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Sample records for ag-ps nanocomposite spheres

  1. Numerical calculation of the Casimir forces between a gold sphere and a nanocomposite sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio; Miura, Kouji; Akamatsu, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2010-11-01

    The repulsive Casimir force is expected as a force which enables to levitate small objects such as machine parts used in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), and superlubricity in MEMS may be realized by this levitation. We study the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a nanocomposite sheet containing many nickel nanoparticles. In particular, we focus on the dependence of the Casimir force on the separation between the gold sphere and the surface of the nanocomposite sheet. The Casimir force changes from the attractive force to the repulsive force as the separation increases. The strength of the repulsive force is, however, too small to levitate MEMS parts.

  2. Silicon and Carbon Nanocomposite Spheres with Enhanced Electrochemical Performance for Full Cell Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Favors, Zachary; Li, Changling; Liu, Chueh; Ye, Rachel; Fu, Chengyin; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Guo, Juchen; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2017-03-01

    Herein, facile synthesis of monodisperse silicon and carbon nanocomposite spheres (MSNSs) is achieved via a simple and scalable surface-protected magnesiothermic reduction with subsequent chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Li-ion batteries (LIBs) were fabricated to test the utility of MSNSs as an anode material. LIB anodes based on MSNSs demonstrate a high reversible capacity of 3207 mAh g‑1, superior rate performance, and excellent cycling stability. Furthermore, the performance of full cell LIBs was evaluated by using MSNS anode and a LiCoO2 cathode with practical electrode loadings. The MSNS/LiCoO2 full cell demonstrates high gravimetric energy density in the order of 850 Wh L‑1 with excellent cycling stability. This work shows a proof of concept of the use of monodisperse Si and C nanocomposite spheres toward practical lithium-ion battery applications.

  3. Silicon and Carbon Nanocomposite Spheres with Enhanced Electrochemical Performance for Full Cell Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Favors, Zachary; Li, Changling; Liu, Chueh; Ye, Rachel; Fu, Chengyin; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Guo, Juchen; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2017-01-01

    Herein, facile synthesis of monodisperse silicon and carbon nanocomposite spheres (MSNSs) is achieved via a simple and scalable surface-protected magnesiothermic reduction with subsequent chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Li-ion batteries (LIBs) were fabricated to test the utility of MSNSs as an anode material. LIB anodes based on MSNSs demonstrate a high reversible capacity of 3207 mAh g−1, superior rate performance, and excellent cycling stability. Furthermore, the performance of full cell LIBs was evaluated by using MSNS anode and a LiCoO2 cathode with practical electrode loadings. The MSNS/LiCoO2 full cell demonstrates high gravimetric energy density in the order of 850 Wh L−1 with excellent cycling stability. This work shows a proof of concept of the use of monodisperse Si and C nanocomposite spheres toward practical lithium-ion battery applications. PMID:28322285

  4. Preparation and electrochemical performances of carbon sphere@ZnO core-shell nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xuechun; Han, Bingqian; Chen, Gang; Wang, Lihong; Wang, Yude

    2017-01-01

    Carbon sphere (CS)@ZnO core-shell nanocomposites were successfully prepared through facile low-temperature water-bath method without annealing treatment. The morphology and the microstructure of samples were characterized by transition electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. ZnO nanoparticles with several nanometers in size decorated on the surface of the carbon sphere and formed a core-shell structure. Electrochemical performances of the CS@ZnO core-shell nanocomposites electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge (GDC). The CS@ZnO core-shell nanocomposite electrodes exhibit much larger specific capacitance and cycling stability is improved significantly compared with pure ZnO electrode. The CS@ZnO core-shell nanocomposite with mole ratio of 1:1 achieves a specific capacitance of 630 F g‑1 at the current density of 2 A g‑1. Present work might provide a new route for fabricating carbon sphere and transition metal oxides composite materials as electrodes for the application in supercapacitors.

  5. Preparation and electrochemical performances of carbon sphere@ZnO core-shell nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xuechun; Han, Bingqian; Chen, Gang; Wang, Lihong; Wang, Yude

    2017-01-01

    Carbon sphere (CS)@ZnO core-shell nanocomposites were successfully prepared through facile low-temperature water-bath method without annealing treatment. The morphology and the microstructure of samples were characterized by transition electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. ZnO nanoparticles with several nanometers in size decorated on the surface of the carbon sphere and formed a core-shell structure. Electrochemical performances of the CS@ZnO core-shell nanocomposites electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge (GDC). The CS@ZnO core-shell nanocomposite electrodes exhibit much larger specific capacitance and cycling stability is improved significantly compared with pure ZnO electrode. The CS@ZnO core-shell nanocomposite with mole ratio of 1:1 achieves a specific capacitance of 630 F g−1 at the current density of 2 A g−1. Present work might provide a new route for fabricating carbon sphere and transition metal oxides composite materials as electrodes for the application in supercapacitors. PMID:28057915

  6. Fabrication and lithium storage performance of sugar apple-shaped SiOx@C nanocomposite spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingqi; Zeng, Ying; Ren, Yurong; Zeng, Chunmei; Gu, Jingwei; Feng, Xiaofang; He, Hongyan

    2015-08-01

    Nonstoichiometric SiOx is a kind of very attractive anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries because of a high specific capacity and facile synthesis. However, the poor electrical conductivity and unstable electrode structure of SiOx severely limit its electrochemical performance as anode in lithium-ion batteries. In this work, highly durable sugar apple-shaped SiOx@C nanocomposite spheres are fabricated to achieve significantly improved electrochemical performance. The composite is synthesized by homogenous one-pot synthesis, using ethyltriethoxysilanes (EtSi(OEt)3) and resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF) as starting materials. The morphology, composition and structure of the composite are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis (EA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). At a current density of 50 mA g-1, the sugar apple-shaped SiOx@C spheres exhibit a stable discharge capacity of about 630 mAh g-1 calculated on the total mass of both SiOx and C. At a current density of 100 mA g-1, a stable discharge capacity of about 550 mAh g-1 is obtained and the capacity has been kept up to 400 cycles. The excellent cycling performance is attributed to the homogeneous dispersion of SiOx in disordered carbon at the nanometer scale and the unique structure of the composite.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Au-ZrO2-SiO2 Nanocomposite Spheres and Their Application in Enrichment and Detection of Organophosphorus Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuqi; Tu, Haiyang; Zhang, Aidong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-03-01

    Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite spheres were synthesized and used as selective sorbents for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of orananophosphorous agents. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor based on an Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} modified electrode was developed for selective detection of orananophosphorous pesticides (OPs). The Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite spheres were synthesized by hydrolysis and condensation of zirconia n-butoxide (TBOZ) on the surface of SiO{sub 2} spheres and then introduction of gold nanoparticles on the surface. Transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to characterize the formation of the nanocomposite sphere. Fast extraction of OP was achieved by Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} modified electrode within 5 min via the specific affinity between zirconia and phosphoric group. The assay yields a broad concentration range of paraoxon-ethyl from 1.0 to 500 ng/mL{sup -1} with a detection limit 0.5 ng/mL{sup -1}. This selective and sensitive method holds great promise for the enrichment and detection of OPs.

  8. Facile fabrication of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables based on the mixed mode of soft/hard templates.

    PubMed

    Wan, Mimi; Zhao, Wenbo; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qi; Xu, Ping; Mao, Chun; Shen, Jian

    2016-08-01

    A new kind of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be facilely synthesized by using soft/hard templates method. In order to effectively introduce Ag sources into porous polystyrene (PS) nanotubes which were trapped in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) hard template, Pluronic F127 (F127) was used as guiding agent, soft template and reductant. Meanwhile, ethylene glycol solution was also used as solvent and co-reducing agent to assist in the formation of silver nanowires. The influences of concentration of F127 and reducing reaction time on the formation of Ag/PS coaxial nanocables were discussed. Results indicated that the high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be obtained by the mixed mode of soft/hard templates under optimized conditions. This strategy is expected to be extended to design more metal/polymer coaxial nanocables for the benefit of creation of complex and functional nanoarchitectures and components.

  9. Facile fabrication of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables based on the mixed mode of soft/hard templates

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Mimi; Zhao, Wenbo; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qi; Xu, Ping; Mao, Chun; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    A new kind of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be facilely synthesized by using soft/hard templates method. In order to effectively introduce Ag sources into porous polystyrene (PS) nanotubes which were trapped in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) hard template, Pluronic F127 (F127) was used as guiding agent, soft template and reductant. Meanwhile, ethylene glycol solution was also used as solvent and co-reducing agent to assist in the formation of silver nanowires. The influences of concentration of F127 and reducing reaction time on the formation of Ag/PS coaxial nanocables were discussed. Results indicated that the high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be obtained by the mixed mode of soft/hard templates under optimized conditions. This strategy is expected to be extended to design more metal/polymer coaxial nanocables for the benefit of creation of complex and functional nanoarchitectures and components. PMID:27477888

  10. One-step synthesis of degradable T1-FeOOH functionalized hollow mesoporous silica nanocomposites from mesoporous silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yung-Kang; Tseng, Yu-Jui; Liu, Chien-Liang; Chou, Shang-Wei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Tsang, S. C. Edman; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a hollow mesoporous structure and a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent has shown its potential in simultaneous drug delivery and cell tracking applications. However, the preparation of this kind of nanocomposite is complicated and usually takes several days, which is unsuitable for scaled-up production. To overcome these hurdles, we report herein a facile method to synthesize iron oxide hydroxide functionalized hollow mesoporous silica spheres (FeOOH/HMSS) in a one-step manner. By carefully controlling the reaction kinetics of K2FeO4 in water, the gram-scale production of FeOOH/HMSS can be readily achieved at 60 °C for as short as 30 min. Most importantly, this synthetic process is also cost-effective and eco-friendly in both the precursor (K2FeO4 and H2O) and the product (FeOOH). The mechanism for the formation of a hollow structure was carefully investigated, which involves the synergetic effect of the surfactant CTAB and the side product KOH. Having outstanding biocompatibility, these degradable nanocolloids also demonstrate their feasibility in in vitro/vivo MR imaging and in vitro drug delivery.The combination of a hollow mesoporous structure and a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent has shown its potential in simultaneous drug delivery and cell tracking applications. However, the preparation of this kind of nanocomposite is complicated and usually takes several days, which is unsuitable for scaled-up production. To overcome these hurdles, we report herein a facile method to synthesize iron oxide hydroxide functionalized hollow mesoporous silica spheres (FeOOH/HMSS) in a one-step manner. By carefully controlling the reaction kinetics of K2FeO4 in water, the gram-scale production of FeOOH/HMSS can be readily achieved at 60 °C for as short as 30 min. Most importantly, this synthetic process is also cost-effective and eco-friendly in both the precursor (K2FeO4 and H2O) and the product (FeOOH). The mechanism for the formation of a

  11. One-step synthesis of degradable T(1)-FeOOH functionalized hollow mesoporous silica nanocomposites from mesoporous silica spheres.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yung-Kang; Tseng, Yu-Jui; Liu, Chien-Liang; Chou, Shang-Wei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Tsang, S C Edman; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2015-02-14

    The combination of a hollow mesoporous structure and a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent has shown its potential in simultaneous drug delivery and cell tracking applications. However, the preparation of this kind of nanocomposite is complicated and usually takes several days, which is unsuitable for scaled-up production. To overcome these hurdles, we report herein a facile method to synthesize iron oxide hydroxide functionalized hollow mesoporous silica spheres (FeOOH/HMSS) in a one-step manner. By carefully controlling the reaction kinetics of K2FeO4 in water, the gram-scale production of FeOOH/HMSS can be readily achieved at 60 °C for as short as 30 min. Most importantly, this synthetic process is also cost-effective and eco-friendly in both the precursor (K2FeO4 and H2O) and the product (FeOOH). The mechanism for the formation of a hollow structure was carefully investigated, which involves the synergetic effect of the surfactant CTAB and the side product KOH. Having outstanding biocompatibility, these degradable nanocolloids also demonstrate their feasibility in in vitro/vivo MR imaging and in vitro drug delivery.

  12. Microscopic Theory for Entangled Polymer Dynamics in Rod-Sphere Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Umi; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a self-consistent microscopic theory for the long-time dynamics of needles in an array of static spherical fillers. The approach exactly enforces the dynamical two-body rod topological uncrossability and sphere impenetrability constraints, leading to a generalized concept of entanglements that includes the filler excluded volume effect. How the diffusion anisotropy (transverse versus longitudinal motion) depends on the filler-needle aspect ratio, polymer concentration, and filler volume fraction is established. Due to the steric blocking of the longitudinal reptative motion by obstacles, a literal localization transition is predicted that is generically controlled by the ratio of filler diameter to the pure polymer tube diameter or needle length. For a window of filler sizes and loadings, the needle is predicted to diffuse via a ``renormalized'' reptation dynamics where the tube is compressed and the longitudinal motion is retarded in a manner that depends on all system variables. At high filler volume fractions the needle diffusivity is strongly suppressed, and localization ultimately occurs in the unentangled needle regime. Generalization of the approach to treat mobile fillers, flexible chains, and nonrandom microstructure is also possible.

  13. Facile fabrication and characterization of amino-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cluster@SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanocomposite spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantari, Mohammad; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► A method developed for the preparation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} clusters@SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. ► This method permits production of core/shell nanomaterials with high yields. ► Resultant superparamagnetic particles are monodisperse with high magnetizations. - Abstract: We developed a modified straightforward method for the fabrication of uniformly sized silica-coated magnetite clusters core/shell type nanocomposite particles. Proposed simple one-step processing method permits quick production of materials in high yield. The structural, surface, and magnetic characteristics of the nanocomposite particles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR). The sphere-shaped particles almost have the average diameter of 120 nm, with a magnetic cluster core of 80 ± 15 nm, and a silica shell of 25 ± 10 nm thickness. The particles are superparamagnetic and present strong magnetization (18 emu/g) due to the fact that they possess core of the magnetic clusters. Subsequently, the silica surface of core/shell particles was amino-functionalized via N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EDS). Findings of the present work highlight the potential for using amino-functionalized magnetic silica core/shell nanocomposite particles in biological applications since they possess useful magnetic properties and proper structure.

  14. Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-10

    Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanocomposite, polymer, rheology , tensile modulus Michael E. Mackay, PhD University of Delaware...published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO support from the start of the project to...the date of this printing. List the papers, including journal references, in the following categories: Received Paper TOTAL: (b) Papers published

  15. Synthesis of rambutan-like MoS2/mesoporous carbon spheres nanocomposites with excellent performance for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shouchuan; Hu, Ruirui; Dai, Peng; Yu, Xinxin; Ding, Zongling; Wu, Mingzai; Li, Guang; Ma, Yongqing; Tu, Chuanjun

    2017-02-01

    A novel rambutan-like composite of MoS2/mesoporous carbon spheres were synthesized by a simple two-step hydrothermal and post-annealing approach via using glucose as C source and Na2MoO4·2H2O and thiourea as Mo and S sources. It is found that the morphology and electrochemical properties can be effectively controlled by the change of the weight ratio of coated MoS2 sheets to carbon spheres. When used as electrode material for supercapacitor, the hybrid MoS2/carbon spheres show a high specific capacity of 411 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g and 272 F/g at a high discharge current density of 10 A/g. The annealing treatment at 700 °C transformed the core carbon spheres into mesoporous ones, which served as the conduction network and favor the enhancement of the specific capacitance. In addition, the strain released during the charge/discharge process can be accommodated and the structural integrity can be kept, improving the cycling life. After 1000 cycles, the capacitance retention of the hybrid MoS2/carbon spheres is 93.2%.

  16. Characterization of silver/polystyrene nanocomposites prepared by in situ bulk radical polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Vukoje, Ivana D.; Vodnik, Vesna V.; Džunuzović, Jasna V.; Džunuzović, Enis S.; Marinović-Cincović, Milena T.; Jeremić, Katarina; Nedeljković, Jovan M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of polystyrene nanocomposites based on Ag nanoparticles. • The glass transition temperature decreased in nanocomposites with respect to the pure polymer. • Resistance of the polymer to thermal degradation enhanced with Ag nanoparticles content. - Abstract: Nanocomposites (NCs) with different content of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) embeded in polystyrene (PS) matrix were prepared by in situ bulk radical polymerization. The nearly monodisperse Ag NPs protected with oleylamine were synthesized via organic solvo-thermal method and further used as a filler. The as-prepared spherical Ag NPs with diameter of 7.0 ± 1.5 nm were well dispersed in the PS matrix. The structural properties of the resulting Ag/PS NCs were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while optical properties were characterized using optical absorption measurements. The gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurements showed that the presence of Ag NPs stabilized with oleylamine has no influence on the molecular weight and polydispersity of the PS matrix. The influence of silver content on the thermal properties of Ag/PS NCs was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that resistance of PS to thermal degradation was improved upon incorporation of Ag NPs. The Ag/PS NCs have lower glass transition temperatures than neat PS because loosely packed oleylamine molecules at the interface caused the increase of free volume and chain segments mobility near the surface of Ag NPs.

  17. Tubelike Gold Sphere-Attapulgite Nanocomposites with a High Photothermal Conversion Ability in the Near-Infrared Region for Enhanced Cancer Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Dan; Gao, Jingwen; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-04-27

    Near-infrared (NIR)-induced photothermal therapy (PTT) is now considered to be a promising and highly efficient method for tumor therapy. Photothermal agents play a crucial role in PTT, and they are required to possess the ability to harvest NIR light and transform the photon energy into heat energy. This work reports a facile method to synthesize a new PTT agent, which is based on the electrostatic binding of the Au nanospheres (Au NSs, ∼15 nm) to the surface of a nanometer-sized mineral, attapulgite, to form tubelike Au-attapulgite nanocomposites. These nanocomposites consist of numerous Au NSs, which are linked to each other along the attapulgite surface. The nanocomposites exhibit similar localized surface plasmon resonance absorption characteristics to those of Au nanorods with a longitudinal absorption mode that shifts to the NIR region (∼670 nm). Moreover, the nanocomposites have a high Cabs/Csca ratio (cross section of absorption to scattering) and photothermal conversion efficiency of 25.6%. Their photothermal therapy effect is studied using A549 cells and A549 cell-bearing nude mice as examples. The results indicate that the nanocomposites can be effectively taken up by the cells, and the nanocomposites show good biocompatibility. The A549 cells almost died after they were incubated with the nanocomposites (at 100 μg mL(-1)) for 12 h and irradiated by an 808 nm laser with a power density of 0.5 W cm(-2) for 15 min. The tumors of nude mice can also be effectively ablated without regrowth during the period of observation (at least 10 d) after photothermal therapy.

  18. Ultrathin TiO2 layer coated-CdS spheres core-shell nanocomposite with enhanced visible-light photoactivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhang; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2013-12-26

    Development of various strategies for controllable fabrication of core-shell nanocomposites (CSNs) with highly active photocatalytic performance has been attracting ever-increasing research attention. In particular, control of the ultrathin layer TiO2 shell in constructing CSNs in an aqueous phase is a significant but technologically challenging issue. Here, this paper demonstrates the interface assembly synthesis of CdS nanospheres@TiO2 core-shell photocatalyst via the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged water-stable titania precursor with positively charged CdS nanospheres (CdS NSPs), followed by the formation of the ultrathin-layer TiO2 shell through a facile refluxing process in aqueous phase. The as-formed CdS NSPs@TiO2 core-shell nanohybrid exhibits a high visible-light-driven photoactivity for selective transformation and reduction of heavy metal ions. The ultrathin TiO2 layer coated on CdS NSPs results in excellent light transmission property, enhanced adsorption capacity, and improved transfer of charge carriers and lifespan of photoinduced electron-hole pairs, which would prominently contribute to the significant photoactivity enhancement. It is anticipated that this facile aqueous-phase synthesis strategy could be extended to design a variety of more efficient CSN photocatalysts with controllable morphology toward target applications in diverse photoredox processes.

  19. SPHERES Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andres; Benavides, Jose Victor; Ormsby, Steve L.; GuarnerosLuna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized satellites that provide a test bed for development and research into multi-body formation flying, multi-spacecraft control algorithms, and free-flying physical and material science investigations. Up to three self-contained free-flying satellites can fly within the cabin of the International Space Station (ISS), performing flight formations, testing of control algorithms or as a platform for investigations requiring this unique free-flying test environment. Each satellite is a self-contained unit with power, propulsion, computers, navigation equipment, and provides physical and electrical connections (via standardized expansion ports) for Principal Investigator (PI) provided hardware and sensors.

  20. Polyolefin nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2007-01-02

    The present invention relates to methods for the preparation of clay/polymer nanocomposites. The methods include combining an organophilic clay and a polymer to form a nanocomposite, wherein the organophilic clay and the polymer each have a peak recrystallization temperature, and wherein the organophilic clay peak recrystallization temperature sufficiently matches the polymer peak recrystallization temperature such that the nanocomposite formed has less permeability to a gas than the polymer. Such nanocomposites exhibit 2, 5, 10, or even 100 fold or greater reductions in permeability to, e.g., oxygen, carbon dioxide, or both compared to the polymer. The invention also provides a method of preparing a nanocomposite that includes combining an amorphous organophilic clay and an amorphous polymer, each having a glass transition temperature, wherein the organophilic clay glass transition temperature sufficiently matches the polymer glass transition temperature such that the nanocomposite formed has less permeability to a gas than the polymer.

  1. DISE: directed sphere exclusion.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Lee, Man-Ling

    2003-01-01

    The Sphere Exclusion algorithm is a well-known algorithm used to select diverse subsets from chemical-compound libraries or collections. It can be applied with any given distance measure between two structures. It is popular because of the intuitive geometrical interpretation of the method and its good performance on large data sets. This paper describes Directed Sphere Exclusion (DISE), a modification of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm, which retains all positive properties of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm but generates a more even distribution of the selected compounds in the chemical space. In addition, the computational requirement is significantly reduced, thus it can be applied to very large data sets.

  2. SPHERES Smartphone Workbench

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Smart SPHERES space robot (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) equipped with an Android smartphone performs a video survey inside of the International Space S...

  3. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  4. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  5. Jammed lattice sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a model for the jamming and glass transitions that enables exploration of much higher dimensions than are usually accessible.

  6. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Besshapov, S. P.; Kabanova, N. V.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Antonov, R. A.; Anyuhina, A. M.; Bronvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2009-12-01

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10-10 eV.

  7. Electromagnetically revolving sphere viscometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Maiko; Sakai, Keiji

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of low viscosity measurement, in which the rolling of a probe sphere on the flat solid bottom of a sample cell is driven remotely and the revolution speed of the probe in a sample liquid gives the viscosity measurements. The principle of this method is based on the electromagnetically spinning technique that we developed, and the method is effective especially for viscosity measurements at levels below 100 mPa·s with an accuracy higher than 1%. The probe motion is similar to that in the well-known rolling sphere (ball) method. However, our system enables a steady and continuous measurement of viscosity, which is problematic using the conventional method. We also discuss the limits of the measurable viscosity range common to rolling-sphere-type viscometers by considering the accelerating motion of a probe sphere due to gravity, and we demonstrate the performance of our methods.

  8. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  9. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  10. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  11. ISS Update: Smart SPHERES

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries conducts a phone interview with Mark Micire, SPHERES Engineering Manager at Ames Research Center. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include ...

  12. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  13. Chinese Armillary Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The armillary sphere was perhaps the most important type of astronomical instrument in ancient China. It was first invented by Luoxia Hong in the first century BC. After Han times, the structure of the armillary sphere became increasingly sophisticated by including more and more rings representing various celestial movements as recognized by the Chinese astronomers. By the eighth century, the Chinese armillary sphere consisted of three concentric sets of rings revolving on the south-north polar axis. The relative position of the rings could be adjusted to reflect the precession of the equinoxes and the regression of the Moon's nodes along the ecliptic. To counterbalance the defect caused by too many rings, Guo Shoujing from the late thirteenth century constructed the Simplified Instruments which reorganized the rings of the armillary sphere into separate instruments for measuring equatorial coordinates and horizontal coordinates. The armillary sphere was still preserved because it was a good illustration of celestial movements. A fifteenth-century replica of Guo Shoujing's armillary sphere still exists today.

  14. The Moyal sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Michał; Sitarz, Andrzej; Wulkenhaar, Raimar

    2016-11-01

    We construct a family of constant curvature metrics on the Moyal plane and compute the Gauss-Bonnet term for each of them. They arise from the conformal rescaling of the metric in the orthonormal frame approach. We find a particular solution, which corresponds to the Fubini-Study metric and which equips the Moyal algebra with the geometry of a noncommutative sphere.

  15. Storing Chemicals in Packed Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    Reactants released by crushing or puncturing. Agglomerated gas-filled spheres hexagonally close packed and sintered or glued together into rods strung together at ends. Rods fed into crushing machine to release material in spheres as needed.

