate the ability to detect monochromatized x-ray radiation from a bend-magnet with the streak camera by measuring the pulse duration of a x-ray pulse to 70 ps. In conclusion, the authors show a rapid disordering of an InSb crystal. The resolution was determined by the duration of the ALS pulse. They also demonstrate that they can detect x-ray radiation from a synchrotron source with a temporal resolution of 2ps, by using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera. Their set-up will allow them to pursue laser pump/x-ray probe experiments to monitor structural changes in materials with ultrafast time resolution.

  13. Contact microscopy with a soft x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D.S.; Kim, D.; Rosser, R.J.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Gupta, A.P.; Hirschberg, J.G.

    1989-03-01

    A soft x-ray laser of output energy 1-3 mJ at 19.2 nm has been used to record high resolution images of biological specimens. The contact images were recorded on photoresist which was later viewed in a scanning electron microscope. We also present a Composite Optical X- ray Laser Microscope ''COXRALM'' of novel design. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Higley, Daniel J; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A; MacArthur, James P; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H; Dürr, Hermann A; Schlotter, William F

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L(3,2)-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature. PMID:27036761

  15. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higley, Daniel J.; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A.; MacArthur, James P.; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L3,2-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  16. X-Ray Diffraction Simulation Using Laser Pointers and Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a laser pointer to demonstrate the analogy between optical and X-ray diffraction and a laser printer with 600 or 1200 dot resolution to create and modify arrays, print them on transparencies, and illuminate them with laser pointers. Includes 14 references. (Author/YDS)

  17. X-ray laser related experiments and theory at Princeton

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes a new system for the development of an x-ray laser in the wavelength region from 5 nm to 1 nm utilizing a Powerful Sub-Picosecond Laser (PP-Laser) of expected peak power up to 0.5 TW in a 300 fs pulse. Soft x-ray spectra generated by the interaction of the PP-Laser beam with different targets are presented and compared to the spectra generated by a much less intense laser beam (20--30 GW). A theoretical model for the interaction of atoms with such a strong laser EM field is also briefly discussed. The development of additional amplifiers for the recombining soft x-ray laser and the design of a cavity are presented from the point of view of applications for x-ray microscopy and microlithography. This overview concludes with the presentation of recent results on the quenching of spontaneous emission radiation and its possible effect on the absolute intensity calibration of soft x-ray spectrometers. 26 refs., 18 figs.

  18. X-ray production with sub-picosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, G.T.; Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Kyrala, G.A.

    1993-12-31

    The interaction of intense, sub-picosecond laser pulses with solid targets produces intense picosecond x-ray pulses. With focused laser pulses of several 10 {sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, He-like and H-like line radiation from targets such as aluminum and silicon has been produced. The energy conversion efficiency from the laser pulse energy to the 1--2 keV line x-rays is nearly one percent. The duration of the line x-ray radiation is of the order of ten picoseconds, although this may be an upper estimate because of the temporal resolution of the x-ray streak camera. The spatial extent of the x-ray source region is only slightly larger than the laser focal spot, or about 10 {mu}m in diameter. With these characteristics, such x-ray sources emit an intensity of nearly 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments and modeling which led to the above conclusions will be discussed.

  19. Excitation of nuclear isomers by X rays from laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Aleksandr A; Karpeshin, F; Trzhaskovskaya, M B; Platonov, Konstantin Yu; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu V

    2010-06-23

    The possibility of obtaining isomer nuclei is studied by the example of the molybdenum isomer {sup 93}Mo upon irradiation of a niobium {sup 93}Nb target by {approx}50-J, 100-fs laser pulses. It is shown that the modern laser technique allows production of isomer nuclei by accelerated protons and radiative de-excitation of isomer nuclear states by thermal or line X-rays from laser plasma. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The state-of-the-art X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam produced by an X-band RF accelerator and a high-intensity laser pulse generated by chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) has been carried out by our research team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system is called "Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source". The applications include nuclear resonance fluorescence, medical imaging and therapy, and nuclear waste imaging and assay. One of the key factors in this system is how we know the interaction happened in the vacuum chamber, which is the spectrometer of electron beams. The other key factor is the interaction after the spectrometer, which is the outgoing X-ray. In this thesis, the work in the simulation for the result of the interaction between electrons and the laser, the calibration of spectrometer, and laser focus characterization are discussed.

  1. Plasma fluctuations and x-ray laser transverse coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Strauss, Moshe; London, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of plasma fluctuations on transverse spatial coherence of x-ray lasers is investigated. Hose type (random) transverse displacements of the x-ray lasing medium induced by pump-laser nonuniformities are considered in detail. Such displacements lead to decreased transverse coherence via reduced gain discrimination from mode coupling. This effect may be related to a previously reported insensitivity of transverse coherence to laser length in neonlike selenium at 206 and 210 Å [Trebes et al.,

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 588 (1992)

  2. X-ray lasers and high-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The improved reliability, high brightness, and short wavelength of x-ray lasers make them ideally suited for studying large, high-density plasmas of interest to the laser-fusion research community. We have been developing the neonlike yttrium x-ray laser as a probe, together with the necessary multilayer mirrors and beam splitters, to image plasmas produced at the Nova laser facility and to measure electron density. With its short-wavelength (15.5-nm) light, we can use the yttrium x-ray laser to probe plasma densities up to 10{sup 23} cm{sup {minus}3}. At the highest magnification (30?), the spatial resolution of our imaging system is better than 1 {mu}m. Using the technique of moire deflectometry, we have measured density gradients of plasmas. Using the technique of interferometry, we have probed 3-mm-long plasmas with electron densities up to 3? 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}. Temporal blurring of plasma images remains the main limitation of our approach. Thus, we are continuing to improve our theoretical and experimental understanding of laboratory x-ray lasers. We are currently working on techniques to reduce the blurring of images by shortening the x-ray laser pulse to durations approaching about 20 ps. In the future, this important research tool can be applied to study high-density plasmas produced at the proposed National Ignition Facility. Other important applications of the x-ray laser include biological imaging of whole, live cells and other structures at resolutions superior to those obtainable by conventional optical microscopy.

  3. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10{sup −3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10{sup −3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  4. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser (10) is formed of a vanadium (12) and titanium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions (32).

  5. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, J.

    1992-05-26

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions. 4 figs.

  6. Techniques for synchronization of X-Ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast X-Ray facility

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Doolittle, L.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2003-05-06

    Accurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted from a synchrotron radiation source with respect to the signal initiating a process in the sample under study is critical for the investigation of structural dynamics in the femtosecond regime. We describe schemes for achieving accurate timing of femtosecond x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses relative to a pump laser, where x-rays pulses of <100 fs duration are generated from the proposed LUX source based on a recirculating superconducting linac. We present a description of the timing signal generation and distribution systems to minimize timing jitter of the x-rays relative to the experimental lasers.

  7. Soft x-ray streak camera for laser fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stradling, G.L.

    1981-04-01

    This thesis reviews the development and significance of the soft x-ray streak camera (SXRSC) in the context of inertial confinement fusion energy development. A brief introduction of laser fusion and laser fusion diagnostics is presented. The need for a soft x-ray streak camera as a laser fusion diagnostic is shown. Basic x-ray streak camera characteristics, design, and operation are reviewed. The SXRSC design criteria, the requirement for a subkilovolt x-ray transmitting window, and the resulting camera design are explained. Theory and design of reflector-filter pair combinations for three subkilovolt channels centered at 220 eV, 460 eV, and 620 eV are also presented. Calibration experiments are explained and data showing a dynamic range of 1000 and a sweep speed of 134 psec/mm are presented. Sensitivity modifications to the soft x-ray streak camera for a high-power target shot are described. A preliminary investigation, using a stepped cathode, of the thickness dependence of the gold photocathode response is discussed. Data from a typical Argus laser gold-disk target experiment are shown.

  8. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, A; Coffee, R; Vetter, S; Hering, P; West, G N; Gilevich, S; Lutman, A A; Li, S; Maxwell, T; Galayda, J; Fry, A; Huang, Z

    2016-06-24

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes. PMID:27391728

  9. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, A.; Coffee, R.; Vetter, S.; Hering, P.; West, G. N.; Gilevich, S.; Lutman, A. A.; Li, S.; Maxwell, T.; Galayda, J.; Fry, A.; Huang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  10. Characterization of Pr:LuAG scintillating crystals for X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Cervi, T.; Clemenza, M.; De Bari, A.; Falcone, A.; Mazza, R.; Menegolli, A.; Nastasi, M.; Rossella, M.

    2016-07-01

    The main features of the Pr doped Lu3Al5O12 (Pr:LuAG) scintillating crystals for X-ray spectroscopy applications have been studied using different radioactive sources and photo-detectors. Pr:LuAG is cheaper, compared to a Germanium detector, but with remarkable properties which make it useful for many applications, from fundamental physics measurements to the PET imaging for medical purposes: high density, elevate light yield, fast response, high energy resolution, no hygroscopicity. A sample of Pr:LuAG crystals with 14 mm×14 mm surface area and 13 mm thickness and a NaI crystal of the same surface and 26 mm thickness used as a reference have been characterized with several radioactive sources, emitting photons in the range 100-1000keV. Different light detectors were adopted for the Pr:LuAG studies, sensitive to its UV emission (peak at 310 nm): a 3 in. PMT (Hamamatsu R11065) and new arrays of Hamamatsu SiPM S13361, with siliconic resin as a window. Preliminary results are presented on the performance of the Pr:LuAG crystals, to be mounted in a 2 × 2 array to be tested in the 2015 run of the FAMU experiment at RIKEN-RAL muon facility. The goal is the detection of the X-rays (around 130 keV) emitted during the de-excitation processes of the muonic hydrogen after the excitation with an IR laser with wavelength set at the resonance of the hyperfine splitting, to measure the muonic atom proton radius with unprecedented precision.

  11. Dynamic x-ray imaging of laser-driven nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    A major promise of current x-ray science at free electron lasers is the realization of unprecedented imaging capabilities for resolving the structure and ultrafast dynamics of matter with nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution or even below via single-shot x-ray diffraction. Laser-driven atomic clusters and nanoparticles provide an ideal platform for developing and demonstrating the required technology to extract the ultrafast transient spatiotemporal dynamics from the diffraction images. In this talk, the perspectives and challenges of dynamic x-ray imaging will be discussed using complete self-consistent microscopic electromagnetic simulations of IR pump x-ray probe imaging for the example of clusters. The results of the microscopic particle-in-cell simulations (MicPIC) enable the simulation-assisted reconstruction of corresponding experimental data. This capability is demonstrated by converting recently measured LCLS data into a ultrahigh resolution movie of laser-induced plasma expansion. Finally, routes towards reaching attosecond time resolution in the visualization of complex dynamical processes in matter by x-ray diffraction will be discussed.

  12. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  13. Molecular design concept for x-ray laser research

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.; Boyer, K.

    1992-12-10

    The goal of this program is the construction of an x-ray laser in the kilovolt regime. Recent experimental results indicate that a new technique for the generation of strong amplification of x-ray wavelengths is feasible. It involves the combination of (1) a new ultrahigh brightness subpicosecond laser technology and (2) a recently discovered unique mode of strong-field interaction, particularly applicable to molecules. A concept of molecular x-ray design emerges from the considerations which matches the mode of excitation to the structure of the molecular system. The molecular approach enables the combination of very highly electronically excited conditions with an environment characteristic of dense cold matter, a general situation exceptionally conducive to x-ray amplification. Both high efficiency and wavelength tunability are intrinsic features of this method. Recent results discussed in this report are revealing important characteristics of the molecular strong-field coupling pertinent to this goal. A continued program of research is proposed to evaluate this method for the production of x-ray amplification in the kilovolt region.

  14. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.; Larsson, J.; Chang, Z.

    1997-09-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si(111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb(111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or camshaft operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

  15. Soft x-ray laser microscope. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL`s 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  16. Grazing Incidence Pumping for High Efficiency X-ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2005-10-03

    Over the last decade, most laser-driven collisional excitation x-ray lasers have relied on the absorption of the pump energy incident at normal incidence to a pre-formed plasma. The main advantage is that the inversion can be created at various plasma regions in space and time where the amplification and ray propagation processes are best served. The main disadvantage is that different plasma regions regardless of the contribution to the inversion have to be pumped simultaneously in order to make the laser work. This leads to a loss of efficiency. The new scheme of grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) addresses this issue. In essence, a chosen electron density region of a pre-formed plasma column, produced by a longer pulse at normal incidence onto a slab target, is selectively pumped by focusing a short pulse of 100 fs-10 ps duration laser at a determined grazing incidence angle to the target surface. The exact angle is dependent on the pump wavelength and relates to refraction of the drive beam in the plasma. The controlled use of refraction of the pumping laser in the plasma results in several benefits: The pump laser path length is longer and there is an increase in the laser absorption in the gain region for creating a collisional Ni-like ion x-ray laser. There is also an inherent traveling wave, close to c, that increases the overall pumping efficiency. This can lead to a 3-30 times reduction in the pump energy for mid-Z, sub-20 nm lasers. We report several examples of this new x-ray laser on two different laser systems. The first demonstrates a 10 Hz x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm pumped with a total of 150 mJ of 800 nm wavelength from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The second case is shown where the COMET laser is used both at 527 nm and 1054 nm wavelength to pump higher Z materials with the goal of extending the wavelength regime of tabletop x-ray lasers below 10 nm.

  17. Recent results in capillary discharge soft x-ray laser research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Jorge J.; Marconi, Mario C.; Wang, Yong; Luther, Bradley M.; Pedacci, Francesco; Grisham, Michael; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Menoni, Carmen S.; Filevich, Jorge; Juha, Libor; Pershin, Yu. P.; Zubarev, E. N.; Voronov, D. L.; Sevryukova, V. A.; Kondratenko, V. V.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav V.; Vinogradov, Alexander; Artioukov, Igor

    2003-12-01

    We report results of the development of capillary discharge driven metal-vapor plasma waveguides for the development of efficient laser-pumped soft x-ray lasers; and of the use of a previously developed capillary discharge Ne-like Ar 46.9 nm laser in study of the interaction of intense soft x-ray laser with materials. The guiding of a laser beam in a dense capillary discharge plasma channel containing a large density of Ag ions is reported. In term of applications we have conducted studies of materials modification and ablation with focalized 46.9 nm laser radiation at fluences between 0.1 and 100 J cm-2. The experiments demonstrated that the combined high repetition rate and high energy per pulse of the capillary discharge laser allows for the first time the processing of large surface areas with intense soft x-ray laser radiation. The damage threshold and damage mechanism of extreme ultraviolet Sc/Si multilayer mirror coatings was studied . Damage threshold fluences of ~ 0.08 J/cm2 were determined for coatings deposited on both borosilicate glass and Si substrates. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and small-angle X-ray diffraction techniques revealed the thermal nature of the damage mechanism. These results provide a benchmark for the use of Sc/Si multilayer mirrors in high fluence applications, and for the development of higher damage threshold mirrors. Soft x-ray laser ablation studies were also conducted for silicon and several plastic materials, including PMMA, Polyamide and PTFE.

  18. Advanced laser driver for soft x-ray projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Beach, R.J.; Dane, C.B.; Reichert, P.; Honig, J.N.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-03-01

    A diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser for use as a driver for a soft x-ray projection lithography system is described. The laser will output 0.5 to 1 J per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width at up to 1.5 kHz repetition frequency. The design employs microchannel-cooled diode laser arrays for optical pumping, zigzag slab energy storage, and a single frequency oscillator injected regenerative amplifier cavity using phase conjugator beam correction for near diffraction limited beam quality. The design and initial results of this laser`s activation experiments will be presented.

  19. X-ray Laser Animated Fly-Through

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

    Take a tour with an electron's-eye-view through SLAC's revolutionary new X-ray laser facility with this 5 1/2 minute animation. See how the X-ray pulses are generated using the world's longest linear accelerator along with unique arrays of machinery specially designed for this one-of-a-kind tool. For more than 40 years, SLAC's two-mile-long linear accelerator (or linac) linac has produced high-energy electrons for cutting-edge physics experiments. Now, SLAC's linac has entered a new phase of its career with the creation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  20. The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John; /SLAC

    2012-08-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

  1. Polycapillary radiography using a quasi-x-ray-laser generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Obara, Haruo; Ichimaru, Toshio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-12-01

    The characteristics of a new quasi-x-ray laser generator and its application to polycapillary radiography are described. The generator employs a high-voltage power supply, a low- impedance coaxial transmission line, a high-voltage condenser with a capacity of about 200 nF, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyristor pulse generator as a trigger device, and a new plasma flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser is charged up to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x- rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to the turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As the electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to the copper target by the electric field in the tube, the plasma x-ray source, which consists of metal ions and electrons, forms by the target evaporating. Both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations, and their peak values increased according to increase in the charging voltage. In the present work, the peak tube voltage was almost equal to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. When the charging voltage was increased, the linear plasma x-ray source formed, and the characteristic x-ray intensities of K-series lines increased. In the radiogrpahy achieved with a computed radiography system, we employed a polycapilary plate with a hole diameter of 20 micrometers and a thickness of 1 mm. The image resolution was primarily determined by the resolution of the CR system and had a value of about 100micrometers .

  2. Molecular Imaging Using X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, Anton; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-04-01

    The opening of hard X-ray free-electron laser facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, has ushered in a new era in structural determination. With X-ray pulse durations down to 10 fs or shorter, and up to 1013 transversely coherent photons per pulse in a narrow spectral bandwidth, focused irradiances of 1018 to 1021 W cm-2 or higher can be produced at X-ray energies ranging from 500 eV to 10 keV. New techniques for determining the structure of systems that cannot be crystallized and for studying the time-resolved behavior of irreversible reactions at femtosecond timescales are now available.

  3. Compact x-ray lasers in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1988-10-03

    Compact x-ray lasers in the laboratory can be produced with ultrahigh gradient rf linacs based on recent advances in linac technology by an SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be converted to soft x rays in the range of 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high field strength wigglers. Alternatively, the beam can pump a low density dielectric to produce x rays via recombination. Such linear light sources can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  5. The history of X-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    2012-10-01

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 Å, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 1013 to 1011, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  6. Lawrence Bragg, microdiffraction and X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, John

    2012-11-01

    We trace the historical development of W. L. Bragg's `law' and the key experimental observation which made it possible using polychromatic radiation at a time when neither X-ray wavelengths nor cell constants were known. This led, through his phasing and solving large mineral structures (without use of a computer), to work on metals, proteins, bubble rafts and his X-ray microscope. The relationship of this to early X-ray microdiffraction is outlined, followed by a brief review of electron microdiffraction methods, where electron-probe sizes smaller than one unit cell can be formed with an interesting `failure' of Bragg's law. We end with a review of recent femtosecond X-ray `snapshot' diffraction from protein nanocrystals, using an X-ray laser which generates pulses so short that they terminate before radiation damage can commence, yet subsequently destroy the sample. Using short pulses instead of freezing, the nexus between dose, resolution and crystal size has been broken, opening the way to time-resolved diffraction without damage for a stream of identical particles.

  7. Resonance transition radiation X-ray laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Piestrup, Melvin A.

    1991-01-01

    A free electron laser is proposed using a periodic dielectric and helical magnetic field. Periodic synchronism between the electrons and the optical wave is obtained at the period of the dielectric and not at the period of the helical magnetic field. The synchronism condition and the gain of the new device are derived. The effects on the gain from dephasing and beam expansion due to elastic scattering of the electrons in the periodic medium are included in the gain calculation. Examples of the resonance transition radiation laser and klystron are given. Operation at photon energies between 2.5 and 3.5 keV with net gain up to 12 percent is feasible using high electron-beam energies of 3 and 5 GeV. Moderate (300-MeV) beam energy allows operation between 80 to 110 eV with up to 57 percent net gain using a klystron design. In both cases, rapid foil heating may limit operation to a single electron-beam pulse.

  8. Nd:glass slab laser for x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Murray K.; Byer, Robert L.

    1990-08-01

    A Nd:Glass laser has been used to generate laser produced plasmas (LLP). The plasma emission in the keV range useful for X-ray lithography has been measured. Lithography with sub-micron linewidths has been demonstrated with a thin absorbing mask. The Nd:Glass slab laser is operated in a Q-switched one-dimensional unstable resonator. The resulting beam quality is a few times diffraction limited and is focused to an area less than the lO cm2 in our vacuum chamber. We have operated at 5 J up to 4 Hz repetition rate without any degradation of the laser output. Injection mode locking of the Nd:Glass laser with 0.7 ns pulses increases the intensity of the Q-switched laser output by about a factor of 10 and allows us to achieve a total integrated pulse length of less than 10 ns. Optical damage limits the laser intensity. The damage threshold for injection mode locked pulses focused into a Nd:Glass slab outside the laser cavity is about 20 J/cm2. However, we have observed another damage mechanism at lower intensities in Nd:Glass slabs in use in the laser head. Brown discoloration occurs in filaments along the laser beam path and we believe solarization with the help of self-focusing and the ultra- violet flashlamp radiation may be occuring. We are still investigating this phenomenon but at present it is limiting the laser output to only 2 J per pulse. The focused laser intensity is 2.1013 W/cm2 on a solid copper target in our vacuum chamber. The plasma emission in the keV X-ray range has been measured through a variety of thin film X-ray filters with a Hamamatsu micro-channel plate detector. Using the published values for the detector quantum efficiency, the micro-channel plate gain, and the filter's transmission spectra, we estimate that the conversion efficiency in the plasma from laser radiation to soft X-rays of energy greater than 0.5 keV is around 2%. We have performed single-level demonstration exposures of PNMA resist through a 10 im thick aluminised Kapton debris

  9. Imaging experiments of Ne-like x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.C., Nilsen, J.; Barbee, T.W.; Da Silva, L.B.; Fill, E.; Li, Y,; Lu, P.

    1997-06-01

    We discuss high resolution two-dimensional near-field images of the neon-like nickel and germanium x-ray laser obtained using the Asterix laser at the Max-Planck-Institute and the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our imaging diagnostic consisted of a concave multilayer mirror that imaged the output end of the x-ray laser line onto a backside illuminated x-ray CCD detector. A 25 microm thick wire positioned at the end of the target provided a spatial fiducial. With the Asterix iodine laser, a prepulse 5.23 ns before the main pulse, was used to irradiate slab targets. A great deal of structure was observed in the near field images, particularly in the J=0-1 emission. We observed a large difference in the spatial dependence of the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines of germanium, with the J=2-1 emission peaking farther away from the original target surface. A larger prepulse moved the peak emission farther away from the target surface. For the Nova experiments we used a series of 100 ps pulses spaced 400 ps apart to illuminate a germanium target. We obtained high resolution images of both the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines of Ge. These measurements are compared to hydrodynamic simulations coupled with atomic kinetics and including refraction effects.

  10. Liquid explosions induced by X-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Claudiu; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond; McQueen, Trevor; Milathianaki, Despina; Koglin, Jason; Lane, Thomas; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth; Hayes, Matt; Guillet, Serge; Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Shoeman, Robert; Stone, Howard; Boutet, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Sudden generation and release of enough energy to vaporize matter are encountered in systems that range from supernovae explosions and asteroid impacts to applications in fusion energy generation, materials processing, and laser surgery. Understanding these strong explosions is important to both fundamental science and technical applications. We studied a new type of microexplosion, induced by absorption of X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser in micron-sized drops and jets of water. These explosions are related to, but different from, those observed in experiments performed with optical lasers. Unlike explosions caused by optical lasers, X-ray laser explosions produce symmetric expansion patterns that are simpler to rationalize. The release of energy initially concentrated in a small region inside drops and jets leads to ballistic vapor flow and inertial liquid flow. The kinematics of these flows indicates that the conversion of the energy deposited by X-rays into flow has a scaling that is similar to the one encountered in shock waves.

  11. Transient-gain photoionization x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Clemens; Rohringer, Nina

    2014-12-01

    We present a generalized theory based on one-dimensional Maxwell-Bloch equations to study the amplification process of an inner-shell photoionization-pumped atomic x-ray laser. Focusing an x-ray free-electron laser beam in an elongated neon-gas target results in a strong exponential amplification of K α fluorescence, as recently demonstrated [N. Rohringer et al., Nature (London) 481, 488 (2012), 10.1038/nature10721; C. Weninger et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 233902 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.233902]. Here, we present an in-depth theoretical study of the amplification process that goes beyond the previous theory based on a rate-equation approach. We study the evolution of the pulse characteristics during the amplification process for transform-limited Gaussian and broadband self-amplified spontaneous-emission pump pulses. We discuss the impact of the gain-dependent group velocity on the emitted x-ray radiation and the resulting gain-guiding effects. A thorough analysis of the spectral and temporal properties of the emitted radiation is presented, including higher-order field-correlation functions, to characterize the ensemble of emitted x-ray pulses.

  12. Tentative study on high-photon-energy quasi-x-ray laser generator by forming plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Ichimaru, Toshio; Mori, Hidezo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Sakamaki, Kimio; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-04-01

    Tentative study on high-photon-energy quasi-x-ray-laser generator by forming plasma x-ray source is described. The generator employs a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line, a high-voltage condenser with a capacity of about 200 nF, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyristor pulse generator as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser is charged up to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to the turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As the electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to the copper target by the electric field in the tube, the plasma x- ray source, which consists of metal ions and electrons, forms by the target evaporating. Both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations, and their peak values increased according to increases in the charging voltage. In the present work, the peak tube voltage was much higher than the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. When the charging voltage was increased, the plasma x-ray source formed, and the characteristic x-ray intensities of K-series lines increased. When the plate target was employed, we observed high-intensity characteristic x-rays from the axial direction of the linear plasma x-ray source. In the case where the rod target was employed, we detected higher-intensity characteristic x-rays.

  13. Properties and Applications of Laser Generated X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Key, M H

    2002-02-25

    The rapid development of laser technology and related progress in research using lasers is shifting the boundaries where laser based sources are preferred over other light sources particularly in the XUV and x-ray spectral region. Laser based sources have exceptional capability for short pulse and high brightness and with improvements in high repetition rate pulsed operation, such sources are also becoming more interesting for their average power capability. This study presents an evaluation of the current capabilities and near term future potential of laser based light sources and summarizes, for the purpose of comparison, the characteristics and near term prospects of sources based on synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers. Conclusions are drawn on areas where the development of laser based sources is most promising and competitive in terms of applications potential.

  14. The physics of x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Marinelli, A.; Reiche, S.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (x-ray FELs) give us for the first time the possibility to explore structures and dynamical processes of atomic and molecular systems at the angstrom-femtosecond space and time scales. They generate coherent photon pulses with time duration of a few to 100 fs, peak power of 10 to 100 GW, over a wavelength range extending from about 100 nm to less than 1 Å. Using these novel and unique capabilities new scientific results are being obtained in atomic and molecular sciences, in areas of physics, chemistry, and biology. This paper reviews the physical principles, the theoretical models, and the numerical codes on which x-ray FELs are based, starting from a single electron spontaneous undulator radiation to the FEL collective instability of a high density electron beam, strongly enhancing the electromagnetic radiation field intensity and its coherence properties. A short review is presented of the main experimental properties of x-ray FELs, and the results are discussed of the most recent research to improve their longitudinal coherence properties, increase the peak power, and generate multicolor spectra.

  15. X-ray lasers for structural and dynamic biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, J. C. H.; Weierstall, U.; Chapman, H. N.

    2012-10-01

    Research opportunities and techniques are reviewed for the application of hard x-ray pulsed free-electron lasers (XFEL) to structural biology. These include the imaging of protein nanocrystals, single particles such as viruses, pump-probe experiments for time-resolved nanocrystallography, and snapshot wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) from molecules in solution. The use of femtosecond exposure times, rather than freezing of samples, as a means of minimizing radiation damage is shown to open up new opportunities for the molecular imaging of biochemical reactions at room temperature in solution. This is possible using a ‘diffract-and-destroy’ mode in which the incident pulse terminates before radiation damage begins. Methods for delivering hundreds of hydrated bioparticles per second (in random orientations) to a pulsed x-ray beam are described. New data analysis approaches are outlined for the correlated fluctuations in fast WAXS, for protein nanocrystals just a few molecules on a side, and for the continuous x-ray scattering from a single virus. Methods for determining the orientation of a molecule from its diffraction pattern are reviewed. Methods for the preparation of protein nanocrystals are also reviewed. New opportunities for solving the phase problem for XFEL data are outlined. A summary of the latest results is given, which now extend to atomic resolution for nanocrystals. Possibilities for time-resolved chemistry using fast WAXS (solution scattering) from mixtures is reviewed, toward the general goal of making molecular movies of biochemical processes.

  16. Reminiscing About the Early Years of the X-Ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J.

    2002-06-26

    To put the development of the X-ray laser in historic context, this paper presents some of the motivation and history of the development of the X-ray laser from the perspective of a scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where the first X-ray laser was demonstrated in the early 1980's using a nuclear device as the driver.

  17. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  18. 100 Hz repetition rate, high average power, plasma-based soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Brendan; Wernsing, Keith; Baumgarten, Cory; Berrill, Mark; Durivage, Leon; Furch, Federico; Curtis, Alden; Luther, Bradley; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav; Rocca, Jorge

    2013-10-01

    Numerous applications demand high average power / high repetition rate compact sources of coherent soft x-ray radiation. We report the demonstration table-top soft x-ray lasers at wavelengths ranging from 10.9 nm to 18.9 nm from plasmas created at 100 Hz repetition rate. Results includes a record average power of 0.15 mW at λ = 18.9 nm from a laser-produced Mo plasma and 0.1 mW average power at λ = 13.9 nm from a Ag plasma. These soft x-ray lasers are driven by collisional electron impact excitation in elongated line focus plasmas a few mm in length heated by a compact, directly diode-pumped, chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser that produces 1 J pulses of ps duration at 100 Hz repetition rate. Pulses from this laser irradiate the surface of polished metal targets producing transient population inversions on the 4d1S0 --> 4p1P1 transition of Ni-like ions. Tailoring of the temporal profile of the driver laser pulse is observed to significantly increase soft x-ray laser output power as well as allow the generation of shorter wavelength lasers with reduced pump energy. Work was supported by the NSF ERC for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology using equipment developed under NSF Award MRI-ARRA 09-561, and by the AMOS program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy.

  19. Development of Laser Plasma X-ray Microbeam Irradiation System and Radiation Biological Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Numasaki, Hodaka; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    Laser plasma x-ray source has the features such as ultra short pulse, high brilliance, monochromaticity, and focusing ability. These features are excellent compared with conventional x-ray source. In order to apply the laser plasma x-ray source to the biomedical study and to more closely research the radiobilogical responce of the cancer cell such as radiation induced bystander effect, we have developed x-ray microbeam system using laser plasma x-ray source. The absorbed dose of laser plasma x-ray was estimated with Gafchromic EBT film and DNA double strand breaks on the cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. When the cells were irradiated with laser plasma x-ray, the circular regions existing γ-H2AX positive cells were clearly identified. The usefulness of the laser plasma x-ray on the radiobiological study was proved in this research.

  20. X-ray measurements at high-power lasers. Relative conversion efficiencies of short pulse laser light into K X-ray radiation in medium to high Z elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, C. I.; Indelicato, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Holland, G. E.; Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Tabakhoff, E.; Brambrink, E.

    2009-03-01

    Conversion efficiencies of laser light into K x-ray radiation are used to characterize laser-solid interactions e.g. in measurements with back-lighter targets in Inertial Confinement Fusion research or in ultra short x-ray science where ultra short laser pulses are used to create x-rays for investigation of dynamic processes. In our measurements we observed high energy (few tens of keV) K x-ray radiation of element pairs created upon impact of a 1 ps, 100 J laser pulse on the target surface. The high-energy electrons created in this interaction ionise and excite the target material. We have used high purity alloy foils of Pd and Ag, as well as In and Sn and crystals of CsI and rare earth molybdates as target materials. Both constituents of these targets were simultaneously excited in one shot. The K x-ray radiation was dispersed and detected with the LCS (LULI Crystal Spectrometer), a Cauchois-type cylindrically bent transmission-crystal spectrometer. Measuring ratios in the x-ray spectra permits determination of relative conversion efficiencies for pairs of elements under identical laser-target interaction conditions.

  1. European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL): local implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European X-Ray FEL - free electron laser is under construction in DESY Hamburg. It is scheduled to be operational at 2015/16 at a cost more than 1 billion Euro. The laser uses SASE method to generate x-ray light. It is propelled by an electron linac of 17,5GeV energy and more than 2km in length. The linac uses superconducting SRF TESLA technology working at 1,3 GHz in frequency. The prototype of EXFEL is FLASH Laser (200 m in length), where the "proof of principle" was checked, and from the technologies were transferred to the bigger machine. The project was stared in the nineties by building a TTF Laboratory -Tesla Test Facility. The EXFEL laser is a child of a much bigger teraelectronovolt collider project TESLA (now abandoned in Germany but undertaken by international community in a form the ILC). A number of experts and young researchers from Poland participate in the design, construction and research of the FLASH and EXFEL lasers.

  2. X-ray irradiation-induced changes in (PVA-PEG-Ag) polymer nanocomposites films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouh, S. A.; Benthami, K.; Abutalib, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of X-ray irradiation on the structural, thermal and optical properties of polyvinyl alcohol-polyethylene glycol-silver (PVA-PEG-Ag) nanocomposites have been investigated. The samples of nanocomposites were prepared by adding Ag nanoparticles with 5 wt% to the (PVA-PEG) blend. The films of 0.05 mm thickness were prepared by the casting method. These films were irradiated with X-ray doses ranging from 20 to 200 kGy. The resultant effect of X-ray irradiation on the structural properties of PVA-PEG-Ag has been investigated using X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also, thermal property studies were carried out using thermogravimetric analysis. Further, the transmission of the PVA-PEG-Ag samples and any color changes were studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed that the crosslinking is the dominant mechanism at the dose range 50-200 kGy. This led to a more compact structure of PVA-PEG-Ag samples, which resulted in an improvement in its thermal stability with an increase in the activation energy of thermal decomposition. Moreover, the color intensity ΔE was greatly increased with an increase in the dose, and was accompanied by a significant increase in the yellow color component.

  3. Gain dynamics in a soft X-ray laser ampli er perturbed by a strong injected X-ray eld

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Shoujun; Oliva, E; Lu, L; Berrill, Mark A; Yin, Liang; Nejdl, J; Luther, Brad; Proux, C; Le, T. T.; Dunn, James; Ros, D; Zeitoun, Philippe; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Seeding soft X-ray plasma ampli ers with high harmonics has been demonstrated to generate high-brightness soft X-ray laser pulses with full spatial and temporal coherence. The interaction between the injected coherent eld and the swept-gain medium has been modelled. However, no exper- iment has been conducted to probe the gain dynamics when perturbed by a strong external seed eld. Here, we report the rst X-ray pump X-ray probe measurement of the nonlinear response of a plasma ampli er perturbed by a strong soft X-ray ultra-short pulse. We injected a sequence of two time-delayed high-harmonic pulses (l518.9 nm) into a collisionally excited nickel-like molybdenum plasma to measure with femto-second resolution the gain depletion induced by the saturated ampli cation of the high-harmonic pump and its subsequent recovery. The measured fast gain recovery in 1.5 1.75 ps con rms the possibility to generate ultra-intense, fully phase-coherent soft X-ray lasers by chirped pulse ampli cation in plasma ampli ers.

  4. Limiting parameters of the x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bessonov, E.G.

    1995-12-31

    Recent progress in free-electron lasers is do to such advantages as tunability, ability to operate at high power or to extend into X-ray regions. The scaling of fre-electron and free-ion lasers down to X-ray regime is analyzed theoretically. A production of a relativistic multilayer ion mirror and hard and high power electromagnetic radiation by reflection from this mirror are discussed. The reflectivity of the mirror is rather high because of the cross-section of the backward Rayleigh scattering of photon light by non-fully stripped relativistic ions ({approximately} {lambda}{sup 2}) is much greater ({approximately} 10 {divided_by} 15 orders) then Thompson one ({approximately}r{sub e}{sup 2}). This position is valid even in the case of non-monochromatic laser light ({Delta}{omega}/{omega}{approximately} 10{sup -4}). Ion cooling both in longitudinal plane and three-dimensional radiation ion cooling had been proposed based on this observation. The using of these cooling techniques will permit to store high current and low emittance relativistic ion beams in storage rings. The bunched ion beam can be used in ordinary Free-Ion Lasers as well. After bunching the ion beam can be extracted from the storage ring in this case.

  5. Observation of Organelles in Leydig Cells by Contact Soft X-Ray Microscopy with a Laser Plasma X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, M.; Ishino, M.; Tamotsu, S.; Yasuda, K.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kinjo, Y.; Shinohara, K.

    2011-09-01

    We observed the same biological specimens for comparison of the images by contact soft x-ray microscopy with a laser plasma x-ray source with those by confocal laser microscopy. Images of wet Leydig cells were directly comparable for organelles and showed that actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the soft x-ray images.

  6. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emma, C.; Fang, K.; Wu, J.; Pellegrini, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  7. Recent X-ray observations of the symbiotic star AG Peg: do they signify Colliding Stellar Winds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Tomov, Toma

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of recent X-ray observations of the symbiotic star AG Peg. The X-ray emission of AG Peg as observed with Swift in 2015 shows considerable variability on time scale of days as variability on shorter time scales might be present as well. Analysis of the X-ray spectra obtained in 2013 and 2015 confirms that AG Peg is an X-ray source of class β of the X-ray sources amongst the symbiotic stars. The X-ray emission of AG Peg as observed with ROSAT (1993 June) might well originate from colliding stellar winds (CSW) in binary system. On the other hand, the characteristics of the X-ray emission of AG Peg in 2013 and 2015 (Swift) are hard to accommodate in the framework of the CSW picture. Analysis of the light curves in 2015 shows that the power spectrum of the X-ray variability in AG Peg resembles that of the flicker noise (or flickering) being typical for accretion processes in astronomical objects. This is a sign that CSWs did not play a key role for the X-ray emission from AG Peg in 2013-2015 and a different mechanism (probably accretion) is also getting into play.

  8. Recent X-ray observations of the symbiotic star AG Peg: do they signify colliding stellar winds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Tomov, Toma

    2016-09-01

    We present an analysis of recent X-ray observations of the symbiotic star AG Peg. The X-ray emission of AG Peg as observed with Swift in 2015 shows considerable variability on time-scale of days as variability on shorter time-scales might be present as well. Analysis of the X-ray spectra obtained in 2013 and 2015 confirms that AG Peg is an X-ray source of class β of the X-ray sources amongst the symbiotic stars. The X-ray emission of AG Peg as observed with ROSAT (1993 June) might well originate from colliding stellar winds (CSWs) in binary system. On the other hand, the characteristics of the X-ray emission of AG Peg in 2013 and 2015 (Swift) are hard to accommodate in the framework of the CSW picture. Analysis of the light curves in 2015 shows that the power spectrum of the X-ray variability in AG Peg resembles that of the flicker noise (or flickering) being typical for accretion processes in astronomical objects. This is a sign that CSWs did not play a key role for the X-ray emission from AG Peg in 2013-2015 and a different mechanism (probably accretion) is also getting into play.