  16. Sticky surface: sphere-sphere adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Sarthok; Younger, John G.; Bortz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-scale model to study the attachment of spherical particles with a rigid core, coated with binding ligands and suspended in the surrounding, quiescent fluid medium. This class of fluid-immersed adhesion is widespread in many natural and engineering settings, particularly in microbial surface adhesion. Our theory highlights how the micro-scale binding kinetics of these ligands, as well as the attractive / repulsive surface potential in an ionic medium affects the eventual macro-scale size distribution of the particle aggregates (flocs). The bridge between the micro-macro model is made via an aggregation kernel. Results suggest that the presence of elastic ligands on the particle surface lead to the formation of larger floc aggregates via efficient inter-floc collisions (i.e., non-zero sticking probability, g). Strong electrolytic composition of the surrounding fluid favors large floc formation as well. The kernel for the Brownian diffusion for hard spheres is recovered in the limit of perfect binding effectiveness (g → 1) and in a neutral solution with no dissolved salts. PMID:25159830

  17. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  18. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  19. Structural assessment of nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yong X

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides an overview on structural assessment of nanocomposite materials. First of all, a brief description of advanced structure characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy is presented. Secondly, applications of these methods for analysis of structures and compositions of typical nanocomposites are introduced. The nanocomposites are formed by different nanoscale processing technologies. Electrochemically polymerized polyaniline (PANi) nanocomposites, thermomechanically processed metal matrix nanocomposites, nanocast ceramic matrix composites are typical examples discussed in this paper. Case studies on several functional nanocomposites for energy storage/conversion, catalysis and sensing applications are mentioned. After that, assessment of the interface structures of nanocomposite materials using surface characterization techniques and mechanical damage models is discussed. Finally, concluding remarks are provided.

  20. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  1. Interactions between uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Riffe, D. M.; Ji, Jeong-Young; Booth, William A.

    2017-02-01

    We use simple symmetry arguments suitable for undergraduate students to demonstrate that the magnetic energy, forces, and torques between two uniformly magnetized spheres are identical to those between two point magnetic dipoles. These arguments exploit the equivalence of the field outside of a uniformly magnetized sphere with that of a point magnetic dipole, and pertain to spheres of arbitrary sizes, positions, and magnetizations. The point dipole/sphere equivalence for magnetic interactions may be useful in teaching and research, where dipolar approximations for uniformly magnetized spheres can now be considered to be exact. The work was originally motivated by interest in the interactions between collections of small neodymium magnetic spheres used as desk toys.

  2. Coherent states on spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Brian C.; Mitchell, Jeffrey J.

    2002-03-01

    We describe a family of coherent states and an associated resolution of the identity for a quantum particle whose classical configuration space is the d-dimensional sphere Sd. The coherent states are labeled by points in the associated phase space T*(Sd). These coherent states are not of Perelomov type but rather are constructed as the eigenvectors of suitably defined annihilation operators. We describe as well the Segal-Bargmann representation for the system, the associated unitary Segal-Bargmann transform, and a natural inversion formula. Although many of these results are in principle special cases of the results of Hall and Stenzel, we give here a substantially different description based on ideas of Thiemann and of Kowalski and Rembieliński. All of these results can be generalized to a system whose configuration space is an arbitrary compact symmetric space. We focus on the sphere case in order to carry out the calculations in a self-contained and explicit way.

  3. Magnetic spheres in microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Rameshti, Babak; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2015-06-01

    We apply Mie scattering theory to study the interaction of magnetic spheres with microwaves in cavities beyond the magnetostatic and rotating wave approximations. We demonstrate that both strong and ultrastrong coupling can be realized for stand alone magnetic spheres made from yttrium iron garnet (YIG), acting as an efficient microwave antenna. The eigenmodes of YIG spheres with radii of the order mm display distinct higher angular momentum character that has been observed in experiments.

  4. The toughening mechanisms in epoxy-silica nanocomposites and hybrid epoxy-silica-rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yi-Ling

    In order to improve the crack resistance of epoxy resins, either soft, micron size rubber particles or rigid, micron size spheres are commonly added as toughening agents. The toughening mechanisms induced by soft rubber particles and rigid spheres are different. The fracture behavior of toughened epoxy resins usually show a peak or plateau when the fraction of toughening agent reaches certain level. Therefore, epoxy resins modified by the incorporation of two types of toughening agents can be developed known as the hybrid composites with toughness greater than that when only one type toughening agent is used. Recently, a well dispersed, nanometer size silica spheres produced by sol-gel technology have been added into epoxy resin. The toughening behavior of the epoxy-silica nanocomposite (ESNs) is very interesting since it contradicts many conventional predictions. Moreover, a significant improvement of fracture behavior has been reported in hybrid epoxy-silica-rubber nanocomposite (HESRNs) when a small amount of nanosilica is used. However the toughening mechanisms in ESNs and HESRNs are not clear. The focus of this study is to understand the effect of nanosilica size as well as the nanosilica dispersion on the toughening behavior in ESNs and HESRNs. In addition, a system of hybrid epoxy-rubber?rubber blends (HERRBs) is developed to further elucidate the role of nanosilica in toughening mechanisms of ESNs, HESRNs.

  5. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  6. Laser range profile of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Profile information about a three-dimensional target can be obtained by laser range profile (LRP). A mathematical LRP model from rough sphere is presented. LRP includes laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile. A target coordinate system and an imaging coordinate system are established, the mathematical model of the range profile is derived in the imaging coordinate system. The mathematical model obtained has nothing to do with the incidence direction of laser. It is shown that the laser range profile of the sphere is independent of the incidence direction of laser. This is determined by the symmetry of the sphere. The laser range profile can reflect the shape and material properties of the target. Simulations results of LRP about some spheres are given. Laser range profile of sphere, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profile of sphere, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retro-reflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of sphere are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width on the range profiles are analyzed.

  7. Science off the Sphere: Bistronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  8. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  9. Doxorubicin loaded nanodiamond-silk spheres for fluorescence tracking and controlled drug release

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Asma; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Marelli, Benedetto; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) based technologies have proved to be considerably beneficial for advances in biomedicine especially in the areas of disease detection, drug delivery and bioimaging. Over the last few decades, NPs have garnered interest for their exemplary impacts on the detection, treatment, and prevention of cancer. The full potential of these technologies are yet to be employed for clinical use. The ongoing research and development in this field demands single multifunctional composite materials that can be employed simultaneously for drug delivery and biomedical imaging. In this manuscript, a unique combination of silk fibroin (SF) and nanodiamonds (NDs) in the form of nanospheres are fabricated and investigated. The spheres were loaded with the anthracyline Doxorubicin (DoX) and the drug release kinetics for these ND-SF-DoX (NDSX) spheres were studied. NDs provided the fluorescence modality for imaging while the degradable SF spheres stabilized and released the drug in a controlled manner. The emission and structural properties of the spheres were characterized during drug release. The degradability of SF and the subsequent release of DoX from the spheres were monitored through fluorescence of NDs inside the spheres. This research demonstrates the enormous potential of the ND-SF nanocomposite platforms for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, which are both important for pharmaceutical research and clinical settings. PMID:26819823

  10. Nanocomposite thermite ink

    DOEpatents

    Tappan, Alexander S.; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Stuecker, John N.

    2011-11-01

    A nanocomposite thermite ink for use in inkjet, screen, and gravure printing. Embodiments of this invention do not require separation of the fuel and oxidizer constituents prior to application of the ink to the printed substrate.

  11. Nano-composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of polymer matrix nanocomposites and their components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnside, Shelly Dawn

    sedimentation volume measurements, have been used to determine dispersability behavior of the layered silicates with an array of solvents. The two techniques gave results which were in good agreement with each other. Maps of dispersability or solubility spheres were developed to serve as a guide for solvent behavior for both neat solvents and mixtures. First attempts were made at relating the solubility parameters developed herein to previously reported surface tension values. Also, preliminary attempts have been made at using the solubility parameters as aid in predicting polymer matrix nanocomposite behavior.

  13. Sphere forming method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngberg, C. L.; Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.; Finnerty, A. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided for forming small accurately spherical objects. Preformed largely spherical objects are supported at the opening of a conduit on the update of hot gas emitted from the opening, so the object is in a molten state. The conduit is suddenly jerked away at a downward incline, to allow the molten object to drop in free fall, so that surface tension forms a precise sphere. The conduit portion that has the opening, lies in a moderate vacuum chamber, and the falling sphere passes through the chamber and through a briefly opened valve into a tall drop tower that contains a lower pressure, to allow the sphere to cool without deformation caused by falling through air.

  14. Improved linings for integrating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fergerson, P. O.; French, B. O.

    1970-01-01

    Sphere surface is covered with plain weave of glass fibers coated with polytetrafluoroethylene and one or two layers of magnesium oxide vapor. The resultant lining is suitable for measurement of radiation in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, is not damage prone, and is easily cleaned.

  15. Phase diagram of elastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, L; Ziherl, P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments show that polymeric nanoparticles often self-assemble into several non-close-packed lattices in addition to the face-centered cubic lattice. Here, we explore theoretically the possibility that the observed phase sequences may be associated with the softness of the particles, which are modeled as elastic spheres interacting upon contact. The spheres are described by two finite-deformation theories of elasticity, the modified Saint-Venant-Kirchhoff model and the neo-Hookean model. We determine the range of indentations where the repulsion between the spheres is pairwise additive and agrees with the Hertz theory. By computing the elastic energies of nine trial crystal lattices at densities far beyond the Hertzian range, we construct the phase diagram and find the face- and body-centered cubic lattices as well as the A15 lattice and the simple hexagonal lattice, with the last two being stable at large densities where the spheres are completely faceted. These results are qualitatively consistent with observations, suggesting that deformability may indeed be viewed as a generic property that determines the phase behavior in nanocolloidal suspensions.

  16. Science off the Sphere: Fun with Antibubbles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit injects air bubbles inside a sphere of water to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership betwe...

  17. Fire retardant polyetherimide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Takekoshi, T.; Giannelis, E.P.

    1997-09-01

    Polyetherimide-layered silicates nanocomposites with increased char yield and fire retardancy are described. The use of nanocomposites is a new, environmentally-benign approach to improve fire resistance of polymers. An increase in the aromaticity yields high char residues that normally correlate with higher oxygen index and lower flammability. The often high cost of these materials and the specialized processing techniques required, however, have limited the use of these polymers to certain specialized applications. The effectiveness of fire retardant fillers is also limited since the large amounts required make processing difficult and might inadvertently affect mechanical properties.

  18. Buckling resistant graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, M. A.; Rafiee, J.; Yu, Z.-Z.; Koratkar, N.

    2009-11-01

    An experimental study on buckling of graphene/epoxy nanocomposite beam structures is presented. Significant increase (up to 52%) in critical buckling load is observed with addition of only 0.1% weight fraction of graphene platelets into the epoxy matrix. Based on the classical Euler-buckling model, the buckling load is predicted to increase by ˜32%. The over 50% increase in buckling load observed in our testing suggests a significant enhancement in load transfer effectiveness between the matrix and the graphene platelets under compressive load. Such nanocomposites with high buckling stability show potential as lightweight and buckling-resistant structural elements in aeronautical and space applications.

  19. Rubber rolling over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koiller, J.; Ehlers, K.

    2007-04-01

    “Rubber” coated bodies rolling over a surface satisfy a no-twist condition in addition to the no slip condition satisfied by “marble” coated bodies [1]. Rubber rolling has an interesting differential geometric appeal because the geodesic curvatures of the curves on the surfaces at corresponding points are equal. The associated distribution in the 5 dimensional configuration space has 2 3 5 growth (these distributions were first studied by Cartan; he showed that the maximal symmetries occurs for rubber rolling of spheres with 3:1 diameters ratio and materialize the exceptional group G 2). The 2 3 5 nonholonomic geometries are classified in a companion paper [2] via Cartan’s equivalence method [3]. Rubber rolling of a convex body over a sphere defines a generalized Chaplygin system [4 8] with SO(3) symmetry group, total space Q = SO(3) × S 2 and base S 2, that can be reduced to an almost Hamiltonian system in T* S 2 with a non-closed 2-form ωNH. In this paper we present some basic results on the sphere-sphere problem: a dynamically asymmetric but balanced sphere of radius b (unequal moments of inertia I j but with center of gravity at the geometric center), rubber rolling over another sphere of radius a. In this example ωNH is conformally symplectic [9]: the reduced system becomes Hamiltonian after a coordinate dependent change of time. In particular there is an invariant measure, whose density is the determinant of the reduced Legendre transform, to the power p = 1/2( b/a - 1). Using sphero-conical coordinates we verify the result by Borisov and Mamaev [10] that the system is integrable for p = -1/2 (ball over a plane). They have found another integrable case [11] corresponding to p = -3/2 (rolling ball with twice the radius of a fixed internal ball). Strikingly, a different set of sphero-conical coordinates separates the Hamiltonian in this case. No other integrable cases with different I j are known.

  20. Active swarms on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Henkes, Silke

    2015-02-01

    We show that coupling to curvature nontrivially affects collective motion in active systems, leading to motion patterns not observed in flat space. Using numerical simulations, we study a model of self-propelled particles with polar alignment and soft repulsion confined to move on the surface of a sphere. We observe a variety of motion patterns with the main hallmarks being polar vortex and circulating band states arising due to the incompatibility between spherical topology and uniform motion—a consequence of the "hairy ball" theorem. We provide a detailed analysis of density, velocity, pressure, and stress profiles in the circulating band state. In addition, we present analytical results for a simplified model of collective motion on the sphere showing that frustration due to curvature leads to stable elastic distortions storing energy in the band.

  1. Numerical simulation of a sphere moving down an incline with identical spheres placed equally apart

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Chen, Cheng-lung; Shen, Hsieh Wen

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of an elastic sphere moving down an incline with a string of identical spheres placed equally apart. Two momentum equations and a moment equation formulated for the moving sphere are solved numerically for the instantaneous velocity of the moving sphere on an incline with different angles of inclination. Input parameters for numerical simulation include the properties of the sphere (the radius, density, Poison's ratio, and Young's Modulus of elasticity), the coefficient of friction between the spheres, and a damping coefficient of the spheres during collision.

  2. Principal Fibrations from Noncommutative Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Suijlekom, Walter Van

    2005-11-01

    We construct noncommutative principal fibrations Sθ7→Sθ4 which are deformations of the classical SU(2) Hopf fibration over the four sphere. We realize the noncommutative vector bundles associated to the irreducible representations of SU(2) as modules of coequivariant maps and construct corresponding projections. The index of Dirac operators with coefficients in the associated bundles is computed with the Connes-Moscovici local index formula. "The algebra inclusion is an example of a not-trivial quantum principal bundle."

  3. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chitosan based E. coli cytosine deaminase nanocomposite for potential application in prodrug enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    Yata, Vinod Kumar; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase is a non-mammalian enzyme of widespread interest for prodrug enzyme therapy due to its ability to convert prodrug 5-fluorocytosine into anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Cytosine deaminase enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from E. coli K-12 MTCC 1302 strain. K(m) values for cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine were found to be 0.26 mM and 1.82 mM, respectively. We developed a chitosan-entrapped cytosine deaminase nanocomposite. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed an elongated sphere shape nanocomposite with an average size of 80 nm diameter. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed gel formation and entrapment of cytosine deaminase within the nanocomposite. Sustained release of cytosine deaminase from the nanocomposite up to one week depicted its potential implication in prodrug inducted enzyme therapy.

  4. Polyimide/carbon Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this product is to design and characterize well-defined conductive nanocomposite materials. The materials will be composed of a polymer matrix composed of rigid-backbone polyimides, and will be filled with modified or unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The ultimate design of this project is to create composite materials with optical clarity and a high conductivity.

  5. Homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Koch, E

    2002-11-01

    All homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry have been derived by studying the characteristic Wyckoff positions P -1 1a and P -1 2i of the two triclinic lattice complexes. These sphere packings belong to 30 different types. Only one type exists that has exclusively triclinic sphere packings and no higher-symmetry ones. The inherent symmetry of part of the sphere packings is triclinic for 18 types. Sphere packings of all but six of the 30 types may be realized as stackings of parallel planar nets.

  6. Highly Thermal Conductive Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Veca, Lucia Monica (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for forming carbon-based fillers as may be utilized in forming highly thermal conductive nanocomposite materials. Formation methods include treatment of an expanded graphite with an alcohol/water mixture followed by further exfoliation of the graphite to form extremely thin carbon nanosheets that are on the order of between about 2 and about 10 nanometers in thickness. Disclosed carbon nanosheets can be functionalized and/or can be incorporated in nanocomposites with extremely high thermal conductivities. Disclosed methods and materials can prove highly valuable in many technological applications including, for instance, in formation of heat management materials for protective clothing and as may be useful in space exploration or in others that require efficient yet light-weight and flexible thermal management solutions.

  7. [Multifunctional nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    These novel nanocomposites are microporous nanometal intercalated clays which have been prepared by a polyol process at 200C and a novel microwave-hydrothermal process using ethylene glycol. These novel nanocomposites have been found to be useful in the conversion of coal to asphaltenes. A crystalline tin (IV) arsenate hydroxide hydrate has been made and its lithium selective ion exchange properties have been measured. This exchanger has shown high lithium selectivity. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure have also been studied. Several pillared clays have also been synthesized and their Mg[sup 2+], Li[sup +] and UO[sub 2][sup 2+] selectivity has been measured. The pillared clays appear to show some Li selectivity.

  8. Evaluation of Nanocomposites for Shielding Electromagnetic Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    performance of the nanocomposites containing MWNTs vi exceeded those comprised of NS. This study found that the EMI SE properties for all four MWNT... performance shortfalls. The advantages and characteristics of nanocomposites are still being uncovered and require further examination in order to...properly design and develop nanocomposite structures. One area considered for nanocomposite application is spaceborne systems. Space vehicles are

  9. Floating behavior of hydrophobic glass spheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Zhou, Feng

    2009-08-15

    When a hydrophobic solid sphere is floating on water or salt solutions with different concentrations, it is at equilibrium under the impact of gravity, buoyancy force, and curvature force, the component of surface tension in the vertical direction. We have changed the diameters of the spheres and the concentrations of the two selected salts, NaCl and NaNO(3), to study the floating behaviors of these spheres and the contributions of surface tension and buoyancy force to their floatation. Generally speaking, the surface tension plays a more important role than the buoyancy force when the gravity is small, but the buoyancy force plays an identical or a more important role when the spheres are big enough. The wettability of the spheres significantly influences the height below the contact perimeter especially in salt solutions. The theoretical calculation meniscus slope angles at the sphere three-phase contact line are in agreement with experimental results.

  10. Sphere-Pac Evaluation for Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is sponsoring a project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the objective of conducting the research and development necessary to evaluate the use of sphere-pac transmutation fuel. Sphere-pac fuels were studied extensively in the 1960s and 1970s. More recently, this fuel form is being studied internationally as a potential plutonium-burning fuel. For transmutation fuel, sphere-pac fuels have potential advantages over traditional pellet-type fuels. This report provides a review of development efforts related to the preparation of sphere-pac fuels and their irradiation tests. Based on the results of these tests, comparisons with pellet-type fuels are summarized, the advantages and disadvantages of using sphere-pac fuels are highlighted, and sphere-pac options for the AFCI are recommended. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory development activities are also outlined.

  11. Nanocomposite Polymer Electrolytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-30

    charge on the intercalation of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was investigated using a series of reduced-charge montmorillonites and smectites with...Capacities of Reduced-Charge Nanocomposites were prepared by solution or melt inter- Montmorillonites calation. PEOs with molecular weights (MWs), 7500 (Poly... Montmorillonite High-charge montmorillonite SAz-1, middle-charge mont- by Molecular Simulations. Masters Thesis, Cornell Univerisity, Ithaca, morillonites HD

  12. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  13. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  14. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-20

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  15. Multilayer graphene rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard; Frasca, Daniele; Schulze, Dietmar; Wachtendorf, Volker; Krafft, Bernd; Morys, Michael; Böhning, Martin; Rybak, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer Graphene (MLG), a nanoparticle with a specific surface of BET = 250 m2/g and thus made of only approximately 10 graphene sheets, is proposed as a nanofiller for rubbers. When homogenously dispersed, it works at low loadings enabling the replacement of carbon black (CB), increase in efficiency, or reduction in filler concentration. Actually the appropriate preparation yielded nanocomposites in which just 3 phr are sufficient to significantly improve the rheological, curing and mechanical properties of different rubbers, as shown for Chlorine-Isobutylene-Isoprene Rubber (CIIR), Nitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Natural Rubber (NR), and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR). A mere 3 phr of MLG tripled the Young's modulus of CIIR, an effect equivalent to 20 phr of carbon black. Similar equivalents are observed for MLG/CB mixtures. MLG reduces gas permeability, increases thermal and electrical conductivities, and retards fire behavior. The later shown by the reduction in heat release rate in the cone calorimeter. The higher the nanofiller concentration is (3 phr, 5 phr, and 10 phr was investigated), the greater the improvement in the properties of the nanocomposites. Moreover, the MLG nanocomposites improve stability of mechanical properties against weathering. An increase in UV-absorption as well as a pronounced radical scavenging are proposed and were proved experimentally. To sum up, MLG is interesting as a multifunctional nanofiller and seems to be quite ready for rubber development.

  16. Microgravity and the Formation of Latex Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This set of photographs illustrates the value of microgravity in the formation of latex spheres. The image at left shows irregular spheres produced on Earth, while the photograph at right shows uniform spheres produced during the STS-3 mission, March 22 - 30, 1982, in the Monodisperse Latex Reactor, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and Lehigh University. The Marshall-managed MLR experiment demonstrated the feasibility of producing monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in space and their application to medicine and industry.

  17. Process for making hollow carbon spheres

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

    2013-04-16

    A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

  18. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  19. Science off the Sphere: Earth in Infrared

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit views cities, agricultural areas and deserts using an infrared camera for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA...

  20. Dynamical interactions between two uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Edwards, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the two-dimensional motion of a magnet sphere in the presence of a second, fixed sphere provide a convenient venue for exploring magnet-magnet interactions, inertia, friction, and rich nonlinear dynamical behavior. These studies exploit the equivalence of these magnetic interactions to the interactions between two equivalent point dipoles. We show that magnet-magnet friction plays a role when magnet spheres are in contact, table friction plays a role at large sphere separations, and eddy currents are always negligible. Web-based simulation and visualization software, called MagPhyx, is provided for education, exploration, and discovery.

  1. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-09

    Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

  2. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1979-01-09

    Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  3. Magnetic torque on a rotating superconducting sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    The London theory of superconductivity is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in a uniform applied magnetic field. The London theory is combined with classical electrodynamics for a calculation of the direct effect of excess charge on a rotating superconducting sphere. Classical electrodynamics, with the assumption of a perfect Meissner effect, is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in an arbitrary magnetic induction; this macroscopic approach yields results which are correct to first order. Using the same approach, the torque due to a current loop encircling the rotating sphere is calculated.

  4. Small-world networks on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corso, Gilberto; Torres Cruz, Claudia P.

    2017-01-01

    The Small-World Network on a Sphere SWNS is a non-crossing network that has no hubs and presents the small-world property diam log N with diam being the maximal distance between any two vertices and N being the number of vertices. The SWNS is constructed using a partition of the sphere and the parallels are regular sections of the sphere with constant latitude. The number of cells on the parallels, however, increases exponentially from the pole to the equator of the sphere. We analytically compute the distribution of connectivity, the clustering coefficient and the SWNS distances. The resilience of the model against selective attacks is also discussed.

  5. Aperture correction for a sphere interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold Nicolaus, R.; Bönsch, Gerhard

    2009-12-01

    Considerations have been made to derive a correction for the diameter measurements of a sphere by means of a special sphere interferometer. This correction is caused by the finite diameter of the light source acting as the entrance 'pinhole' aperture in the light collimating system. The finite diameter has the effect that the wave which is incident on the sphere is a superposition of spherical waves which are slightly inclined with respect to each other. The resulting correction is essential for high accuracy dimensional measurements of silicon spheres to determine the Avogadro constant—a new determination of which is a contribution to a new definition of the kilogram.

  6. Chimera grid simulations of falling spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Thomas; Schauerhamer, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Many applications involve modeling a system with moving objects larger than the grid, such as air pollution, combustion systems, accident simulations, chemical and agricultural processes. The chimera grid approach is an efficient approach to solve such problems. Simulations of one sphere falling under the influence of gravity and suction through an orifice will be presented. Additionally, we will demonstrate collisions between two moving spheres. In this simulation the setup is the same as in the one sphere case, but two spheres are placed side by side. Both are released to be acted upon by gravity, the suction, and each other.

  7. Nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels mimic native tissue microenvironment due to their porous and hydrated molecular structure. An emerging approach to reinforce polymeric hydrogels and to include multiple functionalities focuses on incorporating nanoparticles within the hydrogel network. A wide range of nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, polymeric, ceramic, and metallic nanomaterials can be integrated within the hydrogel networks to obtain nanocomposites with superior properties and tailored functionality. Nanocomposite hydrogels can be engineered to possess superior physical, chemical, electrical, and biological properties. This review focuses on the most recent developments in the field of nanocomposite hydrogels with emphasis on biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In particular, we discuss synthesis and fabrication of nanocomposite hydrogels, examine their current limitations and conclude with future directions in designing more advanced nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:24264728

  8. Improved Chemical Protective Gloves Using Elastomeric Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-06

    Nanocomposite Coatings of neoprene and nitrile Rubber based on InMat’s environmentally friendly, water based , Nanolok coating technology have... nanocomposites . One of the initial problems they encountered was with the butyl based nanocomposite , Air D-Fense 2000R (AD2000R). There was no adhesion with... butyl based nanocomposite , Air D-Fense 2000R. Once InMat was able to provide Best with the neoprene based nanocomposite (Nanolok NP), they

  9. Phase diagram of Hertzian spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pàmies, Josep C.; Cacciuto, Angelo; Frenkel, Daan

    2009-07-01

    We report the phase diagram of interpenetrating Hertzian spheres. The Hertz potential is purely repulsive, bounded at zero separation, and decreases monotonically as a power law with exponent 5/2, vanishing at the overlapping threshold. This simple functional describes the elastic interaction of weakly deformable bodies and, therefore, it is a reliable physical model of soft macromolecules, like star polymers and globular micelles. Using thermodynamic integration and extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we computed accurate free energies of the fluid phase and a large number of crystal structures. For this, we defined a general primitive unit cell that allows for the simulation of any lattice. We found multiple re-entrant melting and first-order transitions between crystals with cubic, trigonal, tetragonal, and hexagonal symmetries.

  10. Dynamical simulations of sedimenting spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of rigid spheres has been studied by dynamical simulation; computational techniques are described and numerical results are reported. It has been found that there is a slow relaxation of the suspension microstructure during sedimentation, so that compared with the initial equilibrium distribution, there is an increased number of pairs of particles near contact; this leads to a 5%--10% increase in the average sedimentation velocity. Individual particle velocities fluctuate about the mean fall speed; these fluctuations are large and persist for long times. The resulting hydrodynamically induced dispersion of the particles can be characterized by strongly anisotropic diffusion coefficients; however, the dispersion process is non-Fickian at high solids concentrations.

  11. Phononic crystals of poroelastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alevizaki, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Morvan, B.; Stefanou, N.

    2016-11-01

    An extension of the layer-multiple-scattering method to phononic crystals of poroelastic spheres immersed in a fluid medium is developed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on specific examples of close-packed fcc crystals of submerged water-saturated meso- and macroporous silica microspheres. It is shown that, by varying the pore size and/or the porosity, the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of finite slabs of these crystals are significantly altered. Strong absorption, driven by the slow waves in the poroelastic material and enhanced by multiple scattering, leads to negligible transmittance over an extended frequency range, which might be useful for practical applications in broadband acoustic shielding. The results are analyzed by reference to relevant phononic dispersion diagrams in the viscous and inertial coupling limits, and a consistent interpretation of the underlying physics is provided.

  12. The "Magical" Sphere: Uncovering the Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Bukleski, Miha

    2006-01-01

    A red sphere is seen at the bottom of a sealed glass tube filled with a colorless, transparent liquid. Holding the tube for a short period makes the sphere rise slowly from the bottom until it finally floats on the surface of the liquid. Instructions for preparing the demonstration are given, together with an explanation of the phenomenon. A…

  13. An introduction to polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Gordon

    2015-11-01

    This review presents an overview of the formulation, characterization and range of applications for polymer nanocomposites. After explaining how material properties at the nanometre scale can vary compared to those observed at longer length scales, typical methods used to formulate and characterize nanocomposites at laboratory and industrial scale will be described. The range of mechanical, electrical and thermal properties obtainable from nanocomposite materials, with examples of current commercial applications, will be outlined. Formulation and characterization of nanoparticle, nanotube and graphene composites will be discussed by reference to nanoclay-based composites, as the latter are presently of most technological relevance. Three brief case studies are presented to demonstrate how structure/property relationships may be controlled in a variety of polymer nanocomposite systems to achieve required performance in a given application. The review will conclude by discussing potential obstacles to commercial uptake of polymer nanocomposites, such as inconsistent protocols to characterize nanocomposites, cost/performance balances, raw material availability, and emerging legislation, and will conclude by discussing the outlook for future development and commercial uptake of polymer nanocomposites.

  14. Synthesis and photo-degradation application of WO3/TiO2 hollow spheres.

    PubMed

    Lv, Kezhen; Li, Jie; Qing, Xiaoxia; Li, Wenzhang; Chen, Qiyuan

    2011-05-15

    A WO(3)/TiO(2) composite, hollow-sphere photocatalyst with average diameter of 320 nm and shell thickness of 50 nm was successfully prepared using a template method. UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra illustrated that the main absorption edges of the WO(3)/TiO(2) hollow spheres were red-shifted compared to the TiO(2) hollow spheres, indicating an extension of light absorption into the visible region of the composite photocatalyst. The WO(3) and TiO(2) phases were confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. BET isotherms revealed that the specific surface area and average pore diameter of the hollow spheres were 40.95 m(2)/g and 19 nm, respectively. Photocatalytic experiments indicate that 78% MB was degraded by WO(3)/TiO(2) hollow spheres under visible light within 80 min. Under the same conditions, only 24% MB can be photodegraded by TiO(2). The photocatalytic mineralization of MB, catalyzed by TiO(2) and WO(3)/TiO(2), proceeded at a significantly higher rate under UV irradiation than that under visible light, and more significant was the increase in the apparent rate constant with the WO(3)/TiO(2) composite semiconductor material which was 3.2- and 3.5-fold higher than with the TiO(2) material under both UV and visible light irradiation. The increased photocatalytic activity of the coupled nanocomposites was attributed to photoelectron/hole separation efficiency and the extension of the wavelength range of photoexcitation.

  15. Functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nanocomposite fibrous networks: Characterization by fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Neda

    2015-02-01

    The preparation and characterization of functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nano-composite fibrous material is described. Magnetite-cellulose nano-composite was prepared by a combination of the solution-based formation of magnetic nano-particles and subsequent coating with amino celluloses. Characterization was accomplished using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis. The peaks of Fe3O4 in the XRD pattern of nanocomposite confirm existence of the nanoparticles in the amino cellulose matrix. Magnetite-cellulose particles exhibit an average diameter of roughly 33 nm as demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles were irregular spheres dispersed in the cellulose matrix. The vibration corresponding to the Nsbnd CH3 functional group about 2850 cm-1 is assigned in the FTIR spectra. Functionalized magnetite-cellulose nano-composite polymers have a potential range of application as targeted drug delivery system in biomedical field.

  16. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; ...

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads tomore » new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.« less

  17. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  18. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  19. Recent advances in biodegradable nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jitendra K; Kumar, A Pratheep; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K; Drzal, Lawrence T; Singh, Raj Pal

    2005-04-01

    There is growing interest in developing bio-based products and innovative process technologies that can reduce the dependence on fossil fuel and move to a sustainable materials basis. Biodegradable bio-based nanocomposites are the next generation of materials for the future. Renewable resource-based biodegradable polymers including cellulosic plastic (plastic made from wood), corn-derived plastics, and polyhydroxyalkanoates (plastics made from bacterial sources) are some of the potential biopolymers which, in combination with nanoclay reinforcement, can produce nanocomposites for a variety of applications. Nanocomposites of this category are expected to possess improved strength and stiffness with little sacrifice of toughness, reduced gas/water vapor permeability, a lower coefficient of thermal expansion, and an increased heat deflection temperature, opening an opportunity for the use of new, high performance, lightweight green nanocomposite materials to replace conventional petroleum-based composites. The present review addresses this green material, including its technical difficulties and their solutions.

  20. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  1. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  2. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  3. Unconventional assembly of bimetallic Au-Ni janus nanoparticles on chemically modified silica spheres.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lei; Pei, Xiaowei; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2014-02-10

    This paper reports that Janus Au-Ni nanoparticles (JANNPs) can self-assemble onto silica spheres in a novel way, which is different from that of single-component isotropic nanoparticles. JANNPs modified with octadecylamine (ODA) assemble onto catechol-modified silica spheres (SiO2-OH) to form a very special core-loop complex structure and finally the core-loop assemblies link each other to form large assemblies through capillary force and the hydrophobic interaction of the alkyl chains of ODA. The nanocomposites disassemble in the presence of vanillin and oleic acid because of the breakage of the catechol-metal link. Vanillin-induced disassembly enables the JANNPs to reassemble into a core-loop structure upon ODA addition. The assembly of SiO2-OH and isotropic Ni or Fe3O4 particles generates traditional core-satellite structures. This unconventional self-assembly can be attributed to the synergistic effect of Janus specificity and capillary force, which is also confirmed by the assembly of thiol-terminated silica spheres (SH-SiO2) with anisotropic JANNPs, isotropic Au, and Ni nanoparticles. These results can guide the development of novel composite materials using Janus nanoparticles as the primary building blocks.

  4. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) nanocomposites with optimal mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuping; Kohls, Doug; Noda, Isao; Schaefer, Dale W.; Akpalu, Yvonne A.

    2010-02-19

    With the ultimate goal to design renewable polymer nanocomposites with optimal mechanical properties, this study reports an investigation of structure-property relationships for a model system - silica/poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHx) nanocomposites. Two molecular weights of PHBHx (M{sub w} = 903,000 g/mol and M{sub w} = 633,000 g/mol) and two types of silica nanoparticles (nominally spheres and fibers according to the manufacturer) were used to prepare the nanocomposites. Small-angle X-ray scattering shows that the sphere and fiber nanoparticles had similar surface areas and primary particle size, but differed in degree of aggregation of the primary particles. The thermal stability of the PHBHx matrix was slightly improved by the addition of nanofillers. Simultaneous improvement of both stiffness and toughness was observed at 1-wt% loading for the higher molecular weight matrix. The more highly aggregated SiO{sub 2} fibers had a greater toughening effect than the SiO{sub 2} spheres. Compared to the unfilled polymer matrix, a 30% increase in Young's modulus and 34% increase in toughness were obtained for the 1-wt% SiO{sub 2} fiber/PHBHx072 nanocomposite. The addition of SiO{sub 2} spheres to PHBHx072 resulted in the same increase in Young's modulus (30%) but a smaller increase (11%) in toughness. The dramatic increases in modulus for PHBHx072 cannot be explained on the basis of two-component micromechanical models. Apparently the filler alters the character of the semicrystalline matrix. When the loading was 3 wt% and above, Young's modulus continued to increase, but the strain at break and toughness decreased. The ultimate strength did not change compared with the unfilled polymer. In order to understand the mechanical properties observed, the thermal behavior, spherulitic morphology and the deformation mechanisms of the nanocomposites and the dispersion state of the nanofillers were studied. We found that a high molecular weight of the

  5. Separate spheres and indirect benefits

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Dan W

    2003-01-01

    On any plausible account of the basis for health care resource prioritization, the benefits and costs of different alternative resource uses are relevant considerations in the prioritization process. Consequentialists hold that the maximization of benefits with available resources is the only relevant consideration. Non-consequentialists do not reject the relevance of consequences of benefits and costs, but insist that other considerations, and in particular the distribution of benefits and costs, are morally important as well. Whatever one's particular account of morally justified standards for the prioritization of different health interventions, we must be able to measure those interventions' benefits and costs. There are many theoretical and practical difficulties in that measurement, such as how to weigh extending life against improving health and quality of life as well as how different quality of life improvements should be valued, but they are not my concern here. This paper addresses two related issues in assessing benefits and costs for health resource prioritization. First, should benefits be restricted only to health benefits, or include as well other non health benefits such as economic benefits to employers from reducing the lost work time due to illness of their employees? I shall call this the Separate Spheres problem. Second, should only the direct benefits, such as extending life or reducing disability, and direct costs, such as costs of medical personnel and supplies, of health interventions be counted, or should other indirect benefits and costs be counted as well? I shall call this the Indirect Benefits problem. These two issues can have great importance for a ranking of different health interventions by either a cost/benefit or cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) standard. PMID:12773217

  6. Magnetoelectric polymer nanocomposite for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Alnassar, M. Alfadhel, A.; Ivanov, Yu. P.; Kosel, J.

    2015-05-07

    This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of a new type of magnetoelectric polymer nanocomposite that exhibits excellent ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity simultaneously at room temperature. The multiferroic nanocomposite consists of high aspect ratio ferromagnetic iron nanowires embedded inside a ferroelectric co-polymer poly(vinylindene fluoride-trifluoroethylene), P(VDF-TrFE). The nanocomposite has been fabricated via a simple low temperature spin coating technique. Structural, ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, and magnetoelectric properties of the developed nanocomposite have been characterized. The nanocomposite films showed isotropic magnetic properties due to the random orientation of the iron nanowires inside the film. In addition, the embedded nanowires did not hinder the ferroelectric phase development of the nanocomposite. The developed nanocomposite showed a high magnetoelectric coupling response of 156 mV/cmOe measured at 3.1 kOe DC bias field. This value is among the highest reported magnetoelectric coupling in two phase particulate polymer nanocomposites.

  7. Effect of Nanofiller Characteristics on Nanocomposite Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Working, Dennis C.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wise, Kristopher E.; Park, Cheol

    2016-01-01

    This report surveys the effect of nanofiller characteristics on nanocomposites fabricated with two polyimide matrices. Mechanical and electrical properties were determined. Microscopy results showed that matrix chemistry, nanofiller characteristics and processing conditions had significant impact on nanocomposite quality.

  8. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  9. Science off the Sphere: Knitting Needles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit uses knitting needles and water droplets to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between N...

  10. Science off the Sphere: Lenses and Vortices

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  11. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  12. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  13. Science off the Sphere: Thin Film Physics

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  14. #4 Simulated Solar Sphere from Data - Interpolated

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rotating solar sphere made from a combination of imagery from the two STEREO spacecraft, together with simultaneous data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory.This movie is made from data taken on Jan...

  15. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  16. Laminar Flow past a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    In this study, laminar flow past a rotating sphere is numerically investigated to understand the effect of the streamwise rotation on the flow characteristics behind a sphere. The present numerical method is based on a newly developed immersed boundary method in a cylindrical coordinate. Numerical simulations are performed at Re =100, 250 and 300 in the range of 0 <= ω^* <= 1.0, where ω^* is the maximum circumferential speed at the sphere surface normalized by the free-stream velocity. At ω^*=0 (without rotation), the flow past a sphere experiences steady axisymmetry, steady plane-symmetry, and unsteady plane-symmetry, respectively, at Re =100, 250 and 300. When the rotational speed increases, the drag increases for all the Reynolds numbers investigated, whereas the lift shows a non-monotonic behavior depending on the Reynolds number. At Re =100, the flow past a sphere shows steady axisymmetry for all the rotational speeds considered and thus the lift is zero. On the other hand, at Re =250 and 300, the flow becomes unsteady with rotation. With increasing rotational speed, the lift first decreases and then increases, showing a local minimum of lift at a specific rotational speed. The three-dimensional vortical structures behind a sphere are significantly modified by the streamwise rotation. For example, the vortical structures at Re =300 are completely changed and phase locked with rotation at ω^*=0.6.

  17. Inverse Magnus effect on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of rotating spheres in the subcritical Reynolds number (Re) regime by measuring the drag and lift forces on the sphere and the two-dimensional velocity in the wake. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 6 ×105 - 2 . 6 ×105 and the spin ratio (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 0.5. The drag coefficient on a stationary sphere remains nearly constant at around 0.52. However, the magnitude of lift coefficient is nearly zero at Re < 2 . 0 ×105 , but rapidly increases to 0.3 and then remains constant with further increasing Reynolds number. On the other hand, with rotation, the lift coefficient shows negative values, called inverse Magnus effect, depending on the magnitudes of the Reynolds number and spin ratio. The velocity field measured from a particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that non-zero lift coefficient on a stationary sphere at Re > 2 . 0 ×105 results from the asymmetry of separation line, whereas the inverse Magnus effect for the rotating sphere results from the differences in the boundary-layer growth and separation along the upper and lower sphere surfaces. Supported by the WCU, Converging Research Center and Priority Research Centers Program, NRF, MEST, Korea.

  18. Nanocomposites of POC and quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borriello, C.; Concilio, S.; Minarini, C.; Iannelli, P.; Di Luccio, T.

    2012-07-01

    New luminescent polymer nanocomposites were synthesized combining carbazole/oxadiazole copolymer (POC) and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) surface passivated by ionic liquids. Ionic liquid ligands improve the photostability of QDs and their compatibility with polymer allowing the deposition of homogeneous nanocomposites films. The nanocomposites were characterized by UV and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  19. Geometry Dependence of Magnetization Reversal in Nanocomposite Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, Ralph; Manchanda, Priyanka; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Cui, Jun

    2014-06-11

    The geometrical optimization of aligned hard-soft permanent-magnet nanocomposites is investigated by model calculations. Considered criteria are the shapes of the soft and c-axis-aligned hard phases, the packing fraction of the soft phase, and magnetostatic interactions. Taking into account that the energy product is enhanced via the volume fraction of the soft phase, subject to maintaining coercivity, we find that the best structures are soft-magnetic cubes as well as long rods with a square cross section. Comparing embedded soft cubes with embedded soft spheres of the same size, our nucleation-field analysis shows that the volume fraction of the soft phase is enhanced by 91%, with a coercivity reduction of only 25%. Magnetostatic interactions often but not always deteriorate the permanent-magnet performance, as exemplified by the example of MnBi:FeCo bilayers and multilayers.

  20. Geometry Dependence of Magnetization Reversal in Nanocomposite Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R; Manchanda, P; Takeuchi, I; Cui, J

    2014-05-31

    The geometrical optimization of aligned hard-soft permanent-magnet nanocomposites is investigated by model calculations. Considered criteria are the shapes of the soft and c-axis-aligned hard phases, the packing fraction of the soft phase, and magnetostatic interactions. Taking into account that the energy product is enhanced via the volume fraction of the soft phase, subject to maintaining coercivity, we find that the best structures are soft-magnetic cubes as well as long rods with a square cross section. Comparing embedded soft cubes with embedded soft spheres of the same size, our nucleation-field analysis shows that the volume fraction of the soft phase is enhanced by 91%, with a coercivity reduction of only 25%. Magnetostatic interactions often but not always deteriorate the permanent-magnet performance, as exemplified by the example of MnBi:FeCo bilayers and multilayers.

  1. Terminal energy distribution of blast waves from bursting spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, A. A.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation results for the total energy delivered to the surroundings by the burst of an idealized massless sphere containing an ideal gas are presented. The logic development of various formulas for sphere energy is also presented. For all types of sphere bursts the fraction of the total initial energy available in the sphere that is delivered to the surroundings is shown to lie between that delivered for the constant pressure addition of energy to a source region and that delivered by isentropic expansion of the sphere. The relative value of E sub/Q increases at fixed sphere pressure/surrounding pressure as sphere temperature increases because the velocity of sound increases.

  2. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrea L.; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals’ endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  3. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrea L; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals' endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology.

  4. Recent researches on the air resistance of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachsbart, O

    1928-01-01

    The following conclusions on air resistance of spheres are drawn: 1) disturbances in front of the sphere and even single fine wires affect the critical Reynolds Number; 2) disturbances around the sphere increased the drag of the sphere without martially affecting the value of the Reynolds Number(sub crith); 3) great disturbances of the boundary layer of the sphere likewise change R.N.(sub crith); 4) turbulence of the approaching air stream lowers critical R.N.

  5. The effect of size ratio on the sphere structure factor in colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinacchi, G.; Doshi, N.; Prescott, S. W.; Cosgrove, T.; Grillo, I.; Lindner, P.; Phipps, J. S.; Gittins, D.; van Duijneveldt, J. S.

    2012-11-01

    Binary mixtures of colloidal particles of sufficiently different sizes or shapes tend to demix at high concentration. Already at low concentration, excluded volume interactions between the two species give rise to structuring effects. Here, a new theoretical description is proposed of the structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, based on a density expansion of the work needed to insert a pair of spheres and a single sphere in a sea of them, in the presence or not of plates. The theory is first validated using computer simulations. The predictions are then compared to experimental observations using silica spheres and gibbsite platelets. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the change of the structure factor of spheres on addition of platelets, under solvent contrast conditions where the platelets were invisible. Theory and experiment agreed very well for a platelet/sphere diameter ratio D/d = 2.2 and reasonably well for D/d = 5. The sphere structure factor increases at low scattering vector Q in the presence of platelets; a weak reduction of the sphere structure factor was predicted at larger Q, and for the system with D/d = 2.2 was indeed observed experimentally. At fixed particle volume fraction, an increase in diameter ratio leads to a large change in structure factor. Systems with a larger diameter ratio also phase separate at lower concentrations.

  6. Polycarbonate based three-phase nanocomposite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Goyal, R. K.; Prasad, Y. V. S. S.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Three-phase polycarbonate (PC) matrix nanocomposites are prepared using the solution method. One of the nanocomposite fillers is dielectric and the other is conducting. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is used as the dielectric filler. The conducting fillers, nano-Cu and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), are used to make two different nanocomposites, MWCNT-PZT-PC and Cu-PZT-PC. The prepared nanocomposites are characterized using density measurement, x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Percolation is absent in both three-phase nanocomposites within the study’s concentration window of conducting fillers. The dielectric properties of the nanocomposites are evaluated using a precision impedance analyser. The dielectric constant of the Cu-PZT-PC nanocomposite increases to 14 (a dissipation factor of 0.17), whereas in the case of the MWCNT-PZT-PC nanocomposite it increases to 8.5 (a dissipation factor of 0.002). The melting point of both nanocomposites decreases with respect to the control PC. The frequency (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and temperature (room temperature to 200 °C) dependence of the dielectric constant and dissipation factor are examined. For the Cu-PZT-PC nanocomposites, the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency, whereas in the case of the MWCNT-PZT-PC nanocomposites the dielectric constant is almost constant. The dielectric constant and dissipation factor exhibit a slight temperature dependence.

  7. Water exit dynamics of buoyant spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Epps, Brenden P.; Munns, Randy H.

    2016-11-01

    Buoyant spheres released below the free surface can rise well above the surface in a phenomenon known as pop-up. Contrary to intuition, increasing the release depth sometimes results in a lower pop-up height. We present the pop-up height of rising buoyant spheres over a range of release depths (1-12.5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4 ×104 to 6 ×105 ). While the dynamics of rising buoyant spheres and bubbles has been thoroughly investigated for Reynolds numbers below 104, pop-up in these larger-Reynolds-number regimes has not been studied. Yet the underwater motions of the sphere for the Reynolds numbers we study are the key to understanding the pop-up height. Two major regimes are apparent: vertical and oscillatory. The vertical regime exhibits a nearly vertical underwater trajectory and results in the largest pop-up heights. The oscillatory regime exhibits an underwater trajectory with periodic lateral motions and results in lower pop-up heights; this periodic lateral motion is modulated by unsteady vortex shedding in the wake of the sphere. Despite these complex fluid structure interactions, the experiments presented herein yield extremely repeatable results.

  8. Robotics Programming Competition Spheres, Russian Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Kukushkina, Natalia; Biryukova, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Spheres" such name was done to Russian part of the Zero Robotics project which is a student competition devoted to programming of SPHERES (SPHERES - Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites are the experimental robotics devices which are capable of rotation and translation in all directions, http://ssl.mit.edu/spheres/), which perform different operations on the board of International Space Station. Competition takes place online on http://zerorobotics.mit.edu. The main goal is to develop a program for SPHERES to solve an annual challenge. The end of the tournament is the real competition in microgravity on the board of ISS with a live broadcast. The Russian part of the tournament has only two years history but the problems, organization and specific are useful for the other educational projects especially for the international ones. We introduce the history of the competition, its scientific and educational goals in Russia and describe the participation of Russian teams in 2014 and 2015 tournaments. Also we discuss the organizational problems.