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Study of L2005 AG17 (IDPs) by Using SR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsumi, K. O.; Hagiya, K. H.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray diffraction study revealed the existence of magnetite and new type of pyrrhotite with the chemical formula of Fe0.56S in L2005 AG17. Considering the total chemical formula of Fe0.83S, residual iron in amorphous state might exist in this sample. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. X rays generated in the interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses with solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Wahlin, E.K.; Fulton, R.D.; Schappert, G.T.; Jones, L.A.; Taylor, A.J.; Casperson, D.E.; Cobble, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    We are investigating the generation of short pulse short wavelength x-rays for pumping inner-shell x-ray lasers by photo-ionization. In contrast with previous proposals, we are looking at the use of a single line as an efficient means of pumping these lasers. As a first step we are optimizing the flashlamp x-ray conversion efficiency and characterizing the x-ray pulse length. 18 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Soft X-Ray Optics by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Felix E.

    1996-01-01

    Mo/Si and C/Co multilayers for soft x-ray optics were designed for spectral regions of interest in possible applications. Fabrication was effected by Pulsed Laser Deposition using Nd:YAG (355 nm) or excimer (248 nm) lasers in order to evaluate the suitability of this technique. Results for Mo/Si structures were not considered satisfactory due mainly to problems with particulate production and target surface modification during Si ablation. These problems may be alleviated by a two-wavelength approach, using separate lasers for each target. Results for C/Co multilayers are much more encouraging, since indication of good layering was observed for extremely thin layers. We expect to continue investigating this possibility. In order to compete with traditional PVD techniques, it is necessary to achieve film coverage uniformity over large enough areas. It was shown that this is feasible, and novel means of achieving it were devised.

  12. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Augustoni, A.L.; Gerardo, J.B.; Raymond, T.D.

    1992-12-29

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography is disclosed. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser. 8 figs.

  13. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Augustoni, Arnold L.; Gerardo, James B.; Raymond, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser.

  14. Modeling of saturation and refraction in x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Kuba, J.; Möller, C.; Zabaydullin, O. Z.

    2003-04-01

    We model an experiment in which an iron slab target is irradiated by superimposing the six beams of the LULI facility onto a 22 mm×100 μm focal line. The driving laser is composed of two Gaussian pulses of 130-ps duration (full width at half maximum), preceded by a prepulse. A strong enhancement of the 3p-3s 0-1 x-ray line at 25.5 nm in neonlike iron was observed. Saturation is attained for plasma lengths near 1 cm. A ray-trace code working as a postprocessor to a hydroatomic code is used to model the x-ray laser beam refraction due to the variation of the electron density versus the distance to the target surface. Knowing the hydrodynamic conditions, i.e., electron density, and electron and ion temperatures, along the ray paths, the radiative transfer equation, and the population equations are solved self-consistently by using a Maxwell-Bloch approach. A more tractable approach, requiring also the intensity of saturation as a function of time and space, is also presented. In this case, calculation time is much less than in the Maxwell-Bloch approach.

  15. X-Ray Free Electron Laser Interaction With Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2009-05-12

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) will enable studying new areas of laser-matter interaction. We summarize the current understanding of the interaction of XFEL pulses with matter and describe some of the simulation approaches that are used to design experiments on future XFEL sources. Modified versions of these models have been successful in guiding and analyzing experiments performed at the extreme-ultraviolet FEL FLASH at wavelengths of 6 nm and longer. For photon energies of several keV, no XFEL-matter interaction experiments have been performed yet but data is anticipated to become available in the near future, which will allow to test our understanding of the interaction physics in this wavelength regime.

  16. Development of x-ray laser architectural components

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Da Silva, L.B.; Moreno, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the recent experimental and computational development of short-pulse, enhanced-coherence, and high-brilliance x-ray lasers (XRLs). The authors will describe the development of an XRL cavity by injecting laser photons back into an amplifying XRL plasma. Using a combination of LASNEX/GLF/SPECTRE-BEAM3 codes, they obtained good agreement with experimental results. They will describe the adaptive spatial filtering technique used to design small-aperture shaped XRLs with near diffraction-limited output. Finally they will discuss issues concerning the development of high-brilliance XRL architecture, with emphasis on scaling the XRL aperture. Combining these advances in XRL architectural components allows them to develop a short-pulse, high-brilliance, coherent XRL suitable for applications in areas such as biological holography, plasma interferometry, and nonlinear optics.

  17. Characterization of germanium stripe x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Moreno, J.C.; MacGowan, B.J.

    1993-07-01

    One method of improving the transverse spatial coherence of x-ray lasers (XRLS) is by adaptive spatial filtering of XRL apertures using geometric shaping in the form of bowtie or wedge XRLS. However, we must maintain the desired geometric shapes in exploding foil or slab configurations during the lasing period. As a first step toward understanding Lasing in such geometries we study the behavior of simple stripe XRLs. Past experience with stripe XRLs deposited on thick plastic substrates resulted in significantly weaker laser intensities as compared to line-focused slab XRLs. Possible reasons for this intensity reduction of stripe XRLs could include mixing at the laser boundary, and changes in plasma, kinetics, and hydrodynamic properties which affect laser gains and propagation. We will present experimental and theoretical characterizations of germanium line-focused and stripe XRLs. Key experimental parameters we will study include images of emission profiles of the laser blow-off, angular divergences, XRL output intensities, and ionization balances as we vary XRL designs. We will compare the experimental results with two-dimensional (2-D) laser deposition and hydrodynamics simulations using LASNEX, and study the changes in ionization balances and level populations from post-processing LASNEX results.

  18. Femtosecond Nanocrystallography with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Henry

    2011-03-01

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers have opened up a new form of protein nanocrystallography. The X-ray pulses are of high enough intensity and of sufficiently short duration that individual single-shot diffraction patterns can be obtained from a sample before significant damage occurs. This ``diffraction before destruction'' method may enable the determination of structures of proteins that cannot be grown into large enough crystals or are too radiation sensitive for high- resolution crystallography. Ultrafast pump-probe studies of photoinduced dynamics can also be studied. We have carried out experiments in coherent diffraction from protein nanocrystals, including Photosystem I membrane protein, at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The crystals are filtered to sizes less than 2 micron, and are delivered to the pulsed X-ray beam in a continuously flowing liquid jet. Millions of diffraction patterns were recorded at the LCLS repetition rate of 60 Hz. Tens of thousands of the single-shot diffraction patterns have been indexed, and combined into a single crystal diffraction pattern, which can be phased for structure determination and analysed for the effects of pulse duration and fluence. Experimental data collection was carried out as part of a large collaboration involving CFEL DESY, Arizona State University, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, University of Uppsala, SLAC, LBNL, LLNL, using the CAMP apparatus which was designed and built by the Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL. The LCLS is operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  19. X-ray micrography and imaging of Escherichia coli cell shape using laser plasma pulsed point x-ray sources.

    PubMed Central

    Rajyaguru, J M; Kado, M; Richardson, M C; Muszynski, M J

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray microscopy is a relatively new technique and is performed mostly at a few large synchrotron x-ray sources that use exposure times of seconds. We utilized a bench-top source of single-shot laser (ns) plasma to generate x-rays similar to synchrotron facilities. A 5 microlitres suspension of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 in 0.9% phosphate buffered saline was placed on polymethylmethyacrylate coated photoresist, covered with a thin (100 nm) SiN window and positioned in a vacuum chamber close to the x-ray source. The emission spectrum was tuned for optimal absorption by carbon-rich material. Atomic force microscope scans provided a surface and topographical image of differential x-ray absorption corresponding to specimen properties. By using this technique we observed a distinct layer around whole cells, possibly representing the Gram-negative envelope, darker stained areas inside the cell corresponding to chromosomal DNA as seen by thin section electron microscopy, and dent(s) midway through one cell, and 1/3- and 2/3-lengths in another cell, possibly representing one or more division septa. This quick and high resolution with depth-of-field microscopy technique is unmatched to image live hydrated ultrastructure, and has much potential for application in the study of fragile biological specimens. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:9083658

  20. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  1. Laser-plasma ion beams-experiments towards charge transfer x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Fill, E.E. ); Bruch, R. ); Schneider, D. )

    1993-06-05

    Laser plasmas produced at intensities of up to 10[sup 14] W/cm[sup 2] expand towards a secondary target a few millimeters away. The intense x-ray emission during the interaction plasma-target was recorded spectrally, spatially and time-resolved. A number of processes, like recombination and charge transfer may account for this strong radiation. The implications of these experiments to the design of a charge transfer x-ray laser are discussed.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Soft X-ray Laser Program: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.; Brown, S.; Campbell, E.M.; Ceglio, N.; Eder, D.; Gaines, D.; Hawryluk, A.; Keane, C.; London, R.; MacGowan, B.

    1987-08-01

    Significant progress toward the goal of producing high power, high coherence x-ray lasers has been made. Lasing at wavelengths as low as 66 A has been achieved in a nickel like laser scheme which is scalable to sub-44 A wavelengths. In addition, x-ray laser cavities, x-ray holography, and an applications beamline have been demonstrated. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Measurement of local gain and electron density in an yttrium x-ray laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.Jr.; Celliers, P.; Decker, C.; London, R.A.; Moreno, J.C.; Trebes, J.E.; Wan, A.S.; Weber, F.

    1996-05-01

    X-ray lasers have measured average gains significantly less than calculated and a persistently low level of spatial coherence. We have used an X-ray laser both as an injected signal to a short X-ray laser amplifier and as an interferometer beam to measure two dimensional local gain and density profiles of the X-ray laser plasma with near-1- mm resolution. The measured local gain is in agreement with atomic models, but its gain is unexpectedly spatially inhomogeneous. This inhomogeneity explains the low level of spatial coherence observed and helps explain the disparity between observed and simulated gains.

  4. Sub-Picosecond Tunable Hard X-Ray Undulator Source for Laser/X-Ray Pump-Probe Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Beaud, P.; Johnson, S.; Streun, A.; Schmidt, T.; Abela, R.; Al-Adwan, A.; Abramsohn, D.; Boege, M.; Grolimund, D.; Keller, A.; Krasniqi, F.; Rivkin, L.; Rohrer, M.; Schilcher, T.; Schmidt, T.; Schlott, V.; Schulz, L.; Veen, F. van der; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The FEMTO source under construction at the {mu}XAS beamline is designed to enable tunable time-resolved laser/x-ray absorption and diffraction experiments in photochemistry and condensed matter with ps- and sub-ps resolution. The design takes advantage of (1) the highly stable operation of the SLS storage ring, (2) the reliable high harmonic operation of small gap, short period undulators to generate hard x-rays with energy 3-18 keV at 2.4 GeV beam energy, and (3) the progress in high power, high repetition rate fs solid-state laser technology to employ laser/e-beam 'slicing' to reach a time resolution of ultimately 100 fs. The source will profit from the inherently synchronized pump (laser I: 100 fs, 2 mJ, 1 kHz) and probe (sliced X-rays, laser II: 50 fs, 5 mJ, 1 kHz) pulses, and from the excellent stability of the SLS storage ring which is operated in top-up mode and controlled by a fast orbit feedback (FOFB). Coherent radiation emitted at THz frequencies by the sliced 100 fs electron bunches will be monitored as on-line cross-correlation signal to keep the laser-electron beam interaction at optimum. The source is designed to provide at 8 keV (100 fs) a monochromized flux of 104 ph/s/0.01% bw (Si crystal monochromator) and 106 ph/s/1.5% bw (multilayer monochromator) at the sample. It is operated in parasitic mode using a hybrid bunch filling pattern. Because of the low intensity measurements are carried out repetitively over many shots using refreshing samples and gated detectors. 'Diffraction gating' experiments will be used to characterize the sub-ps X-ray pulses.

  5. Focusing mirror for x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Takashi; Yamakawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Morita, Shinya; Uehara, Yoshihiro; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Lin, Weimin; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2008-08-15

    We present the design, fabrication, and evaluation of a large total-reflection mirror for focusing x-ray free-electron laser beams to nanometer dimensions. We used an elliptical focusing mirror made of silicon that was 400 mm long and had a focal length of 550 mm. Electrolytic in-process dressing grinding was used for initial-step figuring and elastic emission machining was employed for final figuring and surface smoothing. A figure accuracy with a peak-to-valley height of 2 nm was achieved across the entire area. Characterization of the focused beam was performed at BL29XUL of SPring-8. The focused beam size was 75 nm at 15 keV, which is almost equal to the theoretical size.

  6. First refraction contrast imaging via Laser-Compton Scattering X-ray at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Aoki, Tatsuro; Washio, Masakazu; Araki, Sakae; Fukuda, Masafumi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji

    2012-07-31

    Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS) is one of the most feasible techniques for high quality, high brightness, and compact X-ray source. High energy electron beam produced by accelerators scatters off the laser photon at a small spot. As a laser target, we have been developing a pulsedlaser storage cavity for increasing an X-ray flux. The X-ray flux was still inadequate that was 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5}/sec, however, we performed first refraction contrast imaging in order to evaluate the quality of LCS X-ray. Edge enhanced contrast imaging was achieved by changing the distance from sample to detector. The edge enhancement indicates that the LCS X-ray has small source size, i.e. high brightness. We believe that the result has demonstrated good feasibility of linac-based high brightness X-ray sources via laser-electron Compton scatterings.

  7. Ultrafast phase contrast imaging of laser driven shocks using betatron X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, D. J.; Rutherford, M. E.; White, T. G.; Eakins, D. E.; Wood, J. C.; Poder, K.; Lopes, N. C.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Cole, J. S.; Albert, F.; Pollack, B. B.; Behm, K. T.; Zhao, Z.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Schumaker, W.; Glenzer, S.

    2015-06-01

    Bright, high-energy photon sources, such as synchrotrons and more recently the new generation of X-ray free-electron lasers, offer the attractive combination of high brilliance, short pulse duration and high-energy X-rays. Betatron X-rays produced within a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator provide an exciting complementary energetic photon source to these large scale facilities. We describe the first proof-of-principle experiments imaging shock-front evolution in laser driven targets using wakefield betatron X-rays. These pioneering experiments were performed on the 400TW Gemini laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. Shock waves were driven into silicon wafers along the [100] direction, and stroboscopically imaged perpendicular to the shock propagation direction using a ~ 40 fs betatron X-ray pulse. These initial results showcase a promising, potentially table top sized X-ray source suitable for probing the response of materials under extreme condition.

  8. KSwAGS: A Swift X-Ray and UV Survey of the Kepler Field. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Krista Lynne; Boyd, Patricia T.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Gehrels, Neil; Edelson, Rick; Howell, Steve B.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Brown, Alexander; Young, Steve

    2015-10-01

    We introduce the first phase of the Kepler-Swift Active Galaxies and Stars survey (KSwAGS), a simultaneous X-ray and UV survey of ˜6 square degrees of the Kepler field using the Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) and UV/Optical Telescope. We detect 93 unique X-ray sources with signal-to-noise ratio ≥slant 3 with the XRT, of which 60 have UV counterparts. We use the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) to obtain the optical counterparts of these sources, and construct the fX/fV ratio as a first approximation of the classification of the source. The survey produces a mixture of stellar sources, extragalactic sources, and sources which we are not able to classify with certainty. We have obtained optical spectra for thirty of these targets, and are conducting an ongoing observing campaign to fully identify the sample. For sources classified as stellar or active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with certainty, we construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the 2MASS, UBV, and GALEX data supplied for their optical counterparts by the KIC, and show that the SEDs differ qualitatively between the source types, and so can offer a method of classification in absence of a spectrum. Future papers in this series will analyze the timing properties of the stars and AGN in our sample separately. Our survey provides the first X-ray and UV data for a number of known variable stellar sources, as well as a large number of new X-ray detections in this well-studied portion of the sky. The KSwAGS survey is currently ongoing in the K2 ecliptic plane fields.

  9. The trickle before the torrent-diffraction data from X-ray lasers.

    PubMed

    Maia, Filipe R N C; Hajdu, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Today Scientific Data launched a collection of publications describing data from X-ray free-electron lasers under the theme 'Structural Biology Applications of X-ray Lasers'. The papers cover data on nanocrystals, single virus particles, isolated cell organelles, and living cells. All data are deposited with the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) and available to the scientific community to develop ideas, tools and procedures to meet challenges with the expected torrents of data from new X-ray lasers, capable of producing billion exposures per day. PMID:27479637

  10. Picosecond soft-x-ray pulses from a high-intensity laser-plasma source.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J F; Chaker, M; Kieffer, J C

    1996-07-15

    We report time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of laser-produced plasma x-ray sources. Plasmas produced by a 400-fs 1-TW tabletop laser are characterized with a transmission grating spectrometer coupled to a soft-x-ray streak camera. Soft-x-ray radiation in the 1-6-nm range with durations of 2-7 ps is observed for copper and tantalum plasmas. The effect of incident laser energy on the x-ray pulse duration is also investigated. PMID:19876245

  11. Soft x-ray contact imaging of biological specimens using a laser-produced plasma as an x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a laser-produced plasma as an x-ray source provides significant advantages over other types of sources for x-ray microradiography of, particularly, living biological specimens. The pulsed nature of the x-rays enables imaging of the specimen in a living state, and the small source size minimizes penumbral blurring. This makes it possible to make an exposure close to the source, thereby increasing the x-ray intensity. In this article, we will demonstrate the applications of x-ray contact microradiography in structural and developmental botany such as the localization of silica deposition and the floral morphologenesis of maize.

  12. Application of x-ray-laser interferometry to study high-density laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.; Libby, S.B.; London, R.A.; Moreno, J.C.; Trebes, J.E.; Weber, F.

    1996-02-01

    Collisionally pumped soft-x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4 to 40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beam splitters in the soft-x-ray regime, we can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. Using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser, which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 nm, we have performed a series of radiography, moir{acute e} deflectometry, and interferometry experiments to characterize plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion. We describe experiments using a soft-x-ray laser interferometer, operated in the Mach{endash}Zehnder configuration, to study CH plasmas. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow us to validate and benchmark our numerical models used to study the physics of laser{endash}plasma interactions. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  13. An x-ray probe of nickel nanoparticles generated by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Doumy, G.; Southworth, S. H.; March, A. M.; Dichiara, A. D.; Gao, Y.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Moonshiram, D.; Young, L.; Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    A plume of nickel atoms and nanoparticles can be generated by an intense laser pulse hitting a solid nickel surface. We set up a Ni ablation source in a vacuum chamber on an x-ray beamline at the Advanced Photon Source and used x-ray absorption, x-ray emission, and ion spectroscopies to probe the ablation plume at x-ray energies above the Ni K-edge at 8.33 keV. The laser and x-ray pulses were overlapped in time and space with variable delay to measure the time evolution of the ablation plume. Measurements of the charge states produced by x-ray absorption were not possible due to the intense prompt ions ejected in the ablation process. However, Ni K α x-ray emission was measured as functions of laser fluence and pump-probe delay. The fluorescence yield was also used to record the near-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of the nanoparticles in the plume. The nanoparticles were collected and their diameters were determined to be ~9 nm from x-ray scattering pair-distribution-function measurements. The experiments demonstrate the use of x-ray techniques to characterize laser ablation processes. Work supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Dept of Energy, Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  14. Optimization of a femtosecond laser generated x-ray source for pulsed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, XiaoHui; Li, XiaoYa; Ma, YunCan; Wu, ZhaoKui; Li, Jun; Zhu, WenJun

    2016-01-01

    X-ray radiography is an important tool in medicine as well as in life science and materials science. It is Kα radiation that is of primary interest in the fields of x-ray diffraction, whereas the whole x-ray flux receives most attention in the x-ray imaging application. We present a general Monte Carlo model of x-ray generation in femtosecond laser-irradiated solid material. Bremsstrahlung radiation is taken into account explicitly, permitting both whole x-ray and Kα emission to be calculated for arbitrary experimental conditions (i.e. target material, target thickness, target shape as well as laser intensity). The optimal thickness of both the whole x-ray and Kα emission from Titanium (Ti) foils irradiated with femtosecond laser pulse has been investigated. Comparing the results of whole x-ray with those of the Kα radiation, we find that the optimal thickness is increased by up to 118% for laser intensities I<5×1017 W/cm2, and this in turn leads to an increase in x-ray flux by 8%. The model may thus serve as a guide for experiments, particularly for hard x-ray radiography applications.

  15. Soft x-ray resist characterization: Studies with a laser plasma x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, G.D.; Outka, D.A. ); Zeigler, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Little work has been performed to characterize the exposure sensitivity, contrast, and tone of candidate resists for photon energies between 100--300 eV, the range in which projection soft x-ray lithography will be developed. We report here the characterization of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, exposure sensitivity, contrast, and post-exposure processing of selected polysilane resists at photon energies close to the Si L{sub 2,3} absorption edge (100 eV). We find absorption resonance features in the NEXAFS spectra which we assign to excitation into Si--Si and Si--C {sigma}* orbitals. Using monochromatized XUV exposures on the Si--Si {sigma}* resonance at 105 eV, followed by solvent dissolution development, we have measured the exposure sensitivity curves of these resists. We find sensitivities in the range of 600--3000 mJ/cm{sup 2} and contrasts in the range from 0.5--1.4, depending on the polysilane side chain. We have also performed exposure sensitivity measurements at 92 eV, below the edge. Sensitivity decreases slightly compared to 105 eV exposures and the saturation depth and contrast both increase, as expected. We find also that exposing resist films to oxygen after XUV exposure, but before development increases the sensitivity markedly. 7 figs.

  16. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Brendan A.; Berrill, Mark; Wernsing, Keith A.; Baumgarten, Cory; Woolston, Mark; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at λ = 13.9 nm and 20 μW at λ = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  17. Influence of laser focal position on X-ray and ion emission of copper plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, S.; Tripathi, S.; Ryc, L.; Dhareshwar, L. J.

    2011-05-01

    X-ray emission from copper plasma produced by a sub-nanosecond Nd:glass laser was studied as a function of distance of the target from the focus position. Optimization of soft (0.7-1.56 keV) and hard (3.2-5 keV) X-ray emissions as a function of the laser focal position was studied. In addition, a thallium acid phthalate (TAP) crystal spectrometer with spectral resolution of 30 mÅ was also developed to study variation in X-ray line emission in the spectral range of 1.291-1.610 keV (7.7-9.6 Å) as a function of laser focal position. It is observed that the maximum soft X-ray emission is on either sides of the focus, indicating a dependence on plasma volume, whereas hard X-ray emission shows a single peak close to the 'best focus' position. The line X-ray emission intensity with respect to laser focal position also shows a double hump structure as in the case of soft X-ray emission. This indicates that the line emission is also a function of plasma volume. Scaling of X-ray yield with laser intensity has also been determined. Ion emission was also studied as a function of focal position variation. It is observed to match well with the trend shown by X-ray emission.

  18. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10/sup 12/ watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10/sup 9/ watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/. Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs.

  19. Solid-Density Plasma characterization with X-ray scattering on the 200-J Janus Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P B; Gregori, G; Ravasio, A; Price, D; Bastea, M; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H

    2006-04-25

    We present collective x-ray scattering (CXS) measurements using a Chlorine He-{alpha} x-ray source pumped with less than 200 J of laser energy. The experimental scattering spectra show plasmon resonances from shocked samples. These experiments use only 10{sup 12} x-ray photons at the sample of which 10{sup -5} have been scattered and detected with a highly efficient curved crystal spectrometer. Our results demonstrate that x-ray scattering is a viable technique on smaller laser facilities making CXS measurements accessible to a broad scientific community.

  20. The trickle before the torrent—diffraction data from X-ray lasers

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Hajdu, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Today Scientific Data launched a collection of publications describing data from X-ray free-electron lasers under the theme ‘Structural Biology Applications of X-ray Lasers’. The papers cover data on nanocrystals, single virus particles, isolated cell organelles, and living cells. All data are deposited with the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) and available to the scientific community to develop ideas, tools and procedures to meet challenges with the expected torrents of data from new X-ray lasers, capable of producing billion exposures per day. PMID:27479637

  1. Directional properties of hard x-ray sources generated by tightly focused ultrafast laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Bixue; Mordovanakis, Aghapi; Easter, James; Krushelnick, Karl; Nees, John A.

    2008-11-17

    Directional properties of ultrafast laser-based hard x-ray sources are experimentally studied using tightly focused approximately millijoule laser pulses incident on a bulk Mo target. Energy distributions of K{alpha} and total x rays, as well as source-size distributions are directionally resolved in vacuum and in flowing helium, respectively. Directional distributions of x-ray emission is more isotropic for p-polarized pump than for s-polarized. Based on source-size measurements, a simple two-location model, with expanded plasma and bulk material, is employed to represent the x-ray source profile.

  2. Hybrid-K-edge/X-ray Fluorescense Densitometry with Laser-Compton Scattered X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Khalid Chouffani El Fassi

    2010-08-29

    The quantitative verification of the accountancy of fissile nuclear materials through independent measurements represents one of the key elements of nuclear materials Safeguards. Elemental probes of materials of interest to non-proliferation are critical to research strategy in order to identify sensitive advanced instrumentation detection technologies. Advanced instrumentation for material detection and accountability are needed for use in fuel cycle facilities for real-time in-process monitoring of separations-partitioning, fuels fabrication as well as for traditional safeguards activities. Radiation-based NDA (non-destructive analysis) techniques can provide some vital information about nuclear materials much more quickly, cheaply and safely than chemical or radio chemical analysis. Hybrid K-edge densitometry (HKED) is currently the most accurate nondestructive inspection technique that provides sensitive quantification of heavy metal contamination. HKED in a technique that exploits both K-edge absorption and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and allows simultaneously greater elemental specificity and lower detection limits

  3. Recombination and collisional x-ray lasers at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, Gerard; Jaegle, Pierre; Carillon, Antoine; Gauthe, Bernard; Goedtkindt, P.; Guennou, M.; Klisnick, Annie; Moeller, Clary; Rus, Bedrich; Sureau, Alain; Zeitoun, Philippe

    1994-02-01

    We present our recent efforts to produce X-ray lasers in the 200 angstroms range by using the moderate power drive of the LULI facility in Palaiseau. The 4 - 5 transitions of Li-like sulfur exhibit large gain-length products in recombining plasmas, and appear to be less sensitive to plasma non-uniformity than the 3 - 4 and 3 - 5 transitions previously studied. From numerical simulations this is likely due to smaller radiative and collisional excitation from 4f than from 3d levels. In collisional scheme, neon-like zinc gives analogous results to similar works on other elements for the 3p - 3s, J equals 2 yields 1 transitions, but the J equals 0 yields 1 transition shows a surprisingly large gain coefficient of 4.9 cm-1. From a detailed comparison of time-dependent intensities of the J equals 0 yields 1 and the J equals 2 yields 1 lines, we conclude that transitions from J equals 0 and from J equals 2 are not emitted in the same region of the plasma.

  4. Sub-MeV tunably polarized X-ray production with laser Thomson backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, K.; Kando, M.; Hayakawa, T.; Daito, I.; Kondo, S.; Homma, T.; Kameshima, T.; Kotaki, H.; Chen, L.-M.; Fukuda, Y.; Faenov, A.; Shizuma, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.

    2008-05-01

    Reported in this article is the generation of unique polarized x-rays in the sub-MeV region by means of the Thomson backscattering of the Nd:YAG laser photon with a wavelength of 1064nm on the 150MeV electron from the microtron accelerator. The maximum energy of the x-ray photons is estimated to be about 400keV. The total energy of the backscattered x-ray pulse is measured with an imaging plate and a LYSO scintillator. The angular divergence of the x-rays is also measured by using the imaging plate. We confirm that the x-ray beam is polarized according to the laser polarization direction with the Compton scattering method. In addition, we demonstrate the imaging of the object shielded by lead with the generated x-rays.

  5. Comparison of Single Event Transients Generated by Short Pulsed X-Rays, Lasers and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoza, David; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Tockstein, Michael A.; Brewe, Dale L.; Wells, Nathan P.; Koga, Rokutaro; Gaab, K. M.; Lotshaw, William T.; Moss, Steven C.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the transients generated by pulsed x-rays, heavy ions, and different laser wavelengths in a Si p-i-n photodiode. We compare the charge collected by all of the excitation methods to determine the equivalent LET for pulsed x-rays relative to heavy ions. Our comparisons show that pulsed x-rays from synchrotron sources can generate a large range of equivalent LET and generate transients similar to those excited by laser pulses and heavy ion strikes. We also look at how the pulse width of the transients changes for the different excitation methods. We show that the charge collected with pulsed x-rays is greater than expected as the x-ray photon energy increases. Combined with their capability of focusing to small spot sizes and of penetrating metallization, pulsed x-rays are a promising new tool for high resolution screening of SEE susceptibility

  6. Design of a hard X-ray beamline and end-station for pump and probe experiments at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeku; Eom, Intae; Kang, Tai-Hee; Rah, Seungyu; Nam, Ki Hyun; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Kwon, Soonam; Park, Sang Han; Kim, Kyung Sook; Hyun, Hyojung; Kim, Seung Nam; Lee, Eun Hee; Shin, Hocheol; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Myong-jin; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Ahn, Docheon; Lim, Jun; Yu, Chung-Jong; Song, Changyong; Kim, Hyunjung; Noh, Do Young; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Bongsoo; Kim, Kwang-Woo; Ko, In Soo; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Kim, Sunam

    2016-02-01

    The Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser project, a new worldwide-user facility to deliver ultrashort, laser-like x-ray photon pulses, will begin user operation in 2017 after one year of commissioning. Initially, it will provide two beamlines for hard and soft x-rays, respectively, and two experimental end-stations for the hard x-ray beamline will be constructed by the end of 2015. This article introduces one of the two hard x-ray end-stations, which is for hard x-ray pump-probe experiments, and primarily outlines the overall design of this end-station and its critical components. The content of this article will provide useful guidelines for the planning of experiments conducted at the new facility.

  7. Overview of Tabletop X-Ray Laser Development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, J.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Nilsen, J.; Smith, R. F.; Keenan, R.; Moon, S. J.; Filevich, J.; Rocca, J.; Nelson, A. J.; Hunter, J. R.; MarconiS, M. c.; Li, L.; Osterheld, A. L.; Shepherd, R.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Zeitoun, P.; Hubert, S.; Jacquemot, S.; Fajardo, M.

    It is almost a decade since the first tabletop x-ray laser experiments were implemented at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The decision to pursue the picosecond-driven schemes at LLNL was largely based around the early demonstration of the tabletop Ne-like Ti x-ray laser at the Max Born Institute (MBI) as well as the established robustness of collisional excitation schemes. These picosecond x-ray lasers have been a strong growth area for x-ray laser research. Rapid progress in source development and characterization has achieved ultrahigh peak brightness rivaling the previous activities on the larger facilities. Various picosecond soft-x-ray based applications have benefited from the increased repetition rates. We will describe the activities at LLNL in this area.

  8. X-ray laser resonator for the kilo-electron-volt range

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jie; Tomov, Ivan V.; Er, Ali O.; Rentzepis, Peter M.

    2013-04-29

    We have designed, constructed, and tested an x-ray laser resonator operating in the hard x-ray, keV energy region. This ring x-ray laser cavity is formed by four highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals. The crystals are set at the Bragg angles that allow for the complete 360 Degree-Sign round trip of the 2.37 A, 5.23 keV L{sub {alpha}} line of neodymium. In addition, we also present experimental data of a similar ring laser resonator that utilizes the Cr K{sub {alpha}}, 5.41 keV, x-ray line to propagate through the four mirrors of the cavity. The specific properties of these x-ray laser resonator mirrors, including reflection losses and cavity arrangement, are presented.

  9. Observation of Actin Filaments in Leydig Cells with a Contact-type Soft X-ray Microscope with Laser Plasma X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    Actin filaments in Leydig cells from mouse testes have been observed with a contact-type soft x-ray microscope with laser plasma x-ray source. The Leydig cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde, stained with Phalloidin, and observed with a confocal laser microscope prior to the observation with x-ray microscope. Obtained images by both of the confocal laser microscopy and the x-ray microscopy were directly compared and revealed that not only position of actin filaments but also the shapes can be identified each other. The actin filaments in the x-ray images were clearly recognized and their structures were obtained in more detail compared to those in the confocal laser microscope images.

  10. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  11. Flash imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles by contact x-ray microscopy with a high intensity laser plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    X-ray flash imaging by contact microscopy with a highly intense laser-plasma x-ray source was achieved for the observation of wet biological cells. The exposure time to obtain a single x-ray image was about 600 ps as determined by the pulse duration of the driving laser pulse. The x-ray flash imaging makes it possible to capture an x-ray image of living biological cells without any artificial treatment such as staining, fixation, freezing, and so on. The biological cells were cultivated directly on the surface of the silicon nitride membranes, which are used for the x-ray microscope. Before exposing the cells to x-rays they were observed by a conventional fluorescent microscope as reference, since the fluorescent microscopes can visualize specific organelles stained with fluorescent dye. Comparing the x-ray images with the fluorescent images of the exact same cells, each cellular organelle observed in the x-ray images was identified one by one and actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the x-ray images.

  12. Standoff detection of hidden objects using backscattered ultra-intense laser-produced x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, H.; Mori, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.

    2013-08-28

    Ultra-intense laser-produced sub-ps X-ray pulses can detect backscattered signals from objects hidden in aluminium containers. Coincident measurements using primary X-rays enable differentiation among acrylic, copper, and lead blocks inside the container. Backscattering reveals the shapes of the objects, while their material composition can be identified from the modification methods of the energy spectra of backscattered X-ray beams. This achievement is an important step toward more effective homeland security.

  13. Near-monochromatic X-ray beams produced by the free electron laser and Compton backscatter.

    PubMed

    Carroll, F E; Waters, J W; Price, R R; Brau, C A; Roos, C F; Tolk, N H; Pickens, D R; Stephens, W H

    1990-05-01

    The intense photon output of a free electron laser may be made to collide with its own high energy electron beam to create nearly monochromatic x-rays using Compton backscatter techniques. These x-rays can be used for imaging and non-imaging diagnostic and therapeutic experiments. The initial configuration of the Vanderbilt Medical Free Electron Laser (Sierra Laser Systems, Sunnyvale, CA) produces intense x-rays up to 17.9 keV, although higher energies are easily attainable through the use of frequency doubling methods, alteration of the energy of the electron beam and coupling to conventional laser inputs. PMID:2345075

  14. Method and apparatus for producing durationally short ultraviolet or x-ray laser pulses

    DOEpatents

    MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Trebes, J.E.

    1987-05-05

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing ultraviolet or x- ray laser pulses of short duration. An ultraviolet or x-ray laser pulse of long duration is progressively refracted, across the surface of an opaque barrier, by a streaming plasma that is produced by illuminating a solid target with a pulse of conventional line focused high power laser radiation. The short pulse of ultraviolet or x-ray laser radiation, which may be amplified to high power, is separated out by passage through a slit aperture in the opaque barrier.

  15. Method and apparatus for producing durationally short ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulses

    DOEpatents

    MacGowan, Brian J.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Trebes, James E.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulses of short duration (32). An ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulse of long duration (12) is progressively refracted, across the surface of an opaque barrier (28), by a streaming plasma (22) that is produced by illuminating a solid target (16, 18) with a pulse of conventional line focused high power laser radiation (20). The short pulse of ultraviolet or X-ray laser radiation (32), which may be amplified to high power (40, 42), is separated out by passage through a slit aperture (30) in the opaque barrier (28).

  16. Femtosecond x-rays from Thomson scattering using laser wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2001-03-01

    The possibility of producing femtosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering high power laser beams off laser wakefield generated relativistic electron beams is discussed. The electron beams are produced with either a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SM-LWFA) or through a standard laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with optical injection. For a SM-LWFA (LWFA) produced electron beam, a broad (narrow) energy distribution is assumed, resulting in X-ray spectra that are broadband (monochromatic). Designs are presented for 3-100 fs x-ray pulses and the expected flux and brightness of these sources are compared.

  17. Photoelectron diffraction from laser-aligned molecules with X-ray free-electron laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kyo; Teramoto, Takahiro; Akagi, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Takashi; Majima, Takuya; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Ogawa, Kanade; Sakai, Hirofumi; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Tsuru, Shota; Wada, Ken; Yabashi, Makina; Yagishita, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of deep inner-shell 2p X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) patterns from laser-aligned I2 molecules using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. The XPD patterns of the I2 molecules, aligned parallel to the polarization vector of the XFEL, were well matched with our theoretical calculations. Further, we propose a criterion for applying our molecular-structure-determination methodology to the experimental XPD data. In turn, we have demonstrated that this approach is a significant step toward the time-resolved imaging of molecular structures. PMID:26369428

  18. X-ray laser interferometry for probing high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4-40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beamsplitters in the soft x-ray regime, the authors can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. Using a neon-like yttrium x-ray laser which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 nm, they have performed a series of x-ray laser interferometry experiments to characterize plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion. In this paper the authors describe experiments using a soft x-ray laser interferometer, operated in the Mach-Zehnder configuration, to study CH plasmas and exploding foil targets commonly used for x-ray laser targets. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow the authors to validate and benchmark their numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions.

  19. XUV probing of laser imprint in a thin foil using an x-ray laser backlighter

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; DaSilva, L.B.; Demir, A.

    1996-05-06

    For direct drive ICF, a capsule is imploded by directly illuminating the surface with laser light. Beam smoothing and uniformity of illumination affect the seeding of instabilities at the ablation front. We have developed a technique for studying the imprint of a laser beam on a thin foil using an x-ray laser as an XUV backlighter. We use multilayer XUV optics to relay the x-ray laser onto the directly driven foil, and then to image the foil modulation onto a CCD camera. This technique allows us to measure small fractional variations in the foil thickness. We have measured the modulation due to imprint from a low intensity 0.35 pm drive beam incident on a 3 {mu}m Si foil using an yttrium x-ray laser on Nova. We present results from a similar technique to measure the imprinted modulation due to a low intensity 0.53 {mu}m drive beam incident on a 2 {mu}m Al foil using a germanium x-ray laser at the Vulcan facility.

  20. X-ray Spectral Measurements of the JMAR High-Power Laser-plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Gaeta, Celestino J.; Cassidy, Kelly L.; Powers, Michael F.; Kleindolph, Thomas; Morris, James H.; Forber, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    X-ray spectra of Cu plasmas at the focus of a four-beam, solid-state diode-pumped laser have been recorded. This laser-plasma X-ray source is being developed for JMAR's lithography systems aimed at high- performance semiconductor integrated circuits. The unique simultaneous overlay of the four sub-nanosecond laser beams at 300 Hertz produces a bright, point-plasma X-ray source. PIN diode measurements of the X-ray output indicate that the conversion efficiency (ratio of X-ray emission energy into 2π steradians to incident laser energy) was approximately 9 percent with average X-ray power yields of greater than 10 Watts. Spectra were recorded on calibrated Kodak DEF film in a curved-crystal spectrograph. A KAP crystal (2d = 26.6 Angstroms) was used to disperse the 900 eV to 3000 eV spectral energies onto the film. Preliminary examination of the films indicated the existence of Cu and Cu XX ionization states. Additional spectra as a function of laser input power were also recorded to investigate potential changes in X-ray yields. These films are currently being analyzed. The analysis of the spectra provide absolute line and continuum intensities, and total X-ray output in the measured spectral range.