  9. The thermal conductivity of beds of spheres

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Shapiro, M.; Longest, A.W.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal conductivities (k) of beds of solid and hollow microspheres were measured using two radial heat flow techniques. One technique provided k-data at 300 K for beds with the void spaces between particles filled with argon, nitrogen, or helium from 5 kPa to 30 MPa. The other technique provided k-data with air at atmospheric pressure from 300 to 1000 K. The 300 K technique was used to study bed systems with high k-values that can be varied by changing the gas type and gas pressure. Such systems can be used to control the operating temperature of an irradiation capsule. The systems studied included beds of 500 ..mu..m dia solid Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, the same Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ spheres mixed with spheres of silica--alumina or with SiC shards, carbon spheres, and nickel spheres. Both techniques were used to determine the k-value of beds of hollow spheres with solid shells of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//center dot/7 w/o Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and partially stabilized ZrO/sub 2/. The hollow microspheres had diameters from 2100 to 3500 ..mu..m and wall thicknesses from 80 to 160 ..mu..m. 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Absorption and scattering by bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres and their equivalent coated spheres.

    PubMed

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Sy, Ki Cheong; Pilon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the absorption and scattering cross sections and asymmetry factor of randomly oriented and optically soft bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres, with either monodisperse or polydisperse monomers, can be approximated by an equivalent coated sphere with identical volume and average projected area. This approximation could also apply to the angle-dependent scattering matrix elements for monomer size parameter less than 0.1. However, it quickly deteriorated with increasing monomer number and/or size parameter. It was shown to be superior to previously proposed approximations considering a volume equivalent homogeneous sphere and a coated sphere with identical volume and surface area. These results provide a rapid and accurate way of predicting the radiation characteristics of bispheres, quadspheres, and rings of spheres representative of various unicellular and multicellular cyanobacteria considered for producing food supplements, biofuels, and fertilizers. They could also be used in inverse methods for retrieving the monomers' optical properties, morphology, and/or concentration.

  11. Thermodynamic properties of non-conformal soft-sphere fluids with effective hard-sphere diameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Tonalli; del Río, Fernando

    2012-01-28

    In this work we study a set of soft-sphere systems characterised by a well-defined variation of their softness. These systems represent an extension of the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential widely used in statistical mechanics of fluids. This type of soft spheres is of interest because they represent quite accurately the effective intermolecular repulsion in fluid substances and also because they exhibit interesting properties. The thermodynamics of the soft-sphere fluids is obtained via an effective hard-sphere diameter approach that leads to a compact and accurate equation of state. The virial coefficients of soft spheres are shown to follow quite simple relationships that are incorporated into the equation of state. The approach followed exhibits the rescaling of the density that produces a unique equation for all systems and temperatures. The scaling is carried through to the level of the structure of the fluids.

  12. Nanocomposite Sensors for Food Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avella, Maurizio; Errico, Maria Emanuela; Gentile, Gennaro; Volpe, Maria Grazia

    Nowadays nanotechnologies applied to the food packaging sector find always more applications due to a wide range of benefits that they can offer, such as improved barrier properties, improved mechanical performance, antimicrobial properties and so on. Recently many researches are addressed to the set up of new food packaging materials, in which polymer nanocomposites incorporate nanosensors, developing the so-called "smart" packaging. Some examples of nanocomposite sensors specifically realised for the food packaging industry are reported. The second part of this work deals with the preparation and characterisation of two new polymer-based nanocomposite systems that can be used as food packaging materials. Particularly the results concerning the following systems are illustrated: isotactic polypropylene (iPP) filled with CaCO3 nanoparticles and polycaprolactone (PCL) filled with SiO2 nanoparticles.

  13. Classical and quantum dynamics of the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasukov, Vladimir; Moldovanova, Evgeniia; Abdrashitova, Maria; Malik, Hitendra; Gorbacheva, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    In Minkowski space, there has been developed the mathematic quantum model of the real particle located on the sphere evolving owing to the negative pressure inside the sphere. The developed model is analogous to the geometrodynamic model of the Lemaitre-Friedmann primordial atom in superspace-time, whose spatial coordinate is the scale factor functioning as a radial coordinate. There is a formulation of quantum geometrodynamics in which the spatial coordinate is an offset of the scale factor and wave function at the same time. With the help of the Dirac procedure for extracting the root from the Hamiltonian operator we have constructed a Dirac quantum dynamics of the sphere with fractional spin.

  14. Asymmetric capillary bridges between contacting spheres.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Timothy P; Bird, James C

    2015-09-15

    When a drop of liquid wets two identical solid spheres, the liquid forms a capillary bridge between the spheres to minimize surface energy. In the absence of external forces, these bridges are typically assumed to be axisymmetric, and the shape that minimizes surface energy can be calculated analytically. However under certain conditions, the bridge is axisymmetrically unstable, and migrates to a non-axisymmetric configuration. The goal of this paper is to characterize these non-axisymmetric capillary bridges. Specifically, we numerically calculate the shape of the capillary bridge between two contacting spheres that minimizes the total surface energy for a given volume and contact angle and compare to experiments. When the bridge is asymmetric, finite element calculations demonstrate that the shape of the bridge is spherical. In general, the bridge shape depends on both volume and contact angle, yet we find the degree of asymmetry is controlled by a single parameter.

  15. The flow past a freely rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, David; Tchoufag, Joël; Citro, Vincenzo; Giannetti, Flavio; Luchini, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We consider the flow past a sphere held at a fixed position in a uniform incoming flow but free to rotate around a transverse axis. A steady pitchfork bifurcation is reported to take place at a threshold Re^OS=206 leading to a state with zero torque but nonzero lift. Numerical simulations allow to characterize this state up to Re≈ 270 and confirm that it substantially differs from the steady-state solution which exists in the wake of a fixed, non-rotating sphere beyond the threshold Re^SS=212 . A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out and is shown to successfully reproduce the results and to give substantial improvement over a previous analysis (Fabre et al. in J Fluid Mech 707:24-36, 2012). The connection between the present problem and that of a sphere in free fall following an oblique, steady (OS) path is also discussed.

  16. Stretchable piezoelectric nanocomposite generator.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwi-Il; Jeong, Chang Kyu; Kim, Na Kyung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric energy conversion that generate electric energy from ambient mechanical and vibrational movements is promising energy harvesting technology because it can use more accessible energy resources than other renewable natural energy. In particular, flexible and stretchable piezoelectric energy harvesters which can harvest the tiny biomechanical motions inside human body into electricity properly facilitate not only the self-powered energy system for flexible and wearable electronics but also sensitive piezoelectric sensors for motion detectors and in vivo diagnosis kits. Since the piezoelectric ZnO nanowires (NWs)-based energy harvesters (nanogenerators) were proposed in 2006, many researchers have attempted the nanogenerator by using the various fabrication process such as nanowire growth, electrospinning, and transfer techniques with piezoelectric materials including polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer and perovskite ceramics. In 2012, the composite-based nanogenerators were developed using simple, low-cost, and scalable methods to overcome the significant issues with previously-reported energy harvester, such as insufficient output performance and size limitation. This review paper provides a brief overview of flexible and stretchable piezoelectric nanocomposite generator for realizing the self-powered energy system with development history, power performance, and applications.

  17. Stretchable piezoelectric nanocomposite generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwi-Il; Jeong, Chang Kyu; Kim, Na Kyung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2016-06-01

    Piezoelectric energy conversion that generate electric energy from ambient mechanical and vibrational movements is promising energy harvesting technology because it can use more accessible energy resources than other renewable natural energy. In particular, flexible and stretchable piezoelectric energy harvesters which can harvest the tiny biomechanical motions inside human body into electricity properly facilitate not only the self-powered energy system for flexible and wearable electronics but also sensitive piezoelectric sensors for motion detectors and in vivo diagnosis kits. Since the piezoelectric ZnO nanowires (NWs)-based energy harvesters (nanogenerators) were proposed in 2006, many researchers have attempted the nanogenerator by using the various fabrication process such as nanowire growth, electrospinning, and transfer techniques with piezoelectric materials including polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer and perovskite ceramics. In 2012, the composite-based nanogenerators were developed using simple, low-cost, and scalable methods to overcome the significant issues with previously-reported energy harvester, such as insufficient output performance and size limitation. This review paper provides a brief overview of flexible and stretchable piezoelectric nanocomposite generator for realizing the self-powered energy system with development history, power performance, and applications.

  18. Aerogel nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.J.; Ayers, M.; Cao, W.

    1995-05-01

    Aerogels are porous, low density, nanostructured solids with many unusual properties including very low thermal conductivity, good transparency, high surface area, catalytic activity, and low sound velocity. This research is directed toward developing new nanocomposite aerogel materials for improved thermal insulation and several other applications. A major focus of the research has been to further increase the thermal resistance of silica aerogel by introducing infrared opacification agents into the aerogel to produce a superinsulating composite material. Opacified superinsulating aerogel permit a number of industrial applications for aerogel-based insulation. The primary benefits from this recently developed superinsulating composite aerogel insulation are: to extend the range of applications to higher temperatures, to provide a more compact insulation for space sensitive-applications, and to lower costs of aerogel by as much as 30%. Superinsulating aerogels can replace existing CFC-containing polyurethane in low temperature applications to reduce heat losses in piping, improve the thermal efficiency of refrigeration systems, and reduce energy losses in a variety of industrial applications. Enhanced aerogel insulation can also replace steam and process pipe insulation in higher temperature applications to substantially reduce energy losses and provide much more compact insulation.

  19. Based Adaptive Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazani, M.; Ashrafizadeh, F.; Mozaffarinia, R.

    2014-08-01

    A promising Ni(Al)-Cr2O3-Ag-CNT-WS2 self-lubricating wear-resistant coating was deposited via atmospheric plasma spray of Ni(Al), nano Cr2O3, nano silver and nano WS2 powders, and CNTs. Feedstock powders with various compositions prepared by spray drying were plasma sprayed onto carbon steel substrates. The tribological properties of coatings were tested by a high temperature tribometer in a dry environment from room temperature to 400 °C, and in a natural humid environment at room temperature. It was found that all nanocomposite coatings have better frictional behavior compared with pure Ni(Al) and Ni(Al)-Cr2O3 coatings; the specimen containing aproximately 7 vol.% Ag, CNT, and WS2 had the best frictional performance. The average room temperature friction coefficient of this coating was 0.36 in humid atmosphere, 0.32 in dry atmosphere, and about 0.3 at high temperature.

  20. Polariton dispersion in nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K. S. Joseph Revathy, V.

    2015-06-24

    The several optical properties of crystals are modified due to nonlinearity associated with high intensity of the incident radiation. In the present work, the linear and nonlinear optical characterization of the nanocomposite materials are also discussed in detail. We explore the possibilities of nonlinear effects in the optical parameters in nanocomposite materials. New modes on the polaritonic gap where the propagation of electromagnetic wave is forbidden, are obtained due to nonlinearity. The presence of gap mode shows the propagation of electromagnetic radiation which may be exploited in optical communications.

  1. Biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Kaiyan

    In this dissertation, various noncrosslinked and crosslinked biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites were fabricated and characterized. The properties of these polymer nanocomposites, and their relating mechanisms and corresponding applications were studied and discussed in depth. Chapter 1 introduces the research background and objectives of the current research. Chapter 2 presents the development of a novel low cost carbon source for bacterial cellulose (BC) production and fabrication and characterization of biobased polymer nanocomposites using produced BC and soy protein based resins. The carbon source, soy flour extract (SFE), was obtained from defatted soy flour (SF) and BC yield achieved using SFE medium was high. The results of this study showed that SFE consists of five sugars and Acetobacter xylinum metabolized sugars in a specific order. Chapter 3 discusses the fabrication and characterization of biodegradable polymer nanocomposites using BC and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). These polymer nanocomposites had excellent tensile and thermal properties. Crosslinking of PVA using glutaraldehyde (GA) not only increased the mechanical and thermal properties but the water-resistance. Chapter 4 describes the development and characterization of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) based biodegradable polymer nanocomposites by blending MFC suspension with PVA. Chemical crosslinking of the polymer nanocomposites was carried out using glyoxal to increase the mechanical and thermal properties as well as to make the PVA partially water-insoluble. Chapter 5 reports the development and characterization of halloysite nanotube (HNT) reinforced biodegradable polymer nanocomposites utilizing HNT dispersion and PVA. Several separation techniques were used to obtain individualized HNT dispersion. The results indicated uniform dispersion of HNTs in both PVA and malonic acid (MA) crosslinked PVA resulted in excellent mechanical and thermal properties of the materials, especially

  2. The dissolution or growth of a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N.; Wiltshire, Timothy J.; Subramanian, R. Shankar

    1984-01-01

    The problem of the dissolution or growth of an isolated stationary sphere in a large fluid body is analyzed. The motion of the boundary as well as the the resulting motion in the liquid are properly taken into account. The governing equations are solved using a recently developed technique (Subramanian and Weinberg, 1981) which employs an asymptotic expansion in time. Results for the radius of the sphere as a function of time are calculated. The range of utility of the present solution is established by comparison with a numerical solution of the governing equations obtained by the method of finite differences.

  3. Geometry of entanglement in the Bloch sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Michel; Liss, Rotem; Mor, Tal

    2017-03-01

    Entanglement is an important concept in quantum information, quantum communication, and quantum computing. We provide a geometrical analysis of entanglement and separability for all the rank 2 quantum mixed states: complete analysis for the bipartite states and partial analysis for the multipartite states. For each rank 2 mixed state, we define its unique Bloch sphere, that is spanned by the eigenstates of its density matrix. We characterize those Bloch spheres into exactly five classes of entanglement and separability, give examples for each class, and prove that those are the only classes.

  4. Dependence on sphere size of the phase behavior of mixtures of rods and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakami, Naohito; Imai, Masayuki

    2003-07-01

    By the addition of chondroitin sulfate (Chs) to the aqueous suspension of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the aggregation of TMV occurs at very dilute TMV concentration compared with the addition of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The difference of physical behavior between Chs and PEO is the chain conformation in solution. The Chs chain has a semirigid nature, whereas the PEO chain has a flexible nature. In this study, the Chs and PEO chains are simplified to spherical particles having different size, and we use the spherocylinder model for TMV particle. The effect of the sphere size on the phase behaviors in the mixtures of rods and spheres is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. By the addition of small spheres, the system transforms from the miscible isotropic phase to the miscible nematic phase. On the other hand, by the addition of large spheres, the system changes from the miscible isotropic phase to the immiscible nematic phase through the immiscible isotropic phase. The different phase behaviors between the small and the large spheres originate from the difference of overlapping volume of the depletion zone. In addition, we perform the Monte Carlo simulations in the case that semirigid chains are used as the Chs chain models. The same phase behaviors are observed as the mixtures of rods and large spheres. Thus the sphere model captures the phase behaviors of rod and polymer mixture systems.

  5. High performance thermoelectric nanocomposite device

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Jihui; Snyder, Dexter D.

    2011-10-25

    A thermoelectric device includes a nanocomposite material with nanowires of at least one thermoelectric material having a predetermined figure of merit, the nanowires being formed in a porous substrate having a low thermal conductivity and having an average pore diameter ranging from about 4 nm to about 300 nm.

  6. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  7. How Nano are Nanocomposites (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    morphology of the filler as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering, light scattering and electron imaging. We examine elastomeric ...examine elastomeric , thermoplastic and thermoset composites loaded with a variety of nanoscale reinforcing fillers such as precipitated silica, carbon...percent. Introductory paragraphs similar to the above can be found in hundreds of nanocomposite papers. With the exception of reinforced elastomers

  8. Life in the E-Sphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the survival of the human race in the Third Millennium. Considers environmental issues; shifting from a focus on economic growth to human development; the rate of technological change; the e-sphere, which goes beyond a global village to a global brain; technology in education and in health care; and educational reform. (LRW)

  9. Experimentation on recurrent sphere collision with Audacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Enoch Ming Wei; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-11-01

    Under the theme of collisions that occur repeatedly, we conducted easy and inexpensive experiments of rebounding spheres and Newton’s cradle with two spheres to determine the coefficients of restitution using the sound record feature in modern laptops and a free and open source software called Audacity. In the rebounding sphere experiment, the coefficients of restitution of the golf and ping pong balls used were found to be 0.727 ± 0.025 and 0.816 ± 0.041 respectively. With the Netwon’s cradle experiment, the coefficient of restitution of two steel sphere balls was found to be 0.987 ± 0.003. The contrasts in the results obtained from both experiments permit the operational principles of a pendulum to be emphasized, and engagements to be made to consider the transfer of kinetic energy in the form of vibrational energy of the bodies’ constituents. Using a one-dimensional two-mass model with spring and damper linkages to account for harmonic motions that occur during impact, we found it possible to perform a simple analysis to account for this, and how it can be linked to high energy transfer modes such as the phenomenon of resonance and impedance matching.

  10. Hollow silica spheres: synthesis and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; D'Acunzi, Maria; Kappl, Michael; Auernhammer, Günter K; Vollmer, Doris; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2009-03-03

    Core-shell polystyrene-silica spheres with diameters of 800 nm and 1.9 microm were synthesized by soap-free emulsion and dispersion polymerization of the polystyrene core, respectively. The polystyrene spheres were used as templates for the synthesis of silica shells of tunable thickness employing the Stöber method [Graf et al. Langmuir 2003, 19, 6693]. The polystyrene template was removed by thermal decomposition at 500 degrees C, resulting in smooth silica shells of well-defined thickness (15-70 nm). The elastic response of these hollow spheres was probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A point load was applied to the particle surface through a sharp AFM tip, and successively increased until the shell broke. In agreement with the predictions of shell theory, for small deformations the deformation increased linearly with applied force. The Young's modulus (18 +/- 6 GPa) was about 4 times smaller than that of fused silica [Adachi and Sakka J. Mater. Sci. 1990, 25, 4732] but identical to that of bulk silica spheres (800 nm) synthesized by the Stöber method, indicating that it yields silica of lower density. The minimum force needed to irreversibly deform (buckle) the shell increased quadratically with shell thickness.

  11. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  12. Propulsion of a two-sphere swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotsa, Daphne; Baldwin, Kyle; Hill, Richard; Bowley, Roger; Swift, Michael

    We describe experiments and simulations demonstrating the propulsion of a neutrally-buoyant macroscopic swimming robot that consists of a pair of spheres attached by a spring, immersed in a vibrating fluid. The vibration of the fluid induces relative motion of the spheres which, for sufficiently large amplitudes, can lead to motion of the center of mass of the two spheres. We find that the swimming speed obtained from both experiment and simulation agree and collapse onto a single curve if plotted as a function of the streaming Reynolds number, suggesting that the propulsion is related to streaming flows. There appears to be a critical onset value of the streaming Reynolds number for swimming to occur. We observe a change in the streaming flows as the Reynolds number increases, from that generated by two independent oscillating spheres to a collective flow pattern around the swimmer as a whole. The mechanism for swimming is traced to a strengthening of a jet of fluid in the wake of the swimmer.

  13. Steel Spheres and Skydiver--Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa Leme, J.; Moura, C.; Costa, Cintia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of open source video analysis software in the study of the relationship between the velocity of falling objects and time. We discuss an experiment in which a steel sphere falls in a container filled with two immiscible liquids. The motion is similar to that of a skydiver falling through air.

  14. The Public Sphere and Online, Independent Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, David

    2006-01-01

    The rapid evolution of online, independent journalism affords educators an opportunity to increase students' understanding of the nature and power of the news media. Drawing from Habermas's theories of the role of the public sphere in democratic discourse, the author, as founder of an online news publication, traces trends in concentrated…

  15. The Sphere of Women in Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Robert

    This project is a unit of six lessons designed to study and understand the roles and expectations of women in the colonial period. The unit provides an historical perspective on those expectations, examines how both men and women viewed the sphere of women, and how enlightened thought on this topic began to emerge during this revolutionary time.…

  16. Spheres: from Ground Development to ISS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2016-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES National Lab Facility aboard ISS is managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. SPHERES has served to mature the adaptability of control algorithms of future formation flight missions in microgravity (6 DOF (Degrees of Freedom) / long duration microgravity), demonstrate key close-proximity formation flight and rendezvous and docking maneuvers, understand fault diagnosis and recovery, improve the field of human telerobotic operation and control, and lessons learned on ISS have significant impact on ground robotics, mapping, localization, and sensing in three-dimensions - among several other areas of study.

  17. Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A; Ospino, J.

    2006-08-15

    We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

  18. Water-dispersible Hollow Microporous Organic Network Spheres as Substrate for Electroless Deposition of Ultrafine Pd Nanoparticles with High Catalytic Activity and Recyclability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifang; Chang, Jing; Hu, Yuchen; Yu, Yifu; Guo, Yamei; Zhang, Bin

    2016-11-22

    Microporous organic networks (MONs) have been considered as an ideal substrate to stabilize active metal nanoparticles. However, the development of highly water-dispersible hollow MONs nanostructures which can serve as both the reducing agent and stabilizer is highly desirable but still challenging. Here we report a template-assisted method to synthesize hollow microporous organic network (H-MON) spheres using silica spheres as hard template and 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene as the building blocks through a Glaser coupling reaction. The obtained water-dispersible H-MON spheres bearing sp- and sp(2) -hybridized carbon atoms possess a highly conjugated electronic structure and show low reduction potential; thus, they can serve as a reducing agent and stabilizer for electroless deposition of highly dispersed Pd clusters to form a Pd/H-MON spherical hollow nanocomposite. Benefitting from their high porosity, large surface area, and excellent solution dispersibility, the as-prepared Pd/H-MON hollow nanocomposite exhibits a high catalytic performance and recyclability toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

  19. Simulation of rotary-drum and repose tests for frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    The effects of rotation rate and interparticle friction on the bulk flow behavior in rotating horizontal cylinders are studied via particle-dynamic simulations. Assemblies of inelastic, frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters are utilized, and rotation rates from quasistatic to centrifuging are examined. Flow phenomena explored include size segregation, avalanching, slumping and centrifuging. Simulated drum flows with two sizes of frictional spheres showed very rapid segregation of species perpendicular to the drum axis; however, simulations of up to 10 revolutions, utilizing periodic-boundary ends, did not exhibit the experimentally observed axial segregation into stripes. Angles of repose for uniform-sized spheres in slowly rotating cylinders varied from 13 to 31 degrees as the friction coefficient varied from 0.02 to 1.0. For simulated rotation rates higher than the threshold to obtain uniform flow conditions, the apparent angle of repose increases as the rotation rats increases, consistent with experiments. Also, simulations with rigid clusters of 4 spheres in a tetrahedral shape or 8 spheres in a cubical arrangement, demonstrate that particle shape strongly influences the repose angle. Simulations of cubical 8-sphere clusters, with a surface coefficient of friction of 0.1, produced apparent angles of repose exceeding 35 degrees, compared to 23 degrees for assemblies of single spheres interacting with the same force model parameters. Centrifuging flows at very high rotation rates exist as stationary beds moving exactly as the outer rotating wall. At somewhat slower speeds the granular bed remains in contact with the wall but exhibits surface sliding down the rising inner bed surface, moving a short distance on each revolution. At still slower speeds particles rain from the surface of the upper half of the rotating bed.

  20. Polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites and their preparation

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2007-01-09

    Polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites that exhibit superior properties compared to the polymer alone, and methods-for producing these polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites, are provided. Polymeric surfactant compatabilizers are adsorbed onto the surface of hydrophilic or natural phyllosilicates to facilitate the dispersal and exfoliation of the phyllosilicate in a polymer matrix. Utilizing polymeric glycol based surfactants, polymeric dicarboxylic acids, polymeric diammonium surfactants, and polymeric diamine surfactants as compatabilizers facilitates natural phyllosilicate and hydrophilic organoclay dispersal in a polymer matrix to produce nanocomposites.

  1. Improved Chemical Protective Gloves Using Elastomeric Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-14

    available with 25-30 mil thick butyl rubber gloves. Neoprene nanocomposites were developed in Phase 1 and will be combined with Neoprene substrate in...protection currently available with 25-30 mil thick butyl rubber gloves. Neoprene nanocomposites were developed in Phase 1 and will be combined with... nanocomposite coated substrates or multilayer structures can have better flame resistance than butyl rubber as measured by vertical flame testing

  2. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  3. Fabrication of superparamagnetic magnetite/poly(styrene-co-12-acryloxy-9-octadecenoic acid) nanocomposite microspheres with controllable structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song; Liu, Huarong; Huang, Haofeng; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2009-10-15

    We herein report a novel and facile approach to the fabrication of the superparamagnetic magnetite/poly(styrene-co-12-acryloxy-9-octadecenoic acid) nanocomposite microspheres with controllable structure via gamma-ray radiation induced inverse emulsion polymerization under room temperature and at ambient pressure. 12-Acryloxy-9-octadecenoic acid (AOA, containing part of sodium salts Na-AOA) as a surfactant can also copolymerize with the styrene. It is interesting that just by changing the added amount of styrene, the magnetic hollow spheres with different wall thickness and various sizes of core, up to the magnetic solid spheres, can be obtained. The final products were thoroughly characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron diffraction (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) which showed the formation of magnetite/poly(styrene-co-AOA) nanocomposite microspheres. Magnetic hysteresis loop measurements showed that the magnetic nanocomposite microspheres exhibited superparamagnetism, which should make them have potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. Furthermore, we also proposed a possible formation mechanism of these magnetic microspheres with different morphologies.

  4. Sol-gel synthesis and characterizations of hybrid chitosan-PEG/calcium silicate nanocomposite modified with ZnO-NPs and (E102) for optical and antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Ahmed M; El-Nahrawy, Amany M; Abou Hammad, Ali B

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid Chitosan/Poly ethylene glycol/calcium silicate (CS/PEG/calcium silicate) nanocomposite modified with different two types, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and tartrazine dye (E102) were prepared by sol gel method and the characterization of their structure and biological properties were carried out in order to evaluate the possible use in optical and biomedical fields. The hybrid CS/PEG/calcium silicate complex formations have been established by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. The spheres-like chitosan-PEG/calcium silicate and modified with both ZnO-NPs and (E102) were obtained with optimum concentration of 11% ZnO-NPs and 0.3gm (E102) dyes. Spheres-like particle shape of these nanocomposites from SEM images, higher UV absorption in the region of 200-300nm by UV-vis absorption spectrophotometer are recorded. The fabricate CS/PEG/calcium silicate nanocomposites and doped with ZnO-NPs and tetrazine were studied contrary to gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, fungi (Candidia albicans) and Aspargillus niger via the agar plate method. The obtained results indicated that the prepared CS-PEG/calcium silicate nanocomposites have good antibacterial properties agnist G(+ve), G(-ve) bacteria and fungi, so that it could be a promised candidate in various optical and in biological applications as well as packaging application.

  5. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  6. Fibonacci numerical integration on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, J. H.; Nye, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    For elementary numerical integration on a sphere, there is a distinct advantage in using an oblique array of integration sampling points based on a chosen pair of successive Fibonacci numbers. The pattern has a familiar appearance of intersecting spirals, avoiding the local anisotropy of a conventional latitude longitude array. Besides the oblique Fibonacci array, the prescription we give is also based on a non-uniform scaling used for one-dimensional numerical integration, and indeed achieves the same order of accuracy as for one dimension: error ~N-6 for N points. This benefit of Fibonacci is not shared by domains of integration with boundaries (e.g., a square, for which it was originally proposed); with non-uniform scaling the error goes as N-3, with or without Fibonacci. For experimental measurements over a sphere our prescription is realized by a non-uniform Fibonacci array of weighted sampling points.

  7. Criticality of a {sup 237}Np Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Rene G.; Hayes, David K.; Cappiello, Charlene C.; Myers, William L.; Jaegers, Peter J.; Clement, Steven D.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.

    2003-07-22

    A critical mass experiment using a 6-kg {sup 237}Np sphere has been performed. The purpose of the experiment is to get a better estimate of the critical mass of {sup 237}Np. To attain criticality, the {sup 237}Np sphere was surrounded with 93 wt % {sup 235}U shells. A 1/M as a function of uranium mass was performed. An MCNP neutron transport code was used to model the experiment. The MCNP code yielded a k{sub eff} of 0.99089 {+-} 0.0003 compared with a k{sub eff} 1.0026 for the experiment. Based on these results, it is estimated that the critical mass of {sup 237}Np ranges from kilogram weights in the high fifties to low sixties.

  8. Weighted energy problem on the unit sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilogliadov, Mykhailo

    2016-12-01

    We consider the minimal energy problem on the unit sphere S^2 in the Euclidean space R^3 immersed in an external field Q, where the charges are assumed to interact via Newtonian potential 1/ r, r being the Euclidean distance. The problem is solved by finding the support of the extremal measure, and obtaining an explicit expression for the equilibrium density. We then apply our results to an external field generated by a point charge, and to a quadratic external field.

  9. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro )

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  10. Improved method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Rosencwaig, A.; Koo, J.C.; Dressler, J.L.

    An improved method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100..mu.. to about 500..mu.. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5 to 20..mu.. are described. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions.

  11. Study of the Unequal Spheres Packing Problem:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. P.; Ng, Ka-Lok

    We employ the Monte Carlo method to study a constrained optimization problem — packing hard spheres with unequal radii (r2 > r1) into a 3D bounded region and discuss its connection with the Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment planning. Selection of the best fit solution is based on the Boltzmann factor, e-ΔE/T, which allows us to search for the global optimal solution. As an illustration we determined the least number (≤15) of packed spheres that will occupy the largest volume for three different hypothetical tumor sizes (4115, 10 000 and 36 000 voxels). For the bounded regions and the sizes of the packed spheres that we studied here, the optimal volume packing ratio ranges from 41.3 to 48.7%. From our study, using a lower r2/r1 ratio is more desirable due to the ≤15 radiation shots constraint. The optimal volume packing ratio can be obtained within a relative short CPU computing time and could provide a good starting point for the radiosurgery treatment planning.

  12. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Rosencwaig, Allen; Koo, Jackson C.; Dressler, John L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100.mu. to about 500.mu. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5-20.mu.. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions. In one embodiment, one of the temperature regions is lower than both the preceeding region and the subsequent region. One region utilizes a temperature of at least 200.degree. C. higher than the melting point of the glass-forming material in the solution and, for example, may be at least 3 times higher than the temperature of the preceeding region. In addition, there is a sharp temperature gradient between these regions. As each droplet of solution passes through a first region it forms into a gel membrane having a spherical shape and encapsulates the rest of the drop retained in the elastic outer surface and the water entrapped within diffuses rapidly through the thin gel membrane which causes more of the glass-forming material to go out of solution and is incorporated into the gel membrane causing it to grow in size and become hollow. thus produced hollow glass sphere has a sphericity, concentricity, and wall uniformity of better than 5%. The sphere is capable of retaining material of up to at least 100 atmospheres therein over long periods of time. In one embodiment.

  13. Rainbow Scattering by a Coated Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.; Jamison, J. Michael; Lin, Chih-Yang

    1994-01-01

    We examine the behavior of the first-order rainbow for a coated sphere by using both ray theory and Aden-Kerker wave theory as the radius of the core alpha(sub 12) and the thickness of the coating beta are varied. As the ratio beta/alpha(sub 12) increases from 10(sup -4) to 0.33, we find three classes of rainbow phenomena that cannot occur for a homogeneous-sphere rainbow. For beta/alpha(sub 12) approx less than 10(sup -3), the rainbow intensity is an oscillatory function of the coating thickness, for beta/alpha(sub 12) approx. 10(sup -2), the first-order rainbow breaks into a pair of twin rainbows, and for beta/alpha(sub 12) approx. 0.33, various rainbow-extinction transitions occur. Each of these effects is analyzed, and their physical interpretations are given. A Debye series decomposition of coated-sphere partial-wave scattering amplitudes is also performed and aids in the analysis.

  14. Bidispersed Sphere Packing on Spherical Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy; Mascioli, Andrew; Burke, Christopher

    Packing problems on spherical surfaces have a long history, originating in the classic Thompson problem of finding the ground state configuration of charges on a sphere. Such packings contain a minimal number of defects needed to accommodate the curvature; this is predictable using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from knowledge of the topology of the surface and the local symmetry of the ordering. Famously, the packing of spherical particles on a sphere contains a 'scar' transition, where additional defects over those required by topology appear above a certain critical number of particles and self-organize into chains or scars. In this work, we study the packing of bidispersed packings on a sphere, and hence determine the interaction of bidispersity and curvature. The resultant configurations are nearly crystalline for low values of bidispersity and retain scar-like structures; these rapidly become disordered for intermediate values and approach a so-called Appollonian limit at the point where smaller particles can be entirely accommodated within the voids left by the larger particles. We connect our results with studies of bidispersed packings in the bulk and on flat surfaces from the literature on glassy systems and jamming. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  15. ODERACS 2 White Spheres Optical Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culp, Robert D.; Gravseth, Ian; Gloor, Jason; Wantuch, Todd

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the status of the Orbital Debris Radar Calibration Spheres (ODERACS) 2 white spheres optical calibration study. The purpose of this study is to determine the spectral reflectivity and scattering characteristics in the visible wavelength region for the white spheres that were added to the project in the fall, 1994. Laboratory measurements were performed upon these objects and an analysis of the resulting data was conducted. These measurements are performed by illuminating the objects with a collimated beam of light and measuring the reflected light versus the phase angle. The phase angle is defined as the angle between the light source and the sensor, as viewed from the object. By measuring the reflected signal at the various phase angles, one is able to estimate the reflectance properties of the object. The methodology used in taking the measurements and reducing the data are presented. The results of this study will be used to support the calibration of ground-based optical instruments used in support of space debris research. Visible measurements will be made by the GEODDS, NASA and ILADOT telescopes.

  16. Effects of confinement on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    The hydrodynamic force and couple acting on a rotating sphere in a quiescent fluid are modified by nearby boundaries with possible consequences on spin-up and spin-down times of particles uspended in a fluid, their wall deposition, entraiment and others. Up to now, the vast majority of papers dealing with these problems have considered the low-Reynolds-number regime. This paper focuses on the effect of inertia on the hydrodynamic interaction of a spinning sphere with nearby boundaries. Rotation axes parallel and perpendicular to a plane boundary as well as other situations are studied. Several steady and transient numerical results are presented and interptreted in terms of physical scaling arguments. The Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible, constant-property Newtonian fluid are solved by the finite-difference PHYSALIS method. Among the noteworthy features of this method are the fact that the no-slip condition at the particle surface is satisfied exactly and that the force and torque on the sphere are obtained directly as a by-product of the computation. This feature avoids the need to integrate the stress over the particle surface, which with other methods is a step prone to numerical inaccuracies. A locally refined mesh surrounding the particle is used to enhance the resolution of boundary layers maintaining a manageable overall computational cost.

  17. Integrating spheres for improved skin photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Diana L; Farrell, Thomas J; Hayward, Joseph E; Patterson, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    The prescribed radiant exposures for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of superficial skin cancers are chosen empirically to maximize the success of the treatment while minimizing adverse reactions for the majority of patients. They do not take into account the wide range of tissue optical properties for human skin, contributing to relatively low treatment success rates. Additionally, treatment times can be unnecessarily long for large treatment areas if the laser power is not sufficient. Both of these concerns can be addressed by the incorporation of an integrating sphere into the irradiation apparatus. The light fluence rate can be increased by as much as 100%, depending on the tissue optical properties. This improvement can be determined in advance of treatment by measuring the reflectance from the tissue through a side port on the integrating sphere, allowing for patient-specific treatment times. The sphere is also effective at improving beam flatness, and reducing the penumbra, creating a more uniform light field. The side port reflectance measurements are also related to the tissue transport albedo, enabling an approximation of the penetration depth, which is useful for real-time light dosimetry.

  18. Porcine sperm vitrification II: Spheres method.

    PubMed

    Arraztoa, C C; Miragaya, M H; Chaves, M G; Trasorras, V L; Gambarotta, M C; Neild, D M

    2016-11-10

    Owing to current problems in boar sperm cryopreservation, this study proposes to evaluate vitrification in spheres as an alternative cryopreservation procedure, comparing the use or not of permeable cryoprotectants and two warming methods. Extended (n = 3; r = 4) and raw (n = 5; r = 2) porcine spermatozoa were diluted in media, in the absence or presence of either 4% dimethylformamide or 4% glycerol, to a final concentration of 5 × 10(6)  spermatozoa/ml and vitrified using the spheres method. Two warming procedures were evaluated: a rapid method (30 s at 37°C) and an ultrarapid method (7 s at 75°C, followed by 30 s at 37°C). Percentages of total motility (phase contrast), membrane function (hypo-osmotic swelling test), acrosome integrity (phase contrast), sperm viability (6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide stain), chromatin condensation (toluidine blue stain) and chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation (acridine orange stain) were evaluated in the samples before and after vitrification. Results, analysed using Friedman's test, suggest that rapid warming of raw porcine spermatozoa vitrified without permeable cryoprotectants may preserve DNA condensation and integrity better than the other processing methods studied in this work. Hence, porcine sperm vitrification using spheres could be used to produce embryos with ICSI to further validate this method.

  19. On the separation mechanics of accelerating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, John N.; Marzanek, Mathew; Bond, Clinton; Rival, David E.

    2017-03-01

    The instantaneous drag forces and wake mechanics of an accelerating sphere have been investigated experimentally. Drag forces are first compared to the circular flat plate, which is characterized by stable and Reynolds-number independent vortex-ring formation during accelerations from rest. For the sphere, vortex-ring formation is shown to be greatly suppressed by the time-dependent movement of the separation line during start-up towards the steady-state position, which induces strong vortex-body interactions. Next, inviscid theory is used to predict the state of the pressure-gradient field around a sphere during accelerations from a non-zero initial velocity. The azimuthal point of separation extracted from experimental data for the subcritical cases is found to be strongly correlated with the start of the adverse pressure gradient predicted by theory. For the supercritical cases, the point of separation is unaffected by the imposed accelerations and remains at the steady-state position. The results suggest that accelerations can only be exploited to delay flow separation at Reynolds numbers with steady separation points near the apex, where the tangential accelerations are the largest.

  20. Multiscale modeling of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheidaei, Azadeh

    In recent years, polymer nano-composites (PNCs) have increasingly gained more attention due to their improved mechanical, barrier, thermal, optical, electrical and biodegradable properties in comparison with the conventional micro-composites or pristine polymer. With a modest addition of nanoparticles (usually less than 5wt. %), PNCs offer a wide range of improvements in moduli, strength, heat resistance, biodegradability, as well as decrease in gas permeability and flammability. Although PNCs offer enormous opportunities to design novel material systems, development of an effective numerical modeling approach to predict their properties based on their complex multi-phase and multiscale structure is still at an early stage. Developing a computational framework to predict the mechanical properties of PNC is the focus of this dissertation. A computational framework has been developed to predict mechanical properties of polymer nano-composites. In chapter 1, a microstructure inspired material model has been developed based on statistical technique and this technique has been used to reconstruct the microstructure of Halloysite nanotube (HNT) polypropylene composite. This technique also has been used to reconstruct exfoliated Graphene nanoplatelet (xGnP) polymer composite. The model was able to successfully predict the material behavior obtained from experiment. Chapter 2 is the summary of the experimental work to support the numerical work. First, different processing techniques to make the polymer nanocomposites have been reviewed. Among them, melt extrusion followed by injection molding was used to manufacture high density polyethylene (HDPE)---xGnP nanocomposties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also was performed to determine particle size and distribution and to examine fracture surfaces. Particle size was measured from these images and has been used for calculating the probability density function for GNPs in chapter 1. A series of nanoindentation tests have

  1. [Multifunctional nanocomposite materials]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    These novel nanocomposites are microporous nanometal intercalated clays which have been prepared by a polyol process at 200C and a novel microwave-hydrothermal process using ethylene glycol. These novel nanocomposites have been found to be useful in the conversion of coal to asphaltenes. A crystalline tin (IV) arsenate hydroxide hydrate has been made and its lithium selective ion exchange properties have been measured. This exchanger has shown high lithium selectivity. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure have also been studied. Several pillared clays have also been synthesized and their Mg{sup 2+}, Li{sup +} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} selectivity has been measured. The pillared clays appear to show some Li selectivity.

  2. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of graphene-ZnO nanocomposites for varied compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beura, Rosalin; Thangadurai, P.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene-ZnO nanocomposites (GZ) were prepared with different concentrations of ZnO by chemical method. Structural analysis by x-ray diffraction showed a hexagonal wurtzite phase of ZnO and Raman spectroscopy showed the formation of graphene. Shape of ZnO was found to be varied from sphere to rod with the increasing ZnO composition. Optical absorption at 369 nm (Eg=3.36 eV) was corresponding to the band edge emission of ZnO. Compared to pure ZnO, photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the nanocomposites had decreased drastically, due to quenching of photoemission, in the presence of graphene. The time resolved PL decay followed a triexponential behavior with a maximum lifetime of 27.97 ns. The BET surface area was in the range from 13 to 123 m2/g. Photocatalytic degradation study on methyl orange under UV light and Sun light showed a maximum degradation of 97.1% and 98.6% respectively. It was observed that the nanocomposites with optimum value of lifetime and surface area had shown the maximum degradation rate.

  3. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  4. Nanocomposites for Enhanced Structural Integrity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-11

    to develop the science base necessary for full utilization of nanoreinforcements into polymers and fiber composites to improve mechanical , thermal and...prepreg plies were also studied to a limited extent. The properly oxidated GNPs were found to improve not only mechanical properties but also thermal...102 Nanocomposites for Enhanced Structural Integrity AFOSR bn0)2-1-0414 H. Thomas Hahn Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department University of

  5. Probabilistic Simulation for Nanocomposite Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique probabilistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The simulation is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to simulate uniaxial strengths properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. These results show smooth distributions.

  6. A facile strategy to synthesize bimetallic Au/Ag nanocomposite film by layer-by-layer assembly technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Yi

    2012-05-01

    A facile strategy has been developed for the preparation of bimetallic gold-silver (Au-Ag) nanocomposite films by alternating absorption of poly-(ethyleneimine)-silver ions and Au onto substrates and subsequent reduction of the silver ions. The composition, micro-structure and properties of the {PEI-Ag/Au}n nanocomposite films were characterized by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), transmisson electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The UV-vis characteristic absorbances of {PEI-Ag/Au}n nanocomposite thin film increase almost linear with the number of bilayers, which indicates a process of uniform assembling. Appearance of a double plasmon bands in the visible region and the lack of apparent core-shell structures in the TEM images confirm the formation of bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles. The result of XPS also demonstrates the existence of Ag and Au nanoparticles in the nanocomposite films. TEM and FESEM images show that these Ag and Au nanoparticles in the films possess sphere structure with the size of 20-25 nm. The resulting {PEI-Ag/Au}n films inherit the properties from both the metal Ag and Au, which exhibits a unique performance in SERS and electrocatalytic activities to the oxidation of dopamine. As a result, the {PEI-Ag/Au}n films are more attractive compared to {PEI-Ag/PSS}n and {PEI/Au}n films.

  7. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  8. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  9. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-06-30

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  10. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-09-04

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

  11. Highly Conductive Multifunctional Graphene Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Gaier, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Graphene nanosheet bisphenol A polycarbonate nanocomposites (0.027 2.2 vol %) prepared by both emulsion mixing and solution blending methods, followed by compression molding at 287 C, exhibited dc electrical percolation threshold of approx.0.14 and approx.0.38 vol %, respectively. The conductivities of 2.2 vol % graphene nanocomposites were 0.512 and 0.226 S/cm for emulsion and solution mixing. The 1.1 and 2.2 vol % graphene nanocomposites exhibited frequency-independent behavior. Inherent conductivity, extremely high aspect ratio, and nanostructure directed assembly of the graphene using PC nanospheres are the main factors for excellent electrical properties of the nanocomposites. Dynamic tensile moduli of nanocomposites increased with increasing graphene in the nanocomposite. The glass transition temperatures were decreased with increasing graphene for the emulsion series. High-resolution electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) showed isolated graphene with no connectivity path for insulating nanocomposites and connected nanoparticles for the conductive nanocomposites. A stacked disk model was used to obtain the average particle radius, average number of graphene layers per stack, and stack spacing by simulation of the experimental SANS data. Morphology studies indicated the presence of well-dispersed graphene and small graphene stacking with infusion of polycarbonate within the stacks.

  12. Nanocrystal-polymer nanocomposite electrochromic device

    SciTech Connect

    Milliron, Delia; Runnerstrom, Evan; Helms, Brett; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2015-12-08

    Described is an electrochromic nanocomposite film comprising a solid matrix of an oxide based material, the solid matrix comprising a plurality of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures dispersed in the solid matrix and a lithium salt dispersed in the solid matrix. Also described is a near infrared nanostructured electrochromic device having a functional layer comprising the electrochromic nanocomposite film.

  13. Dynamic Strength Ceramic Nanocomposites Under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-scale computer simulation approach has been applied to research of strength of nanocomposites under dynamic loading. The influence of mesoscopic substructures on the dynamic strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites, which can be formed using additive manufacturing were numerically investigated. At weak shock wave loadings the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites depends not only phase concentration and porosity, but size parameters of skeleton substructures. The influence of skeleton parameter on the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic nanocomposites with the same concentration of phases decreases with increasing amplitude of the shock pulse of microsecond duration above the double amplitude of the Hugoniot elastic limit of nanocomposites. This research carried out in 2014 -2015 was supported by grant from The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program and also Ministry of Sciences and Education of Russian Federation (State task 2014/223, project 1943, Agreement 14.132.

  14. Advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhixin; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2014-02-01

    The research advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes (rubber/HNTs) nanocomposites are reviewed. HNTs are environmentally-friendly natural nanomaterials, which could be used to prepare the rubber-based nanocomposites with high performance and low cost. Unmodified HNTs could be adopted to prepare the rubber/HNTs composites with improved mechanical properties, however, the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites with fine morphology and excellent properties were chiefly prepared with various modifiers by in situ mixing method. A series of rubber/HNTs nanocomposites containing several rubbers (SBR, NR, xSBR, NBR, PU) and different modifiers (ENR, RH, Si69, SA, MAA, ILs) have been investigated. The results showed that all the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites achieved strong interfacial interaction via interfacial covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds or multiple interactions, realized significantly improved dispersion of HNTs at nanoscale and exhibited excellent mechanical performances and other properties.

  15. Nitrogen and sulfur co-doping of 3D hollow-structured carbon spheres as an efficient and stable metal free catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zexing; Liu, Rong; Wang, Jie; Zhu, Jing; Xiao, Weiping; Xuan, Cuijuan; Lei, Wen; Wang, Deli

    2016-12-07

    Three-dimensional, hollow-structured carbon sphere nanocomposites (N,S-hcs) doped with nitrogen and sulfur were prepared using a soft template approach followed by a high-temperature treatment. The synthesized N,S-hcs nanomaterials exhibited favourable catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared to carbon spheres doped solely with nitrogen (N-hcs), polypyrrole (PPY) solid nanoparticles and irregular fragments of polyaniline (PAN). These results demonstrated the co-doping of N/S and the relatively large surface area of the mesoporous carbon structure that enhanced the catalytic activity of the resulting material. Notably, the prepared N,S-hcs electrocatalysts provided four electron oxygen reduction selectivity, long-term durability and high resistance to methanol poisoning, all of which represented improvements over the conventional Pt/C electrocatalyst. The progress represented by this reported work is of great importance in the development of outstanding non-metal based electrocatalysts for the fuel cell industry.

  16. Interferometric determination of the topographies of absolute sphere radii using the sphere interferometer of PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Guido; Krystek, Michael; Nicolaus, Arnold; Giardini, Walter

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a method to reconstruct the absolute shape of a sphere—i.e. a topography of radii—using the sphere interferometer of PTB in combination with a stitching approach. The method allows for the reconstruction of absolute radii instead of the relative shape deviations which result from conventional sphericity measurements. The sphere interferometer was developed for the volume determination of spherical material measures—in particular the spheres of the Avogadro project—by precise diameter measurements with an uncertainty of 1 nm or less. In the scope of the present work a procedure has been implemented that extends the applicability of the interferometer to fields where not the volume or diameter but the direction-dependent radii are of interest. The results of the reconstruction were compared quantitatively to the independent results of sphericity measurements from CSIRO.

  17. Diagnosis of a Poorly Performing Liquid Hydrogen Bulk Storage Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenn, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    There are two 850,000 gallon Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A and the other at Launch Pad B. The LH2 Sphere at Pad B has had a high boiloff rate since being brought into service in the 1960's. The daily commodity loss was estimated to be approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the minimum required by the sphere's specification. Additionally, after being re-painted in the late 1990's a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere which resulted in a poor paint bond, and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of Space Shuttle program service which provided a unique opportunity to diagnose the sphere's poor performance. The sphere was drained and inerted, and then opened from the annular relief device on the top where a series of boroscoping operations were accomplished. Boroscoping revealed a large Perlite insulation void in the region of the sphere where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and off-loaded into the annular void region until the annulus was full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  18. Zinc coordination spheres in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Laitaoja, Mikko; Valjakka, Jarkko; Jänis, Janne

    2013-10-07

    Zinc metalloproteins are one of the most abundant and structurally diverse proteins in nature. In these proteins, the Zn(II) ion possesses a multifunctional role as it stabilizes the fold of small zinc fingers, catalyzes essential reactions in enzymes of all six classes, or assists in the formation of biological oligomers. Previously, a number of database surveys have been conducted on zinc proteins to gain broader insights into their rich coordination chemistry. However, many of these surveys suffer from severe flaws and misinterpretations or are otherwise limited. To provide a more comprehensive, up-to-date picture on zinc coordination environments in proteins, zinc containing protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were analyzed in detail. A statistical analysis in terms of zinc coordinating amino acids, metal-to-ligand bond lengths, coordination number, and structural classification was performed, revealing coordination spheres from classical tetrahedral cysteine/histidine binding sites to more complex binuclear sites with carboxylated lysine residues. According to the results, coordination spheres of hundreds of crystal structures in the PDB could be misinterpreted due to symmetry-related molecules or missing electron densities for ligands. The analysis also revealed increasing average metal-to-ligand bond length as a function of crystallographic resolution, which should be taken into account when interrogating metal ion binding sites. Moreover, one-third of the zinc ions present in crystal structures are artifacts, merely aiding crystal formation and packing with no biological significance. Our analysis provides solid evidence that a minimal stable zinc coordination sphere is made up by four ligands and adopts a tetrahedral coordination geometry.