  1. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Chloroplasts from Cyanidioschyzon merolae by Using X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Inui, Yayoi; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a lens-less technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with the dimensions of submicrometer to micrometer at a resolution of several tens of nanometers. We conducted cryogenic CXDI experiments at 66 K to visualize the internal structures of frozen-hydrated chloroplasts of Cyanidioschyzon merolae using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) as a coherent X-ray source. Chloroplast dispersed specimen disks at a number density of 7/(10×10 µm(2)) were flash-cooled with liquid ethane without staining, sectioning or chemical labeling. Chloroplasts are destroyed at atomic level immediately after the diffraction by XFEL pulses. Thus, diffraction patterns with a good signal-to-noise ratio from single chloroplasts were selected from many diffraction patterns collected through scanning specimen disks to provide fresh specimens into the irradiation area. The electron density maps of single chloroplasts projected along the direction of the incident X-ray beam were reconstructed by using the iterative phase-retrieval method and multivariate analyses. The electron density map at a resolution of 70 nm appeared as a C-shape. In addition, the fluorescence image of proteins stained with Flamingo™ dye also appeared as a C-shape as did the autofluorescence from Chl. The similar images suggest that the thylakoid membranes with an abundance of proteins distribute along the outer membranes of chloroplasts. To confirm the present results statistically, a number of projection structures must be accumulated through high-throughput data collection in the near future. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of XFEL-CXDI experiments in the structural analyses of cellular organelles. PMID:25745031

  2. Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, Christoph

    2012-05-05

    Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

  3. With mirrors and finesse, labs domesticate the x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hellemans, A.

    1996-07-05

    Space beam weapons and unlimited energy from fusion may have been pipe dreams of the 1980s. But today these dreams are giving birth to practical laboratory tools: tabletop x-ray lasers that may open up whole new areas of chemistry and biology. The first x-ray lasers were energized by nuclear explosions or jolts of light from giant glass lasers built for fusion experiments-hardly bench-top equipment. Now, says Joseph Nilsen, a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), {open_quotes}several small university-size places are actually making a lot of progress toward tabletop lasers people can use every day.{close_quotes} This article highlight progress towards cheap ubiquitous X-ray lasers as described at the 5th International Conference on X-ray Lasers.

  4. Time-resolved x-ray transmission grating spectrometer for studying laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ceglio, N M; Kauffman, R L; Hawryluk, A M; Medecki, H

    1983-01-15

    The development of a new time-resolved x-ray spectrometer is reported in which a free-standing x-ray transmission grating is coupled to a soft x-ray streak camera. The instrument measures continuous x-ray spectra with 20-psec temporal resolution and moderate spectral resolution (deltalambda >/= 1 A) over a broad spectral range (0.1-5 keV) with high sensitivity and large information recording capacity. Its capabilities are well suited to investigation of laser-generated plasmas, and they nicely complement the characteristics of other time-resolved spectroscopic techniques presently in use. The transmission grating spectrometer has been used on a variety of laser-plasma experiments. We report the first measurements of the temporal variation of continuous low-energy x-ray spectra from laser-irradiated disk targets. PMID:18195786

  5. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source

    PubMed Central

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced––and more challenging––X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches. PMID:25902493

  6. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-05-01

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced--and more challenging--X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches. PMID:25902493

  7. Measurements of X-ray spectra from irradiated gold foils at the OMEGA Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Joshua; Keiter, Paul; Drake, Paul; Klein, Sallee; Fein, Jeff

    2014-10-01

    In many HED systems high intensity x-rays can be used to measure plasma properties such as density and temperature. At the OMEGA laser facility, these X-rays are produced by irradiating a metal foil with high-intensity lasers, which heats the foil and causes it to act as a quasi-continuum x-ray source for radiography or absorption spectroscopy. As this emission is quasi-continuous and the transmission of x-rays through a material varies with photon energy a well-characterized x-ray source is vital. Therefore, in order to optimize diagnostics reliant upon x-rays it is necessary to gain a better understanding of how the x-ray emission from these targets varies over time and varying beam energy. We will present experimental results studying the effect that beam energy and pulse length have on M-band and sub-keV x-ray emission generated from a 5 μm thick gold disk using time-resolved spectroscopy and a Henway crystal spectrometer. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0000850, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  8. Nonlinear effects in propagation of radiation of X-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosik, V. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear effects accompanying the propagation of high-intensity beams of X-ray free-electron lasers are considered. It is shown that the X-ray wave field in the crystal significantly changes due to the formation of "hollow" atomic shells as a result of the photoelectric effect.

  9. Proposal for an Enhanced Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander

    2004-02-01

    We describe a technique by which an energy modulation of electrons via interaction with a laser pulse in a wiggler magnet is used for a significant increase of the electron peak current prior to entering a long SASE FEL undulator. This results in a reduction of the gain length for the SASE process and a modification of the structure of the output x-ray radiation. It also temporally links the output x-ray pulse to the initial laser pulse, thus providing an opportunity for accurate synchronization between the laser pump pulse and x-ray probe pulse for pump-probe experiments.

  10. High-average-power water window soft X-rays from an Ar laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Sho

    2016-07-01

    A high average power of 140 mW and high conversion efficiency of 14% were demonstrated in “water window” soft X-rays generated using a laser plasma source developed in-house, when a solid Ar target was irradiated by a commercial Nd:YAG Q-switched laser with an energy of 1 J at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This soft X-ray power compared favorably with that produced using a synchrotron radiation source, and the developed laser plasma source can be used in various applications, such as soft X-ray microscopy, in place of synchrotron facilities.

  11. Application of imaging plate to x-ray imaging and spectroscopy in laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Snavely, R; Gregori, G; Koch, J A; Park, H; Remington, B A

    2006-04-25

    We report recent progress of x-ray diagnostic techniques in laser plasma experiment with using imaging plates. Imaging plate is a photo-stimulable phosphor screen (BaF(Br0.85,10.15):Eu{sup 2+}) deposited on flexible metal or plastic substrate. We applied the imaging plate to x-ray microscopy in laser fusion experiment experiments. Self-emission x-ray images of imploded core were obtained successfully with using imaging plate and high magnification target mounted pinhole arrays. The imaging plates were applied also in ultra-intense laser experiment at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Small samarium foil was irradiated by high intensity laser pulse from the Vulcan laser system. The k shell x-rays from the foil ({approx}40keV) was used as a line x-ray source for microscopic radiography. Performance of imaging plate on high-energy x-ray backlit radiography was demonstrated by imaging sinusoidal grooves of 6um amplitude on a Au foil. Detailed spectrum of k shell x-ray from Cu embedded foil target was successfully observed by fully coupling imaging plate with a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometer. The performances of the imaging plates evaluated in actual laser plasma experiments will be presented.

  12. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  13. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; et al

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarilymore » by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.« less

  14. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses. PMID:25600823

  15. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  16. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S; Grguraš, I; Behrens, C; Bromberger, H; Costello, J T; Czwalinna, M K; Felber, M; Hoffmann, M C; Ilchen, M; Liu, H Y; Mazza, T; Meyer, M; Pfeiffer, S; Prędki, P; Schefer, S; Schmidt, C; Wegner, U; Schlarb, H; Cavalieri, A L

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses. PMID:25600823

  17. X-ray diodes for laser fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.H.; Lee, P.; Saloman, E.B.; Nagel, D.J.

    1981-02-01

    Photodiodes with x-ray sensitive photocathodes are commonly used as broadband x-ray detectors in fusion plasma diagnostics. We have measured the risetime of the detector system and have measured the quantum efficiency between 1 to 500 A of numerous photocathode materials of practical interest. The materials studied include aluminum, copper, nickel, gold, three forms of carbon, chromium, and cesium iodide. The results of the measurements are compared with Henke's semiempirical model of photoyield. We have studied the effects of long-term cathode aging and use as a plasma diagnostic on cathode quantum efficiency. In addition, we have measured the x-ray mass-absorption coefficient of several ultrasoft x-ray windows in energy regions where data were unavailable. Windows studied were made of aluminum, Formvar, polypropylene, and Kimfoil. Measurements between 1 to 50 A were performed with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's low-energy x-ray calibration facility, and the measurements between 50 to 550 A were performed at the National Bureau of Standard's synchrotron ultraviolet radiation facility.

  18. Displacive phase-transition of cuprite Ag2O revealed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The low-temperature phase-transition of silver oxide (Ag2O) has been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as a function of temperature. The thermal evolution of the local structure around Ag atoms has been determined. In particular, below the phase-transition temperature at ∼35 K, a progressive splitting of the Ag-Ag next-nearest-neighbor distances is observed. This definitely supports the idea that the phase-transition of Ag2O is due to displacive disorder of the Ag atoms.

  19. X-ray microscopy and imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans nematode using a laser-plasma-pulsed x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Giulio; Orsini, Franceasco; Ullschmied, Jiri; Skala, Jiri; Kralikova, Bozena; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Kadlec, Christelle; Mocek, Tomas; Prag, A. R.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia, C.; Batani, Dimitri; Bernardinello, A.; Desai, Tara; Zullini, A.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on Soft X-ray Contact Microscopy (SXCM) performed on Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes is discussed. This sample has been selected since it is a well studied case used as model in many biological contexts. The experiment has been performed using the iodine PALS laser source to generate pulsed soft X-rays from laser-plasma interaction, using molybdenum and gold as targets. Typical intensities on the targets exceeded 1014 W/cm2. The SXCM imprints have been recorded on Polymethilmetacrylate (PMMA) photo resists which have been chemically developed and analyzed with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) operating in constant force mode. The use of error signal AFM images together with topography AFM images, did allow an easier recognition of biological patterns, and the identification of observed structures with internal organs. Several organs were identified in the SXCM images, including cuticle annuli, alae, pharynx, and three different types of cell nuclei. These are the first SXCM images of multi-cellular complex organisms.

  20. Damage threshold of coating materials on x-ray mirror for x-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Takahisa; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Miura, Takanori; Tono, Kensuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kim, Jangwoo; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yabashi, Makina; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the damage threshold of coating materials such as Mo, Ru, Rh, W, and Pt on Si substrates, and that of uncoated Si substrate, for mirror optics of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). Focused 1 μm (full width at half maximum) XFEL pulses with the energies of 5.5 and 10 keV, generated by the SPring-8 angstrom compact free electron laser (SACLA), were irradiated under the grazing incidence condition. The damage thresholds were evaluated by in situ measurements of X-ray reflectivity degradation during irradiation by multiple pulses. The measured damage fluences below the critical angles were sufficiently high compared with the unfocused SACLA beam fluence. Rh coating was adopted for two mirror systems of SACLA. One system was a beamline transport mirror system that was partially coated with Rh for optional utilization of a pink beam in the photon energy range of more than 20 keV. The other was an improved version of the 1 μm focusing mirror system, and no damage was observed after one year of operation. PMID:27250368

  1. Shielded radiography with a laser-driven MeV-energy X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Grigory; Miller, Cameron; Haden, Daniel; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experimental and numerical-simulation studies of shielded radiography using narrowband MeV-energy X-rays from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering X-ray light source. This recently developed X-ray light source is based on a laser-wakefield accelerator with ultra-high-field gradient (GeV/cm). We demonstrate experimentally high-quality radiographic imaging (image contrast of 0.4 and signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1) of a target composed of 8-mm thick depleted uranium shielded by 80-mm thick steel, using a 6-MeV X-ray beam with a spread of 45% (FWHM) and 107 photons in a single shot. The corresponding dose of the X-ray pulse measured in front of the target is ∼100 nGy/pulse. Simulations performed using the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX accurately reproduce the experimental results. These simulations also demonstrate that the narrow bandwidth of the Compton X-ray source operating at 6 and 9 MeV leads to a reduction of deposited dose as compared to broadband bremsstrahlung sources with the same end-point energy. The X-ray beam's inherently low-divergence angle (∼mrad) is advantageous and effective for interrogation at standoff distance. These results demonstrate significant benefits of all-laser driven Compton X-rays for shielded radiography.

  2. Development of a short pulse Ne-like x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.C.; Cauble, R.C.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.B.; Nilsen, J.; Wan, A.S.

    1995-06-01

    We are developing techniques to shorten the time duration of neon-like x-ray Iners while maintaining their high brightness in order to optimize, their usefulness as a plasma diagnostic. Adjusting the duration of the pump laser pulse is shown to directly influence the duration of neon-like x-ray laser transitions. Using slab targets, multiple 100 ps pulses and traveling wave geometry we have shortened the duration of lasing transitions down to 45 ps for both the neon-like germanium and yttrium x-ray lasers. However for the neon-like yttrium laser the intensity of short duration pulses are down two orders of magnitude from the long duration pulses because of limitations of the driving laser. We are presently looking at curved targets and pulse shaping in order to more efficiently pump the Ne-like x-ray laser system and increase the output intensity of the lasing lines. The relative merits of using the germanium x-ray laser at 196 {Angstrom} compared to the yttrium x-ray laser at 155 {Angstrom} are discussed.

  3. Tomography of human trabecular bone with a laser-wakefield driven x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Parker, S.; Symes, D. R.; Sandholzer, M. A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2016-01-01

    A laser-wakefield driven x-ray source is used for the radiography of human bone. The betatron motion of accelerated electrons generates x-rays which are hard (critical energy {{E}\\text{crit}}>30 keV), have small source size (<3 μm) and high average brightness. The x-rays are generated from a helium gas cell which is near-instantly replenishable, and thus the average photon flux is limited by the repetition rate of the driving laser rather than the breakdown of the x-ray source. A tomograph of a human bone sample was recorded with a resolution down to 50 μm. The photon flux was sufficiently high that a radiograph could be taken with each laser shot, and the fact that x-ray beams were produced on 97% of shots minimised failed shots and facilitated full micro-computed tomography in a reasonable time scale of several hours, limited only by the laser repetition rate. The x-ray imaging beamline length (not including the laser) is shorter than that of a synchrotron source due to the high accelerating fields and small source size. Hence this interesting laboratory-based source may one day bridge the gap between small microfocus x-ray tubes and large synchrotron facilities.

  4. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Workman, Jonathan B; Cobble, James A; Flippo, Kirk; Gautier, Donald C; Montgomery, David S; Offermann, Dustin T

    2010-01-01

    High-energy x-rays, > 10-keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200-TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17-keV produced from 2-ps, 100-J laser interactions with a 12-micron molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1-mm thick polystyrene target using 2-ns, 250-J, 532-nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to 1-D hydro calculations, HELIOS-CR.

  5. Theory of x-ray absorption by laser-aligned symmetric-top molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, C.; Santra, R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2008-01-01

    We devise a theory of x-ray absorption by symmetric-top molecules which are aligned by an intense optical laser. Initially, the density matrix of the system is composed of the electronic ground state of the molecules and a thermal ensemble of rigid-rotor eigenstates. We formulate equations of motion of the two-color (laser plus x rays) rotational-electronic problem. The interaction with the laser is assumed to be nonresonant; it is described by an electric dipole polarizability tensor. X-ray absorption is approximated as a one-photon process. It is shown that the equations can be separated such that the interaction with the laser can be treated independently of the x rays. The laser-only density matrix is propagated numerically. After each time step, the x-ray absorption is calculated. We apply our theory to study adiabatic alignment of bromine molecules (Br2). The required dynamic polarizabilities are determined using the ab initio linear response methods coupled-cluster singles (CCS), second-order approximate coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CC2), and coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD). For the description of x-ray absorption on the {sigma}g1s-->{sigma}u4p resonance, a parameter-free two-level model is used for the electronic structure of the molecules. Our theory opens up novel perspectives for the quantum control of x-ray radiation.

  6. Mapping the x-ray emission region in a laser-plasma accelerator.

    PubMed

    Corde, S; Thaury, C; Phuoc, K Ta; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Faure, J; Lundh, O; Benveniste, E; Ben-Ismail, A; Arantchuk, L; Marciniak, A; Stordeur, A; Brijesh, P; Rousse, A; Specka, A; Malka, V

    2011-11-18

    The x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators can be a powerful tool to understand the physics of relativistic laser-plasma interaction. It is shown here that the mapping of betatron x-ray radiation can be obtained from the x-ray beam profile when an aperture mask is positioned just beyond the end of the emission region. The influence of the plasma density on the position and the longitudinal profile of the x-ray emission is investigated and compared to particle-in-cell simulations. The measurement of the x-ray emission position and length provides insight on the dynamics of the interaction, including the electron self-injection region, possible multiple injection, and the role of the electron beam driven wakefield. PMID:22181891

  7. Measurements of laser imprint by XUV radiography using an x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; DaSilva, L.B.; Glendinning, S.

    1996-05-30

    We have developed a technique for studying the imprint of a laser beam on a thin foil using an x-ray laser as an XUV backlighter and XUV multilayer optics. This technique allows us to measure small fractional variations in the foil thickness due to hydrodynamics imprinted by direct laser irradiation. We present results of imprinted modulation and growth due to a low intensity 0.53 {mu}m drive beam incident on a 2 {mu}m Al foil using a germanium x-ray laser at the Vulcan facility. We present measurements of the modulation due to static RPP, SSD smoothed, and ISI smoothed speckle patterns at 0.53 {mu}m irradiation.

  8. Soft-x-ray laser interferometry of a pinch discharge using a tabletop laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, C.H.; Marconi, M.C.; Kanizay, K.; Rocca, J.J.; Uspenskii, Y.A.; Vinogradov, A.V.; Pershin, Y.A.

    1999-07-01

    We have used a tabletop soft-x-ray laser and a wave-front division interferometer to probe the plasma of a pinch discharge. A very compact capillary discharge-pumped Ne-like Ar laser emitting at 46.9 nm was combined with a wave division interferometer based on Lloyd{close_quote}s mirror and Sc-Si multilayer-coated optics to map the electron density in the cathode region of the discharge. This demonstration of the use of tabletop soft-x-ray laser in plasma interferometry could lead to the widespread use of these lasers in the diagnostics of dense plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Measurements of laser-plasma electron density with a soft x-ray laser deflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.; DaSilva, L.B.; London, R.A.; Trebes, J.E.; Mrowka, S.; Procassini, R.J.; Barbee, T.W. Jr. ); Lehr, D.E. )

    1994-07-22

    A soft x-ray laser (wavelength [lambda] = 15.5 nanometers) was used to create a moire deflectogram of a high-density, laser-produced plasma. The use of deflectometry at this short wavelength permits measurement of the density spatial profile in a long-scalelength (3 millimeters), high-density plasma. A peak density of 3.2 [times] 10[sup 21] per cubic centimeter was recorded.

  10. Measurement of Laser-Plasma Electron Density with a Soft X-ray Laser Deflectometer.

    PubMed

    Ress, D; Dasilva, L B; London, R A; Trebes, J E; Mrowka, S; Procassini, R J; Barbee, T W; Lehr, D E

    1994-07-22

    A soft x-ray laser (wavelength lambda = 15.5 nanometers) was used to create a moiré deflectogram of a high-density, laser-produced plasma. The use of deflectometry at this short wavelength permits measurement of the density spatial profile in a long-scalelength (3 millimeters), high-density plasma. A peak density of 3.2 x 10(21) per cubic centimeter was recorded. PMID:17781311

  11. Laser Pulse Circulation System for Compact Monochromatic Tunable Hard X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Haruyuki; de, Meng; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Sakamoto, Fumito; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2007-09-01

    We are construcing a laser electron Compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source. It consists of the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser. This work is a part of the JST(Japan Science and Technology Agency) project. The whole system is a part of the national project on the advanced compact medical accelerator development, hosted by NIRS(National Institute for Radiological Science). The University of Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage of this X-ray source is monochromatic tunable hard X-rays(10-50keV) with the intensities of 108-109 photons/s. The table-top size X-ray source can generate dual energy monochromatic hard X-ray by turns and it takes about 40ms to chage the X-ray energy. It is calculated that the X-ray intensity is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/s in 10 pps) by the 35MeV electron and YAG laser(2J/pulse). The X-band beam line for the demonstration is under construction. We designed a laser pulse circulation system to increase the X-ray yield 10 times higer (up to 108 photons/RF-pulse, 109 photons/s). It can be proved that the laser total energy increases 10 times higher by the principle experiment with the lower energy laser (25mJ/pulse).

  12. Laser Pulse Circulation System for Compact Monochromatic Tunable Hard X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Haruyuki; de, Meng; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Sakamoto, Fumito; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    We are construcing a laser electron Compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source. It consists of the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser. This work is a part of the JST (Japan Science and Technology Agency) project. The whole system is a part of the national project on the advanced compact medical accelerator development, hosted by NIRS (National Institute for Radiological Science). The University of Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage of this X-ray source is monochromatic tunable hard X-rays (10-50keV) with the intensities of 108-109 photons/s. The table-top size X-ray source can generate dual energy monochromatic hard X-ray by turns and it takes about 40ms to chage the X-ray energy. It is calculated that the X-ray intensity is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/s in 10 pps) by the 35MeV electron and YAG laser (2J/pulse). The X-band beam line for the demonstration is under construction. We designed a laser pulse circulation system to increase the X-ray yield 10 times higer (up to 108 photons/RF-pulse, 109 photons/s). It can be proved that the laser total energy increases 10 times higher by the principle experiment with the lower energy laser (25mJ/pulse).

  13. Calibration of a Flat Field Soft X-ray Grating Spectrometer for Laser Produced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Brown, G V; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Beiersdorfer, P; Cone, K V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E; May, M J; Porter, F S

    2010-05-12

    We have calibrated the x ray response of a variable line spaced grating spectrometer, known as the VSG, at the Fusion and Astrophysics Data and Diagnostic Calibration Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VSG has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasmas, such as those created at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility at LLNL, and at both the Omega and Omega EP lasers at University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The bandwidth of the VSG spans the range from {approx} 6 to 60 {angstrom}. The calibration results present here include the VSG's dispersion and quantum efficiency. The dispersion is determined by measuring the x rays emitted from hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and aluminum. The quantum efficiency is calibrated to an accuracy of 30% or better by normalizing the x ray intensities recorded by the VSG to those simultaneously recorded by an x ray microcalorimeter spectrometer.

  14. Homogeneous focusing with a transient soft X-ray laser for irradiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazamias, S.; Cassou, K.; Guilbaud, O.; Klisnick, A.; Ros, D.; Plé, F.; Jamelot, G.; Rus, B.; Koslová, M.; Stupka, M.; Mocek, T.; Douillet, D.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D.

    2006-07-01

    We report the work done on a transient soft X-ray laser (SXRL) beam to deliver a proper extreme UV irradiation source for applications. The same optical tool was first demonstrated on a quasi stationnary state (QSS) soft X-Ray laser at the PALS Institute in Prague. The problem set by the transient soft X-Ray laser developed by the LIXAM at the LULI installation in Palaiseau is more crucial, first because the beam spatial profile is more irregular secondly because high repetition rate soft X-ray laser facilities in the future are based on this SXRL type. The spots obtained show a 20 micron average diameter and a rather homogeneous and smooth profile that make them a realistic irradiation source to interact with targets requiring relatively high fluence (near 1 J/cm 2) or intensity (near 10 11 W/cm 2) in the extreme UV domain.

  15. Elemental biological imaging by differential absorption with a laser-produced x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, C.; Mercer, I.; Svanberg, S.; Herrlin, K.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate the novel application of hard x rays emitted by a laser-produced plasma for differential imaging of elements. An x-ray-emitting laser-produced plasma, obtained by the focusing of radiation from a 10-Hz terawatt laser, is used for biological imaging. The x-ray source can be arranged to yield characteristic x-ray emission lines with photon energies that bridge the K absorption edge of a chosen atomic species. One can obtain element-specific radiographs by recording transillumination images for different target materials on digital image plates and by subsequently subtracting or dividing the images. Successful phantom and experimental animal imaging are performed utilizing tantalum and gadolinium as target materials for the terawatt laser and gadolinium as the imaged contrast agent.

  16. Instantaneous x-ray radiation energy from laser produced polystyrene plasmas for shock ignition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Wanli; Wei, Huiyue; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Zhu, Tuo; Song, Tianmin; Huang, Chengwu; Yang, Jiamin

    2013-10-15

    Laser target energy coupling mechanism is crucial in the shock ignition (SI) scheme, and x-ray radiation energy is a non-negligible portion of the laser produced plasma energy. To evaluate the x-ray radiation energy amount at conditions relevant to SI scheme, instantaneous x-ray radiation energy is investigated experimentally with continuum phase plates smoothed lasers irradiating layer polystyrene targets. Comparative laser pulses without and with shock spike are employed. With the measured x-ray angular distribution, full space x-ray radiation energy and conversion efficiency are observed. Instantaneous scaling law of x-ray conversion efficiency is obtained as a function of laser intensity and time. It should be pointed out that the scaling law is available for any laser pulse shape and intensity, with which irradiates polystyrene planar target with intensity from 2 × 10{sup 14} to 1.8 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Numerical analysis of the laser energy transformation is performed, and the simulation results agree with the experimental data.

  17. Coherent electron beam density modulator for driving X-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Hettel, B.; Nosochkov, Yu.; Sullivan, M.

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new compact scheme for a Free Electron Laser with more coherent properties for the X-ray beam. Higher FEL performance would be achieved using a train of electron bunches initially accelerated in a linear accelerator. Similar to the RF klystron concept, we propose developing an X-ray FEL which consists of two parts: an X-ray self-seeding electron beam density modulator and an output set of undulators. A density modulator consists of a low-Q X-ray cavity and an undulator, which is placed between the cavity mirrors. We use this undulator as a very high gain amplifier, which compensates the amplitude loss due to monochromatic X-ray reflections from the mirrors. Following the X-ray cavity, the density modulated electron beam is separated from the X-ray beam and then enters the output set of undulators. The frequency spectrum of the final X-ray beam is determined mainly by the bandwidth of the reflected elements in the X-ray cavity.

  18. Progress in compact soft x-ray lasers and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    The ultra-high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. A crucial factor in the availability of these devices is their scale and cost. Recent breakthroughs in this field has brought closer the advent of table-top devices, suitable for applications to fields such as x-ray microscopy, chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography. In this article we review recent progress in the development of compact (table-top) soft x-ray lasers.

  19. Experimental demonstration of laser to x-ray conversion enhancements with low density gold targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shang, Wanli; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Zhichao; Deng, Bo; Dong, Yunsong; Zhu, Tuo; Huang, Chengwu; Zhan, Xiayu; Mei, Yu; et al

    2016-02-12

    The enhancement of laser to x-ray conversion efficiencies using low density gold targets [W. L. Shang, J. M. Yang, and Y. S. Dong, Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 094105 (2013)] is demonstrated. Laser to x-ray conversion efficiencies with 6.3% and 12% increases are achieved with target densities of 1 and 0.25 g/cm3, when compared with that of a solid gold target (19.3 g/cm3). Experimental data and numerical simulations are in good agreement. Lastly, the enhancement is caused by larger x-ray emission zone lengths formed in low density targets, which is in agreement with the simulation results.

  20. Exploring the Potential of Table-Top X-Ray Lasers and Capillary Discharge for Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyaptev, V N; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Moon, S J; Fournier, K B; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L; Kuba, J; Wootton, A J; Lee, R W; Rocca, J J; Rahman, A; Hammarsten, E; Filevich, J; Jankovska, E; Marconi, M C; Fornaciari, N; Buchenauer, D; Hender, H A; Kari,M S; Kanouff, M; Dimkoff, J; Kubiak, G; Shimkaveg, G; Silfvast, W T

    2003-05-08

    The advantages of using of table top x-ray lasers (XRLs) for different applications have been described. Examples of the first successful use of XRLs, the current efforts in applying them and the potential applications where an XRL can be used in future have been discussed. Modeling results showing the possibility of 3-4 times shorter wavelength capillary discharge x-ray lasers and calculated spectrum of Xe capillary EUV source are presented.

  1. Polychromatic x-ray production in helium from a femtosecond high-intensity laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta Phuoc, K.; Rousse, A.; Notebaert, L.; Pittman, M.; Rousseau, J. P.; Malka, V.; Fritzler, S.; Sebban, S.; Balcou, P.; Hulin, D.; Marqués, J. R.; David, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    Polychromatic x-ray radiation has been produced during the relativistic interaction of a 50-TW femtosecond laser with a helium gas jet. We have characterized the spectrum and the angular distribution of the x-ray emission as well as its dependency on the laser polarization and on the plasma electronic density. We have observed a broad continuous spectrum peaking at 0.15 keV with a significant tail up to 2 keV. The radiation was fairly collimated.

  2. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G.; Heimann, P.; Krupin, O.; Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Kelez, N.; Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W.; and others

    2012-04-15

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  3. Laser Assisted Emittance Exchange: Downsizing the X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    A technique is proposed to generate electron beam with ultralow transverse emittance through laser assisted transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange. In the scheme a laser operating in the TEM10 mode is used to interact with the electron beam in a dispersive region and to initiate the emittance exchange. It is shown that with the proposed technique one can significantly downsize an x-ray free electron laser (FEL), which may greatly extend the availability of these light sources. A hard x-ray FEL operating at 1.5 {angstrom} with a saturation length within 30 meters using a 3.8 GeV electron beam is shown to be practically feasible.

  4. Inner-Shell Photon-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45(Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Snavely, R; Da Silva, L

    2002-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Lab Wide (LW) project entitled, ''An Inner-Shell Photo-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45 {angstrom}'', tracking code 99-LW-042. The most significant accomplishments of this project include the design of a suitable x-ray laser target, the invention of a measurement technique for the determination of rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 femtoseconds, and a novel setup for generating a traveling wave with an ultrashort optical laser pulse. The pump probe technique for rise time measurement will allow us to detect ultrashort x-ray pulses, whose generation by means of a variety of 4th generation light sources is currently under planning elsewhere.

  5. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source.

    PubMed

    Wenz, J; Schleede, S; Khrennikov, K; Bech, M; Thibault, P; Heigoldt, M; Pfeiffer, F; Karsch, S

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  6. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  7. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources.

  8. Bright betatron X-ray radiation from a laser-driven-clustering gas target

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L. M.; Yan, W. C.; Li, D. Z.; Hu, Z. D.; Zhang, L.; Wang, W. M.; Hafz, N.; Mao, J. Y.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Lu, X.; Sheng, Z. M.; Wei, Z. Y.; Gao, J.; Zhang, J.

    2013-01-01

    Hard X-ray sources from femtosecond (fs) laser-produced plasmas, including the betatron X-rays from laser wakefield-accelerated electrons, have compact sizes, fs pulse duration and fs pump-probe capability, making it promising for wide use in material and biological sciences. Currently the main problem with such betatron X-ray sources is the limited average flux even with ultra-intense laser pulses. Here, we report ultra-bright betatron X-rays can be generated using a clustering gas jet target irradiated with a small size laser, where a ten-fold enhancement of the X-ray yield is achieved compared to the results obtained using a gas target. We suggest the increased X-ray photon is due to the existence of clusters in the gas, which results in increased total electron charge trapped for acceleration and larger wiggling amplitudes during the acceleration. This observation opens a route to produce high betatron average flux using small but high repetition rate laser facilities for applications. PMID:23715033

  9. Bright betatron X-ray radiation from a laser-driven-clustering gas target.

    PubMed

    Chen, L M; Yan, W C; Li, D Z; Hu, Z D; Zhang, L; Wang, W M; Hafz, N; Mao, J Y; Huang, K; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Ma, J L; Li, Y T; Lu, X; Sheng, Z M; Wei, Z Y; Gao, J; Zhang, J

    2013-01-01

    Hard X-ray sources from femtosecond (fs) laser-produced plasmas, including the betatron X-rays from laser wakefield-accelerated electrons, have compact sizes, fs pulse duration and fs pump-probe capability, making it promising for wide use in material and biological sciences. Currently the main problem with such betatron X-ray sources is the limited average flux even with ultra-intense laser pulses. Here, we report ultra-bright betatron X-rays can be generated using a clustering gas jet target irradiated with a small size laser, where a ten-fold enhancement of the X-ray yield is achieved compared to the results obtained using a gas target. We suggest the increased X-ray photon is due to the existence of clusters in the gas, which results in increased total electron charge trapped for acceleration and larger wiggling amplitudes during the acceleration. This observation opens a route to produce high betatron average flux using small but high repetition rate laser facilities for applications. PMID:23715033

  10. Laser-driven hard-x-ray generation based on ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of Ni compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Fang; Carter, Josh D.; Ng, Vicky; Guo Ting

    2005-02-01

    Three Ni compounds were studied by ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy using a laser-driven electron x-ray source with a tungsten target. The measured K edges of these Ni compounds using this self-referencing method were made identical to those measured with synchrotron x-ray sources. This enabled us to determine the absolute peak positions of tungsten L{alpha}{sub 1} and L{alpha}{sub 2} emitted from this source to be within 1 eV of those from the neutral tungsten atoms, which strongly suggested that the x rays were emitted from high energy electrons interacting with tungsten atoms in the solid target. This is the best evidence to date that directly supports the cold atom x-ray generation theory.

  11. Compton Backscattered X-rays from Self-Generated Laser Wiggler in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Antonio; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Hafizi, Bahman; Palastro, John; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Seely, John

    2014-10-01

    A unique Compton backscattering configuration for generating monochromatic, short pulse, and potentially coherent x-rays in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) is being studied at the Naval Research Laboratory. Reflection mechanisms such as stimulated Raman scattering and shock-created density gradients in a plasma can generate the required backward-travelling laser pulse directly from the same laser pulse used in the LWFA, i.e., the high energy electron beam and the counter-propagating photon beam are both self-generated by an ultrashort laser pulse in plasma. The automatic alignment of the counter-propagating electrons and photons together with the extended interaction distance and tightly guided beam sizes in a LWFA can lead to a high-gain situation for the Doppler upshifted forward propagating x-rays. Possibilities for exponential gain to achieve coherent generation of the x-rays are under investigation. Theoretical, numerical, and preliminary experimental results will be presented. This work is supported by DOE and NRL 6.1 funding.

  12. A convenient alignment approach for x-ray imaging experiments based on laser positioning devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Da; Donovan, Molly; Wu Xizeng; Liu Hong

    2008-11-15

    This study presents a two-laser alignment approach for facilitating the precise alignment of various imaging and measuring components with respect to the x-ray beam. The first laser constantly pointed to the output window of the source, in a direction parallel to the path along which the components are placed. The second laser beam, originating from the opposite direction, was calibrated to coincide with the first laser beam. Thus, a visible indicator of the direction of the incident x-ray beam was established, and the various components could then be aligned conveniently and accurately with its help.

  13. Coherence measurements of a transient 14.7-nm x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, James; Smith, Raymond F.; Hubert, Sebastian; Fajardo, Marta; Zeitoun, Philippe; Hunter, James R.; Remond, Christian; Vanbostal, Laurent; Jacquemot, Sylvie; Nilsen, Joseph; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Marmoret, Remy; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Ravet, Marie-Francoise; Delmotte, Franck

    2003-12-01

    We present the longitudinal coherence measurement of the transient inversion collisional x-ray laser for the first time. The Ni-like Pd x-ray laser at 14.68 nm is generated by the LLNL COMET laser facility and is operating in the gain-saturated regime. Interference fringes are produced using a Michelson interferometer setup in which a thin multilayer-coated membrane is used as a beam splitter. The longitudinal coherence length for the picosecond duration 4d1S0 --> 4p1P1 lasing transition is determined to be ~400 µm (1/e HW) by adjusting the length of one interferometer arm and measuring the resultant variation in fringe visibility. This is four times improved coherence than previous measurements on quasi-steady state schemes largely as a result of the narrower line profile in the lower temperature plasma. The inferred gain-narrowed linewidth of ~0.29 pm is also substantially narrower than previous measurements on quasi-steady state x-ray laser schemes. This study shows that the coherence of the x-ray laser beam can be improved by changing the laser pumping conditions. The x-ray laser is operating at 4 5 times the transform-limited pulse.

  14. Angular dependence of L X-rays emission for Ag by 10 keV electron-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Chengwei

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic X-ray intensities of Ag-Lα, Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 are measured in electron-impact ionization at energy of 10 keV. The emission angle in this work ranges from 0° to 20° at interval of 5°. The angular dependence of L X-ray intensity ratios has been investigated for Lα / Lβ1, Lβ2 / Lβ1 and Lγ1 / Lβ1. It is found from the experimental results that the emissions of Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 X-rays are spatially isotropic, while the Lα X-rays exhibit anisotropic emission. Consequently, the alignment behavior of vacancy states is discussed with thorough analysis of vacancy transfer process.

  15. Generation and application of the soft X-ray laser beam based on capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Straus, Jaroslav; Schmidt, Jiri; Prukner, Vaclav; Shukurov, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report on the generation and characterization of a focused soft X-ray laser beam with intensity and energy density that exceed the threshold for the ablation of PMMA. We demonstrate a feasibility of direct ablation of holes using a focused soft X-ray laser beam. Ablated craters in PMMA/gold-covered-PMMA samples were obtained by focusing the soft X-ray Ar8+ laser pulses generated by a 46.9 nm tabletop capillary-discharge-pumped driver with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer mirror. It was found that the focused beam is capable by one shot to ablate PMMA, even if the focus is significantly influenced by astigmatism. Analysis of the laser beam footprints by atomic force microscope shows that ablated holes have periodic surface structure (similarly as Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structure) with period ~2,8 μm and with peak-to-peak depth ~5-10 nm.

  16. The x-ray laser as a tool for imaging plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S.B.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    The x-ray laser is now being used at LLNL as a tool for measuring the behaviors of hot dense plasmas. In particular, we have used the 155{Angstrom} yttrium laser to study transient plasmas by both radiography and moire deflectrometry. These techniques have been used to probe long scale length plasmas at electron densities exceeding 10{sup 22}cm{sup {minus}3}. Recent advances in multilayer technology have made it possible to directly image ion densities in directly driven thin foils to an accuracy of 1--2 {mu}m. In addition, we have constructed an x-ray laser Mach-Zehnder interferometer using multilayer beam-splitters. This interferometer yields direct 2D projections of electron densities in plasmas with micron spatial resolution. In addition, this interferometer can be used to measure spectral line shapes to high accuracy. Among the subject plasmas under study are laser irradiated planar targets, gold hohlraums, and x-ray lasers themselves.

  17. Development of XUV-interferometry (155 {angstrom}) using a soft x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W.; Cauble, R.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past several years the authors have developed a variety of techniques for probing plasmas with x-ray lasers. These have included direct high resolution plasma imaging to quantify laser produced plasma uniformities and moire deflectometry to measure electron density profiles in one-dimension. Although these techniques have been valuable, a need existed for direct two dimensional measurements of electron densities in large high density plasmas. For this reason the authors have worked on developing a xuv interferometer compatible with the harsh environment of laser produced plasmas. This paper describes the design and presents some results showing excellent fringe visibility using the neon-like yttrium x-ray laser operating at 155 {angstrom}. The coherence properties of this x-ray laser source were measured using interferometry and are also discussed.

  18. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Chen, Y. -H.; Alessi, D.; Pak, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  19. Refraction and absorption of x rays by laser-dressed atoms.

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, C.; Santra, R.; Young, L.

    2010-06-01

    X-ray refraction and absorption by neon atoms under the influence of an 800 nm laser with an intensity of 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} is investigated. For this purpose, we use an ab initio theory suitable for optical strong-field problems. Its results are interpreted in terms of a three-level model. On the Ne 1s {yields} 3p resonance, we find electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for x rays. Our work opens novel perspectives for ultrafast x-ray pulse shaping.

  20. Femtosecond electron and x-ray generation by laser andplasma-based sources

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2000-02-01

    The generation of ultra-short x-rays by Thomson scattering intense laser pulses from electron beams is discussed, including recent experimental results and methods for enhancing the x-ray flux. A high flux of x-rays in a femtosecond pulse requires the generation of femtosecond electron bunches and a head-on Thomson scattering geometry. The generation of ultrashort electron bunches in a plasma-based accelerator with an injection technique that uses two colliding laser pulses is discussed. Simulations indicate the bunches as short as a few fs can be produced. Conversion of the fs electron pulse to a fs x-ray pulse can be accomplished by Bremsstrahlung or Thomson scattering.