  19. Synthesis and structural characterization of magnetic cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, and study of its activity for dyes degradation under ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite (CdS/CFO) nanocomposite was easily synthesized by one-step hydrothermal decomposition of cadmium diethyldithiocarbamate complex on the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at 200 °C. Spectroscopic techniques of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and magnetic measurements were applied for characterizing the structure and morphology of the product. The results of FT-IR, XRD and EDX indicated that the CdS/CFO was highly pure. SEM and TEM results revealed that the CdS/CFO nanocomposite was formed from nearly uniform and sphere-like nanoparticles with the size of approximately 20 nm. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the CdS/CFO nanocomposite showed the band gap of 2.21 eV, which made it suitable for sono-/photo catalytic purposes. By using the obtained CdS/CFO nanocomposite, an ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation process (AOP) has been developed for catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB), and methyl orange (MO)) in the presence of H2O2 as a green oxidant. CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited excellent sonocatalytic activity, so that, dyes were completely degraded in less than 10 min. The influences of crucial factors such as the H2O2 amount and catalyst dosage on the degradation efficiency were evaluated. The as-prepared CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited higher catalytic activity than pure CdS nanoparticles. Moreover, the magnetic property of CoFe2O4 made the nanocomposite recyclable.

  20. EDITORIAL: Optics of nanocomposite materials Optics of nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Malgosia; Tomita, Yasuo

    2009-02-01

    This special issue aims to consolidate and capture the breadth of current research at the forefront of photonic nanocomposite materials. The selection of articles from multi-component, hybrid polymer-liquid crystal materials to nanocrystalline materials reflects different strands of research pursued in that area. Both review and research papers, covering basic and applied research topics, are presented. Photonic nanocomposite materials are generally constructed by embedding an optically functional nanosized guest material (e.g. nanoparticles, nanocrystals and molecules) into an optically transparent host matrix such as organics (e.g. (photo)polymers, polymer blends, liquid crystals) or inorganic solids (e.g. glasses and ceramics). The addition of the guest material to the host matrix can yield significant improvement and modification in their mechanical, thermal, transport and optical properties over bulk materials. As a result, high-performance photonic functionalities, with environmentally stable optical characteristics, can be achieved. In addition, nanocomposite materials can be tailor-made via the control of their linear optical properties, such as the refractive index and absorption as well as their laser, electro-optic, and nonlinear optical properties. For example, the incorporation of liquid crystalline droplets in polymers gives electrically controllable light scattering characteristics, ideally suited for display and optical switching applications. Dispersing inorganic or organic nanoparticles in optical materials leads to a strong response to incident light. Indeed, ferroelectric nanoparticles in cholesteric liquid crystals enhance the electro-optic response of the mixture. In photopolymers, nanoparticles make the formation of a high-contrast holographic grating possible, which should prove useful for applications such as optical elements and data storage. Moreover, nanoparticles dispersed in photopolymer can be assembled by light, providing the

  1. Homothetic motion in radiating and dissipative spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, W.; Castillo, L.

    1995-10-01

    A method used to study the evolution of radiating dissipative fluid spheres is applied to the case in which the space-time admits a homothetic motion. We obtain a system of equations at the surface of the distribution which is integrated numerically. Considering that the shear viscosity induces anisotropy, we obtain a model derived from the static solution by Herrera, Jiménez, Leal, Esculpi, Ponce de León, and Galina [J. Math. Phys. 25, 3274 (1984)] for homothetic fluids but which includes dynamic variables. Therefore, the profiles of the physical variables at the surface are calculated and discussed in the light of one astrophysical scenario.

  2. Fermions, Skyrmions and the 3-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goatham, Stephen W.; Krusch, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates a background charge one Skyrme field chirally coupled to light fermions on the 3-sphere. The Dirac equation for the system commutes with a generalized angular momentum or grand spin. It can be solved explicitly for a Skyrme configuration given by the hedgehog form. The energy spectrum and degeneracies are derived for all values of the grand spin. Solutions for non-zero grand spin are each characterized by a set of four polynomials. The paper also discusses the energy of the Dirac sea using zeta-function regularization.

  3. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand.

    PubMed

    Marston, J O; Vakarelski, I U; Thoroddsen, S T

    2012-08-01

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  4. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, J. O.; Vakarelski, I. U.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2012-08-01

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  5. Soft Sphere Suspensions: Flow and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workamp, Marcel; Dijksman, Joshua A.

    We experimentally study the role of particle elasticity on the rheology of soft sphere suspensions. Experiments consist of custom designed particles with tuneable stiffness. These particles allow us to probe the role of elastic timescales, relaxation and anisotropy in a custom 3D printed shear cell. We find robust rheological features, such as a flow instability, that are not well captured by existing models for suspension flows. In addition, we find relaxation effects after shear even in the absence of shear or thermal fluctuations. We aim to integrate these findings in the emerging unified framework for structured fluids.

  6. Multiscale mesh generation on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, Jonathan; Comblen, Richard; Legat, Vincent; Geuzaine, Christophe; Remacle, Jean-François

    2008-12-01

    A method for generating computational meshes for applications in ocean modeling is presented. The method uses a standard engineering approach for describing the geometry of the domain that requires meshing. The underlying sphere is parametrized using stereographic coordinates. Then, coastlines are described with cubic splines drawn in the stereographic parametric space. The mesh generation algorithm builds the mesh in the parametric plane using available techniques. The method enables to import coastlines from different data sets and, consequently, to build meshes of domains with highly variable length scales. The results include meshes together with numerical simulations of various kinds.

  7. Further Investigations of NIST Water Sphere Discrepancies

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    2001-01-11

    Measurements have been performed on a family of water spheres at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) facilities. These measurements are important for criticality safety studies in that, frequently, difficulties have arisen in predicting the reactivity of individually subcritical components assembled in a critical array. It has been postulated that errors in the neutron leakage from individual elements in the array could be responsible for these problems. In these NIST measurements, an accurate determination of the leakage from a fission spectrum, modified by water scattering, is available. Previously, results for 3-, 4-, and 5-in. diam. water-filled spheres, both with and without cadmium covers over the fission chambers, were presented for four fissionable materials: {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu. Results were also given for ''dry'' systems, in which the water spheres were drained of water, with the results corresponding to essentially measurements of unmoderated {sup 252}Cf spontaneous-fission neutrons. The calculated-to-experimental (C/E) values ranged from 0.94 to 1.01 for the dry systems and 0.93 to 1.05 for the wet systems, with experimental uncertainties ranging from 1.5 to 1.9%. These results indicated discrepancies that were clearly outside of the experimental uncertainties, and further investigation was suggested. This work updates the previous calculations with a comparison of the predicted C/E values with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI transport cross sections. Variations in the predicted C/E values that arise from the use of ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, ENDL92, and LLLDOS for the response fission cross sections are also tabulated. The use of both a 45-group NIST fission spectrum and a continuous-energy fission spectrum for {sup 252}Cf are evaluated. The use of the generalized-linear-least-squares (GLLSM) procedures to investigate the reported discrepancies in the water sphere results for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu

  8. Second virial coefficients of dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Philipse, Albert P; Kuipers, Bonny W M

    2010-08-18

    An asymptotic formula is reported for the second virial coefficient B(2) of a dipolar hard-sphere (DHS) fluid, in zero external field, for strongly coupled dipolar interactions. This simple formula, together with the one for the weak-coupling B(2), provides an accurate prediction of the second virial coefficient for a wide range of dipole moments, including those that are experimentally accessible in magnetite ferrofluids. The weak-coupling B(2) also yields an estimate of the magnetic moment minimally needed for isotropic gas-liquid phase-separation, if any, in the DHS fluid.

  9. The Finite Deformation Dynamic Sphere Test Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Versino, Daniele; Brock, Jerry Steven

    2016-09-02

    In this manuscript we describe test cases for the dynamic sphere problem in presence of finite deformations. The spherical shell in exam is made of a homogeneous, isotropic or transverse isotropic material and elastic and elastic-plastic material behaviors are considered. Twenty cases, (a) to (t), are thus defined combining material types and boundary conditions. The inner surface radius, the outer surface radius and the material's density are kept constant for all the considered test cases and their values are ri = 10mm, ro = 20mm and p = 1000Kg/m3 respectively.

  10. Vortex-induced vibrations of a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, R. N.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2005-05-01

    There are many studies on the vortex-induced vibrations of a cylindrical body, but almost none concerned with such vibrations for a sphere, despite the fact that tethered bodies are a common configuration. In this paper, we study the dynamics of an elastically mounted or tethered sphere in a steady flow, employing displacement, force and vorticity measurements. Within a particular range of flow speeds, where the oscillation frequency (f) is of the order of the static-body vortex shedding frequency (f_{vo}), there exist two modes of periodic large-amplitude oscillation, defined as modes I and II, separated by a transition regime exhibiting non-periodic vibration. The dominant wake structure for both modes is a chain of streamwise vortex loops on alternating sides of the wake. Further downstream, the heads of the vortex loops pinch off to form a sequence of vortex rings. We employ an analogy with the lift on an aircraft that is associated with its trailing vortex pair (of strength Gamma(*) and spacing b(*) ), and thereby compute the rate of change of impulse for the streamwise vortex pair, yielding the vortex force coefficient (cvortex): [ cvortex = {8}/{pi} {U^*_{v}}b^*( - Gamma^*). ] This calculation yields predicted forces in reasonable agreement with direct measurements on the sphere. This is significant because it indicates that the principal vorticity dynamics giving rise to vortex-induced vibration for a sphere are the motions of these streamwise vortex pairs. The Griffin plot, showing peak amplitudes as a function of the mass damping (m(*zeta) ), exhibits a good collapse of data, indicating a maximum response of around 0.9 diameters. Following recent studies of cylinder vortex-induced vibration, we deduce the existence of a critical mass ratio, m(*_{crit}) {≈} 0.6, below which large-amplitude vibrations are predicted to persist to infinite normalized velocities. An unexpected large-amplitude and highly periodic mode (mode III) is found at distinctly higher

  11. Primary mass calibration of silicon spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.

    2006-10-01

    One of the routes to a redefinition of the kilogram requires a new determination of the Avogadro constant at a high level of accuracy. Laboratories must achieve mass comparison between a 1 kg 28Si sphere and 1 kg Pt/Ir mass standards to a combined standard uncertainty of 4 µg. The BIPM has developed a method of achieving this target. The goal of this paper is to report the advances at the BIPM and to describe our new method for linking weighings in air and in vacuum. The results obtained by classical comparisons in air are compared to those obtained by the new BIPM method. .

  12. Movements of a Sphere Moving Over Smooth and Rough Inclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Chyan-Deng

    1992-01-01

    The steady movements of a sphere over a rough incline in air, and over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid were studied theoretically and experimentally. The principle of energy conservation was used to analyze the translation velocities, rolling resistances, and drag coefficients of a sphere moving over the inclines. The rolling resistance to the movement of a sphere from the rough incline was presumed to be caused by collisions and frictional slidings. A varnished wooden board was placed on the bottom of an experimental tilting flume to form a smooth incline and a layer of spheres identical to the sphere moving over them was placed on the smooth wooden board to form a rough incline. Spheres used in the experiments were glass spheres, steel spheres, and golf balls. Experiments show that a sphere moving over a rough incline with negligible fluid drag in air can reach a constant translation velocity. This constant velocity was found to be proportional to the bed inclination (between 11 ^circ and 21^circ) and the square root of the sphere's diameter, but seemingly independent of the sphere's specific gravity. Two empirical coefficients in the theoretical expression of the sphere's translation velocity were determined by experiments. The collision and friction parts of the shear stress exerted on the interface between the moving sphere and rough incline were determined. The ratio of collision to friction parts appears to increase with increase in the bed inclination. These two parts seem to be of the same order of magnitude. The rolling resistances and the relations between the drag coefficient and Reynolds number for a sphere moving over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid, such as water or salad oil, were determined by a regression analysis based on experimental data. It was found that the drag coefficient for a sphere over the rough incline is larger than that for a sphere over the smooth incline, and both of which are much larger than that for a sphere in free

  13. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  14. An evaluation of temperature profiles from falling sphere soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    An evaluation of 30 pairs of high-altitude inflatable falling spheres and independent thermistor soundings with a mean rocket-launch-time separation of 27 min shows average temperature differences within 6 C at 32-70 km, except for an average difference of 10 C at 68 km near Mach 1 in the sphere descent curve. The mean difference is exhibited as a negative bias (sphere temperature colder) for which various explanations are considered. The rms temperature differences are greatest near 50 km (7 C) and 68 km (11 C). From 70 to approximately 87.5 km, confidence in the reliability of the sphere temperature soundings is based on the 'repeatability' of pairs of sphere soundings taken within 20 min, temperature differences generally being less than 10 C. Illustrations of large atmospheric variations measured by the sphere soundings are given along with verification from independent measurements.

  15. Photoelastic gelatin spheres for investigation of locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Ceniceros, Ericson; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; McCormick, Zephyr; Fu, Henry

    2014-11-01

    We describe a force measurement method in granular media which uses highly-sensitive photoelastic gelatin spheres and its application to measuring forces exerted as animals burrow through granular media. The method is applicable to both freshwater and marine organisms. We fabricate sensitively photoelastic gelatin spheres and describe a calibration method which relates forces applied to gelatin spheres with photoelastic signal. We show that photoelastic gelatin spheres can detect forces as small as 1 microNewton, and quantitatively measure forces with up to 60 microNewton precision, a two order of magnitude improvement compared to methods using plastic disks. Gelatin spheres can be fabricated with a range of sizes to investigate a variety of granular media. Finally, we used the calibrated gelatin spheres in a proof-of-principle experiment to measure forces during earthworm locomotion.

  16. Facile synthesis of ultrasmall monodisperse ``raisin-bun''-type MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites with enhanced catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiasheng; Li, Xin; Zhang, Shufen; Lu, Rongwen

    2013-05-01

    We report the preparation of ultrasmall monodisperse MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites in reverse microemulsions formed by Brij-58/cyclohexane/water. The nanocomposites are of ``raisin-bun''-type with 1.0 +/- 0.2 nm MoO3 homogeneously dispersed in 23 +/- 2 nm silica spheres. Characterization is carried out based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), N2 sorption measurement, and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The as-prepared MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites are microporous and exhibit enhanced catalytic activities for acetalization of benzaldehyde with ethylene glycol and can be repeatedly used 5 times without obvious deactivation. The catalytic performance improvement is attributed to the unique structure and ultrasmall size of the nanocomposites.We report the preparation of ultrasmall monodisperse MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites in reverse microemulsions formed by Brij-58/cyclohexane/water. The nanocomposites are of ``raisin-bun''-type with 1.0 +/- 0.2 nm MoO3 homogeneously dispersed in 23 +/- 2 nm silica spheres. Characterization is carried out based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), N2 sorption measurement, and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The as-prepared MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites are microporous and exhibit enhanced catalytic activities for acetalization of benzaldehyde with ethylene glycol and can be repeatedly used 5 times without obvious deactivation. The catalytic performance improvement is attributed to the unique

  17. Characterizing HR 3549 B using SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, D.; Vigan, A.; D'Orazi, V.; Ginski, C.; Desidera, S.; Bonnefoy, M.; Gratton, R.; Langlois, M.; Marzari, F.; Messina, S.; Antichi, J.; Biller, B.; Bonavita, M.; Cascone, E.; Chauvin, G.; Claudi, R. U.; Curtis, I.; Fantinel, D.; Feldt, M.; Garufi, A.; Galicher, R.; Henning, Th.; Incorvaia, S.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Millward, M.; Perrot, C.; Salasnich, B.; Scuderi, S.; Sissa, E.; Wahhaj, Z.; Zurlo, A.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: In this work, we characterize the low-mass companion of the A0 field star HR 3549. Methods: We observed HR 3549B in imaging mode with the near-infrared branch (IFS and IRDIS) of SPHERE at the VLT, with IFS in YJ mode and IRDIS in the H band. We also acquired a medium-resolution spectrum with the IRDIS long-slit spectroscopy mode. The data were reduced using the dedicated SPHERE GTO pipeline, which is custom-designed for this instrument. We employed algorithms such as PCA and TLOCI to reduce the speckle noise. Results: The companion was clearly visible with both IRDIS and IFS. We obtained photometry in four different bands and also the astrometric position for the companion. Based on our astrometry, we confirm that it is a bound object and set constraints on its orbit. Although several uncertainties still remain, we estimate an age of ~100-150 Myr for this system, yielding a most probable mass for the companion of 40-50 MJup and Teff ~ 2300-2400 K. Compared with template spectra, this points to a spectral type between M9 and L0 for the companion, commensurate with its position on the color-magnitude diagram.

  18. The hydrodynamics of an oscillating porous sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Jason R.; Carnie, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    We determine the hydrodynamics of a rigid, weakly permeable sphere undergoing translational oscillations in an incompressible Newtonian fluid. We check using homogenization and scaling arguments that the flow inside the sphere may be modeled by Darcy's law and that the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman (BJS) boundary condition still applies for oscillatory flows, provided the frequency of oscillation is not too high. The BJS boundary condition introduces a slip velocity and to leading order in ɛ=√k /a, where k is the particle permeability and a is the radius, the particle may be regarded as impermeable with a slip length independent of frequency. Under these circumstances we solve for the flow field, pressure distribution and drag explicitly and show their behavior for 0⩽ɛ⩽0.05 and frequencies relevant to electroacoustics (1-10 MHz). From the drag we find the leading order corrections due to particle permeability of the pseudo-steady drag, Basset force and added mass.

  19. Percolation of disordered jammed sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziff, Robert M.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2017-02-01

    We determine the site and bond percolation thresholds for a system of disordered jammed sphere packings in the maximally random jammed state, generated by the Torquato–Jiao algorithm. For the site threshold, which gives the fraction of conducting versus non-conducting spheres necessary for percolation, we find {{p}\\text{c}}=0.3116(3) , consistent with the 1979 value of Powell 0.310(5) and identical within errors to the threshold for the simple-cubic lattice, 0.311 608, which shares the same average coordination number of 6. In terms of the volume fraction ϕ, the threshold corresponds to a critical value {φ\\text{c}}=0.199 . For the bond threshold, which apparently was not measured before, we find {{p}\\text{c}}=0.2424(3) . To find these thresholds, we considered two shape-dependent universal ratios involving the size of the largest cluster, fluctuations in that size, and the second moment of the size distribution; we confirmed the ratios’ universality by also studying the simple-cubic lattice with a similar cubic boundary. The results are applicable to many problems including conductivity in random mixtures, glass formation, and drug loading in pharmaceutical tablets.

  20. Low TCR nanocomposite strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); Chen, Ximing (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high temperature thin film strain gage sensor capable of functioning at temperatures above 1400.degree. C. The sensor contains a substrate, a nanocomposite film comprised of an indium tin oxide alloy, zinc oxide doped with alumina or other oxide semiconductor and a refractory metal selected from the group consisting of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ni, W, Ir, NiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY deposited onto the substrate to form an active strain element. The strain element being responsive to an applied force.

  1. Probabilistic Simulation for Nanocomposite Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A unique probabilistic theory is described to predict the uniaxial strengths and fracture properties of nanocomposites. The simulation is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to simulate uniaxial strengths and fracture of a nanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. These results show smooth distributions from low probability to high.

  2. Isotropic vector fields on spheres, spinor structures on spheres and projective spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumeyrolle, A.

    1989-08-01

    In a previous paper "Fields of totally isotropic subspaces and almost complex structures" [1c], we constructed on the sphere S4, in the complexified tangent bundle, a global field of totally isotropic planes to obtain a counterexample nullifying a statement about some manifolds and vector bundles; we proved that if the complexified tangent bundle T c( M) of a 2 r-dimensional C∞ manifold M is a Withney sum T c(M) = η ⊕ η' , where η, η' are r-complex subbundles such that for any x belonging to M, η' x = ηmacr;x, M does not have necessarily an almost complex structure. This article has two aims. First, we construct on any sphere global fields of isotropic vectors, nowhere zero, cross-sections of the complexified tangent bundle. We give for n ≥ 3 two independent methods, one with continuous hypothesis only, the second method with smooth conditions, valid for any dimension n ≥ 2. Our developments bring a new proof of the statement given in [1c] and a more precise and new result: the C∞ complexified tangent bundle of any sphere is trivializable. Our second aim is to give an elementary approach to the existence conditions for spinor structures on spheres and projective spaces, using naturally our methods developed in numerous papers, particularly in [1d] and [1e]. However, the major part of the paper deals with the isotropic vector field problem on spheres and the reader unfamilar with spinors will be able to read the Secs. I, II and III, except some details at the end. We think that this paper will contribute to explaining some delicate questions and remove some errors or sophisms and also point out the role of the elementary geometry in spinor structures for particularly simple cases.

  3. Polymeric spheres on substrates from a spin-coating process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Ling; Chen, Shi-Yi; Wang, Ko-Shung

    2009-02-01

    Formation of polymeric spheres in nanometer to sub-micrometer is achieved through a spin-coating process with polyamide (from 4,4(')-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)dianiline and 4,4(')-dicarboxydiphenylether) solutions in N,N-dimethylformamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide. The formation of polymeric spheres and their sizes are dependent on the polymer solution concentrations and the rates in spin-coating. The polymeric spheres could be obtained on various substrates including silicon, mica, and glass.

  4. Cobalt - poly(amido amine) superparamagnetic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Atwater, James E; Akse, James R; Holtsnider, John T

    2008-06-30

    Metallic cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were prepared using generation 5 Poly(amido amine) dendrimers with primary amino termini. Cobalt loading of ~38 atoms per dendrimer was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Magnetic properties of the cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were investigated across the temperature range from 2-300 K by SQUID magnetometry. Magnetization as a function of temperature and applied field strength was studied in zero field cooled samples. Magnetization-demagnetization curves (hysteresis loops) were also acquired at temperatures between 10 - 300 K. These results clearly indicate superparamagnetism for the nanocomposites with a characteristic blocking temperature of ~50 K.

  5. Cobalt - poly(amido amine) superparamagnetic nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were prepared using generation 5 Poly(amido amine) dendrimers with primary amino termini. Cobalt loading of ~38 atoms per dendrimer was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Magnetic properties of the cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were investigated across the temperature range from 2–300 K by SQUID magnetometry. Magnetization as a function of temperature and applied field strength was studied in zero field cooled samples. Magnetization-demagnetization curves (hysteresis loops) were also acquired at temperatures between 10 – 300 K. These results clearly indicate superparamagnetism for the nanocomposites with a characteristic blocking temperature of ~50 K. PMID:20352068

  6. Extensive nuclear sphere generation in the human Alzheimer's brain.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Katharina; Bukhari, Hassan; Loosse, Christina; Leonhardt, Gregor; Glotzbach, Annika; Pawlas, Magdalena; Hess, Katharina; Theiss, Carsten; Müller, Thorsten

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear spheres are protein aggregates consisting of FE65, TIP60, BLM, and other yet unknown proteins. Generation of these structures in the cellular nucleus is putatively modulated by the amyloid precursor protein (APP), either by its cleavage or its phosphorylation. Nuclear spheres were preferentially studied in cell culture models and their existence in the human brain had not been known. Existence of nuclear spheres in the human brain was studied using immunohistochemistry. Cell culture experiments were used to study regulative mechanisms of nuclear sphere generation. The comparison of human frontal cortex brain samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients to age-matched controls revealed a dramatically and highly significant enrichment of nuclear spheres in the AD brain. Costaining demonstrated that neurons are distinctly affected by nuclear spheres, but astrocytes never are. Nuclear spheres were predominantly found in neurons that were negative for threonine 668 residue in APP phosphorylation. Cell culture experiments revealed that JNK3-mediated APP phosphorylation reduces the amount of sphere-positive cells. The study suggests that nuclear spheres are a new APP-derived central hallmark of AD, which might be of crucial relevance for the molecular mechanisms in neurodegeneration.