  1. X-ray Emission from Electron Betatron Motion in a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Battaglia, M.; Kim, T. S.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Thorn, D. B.; Stoehlker, T.

    2010-11-04

    Single-shot x-ray spectra from electron bunches produced by a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator (LPA) were measured using a photon-counting single-shot pixelated Silicon-based detector, providing for the first time single-shot direct spectra without assumptions required by filter based techniques. In addition, the electron bunch source size was measured by imaging a wire target, demonstrating few micron source size and stability. X-rays are generated when trapped electrons oscillate in the focusing field of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse. In addition to improving understanding of bunch emittance and wake structure, this provides a broadband, synchronized femtosecond source of keV x-rays. Electron bunch spectra and divergence were measured simultaneously and preliminary analysis shows correlation between x-ray and electron spectra. Bremsstrahlung background was managed using shielding and magnetic diversion.

  2. The X-ray measurements at picosecond laser facility PROGRESS-P

    SciTech Connect

    Zapysov, A. L.; Gilev, O. N.; Izrailev, I. M.; Krasov, S. V.; Lykov, V. A.; Ostashev, V. I.; Pokrovski, V. G.; Potapov, A. V.; Pronin, V. A.; Saprykin, V. N.; Khavronin, N. A.; Borodin, V. G.; Komarov, V. M.; Malinov, V. A.; Migel, V. M.; Nikitin, N. V.; Charukchev, A. V.; Chernov, V. V.

    1997-04-15

    The results of recent laser-solid interaction experiments carried out at the PROGRESS-P facility are described for the following parameters of laser radiation: {lambda}=1.053 {mu}m, energy up to 500 mJ, pulse duration {approx}2 ps, focal spot diameter of 20 {mu}m. The spectrum of soft X-ray ({epsilon}<1.5 keV) and the hard X-ray ({epsilon}=5 divide 80 keV) were measured for solid targets from Al, glass, Ta used in these experiments. The fast electrons temperature is estimated to be about of 10 keV. The soft X-ray spot size about of 20 {mu}m was measured by pinhole camera. The X-ray lines of He-like Al ions were registered by the spectrometer using plane gypsum crystal.

  3. 21nm x-ray laser Thomson scattering of laser-heated exploding foil plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Rus, B; Mocek, T; Nelson, A J; Foord, M E; Rozmus, W; Baldis, H A; Shepherd, R L; Kozlova, M; Polan, J; Homer, P; Stupka, M

    2007-09-26

    Recent experiments were carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) towards the demonstration of a soft x-ray laser Thomson scattering diagnostic for a laser-produced exploding foil. The Thomson probe utilized the Ne-like zinc x-ray laser which was double-passed to deliver {approx}1 mJ of focused energy at 21.2 nm wavelength and lasting {approx}100 ps. The plasma under study was heated single-sided using a Gaussian 300-ps pulse of 438-nm light (3{omega} of the PALS iodine laser) at laser irradiances of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. Electron densities of 10{sup 20}-10{sup 22} cm{sup -3} and electron temperatures from 200 to 500 eV were probed at 0.5 or 1 ns after the peak of the heating pulse during the foil plasma expansion. A flat-field 1200 line mm{sup -1} variable-spaced grating spectrometer with a cooled charge-coupled device readout viewed the plasma in the forward direction at 30{sup o} with respect to the x-ray laser probe. We show results from plasmas generated from {approx}1 {micro}m thick targets of Al and polypropylene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}). Numerical simulations of the Thomson scattering cross-sections will be presented. These simulations show electron peaks in addition to a narrow ion feature due to collective (incoherent) Thomson scattering. The electron features are shifted from the frequency of the scattered radiation approximately by the electron plasma frequency {+-}{omega}{sub pe} and scale as n{sub e}{sup 1/2}.

  4. Elliptical x-ray analyzer spectrograph application to a laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.J.; Palmer, M.A.; Henke, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    This spectrograph was designed to record a range of 100 to 2000 eV x-rays on calibrated Kodak Rar-2497 film. Using point calibrations and theoretical models, the spectrograph efficiency was predicted. Basic spectrograph geometry and photographic calibrations are presented in companion papers. A 20 J, 6 ns duration Nd:glass laser pulse was focussed upon planar targets of gold, aluminum, teflon and boron carbide. Sample spectra for line and x-ray yields analysis are presented.

  5. Visualizing a protein quake with time resolved X-ray scattering at a free electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Barty, Anton; Williams, Garth J.; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Milathianaki, Despina; DePonte, Daniel P.; Shoeman, Robert L.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Katona, Gergely; Westenhoff, Sebastian; White, Thomas A.; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Berntsen, Peter; Bogan, Mike; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Doak, R. Bruce; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Henning, Robert; Hunter, Mark S.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kosheleva, Irina; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Stellato, Francesco; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Schlichting, Ilme; Boutet, Sébastien; Groenhof, Gerrit; Chapman, Henry N.; Neutze, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A ‘protein quake’ describes the hypothesis that proteins rapidly dissipate energy through quake like structural motions. Here we measure ultrafast structural changes in the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center following multi-photon excitation using time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free electron laser. A global conformational change arises within picoseconds, which precedes the propagation of heat through the protein. This motion is damped within a hundred picoseconds. PMID:25108686

  6. Sensitive X-ray and Radio Monitoring of the Sgr A*/G2 Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, Daryl; Baganoff, F. K.; Ponti, G.; Heinke, C. O.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Roberts, D. A.; Cotton, W. D.; Gillessen, S.; Genzel, R.; Markoff, S.; Nowak, M.; Neilsen, J.; Schulz, N. S.; Rea, N.

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of a dense, cold cloud (dubbed "G2") approaching Sgr A* offers an opportunity to test models of black hole accretion and its associated feedback. G2's orbit is eccentric and the cloud shows signs of tidal disruption by the black hole. High-energy emission from the Sgr A*/G2 encounter may rise toward pericenter (mid-to-late 2013, or early 2014) and continue over the next several years as the material circularizes. This encounter is also likely to enhance Sgr A*'s flare activity across the electromagnetic spectrum. We present preliminary results from our 2013 joint Chandra/XMM/VLA monitoring campaigns. Our programs aim to study the radiation properties of Sgr A* as G2 breaks up and feeds the accretion flow, to constrain the rates and emission mechanisms of faint X-ray flares, and to detect G2 itself as it is shocked and heated. We discuss the constraints these data place on theoretical models for the Sgr A*/G2 encounter and outline plans for continued monitoring with Chandra, XMM, HST, and VLA in 2014.

  7. Soft x-ray generation in gases with an ultrashort pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmire, T R

    1996-01-08

    An experimental investigation of soft x-ray production resulting from the interaction of intense near infra-red laser radiation with gases is presented in this thesis. Specifically, soft x-ray generation through high order harmonic generation or exploiting intense inverse bremsstrahlung heating is examined. Most of these studies are conducted with femtosecond, terawatt class Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (LiSAF) laser, though results derived from studies with other laser systems are presented as well. The majority of this work is devoted to experimental investigations, however, theoretical and computational models are developed to interpret the data. These studies are motivated by the possibility of utilizing the physics of intense laser/matter interactions as a potential compact source of bright x-rays. Consequently, the thrust of many of the experiments conducted is aimed at characterizing the x-rays produced for possible use in applications. In general, the studies of this manuscript fall into three categories. First, a unique 130 fs, 8 TW laser that is based on chirped pulse amplification, is described, and its performance is evaluated. The generation of x-rays through high order harmonics is then discussed with emphasis on characterizing and optimizing harmonic generation. Finally, the generation of strong, incoherent x-ray radiation by the intense irradiation of large (>1,000 atom) clusters in gas jets, is explored. The physics of laser energy absorption by clusters illuminated with intensities of 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} is considered in detail. X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas that result from the irradiation of the clusters is conducted, and energy transport and kinetics issues in these plasmas are discussed.

  8. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser wakefield accelerator and plasma mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Arefiev, Alex; Downer, Mike; InstituteFusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin Team

    2014-10-01

    Compton backscatter (CBS) x-rays have been generated from laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) electron beams by retro-reflecting the LWFA drive pulse with a plasma mirror (PM) and by backscattering a secondary pulse split from the driver pulse. However, tunable quasi-monoenergetic CBS x-rays have been produced only by the latter method, which requires challenging alignment. Here we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (~50% FWHM), bright (5 × 106 photon per shot) CBS x-rays with central energy tunability from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by combining a PM with a tunable LWFA. 30 TW, 30-fs (FWHM), laser pulses from the UT3 laser system were focused (f/12) to spot diameter 11 micron, intensity ~6 × 1018 W/cm2 (a = 1.5) at a 1-mm long Helium gas jet, yielding quasi-monoenergetic relativistic electrons. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflected the LWFA driving pulse into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detecting bremsstrahlung background. By changing gas jet backing pressure, electron energy was tuned from 60 to 90 MeV, thereby tuning the CBS x-ray energy, which was determined by measuring transmission through a metal filter pack. The x-ray beam profiles recorded on an image plate had 5-10-mrad divergence.

  9. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  10. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  11. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F.-J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T.J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:25744344

  12. Utilizing ablation of solids to characterize a focused soft X-ray laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupský, J.; Juha, L.; Kuba, J.; Hájková, V.; Cihelka, J.; Homer, P.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Rus, B.; Krzywinsky, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Wabnitz, H.; Feldhaus, J.; Tiedtke, K.; the, And

    2007-05-01

    An advanced time integrated method has been developed for soft X-ray pulsed laser beam characterization. A technique based on poly (methyl methacrylate) - PMMA laser induced ablation has been used for beam investigations of soft X-ray laser sources like FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg; formerly known as VUV FEL and/or TTF2 FEL) and plasma-based Ne-like Zn laser performed at PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System). For the interaction experiments reported here, the FLASH system provided ultra-short pulses (~10-fs) of 21.7-nm radiation. The PMMA ablation was also induced by plasma-based Ne-like Zn soft X-ray laser pumped by NIR beams at the PALS facility. This quasi-steady-state (QSS) soft X-ray laser provides 100-ps pulses of 21.2-nm radiation, i.e. at a wavelength very close to that of FLASH but with about 5,000 times longer pulses. In both cases, the PMMA samples were irradiated by a single shot with a focused beam under normal incidence conditions. Characteristics of ablated craters obtained with AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) and Nomarski microscopes were utilized for profile reconstruction and diameter determination of the focused laser beams ablating the PMMA surface.

  13. Resonant photo-pumping x-ray-laser scheme using intense characteristic x rays for water-window radiation generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2011-12-15

    A line pair for a resonant photo-pumping x-ray-laser scheme is proposed in which the wavelength matching between the aluminum K{alpha}{sub 2} line ({lambda}= 0.833 95 nm) and the 2p{sup 6}-(2p{sub 1/2},4d{sub 3/2}){sub 1} transition of the neonlike zinc ions ({lambda}= 0.834 00 nm) is used. The population kinetics code of the neonlike zinc ions in plasma under irradiation of the aluminum K{alpha} line shows that substantial amplification gain can be generated in the transition of (2p{sub 1/2},3p{sub 1/2}){sub 0}-(2p{sub 1/2},4d{sub 3/2}){sub 1} at a wavelength of 3.5 nm. We also investigate the experimental arrangement of this scheme, which implies that this scheme is feasible with the present ultra-short-pulse-laser technology.

  14. Compton X-rays from Self-Generated Backscattered Radiation in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Antonio; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Helle, Michael; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Palastro, John; Hafizi, Bahman; Gordon, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    A unique Compton scattering configuration for generating monochromatic, short pulse, and potentially coherent x-rays in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) is being studied at the Naval Research Laboratory. Reflection mechanisms such as stimulated Raman scattering and shock-created density gradients in a plasma can generate the required backward-travelling laser pulse directly from the same laser pulse used in the LWFA, i.e., the high energy electron beam and the counter-propagating photon beam are both self-generated by an ultrashort laser pulse in plasma. Extended interaction distance and automatic alignment of electron beam and backscattered radiation could be beneficial to the amplification of the Doppler upshifted Compton X-rays. Preliminary experiments are ongoing with measurement of Raman backscattering and reflection off a plasma density gradient. Energy resolved X-ray results are also anticipated. This work is supported by NRL Base Program and DOE.

  15. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction ina diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk,Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-29

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radialx-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup ofALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a samplein a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser whileprobing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cellis placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to thebeam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while thesample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparentboron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of(Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observedabove 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  16. Development of Silver Tape Target System for High Repetition X-ray Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ohba, Toshiyuki; Kaihori, Takeshi; Nagashima, Keisuke

    The development of continuous pumping to the target system is an important issue for realizing an x-ray laser (XRL) with the high repetition rate. We have developed a 13.9 nm XRL using a silver tape target and demonstrated a highly coherent XRL with an oscillator-amplifier configuration using two tape target systems and the TOPAZ laser system with a 10-J and a 0.1-Hz repetition rate. The output energy is comparable to the x-ray laser generated with a silver-deposited slab target, and the pointing stability using the new tape target system is better than conventional slab target.

  17. Characteristics of the soft X-ray emission from laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Arai, Goki; Kondo, Yoshiki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Ejima, Takeo; Hatano, Tadashi; Jiang, Weihua; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    We characterized the spectral structure of the soft X-ray emission and determined the plasma parameters in laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas. The spectral structure observed originated from Pt21+ to Pt34+ ions, emissions from which overlapped to produce a high output flux in the carbon-window soft X-ray spectral region. Using dual laser pulse irradiation, we observed the maximum output flux, which was 20% larger than that obtained under single-laser irradiation, and the evolution of a strongly absorbed spectral structure, which was attributed to the effects of both opacity and long-scale length of the expanding pre-plasma.

  18. Pulse energy measurement at the hard x-ray laser in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Tanaka, T.; Saito, N.; Kurosawa, T.; Richter, M.; Sorokin, A. A.; Tiedtke, K.; Kudo, T.; Yabashi, M.; Tono, K.; Ishikawa, T.

    2012-07-09

    The pulse energies of a free electron laser have accurately been measured in the hard x-ray spectral range. In the photon energy regime from 4.4 keV to 16.8 keV, pulse energies up to 100 {mu}J were obtained at the hard x-ray laser facility SACLA (SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser). Two independent methods, using a cryogenic radiometer and a gas monitor detector, were applied and agreement within 3.3% was achieved. Based on our validated pulse energy measurement, a SACLA online monitor detector could be calibrated for all future experiments.

  19. Hard X-ray Imaging for Measuring Laser Absorption Spatial Profiles on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Jones, O S; Landen, O L; Suter, L; Amendt, P; Turner, R E; Regan, S

    2006-04-25

    Hard x-ray (''Thin wall'') imaging will be employed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to spatially locate laser beam energy deposition regions on the hohlraum walls in indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments, relevant for ICF symmetry tuning. Based on time resolved imaging of the hard x-ray emission of the laser spots, this method will be used to infer hohlraum wall motion due to x-ray and laser ablation and any beam refraction caused by plasma density gradients. In optimizing this measurement, issues that have to be addressed are hard x-ray visibility during the entire ignition laser pulse with intensities ranging from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, as well as simultaneous visibility of the inner and the outer laser drive cones. In this work we will compare the hard x-ray emission calculated by LASNEX and analytical modeling with thin wall imaging data recorded previously on Omega and during the first hohlraum experiments on NIF. Based on these calculations and comparisons the thin wall imaging will be optimized for ICF/NIF experiments.

  20. Laser-based microfocused x-ray source for mammography: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Krol, A; Ikhlef, A; Kieffer, J C; Bassano, D A; Chamberlain, C C; Jiang, Z; Pépin, H; Prasad, S C

    1997-05-01

    A laser-produced plasma (LPP) x-ray source with possible application in mammography was created by focusing a laser beam on a Mo target. A Table-Top-Terawatt (TTT) laser operating at 1 J energy per pulse was employed. A dual pulse technique was used. Maximum energy transfer (approximately 10%) from laser light to hot electrons was reached at a 150 ps delay between pulses and the conversion efficiency (hard x-ray yield/laser energy input) was approximately 2 x 10(-4). The created LPP x-ray source is characterized by a very small focal spot size (tens of microns), Gaussian brightness distribution, and a very short pulse duration (a few ps). The spectral distribution of the generated x rays was measured. Images of the focal spot, using a pinhole camera, and images of a resolution pattern and a mammographic phantom were obtained. The LPP focal spot modulation transfer function for different magnification factors was calculated. We have shown that the LPP source in conjunction with a spherically bent, high throughput, crystal monochromator in a fixed-exit Rowland circle configuration can be used to created a narrow band tunable mammography system. Tunability to a specific patient breast tissue thickness and density would allow one to significantly improve contrast and resolution (exceeding 20 lp/mm) while lowering the exposure up to 50% for thicker breasts. The prospects for the LPP x-ray source for mammographic application are discussed. PMID:9167163

  1. Image reconstruction in serial femtosecond nanocrystallography using x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Joe P. J.; Kirian, Richard A.; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Bean, Richard J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; Arnal, Romain D.; Wojtas, David H.; Bones, Phil J.; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Millane, Rick P.

    2015-09-01

    Serial femtosecond nanocrystallography (SFX) is a form of x-ray coherent diffraction imaging that utilises a stream of tiny nanocrystals of the biological assembly under study, in contrast to the larger crystals used in conventional x-ray crystallography using conventional x-ray synchrotron x-ray sources. Nanocrystallography utilises the extremely brief and intense x-ray pulses that are obtained from an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL). A key advantage is that some biological macromolecules, such as membrane proteins for example, do not easily form large crystals, but spontaneously form nanocrystals. There is therefore an opportunity for structure determination for biological molecules that are inaccessible using conventional x-ray crystallography. Nanocrystallography introduces a number of interesting image reconstruction problems. Weak diffraction patterns are recorded from hundreds of thousands of nancocrystals in unknown orientations, and these data have to be assembled and merged into a 3D intensity dataset. The diffracted intensities can also be affected by the surface structure of the crystals that can contain incomplete unit cells. Furthermore, the small crystal size means that there is potentially access to diffraction information between the crystalline Bragg peaks. With this information, phase retrieval is possible without resorting to the collection of additional experimental data as is necessary in conventional protein crystallography. We report recent work on the diffraction characteristics of nanocrystals and the resulting reconstruction algorithms.

  2. Measurements of laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas using x-ray laser refractometry (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, R.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, K.A.; Kato, Y.; Murai, K.; Weber, F.; Barbee, T.W.; DaSilva, L.B.

    1999-01-01

    We developed a 19.6 nm laser x-ray laser grid-image refractometer (XRL-GIR) to diagnose laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas. The XRL-GIR was optimized to measure two-dimensional electron density perturbation on a scale of a few tens of {mu}m in underdense plasmas. Electron density profiles of laser-produced plasmas were obtained for 10{sup 20}{endash}10{sup 22}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} with the XRL-GIR and for 10{sup 19}{endash}10{sup 20}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} from an ultraviolet interferometer, the profiles of which were compared with those from hydrodynamic simulation. By using this XRL-GIR, we directly observed laser channeling into overdense plasmas accompanied by a bow shock wave showing a Mach cone ascribed to supersonic propagation of the channel front. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Measurements of laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas using x-ray laser refractometry (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, R.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Kato, Y.; Murai, K.; Weber, F.; Barbee, T. W.; DaSilva, L. B.

    1999-01-01

    We developed a 19.6 nm laser x-ray laser grid-image refractometer (XRL-GIR) to diagnose laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas. The XRL-GIR was optimized to measure two-dimensional electron density perturbation on a scale of a few tens of μm in underdense plasmas. Electron density profiles of laser-produced plasmas were obtained for 1020-1022cm-3 with the XRL-GIR and for 1019-1020cm-3 from an ultraviolet interferometer, the profiles of which were compared with those from hydrodynamic simulation. By using this XRL-GIR, we directly observed laser channeling into overdense plasmas accompanied by a bow shock wave showing a Mach cone ascribed to supersonic propagation of the channel front.

  4. Attosecond x-ray pulses produced by ultra short transverse slicing via laser electron beam interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholents, A. A.; Zolotorev, M. S.

    2008-02-01

    We propose a method of generation of ~115 attosecond x-ray pulses in a free electron laser (FEL) by means of producing ultra-fast angular modulation of the electron trajectories prior to entering the FEL. For this modulation, we employ a few-cycle laser pulse in a higher-order Gaussian mode and with carrier-envelope phase stabilization.

  5. Applications using a Picosecond 14.7 nm X-Ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Nilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Filevich, J; Rocca, J J; Marconi, M C

    2001-09-21

    We report recent application experiments on the LLNL COMET tabletop facility using the picosecond, 14.7 nm Ni-like Pd x-ray laser. This work includes measurements of a laser-produced plasma density profile with a diffraction grating interferometer.

  6. Soft X-ray spectrum of laser-produced aluminum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vergunova, G. A.; Grushin, A. S.; Kologrivov, A. A.; Novikov, V. G.; Osipov, M. V.; Puzyrev, V. N. Rozanov, V. B. Starodub, A. N. Yakushev, O. F.

    2015-05-15

    Soft X-ray spectra (30–70 Å) of aluminum plasma have been measured in experiments carried out at the Kanal-2 laser facility at laser intensities of (1–7) × 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. It is shown that the measured spectra satisfactory agree with those calculated using the RADIAN numerical code.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  8. KSwAGS: A Swift X-Ray and UV Survey of the Kepler and K2 Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Krista Lynne; Boyd, Patricia T.; Mushotzky, Richard; Gehrels, Neil; Howell, Steve B.; Edelson, Rick; Gelino, Dawn M.; Brown, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    We present the first phase of the Kepler-Swift Active Galaxies and Stars survey (KSwAGS), a simultaneous X-ray and UV survey of 6 square degrees of the Kepler field. Kepler/K2 is the most precise photometer of our time, producing exquisite light curves of both stellar targets and active galaxies. We detect 93 unique X-ray sources with signal-to-noise ratio > 3 with the XRT, of which 60 have UV counterparts. The survey produces a mixture of stellar sources, extragalactic sources, and sources which we are not able to classify with certainty. We have obtained optical spectra for a majority of these targets, providing necessary parameters for study of the light curves in an astrophysical context; for example, surface gravities and rotation velocities for stars, and black hole mass estimates for AGN. Our survey provides the first X-ray and UV data for a number of known variable stellar sources, as well as a large number of new X-ray detections in this well-studied portion of the sky. The KSwAGS survey is currently ongoing in the K2 ecliptic plane fields, and provides a wide array of X-ray selected targets for photometric study with archival Kepler light curves and new data from K2.

  9. Resonantly photo-pumped nickel-like erbium X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    A resonantly photo-pumped X-ray laser (10) that enhances the gain of seve laser lines that also lase because of collisional excitations and recombination processes, is described. The laser comprises an aluminum (12) and erbium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like erbium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from hydrogen-like aluminum ions (32).

  10. Rapid, absolute calibration of x-ray filters employed by laser-produced plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Emig, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Heeter, R F; Magee, E; Thorn, D B; Widmann, K; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S

    2008-10-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to absolutely calibrate the transmission efficiency of x-ray filters employed by diodes and spectrometers used to diagnose laser-produced plasmas. EBIT emits strong, discrete monoenergetic lines at appropriately chosen x-ray energies. X rays are detected using the high resolution EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), developed for LLNL at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. X-ray filter transmission efficiency is determined by dividing the x-ray counts detected when the filter is in the line of sight by those detected when out of the line of sight. Verification of filter thickness can be completed in only a few hours, and absolute efficiencies can be calibrated in a single day over a broad range from about 0.1 to 15 keV. The EBIT calibration lab has been used to field diagnostics (e.g., the OZSPEC instrument) with fully calibrated x-ray filters at the OMEGA laser. Extensions to use the capability for calibrating filter transmission for the DANTE instrument on the National Ignition Facility are discussed. PMID:19044471

  11. Rapid, absolute calibration of x-ray filters employed by laser-produced plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Emig, J.; Frankel, M.; Gu, M. F.; Heeter, R. F.; Magee, E.; Thorn, D. B.; Widmann, K.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2008-10-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to absolutely calibrate the transmission efficiency of x-ray filters employed by diodes and spectrometers used to diagnose laser-produced plasmas. EBIT emits strong, discrete monoenergetic lines at appropriately chosen x-ray energies. X rays are detected using the high resolution EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), developed for LLNL at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. X-ray filter transmission efficiency is determined by dividing the x-ray counts detected when the filter is in the line of sight by those detected when out of the line of sight. Verification of filter thickness can be completed in only a few hours, and absolute efficiencies can be calibrated in a single day over a broad range from about 0.1 to 15 keV. The EBIT calibration lab has been used to field diagnostics (e.g., the OZSPEC instrument) with fully calibrated x-ray filters at the OMEGA laser. Extensions to use the capability for calibrating filter transmission for the DANTE instrument on the National Ignition Facility are discussed.

  12. Rapid, Absolute Calibration of X-ray Filters Employed By Laser-Produced Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Emig, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Heeter, R F; Magee, E; Thorn, D B; Widmann, K; . Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S

    2008-05-11

    The electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to absolutely calibrate the transmission efficiency of X-ray filters employed by diodes and spectrometers used to diagnose laser-produced plasmas. EBIT emits strong, discrete monoenergetic lines at appropriately chosen X-ray energies. X-rays are detected using the high-resolution EBIT calorimeter spectrometer (ECS), developed for LLNL at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. X-ray filter transmission efficiency is determined by dividing the X-ray counts detected when the filter is in the line of sight by those detected when out of the line of sight. Verification of filter thickness can be completed in only a few hours, and absolute efficiencies can be calibrated in a single day over a broad range from about 0.1 to 15 keV. The EBIT calibration lab has been used to field diagnostics (e.g., the OZSPEC instrument) with fully calibrated X-ray filters at the OMEGA laser. Extensions to use the capability for calibrating filter transmission for the DANTE instrument on the National Ignition Facility are discussed.

  13. X-ray spectromicroscopy of clusters heated by fs laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Faenov, A.Ya.; Magunov, A.I.; Pikuz, T.A.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Blasco, F.; Dorchies, F.; Stenz, C.; Salin, F.; Junkel-Vives, G.C.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Auguste, T.; Dobosz, S.; D'Oliveira, P.; Hulin, S.; Monot, P.; Hansen, S.; Shlyaptseva, A.; Safronova, U.I.

    2003-01-24

    The review of systematic investigations of X-ray radiation properties of different clusters heated by short-pulse (35-1100 fs) high-intensive (1016- 1018 W/cm2) Ti:Sa laser radiation is presented. The cluster targets were formed by the adiabatic expansion in vacuum of an Kr or Ar gas jets produced by a pulsed valve with Laval or conical nozzles. The gas pressure is varied from 15 up to 100 bar. High spectrally ({lambda}/{delta}{lambda}=4000-5000) and spatially (40-80 {mu}m) resolved X-Ray spectra near resonance lines (4-2 transitions) of Ne-like ions of Kr, H- and He-like ions of Ar have been obtained and detailed spectroscopic analysis was consistent with a theoretical two-temperature collisional-radiative model of irradiated atomic clusters incorporating with an effects of highly energetic electrons. The role of laser prepulse for X-ray intensity emission investigated in details. X-ray spectra radiation from plasma with electron density more than 2x1022 cm-3 was observed. Big effect of fast electrons influence on the X-ray emission of He-like Ar and Ne-like Kr spectra was demonstrated. Comparison of data obtained under various experimental conditions clearly showed that for increasing X-ray output from plasma the most essential to increase size of clusters and has reasonable value of ps prepulse.

  14. Femtosecond nanocrystallography using X-Ray Lasers for membrane protein structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Fromme, Petra; Spence, John CH

    2012-01-01

    The invention of Free Electron X-ray Lasers has opened a new era for membrane protein structure determination with the recent first proof-of-principle of the new concept of femtosecond nanocrystallography. Structure determination is based on thousands of diffraction snapshots that are collected on a fully hydrated stream of nanocrystals. This review provides a summary of the method and describes how femtosecond X-ray crystallography overcomes the radiation damage problem in X-ray crystallography, avoids the need for growth and freezing of large single crystals while offering a new method for direct digital phase determination by making use of the fully coherent nature of the X-ray beam. We briefly review the possibilities for time-resolved crystallography, and the potential for making “molecular movies” of membrane proteins at work. PMID:21752635

  15. Selective photo-activation analysis with laser-driven x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sudeep; Golovin, Grigory; Powers, Nathan; Liu, Cheng; Chen, Shouyuan; Petersen, Chad; Zhang, Jun; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Zhao, Baozhen; Brown, Kevin; Mills, Jared; Umstadter, Donald; Haden, Dan; Silano, Jack; Karwowski, Hugon

    2013-04-01

    We discuss a technique for the identification of nuclear isotopes by selective photo-activation analysis. A narrow divergence beam of high-energy photons is produced when a laser driven electron beam Compton backscatters off a counter-propagating high-intensity laser pulse. The x-rays from this compact laser-driven synchrotron light source are MeV energy, narrow-bandwidth, tunable, polarized, and bright (10^8 photons s-1). Such characteristics make these x-rays well-suited for nuclear interrogation by means of triggering (γ,f) and (γ,xn) reactions. The narrow bandwidth of the x-ray light can be exploited to selectively activate nuclei with isotopic sensitivity, without causing unwanted background from collateral activation. Additionally, the polarized nature of the x-rays can be used to study anisotropy of neutron emission, for precise identification of isotopes. Activation by laser-driven synchrotron x-rays will be compared with activation by bremsstrahlung.

  16. Pair production from vacuum at the focus of an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringwald, A.

    2001-06-01

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: one could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. In this Letter we discuss the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production). We find that if X-ray optics can be improved to approach the diffraction limit of focusing, and if the power of the planned X-ray FELs can be increased to the terawatt region, then there is ample room for an investigation of the Schwinger pair production mechanism.

  17. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  18. Development of an X-ray pixel detector with multi-port charge-coupled device for X-ray free-electron laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kameshima, Takashi; Ono, Shun; Kudo, Togo; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Kirihara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Hatsui, Takaki; Horigome, Toshio; Holland, Andrew; Holland, Karen; Burt, David; Murao, Hajime

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents development of an X-ray pixel detector with a multi-port charge-coupled device (MPCCD) for X-ray Free-Electron laser experiments. The fabrication process of the CCD was selected based on the X-ray radiation hardness against the estimated annual dose of 1.6 × 10{sup 14} photon/mm{sup 2}. The sensor device was optimized by maximizing the full well capacity as high as 5 Me- within 50 μm square pixels while keeping the single photon detection capability for X-ray photons higher than 6 keV and a readout speed of 60 frames/s. The system development also included a detector system for the MPCCD sensor. This paper summarizes the performance, calibration methods, and operation status.

  19. Overview of the program on soft x-ray lasers and their applications at Princeton

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Ilcisin, K. . Plasma Physics Lab. Princeton Univ., NJ . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

    1991-05-01

    In the last several years, rapid progress in the development of soft x-ray lasers (SXL) has been observed at a number of laboratories worldwide. Although SXLs are very young'' devices they have already been used for microscopy and holography, and new ideas emerging for broader application of SXLs to microscopy, holography and lithography. This paper describes the work at Princeton University on the development of a soft x-ray imaging transmission microscopy using a SXL as a radiation source and work on the development of a novel soft x-ray reflection microscope and its application to biological cell studies and lithography. Progress in the development of a photopumped VUV laser (60 nm), and programs for the development of a small scale SXL and for the application of a powerful subpicosecond KrF laser system are also discussed. 35 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Compact laser accelerators for X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Najmudin, Z; Kneip, S; Bloom, M S; Mangles, S P D; Chekhlov, O; Dangor, A E; Döpp, A; Ertel, K; Hawkes, S J; Holloway, J; Hooker, C J; Jiang, J; Lopes, N C; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P A; Rajeev, P P; Russo, C; Streeter, M J V; Symes, D R; Wing, M

    2014-03-01

    Advances in X-ray imaging techniques have been driven by advances in novel X-ray sources. The latest fourth-generation X-ray sources can boast large photon fluxes at unprecedented brightness. However, the large size of these facilities means that these sources are not available for everyday applications. With advances in laser plasma acceleration, electron beams can now be generated at energies comparable to those used in light sources, but in university-sized laboratories. By making use of the strong transverse focusing of plasma accelerators, bright sources of betatron radiation have been produced. Here, we demonstrate phase-contrast imaging of a biological sample for the first time by radiation generated by GeV electron beams produced by a laser accelerator. The work was performed using a greater than 300 TW laser, which allowed the energy of the synchrotron source to be extended to the 10-100 keV range. PMID:24470414

  1. Compact laser accelerators for X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Najmudin, Z.; Kneip, S.; Bloom, M. S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Chekhlov, O.; Dangor, A. E.; Döpp, A.; Ertel, K.; Hawkes, S. J.; Holloway, J.; Hooker, C. J.; Jiang, J.; Lopes, N. C.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P. A.; Rajeev, P. P.; Russo, C.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Symes, D. R.; Wing, M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in X-ray imaging techniques have been driven by advances in novel X-ray sources. The latest fourth-generation X-ray sources can boast large photon fluxes at unprecedented brightness. However, the large size of these facilities means that these sources are not available for everyday applications. With advances in laser plasma acceleration, electron beams can now be generated at energies comparable to those used in light sources, but in university-sized laboratories. By making use of the strong transverse focusing of plasma accelerators, bright sources of betatron radiation have been produced. Here, we demonstrate phase-contrast imaging of a biological sample for the first time by radiation generated by GeV electron beams produced by a laser accelerator. The work was performed using a greater than 300 TW laser, which allowed the energy of the synchrotron source to be extended to the 10–100 keV range. PMID:24470414

  2. Application of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, L.B. da; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.

    1996-12-31

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray laser make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 15 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda}-10{sup {minus}4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this talk the author describes the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters they have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {angstrom} to probe 1--3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 {times} 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}. A comparison of the results with computer simulations will be presented. They have also used x-ray lasers and a multilayer mirror imaging system to study hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle patterns on directly driven thin foils with 1--2 {micro}m spatial resolution. Results from these experiments as well as the use of x-ray laser moire deflectometry to measure the electron density profile in ICF hohlraums will be discussed.

  3. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: X-ray spectral diagnostics of plasmas heated by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryunetkin, B. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Khakhalin, S. Ya; Kalashnikov, M. P.; Nickles, P. V.; Schnürer, M.

    1993-06-01

    The properties of a magnesium plasma heated by picosecond laser pulses have been determined by x-ray spectral methods. Experiments were carried out at a laser power density ~ 1.5 · 1018 W/cm2. The x-ray spectra were detected by spectrographs with a plane CsAP crystal and a mica crystal bent into part of a spherical surface 10 cm in radius. The experimental data are compared with predictions of a calculation on the time-varying kinetics of multiply charged magnesium ions.

  4. Optimization of x-ray emission from under-critical CH foam coated gold targets by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wanli; Yu, Ruizhen; Zhang, Wenhai; Yang, Jiamin

    2016-08-01

    Under-critical CH foam coated gold targets benefit laser-to-x-ray emission because CH plasma inhibits gold plasma expansion, which leads to higher gold plasma density and temperature. Conversely, the CH foam partially absorbs the incident laser energy, which lowers laser absorption into the gold plasma. An analytical model is built to solve the laser collisional deposition fraction in the CH foam layer. The optimization of x-ray emission from under-critical CH foam coated gold targets by laser irradiation is obtained numerically with different CH foam densities and thicknesses. The plasma and x-ray emission properties are investigated. It is found that different CH thicknesses lead to different increase mechanisms for x-ray emission. The x-ray spectrum distributions show that most of the x-ray emission increases occur with photon energy less than 2000 eV.

  5. Exploration of the fragmentation of laser shock-melted aluminum using x-ray backlighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Li, Ying-Hua; Li, Xue-Mei; Ye, Xiang-Ping; Zhang, Zu-Gen; Cheng, Jin-Ming; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    The fragmentation of shock-melted metal material is an important scientific problem in shock physics and is suitable for experimentally investigating by the laser-driven x-ray backlighting technique. This letter reports on the exploration of laser shock-melted aluminum fragmentation by means of x-ray backlighting at the SGII high energy facility in China. High-quality and high-resolution radiographs with negligible motion blur were obtained and these images enabled analysis of the mass distribution of the fragmentation product.

  6. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy of subpicosecond laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnick, K. M.; Tighe, W.; Suckewer, S.

    1996-02-01

    Experiments that examine the interaction of high-intensity subpicosecond laser radiation ( \\similar 1018 W / cm2) with solid targets are performed. Soft-x-ray spectra from interactions with Teflon and aluminum targets that imply the creation of high-temperature ( > 200 eV) high-density ( > 10 23 cm -3 ) plasmas are obtained. Effects of a prepulse on the plasma characteristics are examined. The applicability of short, intense laser pulses for the formation of population inversions on x-ray transitions during recombination of high-density plasmas is discussed. 42.55.Vc.

  7. Modal study of refractive effects on x-ray laser coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A. ); Strauss, M. . Nuclear Research Center-Negev)

    1991-04-05

    The role of smoothly varying transverse gain and refraction profiles on x-ray laser intensity and coherence is analyzed by modally expanding the electric field within the paraxial approximation. Comparison with a square transverse profile reveals that smooth-edged profiles lead to: (1) a greatly reduced number of guided modes, (2) the continued cancellation of local intensity from a loosely guided mode by resonant free modes, (3) and the absence of extraneous (or anomalous) free mode resonances. These generic spectral properties should enable a considerable simplification in analyzing and optimizing the coherence properties of laboratory soft x-ray lasers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Compton Scattering X-Ray Sources Driven by Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Gibson, D J; Brown, W J; Rousse, A; Phuoc, K T; Pukhov, A

    2005-10-19

    Recent laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated the generation of femtosecond, nano-Coulomb, low emittance, nearly monokinetic relativistic electron bunches of sufficient quality to produce bright, tunable, ultrafast x-rays via Compton scattering. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented using a three-dimensional Compton scattering code and a laser-plasma interaction particle-in-cell code modeling the wakefield acceleration process; x-ray fluxes exceeding 10{sup 22} s{sup -1} are predicted, with a peak brightness > 10{sup 20} photons/(mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x s x 0.1% bandwidth).

  9. Application of a transmission crystal x-ray spectrometer to moderate-intensity laser driven sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Zhang, L.; Sun, Y. Q.; Lin, X. X.; Hudson, L. T.; Seely, J. F.; Zhang, J.

    2012-04-15

    In the pursuit of novel, laser-produced x-ray sources for medical imaging applications, appropriate instrumental diagnostics need to be developed concurrently. A type of transmission crystal spectroscopy has previously been demonstrated as a survey tool for sources produced by high-power and high-energy lasers. The present work demonstrates the extension of this method into the study of medium-intensity laser driven hard x-ray sources with a design that preserves resolving power while maintaining high sensitivity. Specifically, spectroscopic measurements of characteristic K{alpha} and K{beta} emissions were studied from Mo targets irradiated by a 100 fs, 200 mJ, Ti: sapphire laser with intensity of 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} per shot. Using a transmission curved crystal spectrometer and off-Rowland circle imaging, resolving powers (E/{Delta}E) of around 300 for Mo K{alpha}{sub 2} at 17.37 keV were obtained with an end-to-end spectrometer efficiency of (1.13 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -5}. This sensitivity is sufficient for registering x-ray lines with high signal to background from targets following irradiation by a single laser pulse, demonstrating the utility of this method in the study of the development of medium-intensity laser driven x-ray sources.

  10. Emerging trends in X-ray spectroscopic studies of plasma produced by intense laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, V.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2015-07-31

    X-ray line emission from hot dense plasmas, produced by ultra-short high intensity laser systems, has been studied experimentally in recent years for applications in materials science as well as for back-lighter applications. By virtue of the CPA technology, several laser facilities delivering pulses with peak powers in excess of one petawatt (focused intensities > 10{sup 20} W-cm{sup −2}) have either been commissioned across the globe during the last few years or are presently under construction. On the other hand, hard x-ray sources on table top, generating ultra-short duration x-rays at a repetition rate up to 10 kHz, are routinely available for time resolved x-ray diffraction studies. In this paper, the recent experiments on x-ray spectroscopic studies of plasma produced by 45 fs, Ti:sapphire laser pulses (focused iintensity > 10{sup 18} W-cm{sup −2}) at RRCAT Indore will be presented.

  11. A free-electron laser fourth-generation x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, D. E.

    1999-10-21

    The field of synchrotrons radiation research has grown rapidly over the last 25 years due to both the push of the accelerator and magnet technology that produces the x-ray beams and the pull of the extraordinary scientific research those beams make possible. Three successive generations of synchrotrons radiation facilities have resulted in beam brilliances 11 to 12 orders of magnitude greater than the standard laboratory x-ray tube. However, greater advances can be easily imagined given the fact that x-ray beams from present-day facilities do not exhibit the coherence or time structure so familiar with the.optical laser. Theoretical work over the last ten years or so has pointed to the possibility of generating hard x-ray beams with laser-like characteristics. The concept is based on self-amplified spontaneous emission in free electron lasers. The use of a superconducting linac could produce a major, cost-effective facility that spans wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the hard x-ray regime, simultaneously servicing large numbers experimenters from a wide range of disciplines. As with each past generation of synchrotron facilities, immense new scientific opportunities from fourth-generation sources.

  12. Laser Plasma Soft X-Ray Contact Microscopy of Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Hirozumi; Takeichi, Akihiro; Noda, Shoji

    1994-08-01

    Microstructures of polymer composites are observed with a good contrast and with a submicron spatial resolution by contact soft X-ray microscopy with a laser plasma as a soft X-ray source. An iron target was irradiated by a YAG laser ( 2ω=532 nm, 0.4 J) at laser power density of 2.5×1012 W/cm2 and the emitted soft X-rays were filtered with a thin aluminum foil. For a 0.1-µ m-thick poly acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene specimen, poly-butadiene or copolymer of butadiene spheres of about 500 nm diameter, which are selectively stained with osmium, is observed with soft X-rays in the wavelength region between 17 and 20 nm. For a 4-µ m-thick polyvinyl chloride film specimen formed by polymer powder compaction, peripheral areas of holes, grain boundaries, and areas probably degraded by HCl reduction are observed with soft X-rays in the wavelength region mainly around 2 nm.

  13. Diagnosing high density, fast-evolving plasmas using x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    As x-ray laser (XRL) research has matured, it has become possible to reliably utilize XRLs for applications in the laboratory. Laser coherence, high brightness and short pulse duration all make the XRL a unique tool for the diagnosis of laboratory plasmas. The high brightness of XRLs makes them well-suited for imaging and for interferometry when used in conjunction with multilayer mirrors and beamsplitters. We have utilized a soft x-ray laser in such an imaging system to examine laser-produced plasmas using radiography, moire deflectometry, and interferometry. Radiography experiments yield 100-200 ps snapshots of laser driven foils at a resolution of 1-2 {mu}m. Moire deflectometry with an XRL has been used to probe plasmas at higher density than by optical means. Interferograms, which allow direct measurement of electron density in laser plasmas, have been obtained with this system.

  14. Production of tunable monochromatic x rays by the Vanderbilt free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Frank E.; Waters, James W.; Traeger, Robert H.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Clark, Weiwei; Brau, Charles A.

    1999-07-01

    Sustained/long duration X-ray output has been demonstrated emanating from the monochromatic X-ray beamline of the Vanderbilt Free-Electron Laser. Tunable, pulsed monochromatic X-rays ranging in energy from 14 - 18 keV are produced by inverse Compton scattering created by the counter propagation of the FEL e-beam and its own infrared beam. These beams are focused and optimized at an interaction zone between the linac and the wiggler where they are brought into coalignment. The X-rays produced exit the beamline through a beryllium window and are directed onto mosaic crystals which divert the beam to an imaging laboratory on the floor above the vault. The initial application of these X-rays is directed toward human imaging, specifically for the diagnosis of breast diseases including cancer. The characteristics of the X-rays are such that they can be used in standard geometry monochromatic imaging, CT like images of the breast using a rotating mosaic crystal 'optic,' time-of-flight imaging and phase contrast images. Eventual extension to other portions of the body, cell biology and material sciences are already anticipated.

  15. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited).

    PubMed

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Piston, K; Felker, B; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2014-11-01

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2-17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10(17). We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments. PMID:25430346

  16. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R. Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  17. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect

    Trosseille, C. Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C.; Beck, T.; Gazave, J.

    2014-11-15

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  18. Sequential single shot X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the SACLA free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-11-27

    In this study, hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.

  19. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser

    PubMed Central

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources. PMID:26610328

  20. Upscaling of X-Ray Laser Repetition Rate Using an OPCPA Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Fei; Staub, Felix; Balmer, Jürg

    We present a novel design of a hybrid amplification chain for pumping a Sn target producing ˜μJ coherent soft-X-ray pulses at few-Hz repetition rate. The driver aims to generate multi-joule energy at the central wavelength of 1053 nm and consists of optical-parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) combined with diode-pumped Nd:YLF amplifiers. The soft-X-ray laser at the wavelength of 11.9 nm is produced by focusing the infrared beam into a line focus on a solid Sn target. Benefiting from this hybrid pump scheme and grazing-incidence pump geometry (GRIP), such a system has the potential to upscale the repetition rate of soft-X-ray lasers from single shot to the few-Hz region.

  1. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources. PMID:26610328

  2. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.

  3. Femtosecond X-ray Pulse Temporal Characterization in Free-Electron Lasers Using a Transverse Deflector

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Krejcik, P.; Wang, M-H.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    We propose a novel method to characterize the temporal duration and shape of femtosecond x-ray pulses in a free-electron laser (FEL) by measuring the time-resolved electron-beam energy loss and energy spread induced by the FEL process, with a transverse radio-frequency deflector located after the undulator. Its merits are simplicity, high resolution, wide diagnostic range, and non-invasive to user operation. When the system is applied to the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first hard x-ray free-electron laser in the world, it can provide single-shot measurements on the electron beam and x-ray pulses with a resolution on the order of 1-2 femtoseconds rms.

  4. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule.

    PubMed

    Trosseille, C; Aubert, D; Auger, L; Bazzoli, S; Beck, T; Brunel, P; Burillo, M; Chollet, C; Gazave, J; Jasmin, S; Maruenda, P; Moreau, I; Oudot, G; Raimbourg, J; Soullié, G; Stemmler, P; Zuber, C

    2014-11-01

    Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an "air-box" that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes. PMID:25430196

  5. Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Doak, R. Bruce; Kirian, Richard A.; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Andreasson, Jakob; Arnlund, David; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Bogan, Michael J.; Bostedt, Christoph; Bottin, Hervé; Bozek, John D.; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; DePonte, Daniel P.; Elser, Veit; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Graafsma, Heinz; Grotjohann, Ingo; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M.; Hömke, André; Johansson, Linda; Kimmel, Nils; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Neutze, Richard; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Williams, Garth J.; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 µs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. PMID:22330507

  6. Obtaining attosecond X-ray pulses using a self-amplifiedspontaneous emission free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A.A.; Penn, G.

    2005-01-07

    We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond X-ray pulse in a free electron laser (FEL), via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, sub-femtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator,this current spike emits a {approx}250 attosecond X-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the X-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch.

  7. Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S; Doak, R Bruce; Kirian, Richard A; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A; Andreasson, Jakob; Arnlund, David; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R M; Barthelmess, Miriam; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Bottin, Hervé; Bozek, John D; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; DePonte, Daniel P; Elser, Veit; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Graafsma, Heinz; Grotjohann, Ingo; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M; Hömke, André; Johansson, Linda; Kimmel, Nils; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V; Maia, Filipe R N C; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Neutze, Richard; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Schmidt, Kevin E; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Williams, Garth J; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C H; Chapman, Henry N

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 µs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. PMID:22330507

  8. Laue diffraction hard x-ray spectrometer for laser fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W.C.; Lier, D.W.; Day, R.H.

    1983-12-01

    We show that a crystal spectrometer used in the Laue mode is a useful diagnostic of high-energy x-ray emission from laser fusion plasmas. It has good collection efficiency and adequate energy resolution for continuum measurements. The instrument measures time integrated x-ray spectra with a resolving power E/..delta..Eroughly-equal10 for photon energies between 60 and 300 keV. A strong signal and no detectable background are obtained in laser fusion experiments where approx.15 J of x rays are released in a pulsed (1 ns), hard (kTroughly-equal200 keV) spectrum. A Lanex/Tri-X phosphor/film combination is used as a focal plane detector; we report its relative energy calibration. Because of the imperfection of available crystals, detailed measurements of reflectivity along the crystal are required to achieve absolute calibration.

  9. Laué diffraction hard x-ray spectrometer for laser fusion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Lier, D. W.; Day, R. H.

    1983-12-01

    We show that a crystal spectrometer used in the Laué mode is a useful diagnostic of high-energy x-ray emission from laser fusion plasmas. It has good collection efficiency and adequate energy resolution for continuum measurements. The instrument measures time integrated x-ray spectra with a resolving power E/ΔE≊10 for photon energies between 60 and 300 keV. A strong signal and no detectable background are obtained in laser fusion experiments where ˜15 J of x rays are released in a pulsed (1 ns), hard (kT≊200 keV) spectrum. A Lanex/Tri-X phosphor/film combination is used as a focal plane detector; we report its relative energy calibration. Because of the imperfection of available crystals, detailed measurements of reflectivity along the crystal are required to achieve absolute calibration.

  10. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoulea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trosseille, C.; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Beck, T.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Gazave, J.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C.

    2014-11-01

    Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an "air-box" that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  11. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C.; Gorelick, S.; Rutishauser, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Guzenko, V. A.; Bunk, O.; Färm, E.; Ritala, M.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Barrett, R.; Samoylova, L.; Grünert, J.; Sinn, H.

    2011-08-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×1017 W/cm2 was obtained at 70 fs pulse length.

  12. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates.

    PubMed

    David, C; Gorelick, S; Rutishauser, S; Krzywinski, J; Vila-Comamala, J; Guzenko, V A; Bunk, O; Färm, E; Ritala, M; Cammarata, M; Fritz, D M; Barrett, R; Samoylova, L; Grünert, J; Sinn, H

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×10(17)W/cm(2) was obtained at 70 fs pulse length. PMID:22355576

  13. Laser-Hole Boring into Overdense Plasmas Measured with Soft X-Ray Laser Probing

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kodama, R.; Tanaka, K. A.; Hashimoto, H.; Kato, Y.; Mima, K.; Weber, F. A.; Barbee, T. W. Jr.; Da Silva, L. B.

    2000-03-13

    A laser self-focused channel formation into overdense plasmas was observed using a soft x-ray laser probe system with a grid image refractometry (GIR) technique. 1.053 {mu}m laser light with a 100 ps pulse duration was focused onto a preformed plasma at an intensity of 2x10{sup 17} W /cm{sup 2} . Cross sections of the channel were obtained which show a 30 {mu}m diameter in overdense plasmas. The channel width in the overdense region was kept narrow as a result of self-focusing. Conically diverging density ridges were also observed along the channel, indicating a Mach cone created by a shock wave due to the supersonic propagation of the channel front. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Laser-Hole Boring into Overdense Plasmas Measured with Soft X-Ray Laser Probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kodama, R.; Tanaka, K. A.; Hashimoto, H.; Kato, Y.; Mima, K.; Weber, F. A.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.; da Silva, L. B.

    2000-03-01

    A laser self-focused channel formation into overdense plasmas was observed using a soft x-ray laser probe system with a grid image refractometry (GIR) technique. 1.053 μm laser light with a 100 ps pulse duration was focused onto a preformed plasma at an intensity of 2×1017 W/cm 2. Cross sections of the channel were obtained which show a 30 μm diameter in overdense plasmas. The channel width in the overdense region was kept narrow as a result of self-focusing. Conically diverging density ridges were also observed along the channel, indicating a Mach cone created by a shock wave due to the supersonic propagation of the channel front.

  15. Characterization of a high-gain Ne-like Fe transient x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Facnov, A; Fournier, K B; Moon, S J; Osterheld, A; Pikuz, T; Shlyaptsev, V N

    1999-09-13

    The authors present experimental results of a high efficiency Ne-like Fe transient collisional excitation x-ray laser using the COMET 15 TW table-top laser system at LLNL. The plasma formation, ionization and collision excitation of the x-ray laser have been optimized using two sequential laser pulses: a plasma formation beam with 5 J energy of 600 ps duration and a pump beam with 5 J energy of 1.2 ps duration. Since the observation of strong lasing on the 255 {angstrom} 3p-3s J = 0-1 transition of Ne-like Fe, they have achieved high gains of 35 cm{sup {minus}1} and saturation of the x-ray laser. A five-stage traveling wave excitation enhances the strongest Fe 3p-3s 255 {angstrom} lasing line as well as additional x-ray lines. A careful characterization of the plasma column conditions using L-shell spectroscopy indicates the degree of ionization along the line focus.

  16. Rapid discharge-pumped wide aperture X-ray preionized KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, H.; Endoh, A.; Jethwa, J.; Rácz, B.; Schäfer, F. P.

    1991-03-01

    A wide aperture X-ray preionized discharge-pumped KrF excimer laser has been constructed. A flat plate pulse-forming line (36 nF, 340 kV) charges a peaking capacitor (6 nF) through a rail-gap to facilitate a rapid discharge in the laser head. Collimated X-ray preionization is employed to obtain a wide and uniform discharge. The laser is intended to be used as a short pulse amplifier and results are presented when characterized as an oscillator. The active cross-section of the laser beam is 10×8 cm2 with 50 cm effective electrode length. The laser pulse energy exceeds 4.7 J in a 28 ns pulse (FWHM).

  17. Bright tunable femtosecond x-ray emission from laser irradiated micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Tong-Pu Hu, Li-Xiang; Yin, Yan; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Luo, Wen; Pukhov, Alexander

    2014-09-15

    It is demonstrated that bright femtosecond X-rays can be obtained by irradiating a moderate laser onto a helium micro-droplet. The laser ponderomotive force continuously sweeps electrons from the droplets and accelerates them forward. The electrons exposed in the outrunning laser field oscillate transversely and emit photons in the forward direction. The total flux of photons with energies above 1 keV is as high as 10{sup 9}/shot which is about 10-fold enhancement compared with betatron oscillation under similar laser conditions. The maximum achieved peak brightness is up to 10{sup 21} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW. By adjusting laser and droplet parameters, we can get tunable X-rays with required brightness and energy.

  18. Molecular design concept for x-ray laser research. Progress report, 15 December--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.; Boyer, K.

    1992-12-10

    The goal of this program is the construction of an x-ray laser in the kilovolt regime. Recent experimental results indicate that a new technique for the generation of strong amplification of x-ray wavelengths is feasible. It involves the combination of (1) a new ultrahigh brightness subpicosecond laser technology and (2) a recently discovered unique mode of strong-field interaction, particularly applicable to molecules. A concept of molecular x-ray design emerges from the considerations which matches the mode of excitation to the structure of the molecular system. The molecular approach enables the combination of very highly electronically excited conditions with an environment characteristic of dense cold matter, a general situation exceptionally conducive to x-ray amplification. Both high efficiency and wavelength tunability are intrinsic features of this method. Recent results discussed in this report are revealing important characteristics of the molecular strong-field coupling pertinent to this goal. A continued program of research is proposed to evaluate this method for the production of x-ray amplification in the kilovolt region.

  19. Soft x-ray images of the laser entrance hole of ignition hohlraums.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M B; Meezan, N B; Alvarez, S S; Alameda, J; Baker, S; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Celeste, J R; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Fernandez-Perea, M; Gullikson, E; Haugh, M J; Hau-Riege, S; Hsing, W; Izumi, N; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; London, R A; MacGowan, B J; MacKinnon, A J; McCarville, T J; Milovich, J L; Mirkarimi, P; Moody, J D; Moore, A S; Myers, M D; Palma, E A; Palmer, N; Pivovaroff, M J; Ralph, J E; Robinson, J; Soufli, R; Suter, L J; Teruya, A T; Thomas, C A; Town, R P; Vernon, S P; Widmann, K; Young, B K

    2012-10-01

    Hohlraums are employed at the national ignition facility to convert laser energy into a thermal x-radiation drive, which implodes a fusion capsule, thus compressing the fuel. The x-radiation drive is measured with a low spectral resolution, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer, which views the region around the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. This measurement has no spatial resolution. To convert this to the drive inside the hohlraum, the size of the hohlraum's opening ("clear aperture") and fraction of the measured x-radiation, which comes from this opening, must be known. The size of the clear aperture is measured with the time integrated static x-ray imager (SXI). A soft x-ray imaging channel has been added to the SXI to measure the fraction of x-radiation emitted from inside the clear aperture. A multilayer mirror plus filter selects an x-ray band centered at 870 eV, near the peak of the x-ray spectrum of a 300 eV blackbody. Results from this channel and corrections to the x-radiation drive are discussed. PMID:23127032

  20. Soft x-ray images of the Laser Entrance Hole of NIC Hohlraums (paper, HTPD2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M B; Meezan, N B

    2012-04-30

    Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility convert laser energy into a thermal x-radiation drive, which implodes the capsule, thus compressing the fuel. The x-radiation drive is measured with a low resolution, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer that views the hohlraum's laser entrance hole (LEH) at 37{sup o} to the hohlraum axis. This measurement has no spatial resolution. To convert this to the drive inside the hohlraum, the area and fraction of the measured x-radiation which comes from the region inside the hohlraum must be known. The size of the LEH is measured with the time integrated Static X-ray Imager (SXI) which view the LEH at 18{sup o} to the hohlraum axis. A soft x-ray image has been added to the SXI to measure the fraction of x-radiation inside the LEH's Clear Aperture in order to correct the measured radiation. A multilayer mirror plus filter selects an x-ray band centered at 870 eV, near the x-ray energy peak of a 300 eV blackbody. Results from this channel and corrections to the x-radiation drive are discussed.

  1. Diffusion of Ag into organic semiconducting materials: a combined analytical study using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Fladischer, Stefanie; Neuhold, Alfred; Kraker, Elke; Haber, Thomas; Lamprecht, Bernhard; Salzmann, Ingo; Resel, Roland; Grogger, Werner

    2012-10-24

    This study shows that the morphology of organic/metal interfaces strongly depends on process parameters and the involved materials. The interface between organic n-type blocking layer materials and the top Ag cathode within an organic photodiode was investigated. Ag was deposited on either amorphous tris-8-hydroxyquinolinato-aluminum (Alq(3)) or crystalline 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) using different deposition techniques such as electron beam deposition, ion beam sputtering, and vacuum thermal evaporation at various deposition rates. The interfaces were studied by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. It was found that Bphen does not show any Ag diffusion no matter which deposition technique was used, whereas the Ag diffusion into Alq(3) depends on the deposition technique and the deposition rate. The highest amount of Ag diffusion into Alq(3) occurred by using thermal vacuum deposition at low deposition rates. PMID:23027799

  2. X-Ray Comb Generation from Nuclear-Resonance-Stabilized X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as Fe-57 as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as Ta-181 or Sc-45.

  3. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum. PMID:24850866

  4. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10−18 s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum. PMID:24850866

  5. Multi-tens of GW peak power plasma-based soft x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, E.; Fajardo, M.; Li, L.; Le, T. T. T.; Ros, D.; Sebban, S.; Velarde, P.; Zeitoun, P.

    2013-09-01

    Ultra-intense X-ray sources have opened new avenues by creating new states of matter or probing and imaging living or inert matter. Free-electron lasers have a strong leadership by delivering pulses combining femtosecond duration and 10s of microJoules to milliJoule energy. However, these sources remain highly expensive limiting their number to a few worldwide. In parallel, laser-pumped soft X-ray lasers hold outstanding promises having demonstrated the most energetic monochromatic soft x-ray pulse and being intrinsically fully synchronized with any secondary source of the pump laser. Since the first successful demonstration of amplification of a high harmonic pulse in a plasma from gas in 2003 and from solid in 2008, we have developed an extensive numerical study. 2D hydrodynamic simulations showed that optimized Transient Collisional Excitation plasma amplifiers, may store up to 0.4 mJ in the population inversion. If carefully seeded, pulses of 80 fs and 20 μJ might be generated with table-top lasers (10J). As the energy extracted is far from the milliJoule requirements of most exciting applications, we studied the seminal experiment of Ditmire et al who seeded a plasma emitting milliJoules in the form of Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE).We retrieved and explained for the first time the experimental result (ASE 1,000 times stronger than amplified seed). We thus proposed and fully modeled the transposition of the so-called Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) in the soft X-ray range, showing that 6 mJ, 200 fs, fully coherent soft X-ray pulse is accessible with compact pump lasers.

  6. Generation of phase - matched coherent point source in plasma media by propagated X-ray laser seeded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, T.; Faenov, A.; Magnitskiy, S.; Nagorskiy, N.; Tanaka, M.; Ishino, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kando, M.; Kato, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant interest in developing the coherent table-top X-ray lasers. Advent of plasma-based transient collisional excitation x-ray laser and particular, injection of coherent seeded beam, especially high-order harmonics, has tremendously improved the spatial coherence of such lasers, what allowed them to be the same widely used as synchrotron sources. Here we report experimental founding of unknown interference structure in a spatial profile of the output beam of the two-stage plasma X-ray laser. That allowed us experimental and theoretical discovering a new phenomenon consisted in a generation of phase-matched coherent point source in a laser plasma media by propagated X-ray laser seeded beam. This phenomenon could extend the applications of such x-ray lasers. For explanation of the observed phenomenon a new method of solving the standard system of Maxwell-Bloch equations has been developed. It was found that the interference pattern in the output laser beam was formed due to an emergence of phase-matched coherent virtual point source in the XRL amplifier and could be treated as the first observation of mirage phenomenon, analogous to the optical mirage, but in X-rays. The obtained results bring new comprehension into the physical nature of amplification of X-ray radiation in laser-induced plasma amplifiers and opening new opportunities for X-ray interferometry, holography and other applications, which requiring multiple rigidly phased sources of coherent radiation.

  7. Laser-based K α X-ray emission characterization using a high contrast ratio and high-power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, S.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    We characterized a laser-based K_α X-ray source produced onto a Mo solid target. We used a laser system with a high laser pulse contrast ratio (LPCR) and an instantaneous power ˜30 TW. We investigated simultaneously the K_α X-ray conversion efficiency, the X-ray source size, and the proton front surface emission. We found a high K_α X-ray conversion efficiency up to 2× 10^{-4} associated with an X-ray source size only ˜1.8 times larger than the laser focal spot for the highest intensities. We found that using a high LPCR laser pulse with 245 mJ per pulse is of interest to develop a laser-based X-ray imaging system as it can combine a high conversion efficiency with a small increase in the X-ray source size compared to the laser focal spot.

  8. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hantke, Max, F.

    2014-11-17

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  9. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

  10. Calibration of a flat field soft x-ray grating spectrometer for laser produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Brown, G V; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Beiersdorfer, P; Cone, K V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E W; May, M J; Porter, F S

    2010-10-01

    We have calibrated the x-ray response of a variable line spaced grating spectrometer, known as the VSG, at the Fusion and Astrophysics Data and Diagnostic Calibration Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VSG has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasmas, such as those created at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility at LLNL and at both the Omega and Omega EP lasers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The bandwidth of the VSG spans the range of ∼6-60 Å. The calibration results presented here include the VSG's dispersion and quantum efficiency. The dispersion is determined by measuring the x rays emitted from the hydrogenlike and heliumlike ions of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and aluminum. The quantum efficiency is calibrated to an accuracy of 30% or better by normalizing the x-ray intensities recorded by the VSG to those simultaneously recorded by an x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer. PMID:21034017

  11. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  12. X-ray streak camera diagnostics of picosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.; Wahlin, E.K.

    1992-05-01

    An x-ray streak camera is used to diagnose a laser-produced Al plasma with time resolution of {approximately}10 ps. A streak record of filtered emission and a time-integrated transmission grating spectrum reveal that the plasma radiation is dominated by emission from He- and H-like resonance lines. 11 refs.

  13. X-ray streak camera diagnostics of picosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.; Wahlin, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray streak camera is used to diagnose a laser-produced Al plasma with time resolution of {approximately}10 ps. A streak record of filtered emission and a time-integrated transmission grating spectrum reveal that the plasma radiation is dominated by emission from He- and H-like resonance lines. 11 refs.

  14. Strip Velocity Measurements for Gated X-Ray Imagers Using Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P. W.; Cardenas, M.; Griffin, M.; Mead, A.; Silbernagel, C. T.; Bell, P.; Haque, S. H.

    2013-09-01

    Strip velocity measurements of gated X-ray imagers are presented using an ultra-short pulse laser. Obtaining time-resolved X-ray images of inertial confinement fusion shots presents a difficult challenge. One diagnostic developed to address this challenge is the gated X-ray imagers. The gated X-ray detectors (GXDs) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory use a microchannel plate (MCP) coated with a gold strip line, which serves as a photocathode. GXDs are used with an array of pinholes, which image onto various parts of the GXD image plane. As the pulse sweeps over the strip lines, it creates a time history of the event with consecutive images. In order to accurately interpret the timing of the images obtained using the GXDs, it is necessary to measure the propagation of the pulse over the strip line. The strip velocity was measured using a short pulse laser with a pulse duration of approximately 1-2 ps. The 200nm light from the laser is used to illuminate the GXD MCP. The laser pulse is split and a retroreflective mirror is used to delay one of the legs. By adjusting the distance to the mirror, one leg is temporally delayed compared to the reference leg. The retroreflective setup is calibrated using a streak camera with a 1 ns full sweep. Resolution of 0.5 mm is accomplished to achieve a temporal resolution of ~5 ps on the GXD strip line.

  15. An advanced high resolution x-ray imager for laser-plasma interaction observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennetiere, D.; Troussel, Ph.; Courtois, C.; Wrobel, R.; Audebert, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present here the latest results obtained with our high resolution broadband X-ray microscope. These results, both spatial and spectral, were obtained in several facilities such as Berlin's synchrotron Bessy II and LULI's laser ELFIE 100TW. The results show clearly the opportunity in high resolution microscopy that offer mirror based diagnostics.

  16. Generation of intense coherent soft x-ray with electron microbunches induced and frozen by lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yu. L.H.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new improved version of Transverse Optical Klystron Harmonic Generator that uses three lasers to replace the undulators in the modulator and radiator and freeze the electron microbunching. We show that intense soft x-rays can be generated.

  17. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  18. Preliminary study of X-ray and laser digital image of kidney endocast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewniak, Tomasz; Bielecki, Jakub; WyczóŁkowski, Marek; Smoleński, Witold; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2011-10-01

    Kidney endocasts are the only way to show intrarenal arteries and the collecting system of pathologically unchanged human kidney. We describe different methods of digital endocast three dimensional (3D) imaging with the use of X-ray and laser radiation. Images of several kidney endocasts were obtained with the use of: (i) X-ray microtomography, (ii) Medical Computed Tomography (CT) and (iii) 3D Laser Scanner. The images were compared with an appearance of endocast and the images of kidney vessels obtained during angiographic CT protocols in clinical practice. The X-ray computed microtomography is characterized by very high resolution; however, relatively small field of view is available at high magnification and long data acquisition time is needed. Laser 3D scanner has a comparable resolution, but it was not possible to obtain full 3D reconstruction of the sample structure. The cast was too complex for reconstruction with limited number of projection obtained with the use of the laser scanner. Medical CT has limited resolution but time of data acquisition was very short. The achieved images were comparable with those from Angio-CT protocols. Digital imaging of kidney endocasts is possible with current imaging obtained by means of X-ray imaging techniques. The obtained images are useful for further study, such as statistical analysis, especially those obtained from Medical CT.

  19. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    PubMed

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions. PMID:12939982

  20. Chemical state of Ag in Conducting Bridge Random Access Memory cells: a depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Souchier, E.; Noe, P.; Blaise, P.; Bernard, M.; Jousseaume, V.

    2016-05-01

    Conducting Bridge Random Access Memories (CBRAM) are a promising substitute for FLASH technology but problems with limited retention of the low resistance ON state still hamper their massive deployment. Depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy has been used to describe the chemical state of the atoms of the active electrode (in this case Ag) and to reveal the role of Sb as stabilizer of the metallic state.

  1. LIGHT SOURCE: TW Laser system for Thomson scattering X-ray light source at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li-Xm; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Hua, Jian-Fei; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    A TW (Tera Watt) laser system based on Ti:sapphire mainly for the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray light source (TTX) is being built. Both UV (ultraviolet) laser pulse for driving the photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun and the IR (infrared) laser pulse as the electron-beam-scattered-light are provided by the system. Efforts have also been made in laser pulse shaping and laser beam transport to optimize the high-brightness electron beam production by the photocathode RF gun.

  2. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  3. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-08-22

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY.

  4. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Bogan, Michael J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Adams, Paul D.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and free from radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract statistically significant high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements. PMID:24633409

  5. A Review of X-ray Free-Electron Laser Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je; /ANL, APS

    2006-12-18

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed as extremely bright sources for a next-generation x-ray facility. In this paper, we review the basic theory of the startup, the exponential growth, and the saturation of the high-gain process, emphasizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The radiation characteristics of an x-ray FEL, including its transverse coherence, temporal characteristics, and harmonic content, are discussed. FEL performance in the presence of machine errors and undulator wakefields is examined. Various enhancement schemes through seeding and beam manipulations are summarized.

  6. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  7. Boiling the Vacuum with AN X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringwald, A.

    2004-10-01

    X-ray free electron lasers will be constructed in this decade, both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called TESLA XFEL laboratory uses techniques developed for the design of the TeV energy superconducting electron-positron linear accelerator TESLA. Such X-ray lasers may allow also for high-field science applications by exploiting the possibility to focus their beams to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. We consider here the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production) and review the prospects to verify this non-perturbative production mechanism for the first time in the laboratory.

  8. Progress in table-top transient collisional excitation x-ray lasers at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L B; Dunn, J; Li, Y; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A; Shepherd, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    1999-02-07

    We present progress in experiments for high efficiency Ne-like and Ni-like ion x-ray lasers using the transient collisional excitation scheme. Experimental results have been obtained on the COMET 15 TW table-top laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The plasma formation, ionization and collisional excitation of the x-ray laser have been optimized using two sequential laser pulses of 600 ps and 1 ps duration with an optional pre-pulse. We have observed high gains up to 55 cm{sup {minus}1} in Ne-like and Ni-like ion schemes for various atomic numbers. We report strong output for the 4d - 4p line in lower Z Ni-like ion sequence for Mo to Y, lasing from {approximately}190 {angstrom} to 240 {angstrom}, by pumping with less than 5 J energy on target.

  9. Picosecond soft-x-ray source from subpicosecond laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Liu, X.; Ellenberger, U.; Coe, J. S.; Chien, C.-Y.; Umstadter, D.

    1996-01-01

    Short-pulse high-intensity laser-plasma interactions are investigated experimentally with temporally and spectrally resolved soft-x-ray diagnostics. We demonstrate that, by adjustment of the incident laser flux, the pulse width of the laser-produced x rays emitted from solid targets may be varied to as short as the picosecond time scale. Bright, picosecond, broadband emission characteristic of a short-scale-length high-density plasma is produced only when a high laser contrast (1010) is used. The results are found to be in qualitative agreement with both the predictions of a simple model of radiation from a collisionally dominated atomic system and the results obtained from a numerical simulation. 52.40.Nk.

  10. Simulation of an X-ray laser in the transient gain-saturation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Starikov, F A; Volkov, V A; Gasparyan, P D; Roslov, V I

    2009-09-30

    By using the TRANS code, we performed three-dimensional calculations of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in X-ray lasers on the 3p-3s transition in Ne-like Ge ({lambda} = 19.6 nm) and Ti ({lambda} = 2.6 nm) operating in the transient regime upon irradiation of a flat target by a high-power picosecond laser pulse focused into a line with one or two nanosecond prepulses. The hydrodynamics and population kinetics of the active medium of X-ray lasers were calculated by using the SS-9M code. The pulse duration, the gain, the spatial structure of the laser beam and the type of influence of a 'travelling' pump wave on the ASE brightness obtained in calculations are in agreement with the experimental data. The use of the 'travelling pump wave' leads not only to the increase in the ASE brightness but also considerably reduces its angular divergence. (active media)

  11. Bright X-Ray Source from a Laser-Driven Microplasma Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Luu-Thanh, Phuc; Shen, Baifei

    2016-03-18

    Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities have become available. These pulses allow for interaction with microstructured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic prepulses. This opens a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with micro- and nanoscale photonic materials at relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that when coupled with a readily available 1.8 J laser, a microplasma waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls and form a dense helical bunch inside the channel. These electrons are efficiently accelerated and wiggled by the waveguide modes in the MPW, which results in a bright, well-collimated emission of hard x rays in the range of 1∼100  keV. PMID:27035304

  12. Bright X-Ray Source from a Laser-Driven Microplasma Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Luu-Thanh, Phuc; Shen, Baifei

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities have become available. These pulses allow for interaction with microstructured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic prepulses. This opens a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with micro- and nanoscale photonic materials at relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that when coupled with a readily available 1.8 J laser, a microplasma waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls and form a dense helical bunch inside the channel. These electrons are efficiently accelerated and wiggled by the waveguide modes in the MPW, which results in a bright, well-collimated emission of hard x rays in the range of 1 ˜100 keV .

  13. Generating intense fully coherent soft x-ray radiation based on a laser-plasma accelerator.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Xiang, Dao; Deng, Haixiao; Huang, Dazhang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-06-01

    Laser-plasma based accelerator has the potential to dramatically reduce the size and cost of future x-ray light sources to the university-laboratory scale. However, the large energy spread of the laser-plasma accelerated electron beam may hinder the way for short wavelength free-electron laser generation. In this paper, we propose a novel method for directly imprinting strong coherent micro-bunching on the electron beam with large intrinsic energy spread by using a wavefront-tilted conventional optical laser beam and a weak dipole magnet. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate that this technique can be used for the generation of fully coherent femtosecond soft x-ray radiation at gigawatts level with a very short undulator. PMID:26072855

  14. Speciation and Lability of Ag-, AgCl- and Ag2S-Nanoparticles in Soil Determined by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term speciation and lability of silver (Ag-), silver chloride (AgCl-) and silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) in soil were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and newly developed "nano" Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films (DGT) devices. These nano-D...

  15. Tentative experiment for generating low-photon-energy quasi-x-ray lasers using a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Toriyabe, Hiroyuki; Awaji, Wataru; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Ichimaru, Toshio; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-04-01

    The tentative experiment for producing low-photon-energy quasi-x-ray laser using a capillary is described. This flash x-ray generator was improved in order to increase the x-ray intensity and to produce high-intensity characteristic x-rays by forming the linear plasma x-ray source. The generator consists of a high-voltage power supply, a polarity-inversion ignitron pulse generator, a turbo-molecular pump, and a radiation tube with a capillary. A high-voltage condenser of 0.2 (mu) F in the pulse generator is charged up to 20 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the capillary in the tube after closing the ignitron. In the present work, the chamber is evacuated by the pump with a pressure of about 1 mPa, and the carbon anode and cathode electrodes are employed to produce K(alpha) characteristic x-rays. The diameter and the length of the ferrite capillary are 2.0 and 29 mm, respectively, and both the cathode voltage and the discharge current displayed damped oscillations. The peak values of the voltage and current increased when the charging voltage was increased, and their maximum values were -9.9 kV and 4.4 kA, respectively. The pulse durations of the x-rays were nearly equivalent to those of the damped oscillations in the voltage and current, and their values were less than 20 microseconds. In the spectrum measurement, we observed the carbon K(alpha) line.

  16. Adsorption height determination of nonequivalent C and O species of PTCDA on Ag(110) using x-ray standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, G.; Bauer, O.; Willenbockel, M.; Fairley, N.; Reckien, W.; Schmitz, C. H.; Fiedler, B.; Soubatch, S.; Bredow, T.; Sokolowski, M.; Tautz, F. S.

    2013-01-01

    The normal incidence x-ray standing wave (NIXSW) technique is used to determine the adsorption geometry of submonolayer 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) adsorbed on the Ag(110) surface. An accurate analysis of both C1s and O1s photoemission (PE) spectra allows the respective adsorption heights of carbon and oxygen atoms in different chemical environments within PTCDA to be distinguished. Due to the intricacy of the PE fitting models, a systematic error analysis of NIXSW structural parameters was developed and employed. Based on the adsorption geometry of PTCDA on Ag(110) a bonding mechanism is discussed.

  17. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. The technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II. PMID:23129631

  18. Key Laser Technologies for X-Ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Kaertner, Franz

    2013-08-31

    In the final project period, we demonstrated sub femtosecond timing distribution over a 1.2 km polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber-optic link using balanced optical cross-correlators (BOCs) for link stabilization. By eliminating polarization mode dispersion, link operation for 16 days maintained 0.6 fs RMS timing drift and during a 3-day interval only 0.13 fs drift, which corresponds to a stability level of 10-21. To improve the overall system efficiency and robustness, we developed fiber-coupled, hybrid-integrated BOCs using waveguides in periodically-poled KTiOPO4 (PPKTP). The measured second-harmonic conversion efficiency in the waveguides is a factor of 50 higher than that of bulk-optic crystals. Characterization of 1st-generation devices shows performance comparable to free-space BOCs, with the potential for significant improvement in future devices. For optical-to-RF conversion, we developed two balanced optical-microwave phase detectors (BOM-PD) based on the Sagnac and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF extraction using BOM-PDs in phase-locked loops yielded sub-10-fs residual timing jitter for locking bandwidths on the order of several hundred kHz. Finally, we characterized the timing jitter of ultralow-noise Ti:Sapphire oscillators, demonstrating an unprecedented 13 as of jitter integrated over the entire Nyquist band. Our measurements agreed well with theory, confirming our models for quantum-limited laser noise. Measurements of commercially available solid-state lasers at 1550 nm showed that there are laser sources already available with sufficiently low noise to achieve sub-femtosecond performance as master oscillators within a timing distribution system.

  19. X-ray generation in cryogenic targets irradiated by 1 {mu}m pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, A.; Amano, S.; Miyamoto, S.; Mochizuki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Soft x-ray spectral radiations from Xe, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2} cryogenic targets irradiated by a 1 {mu}m neodymium doped YAG-slab laser at pulse widths of 12{endash}20 ns and at laser intensities of 5{times}10{sup 10}{endash}10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} have been observed. These targets radiate soft x-rays in a wavelength range of 10{endash}13 nm which is useful for projection microlithography. We have found a strong x-ray spectral peak at {lambda}=10.8nm with a Xe cryogenic target. The measured x-ray conversion efficiency with the Xe target was 0.8{percent}/sr({lambda}=10.8{plus_minus}0.27nm) at a laser intensity of 1{times}10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}. This was ten times or more efficient than that with H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} targets. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons. PMID:27273170

  1. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Li, Y F; Li, D Z; Chen, L M; Tao, M Z; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Li, M H; Chen, M; Mirzaie, M; Hafz, N; Sokollik, T; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 10(8)/shot and 10(8 )photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3(rd) generation synchrotrons. PMID:27273170

  2. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons.