  7. Meteoroid ablation spheres from deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bunch, T. E.; Hodge, P. W.; Kyte, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with an examination of spheres that are magnetically extracted from mid-Pacific abyssal clays that are up to half a million years old. The spheres are divided into three groups using their dominant mineralogy - namely, iron, glassy, and silicate. Most spheres were formed from particles that completely melted as they separated from their parent meteoroids during the ablation process. It is concluded that the mineralogy and composition of the deep-sea spheres are identical in many respects to the meteorite fusion crusts, laboratory-created ablation debris, and the ablated interplanetary dust particles in the stratospheric collection.

  8. Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T.gtoreq.600.degree. C.). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  9. Oil capture from a water surface by a falling sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Linda; McLaughlin, Clare; Witelski, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    When a spherical particle is dropped from rest into an oil lens that floats on top of a water surface, a portion of the oil adheres to the sphere. Once the sphere comes to rest at the subsurface, the oil forms a pendant drop that remains attached in equilibrium to the sphere effectively removing oil from the water surface. Best fit solutions of the Laplace equation to experimental profiles are used to investigate the parameter dependence of the radius of curvature and the filling and contact angles at the three-phase contact line of the pendant drop for spheres with different wetting properties, densities and radii. The volume of oil captured by a sphere increases with a sphere's mass and diameter. However, lighter and smaller spheres capture more oil relative to their own volume than do heavier and larger spheres (scaling with the sphere mass ~M - 0 . 544) and are thus more efficient at removing oil from a water surface. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. DMS-0707755 and DMS-0968252.

  10. Diffusion of spheres in crowded suspensions of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyongok; Gapinski, J.; Lettinga, M. P.; Buitenhuis, J.; Meier, G.; Ratajczyk, M.; Dhont, Jan K. G.; Patkowski, A.

    2005-01-01

    Translational tracer diffusion of spherical macromolecules in crowded suspensions of rodlike colloids is investigated. Experiments are done using several kinds of spherical tracers in fd-virus suspensions. A wide range of size ratios L/2a of the length L of the rods and the diameter 2a of the tracer sphere is covered by combining several experimental methods: fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for small tracer spheres, dynamic light scattering for intermediate sized spheres, and video microscopy for large spheres. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is shown to measure long-time diffusion only for relatively small tracer spheres. Scaling of diffusion coefficients with a/ξ, predicted for static networks, is not found for our dynamical network of rods (with ξ the mesh size of the network). Self-diffusion of tracer spheres in the dynamical network of freely suspended rods is thus fundamentally different as compared to cross-linked networks. A theory is developed for the rod-concentration dependence of the translational diffusion coefficient at low rod concentrations for freely suspended rods. The proposed theory is based on a variational solution of the appropriate Smoluchowski equation without hydrodynamic interactions. The theory can, in principle, be further developed to describe diffusion through dynamical networks at higher rod concentrations with the inclusion of hydrodynamic interactions. Quantitative agreement with the experiments is found for large tracer spheres, and qualitative agreement for smaller spheres. This is probably due to the increasing importance of hydrodynamic interactions as compared to direct interactions as the size of the tracer sphere decreases.

  11. Porous Sphere in Stratified Environments: Entrainment and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassa, Roberto; Falcon, Claudia; Khatri, Shilpa; McLaughlin, Richard; UNC Joint Fluids Lab Team

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical, experimental, and numerical study of porous spheres falling in stratified fluids will be presented. The systematic justification of asymptotic regimes resulting in asymptotic models with ``heat bath'' boundary conditions for salinity are derived in low Reynolds number regimes. Violation of these asymptotic scalings will be discussed in the context of experiments and mathematical modeling. In particular the presence of a salt depletion or enrichment wake left behind by the settling, ab/de-sorbing sphere, and its competition with entrainment, will be presented and highlighted. Experimental results with microporous spheres as well calibrated manufactured drilled spheres will be compared. Supported by: NSF CMG, NSF RTG, ONR.

  12. Image charge inclusion in the dielectric sphere revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redžić, D. V.; Eldakli, M. S. A.; Redžić, M. D.

    2012-11-01

    Van Siclen (1988 Am. J. Phys. 56 1142) reported a curious property of a dielectric sphere in the field of an external point charge: the field outside the sphere generated by the combination of the original charge exterior and the Kelvin image charge interior to the sphere is independent of the permittivity of the sphere. In this paper, we simplify and correct the original derivation and give a detailed analysis of the sources of the field. We also present various checks for the theory, providing instructive exercises for advanced undergraduates.

  13. ISS Update: SPHERES with Telerobotics Project Manager Terry Fong

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Terry Fong, Telerobotics Project Manager, about how the Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, are ...

  14. GRADIENT INDEX SPHERES BY THE SEQUENTIAL ACCRETION OF GLASS POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    MARIANO VELEZ

    2008-06-15

    The Department of Energy is seeking a method for fabricating mm-scale spheres having a refractive index that varies smoothly and continuously from the center to its surface [1]. The fabrication procedure must allow the creation of a range of index profiles. The spheres are to be optically transparent and have a refractive index differential greater than 0.2. The sphere materials can be either organic or inorganic and the fabrication technique must be capable of scaling to low cost production. Mo-Sci Corporation proposed to develop optical quality gradient refractive index (GRIN) glass spheres of millimeter scale (1 to 2 mm diameter) by the sequential accretion and consolidation of glass powders. Other techniques were also tested to make GRIN spheres as the powder-accretion method produced non-concentric layers and poor optical quality glass spheres. Potential ways to make the GRIN spheres were (1) by "coating" glass spheres (1 to 2 mm diameter) with molten glass in a two step process; and (2) by coating glass spheres with polymer layers.

  15. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-05

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption.

  16. A Multimodal Nanocomposite for Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, A.; Paunesku, T.; Zhang, Z.; Vogt, S.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.; Yaghmai, V.; Li, D.; Omary, R. A.; Woloschak, G. E.

    2011-09-01

    A multimodal nanocomposite was designed, synthesized with super-paramagnetic core (CoFe2O4), noble metal corona (Au), and semiconductor shell (TiO2). The sizes of core, core-corona, and core-corona-shell particles were determined by TEM. This multimodal nanocrystal showed promise as a contrast agent for two of the most widely used biomedical imaging techniques: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and x-ray computed tomography (CT). Finally, these nanocomposites were coated with a peptide SN-50. This led to their ready uptake by the cultured cells and targeted the nanocomposites to the pores of nuclear membrane. Inside cells, this nanocomposite retained its integrity as shown by x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). Inside cells imaged by XFM we found the complex elemental signature of nanoconjugates (Ti-Co-Fe-Au) always co-registered in the 2D elemental map of the cell.

  17. Polymer matrix nanocomposites for automotive structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Keum, Jong K.; Boeman, Raymond G.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past several decades, the automotive industry has expended significant effort to develop lightweight parts from new easy-to-process polymeric nanocomposites. These materials have been particularly attractive because they can increase fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, attempts to reinforce soft matrices by nanoscale reinforcing agents at commercially deployable scales have been only sporadically successful to date. This situation is due primarily to the lack of fundamental understanding of how multiscale interfacial interactions and the resultant structures affect the properties of polymer nanocomposites. In this Perspective, we critically evaluate the state of the art in the field and propose a possible path that may help to overcome these barriers. Only once we achieve a deeper understanding of the structure-properties relationship of polymer matrix nanocomposites will we be able to develop novel structural nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical properties for automotive applications.

  18. Electrical conduction of a XLPE nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Jun; Sim, Jae-Yong; Lim, Kee-Joe; Nam, Jin-Ho; Park, Wan-Gi

    2014-07-01

    The resistivity, breakdown strength, and formation of space charges are very important factors for insulation design of HVDC cable. It is known that a nano-sized metal-oxide inorganic filler reduces the formation of space charges in the polymer nanocomposite. Electrical conduction of cross-linked polyethylene(XLPE) nanocomposite insulating material is investigated in this paper. The conduction currents of two kinds of XLPE nanocomposites and XLPE without nano-filler were measured at temperature of 303 ~ 363 K under the applied electric fields of 10 ~ 50 kV/mm. The current of the nanocomposite specimen is smaller than that of XLPE specimen without nano-filler. The conduction mechanism may be explained in terms of Schottky emission and multi-core model.

  19. Graphene oxide nanocomposites and their electrorheology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen Ling; Liu, Ying Dan; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GO-based PANI, NCOPA and PS nanocomposites are prepared. • The nanocomposites are adopted as novel electrorheological (ER) candidates. • Their critical ER characteristics and dielectric performance are analyzed. • Typical ER behavior widens applications of GO-based nanocomposites. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO), a novel one-atom carbon system, has become one of the most interesting materials recently due to its unique physical and chemical properties in addition to graphene. This article briefly reviews a recent progress of the fabrication of GO-based polyaniline, ionic N-substituted copolyaniline and polystyrene nanocomposites. The critical electrorheological characteristics such as flow response and yield stress from rheological measurement, relaxation time and achievable polarizability from dielectric analysis are also analyzed.

  20. Polymer matrix nanocomposites for automotive structural components.

    PubMed

    Naskar, Amit K; Keum, Jong K; Boeman, Raymond G

    2016-12-06

    Over the past several decades, the automotive industry has expended significant effort to develop lightweight parts from new easy-to-process polymeric nanocomposites. These materials have been particularly attractive because they can increase fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, attempts to reinforce soft matrices by nanoscale reinforcing agents at commercially deployable scales have been only sporadically successful to date. This situation is due primarily to the lack of fundamental understanding of how multiscale interfacial interactions and the resultant structures affect the properties of polymer nanocomposites. In this Perspective, we critically evaluate the state of the art in the field and propose a possible path that may help to overcome these barriers. Only once we achieve a deeper understanding of the structure-properties relationship of polymer matrix nanocomposites will we be able to develop novel structural nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical properties for automotive applications.

  1. A Multimodal Nanocomposite for Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Aiguo; Paunesku, Tatjana; Zhang, Zhuoli; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Maser, Jörg; Yaghmai, Vahid; Li, Debiao; Omary, Reed A.; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-01-01

    A multimodal nanocomposite was designed, synthesized with super-paramagnetic core (CoFe2O4), noble metal corona (Au), and semiconductor shell (TiO2). The sizes of core, core-corona, and core-corona-shell particles were determined by TEM. This multimodal nanocrystal showed promise as a contrast agent for two of the most widely used biomedical imaging techniques: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray computed tomography (CT). Finally, these nanocomposites were coated with a peptide SN-50. This led to their ready uptake by the cultured cells and targeted the nanocomposites to the pores of nuclear membrane. Inside cells, this nanocomposite retained its integrity as shown by X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). Inside cells imaged by XFM we found the complex elemental signature of nanoconjugates (Ti-Co-Fe-Au) always co-registered in the 2D elemental map of the cell. PMID:24817775

  2. Polymer matrix nanocomposites for automotive structural components

    DOE PAGES

    Naskar, Amit K.; Keum, Jong K.; Boeman, Raymond G.

    2016-12-06

    Over the past several decades, the automotive industry has expended significant effort to develop lightweight parts from new easy-to-process polymeric nanocomposites. These materials have been particularly attractive because they can increase fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, attempts to reinforce soft matrices by nanoscale reinforcing agents at commercially deployable scales have been only sporadically successful to date. This situation is due primarily to the lack of fundamental understanding of how multiscale interfacial interactions and the resultant structures affect the properties of polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we critically evaluate the state of the art in the field andmore » propose a possible path that may help to overcome these barriers. Finally, only once we achieve a deeper understanding of the structure–properties relationship of polymer matrix nanocomposites will we be able to develop novel structural nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical properties for automotive applications.« less

  3. Polymer matrix nanocomposites for automotive structural components

    SciTech Connect

    Naskar, Amit K.; Keum, Jong K.; Boeman, Raymond G.

    2016-12-06

    Over the past several decades, the automotive industry has expended significant effort to develop lightweight parts from new easy-to-process polymeric nanocomposites. These materials have been particularly attractive because they can increase fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, attempts to reinforce soft matrices by nanoscale reinforcing agents at commercially deployable scales have been only sporadically successful to date. This situation is due primarily to the lack of fundamental understanding of how multiscale interfacial interactions and the resultant structures affect the properties of polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we critically evaluate the state of the art in the field and propose a possible path that may help to overcome these barriers. Finally, only once we achieve a deeper understanding of the structure–properties relationship of polymer matrix nanocomposites will we be able to develop novel structural nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical properties for automotive applications.

  4. Large-Strain Transparent Magnetoactive Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses polymer nano - composite superparamagnetic actuators that were prepared by the addition of organically modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. The nanocomposite films exhibited large deformations under a magnetostatic field with a low loading level of 0.1 wt% in a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer (TPU) matrix. The maximum actuation deformation of the nanocomposite films increased exponentially with increasing nanoparticle concentration. The cyclic deformation actuation of a high-loading magnetic nanocomposite film was examined in a low magnetic field, and it exhibited excellent reproducibility and controllability. Low-loading TPU nanocomposite films (0.1-2 wt%) were transparent to semitransparent in the visible wavelength range, owing to good dispersion of the magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetoactuation phenomena were also demonstrated in a high-modulus, high-temperature polyimide resin with less mechanical deformation.

  5. Nanocomposite polymer electrolyte for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Wei, Zhehao; Gu, Meng; Deng, Xuchu; Xu, Suochang; Han, Kee Sung; Wang, Jiulin; Nie, Zimin; Li, Guosheng; Zavadil, K.; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong M.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Yong; Mueller, Karl T.; Persson, Kristin A.; Liu, Jun

    2014-12-28

    Nanocomposite polymer electrolytes present new opportunities for rechargeable magnesium batteries. However, few polymer electrolytes have demonstrated reversible Mg deposition/dissolution and those that have still contain volatile liquids such as tetrahydrofuran (THF). In this work, we report a nanocomposite polymer electrolyte based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), Mg(BH4)2 and MgO nanoparticles for rechargeable Mg batteries. Cells with this electrolyte have a high coulombic efficiency of 98% for Mg plating/stripping and a high cycling stability. Through combined experiment-modeling investigations, a correlation between improved solvation of the salt and solvent chain length, chelation and oxygen denticity is established. Following the same trend, the nanocomposite polymer electrolyte is inferred to enhance the dissociation of the salt Mg(BH4)2 and thus improve the electrochemical performance. The insights and design metrics thus obtained may be used in nanocomposite electrolytes for other multivalent systems.

  6. Mean-field avalanches in jammed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, S.; Spigler, S.

    2017-02-01

    Disordered systems are characterized by the existence of many sample-dependent local-energy minima that cause a step-wise response when the system is perturbed. In this article we use an approach based on elementary probabilistic methods to compute the complete probability distribution of the jumps (static avalanches) in the response of mean-field systems described by replica symmetry breaking; we find a precise condition for having a power-law behavior in the distribution of avalanches caused by small perturbations, and we show that our predictions are in remarkable agreement both with previous results and with what is found in simulations of three-dimensional systems of soft spheres, either at jamming or at slightly higher densities.

  7. Equilibrium Phase Behavior of Polydisperse Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasolo, Moreno; Sollich, Peter

    2003-08-01

    We calculate the phase behavior of hard spheres with size polydispersity, using accurate free energies for the fluid and solid phases. Cloud and shadow curves are found exactly by the moment free energy method, but we also compute the complete phase diagram, taking full account of fractionation. In contrast to earlier, simplified treatments we find no point of equal concentration between fluid and solid or reentrant melting at higher densities. Rather, the fluid cloud curve continues to the largest polydispersity that we study (14%); from the equilibrium phase behavior a terminal polydispersity can thus be defined only for the solid, where we find it to be around 7%. At sufficiently large polydispersity, fractionation into several solid phases can occur, consistent with previous approximate calculations; we find, in addition, that coexistence of several solids with a fluid phase is also possible.

  8. Hard sphere study of condensation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2008-06-01

    A simple procedure is devised to calculate the Ben-Naim standard condensation entropy by treating neat liquids as hard sphere fluids. The calculated values are close to the experimental ones for nonpolar liquids, but not for polar aprotic ones and for H-bonded liquids. For the latter the calculated entropy values become close to the experimental ones if the molecular van der Waals diameters are used instead of the effective ones. This implies that the magnitude of the orientational entropy loss due to H-bond formation is quantitatively similar to that of the configurational entropy gain for the decrease in excluded volume due to the bunching up effect caused by H-bonds.

  9. Mean-field avalanches in jammed spheres.

    PubMed

    Franz, S; Spigler, S

    2017-02-01

    Disordered systems are characterized by the existence of many sample-dependent local-energy minima that cause a step-wise response when the system is perturbed. In this article we use an approach based on elementary probabilistic methods to compute the complete probability distribution of the jumps (static avalanches) in the response of mean-field systems described by replica symmetry breaking; we find a precise condition for having a power-law behavior in the distribution of avalanches caused by small perturbations, and we show that our predictions are in remarkable agreement both with previous results and with what is found in simulations of three-dimensional systems of soft spheres, either at jamming or at slightly higher densities.

  10. Carbon adsorption system protects LPG storage sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gothenquist, C.A.; Rooker, K.M.

    1996-07-01

    Chevron U.S.A. Products Co. installed a carbon adsorption system to protect an LPG storage sphere at its refinery in Richmond, Calif. Vessel damage can result when amine contamination leads to emulsion formation and consequent amine carry-over, thus promoting wet-H{sub 2}S cracking. In Chevron`s No. 5 H{sub 2}S recovery plant, a mixture of butane and propane containing H{sub 2}S is contacted with diethanolamine (DEA) in a liquid-liquid absorber. The absorber is a countercurrent contactor with three packed beds. Because the sweetening system did not include a carbon adsorption unit for amine purification, contaminants were building up in the DEA. The contaminants comprised: treatment chemicals, hydrocarbons, foam inhibitors, and amine degradation products. The paper describes the solution to this problem.

  11. A Bonner Sphere Spectrometer for pulsed fields

    PubMed Central

    Aza, E.; Dinar, N.; Manessi, G. P.; Silari, M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of conventional Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS) in pulsed neutron fields (PNF) is limited by the fact that proportional counters, usually employed as the thermal neutron detectors, suffer from dead time losses and show severe underestimation of the neutron interaction rate, which leads to strong distortion of the calculated spectrum. In order to avoid these limitations, an innovative BSS, called BSS-LUPIN, has been developed for measuring in PNF. This paper describes the physical characteristics of the device and its working principle, together with the results of Monte Carlo simulations of its response matrix. The BSS-LUPIN has been tested in the stray neutron field at the CERN Proton Synchrotron, by comparing the spectra obtained with the new device, the conventional CERN BSS and via Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:25948828

  12. Nematic Elastomer Nanocomposites as Electromechanical Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-07

    in nanocomposite elastomersii. Our main tasks have been: (A) Develop the robust method of CNT dispersion in amorphous polymeric matrix and...establish a set of quantitative methods to characterise the quality of this dispersion . (B) Develop a technique for nanotube alignment on the dense...effects and develop proper characterisation techniques. The first stage of nanocomposite preparation is the dispersion of CNT aggregates. Figure

  13. Optoelectronic Nanocomposite Materials for Thin Film Photovoltaics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    CdTe and ZnO single-phase thin films , nanocomposite films ...for the CdTe -ZnO thin film system under these conditions. c. Optical Absorption The films produced in the present study consistently exhibited...optical absorbance spectra collected from CdTe -ZnO multilayer nanocomposite thin films . The effect of CdTe layer thickness used per deposition cycle

  14. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  15. Polysaccharide-based nanocomposites and their applications

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yingying; Monty, Jonathan; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharide nanocomposites have become increasingly important materials over the past decade. Polysaccharides offer a green alternative to synthetic polymers in the preparation of soft nanomaterials. They have also been used in composites with hard nanomaterials, such as metal nanoparticles and carbon-based nanomaterials. This mini review describes methods for polysaccharide nanocomposite preparation and reviews the various types and diverse applications for these novel materials. PMID:25498200

  16. Biodegradable Polyester/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    compatible with the polymer [5-9]. In this paper we report the synthesis and properties of both PLA and PHB nanocomposites with different nanoclays...hydroxy polyester, polylactide (PLA) and fl-hydroxy polyester, polyhydroxybutyrate ( PHB ) with layered silicates have been successfully prepared by melt...extrusion of PLA and PHB with organically modified montmorillonite (MMT) and fluoromica. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are improved

  17. Random lasing in a nanocomposite medium

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Basiev, Tasoltan T

    2013-01-31

    The characteristics of a random laser based on a nanocomposite medium consisting of a transparent dielectric and scattering doped nanocrystals are calculated. It is proposed to use ytterbium laser media with a high concentration of active ions as nanocrystals and to use gases, liquids, or solid dielectrics with a refractive index lower than that of nanocrystals as dielectric matrices for nanocrystals. Based on the concept of nonresonant distributed feedback due to the Rayleigh scattering, an expression is obtained for the minimum length of a nanocomposite laser medium at which the random lasing threshold is overcome. Expressions are found for the critical (maximum) and the optimal size of nanocrystals, as well as for the optimal relative refractive index of nanocomposites that corresponds not only to the maximum gain but also to the minimum of the medium threshold length at the optimal size of nanocrystals. It is shown that the optimal relative refractive index of a nanocomposite increases with increasing pump level, but is independent of the other nanocomposite parameters. (nanocomposites)

  18. Segregation of Fluidized Binary Hard-Sphere Systems Under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul

    We have derived an analytic expression for the contact value of the local density of binary hard-sphere systems under gravity. We have obtained the crossover conditions for the Brazil-nut type segregation of binary hard-sphere mixtures and binary hard-sphere chain mixtures from the segregation criterion, where the segregation occurs when the density (or the pressure) of the small spheres at the bottom is higher than that of the large spheres, or vice versa. For the binary hard-sphere chain mixtures, the crossover condition for the segregation depends on the number of monomers composed of hard-sphere chains as well as the mass and the diameter of each species. The fundamental-measure theories (FMTs) and local density approximation (LDA) are employed to examine the crossover condition for the segregation of the gravity-induced hard-sphere mixtures. The calculated results show that the LDA does not explain the density oscillation near the bottom, whereas the modified fundamental-measure theory (MFMT) compares with molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Social Justice and Education in the Public and Private Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Sally; Taylor, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the complex relationship between social justice and education in the public and private spheres. The politics of education is often presented as a battle between left and right, the state and the market. In this representation, the public and the private spheres are neatly aligned on either side of the line of battle, and…

  20. Squeeze flow between a sphere and a textured wall

    SciTech Connect

    Chastel, T.; Mongruel, A.

    2016-02-15

    The motion of a millimetric sphere, translating in a viscous fluid towards a wettable textured wall, is investigated experimentally. The textures consist of square arrays of cylindrical or square micro-pillars, the height, width, and spacing of which are varied, keeping the periodicity small compared to the sphere radius. An interferometric device is used to measure the sphere vertical displacement, for distances between the sphere and the base of the pillars smaller than 0.1 sphere radius, and with a resolution of 200 nm. At a given distance from the top of the pillars, the sphere velocity is found to be significantly larger than the corresponding velocity for a smooth solid wall. A squeeze flow model of two adjacent fluid layers is developed in the lubrication approximation, one fluid layer having an effective viscosity that reflects the viscous dissipation through the array of pillars. The pressure field in the gap between the sphere and the textured surface is then used to obtain the drag force on the sphere and hence its velocity. Adjustment of the model to the velocity measurements yields the effective viscosity for a given texture. Finally, a correlation between the effective viscosity and the geometry of the pillar array is proposed.

  1. Orbital Motion of Electrically Charged Spheres in Microgravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Shubho; Andring, Kevin; Campbell, Desmond; Janeski, John; Keedy, Daniel; Quinn, Sean; Hoffmeister, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The similar mathematical forms of Coulomb's law and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two uniformly charged spheres should be able to orbit each other just as two uniform spheres of mass are known to do. In this paper we describe an experiment that we performed to demonstrate such an orbit. This is the first published account of a…

  2. Computational Analysis of Wake Field Flow between Multiple Identical Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Wesley; Greenslit, Morton; Klassen, Zach; Hastings, Jay; Matson, William

    2014-11-01

    It is well understood both that objects moving through a fluid perturb the motion of nearby objects in the same fluid and that some configurations of objects moving through a fluid have little inter-object perturbation, such as a flock of birds flying in a V-formation. However, there is presently no known method for predicting what configurations of objects will be stable while moving through a fluid. Previous work has failed to find such stable configurations because of the computational complexity of finding individual solutions. In this research, the motions of two spheres in water were simulated and combinations of those simulations were used to extrapolate the motions of multiple spheres and to find configurations where the lateral forces on each sphere were negligible and the vertical forces on each sphere were equivalent. Two and three sphere arrangements were simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics and Mathematica was used both to demonstrate that combinations of two sphere cases are identical to three sphere cases and to identify stable configurations of three or more spheres. This new approach is expected to simplify optimization of aerodynamic configurations and applications such as naval and aerospace architecture and racecar driving. Advisor.