  3. High-resolution and ultrafast imaging using betatron x-rays from laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2015-11-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators now routinely produce ~GeV energy gain in ~cm plasmas. and are simultaneously capable of producing high brightness and spatially coherent hard x-ray beams. This unique light-source has been used for medical applications, and also for ultrafast imaging in high energy density science. The experiments were performed with the Astra Gemini laser producing 10 J pulses with duration ~ 40 fs focussed to produce a spot of 25 μ m (fwhm) in a gas-cell of variable length to produce a low divergence beam of x-rays. The length of the gas cell was optimised to produce high contrast x-ray images of radiographed test objects. This source was used for full tomographic imaging of a human trabecular bone sample, with resolution exceeding the ~ 100 μ m level required for CT applications. Phase-contrast imaging of human prostate and mouse neonates at the micron level was also demonstrated. These studies indicate the usefulness of these sources in research and clinical applications. The ultrafast nature of the source was also demonstrated by performing time resolved imaging of a laser driven shock. The ultrashort duration of the x-ray source essentially freeze the motion of these fast moving transient phenomena.

  4. Broad-band soft x-ray diagnostic instruments at the LLNL Novette laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tirsell, K.G.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Nilson, D.G.; Medecki, H.

    1983-09-15

    Complementary broad-band instruments have been developed to measure time dependent, absolute soft x-ray spectra at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nd glass laser irradiation facilities. Absolute flux measurements of x rays emitted from laser-produced plasmas are important for understanding laser absorption and energy transport. We will describe two new 10-channel XRD systems that have been installed at the LLNL Novette facility for use in the 0.15- to 1.5-keV range. Since XRD channel time response is limited by available oscilloscope performance to 120 ps, a soft x-ray streak camera has been developed for better time resolution (20 ps) and greater dynamic range (approx.10/sup 3/) in the same x-ray energy region. Using suitable filters, grazing incidence mirrors, and a gold or cesium-iodide transmission cathode, this streak camera instrument has been installed at Novette to provide one broad and four relatively narrow channels. It can also be used in a single channel, spatially discriminating mode by means of pinhole imaging. The complementary nature of these instruments has been enhanced by locating them in close proximity and matching their channel energy responses. As an example of the use of these instruments, we present results from Novette 2..omega..(0.53 ..mu..m) gold disk irradiations at 1 ns and 10/sup 14/ to 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  5. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C.H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes. PMID:27070998

  6. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N; Spence, John C H; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes. PMID:27070998

  7. Emerging opportunities in structural biology with X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Ilme; Miao, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FELs) produce X-ray pulses with extremely brilliant peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration. It has been proposed that radiation damage can be “outrun” by using an ultra intense and short X-FEL pulse that passes a biological sample before the onset of significant radiation damage. The concept of “diffraction-before-destruction” has been demonstrated recently at the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first operational hard X-ray FEL, for protein nanocrystals and giant virus particles. The continuous diffraction patterns from single particles allow solving the classical “phase problem” by the oversampling method with iterative algorithms. If enough data are collected from many identical copies of a (biological) particle, its three-dimensional structure can be reconstructed. We review the current status and future prospects of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) and single-particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) with X-FELs. PMID:22922042

  8. Spectrometer for hard X-ray free-electron laser based on diffraction focusing.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Gorobtsov, O Y; Vartanyants, I A

    2013-03-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short spatially coherent pulses of X-ray radiation. A diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of ΔE/E 2 × 10(-6), is proposed. This is much better than for most modern X-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single-crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from a metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. It is shown that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV. PMID:23412482

  9. Emerging opportunities in structural biology with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Ilme; Miao, Jianwei

    2012-10-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FELs) produce X-ray pulses with extremely brilliant peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration. It has been proposed that radiation damage can be 'outrun' by using an ultra intense and short X-FEL pulse that passes a biological sample before the onset of significant radiation damage. The concept of 'diffraction-before-destruction' has been demonstrated recently at the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first operational hard X-ray FEL, for protein nanocrystals and giant virus particles. The continuous diffraction patterns from single particles allow solving the classical 'phase problem' by the oversampling method with iterative algorithms. If enough data are collected from many identical copies of a (biological) particle, its three-dimensional structure can be reconstructed. We review the current status and future prospects of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) and single-particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) with X-FELs. PMID:22922042

  10. Performance of the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator with crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, R. R.; Kim, K.-J.; Shvyd'Ko, Yu.; Fawley, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include the frequency-dependent Bragg crystal reflectivity and the transverse diffraction and focusing using the two-dimensional FEL code GINGER. A review of the physics of Bragg crystal reflectors and the x-ray FEL oscillator is made, followed by a discussion of its numerical implementation in GINGER. The simulation results for a two-crystal cavity and realistic FEL parameters indicate ˜109 photons in a nearly Fourier-limited, ps pulse. Compressing the electron beam to 100 A and 100 fs results in comparable x-ray characteristics for relaxed beam emittance, energy spread, and/or undulator parameters, albeit in a larger radiation bandwidth. Finally, preliminary simulation results indicate that the four-crystal FEL cavity can be tuned in energy over a range of a few percent.

  11. Simulation of experimental investigations of X-ray spectral path lengths on Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'kov, S. A.; Sharov, O. O.

    2011-10-01

    We describe an improved Slater average-ion model employed in the numerical-theoretical analysis of experimental data, which were obtained in the investigation of X-ray spectral path lengths performed on the Iskra-5 laser facility at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). The proposed model permits determining the spectral characteristics of the X-ray radiation with an accuracy of a few electronvolts. We outline the results of simulations of experiments with X-ray radiation-heated aluminium and germanium specimens of initial thickness of ~0.1 mm, in which absorption lines arising from 1s—2p transitions in Al and the absorption band arising from 2p—3d transitions in Ge were recorded.

  12. Two-dimensional imaging detectors for structural biology with X-ray lasers

    PubMed Central

    Denes, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to harness the advances in microelectronics over the past decade(s) for X-ray detection has resulted in significant improvements in the state of the art. Biology with X-ray free-electron lasers present daunting detector challenges: all of the photons arrive at the same time, and individual high peak power pulses must be read out shot-by-shot. Direct X-ray detection in silicon pixel detectors—monolithic or hybrid—are the standard for XFELs today. For structural biology, improvements are needed for today's 10–100 Hz XFELs, and further improvements are required for tomorrow's 10+ kHz XFELs. This article will discuss detector challenges, why they arise and ways to overcome them, along with the current state of the art. PMID:24914161

  13. Simulation of experimental investigations of X-ray spectral path lengths on Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S A; Sharov, O O

    2011-10-31

    We describe an improved Slater average-ion model employed in the numerical-theoretical analysis of experimental data, which were obtained in the investigation of X-ray spectral path lengths performed on the Iskra-5 laser facility at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). The proposed model permits determining the spectral characteristics of the X-ray radiation with an accuracy of a few electronvolts. We outline the results of simulations of experiments with X-ray radiation-heated aluminium and germanium specimens of initial thickness of {approx}0.1 mm, in which absorption lines arising from 1s-2p transitions in Al and the absorption band arising from 2p-3d transitions in Ge were recorded.

  14. The Mn4Ca photosynthetic water-oxidation catalyst studied by simultaneous X-ray spectroscopy and crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Hattne, Johan; Koroidov, Sergey; Hellmich, Julia; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of photosystem II and the catalytic intermediate states of the Mn4CaO5 cluster involved in water oxidation have been studied intensively over the past several years. An understanding of the sequential chemistry of light absorption and the mechanism of water oxidation, however, requires a new approach beyond the conventional steady-state crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. In this report, we present the preliminary progress using an X-ray free-electron laser to determine simultaneously the light-induced protein dynamics via crystallography and the local chemistry that occurs at the catalytic centre using X-ray spectroscopy under functional conditions at room temperature. PMID:24914152

  15. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R. Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Gregory, Steven T.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes. PMID:23989164

  16. High-precision laser-assisted absolute determination of x-ray diffraction angles

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, K.; Braun, J.; Bruhns, H.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Mokler, P. H.; Ullrich, J.

    2012-01-15

    A novel technique for absolute wavelength determination in high-precision crystal x-ray spectroscopy recently introduced has been upgraded reaching unprecedented accuracies. The method combines visible laser beams with the Bond method, where Bragg angles ({theta} and -{theta}) are determined without any x-ray reference lines. Using flat crystals this technique makes absolute x-ray wavelength measurements feasible even at low x-ray fluxes. The upgraded spectrometer has been used in combination with first experiments on the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields} 1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} w-line in He-like argon. By resolving a minute curvature of the x-ray lines the accuracy reaches there the best ever reported value of 1.5 ppm. The result is sensitive to predicted second-order QED contributions at the level of two-electron screening and two-photon radiative diagrams and will allow for the first time to benchmark predicted binding energies for He-like ions at this level of precision.

  17. Membrane protein structural biology using X-ray free electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Neutze, Richard; Brändén, Gisela; Schertler, Gebhard F X

    2015-08-01

    Membrane protein structural biology has benefitted tremendously from access to micro-focus crystallography at synchrotron radiation sources. X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are linear accelerator driven X-ray sources that deliver a jump in peak X-ray brilliance of nine orders of magnitude and represent a disruptive technology with potential to dramatically change the field. Membrane proteins were amongst the first macromolecules to be studied with XFEL radiation and include proof-of-principle demonstrations of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), the observation that XFEL data can deliver damage free crystallographic structures, initial experiments towards recording structural information from 2D arrays of membrane proteins, and time-resolved SFX, time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering and time-resolved X-ray emission spectroscopy studies. Conversely, serial crystallography methods are now being applied using synchrotron radiation. We believe that a context dependent choice of synchrotron or XFEL radiation will accelerate progress towards novel insights in understanding membrane protein structure and dynamics. PMID:26342349

  18. X-ray laser-induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A; Putkunz, Corey T; Martin, Andrew V; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W M; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Quiney, Harry M

    2016-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration. PMID:27626076

  19. Soft x ray optics by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Felix E.

    1994-01-01

    A series of molybdenum thin film depositions by PLD (Pulsed Laser Deposition) have been carried out, seeking appropriate conditions for multilayer fabrication. Green (532 nm) and UV (355 nm) light pulses, in a wide range of fluences, were used. Relatively large fluences (in comparison with Si) are required to cause evaporation of molybdenum. The optical penetration depths and reflectivities for Mo at these two wavelengths are comparable, which means that results should be, and do appear to be similar for equal fluences. For all fluences above threshold used, a large number of incandescent particles is ejected by the target (either a standard Mo sputtering target or a Mo sheet were tried), together with the plasma plume. Most of these particles are clearly seen to bounce off the substrate. The films were observed with light microscopy using Nomarski and darkfield techniques. There is no evidence of large debris. Smooth films plus micron-sized droplets are usually seen. The concentration of these droplets embedded in the film appears not to vary strongly with the laser fluence employed. Additional characterization with SEM and XRD is under way.

  20. Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.

    1996-08-01

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

  1. Time-resolved Soft X-Ray Imaging (SXRI) diagnostic for use at the NIF and OMEGA lasers (version 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M B; Holder, J P; James, D L; Bruns, H C; Celeste, J R; Compton, S; Costa, R L; Ellis, A D; Emig, J A; Hargrove, D; Kalantar, D H; MacGowan, B J; Power, G D; Sorce, C; Rekow, V; Widmann, K; Young, B K; Young, P E; Garcia, O F; McKenney, J; Haugh, M; Goldin, F; MacNeil, L P; Cone, K

    2006-07-21

    The soft x-ray imager (SXRI) built for the first experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has four soft x-ray channels and one hard x-ray channel. The SXRI is a snout that mounts to a four strip gated imager. This produces four soft x-ray images per strip, which can be separated in time by {approx}60psec. Each soft x-ray channel consists of a mirror plus a filter. The diagnostic was used to study x-ray burnthrough of hot hohlraum targets at the NIF and OMEGA lasers. The SXRI snout design and issues involved in selecting the desired soft x-ray channels are discussed.

  2. Time-resolved Soft X-Ray Imaging (SXRI) diagnostic for use at the NIF and OMEGA lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M; Holder, J; James, D; Bruns, H; Celeste, J; Compton, S; Costa, R; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Hargrove, D; Kalantar, D; MacGowan, B; Power, G; Sorce, C; Rekow, V; Widmann, K; Young, B; Young, P; Garcia, O; McKenney, J; Haugh, M; Goldin, F; MacNeil, L; Cone, K

    2006-05-04

    The soft x-ray imager (SXRI) built for the first experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has four soft x-ray channels and one hard x-ray channel. The SXRI is a snout that mounts to a four strip gated imager. This produces four soft x-ray images per strip, which can be separated in time by {approx}60psec. Each soft x-ray channel consists of a mirror plus a filter. The diagnostic was used to study x-ray burnthrough of hot hohlraum targets at the NIF and OMEGA lasers. The SXRI snout design and issues involved in selecting the desired soft x-ray channels are discussed.

  3. Modelling of transient Ni-like silver X-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Dubau, J.; Guilbaud, O.; Klisnick, A.; Möller, C.

    2007-10-01

    We have modelled an experiment performed at the LULI facility (Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France). This experiment was devoted to the measurement of the temporal coherence of the transient Ni-like silver X-ray laser at the wavelength of 13.9 nm. In population kinetics studies of saturated lasers, it is necessary to account for the interaction between the X-ray laser electric field and the lasing ions. To this end, we have used the Maxwell-Bloch formalism in the paraxial approximation. The Zeeman sublevels ( JM) associated with the lower lasing level ( J = 1) are not identically affected by the X-ray laser field. As a result, their populations are different. However, elastic collisions between free electrons and lasing ions have the opposite effect: they tend to restore equilibrium between the sublevel populations. Therefore, elastic collision rates obtained in the distorted wave approximation have been included in the rate equations. Refraction of the X-ray beam, due to electron density gradients, is taken into account by using a ray-trace code which works as a post-processor of the hydro-code EHYBRID. We have checked that the Voigt profile is a good approximation for lasing lines in Ni-like ions. This allowed us to implement a subroutine calculating the Voigt profile in the Maxwell-Bloch code. Whilst the FWHM of the spontaneous emission profile is 12 mÅ, the amplified X-ray line shows a smaller width of ˜3 mÅ. This is known as the gain narrowing effect. We notice the saturation of the line-width for a propagation length of 2-3 mm. Comparison with experiment is discussed.

  4. Convex crystal x-ray spectrometer for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.; Heeter, R.; Emig, J.

    2004-10-01

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC.

  5. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    1997-03-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO2 laser may be used for prototype LSS demonstration. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 Å) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ˜1019photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 1022 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO2 laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact "table-top" LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  6. Enhanced output of soft X-ray lasers using double slab targets

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.C.; Nilsen, J.; Chandler, E.

    1994-06-01

    Double slab neon-like niobium soft x-ray laser experiments have been performed using the Nova laser. The two slabs have their front surfaces facing in opposite directions with either a 300 {mu}m planar separation between them. Separate laser beams irradiate each slab with an intensity on target of 1.3 {times} 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Best coupling was observed using a 300 {mu}m separation. The angular divergence of the laser is measured for single slab and double slab configurations. Comparisons to numerical models are discussed.

  7. Advanced design and modeling concepts for recombination x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D.C.; Rosen, M.D.; Shephard, R.; Staffin, R.; Nash, J.K.; Keane, C.J.

    1990-11-29

    Geometric, kinetic, and trapping issues, in short and ultrashort recombination x-ray lasers, are discussed. The design of a composite target consisting of a lasant strip on a plastic backing is described. Examples of modeling showing the effect of photon trapping and uncertainties in other physical processes on calculated gain coefficients are given. A simple and accurate expression for photon trapping in cylindrical geometry is presented. Recombination lasers that have the ground state as the lower laser state are shown to have small I{sub sat}'s and corresponding low efficiencies. Scaling laws for femtosecond laser-plasma interactions are presented. 19 refs.

  8. Interaction of high intensity laser with non-uniform clusters and enhanced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-10-15

    Laser irradiated clusters with non-uniform density variation are shown to broaden surface plasmon resonance very significantly. As the clusters get heated and expand hydro-dynamically, the Bremsstrahlung X-ray emission yield passes through a maximum in time. The maximum yield decreases with increase in non-uniformity in the electron density inside the clusters. At higher laser intensity, the nonlinearity in laser cluster interaction may arise even prior to electron heating, via the relativistic mass variation and the nonlinear restoration force on electrons. For clusters with radius less than one tenth of the laser wavelength, the restoration force nonlinearity dominates.

  9. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Castillo, Jr.; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag+ concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  10. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    González-Castillo, J R; Rodriguez, E; Jimenez-Villar, E; Rodríguez, D; Salomon-García, I; de Sá, Gilberto F; García-Fernández, T; Almeida, D B; Cesar, C L; Johnes, R; Ibarra, Juana C

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag(+) concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). PMID:26464175

  11. Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, W.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Ma, Y. Y.; Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C.; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-10-21

    The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ≤200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 10{sup 6} photons/s in the form of ∼160 as pulses in the range of 3–300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ≥5 × 10{sup 20} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed “attosecond physics.”.

  12. Soft X-Ray Laser Spectroscopy on Trapped Highly Charged Ions at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Epp, S. W.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Brenner, G.; Maeckel, V.; Mokler, P. H.; Ullrich, J.; Treusch, R.; Kuhlmann, M.; Yurkov, M. V.; Feldhaus, J.; Schneider, J. R.; Wellhoefer, M.; Martins, M.; Wurth, W.

    2007-05-04

    In a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate high-resolution resonant laser excitation in the soft x-ray region at 48.6 eV of the 2 {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} to 2 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} transition of Li-like Fe{sup 23+} ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap by using ultrabrilliant light from Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). High precision spectroscopic studies of highly charged ions at this and upcoming x-ray lasers with an expected accuracy gain up to a factor of a thousand, become possible with our technique, thus potentially yielding fundamental insights, e.g., into basic aspects of QED.

  13. Optimal main pulse angle for different preplasma conditions in transient collisionally pumped x-ray lasers.

    PubMed

    Ursescu, Daniel; Zielbauer, Bernhard; Kuehl, Thomas; Neumayer, Paul; Pert, Geoff

    2007-04-01

    The effects of the incidence angle of the main pump (MP) pulse in non-normal pumping geometry and the influence of the MP duration are investigated experimentally and theoretically for a transient collisionally pumped (TCE) x-ray laser in Ni-like Zr at 45 degrees and 72 degrees incidence angle on the target. The way they transfer to the x-ray laser output depends on the preplasma conditions, most notably on the average ionization distribution at the arrival of the MP. Moreover, contrary to previous grazing incidence pumping results, it is found that the shortest attainable MP maximizes the output. Modeling of the experimental results is performed with EHYBRID code. The results are important for scaling high repetition-rate non-normal incidence pumped lasers to sub- 10nm wavelengths. PMID:17500953

  14. Soft x-ray power diagnostic improvements at the Omega Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sorce, C.; Schein, J.; Weber, F.; Widmann, K.; Campbell, K.; Dewald, E.; Turner, R.; Landen, O.; Jacoby, K.; Torres, P.; Pellinen, D.

    2006-10-15

    Soft x-ray power diagnostics are essential for evaluating high temperature laser plasma experiments. The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, a core diagnostic for radiation flux and temperature measurements of Hohlraums, installed on the Omega Laser Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics has recently undergone a series of upgrades. Work performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the development of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Dante spectrometer enables the Omega Dante to offer a total of 18 absolutely calibrated channels in the energy range from 50 eV to 20 keV. This feature provides Dante with the capability to measure higher, NIF relevant, radiation temperatures with increased accuracy including a differentiation of higher energy radiation such as the Au M and L bands. Diagnostic monitoring using experimental data from directly driven Au spherical shots is discussed.

  15. Demonstration of a Circularly Polarized Plasma-Based Soft-X-Ray Laser.

    PubMed

    Depresseux, A; Oliva, E; Gautier, J; Tissandier, F; Lambert, G; Vodungbo, B; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Nejdl, J; Kozlova, M; Maynard, G; Kim, H T; Phuoc, K Ta; Rousse, A; Zeitoun, P; Sebban, S

    2015-08-21

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a laser-driven circularly polarized soft-x-ray laser chain. It has been achieved by seeding a 32.8 nm Kr ix plasma amplifier with a high-order harmonic beam, which has been circularly polarized using a four-reflector polarizer. Our measurements testify that the amplified radiation maintains the initial polarization of the seed pulse in good agreement with our Maxwell-Bloch modeling. The resulting fully circular soft-x-ray laser beam exhibits a Gaussian profile and yields about 10^{10} photons per shot, fulfilling the requirements for laboratory-scale photon-demanding application experiments. PMID:26340189

  16. Convex Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Laser Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M; Heeter, R; Emig, J

    2004-04-15

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC. Work supported by U. S. DoE/UC LLNL contract W-7405-ENG-48

  17. The x-ray laser as a tool for imaging plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S.B.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Moreno, J.C.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Wan, A.S.; Weber, F.

    1996-05-01

    The x-ray laser is now being used at LLNL as a tool for measuring the behaviors of hot dense plasmas. In particular, we have used the 155A yttrium laser to study transient plasmas by both radiography and moir{acute e} deflectometry. These techniques have been used to probe long scale length plasmas at electron densities exceeding 10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3}. Recent advances in multilayer technology have made it possible to directly image ion densities in directly driven thin foils to an accuracy of 1{endash}2 {mu}m. In addition, we have constructed an x-ray laser Mach-Zehnder interferometer using multilayer beam-splitters. This interferometer yields direct 2D projections of electron densities in plasmas with micron spatial resolution. In addition, this interferometer can be used to measure spectral line shapes to high accuracy. Among the subject plasmas under study are laser irradiated planar targets, gold hohlraums, and x-ray lasers themselves. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hantke, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Seibert, M Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Westphal, Daniel; Almeida, F Nunes; Odic, Dusko; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H; Larsson, Daniel S D; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Duane Loh, Ne-Te; Chapman, Henry N; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    There exists a conspicuous gap of knowledge about the organization of life at mesoscopic levels. Ultra-fast coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers can probe structures at the relevant length scales and may reach sub-nanometer resolution on micron-sized living cells. Here we show that we can introduce a beam of aerosolised cyanobacteria into the focus of the Linac Coherent Light Source and record diffraction patterns from individual living cells at very low noise levels and at high hit ratios. We obtain two-dimensional projection images directly from the diffraction patterns, and present the results as synthetic X-ray Nomarski images calculated from the complex-valued reconstructions. We further demonstrate that it is possible to record diffraction data to nanometer resolution on live cells with X-ray lasers. Extension to sub-nanometer resolution is within reach, although improvements in pulse parameters and X-ray area detectors will be necessary to unlock this potential. PMID:25669616

  19. Open data set of live cyanobacterial cells imaged using an X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hantke, Max F; DePonte, Daniel P; Seibert, M Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard A; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Bari, Sadia; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Bielecki, Johan; Westphal, Daniel; Nunes de Almeida, Francisca; Odić, Duško; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H; Larsson, Daniel S D; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Carron, Sebastian; Ferguson, Ken; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha W; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Loh, N Duane; Chapman, Henry N; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Structural studies on living cells by conventional methods are limited to low resolution because radiation damage kills cells long before the necessary dose for high resolution can be delivered. X-ray free-electron lasers circumvent this problem by outrunning key damage processes with an ultra-short and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse. Diffraction-before-destruction experiments provide high-resolution data from cells that are alive when the femtosecond X-ray pulse traverses the sample. This paper presents two data sets from micron-sized cyanobacteria obtained at the Linac Coherent Light Source, containing a total of 199,000 diffraction patterns. Utilizing this type of diffraction data will require the development of new analysis methods and algorithms for studying structure and structural variability in large populations of cells and to create abstract models. Such studies will allow us to understand living cells and populations of cells in new ways. New X-ray lasers, like the European XFEL, will produce billions of pulses per day, and could open new areas in structural sciences. PMID:27479514

  20. High-order harmonic generation enhanced by x rays from free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buth, Christian; Kohler, Markus C.; He, Feng; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Ullrich, Joachim; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2012-06-01

    We theoretically examine high-order harmonic generation (HHG), by an intense near-infrared (nir) laser, in the light of the emerging, intense x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) which have started to revolutionize x-ray science. We present two theories based on modified three-step models of HHG. Once, we combine HHG with resonant x-ray excitation of a core electron into the transient valence vacancy that is created in the course of the HHG process via tunnel ionization (first step of HHG) by the nir light. When the continuum electron is driven back to the parent ion, a recombination with the valence and the core hole may occur. Modified HHG spectra are determined and analyzed for krypton on the 3d ->4p resonance and for neon on the 1s ->2p resonance. Another time, we examine HHG where tunnel ionization by the nir light is replaced by direct x-ray ionization of a core electron. We use the boosted HHG radiation from 1s electrons of neon to predict single attosecond pulses in the kiloelectronvolt regime. For both presented schemes, we find substantial HHG yield from the recombination of the continuum electron with the core hole. Our research brings the capabilities of HHG-based sources to FELs.

  1. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  2. First set of gated x-ray imaging diagnostics for the Laser Megajoule facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosch, R.; Trosseille, C.; Caillaud, T.; Allouche, V.; Bourgade, J. L.; Briat, M.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Gontier, D.; Jadaud, J. P.; Le Breton, J. P.; Llavador, P.; Loupias, B.; Miquel, J. L.; Oudot, G.; Perez, S.; Raimbourg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Rubbelynck, C.; Stemmler, P.; Troussel, P.; Ulmer, J. L.; Wrobel, R.; Beauvais, P.; Pallet, M.; Prevot, V.

    2016-03-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility located at CEA/CESTA started to operate in the early 2014 with two quadruplets (20 kJ at 351 nm) focused on target for the first experimental campaign. We present here the first set of gated x-ray imaging (GXI) diagnostics implemented on LMJ since mid-2014. This set consists of two imaging diagnostics with spatial, temporal, and broadband spectral resolution. These diagnostics will give basic measurements, during the entire life of the facility, such as position, structure, and balance of beams, but they will also be used to characterize gas filled target implosion symmetry and timing, to study x-ray radiography and hydrodynamic instabilities. The design requires a vulnerability approach, because components will operate in a harsh environment induced by neutron fluxes, gamma rays, debris, and shrapnel. Grazing incidence x-ray microscopes are fielded as far as possible away from the target to minimize potential damage and signal noise due to these sources. These imaging diagnostics incorporate microscopes with large source-to-optic distance and large size gated microchannel plate detectors. Microscopes include optics with grazing incidence mirrors, pinholes, and refractive lenses. Spatial, temporal, and spectral performances have been measured on x-ray tubes and UV lasers at CEA-DIF and at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt BESSY II synchrotron prior to be set on LMJ. GXI-1 and GXI-2 designs, metrology, and first experiments on LMJ are presented here.

  3. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  4. Gain dynamics measurement in injection-seeded soft x-ray laser plasma amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Wang, S.; Li, L.; Oliva, E.; Thuy Le, T. T.; Ros, D.; Berrill, M.; Dunn, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Yin, L.; Luther, B.; Rocca, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    Herein we report the first measurement of the gain dynamics in a soft x-ray plasma amplifier seeded by high harmonic pulses. A sequence of two time-delayed spatially-overlapping high harmonic pulses was injected into a λ = 18.9 nm Ni-like Mo plasma amplifier to measure the regeneration of the population inversion that follows the gain depletion caused by the amplification of the first seed pulse. Collisional excitation is observed to re-establish population inversion depleted during the amplification of the seed pulse in about ~1.75 ps. The measured gain-recovery time is compared to model simulations to gain insight on the population inversion mechanisms that create the transient gain in these amplifiers. This result supports the concept of a soft x-ray laser amplification scheme based on the continuous extraction of energy from a soft x-ray plasma-based amplifier by an stretched seed pulse has the potential to generate ultra-intense fully phase-coherent soft x-ray laser pulses. Work supported by AMOS program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the US DoE, and the NSF ERC Program with equipment developed under NSF Award MRI-ARRA 09-561, and by LASERLAB3-INREX European project and SHYLAX plus CIBORG RTRA `Triangle de la Physique.'

  5. Analysis of neon soft x-ray spectra from short-pulse laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abare, A.C.; Keane, C.J.; Crane, J.K.; DaSilva, L.B.; Lee, R.W.; Perry, M.D.; Falcone, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    We report preliminary results from the analysis of streaked soft x-ray neon spectra obtained from the interaction of a picosecond Nd:glass laser with a gas jet target. In these experiments streaked spectra show prompt harmonic emission followed by longer time duration soft x-ray line emission. The majority of the line emission observed was found to originate from Li- and Be-like Ne and the major transitions in the observed spectra have been identified. Li-like emission lines were observed to decay faster in time than Be-like transitions, suggesting that recombination is taking place. Line ratios of n=4-2 and n=3-2 transitions supported the view that these lines were optically thin and thick, respectively. The time history of Li-like Ne 2p-4d and 2p-3d lines is in good agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model coupled to a time dependent collisional-radiative code. Further x-ray spectroscopic analysis is underway which is aimed at diagnosing plasma conditions and assessing the potential of this recombining neon plasma as a quasi-steady-state recombination x-ray laser medium.

  6. Open data set of live cyanobacterial cells imaged using an X-ray laser

    PubMed Central

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Hantke, Max F.; DePonte, Daniel P.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard A.; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Bari, Sadia; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Bielecki, Johan; Westphal, Daniel; Nunes de Almeida, Francisca; Odić, Duško; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H.; Larsson, Daniel S.D.; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V.; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Carron, Sebastian; Ferguson, Ken; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha W.; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Loh, N. Duane; Chapman, Henry N.; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Structural studies on living cells by conventional methods are limited to low resolution because radiation damage kills cells long before the necessary dose for high resolution can be delivered. X-ray free-electron lasers circumvent this problem by outrunning key damage processes with an ultra-short and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse. Diffraction-before-destruction experiments provide high-resolution data from cells that are alive when the femtosecond X-ray pulse traverses the sample. This paper presents two data sets from micron-sized cyanobacteria obtained at the Linac Coherent Light Source, containing a total of 199,000 diffraction patterns. Utilizing this type of diffraction data will require the development of new analysis methods and algorithms for studying structure and structural variability in large populations of cells and to create abstract models. Such studies will allow us to understand living cells and populations of cells in new ways. New X-ray lasers, like the European XFEL, will produce billions of pulses per day, and could open new areas in structural sciences. PMID:27479514

  7. First set of gated x-ray imaging diagnostics for the Laser Megajoule facility.

    PubMed

    Rosch, R; Trosseille, C; Caillaud, T; Allouche, V; Bourgade, J L; Briat, M; Brunel, P; Burillo, M; Casner, A; Depierreux, S; Gontier, D; Jadaud, J P; Le Breton, J P; Llavador, P; Loupias, B; Miquel, J L; Oudot, G; Perez, S; Raimbourg, J; Rousseau, A; Rousseaux, C; Rubbelynck, C; Stemmler, P; Troussel, P; Ulmer, J L; Wrobel, R; Beauvais, P; Pallet, M; Prevot, V

    2016-03-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility located at CEA/CESTA started to operate in the early 2014 with two quadruplets (20 kJ at 351 nm) focused on target for the first experimental campaign. We present here the first set of gated x-ray imaging (GXI) diagnostics implemented on LMJ since mid-2014. This set consists of two imaging diagnostics with spatial, temporal, and broadband spectral resolution. These diagnostics will give basic measurements, during the entire life of the facility, such as position, structure, and balance of beams, but they will also be used to characterize gas filled target implosion symmetry and timing, to study x-ray radiography and hydrodynamic instabilities. The design requires a vulnerability approach, because components will operate in a harsh environment induced by neutron fluxes, gamma rays, debris, and shrapnel. Grazing incidence x-ray microscopes are fielded as far as possible away from the target to minimize potential damage and signal noise due to these sources. These imaging diagnostics incorporate microscopes with large source-to-optic distance and large size gated microchannel plate detectors. Microscopes include optics with grazing incidence mirrors, pinholes, and refractive lenses. Spatial, temporal, and spectral performances have been measured on x-ray tubes and UV lasers at CEA-DIF and at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt BESSY II synchrotron prior to be set on LMJ. GXI-1 and GXI-2 designs, metrology, and first experiments on LMJ are presented here. PMID:27036783

  8. Efficient multi-keV x-ray generation from a high-Z target irradiated with a clean ultra-short laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Nishikino, M; Nishimura, H; Kawachi, T; Pirozhkov, A S; Sagisaka, A; Orimo, S; Ogura, K; Yogo, A; Okano, Y; Ohshima, S; Fujioka, S; Kiriyama, H; Kondo, K; Shimomura, T; Kanazawa, S

    2011-02-28

    Kα line emissions from Mo and Ag plates were experimentally studied using clean, ultrahigh-intensity femtosecond laser pulses. The absolute yields of Kα x-rays at 17 keV from Mo and 22 keV from Ag were measured as a function of the laser pulse contrast ratio and irradiation intensity. Significantly enhanced Kα yields were obtained for both Mo and Ag by employing high contrast ratios and irradiances. Conversion efficiencies of 4.28×10⁻⁵/sr for Mo and 4.84×10⁻⁵/sr for Ag, the highest values obtained to date, were demonstrated with contrast ratios in the range 10⁻¹⁰ to 10⁻¹¹. PMID:21369288

  9. Correspondence between laser coupling and x-ray flux measurements in a NIF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Divol, L.; Landen, O.; Lepape, S.; Michel, P.; Ralph, J.; Town, R. P. J.; Widmann, K.; Moore, A.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a simple model relating measurements of the hohlraum x-ray emission (DANTE) to the coupled (incident less backscattered) laser power in NIF indirect drive hohlraum experiments. The model was motivated by observing that the measured x-ray emission showed a lag in rise corresponding to a measured reduction in laser coupling due to backscatter. Two adjustable scalar parameters (a coupling efficiency and a time-scale) in the model are determined for each experiment. Comparing these parameters for different hohlraum gas-fill, ablator, pulse-length, and laser power conditions provides insight into the hohlraum behavior and performance. In some cases, the model can be inverted to estimate the backscatter loss using the measured hohlraum x-ray emission time-history and delivered laser power. We will describe the model and compare the adjustable parameters between different hohlraum platforms. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Optical control of hard X-ray polarization by electron injection in a laser wakefield accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Uschmann, Ingo; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Kämpfer, Tino; Landgraf, Björn; Jäckel, Oliver; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma particle accelerators could provide more compact sources of high-energy radiation than conventional accelerators. Moreover, because they deliver radiation in femtosecond pulses, they could improve the time resolution of X-ray absorption techniques. Here we show that we can measure and control the polarization of ultra-short, broad-band keV photon pulses emitted from a laser-plasma-based betatron source. The electron trajectories and hence the polarization of the emitted X-rays are experimentally controlled by the pulse-front tilt of the driving laser pulses. Particle-in-cell simulations show that an asymmetric plasma wave can be driven by a tilted pulse front and a non-symmetric intensity distribution of the focal spot. Both lead to a notable off-axis electron injection followed by collective electron–betatron oscillations. We expect that our method for an all-optical steering is not only useful for plasma-based X-ray sources but also has significance for future laser-based particle accelerators. PMID:24026068

  11. Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena. PMID:24394916

  12. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  13. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Wiechec, Anna; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Bartnik, Andrzej; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, Ladislav; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Application of a compact laser plasma source of soft X-rays in radiobiology studies is demonstrated. The source is based on a laser produced plasma as a result of irradiation of a double-stream gas puff target with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercially available Nd:YAG laser. The source allows irradiation of samples with soft X-ray pulses in the "water window" spectral range (wavelength: 2.3-4.4 nm; photon energy: 280-560 eV) in vacuum or a helium atmosphere at very high-dose rates and doses exceeding the kGy level. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DBS) induced in DNA plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 have been measured. The different conformations of the plasmid DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. An exponential decrease in the supercoiled form with an increase in linear and relaxed forms of the plasmids has been observed as a function of increasing photon fluence. Significant difference between SSB and DSB in case of wet and dry samples was observed that is connected with the production of free radicals in the wet sample by soft X-ray photons and subsequent affecting the plasmid DNA. Therefore, the new source was validated to be useful for radiobiology experiments.

  14. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  15. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-04-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  16. Theory of x-ray absorption by laser-dressed atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, Christian; Santra, Robin

    2007-03-15

    An ab initio theory is devised for the x-ray photoabsorption cross section of atoms in the field of a moderately intense optical laser (800 nm, 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}). The laser dresses the core-excited atomic states, which introduces a dependence of the cross section on the angle between the polarization vectors of the two linearly polarized radiation sources. We use the Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation to describe the atomic many-particle problem in conjunction with a nonrelativistic quantum-electrodynamic approach to treat the photon-electron interaction. The continuum wave functions of ejected electrons are treated with a complex absorbing potential that is derived from smooth exterior complex scaling. The solution to the two-color (x-ray plus laser) problem is discussed in terms of a direct diagonalization of the complex symmetric matrix representation of the Hamiltonian. Alternative treatments with time-independent and time-dependent non-Hermitian perturbation theories are presented that exploit the weak interaction strength between x rays and atoms. We apply the theory to study the photoabsorption cross section of krypton atoms near the K edge. A pronounced modification of the cross section is found in the presence of the optical laser.

  17. Improved energy coupling into the gain region of the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Rocca, J; Hunter, J; Shepherd, R; Booth, R; Marconi, M

    2004-10-05

    We present within this paper a series of experiments, which yield new observations to further our understanding of the transient collisional x-ray laser medium. We use the recently developed technique of picosecond x-ray laser interferometry to probe the plasma conditions in which the x-ray laser is generated and propagates. This yields two dimensional electron density maps of the plasma taken at different times relative to the peak of the 600ps plasma-forming beam. In another experimental campaign, the output of the x-ray laser plasma column is imaged with a spherical multilayer mirror onto a CCD camera to give a two-dimensional intensity map of the x-ray laser output. Near-field imaging gives insights into refraction, output intensity and spatial mode structure. Combining these images with the density maps gives an indication of the electron density at which the x-ray laser is being emitted at (yielding insights into the effect of density gradients on beam propagation). Experimental observations coupled with simulations predict that most effective coupling of laser pump energy occurs when the duration of the main heating pulse is comparable to the gain lifetime ({approx}10ps for Ni-like schemes). This can increase the output intensity by more than an order of magnitude relative to the case were the same pumping energy is delivered within a shorter heating pulse duration (< 3ps). We have also conducted an experiment in which the output of the x-ray laser was imaged onto the entrance slit of a high temporal resolution streak camera. This effectively takes a one-dimensional slice of the x-ray laser spatial profile and sweeps it in time. Under some conditions we observe rapid movement of the x-ray laser ({approx} 3 {micro}m/ps) towards the target surface.

  18. Synchronizing femtosecond laser with x-ray synchrotron operating at arbitrarily different frequencies.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wonhyuk; Lee, Sooheyong; Eom, Intae; Landahl, Eric C

    2014-12-01

    The ability to synchronize a femtosecond laser to x-ray pulses is crucial for performing ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering experiments at synchrotrons. Conventionally, the task has been achieved by locking a harmonic frequency of the laser oscillator to the storage ring master radio-frequency (RF). However, when the frequency mismatch between the two sources cannot be compensated by small adjustments to the laser cavity length, synchronization to a harmonic frequency requires modifying the optical components of the laser system. We demonstrate a novel synchronization scheme, which is a flexible alternative for synchronizing these two sources operating at arbitrarily different frequencies. First, we find the greatest common divisor (GCD) of the two frequencies that is still within the limited tuning range of the laser cavity length. The GCD is generated by dividing down from the storage ring RF, and is separately multiplied up to provide a feedback signal for synchronizing the laser cavity. Unique to our scheme, the GCD also serves as a harmonic RF source for the laser amplifier such that only laser oscillator pulses at fixed integer multiples of the storage ring RF are selected for amplification and delivery to experiments. Our method is implemented at the Photon Test Facility beamline of Pohang Light Source where timing-jitter less than 4 ps (r.m.s.) is measured using a new shot-to-shot method. PMID:25554331

  19. Synchronizing femtosecond laser with x-ray synchrotron operating at arbitrarily different frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Wonhyuk; Lee, Sooheyong; Eom, Intae; Landahl, Eric C.

    2014-12-15

    The ability to synchronize a femtosecond laser to x-ray pulses is crucial for performing ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering experiments at synchrotrons. Conventionally, the task has been achieved by locking a harmonic frequency of the laser oscillator to the storage ring master radio-frequency (RF). However, when the frequency mismatch between the two sources cannot be compensated by small adjustments to the laser cavity length, synchronization to a harmonic frequency requires modifying the optical components of the laser system. We demonstrate a novel synchronization scheme, which is a flexible alternative for synchronizing these two sources operating at arbitrarily different frequencies. First, we find the greatest common divisor (GCD) of the two frequencies that is still within the limited tuning range of the laser cavity length. The GCD is generated by dividing down from the storage ring RF, and is separately multiplied up to provide a feedback signal for synchronizing the laser cavity. Unique to our scheme, the GCD also serves as a harmonic RF source for the laser amplifier such that only laser oscillator pulses at fixed integer multiples of the storage ring RF are selected for amplification and delivery to experiments. Our method is implemented at the Photon Test Facility beamline of Pohang Light Source where timing-jitter less than 4 ps (r.m.s.) is measured using a new shot-to-shot method.

  20. Design considerations for the magnetic system of a prototype x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokurov, N.A.; Dejus, R.; Friedsam, H.; Gluskin, E.S.; Maines, J.; Milton, S.V.; Moog, E.R.; Trakhtenberg, E.M.; Vasserman, I.B.

    1997-04-01

    A number of difficult technical challenges need to be solved in the fields of accelerator and free-electron laser (FEL) technologies in order to build an X-ray FEL. One of the tasks well suited to the Advanced Photon Source Low Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) is to take the intermediate step of solving some of the problems of single-pass FEL operation in the ultraviolet range. The existing Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac, in addition to its role of supply positrons for the APS storage ring, will also be used to generate the particle beam for the LEUTL. Here, the design of the magnetic system for the high gain soft x-ray free electron laser is described.

  1. A three-dimensional ray-tracing code dedicated to x-ray laser amplification simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, M.; Jacquemot, S.; Bonnet, L.; Decoster, A.

    2001-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate the x-ray intensity produced in recent experiments where a silver target was driven by two laser beams. The code is used as a postprocessor of a detailed atomic physics code, which provides emissivities and opacities for inverted transitions. The hydrodynamics of the plasma is calculated with a 1D1/2 hydrocode where transverse profiles of temperature and density follow a self-similar solution. The 3D ray-tracing code accounts for progressive target illumination and calculates the x-ray laser output by solving the eikonal equation. Once 3D paths are determined, a steady-state transport solution is used to calculate the output intensity. The ray-tracing package is discussed first, then the present 3D results are compared with 2D calculations, as well as with collected experimental data.

  2. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Kanngießer, Birgit; Witte, Katharina; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  3. Claudio Pellegrini and the World’s First Hard X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-10-20

    President Obama welcomed SLAC's Claudio Pellegrini inside the Oval Office on Tuesday morning as a recipient of the Enrico Fermi Award, one of the highest honors the U.S. government can give to a scientist. Pellegrini, a visiting scientist and consulting professor at SLAC and distinguished professor emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles, received the award for research that aided in the development of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) including SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a DOE Office of Science User Facility that started up in 2009. Here, Pellegrini describes his efforts that contributed to the realization of SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source, the world’s first hard X-ray free-electron laser.

  4. Initial experimentation with in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kincaid, Russell; Servol, Marina; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Nesterets, Yakov; Gureyev, Tim; Stevenson, Andrew; Wilkins, Steve; Ye, Hongwei; Lipson, Edward; Toth, Remy; Pogany, Andrew; Coman, Ioana

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated experimentally and theoretically the imaging performance of our newly constructed in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging system with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source. Projection images of nylon fibers with diameters in the 10-330 μm range were obtained using an ultrafast (100 Hz, 28 fs, 40 mJ) laser-based x-ray source with Mo and Ta targets and Be filter, and Gaussian spatial-intensity distribution (FWHMS = 5 μm). A cooled CCD camera (24 μm pitch) with a Gd IIOS II screen coupled via 1:1 optical taper was used (FWHMD = 50 μm). We have investigated nylon-fiber image quality vs. imaging setup geometry and x-ray spectra. The following parameters were evaluated: contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and sampling. In addition, we performed theoretical simulation of image formation for the same objects but within a wide range of geometrical parameters. The rigorous wave-optical formalism was used for modeling of the free-space propagation of x-rays from the object plane to the detector, and the "projection approximation" was used. We found reasonable agreement between predictions of our analytical model and the experiments. We conclude that: a) Optimum magnification maximizing contrast and SNR is almost independent of the source-to-detector (R) distance and depends strongly on the diameter of the fiber. b) The corresponding maximum values of the contrast and SNR are almost linear with respect to R; the optimum magnification decreases with fiber diameter. c) The minimum diameter of fiber defines the minimum source-to-object distance R I if R is fixed and the object is moved.

  5. Low electron temperature in ablating materials formed by picosecond soft x-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Pikuz, Tatiana; Skobelev, Igor; Faenov, Anatoly; Inogamov, Nail; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru

    2015-09-01

    To study the ablation process induced by the soft x-ray laser pulse, we investigated the electron temperature of the ablating material. Focused soft x-ray laser pulses having a wavelength of 13.9 nm and duration of 7 ps were irradiated onto the LiF, Al, and Cu surfaces, and we observed the optical emission from the surfaces by use of an optical camera. On sample surfaces, we could confirm damage structures, but no emission signal in the visible spectral range during ablation could be observed. Then, we estimated the electron temperature in the ablating matter. To consider the radiation from a heated layer, we supposed a black-body radiator as an object. The calculation result was that the electron temperature was estimated to be lower than 1 eV and the process duration was shorter than 1000 ps. The theoretical model calculation suggests the spallative ablation for the interaction between the soft x-ray laser and materials. The driving force for the spallation is an increasing pressure appearing in the heated layer, and the change of the surface is considered to be due to a splash of a molten layer. The model calculation predicts that the soft x-ray laser with the fluence around the ablation threshold can create an electron temperature around 1 eV in a material. The experimental result is in good accordance with the theoretical prediction. Our investigation implies that the spallative ablation occurs in the low electron temperature region of a non-equilibrium state of warm dense matter.

  6. Data acquisition system for X-ray free-electron laser experiments at SACLA

    PubMed Central

    Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Yamaga, Mitsuhiro; Sugimoto, Takashi; Okada, Kensuke; Abe, Toshinori; Furukawa, Yukito; Ohata, Toru; Tanaka, Ryotaro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-01-01

    A data acquisition system for X-ray free-electron laser experiments at SACLA has been developed. The system has been designed for reliable shot-to-shot data storage with a high data stream greater than 4 Gbps and massive data analysis. Configuration of the system and examples of prompt data analysis during experiments are presented. Upgrade plans for the system to extend flexibility are described. PMID:25931070

  7. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.

    2015-02-15

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a{sub 0} ∼ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic “denting” of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75–200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (∼6 × 10{sup −12}) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  8. X-ray absorption lines - Signature for preheat level in non-explosive laser implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaakobi, B.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Bourke, P.; Soures, J. M.; Hooper, C. F.; Deckman, H.

    1980-08-01

    The measured X-ray spectrum from thick glass shells imploded with two TW six-beam laser pulses displayed absorption by transitions of Si ions. This indicates the existence around the time of peak compression of a cooler (less than approximately 200 eV) layer surrounding the hot innermost glass layer, of density times thickness approximately 0.0006 g/sq cm. This temperature is indicative of the preheat level ealier in the implosion.

  9. Electrochemically adsorbed Pb on Ag (111) studied with grazing- incidence x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Ross, P.N.; Melroy, O.R.; Toney, M.F.; Borges, G.L.; Samant, M.G.

    1989-04-01

    Grazing-incidence x-ray scattering studies of the evolution of electrochemically deposited layers of lead on silver (111) as a function of applied electrochemical potential are presented. Measurements were made with the adsorbed layers in contact with solution in a specially designed sample cell. The observed lead structures are a function of the applied potential and range from an incommensurate monolayer, resulting from underpotential deposition, to randomly oriented polycrystalline bulk lead, resulting from lower deposition potentials. These early experiments demonstrate the ability of in situ x-ray diffraction measurements to determine structures associated with electrochemical deposition. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Vartanyants, I.A.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; Williams, G.J.; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; Sinn, H.; Attwood, D.; Nugent, K.A.; Weckert, E.; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  11. High Repetition Rate Table-Top Soft X-Ray Lasers in Capillary Discharges and Laser-Created Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, J.J.; Luther, B.M.; Heinbuch, S.; Larotonda, M.A.; Wang, Y.; Alessi, D.; Berrill, M.; Marconi, M.C.; Menoni, C.S.; Shlyaptsev, V.N.

    2006-01-05

    We discuss very recent advances in high repetition rate soft x-ray lasers resulting from the use of two different types of hot dense plasmas: fast capillary discharges and laser-created plasmas. We have demonstrated a new high repetition rate 46.9 nm capillary discharge laser that fits onto the surface area of a small desk and that operates at a relatively low voltage, therefore not requiring a Marx generator. Laser pulses with an energy of {approx} 13 {mu}J are generated at repetition rates up to 12 Hz. About (2-3)x104 laser shots can be generated with a single capillary. This new type of portable laser is an easily accessible source of intense short wavelength laser light for applications. We also discuss the demonstration of 5 Hz repetition rate table-top soft x-ray lasers producing microwatt average powers at wavelengths ranging from 13.2 to 33 nm. The results were obtained by collisional electron excitation of Ni-like and Ne-like ions in plasmas efficiently heated with a picosecond optical laser pulse impinging at grazing incidence onto a pre-created plasma. Efficient deposition of the pump beam into the gain region allows for the excitation of soft x-ray lasers in this wavelength range with a short pulse pump energy of only 1 J.

  12. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-11-15

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of {sup 93}Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in {sup 57}Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  13. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of 93Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in 57Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  14. Generation of intense attosecond x-ray pulses using ultraviolet laser induced microbunching in electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, D.; Huang, Z.; Stupakov, G.

    2009-06-01

    We propose a scheme that combines the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique with the bunch compression and allows one to generate harmonic numbers of a few hundred in a microbunched beam through up-conversion of the frequency of an ultraviolet seed laser. A few-cycle intense laser is used to generate the required energy chirp in the beam for bunch compression and for selection of an attosecond x-ray pulse. Sending this beam through a short undulator results in an intense isolated attosecond x-ray pulse. Using a representative realistic set of parameters, we show that 1 nm x-ray pulse with peak power of a few hundred MW and duration as short as 20 attoseconds (FWHM) can be generated from a 200 nm ultraviolet seed laser. The proposed scheme may enable the study of electronic dynamics with a resolution beyond the atomic unit of time (˜24 attoseconds) and may open a new regime of ultrafast sciences.

  15. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; et al

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense lasermore » probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.« less

  16. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.; Dalton, D. Allen

    2010-11-03

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2–10 kHz repetition rate, 1064–1075 nm fiber laser with 1–100 μs pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10,000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 μm thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  17. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.; Dalton, D. Allen

    2010-11-19

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 {micro}s pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10,000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 {micro}m thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  18. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Dalton, D. Allen; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.

    2010-11-15

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 {mu}s pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10 000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 {mu}m thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  19. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Pinegin, A V; Suslov, N A

    2012-01-31

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 - 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s - 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p - 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  20. Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, David

    2009-01-01

    2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

  1. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 80TH ANNIVERSARY OF ACADEMICIAN N G BASOV'S BIRTH: Reminiscing about the early years of the X-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    To put the development of the X-ray laser in historic context, this paper presents some of the motivation and history of the development of the X-ray laser from the perspective of a scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where the first X-ray laser was demonstrated in the early 1980s using a nuclear device as the driver.

  2. A laser driven pulsed X-ray backscatter technique for enhanced penetrative imaging.

    PubMed

    Deas, R M; Wilson, L A; Rusby, D; Alejo, A; Allott, R; Black, P P; Black, S E; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C M; Bryant, J; Clarke, R J; Collier, J C; Edwards, B; Foster, P; Greenhalgh, J; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Kar, S; Lockley, D; Moss, R M; Najmudin, Z; Pattathil, R; Symes, D; Whittle, M D; Wood, J C; McKenna, P; Neely, D

    2015-01-01

    X-ray backscatter imaging can be used for a wide range of imaging applications, in particular for industrial inspection and portal security. Currently, the application of this imaging technique to the detection of landmines is limited due to the surrounding sand or soil strongly attenuating the 10s to 100s of keV X-rays required for backscatter imaging. Here, we introduce a new approach involving a 140 MeV short-pulse (< 100 fs) electron beam generated by laser wakefield acceleration to probe the sample, which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays within the sample enabling greater depths to be imaged. A variety of detector and scintillator configurations are examined, with the best time response seen from an absorptive coated BaF2 scintillator with a bandpass filter to remove the slow scintillation emission components. An X-ray backscatter image of an array of different density and atomic number items is demonstrated. The use of a compact laser wakefield accelerator to generate the electron source, combined with the rapid development of more compact, efficient and higher repetition rate high power laser systems will make this system feasible for applications in the field. Content includes material subject to Dstl (c) Crown copyright (2014). Licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@ nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk. PMID:26756414

  3. Time-Domain X-ray Diffraction in the Pulsed Laser Heated Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapenka, V.; Goncharov, A. F.; Struzhkin, V.; Kantor, I.; Rivers, M. L.; Dalton, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) at pressure up to 100 GPa and 3500 K. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 microseconds pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time resolved radiometric temperature measurements. For the special APS hybrid mode, the measurements were also synchronized with a 500 ns long bunch carrying 88% of the ring current. This setup enables time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a micrometers time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10,000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration samples 4 micrometers thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformity as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. We will show examples of studies of the melting, thermal equation of state, and chemical reactivity. We acknowledge support from NSF EAR-0842057, DOE/ NNSA (CDAC), and EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DESC0001057. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed at GSECARS (APS) supported by DOE Contract No.W-31-109- Eng-38.

  4. Structure analysis of the Ag (001) surface at 25 K by synchrotron x-ray crystal truncation rod scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, O.; Shimada, Y.; Walker, C.J.; Yi, M.-S.; Imai, Y.

    2004-05-12

    We have commissioned an ultra-high vacuum chamber for surface structure determination at an undulator beamline BL13XU, SPring-8. As a test experiment, a structure of a Ag (001) surface at a temperature of 25 K has been studied by analyzing x-ray scattering intensities along several surface crystal truncation rods (CTR). Results of least-squares fits to the CTR data show that the top atomic layer was shifted inwards by 0.0011 nm {+-} 0.0003 nm relative to the bulk position.

  5. Measurements of the LCLS Laser Heater and its impact on the x-ray FEL Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Stupakov, G.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Xiang, D.

    2009-12-17

    The very bright electron beam required for an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is susceptible to a microbunching instability in the magnetic bunch compressors, prior to the FEL undulator. The uncorrelated electron energy spread in the LCLS can be increased by an order of magnitude to provide strong Landau damping against the instability without degrading the FEL performance. To this end, a 'laser-heater' system has been installed in the LCLS injector, which modulates the energy of a 135-MeV electron bunch with an IR laser beam in a short undulator, enclosed within a four-dipole chicane. In this paper, we report detailed measurements of laser heater-induced energy spread, including the unexpected self-heating phenomenon when the laser energy is very low. We discuss the suppression of the microbunching instability with the laser heater and its impact on the x-ray FEL performance. We also present the analysis of these experimental results and develop a three-dimensional longitudinal space charge model to explain the self-heating effect.

  6. A bright attosecond x-ray pulse train generation in a double-laser-driven cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Luo, Wen; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the generation of a high-brightness attosecond x-ray pulse train in a double-laser-driven cone target. The scheme makes use of two lasers: the first high-intensity laser with a laser peak intensity 1.37 × 1020 W/cm2 irradiates the cone and produces overdense attosecond electron bunches; the second counterpropagating weakly relativistic laser with a laser peak intensity 4.932 × 1017 W/cm2 interacts with the produced electron bunches and a bright x-ray pulse train is generated by Thomson backscattering of the second laser off the attosecond electron bunches. It is shown that the photon flux rises by 5 times using the cone target as compared with a normal channel. Meanwhile, the x-ray peak brightness increases significantly from 1.4 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV) to 6.0 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV), which is much higher than that of the Thomson x-ray source generated from traditional accelerators. We also discuss the influence of the laser and target parameters on the x-ray pulse properties. This compact bright x-ray source may have diverse applications, e.g., the study of electric dynamics and harmonics emission in the atomic scale.

  7. Coherent X-ray and laser spectroscopy measurements of diffusion in concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunaratne, V. N. C.

    The mammalian eye lens is composed of a concentrated solution of water soluble proteins called crystallins. Alpha-crystallin, the most abundant protein found in the lens, plays a crucial role in maintaining lens transparency and lens accommodation. However, alpha-crystallins along with other ocular proteins suffer from irreversible processes such as oxidation. One cause of oxidation is radiation-induced radical formation which alters the inter-molecular interactions, thereby degrading the normal function of ocular proteins. The main goal of this thesis is to quantify molecular scale dynamics of concentrated solutions of alpha-crystallins using coherent X-rays and visible laser light. I believe a detailed analysis of the dynamics pertaining to alpha-crystallin will provide the foundation to understand molecular scale mechanisms that lead to conditions like cataract and presbyopia. I explore the dynamics of concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions by measuring diffusive motion over a range of length scales using Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). To a certain extent, the dynamical properties of crystallins obtained in this manner are consistent with established theories in colloidal physics. However, there are some deviations, which I will address in this thesis. In terms of X-ray data, I employed a new, efficient photon correlation technique to obtain the best possible signal, furthermore this technique is embedded in a stand-alone software program that has the ability to provide real time results, quickly and efficiently with the help of high performance computing resources available at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The technique has potential to be used by the coherent X-ray spectroscopy community in the future. In addition, by using X-ray scattering data, I probe potential modifications and or damage effects on alpha-crystallins due to radiation exposure. The damage analysis methodology described in this thesis

  8. Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers

    DOEpatents

    Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2013-06-11

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

  9. Gain dynamics in quickly ionized plasma for seeded operated soft x-ray lasers.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, O; Cojocaru, G V; Li, L; Delmas, O; Ungureanu, R G; Banici, R A; Kazamias, S; Cassou, K; Neveu, O; Demailly, J; Baynard, E; Pittman, M; Le Marec, A; Klisnick, A; Zeitoun, Ph; Ursescu, D; Ros, D

    2015-10-15

    Harmonic seeded operation of a neon-like titanium plasma-based soft x-ray laser is described. The plasma amplifier is pumped with a variation of the grazing incidence technique involving a fast and localized ionization step. We discuss its effect on gain dynamics by measuring the amplifying factor as a function of the delay between pump pulse and harmonic seed. Two different regimes are pointed out, following the pumping scheme used. For one of them, a delay in the gain generation compared with the pumping laser pulse is observed. PMID:26469617

  10. Cautionary note concerning the CuSO4 X-ray laser. [alternative to lasing action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Mark, H.

    1973-01-01

    For the so far unconfirmed lasing action claimed by Kepros et al. (1972) to have been obtained by focusing a 1.06-micron radiation of a q-switched Nd(3+) glass laser to a small cylindrical volume inside a CuSO4-doped gelatin medium supported between two glass plates, an alternate explanation is proposed that does not depend on the assumption of laser action in copper. The proposed explanation shows how collimated X-ray beams might be created under the experimental conditions described by Kepros et al.

  11. X-ray laser studies using plasmas created by optical field ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Krushelnick, K.M.; Tighe, W.; Suckewer, S.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray laser experiments involving the creation of fast recombining plasmas by optical field ionization of preformed targets were conducted. A nonlinear increase in the intensity of the 13.5nm Lyman-{alpha} line in Li III with the length of the target plasma was observed but only for distances less than the laser confocal parameter and for low plasma electron temperatures. Multiphoton pumping of resonant atomic transitions was also examined and the process of multiphoton ionization of FIII was found to be more probable than multiphoton excitation.

  12. Development of a laser scanner for medical x rays using phosphor plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givati, Zaki

    1997-07-01

    The use of filmless laser scanner (FLS) for medical imaging can provide many benefits including improved diagnostic quality, better user interface and time and operating cost efficiency. From the beginning radiography has depended on silver-halide film for recording and displaying images. The use of phosphor as x-ray to light converter has intrigued scientists and engineers for many years and phosphors are used in many forms in a variety of applications. The acceptance of digital imaging in the medical field has triggered an increased interest in an improved and new imaging sensors for x-ray which generated new products. Phosphor plates and CCD are among the most popular sensors currently used commercially. This development is based on the use of phosphor plate which have been found to be far superior in performance and cost-effectiveness than competitive media. The laser scanner is integrated with a computerized workstation which provides image control, display and analysis as well as archiving and communication of x-ray images for the dental industry.

  13. Single-particle structure determination by X-ray free-electron lasers: Possibilities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinizadeh, A.; Dashti, A.; Schwander, P.; Fung, R.; Ourmazd, A.

    2015-01-01

    Single-particle structure recovery without crystals or radiation damage is a revolutionary possibility offered by X-ray free-electron lasers, but it involves formidable experimental and data-analytical challenges. Many of these difficulties were encountered during the development of cryogenic electron microscopy of biological systems. Electron microscopy of biological entities has now reached a spatial resolution of about 0.3 nm, with a rapidly emerging capability to map discrete and continuous conformational changes and the energy landscapes of biomolecular machines. Nonetheless, single-particle imaging by X-ray free-electron lasers remains important for a range of applications, including the study of large “electron-opaque” objects and time-resolved examination of key biological processes at physiological temperatures. After summarizing the state of the art in the study of structure and conformations by cryogenic electron microscopy, we identify the primary opportunities and challenges facing X-ray-based single-particle approaches, and possible means for circumventing them. PMID:26798800

  14. Investigation of self-filtering unstable resonator for soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani-Moghadam, G.; Farahbod, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, it is proposed that the self-filtering unstable resonator (SFUR) is suitable for soft x-ray lasers which have active medium with a short-gain-lifetime. In order to evaluate the idea, we have analyzed the self-filtering unstable resonator in two dimensions with Ne-like Fe soft x-ray active medium for transitions 2p5 3 p → 2p5 3 s and 3d9 4 d → 3d9 4 p at 25.5 nm. The role of field-limiting aperture in mode propagation has been shown. Moreover, beam quality factor M2 has been calculated and output mode behavior studied and compared with a plane-parallel (PP) resonator of equal length. The calculations indicate that the M2 factor in SFUR resonator is smaller than PP resonator and therefore output beam divergence is lower and the mode quality is much better. It is expected that a high quality beam of soft x-ray laser with brightness of the order 1013 W / cm2 sr and energy more than 10 nJ may be achievable with a properly designed diffraction-filtered unstable resonator.

  15. Sequential single shot X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the SACLA free electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; et al

    2015-11-27

    In this study, hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shotmore » based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.« less

  16. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates

    PubMed Central

    David, C.; Gorelick, S.; Rutishauser, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Guzenko, V. A.; Bunk, O.; Färm, E.; Ritala, M.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Barrett, R.; Samoylova, L.; Grünert, J.; Sinn, H.

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×1017 W/cm2 was obtained at 70 fs pulse length. PMID:22355576

  17. Testing Talbot-Lau X-Ray Moiré Fringe Deflectometry with a Laser Backlighter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Valdivia, M. P.; Finkenthal, M.; Regan, S. P.; Stoeckl, C.; Stoeckl, B.

    2014-10-01

    Moiré fringe deflectometry is a simple and robust density diagnostic method, based on light refraction caused by electron density gradients. The Talbot-Lau (TL) grating interferometer could make it possible to apply this method for density diagnostics in high-energy-density plasmas using hard x rays from conventional backlighters. When compared to conventional radiography, the TL interferometer offers more sensitivity to refraction and is therefore less dependent on modeling. We adapted the TL interferometer to the high-energy-density-physics requirements by extending its operation to high magnification, 8 to 17 keV x-ray energy, and single-shot phase retrieval. The next step of development is to test its operation close to a high power laser backlighter. We designed an experiment on the Multi-Terawatt laser aimed at studying grating survival as a function of distance from the backlighter as well as demonstrating Moiré fringe production with 8-keV x rays. The possibility of directly using a microperiodic backlighter instead of a ``source'' grating is also discussed. Work supported by DoE Awards DE-NA0001B35 and DE-NA0001944.

  18. Hard x-ray production from high intensity laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sefcik, J. A., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    Intense laser (> 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and cost advantage for multiple axis views and have the potential for much higher spatial and temporal resolution than is achievable with accelerator sources We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for radiography applications Absolutely calibrated spectra extending to 20 MeV and high resolution radiographs through a {rho}r{>=}150 gm/cm{sup 2} have been obtained The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide the dose levels necessary for radiography applications will be discussed Diagnostics of the laser produced electrons and photons will be addressed

  19. An ultracompact X-ray source based on a laser-plasma undulator.

    PubMed

    Andriyash, I A; Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A; Thaury, C; Rax, J-M; Krushelnick, K; Malka, V

    2014-01-01

    The capability of plasmas to sustain ultrahigh electric fields has attracted considerable interest over the last decades and has given rise to laser-plasma engineering. Today, plasmas are commonly used for accelerating and collimating relativistic electrons, or to manipulate intense laser pulses. Here we propose an ultracompact plasma undulator that combines plasma technology and nanoengineering. When coupled with a laser-plasma accelerator, this undulator constitutes a millimetre-sized synchrotron radiation source of X-rays. The undulator consists of an array of nanowires, which are ionized by the laser pulse exiting from the accelerator. The strong charge-separation field, arising around the wires, efficiently wiggles the laser-accelerated electrons. We demonstrate that this system can produce bright, collimated and tunable beams of photons with 10-100 keV energies. This concept opens a path towards a new generation of compact synchrotron sources based on nanostructured plasmas. PMID:25145401

  20. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Chapman, Henry N.; Marchesini, Stefano; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry Rohner, Urs; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Bajt, Sasa; Woods, Bruce; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  1. An ultracompact X-ray source based on a laser-plasma undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyash, I. A.; Lehe, R.; Lifschitz, A.; Thaury, C.; Rax, J.-M.; Krushelnick, K.; Malka, V.

    2014-08-01

    The capability of plasmas to sustain ultrahigh electric fields has attracted considerable interest over the last decades and has given rise to laser-plasma engineering. Today, plasmas are commonly used for accelerating and collimating relativistic electrons, or to manipulate intense laser pulses. Here we propose an ultracompact plasma undulator that combines plasma technology and nanoengineering. When coupled with a laser-plasma accelerator, this undulator constitutes a millimetre-sized synchrotron radiation source of X-rays. The undulator consists of an array of nanowires, which are ionized by the laser pulse exiting from the accelerator. The strong charge-separation field, arising around the wires, efficiently wiggles the laser-accelerated electrons. We demonstrate that this system can produce bright, collimated and tunable beams of photons with 10-100 keV energies. This concept opens a path towards a new generation of compact synchrotron sources based on nanostructured plasmas.

  2. Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-04-26

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Just two years after turning on in 2009, breakthrough science is emerging from the LCLS at a rapid pace. A recent experiment used the X-rays to create and probe a 2-million-degree piece of matter in a controlled way for the first time-a significant leap toward understanding the extreme conditions found in the hearts of stars and giant planets, and a finding which could further guide research into nuclear fusion, the mechanism that powers the sun. Upcoming experiments will investigate the fundamental, atomic-scale processes behind such phenomena as superconductivity and magnetism, as well as peering into the molecular workings of photosynthesis in plants.

  3. Few-cycle pulse generation in an x-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Dunning, D J; McNeil, B W J; Thompson, N R

    2013-03-01

    A method is proposed to generate trains of few-cycle x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier via a compact "afterburner" extension consisting of several few-period undulator sections separated by electron chicane delays. Simulations show that in the hard x ray (wavelength ~0.1 nm; photon energy ~10 keV) and with peak powers approaching normal FEL saturation (GW) levels, root mean square pulse durations of 700 zs may be obtained. This is approximately two orders of magnitude shorter than that possible for normal FEL amplifier operation. The spectrum is discretely multichromatic with a bandwidth envelope increased by approximately 2 orders of magnitude over unseeded FEL amplifier operation. Such a source would significantly enhance research opportunity in atomic dynamics and push capability toward nuclear dynamics. PMID:23521266

  4. Compression of X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulses to Attosecond Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, James D.; Nathvani, Ricky; Oleśkiewicz, Piotr; Ceurvorst, Luke A.; Ratan, Naren; Kasim, Muhammad F.; Trines, Raoul M. G. M.; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter A.

    2015-11-01

    State of the art X-ray Free Electron Laser facilities currently provide the brightest X-ray pulses available, typically with mJ energy and several hundred femtosecond duration. Here we present one- and two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, utilising the process of stimulated Raman amplification, showing that these pulses are compressed to a temporally coherent, sub-femtosecond pulse at 8% efficiency. Pulses of this type may pave the way for routine time resolution of electrons in nm size potentials. Furthermore, evidence is presented that significant Landau damping and wave-breaking may be beneficial in distorting the rear of the interaction and further reducing the final pulse duration.

  5. Undulator beamline optimization with integrated chicanes for X-ray free-electron-laser facilities.

    PubMed

    Prat, Eduard; Calvi, Marco; Ganter, Romain; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    An optimization of the undulator layout of X-ray free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities based on placing small chicanes between the undulator modules is presented. The installation of magnetic chicanes offers the following benefits with respect to state-of-the-art FEL facilities: reduction of the required undulator length to achieve FEL saturation, improvement of the longitudinal coherence of the FEL pulses, and the ability to produce shorter FEL pulses with higher power levels. Numerical simulations performed for the soft X-ray beamline of the SwissFEL facility show that optimizing the advantages of the layout requires shorter undulator modules than the standard ones. This proposal allows a very compact undulator beamline that produces fully coherent FEL pulses and it makes possible new kinds of experiments that require very short and high-power FEL pulses. PMID:27359133

  6. Generation of subterawatt-attosecond pulses in a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Senlin; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Marcus, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate attosecond soft x rays in a self-seeded free-electron laser (FEL) suitable for enabling attosecond spectroscopic investigations. A time-energy chirped electron bunch with additional sinusoidal energy modulation is adopted to produce a short seed pulse through a self-seeding monochromator. This short seed pulse, together with high electron current spikes and a cascaded delay setup, enables a high-efficiency FEL with a fresh bunch scheme. Simulations show that using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) parameters, soft x-ray pulses with a FWHM of 260 attoseconds and a peak power of 0.5 TW can be obtained. This scheme also has the feature of providing a stable central wavelength determined by the self-seeding monochromator.

  7. Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action

    ScienceCinema

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2014-05-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Just two years after turning on in 2009, breakthrough science is emerging from the LCLS at a rapid pace. A recent experiment used the X-rays to create and probe a 2-million-degree piece of matter in a controlled way for the first time-a significant leap toward understanding the extreme conditions found in the hearts of stars and giant planets, and a finding which could further guide research into nuclear fusion, the mechanism that powers the sun. Upcoming experiments will investigate the fundamental, atomic-scale processes behind such phenomena as superconductivity and magnetism, as well as peering into the molecular workings of photosynthesis in plants.

  8. Single-shot measurements of plasmons in compressed diamond with an x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E. J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; Galtier, E.; Gauthier, M.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Zastrau, U.; MacDonald, M. J.; Vorberger, J.; Gericke, D. O.

    2015-05-15

    Strong plasmon resonances characteristics of electron density fluctuations have recently been observed in dynamically compressed diamond for the first time at the Linac Coherent Light Source. These experiments observe the forward scattering spectra from 8 keV x-ray pulses at record peak brightness to probe laser-compressed diamond foils at the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument. We demonstrate single-shot measurements of the x-ray scattering spectrum, which are sensitive to the temperatures and densities of the compressed samples. The inferred values from the inelastic scattering are compared to simulations, finding good agreement with the temperature and demonstrating the need to include solid state effects in the modeling of the plasmon oscillation.

  9. Few-Cycle Pulse Generation in an X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, D. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Thompson, N. R.

    2013-03-01

    A method is proposed to generate trains of few-cycle x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier via a compact “afterburner” extension consisting of several few-period undulator sections separated by electron chicane delays. Simulations show that in the hard x ray (wavelength ˜0.1nm; photon energy ˜10keV) and with peak powers approaching normal FEL saturation (GW) levels, root mean square pulse durations of 700 zs may be obtained. This is approximately two orders of magnitude shorter than that possible for normal FEL amplifier operation. The spectrum is discretely multichromatic with a bandwidth envelope increased by approximately 2 orders of magnitude over unseeded FEL amplifier operation. Such a source would significantly enhance research opportunity in atomic dynamics and push capability toward nuclear dynamics.

  10. Simulation Studies of the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, R. R.; Shyd'ko, Y.; Kim, K.-J; Fawley, W. M.

    2009-08-14

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include transverse effects and realistic Bragg crystal properties with the two-dimensional code GINGER. In the present cases considered the radiation divergence is much narrower than the crystal acceptance, and the numerical algorithm can be simplified by ignoring the finite angular bandwidth of the crystal. In this regime GINGER shows that the saturated x-ray pulses have 109 photons and are nearly Fourier-limited with peak powers in excess of 1 MW. Wealso include preliminary results for a four-mirror cavity that can be tuned in wavelength over a few percent, with future plans to incorporate the full transverse response of the Bragg crystals into GINGER to more accurately model this tunable source.

  11. Compression of X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulses to Attosecond Duration.

    PubMed

    Sadler, James D; Nathvani, Ricky; Oleśkiewicz, Piotr; Ceurvorst, Luke A; Ratan, Naren; Kasim, Muhammad F; Trines, Raoul M G M; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    State of the art X-ray Free Electron Laser facilities currently provide the brightest X-ray pulses available, typically with mJ energy and several hundred femtosecond duration. Here we present one- and two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, utilising the process of stimulated Raman amplification, showing that these pulses are compressed to a temporally coherent, sub-femtosecond pulse at 8% efficiency. Pulses of this type may pave the way for routine time resolution of electrons in nm size potentials. Furthermore, evidence is presented that significant Landau damping and wave-breaking may be beneficial in distorting the rear of the interaction and further reducing the final pulse duration. PMID:26568520

  12. A single-shot transmissive spectrometer for hard x-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Diling; Cammarata, Marco; Feldkamp, Jan M.; Fritz, David M.; Hastings, Jerome B.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Robert, Aymeric; Turner, James L.; Feng Yiping

    2012-07-16

    We report hard x-ray single-shot spectral measurements of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The spectrometer is based on a 10 {mu}m thick cylindrically bent Si single crystal operating in the symmetric Bragg geometry to provide dispersion and high transmission simultaneously. It covers a spectral range >1% using the Si(111) reflection. Using the Si(333) reflection, it reaches a resolving power of better than 42 000 and transmits >83% of the incident flux at 8.3 keV. The high resolution enabled the observation of individual spectral spikes characteristic of a self-amplified spontaneous emission x-ray free electron laser source. Potential applications of the device are discussed.

  13. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cupane, Antonio; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light-induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations with a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale. PMID:25832715

  14. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; KAIST, Daejeon; Cupane, Antonio; et al

    2015-04-02

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations withmore » a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale.« less

  15. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; KAIST, Daejeon; Cupane, Antonio; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-04-02

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations with a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale.

  16. Compression of X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulses to Attosecond Duration

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, James D.; Nathvani, Ricky; Oleśkiewicz, Piotr; Ceurvorst, Luke A.; Ratan, Naren; Kasim, Muhammad F.; Trines, Raoul M. G. M.; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    State of the art X-ray Free Electron Laser facilities currently provide the brightest X-ray pulses available, typically with mJ energy and several hundred femtosecond duration. Here we present one- and two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, utilising the process of stimulated Raman amplification, showing that these pulses are compressed to a temporally coherent, sub-femtosecond pulse at 8% efficiency. Pulses of this type may pave the way for routine time resolution of electrons in nm size potentials. Furthermore, evidence is presented that significant Landau damping and wave-breaking may be beneficial in distorting the rear of the interaction and further reducing the final pulse duration. PMID:26568520

  17. Sensing the wavefront of x-ray free-electron lasers using aerosol spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, N.Duane; Starodub, Dimitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y.; Martin, Andrew V.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz

    2014-04-22

    Characterizing intense, focused x-ray free electron laser (FEL) pulses is crucial for their use in diffractive imaging. We describe how the distribution of average phase tilts and intensities on hard x-ray pulses with peak intensities of 10 21 W/m2 can be retrieved from an ensemble of diffraction patterns produced by 70 nm-radius polystyrene spheres, in a manner that mimics wave-front sensors. Besides showing that an adaptive geometric correction may be necessary for diffraction data from randomly injected sample sources, the paper demonstrates the possibility of collecting statistics on structured pulses using only the diffraction patterns they generate and highlights the imperative to study its impact on single-particle diffractive imaging.

  18. Performance Optimization of a High-Repetition-Rate KrF Laser Plasma X-Ray Source for Microlithography.

    PubMed

    Bukerk, F; Louis, E; Turcu, E C; Tallents, G J; Batani, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to develop a high-intensity laser plasma x-ray source appropriate for industrial application of x-ray lithography, experiments have been carried out using a high-repetition-rate (up to 40 Hz) excimer laser (249 nm, 300 mJ) with a power density of 2 × 1013 W/ cm2 in the laser focus. In this study emphasis is given to remedying specific problems inherent in operating the laser plasma x-ray source at high repetition rates and in its prolonged operation. Two different methods of minimizing the production of target debris are investigated. First, the use of helium as a quenching gas results in a reduction of the amount of atomic debris particles by more than two orders of magnitude with negligible x-ray absorption. Second, a tape target as opposed to a solid target reduces the production of larger debris particles by a further factor of 100. Remaining debris is stopped by an aluminized plastic or beryllium filter used to avoid exposure of the resist by plasma ultraviolet radiation. The x-ray source has been used to image x-ray transmission mask structures down to 0.3 μm onto general purpose x-ray photo-resist. Results have been analyzed with SEM. The x-ray emission spectrum of the repetitive laser plasmas created from an iron target has been recorded and the conversion efficiency of the laser light into x-rays that contribute to exposure of the resist was measured to be 0.3% over 2π sr. PMID:21307442

  19. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Dense, Shock Compressed, Laser Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The central theme of this work involves the diagnosis of shock compressed highly correlated laser plasmas, by observation of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) in the absorption spectrum. Measurements have been made using a plane crystal mini-spectrometer and a spectrometer purpose built for EXAFS measurement which employed an elliptically curved x-ray dispersing crystal. Chapter 1 serves as a very brief introduction to the plasma state, and describes how the strongly coupled plasmas which are of interest to this work are created, through laser interaction, and theoretically modelled. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 concern the development and the testing of the elliptical spectrometer. Chapter 2 introduces the theoretical models and concepts which have been developed to predict the behaviour of the spectrometer, and demonstrates how these predictions have influenced the spectrometer design. Chapter 3 charts the development of the EXAFS spectrometer from the early plane crystal geometry to the successful elliptical crystal arrangement. Also described is the process by which the x-ray dispersing crystals are bent to the correct elliptical contour. Chapter 4 describes the testing of the elliptical spectrometer prior to EXAFS measurement, in order to assess the viability of the spectrometer alignment procedure and the general viability of the spectrometer as a diagnostic device. Chapter 5 is concerned with the experimental details of the plasma EXAFS studies. The use of both planar and elliptical crystal spectrometers, in the VULCAN glass laser environment is described. Chapter 6 is concerned with the analysis of the experimental results. The models by which the density, temperature and ion correlation are calculated are introduced, and applied to EXAFS measurements from both spectrometers. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form and discussed at length. Chapter 7

  20. Novel x-ray imaging methods at the Nova laser facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.; DaSilva, L.B.; London, R.A.; Trebes, J.E.; Lerche, R.A. ); Bradley, D.K. )

    1995-01-01

    We are pursuing several novel x-ray imaging schemes to measure plasma parameters in inertial-confinement fusion experiments. This paper will concentrate principally on two quite successful approaches, the soft x-ray moire deflectometer, and the annular (ring) coded-aperture microscope. The first scheme uses moire deflectometry to measure the electron density within a plasma. When a beam of collimated light travels through a plasma, it is refracted by electron-density gradients. Moire deflectometry is a scheme to measure the refraction, and thus provides a diagnostic of the line-integrated electron-density spatial profile. To use deflectometry with a high-density laser-produced plasma, we produced a probe beam with a soft x-ray laser ([lambda]=15.5 nm). The short wavelength of the probe radiation allows us to measure the spatial profiles at densities up to critical in long scale-length ([gt]1 mm) plasmas. We use finely made one-dimensional rulings (10-[mu]m pitch), a set of synthetic multilayer mirror optics, and a soft-x-ray sensitive CCD camera to achieve a spatial resolution of 6 [mu]m. In the second scheme, a ring coded-aperture microscope (RAM) provides a large improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over pinhole imaging when the source size is much less than the major diameter of the annular aperture. It is therefore very useful to image the cores of imploded laser-fusion capsules. We have obtained very high-quality (SNR[approx]100) time-integrated images of indirectly driven targets. By coupling ring apertures with x-ray framing cameras, we have also obtained high-quality (SNR[approx]50) time-resolved images of directly driven capsule cores. These images can be used to observe the symmetry of the drive and the hydrodynamics of the implosion. Recently, we also obtained high-quality images of short-pulse laser (0.6 ps) irradiations of Ta targets. The spatial resolution of the RAM has been investigated both experimentally and through diffraction calculations.

  1. Towards possible opportunities in nuclear materials science and technology at an X-ray free electron laser research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froideval, A.; Badillo, A.; Bertsch, J.; Churakov, S.; Dähn, R.; Degueldre, C.; Lind, T.; Paladino, D.; Patterson, B. D.

    2011-09-01

    Spectroscopy and imaging of condensed matter have benefited greatly from the availability of intense X-ray beams from synchrotron sources, both in terms of spatial resolution and of elemental specificity. The advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-ray FEL) provides the additional features of ultra-short pulses and high transverse coherence, which greatly expand possibilities to study dynamic processes and to image non-crystalline materials. The proposed SwissFEL facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute is one of at present four X-ray FEL projects worldwide and is scheduled to go into operation in the year 2017. This article describes a selection of problems in nuclear materials science and technology that would directly benefit from this and similar X-ray FEL sources. X-ray FEL-based experiments are proposed to be conducted on nuclear energy-related materials using single-shot X-ray spectroscopy, coherent X-ray scattering and/or X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy in order to address relevant scientific questions such as the evolution in time of the irradiation-induced damage processes, the deformation processes in nuclear materials, the ion diffusion processes in the barrier systems of geological repositories, the boiling heat transfer in nuclear reactors, as well as the structural characterization of graphite dust in advanced nuclear reactors and clay colloid aggregates in the groundwater near a radioactive waste repository.

  2. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  3. Imaging the heterogeneity of mineral surface reactivity using Ag(I) and synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Heald, Steve M.; Russell, Colleen K.

    2003-10-01

    Microscopic-scale imaging of reduced zones on the surfaces of minerals can be achieved by reaction with dilute Ag(I) solutions and subsequent analysis using synchrotron X-ray microscopy (XRM) above the Ag K-edge (25.5 keV). The principal reductant is Fe(II), but other reductants such as sulfide may contribute. Reduced zones may exist instrinsically, as in the structure of biotite and augite, or may be generated by reaction with chemical agents such as dithionite or treatment with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We demonstrate the method on flakes of specular hematite and biotite, as well as on thin sections of different rocks (arfvedsonitic granite, oolitic hematite, diabase, and quartz conglomerate) treated with SRB, and discuss possible artifacts that can occur. To our knowledge, this is the only microscopic technique that can image Fe(II) zones on the surface of an Fe-bearing mineral with monolayer sensitivity.

  4. Design study of compact Laser-Electron X-ray Generator for material and life sciences applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessonov, E. G.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Maslova, Yu Ya; Tunkin, V. G.; Postnov, A. A.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray generators utilizing Thomson scattering fill in the gap that exists between conventional and synchrotron-based X-ray sources. They are expected to be more intensive than X-ray tubes and more compact, accessible and less expensive than synchrotrons. In this work, two operation modes of Thomson X-ray source (or laser-electron X-ray generator — LEXG) are documented: quasi continuous wave (QCW) and a pulsed one. They are considered for material sciences and medical applications that are currently implemented at Synchrotron Radiation (SR) facilities. The proposed system contains a ~ 50 MeV linac and a picosecond laser with an average power ~ few hundred Watts. The Thomson X-ray source is able to deliver up to 5 × 1011 photons in a millisecond flash and an average flux of 1012-1013 phot/sec. To achieve these parameters with existing optical and accelerator technology, the system must also contain a ring for storage of e-bunches for 103-105 revolutions and an optical circulator for storage of laser pulses for 102 passes. The XAFS spectroscopy, small animal angiography and human noninvasive coronary angiography are considered as possible applications of laser-electron X-ray generator.

  5. Four-channel X-ray microscope for plasma investigations on the Sokol-P laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Vikhlyaev, D A; Gavrilov, D S; Kakshin, A G; Potapov, A V; Safronov, K V

    2011-03-31

    The design, assembly, and alignment of a Kirkpatrick - Baez X-ray microscope are described. A technique for the experimental evaluation of the resolving power of the microscope is outlined. This microscope permits obtaining simultaneous images of laser target plasmas in narrow energy regions belonging to the 0.3 - 1.5-keV X-ray range with a resolution of {approx}2 {mu}m. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  6. Detecting vacuum birefringence with x-ray free electron lasers and high-power optical lasers: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Heinzl, Tom; Schramm, Ulrich; Cowan, Thomas E.; Sauerbrey, Roland

    2016-02-01

    We study the feasibility of measuring vacuum birefringence by probing the focus of a high-intensity optical laser with an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). This amounts to performing a new type of QED precision experiment, employing only laser pulses, hence space- and time-dependent fields. To set the stage, we briefly review the status of QED precision tests and then focus on the example of vacuum birefringence. Adopting a realistic laser beam model in terms of pulsed Gaussian beams we calculate the induced phase shift and translate it into an experimental signal, counting the number of photons with flipped polarization. We carefully design a detailed experiment at the European XFEL operating in self-seeded mode, supplemented by a petawatt class optical laser via the HIBEF project. Assuming all components to represent the current state of the art, in particular the x-ray polarizers, realistic estimates of signal-to-noise ratios plus ensuing acquisition times are provided. This is accompanied by a statistical analysis of the impact of poor laser focus overlap either due to timing and pointing jitter as well as limited alignment accuracy. A number of parasitic effects are analyzed together with appropriate countermeasures. We conclude that vacuum birefringence can indeed be measured upon combining an XFEL with a high-power optical laser if depolarization effects in the x-ray lenses can be controlled.

  7. Development of laser cladding system with process monitoring by x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Takaya; Yamada, Tomonori; Nishimura, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have been developing a new laser cladding system to repair the damages of parts in aging plants. It consists of some devices which are a laser torch, composite-type optical fiber, QCW fiber laser and etc. All devices are installed in a mobile rack, so we can carry it to plants, laboratories or anywhere we want to use. We should irradiate the work with the best accuracy of laser beam and filler wire in laser cladding. A composite-type optical fiberscope is useful. This fiberscope was composed of a center fiber for beam delivery surrounded by 20000 fibers for visible image delivery. Thus it always keeps target on center of gun-sight. We succeeded to make a line laser cladding on an inside wall of 1-inch tube by our system. Before this success, we solved two serious problems which are the contamination of optics and the deformation of droplet. Observing laser cladding process by X-ray imaging with Spring-8 synchrotron radiation, we found that the molten pool depth was formed to be under a hundred micrometers for 10 milliseconds. A Quasi-CW fiber laser with 1 kW was employed for a heat source to generate the shallow molten pool. The X-ray shadowgraph clarified that a molten droplet was formed at the edge of a wire up to a millimeter size. It grew up if the wire didn't contact with the tube wall in initial state. Here we succeeded to measure the thermo-electromotive force voltage between a wire and a tube metal to confirm whether both came in contact. We propose to apply the laser cladding technology to the maintenance of aging industrial plants and nuclear facilities.

  8. Magnetization, magnetoresistance, and x-ray diffraction measurements of discontinuous [Ni80Fe20/Ag] multilayers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, T.; Moske, M.; Käufler, A.; Geisler, H.; Samwer, K.

    1996-04-01

    Thin films for magnetic sensor application require a high sensitivity at low magnetic fields, for example, realized by Permalloy films. Promising candidates for a further improvement are discontinuous multilayers, first reported by Hylton et al. In our study, we report on [2.5 nm Ni80Fe20/y nm Ag] multilayers with the spacer layer thickness y ranging from 1.2 nm to 6.0 nm. The multilayers were electron beam deposited in UHV at different temperatures. The substrates used are thermally oxidized silicon wafers. The magnetization is obtained using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), the magnetoresistance is measured at room temperature with the Montgomery method. Low and high angle x-ray diffraction measurements are performed in a Siemens D-5000 diffractometer. The samples are annealed ex situ between room temperature and 340 °C. The magnetoresistance is maximal after annealing the samples at a specific temperature, which decreases with increasing Ag-spacer thickness y. Moreover, the GMR decreases if the multilayers are deposited at elevated temperatures (100-200 °C). We also report on the dependence of the GMR on the interface roughness (σ≊0.5 nm rms) which we deduce from the small angle x-ray diffraction measurements. For a characterization of the reliability, we also investigated the dependence of the GMR on aging at 100 °C for several hours.

  9. Self-modulated laser wakefield accelerators as x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, N.; Martins, J. L.; Tsung, F. S.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Joshi, C.

    2016-03-01

    The development of a directional, small-divergence, and short-duration picosecond x-ray probe beam with an energy greater than 50 keV is desirable for high energy density science experiments. We therefore explore through particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations the possibility of using x-rays radiated by betatron-like motion of electrons from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator as a possible candidate to meet this need. Two OSIRIS 2D PIC simulations with mobile ions are presented, one with a normalized vector potential a 0  =  1.5 and the other with an a 0  =  3. We find that in both cases direct laser acceleration (DLA) is an important additional acceleration mechanism in addition to the longitudinal electric field of the plasma wave. Together these mechanisms produce electrons with a continuous energy spectrum with a maximum energy of 300 MeV for a 0  =  3 case and 180 MeV in the a 0  =  1.5 case. Forward-directed x-ray radiation with a photon energy up to 100 keV was calculated for the a 0  =  3 case and up to 12 keV for the a 0  =  1.5 case. The x-ray spectrum can be fitted with a sum of two synchrotron spectra with critical photon energies of 13 and 45 keV for the a 0 of 3 and critical photon energies of 0.3 and 1.4 keV for a 0 of 1.5 in the plane of polarization of the laser. The full width at half maximum divergence angle of the x-rays was 62  ×  1.9 mrad for a 0  =  3 and 77  ×  3.8 mrad for a 0  =  1.5.

  10. Ordered many-electron motions in atoms and x-ray lasers. [Subpicosecond ultraviolet laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Subpicosecond ultraviolet laser technology is enabling the exploration of nonlinear atomic interactions with electric field strengths considerably in excess of an atomic unit. As this regime is approached, experiments studying multiple ionization, photoelectron energy spectra, and harmonically produced radiation all exhibit strong nonlinear coupling. Peak total energy transfer rates on the order of approx.2 x 10/sup -4/ W/atom have been observed at an intensity of approx.10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/, and it is expected that energy transfer rates approaching approx.0.1 to 1 W/atom will occur under more extreme conditions for which the ultraviolet electric field E is significantly greater than e/a/sub 0//sup 2/. In this high intensity regime, a wide range of new nonlinear phenomena will be open to study. These will include the possibility of ordered driven motions in atoms, molecules, and plasmas, mechanisms involving collisions, and relativistic processes such as electron-positron pair production. An understanding of these physical interactions may provide a basis for the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 100 refs., 8 figs.

  11. PROCEEDING OF THE SEEDED X-RAY FREE ELECTRON LASER WORKSHOP.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,X.J.; MURPHY,J.B.; YU,L.H.; FAATZ,B.; HUANG,Z.; REICHE,S.; ZOLOTOREV,M.

    2002-12-13

    The underlying theory of a high gain free electron laser (FEL) has existed for two decades [1-2], but it is only in the last few years that these novel radiation sources have been realized experimentally. Several high gain FELs have successfully reached saturation in the infrared, visible and the VUV portion of the spectrum: the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) free electron lasers [3] at BNL and the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FELs at LEUTL, VISA and TTF [4-6]. The outstanding challenges for future FELs are to extend high gain FELs to the X-ray regime, improve the longitudinal coherence of the radiation using seeded FEL schemes and generate ultrashort pulses (<100 fs). The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) sponsored a Seeded X-ray Free Electron Laser Workshop on December 13-14, 2002 to explore these challenging issues. Representatives from BNL, DESY, LBNL, SLAC and UCLA made presentations on the novel schemes under consideration at their laboratories. Workshop participants had a lively discussion on the feasibility, performance and R&D issues associated with the seeded XFEL schemes. An improvement of the electron beam quality will certainly be necessary to drive the XFEL. Self-seeding SASE, cascaded HGHG, and SASE pulse compression FELs show the most promise for producing short pulse X-rays. Of these, only the self-seeded and HGHG schemes generate longitudinally coherent radiation. While the pulse length in the self-seeded scheme is determined by the electron bunch length ({approx}100 fs), the pulse length in the HGHG scheme is determined by the short pulse seed laser, and so can be much shorter ({approx} 20 fs).

  12. Multiple pulse thermal damage thresholds of materials for x-ray free electron laser optics investigated with an ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; London, Richard A.; Bionta, Richard M.; Soufli, Regina; Ryutov, Dmitri; Shirk, Michael; Baker, Sherry L.; Smith, Patrick M.; Nataraj, Pradeep

    2008-11-17

    Optical elements to be used for x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) must withstand multiple high-fluence pulses. We have used an ultraviolet laser to study the damage of two candidate materials, crystalline Si and B{sub 4}C-coated Si, emulating the temperature profile expected to occur in optics exposed to XFEL pulses. We found that the damage threshold for 10{sup 5} pulses is {approx}20% to 70% lower than the melting threshold.

  13. Generation of strongly coupled Xe cluster nanoplasmas by low intensive soft x-ray laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2012-07-11

    A seeding gas jet including Xe clusters was irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft x-ray laser pulse ({lambda}=13.9 nm, {approx}7 ps, {<=}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}), where the laser photon energy is high enough to ionize 4d core electrons. In order to clarify how the innershell ionization followed by the Auger electron emission is affected under the intense laser irradiation, the electron energy distribution was measured. Photoelectron spectra showed that the peak position attributed to 4d hole shifted to lower energy and the spectral width was broadened with increasing cluster size. Moreover, the energy distribution exhibited that a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma with several eV was generated.

  14. Repair of photo- and x-ray masks by LCVD using nitrogen laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznikova, Elena F.; Chesnokov, Vladimir V.; Zharkova, Galina I.; Makarov, Oleg A.; Naz'mov, Vladimir P.; Igumenov, Igor K.

    1995-05-01

    The use of laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of chromium and rhenium film patterns for reporting of photomask defects and LCVD of rhenium, gold and platinum film pattern for repairing similar defects of X-ray masks was demonstrated. Initial compounds were Cr(CO)6, Re2(CO)10, Me2Au(dpm) and Pt(hfa)2. The high marginal sharpness and the thickness uniformity of deposited films was provided by the use of powerful nanosecond pulse laser, the protective system for a delineation of a irradiation zone and the laser beam microscanning in limits of this zone. The scheme of the set for the direct laser deposition of film micropatterns was presented.

  15. 32.8-nm X-ray laser produced in a krypton cluster jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E P; Vinokhodov, A Yu

    2013-12-31

    We have interpreted the well-known experimental quantum yield data for a 32.8-nm X-ray laser operating at the 3d{sup 9}4d (J = 0) – 3d{sup 9}4p (J = 1) transition of Kr{sup 8+} with the use of gaseous krypton or a krypton cluster jet. Proceeding from our model we propose a novel scheme for the 32.8-nm laser produced in a krypton cluster jet. The quantum yield is shown to saturate for a plasma length of ∼300 μm, a krypton ion density n{sub Kr} ∼ (4 – 9) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, and an electron temperature Te ∼ 5000 eV. In this case, the energy conversion coefficient amounts to ∼5 × 10{sup -3} of the pump pulse energy. We propose the experimental setup for producing a highefficiency subpicosecond X-ray laser in a krypton cluster jet. (lasers)

  16. X-ray and EUV micro-imaging systems for laser ICF diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S.; Mu, B.; Wang, X.; Huang, W.; Li, J.; Wang, Z.

    2013-10-01

    Plasma imaging diagnostics plays an important role for laser ICF. Based on the urgent need to carry out high-resolution, high-throughput plasma diagnostics, grazing-incidence X-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscopes and normal-incidence EUV Schwarzschild imaging system were developed. The X-ray multilayer KB microscopes were successfully been applied in the physics experiments of SGII laser facility. Combined with streaked camera, the Mo-backlit implosion flow line of hollow Carbon-Hydrogen (CH) spherical target was obtained in SGII. The 4.75keV single-channel and four-channel KB microscopes were also developed for self-emission and short-pulse backlit imaging diagnostic of CH cylindrical target. In addition, according to the need of ultra-short laser pulse plasma diagnostics, the Schwarzschild imaging system working at 68eV was researched, and the physical experiments of hot electron transport with Schwarzschild imaging system were performed in SILEX-I laser facility.

  17. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-01

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width deltaE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As deltaE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For deltaE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d(max). Although increasing deltaE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d(max) by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude. PMID:15715431

  18. Application of Strong Field Physics Techniques to X-Ray Free Electron Laser Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roedig, Christoph Antony

    With the commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) was realized at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This novel device brings an unprecedented parameter set to a diverse community of scientists. The short wavelengths and short pulse durations enable an entire new class of time resolved structural analysis. The imaging capabilities enabled by the machine will lead to many breakthroughs in the fields of biophysics and nano technology. With the new capabilities of the LCLS come many challenges. The understanding required to effectively utilize the XFEL on complex molecular or biological systems goes back to the basic atomic physics of the interaction of light and matter. The parameter set of this machine is as unprecedented as it will be untested. To make informed measurements with the LCLS beam, a set of novel diagnostic techniques will be required. This report outlines major contributions made to the early experimental atomic physics and diagnostic efforts at LCLS. Building on a rich history of techniques used for ultra short optical lasers and atomic physics experimentation, a diagnostic instrument and experimental techniques are developed to make spectral, energy and temporal measurements of the LCLS pulses possible. Expanding on earlier studies of ionization performed on optical lasers and synchrotron sources, new ionization mechanisms such as multiphoton ionization in the x-ray regime are observed. Leveraging the unique combination of hard x-ray photon energy, extremely short pulse duration and high pulse energy, a technique for the time resolved study of ultrafast inner shell electronic relaxation processes is developed and studied for feasibility. The common theme to the efforts described here is the advancement of proven techniques and interesting atomic physics phenomena to the next generation of ultra short pulsed x-ray laser systems. The atomic physics explored here lay the groundwork for the

  19. Dynamic Ultra-Bright X-ray Laser Scattering from Isochorically Heated Cryogenic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Luke; High Energy Density Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Recent x-ray scattering experiments performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS, have demonstrated novel plasma measurements of the electron temperature, pressure, and density by simultaneous high-resolution angularly and spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from shock-compressed materials in the warm dense regime. Such measurements provide the structural properties relating the microscopic quantities in terms of thermodynamic properties using first-principles calculations. These studies have led us on a path where we create conditions with increasing temperatures and pressures to explore the high-energy density phase space. Specifically, we have begun experiments on hot and dense hydrogen plasmas producing energetic proton beams that find applications in fusion research and astrophysical phenomena. For our experiments with the 25 TW short pulse laser we apply repetition rates and pulse widths with a good match to the LCLS x-ray beam capabilities allowing pump-probe experiments with ultrahigh temporal resolution with very high data throughput with shot rates of up to 5 Hz. In this talk we will discuss our recent measurements that have resolved the ultrafast structural response of hydrogen to intense heating.

  20. Hard x-ray transmission crystal spectrometer at the OMEGA-EP laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.

    2010-10-15

    The transmission crystal spectrometer (TCS) is approved for taking data at the OMEGA-EP laser facility since 2009 and will be available for the OMEGA target chamber in 2010. TCS utilizes a Cauchois type cylindrically bent transmission crystal geometry with a source to crystal distance of 600 mm. Spectral images are recorded by image plates in four positions, one IP on the Rowland circle and three others at 200, 400, and 600 mm beyond the Rowland circle. An earlier version of TCS was used at LULI on experiments that determined the x-ray source size from spectral line broadening on one IP positioned behind the Rowland circle. TCS has recorded numerous backlighter spectra at EP for point projection radiography and for source size measurements. Hard x-ray source size can be determined from the source broadening of both K shell emission lines and from K absorption edges in the bremsstrahlung continuum, the latter being a new way to measure the spatial extent of the hard x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum.

  1. Hard x-ray transmission crystal spectrometer at the OMEGA-EP laser facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.

    2010-10-01

    The transmission crystal spectrometer (TCS) is approved for taking data at the OMEGA-EP laser facility since 2009 and will be available for the OMEGA target chamber in 2010. TCS utilizes a Cauchois type cylindrically bent transmission crystal geometry with a source to crystal distance of 600 mm. Spectral images are recorded by image plates in four positions, one IP on the Rowland circle and three others at 200, 400, and 600 mm beyond the Rowland circle. An earlier version of TCS was used at LULI on experiments that determined the x-ray source size from spectral line broadening on one IP positioned behind the Rowland circle. TCS has recorded numerous backlighter spectra at EP for point projection radiography and for source size measurements. Hard x-ray source size can be determined from the source broadening of both K shell emission lines and from K absorption edges in the bremsstrahlung continuum, the latter being a new way to measure the spatial extent of the hard x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum.

  2. Hard x-ray transmission crystal spectrometer at the OMEGA-EP laser facility.

    PubMed

    Seely, J F; Szabo, C I; Feldman, U; Hudson, L T; Henins, A; Audebert, P; Brambrink, E

    2010-10-01

    The transmission crystal spectrometer (TCS) is approved for taking data at the OMEGA-EP laser facility since 2009 and will be available for the OMEGA target chamber in 2010. TCS utilizes a Cauchois type cylindrically bent transmission crystal geometry with a source to crystal distance of 600 mm. Spectral images are recorded by image plates in four positions, one IP on the Rowland circle and three others at 200, 400, and 600 mm beyond the Rowland circle. An earlier version of TCS was used at LULI on experiments that determined the x-ray source size from spectral line broadening on one IP positioned behind the Rowland circle. TCS has recorded numerous backlighter spectra at EP for point projection radiography and for source size measurements. Hard x-ray source size can be determined from the source broadening of both K shell emission lines and from K absorption edges in the bremsstrahlung continuum, the latter being a new way to measure the spatial extent of the hard x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. PMID:21034000

  3. Structural biology at the European X-ray free-electron laser facility

    PubMed Central

    Altarelli, Massimo; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    The European X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility, under construction in the Hamburg region, will provide high-peak brilliance (greater than 1033 photons s−1 mm−2 mrad−2 per 0.1% BW), ultrashort pulses (approx. 10 fs) of X-rays, with a high repetition rate (up to 27 000 pulses s−1) from 2016 onwards. The main features of this exceptional X-ray source, and the instrumentation developments necessary to exploit them fully, for application to a variety of scientific disciplines, are briefly summarized. In the case of structural biology, that has a central role in the scientific case of this new facility, the instruments and ancillary laboratories that are being planned and built within the baseline programme of the European XFEL and by consortia of users are also discussed. It is expected that the unique features of the source and the advanced features of the instrumentation will allow operation modes with more efficient use of sample materials, faster acquisition times, and conditions better approaching feasibility of single molecule imaging. PMID:24914145

  4. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-07-01

    Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup. PMID:26144230

  5. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton: AUTHOR = Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastian; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Marchesini, Stefano; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Sasa; Benner, W.Henry; London, Richard A.; Plonjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Dusterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; Spiller, Eberhard; Moller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; Shapiro, David A.; /UC, Davis /SLAC /Uppsala U. /LLNL, Livermore /Uppsala U. /Uppsala U. /SLAC /Uppsala U.

    2010-10-07

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  6. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; et al

    2016-04-12

    Here, serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solvedmore » with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.« less

  7. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Marchesini, Stefano; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Saša; Benner, W. Henry; London, Richard A.; Plönjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Düsterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; Spiller, Eberhard; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; Shapiro, David A.; Hodgson, Keith O.; van der Spoel, David; Burmeister, Florian; Bergh, Magnus; Caleman, Carl; Huldt, Gösta; Seibert, M. Marvin; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Lee, Richard W.; Szöke, Abraham; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos

    2006-12-01

    Theory predicts that, with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft-X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25fs, 4×1013Wcm-2 pulse, containing 1012 photons at 32nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nanostructured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000K. A novel X-ray camera assured single-photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and is reconstructed at the diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  8. Development of a Laser-Produced Plasma X-ray source for Phase-Contrast Radiography of DT Ice layers

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O L; Koch, J A

    2008-07-21

    Refraction enhanced x-ray phase contrast imaging is crucial for characterization of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer roughness in optically opaque inertial confinement fusion capsules. To observe the time development of DT ice roughness over {approx} second timescales, we need a bright x-ray source that can produce an image faster than the evolution of the ice surface roughness. A laser produced plasma x-ray source is one of the candidates that can meet this requirement. We performed experiments at the Janus laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and assessed the characteristics of the laser produced plasma x-ray source as a potential backlight for in situ target characterization.

  9. Single-hit spectroscopy of betatron X-ray spectra generated by laser wakefield acceleration using self and ionization injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condamine, Florian; Schumaker, Will; Kotick, Jordan; Albert, Felicie; Barbrel, Benjamin; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Ravasio, Alessandra; Fry, Alan; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Betatron X-ray created by laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are of fundamental interest in plasma physics due to their broadband X-ray spectra, compact source size and ultra short duration. In particular, the femtosecond duration of electrons bunches produced during LWFA offers the opportunity to study warm dense matter (WDM) in detail via pump/probe experiments. In this study, we used the SLAC MEC optical laser (Ti:S 800nm, 1J in 40fs) focused in a gas cell to generate betatron X-ray by using two LWFA techniques : self-injection and ionization-injection. Three different gas types (100%, 98% and 90% helium, doped with nitrogen) were investigated using a single hit detector to characterize X-ray spectra generated by the betatron source. We will compare results with self-injection and ionization-injection for different plasma conditions and several positions of the laser focal spot inside the gas cell.

  10. A laser-plasma-produced soft X-ray laser at 89 eV generates DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Shimokawa, Takashi; Imai, Takashi; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kando, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    While it has been expected that X-ray laser will be widely applied to biomedical studies, this has not been achieved to date and its biological effects such as DNA damage have not been evaluated. As a first step for its biological application, we developed a culture cell irradiation system, particularly designed for a plasma-driven soft X-ray laser pulse, to investigate whether the soft X-ray laser is able to induce DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells or not. The human adenocarcimona cell line A549 was irradiated with the soft X-ray laser at a photon energy of 89 eV and the repair focus formation of the DSBs was assessed by immunofluorescence staining with antiphosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs), ATM (p-ATM) and γ-H2AX antibody. The p-DNA-PKcs, ATM, and γ-H2AX foci were clearly identified after soft X-ray laser irradiation. Furthermore, the increase in the X-ray laser shot number, even from a single shot, results in the increase in p-DNA-PKcs foci. These results are the first evidence that the 89 eV soft X-ray laser is able to induce DSB in living cells. Our study demonstrated that this irradiation system is a useful tool for investigating the radiobiological effect of soft X-ray laser. PMID:25862698

  11. A laser-plasma–produced soft X-ray laser at 89 eV generates DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Shimokawa, Takashi; Imai, Takashi; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kando, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    While it has been expected that X-ray laser will be widely applied to biomedical studies, this has not been achieved to date and its biological effects such as DNA damage have not been evaluated. As a first step for its biological application, we developed a culture cell irradiation system, particularly designed for a plasma-driven soft X-ray laser pulse, to investigate whether the soft X-ray laser is able to induce DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells or not. The human adenocarcimona cell line A549 was irradiated with the soft X-ray laser at a photon energy of 89 eV and the repair focus formation of the DSBs was assessed by immunofluorescence staining with antiphosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs), ATM (p-ATM) and γ-H2AX antibody. The p-DNA-PKcs, ATM, and γ-H2AX foci were clearly identified after soft X-ray laser irradiation. Furthermore, the increase in the X-ray laser shot number, even from a single shot, results in the increase in p-DNA-PKcs foci. These results are the first evidence that the 89 eV soft X-ray laser is able to induce DSB in living cells. Our study demonstrated that this irradiation system is a useful tool for investigating the radiobiological effect of soft X-ray laser. PMID:25862698

  12. X-ray free-electron lasers: Scientific goals and machine implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, John

    2001-07-01

    Free electron lasers are now being designed which will operate at wavelengths down to about 1. [1] The physics of the high-gain, single pass FEL process requires extremely bright electron pulses in the 10-20 GeV range. This electron brightness should be achievable using an RF-photocathode source and a linear accelerator, such as the initial acceleration stage of a TeV-range linear electron-positron collider. The x-ray FEL radiation produced will have unique properties. In particular: • The FEL peak intensity and peak brightness will be many orders of magnitude higher than can be produced by any other source. • The pulse length will be less than 1 picosecond, orders of magnitude shorter than can be achieved with any other bright source such as a synchrotron. • The FEL radiation will have full transverse coherence and a degeneracy parameter (photons/coherence volume) equal to 109 or more. No other source can produce hard x-radiation with a degeneracy parameter significantly greater than 1. These properties offer the chance to study chemical, biological, and condensed matter dynamical processes with sub-picosecond time resolution and angstrom spatial resolution. [2] The high peak power of the FEL radiation (greater than 1014W/cm2) could be used to create precisely-controlled chemical and structural modifications inside samples. There is also the possibility that nonlinear x-ray interactions could be used to give increased resolution for spectroscopic studies, to greatly expand the parameter space for atomic physics studies, and to permit new fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. The exploration of these new x-ray techniques will require considerable development, not only in technical areas such as optics and detectors, but also in understanding the basic physics of the interaction of very intense x-radiation with matter. A large collaboration of US institutions is now conducting preliminary research and development in these areas, with the intention of

  13. Demonstration experiment of a laser synchrotron source for tunable, monochromatic x-rays at 500 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, A.; Fischer, R.; Fisher, A.

    1995-12-31

    A Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS) was proposed to generate short-pulsed, tunable x-rays by Thomson scattering of laser photons from a relativistic electron beam. A proof-of-principle experiment was performed to generate x-ray photons of 20 eV. A demonstration experiment is being planned and constructed to generate x-ray photons in the range of {approximately}500 eV. Laser photons of {lambda}=1.06 {mu}m are Thomson backscattered by a 4.5 MeV electron beam which is produced by an S-band RF electron gun. The laser photons are derived from either (i) a 15 Joules, 3 nsec Nd:glass laser, (ii) the uncompressed nsec: pulse of the NRL table-top terawatt (T{sup 3}) laser, or (iii) the compressed sub-picosec pulse of the T{sup 3} laser. The RF electron gun is being constructed with initial operation using a thermionic cathode. It will be upgraded to a photocathode to produce high quality electron beams with high current and low emittance. The x-ray pulse structure consists of {approximately}10 psec within an envelope of a macropulse whose length depends on the laser used. The estimated x-ray photon flux is {approximately}10{sup 18} photons/sec, and the number of photons per macropulse is {approximately}10{sup 8}. Design parameters and progress of the experiment will be presented.

  14. Development of time resolved x-ray spectroscopy in high intensity laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Notley, M. M.; Weber, R. L.; Fell, B.; Jeffries, J.; Freeman, R. R.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Dickson, R.; Hey, D.; Khattak, F.; Saiz, E. Garcia; Gregori, G.

    2006-10-15

    This article discusses the design of a novel time resolved von Hamos Bragg spectrometer to provide spectra in the region around the titanium K-{alpha} and He-{alpha} lines. The instrument consists of a highly oriented pyrolitic graphite mosaic crystal coupled to a picosecond x-ray streak camera. Measurements of the time dependent behavior from Ti foils illuminated with intense laser pulses can be used to improve the understanding of recombination dynamics, electron transport, and phase transitions in strongly coupled dense plasma. This is important for the modeling of the compression phase in inertial confinement fusion research and the study of astrophysical environments.

  15. Radiation damage in protein serial femtosecond crystallography using an x-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Lomb, Lukas; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Aquila, Andrew; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Rudek, Benedikt; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Shoeman, Robert L.; Andreasson, Jakob; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J.; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Caleman, Carl; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P.; Doak, R. Bruce; Ekeberg, Tomas; Fleckenstein, Holger; Fromme, Petra; Gebhardt, Maike; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hartmann, Andreas; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M.; Hunter, Mark S.; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Kimmel, Nils; Kirian, Richard A.; Liang, Mengning; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Meinhart, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Spence, John C. H.; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Wunderer, Cornelia; Chapman, Henry N.; Ullrich, Joachim; Strüder, Lothar; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers deliver intense femtosecond pulses that promise to yield high resolution diffraction data of nanocrystals before the destruction of the sample by radiation damage. Diffraction intensities of lysozyme nanocrystals collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source using 2 keV photons were used for structure determination by molecular replacement and analyzed for radiation damage as a function of pulse length and fluence. Signatures of radiation damage are observed for pulses as short as 70 fs. Parametric scaling used in conventional crystallography does not account for the observed effects. PMID:24089594

  16. MaRIE X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Pre-Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, Bruce E.; Barnes, Cris W.; Bishofberger, Kip A.; Duffy, Leanne D.; Heath, Cynthia E.; Marksteiner, Quinn R.; Nguyen, Dinh Cong; Russell, Steven J.; Ryne, Robert D.; Sheffield, Richard L.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Yampolsky, Nikolai A.

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will include a 50-keV X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL), a significant extension from planned and existing XFEL facilities. To prevent an unacceptably large energy spread arsing from energy diffusion, the electron beam energy should not exceed 20 GeV, which puts a significant constraint on the beam emittance. A 100-pC baseline design is presented along with advanced technology options to increase the photon flux and to decrease the spectral bandwidth through pre-bunching the electron beam.

  17. Single-pulse resonant magnetic scattering using a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gutt, C.; Streit-Nierobisch, S.; Stadler, L.-M.; Faeustlin, R. R.; Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.; Weckert, E.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Gruebel, G.; Pfau, B.; Guenther, C. M.; Koennecke, R.; Eisebitt, S.; Froemter, R.; Kobs, A.; Stickler, D.; Oepen, H. P.; Grunze, M.; Rosenhahn, A.; Wilhein, T.

    2010-03-01

    We report on single-pulse resonant magnetic scattering experiments using soft x-ray pulses generated by the free-electron laser FLASH at DESY. We could record a magnetic diffraction pattern from a Co/Pt multilayer sample at the Co M{sub 2,3} edge with a single 30-fs-long FEL pulse. The analysis of the magnetic small-angle scattering signal for subsequent pulses indicates a threshold energy density below which there is no indication that the magnetic properties of the sample might be altered.

  18. The x-ray source application test cassette for radiation exposures at the OMEGA laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Rekow, V.; Emig, J.; Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Horton, R.; Davis, J.

    2012-10-15

    We have designed a sample cassette that can be used to position up to six samples in the OMEGA laser chamber. The cassette accommodates round samples up to 38.1 mm (1.5{sup Double-Prime }) in diameter and square samples up to 27 mm on a side, any of which can be up to 12.7 mm thick. Smaller specimens are centered with spacers. The test cassette allows each sample to have a unique filter scheme, with multiple filter regions in front of each sample. This paper will present mechanical design considerations and operational aspects of the x-ray source application cassette.

  19. A laser-plasma clean soft x-ray source for projection microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollanti, S.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Flora, F.; Mezi, L.; Murra, D.; Torre, A.

    2008-10-01

    Within a National Project on nanotechnologies, at the ENEA Research Centre in Frascati a micro-exposure tool for projection lithography at 14.4 nm has been developed. The laser-plasma soft X-ray source is equipped with a patented debris mitigation system developed in the frame of a European Integrated Project, in order to preserve the collecting optics. A 90-nm-resolution patterning has been achieved on resist by this laboratory-scale tool based on a Schwarzschildtype projection optics.

  20. Spatially resolved x-ray spectroscopy investigation of femtosecond laser irradiated Ar clusters.

    PubMed

    Junkel-Vives, G C; Abdallah, J; Auguste, T; D'Oliveira, P; Hulin, S; Monot, P; Dobosz, S; Faenov, A Ya; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Yu; Boldarev, A S; Gasilov, V A

    2002-03-01

    High temperature plasmas have been created by irradiating Ar clusters with high intensity 60-fs laser pulses. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of spatially resolved, high resolution x-ray data near the He(alpha) line of Ar is consistent with a two-temperature collisional-radiative model incorporating the effects of highly energetic electrons. The results of the spectral analysis are compared with a theoretical hydrodynamic model of cluster production, as well as interferometric data. The plasma parameters are notably uniform over one Rayleigh length (600 microm). PMID:11909265