  3. Applications of Bonner sphere detectors in neutron field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, M.; Sanna, R.S.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of neutron moderation and spectroscopy are briefly reviewed, and moderators that are useful for Bonner sphere spectrometers are discussed. The choice of the neutron detector for a Bonner sphere spectrometer is examined. Spectral deconvolution methods are briefly reviewed, including derivative, parametric, quadrature, and Monte Carlo methods. Calibration is then discussed. (LEW)

  4. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  5. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  6. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  7. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  8. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  9. Experimental Visualization of Flows in Packed Beds of Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Lattime, S.; Braun, M. J.; Athavale, M. M.

    1997-01-01

    The flow experiment consisted of an oil tunnel, 76 x 76 mm in cross-section, packed with lucite spheres. The index of refraction of the working fluid and the spheres were matched such that the physical spheres invisible to the eye and camera. By seeding the oil and illuminating the packed bed with planar laser light sheet, aligned in the direction of the bulk flow, the system fluid dynamics becomes visible and the 2-D projection was recorded at right angles to the bulk flow. The planar light sheet was traversed from one side of the tunnel to the other providing a simulated 3-D image of the entire flow field. The boundary interface between the working fluid and the sphere rendered the sphere black permitting visualization of the exact locations of the circular interfaces in both the axial and transverse directions with direct visualization of the complex interstitial spaces between the spheres within the bed. Flows were observed near the surfaces of a plane and set of spheres as well as minor circles that appear with great circles and not always uniformly ordered. In addition to visualizing a very complex flow field, it was observed that flow channeling in the direction of the bulk flow occurs between sets of adjacent spheres. Still photographs and video recordings illustrating the flow phenomena will be presented.

  10. Mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Meng; Yan Guojin; Hou Yonggai; Wang Chunhua

    2009-05-15

    NiO solid/hollow spheres with diameters about 100 nm have been successfully synthesized through thermal decomposition of nickel acetate in ethylene glycol at 200 deg. C. These spheres are composed of nanosheets about 3-5 nm thick. Introducing poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) surfactant to reaction system can effectively control the products' morphology. By adjusting the quantity of PVP, we accomplish surface areas-tunable NiO assembled spheres from {approx}70 to {approx}200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. Electrochemical tests show that NiO hollow spheres deliver a large discharge capacity of 823 mA h g{sup -1}. Furthermore, these hollow spheres also display a slow capacity-fading rate. A series of contrastive experiments demonstrate that the surface area of NiO assembled spheres has a noticeable influence on their discharge capacity. - Graphical abstract: The mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres have been achieved by a solvothermal method. N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms show the S{sub BET} of NiO is tunable. NiO spheres show large discharge capacity and slow capacity-fading rate.

  11. Peculiarities of Future Social Sphere Specialists' Professional Training in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zieba, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews certain aspects of organising the process of professional training of future specialists in social sphere. It identifies, considers and analyzes the main definitions of scientific research, the object of which is to make specialists in social sphere ready for professional activity. The article highlights peculiarities of…

  12. Dual-Purpose Millikan Experiment with Polystyrene Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, C. N.; Christensen, F. E.

    1975-01-01

    This procedure, using polystyrene spheres of specified diameter, renders the Millikan oil drop experiment more accurate than the conventional procedure of the polystyrene spheres, eliminates size estimation error, and removes the guesswork involved in assigning proper index integers to the observed charges. (MLH)

  13. Meteor ablation spheres from deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bunch, T. E.; Hodge, P. W.; Kyte, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Spheres from mid-Pacific abyssal clays (0 to 500,000 yrs old), formed from particles that completely melted and subsequently recrystallized as they separated from their meteoroid bodies, or containing relict grains of parent meteoroids that did not experience any melting were analyzed. The spheres were readily divided into three groups using their dominant mineralogy. The Fe-rich spheres were produced during ablation of Fe and metal-rich silicate meteoroids. The glassy spheres are considerably more Fe-rich than the silicate spheres. They consist of magnetite and an Fe glass which is relatively low in Si. Bulk compositions and relict grains are useful for determining the parent meteoroid types for the silicate spheres. Bulk analyses of recrystallized spheres show that nonvolatile elemental abundances are similar to chondrite abundances. Analysis of relict grains identified high temperature minerals associated with a fine-grained, low temperature, volatile-rich matrix. The obvious candidates for parent meteoroids of this type of silicate sphere is a carbonaceous chondrite.

  14. Comparing standard Bonner spheres and high-sensitivity Bonner cylinders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Wei; Yuan, Ming-Chen; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2014-10-01

    Standard Bonner spheres and proposed high-sensitivity Bonner cylinders were calibrated in a neutron calibration room, using a (252)Cf source. The Bonner sphere system consists of 11 polyethylene (PE) spheres of various diameters and 4 extended spheres that comprise embedded metal shells. Similar to the design of Bonner spheres, a set of Bonner cylinders was assembled using a large cylindrical (3)He tube as the central probe, which was wrapped using various thicknesses of PE. A layer of lead was employed inside one of the PE cylinders to increase the detection efficiency of high-energy neutrons. The central neutron probe used in the Bonner cylinders exhibited an efficiency of ∼17.9 times higher than that of the Bonner spheres. However, compared with the Bonner spheres, the Bonner cylinders are not fully symmetric in their geometry, exhibiting angular dependence in their responses to incoming neutrons. Using a series of calculations and measurements, this study presents a systematic comparison between Bonner spheres and cylinders in terms of their response functions, detection efficiencies, angular dependences and spectrum unfolding.

  15. Seeded Synthesis of Monodisperse Core-Shell and Hollow Carbon Spheres.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Luz Karime; Blanco, Álvaro; Juárez, Beatriz H; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Monodisperse carbon spheres between 500 and 900 nm are hydrothermally synthesized from glucose on polystyrene seeds. Control over temperature, time, glucose concentration, and seed size yields hybrid spheres without aggregation and no additional spheres population. Pyrolysis transforms the hybrid into hollow carbon spheres preserving monodispersity. This approach provides a basis for functional carbon spheres applicable in photonics and energy storage.

  16. Unsteady heat transfer from a sphere at small Peclet numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.G.; Michaelides, E.E.

    1996-03-01

    In a recent paper by Michaelides and Feng (1994) it was discovered that there are history terms in the unsteady heat conduction equation from a small sphere. The history terms are analogous to the terms found in the equation of motion of the sphere, which sometimes are called Basset terms. An analysis is presented here for the unsteady heat transfer from a sphere, when its surface temperature undergoes a step change. The singular perturbation technique is used to obtain short and long-time solutions, first in the vicinity of the sphere and then far from the sphere. The solution obtained is for finite but low Peclet numbers. It appears that in the case of the step temperature, change, the history terms are reduced to an analytical expression of the error function.

  17. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  18. RESEARCH PAPERS : Geomagnetic induction in multiple eccentrically nested spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinec, Z.

    1998-01-01

    We present a semi-analytic solution to the 3-D forward modelling of electromagnetic induction in a heterogeneous model consisting of multiple eccentrically nested spheres. A number of numerical methods for 2-D and 3-D global electromagnetic modelling have been applied recently, including thin-sheet, perturbation-expansion, finite-element and spectral-finite-element schemes. The present semi-analytical approach may be used as an aid for testing more general algorithms of electromagnetic induction modelling. The multiple eccentrically nested spheres solution has been tested by comparing against the analytical solution for electromagnetic induction in a uniform sphere and in two eccentrically nested spheres with an azimuthal structure of electrical conductivity, and good agreements have been obtained. We further solve the electromagnetic induction problem in three and four eccentrically nested spheres configurations and compute the global response function and the spherical components of magnetic intensity within the model.

  19. Encapsulation of urease enzyme in xanthan-alginate spheres.

    PubMed

    Elçin, Y M

    1995-10-01

    Urease-containing xanthan-alginate spheres were prepared by a two-step process which involved the Ca2+ coupling of the polysaccharides, followed by gentle glutaraldehyde cross-linking with amine groups of gelatin present in the initial mixture. This second step caused a slight decrease in the enzymatic activity but increased the stability. The water content and size distribution of the spheres were examined together with the sphere morphology. The effect of polymer ratio and enzyme loading on urease activity was investigated. An increase in xanthan content was found to affect the water uptake of the spheres. Temperature and pH stability of encapsulated urease was found to be higher than the free form. The xanthan-alginate spheres showed 75% of maximum urease activity even after 20 repeated uses under optimal conditions.

  20. Multi-shelled ceria hollow spheres with a tunable shell number and thickness and their superior catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuanyuan; Li, Yuan; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Yongxia; Ma, Danyang; Wang, Biqing; Wan, Yongxia; Zhong, Shengliang

    2017-01-31

    In this work, ceria multi-shelled nanospheres with a tunable shell number and thickness were prepared by a facile coordination polymer (CP) precursor method without the use of any template and surfactant. Interestingly, the number, thickness and structure of the shell can be tuned by varying the reaction time, reaction temperature, ratio of reagent and calcination temperature. The formation process of the multi-shelled hollow spheres was also investigated, which experienced a core contraction and shell separation process. Moreover, the multi-shelled CeO2 hollow nanospheres displayed excellent photocatalytic activity in the degradation of RhB. Au and AuPd nanoparticle loaded multi-shelled CeO2 nanocomposites were also prepared. Results show that Au/CeO2 multi-shelled hollow nanospheres showed eximious catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol with a reaction rate constant k of 0.416 min. In addition, AuPd/CeO2 exhibited a remarkable catalytic activity for the conversion of CO. Employing this method, heavy rare earth oxide multi-shelled structures and light rare earth oxide solid spheres were obtained. This method may be employed for the preparation of other materials with complex structures.

  1. High Volumetric Capacity Three-Dimensionally Sphere-Caged Secondary Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Xi; Kim, Jinwoo; Zheng, Qiye; Ning, Hailong; Sun, Pengcheng; Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Niu, Junjie; Braun, Paul V

    2016-07-13

    High volumetric energy density secondary batteries are important for many applications, which has led to considerable efforts to replace the low volumetric capacity graphite-based anode common to most Li-ion batteries with a higher energy density anode. Because most high capacity anode materials expand significantly during charging, such anodes must contain sufficient porosity in the discharged state to enable the expansion, yet not excess porosity, which lowers the overall energy density. Here, we present a high volumetric capacity anode consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite formed in only a few steps which includes both a 3D structured Sn scaffold and a hollow Sn sphere within each cavity where all the free Sn surfaces are coated with carbon. The anode exhibits a high volumetric capacity of ∼1700 mA h cm(-3) over 200 cycles at 0.5C, and a capacity greater than 1200 mA h cm(-3) at 10C. Importantly, the anode can even be formed into a commercially relevant ∼100 μm thick form. When assembled into a full cell the anode shows a good compatibility with a commercial LiMn2O4 cathode. In situ TEM observations confirm the electrode design accommodates the necessary volume expansion during lithiation.

  2. Nanocomposites: The End of Compromise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Damme, H.

    Increase the Young's modulus of a glassy resin by a factor of ten without making it heavier, for a new ski design, for example? Triple the rupture strength of an elastomer? Improve the thermal behaviour of an object made from a thermoplastic polymer by 100 degrees, to make a car dashboard, for example, or a part for the engine? Double the fire resistance time for the sheath around an electricity cable? Reduce the oxygen permeability of a film by a factor of ten, to make long conservation food packaging? All these things have been made possible by incorporating a few percent of inorganic nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. Figures 14.1 and 14.2 illustrate two such nanocomposites: the first was obtained by incorporating lamellar clay particles, and the second by incorporating fibrous nanoparticles, in fact, carbon nanotubes.

  3. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  4. MULTISCALE MODELING OF POLYMER NANOCOMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2007-07-16

    Polymer Nanocomposites are an important class of nanomaterials with potential applications including but not limited to structural and cushion materials, electromagnetic and heat shields, conducting plastics, sensors, and catalysts for various chemical and bio processes. Success in most such applications hinges on molecular-level control of structure and assembly, and a deep understanding of how the overall morphology of various components and the interfaces between them affect the composite properties at the macroscale. The length and time-scales associated with such assemblies are prohibitively large for a full atomistic modeling. Instead we adopt a multiscale methodology in which atomic-level interactions between different components of a composite are incorporated into a coarse-grained simulation of the mesoscale morphology, which is then represented on a numerical grid and the macroscopic properties computed using a finite-elements method.

  5. Characterization of Hybrid Epoxy Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Simcha, Shelly; Dotan, Ana; Kenig, Samuel; Dodiuk, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) content and its surface treatment on thermo-mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites. MWCNTs were surface treated and incorporated into two epoxy systems. MWCNT's surface treatments were based on: (a) Titania coating obtained by sol-gel process and (b) a nonionic surfactant. Thermo-mechanical properties improvement was obtained following incorporation of treated MWCNT. It was noticed that small amounts of titania coated MWCNT (0.05 wt %) led to an increase in the glass transition temperature and stiffness. The best performance was achieved adding 0.3 wt % titania coated MWCNT where an increase of 10 °C in the glass transition temperature and 30% in storage modulus were obtained.

  6. Shape-Morphing Nanocomposite Origami

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nature provides a vast array of solid materials that repeatedly and reversibly transform in shape in response to environmental variations. This property is essential, for example, for new energy-saving technologies, efficient collection of solar radiation, and thermal management. Here we report a similar shape-morphing mechanism using differential swelling of hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayer inkjets deposited on an LBL carbon nanotube (CNT) composite. The out-of-plane deflection can be precisely controlled, as predicted by theoretical analysis. We also demonstrate a controlled and stimuli-responsive twisting motion on a spiral-shaped LBL nanocomposite. By mimicking the motions achieved in nature, this method offers new opportunities for the design and fabrication of functional stimuli-responsive shape-morphing nanoscale and microscale structures for a variety of applications. PMID:24689908

  7. Nanocomposite multilayer optically variable coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junxia; Lai, Zhenquan; Wei, Jiandong; Zhang, Huilin; Deng, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Qinyuan; Wang, Jue

    2000-11-01

    The optically variable coatings can prevent counterfeiting of value documents. The cost of these coatings deposited by physical technology is very high. The sol-gel technology has the feature of a relatively lower cost and can be used to produce thin films with low refractive. We studied the optically variable coatings by the nano-composite technology (i.e., compound method of sol-gel technology and physical technology). The degree of color shift of some film structures with the viewing angle, including PET (substrate)/Cr/SiO2/Al and PET(sub.)/Cr/resin/Al etc., was calculated according to the color perception of human eyes. And the coatings produced were measured with the spectrometer.

  8. Thermoset polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen

    Nanocomposites are formed when phase mixing occurs on a nanometer length scale. Due to the improved phase morphology and interfacial properties, nanocomposites exhibit mechanical properties superior to conventional composites. Toyota researchers first demonstrated that organoclay could be exfoliated in a nylon-6 matrix to greatly improve the thermal and mechanical properties of the polymer, which has resulted in a practical application in the automobile industry. A great deal of research has been conducted on organic-inorganic hybrid composites in which smectite clays are used as reinforcement agents. However, little work has been devoted to derivatives of other layered inorganic solids. In the present work, the first examples of organic polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites have been prepared by formation of a cured epoxy polymer network in the presence of organo cation exchange forms of magadiite. The exfoliation of silicate nanolayers in the epoxy matrix was achieved by in-situ intragallery polymerization during the thermosetting process. In general, the tensile properties, solvent resistance, barrier properties and chemical stability of the polymer matrix are greatly improved by the embedded silicate nanolayers when the matrix is flexible (sub-ambient Tg). The improvement of properties are dependent on the silicate loading, the degree of nanolayer separation and interfacial properties. Interestingly, the exfoliation also affects the polymer elasticity in a favorable way. The mechanism leading to nanocomposite formation is proposed. One exfoliated epoxy-magadiite nanocomposite/composition possessed unique transparent optical properties. The exfoliation chemistry was successfully extended to the other members of the layered silicic acid family. A new approach also was developed to prepare thermoset epoxy polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites in which curing agents can be directly intercalated into the intragallery without the need for alkylammonium ions

  9. Recovering functions defined on the unit sphere by integration on a special family of sub-spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Yehonatan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to derive a reconstruction formula for the recovery of C1 functions, defined on the unit sphere {{{S}}}^{n - 1} , given their integrals on a special family of n - 2 dimensional sub-spheres. For a fixed point overline{a} strictly inside {{{S}}}^{n - 1} , each sub-sphere in this special family is obtained by intersection of {{{S}}}^{n - 1} with a hyperplane passing through overline{a} . The case overline{a} = 0 results in an inversion formula for the special case of integration on great spheres (i.e., Funk transform). The limiting case where pin {{{S}}}^{n - 1} and overline{a}→ p results in an inversion formula for the special case of integration on spheres passing through a common point in {{{S}}}^{n - 1}.

  10. Multifunctional Ultra-Light Mg-Li Alloy Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-20

    Nanoccomposite Materials for Energy Storage and Multifunctional Applications at TMS, Orlando, FL (2012) (invited) 3. G. Yushin, Nanocomposite Materials for...Lithium and Beyond (invited) 4. G. Yushin, Nanocomposite Carbon-Containing Materials for Energy Storage and Multifunctional Applications , at the... Nanocomposite Materials for Energy Storage Applications , at the 2nd UNIST International Conference, which took place in Ulsan, Korea (2010) (invited

  11. Dynamic simulation of sphere motion in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaosheng; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Tanner, Roger I.

    2004-11-01

    In this paper, the sedimentation of a sphere and its radial migration in a Poiseuille flow in a vertical tube filled with a Newtonian fluid are simulated with a finite-difference-based distributed Lagrange multiplier (DLM) method. The flow features, the settling velocities, the trajectories and the angular velocities of the spheres sedimenting in a tube at different Reynolds numbers are presented. The results show that at relatively low Reynolds numbers, the sphere approaches the tube axis monotonically, whereas in a high-Reynolds-number regime where shedding of vortices takes place, the sphere takes up a spiral trajectory that is closer to the tube wall than the tube axis. The rotation motion and the lateral motion of the sphere are highly correlated through the Magnus effect, which is verified to be an important (but not the only) driving force for the lateral migration of the sphere at relatively high Reynolds numbers. The standard vortex structures in the wake of a sphere, for Reynolds number higher than 400, are composed of a loop mainly located in a plane perpendicular to the streamwise direction and two streamwise vortex pairs. When moving downstream, the legs of the hairpin vortex retract and at the same time a streamwise vortex pair with rotation opposite to that of the legs forms between the loops. For Reynolds number around 400, the wake structures shed during the impact of the sphere on the wall typically form into streamwise vortex structures or else into hairpin vortices when the sphere spirals down. The radial, angular and axial velocities of both neutrally buoyant and non-neutrally buoyant spheres in a circular Poiseuille flow are reported. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the available experimental data. It is shown that suppresion of the sphere rotation produces significant large additional lift forces pointing towards the tube axis on the spheres in the neutrally buoyant and more-dense-downflow cases, whereas it has a negligible

  12. Experimental study on combustion of a methane hydrate sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yokomori, Takeshi; Ohmura, Ryo; Ueda, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    The combustion behavior of a methane hydrate sphere under normal gravity is experimentally investigated. The initial diameter of the sphere is 20 mm. Variation in temperature at the center of the sphere ( T c) is measured with a K-type thermocouple at ignition temperatures ( T c,i) from 193 to 253 K at 20 K intervals. Variation in the near-surface temperature of the sphere ( T s) is measured at ignition temperatures ( T s,i) from 233 to 263 K at 10 K intervals. Two combustion phases are observed. When the hydrate is ignited, a stable flame envelope is formed around the sphere (phase 1). In phase 1, the surface of the sphere is dry. After a few seconds, water formed by dissociation of the methane hydrate appears on the surface and methane bubbles are formed by methane ejected from inside the sphere (phase 2), thus destabilizing the flame and causing local extinction. Methane bubbles move down along the surface and merge into a large methane bubble at the bottom of the sphere. This bubble bursts, releasing methane to form a temporary flame, and the water drops from the hydrate sphere. Water on the surface is cooled by the hydrate inside, and an ice shell confines the methane gas that dissociated inside the sphere. Because the dissociation occurs continuously inside the hydrate, the inner pressure gradually increases and at some instant, the ice cracks and methane gas is ejected from the cracks, which results in a micro-explosion with a flame. In phase 1, the surface temperature is below the freezing point of water, and so the surface remains dry and a stable flame envelope is formed; in phase 2, the surface temperature is above the freezing point, and so water appears on the surface. When the temperature at the center of the sphere is lower (193, 213, or 233 K), some methane hydrate remains even after flame extinction because heat transfer from the flame decreases in phase 2 as a result of local extinction. The diameter of the sphere decreases during combustion in

  13. Viscoelasticity of Epoxy nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2013-03-01

    Nanocomposites have been modeled in a multiscale covering from molecular scale (e.g., molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo), microscale (e.g., Brownian dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, lattice Boltzmann, time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau method, dynamic density functional theory method) to mesoscale and macroscale (e.g., micromechanics, equivalent-continuum and self-similar approaches, finite element method) The presence of layered silicates in nonaqueous polymers changes the viscoelastic behavior of the unfilled matrix from liquid-like to solid-like because of the formation of a three-dimensional percolating network of exfoliated or intercalated stacks. This gel-like behavior is a direct consequence of the highly anisotropic nature of the nanoclays which prevents their free rotation and the dissipation of stress. Particle to particle interactions is the dominant mechanism in fumed silica nanocomposites whereas particle to polymer interaction is the dominant one in colloidal silica nanocomposites at identical filler concentrations. These interactions are balanced in each nanocomposite systems by the silica surface treatments (chain grafting, silane modification) and the molecular weight of the matrix. Two different types of nanocomposite structures exist namely, intercalated nanocomposites where the polymer chains are sandwiched between silicate layers and exfoliated nanocomposites where the layers can be considered individually but remain more or less dispersed in the polymer matrix. Yield stress from Carreau-Yasuda model has been correlated to exfoliation. Also, equilibrium modulus and zero shear rate viscosity has been used to analyze percolation threshold and sol-gel transition. Nano clays organically functionalized were mixed with Epoxy in a high shear mixer.

  14. Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Low Friction, Nanocomposite AlMgB14-TiB2 Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Bruce A; Harringa, J; Anderegg, A; Russell, A M; Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Higdon, Clifton; Elmoursi, Alaa A

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in coating science and technology offer new opportunities to enhance the energy-efficiency and performance of industrial machinery such as hydraulic fluid pumps and motors. The lubricated friction and wear characteristics of two wear-resistant coatings, diamond-like carbon and a nanocomposite material based on AlMgB{sub 14}-50 vol.% TiB{sub 2}, were compared in pin-on-disk tribotests using Mobil DTE-24{trademark} oil as the lubricant. In each case, the pins were fixed 9.53 mm diameter spheres of AISI 52100 steel, the load was 10 N, and the speed 0.5 m/s in all tests. Average steady-state friction coefficient values of 0.10 and 0.08 were measured for the DLC and nanocomposite, respectively. The coatings and their 52100 steel counterfaces were analyzed after the tests by X-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy for evidence of material transfer or tribo-chemical reactions. The low-friction behavior of the boride nanocomposite coating is due to the formation of lubricative boric acid, B(OH){sub 3}. In contrast, the low-friction behavior of the DLC coating is related to the relatively low dielectric constant of the oil-based lubricant, leading to desorption of surface hydrogen from the coating.

  15. Facile modulation of cell adhesion to a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate film with incorporation of polystyrene nano-spheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenguang; Yu, Haibo; Li, Gongxin; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-12-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) is a common hydrogel that has been actively investigated for various tissue engineering applications owing to its biocompatibility and excellent mechanical properties. However, the native PEGDA films are known for their bio-inertness which can hinder cell adhesion, thereby limiting their applications in tissue engineering and biomedicine. Recently, nano composite technology has become a particularly hot topic, and has led to the development of new methods for delivering desired properties to nanomaterials. In this study, we added polystyrene nano-spheres (PS) into a PEGDA solution to synthesize a nano-composite film and evaluated its characteristics. The experimental results showed that addition of the nanospheres to the PEGDA film not only resulted in modification of the mechanical properties and surface morphology but further improved the adhesion of cells on the film. The tensile modulus showed clear dependence on the addition of PS, which enhanced the mechanical properties of the PEGDA-PS film. We attribute the high stiffness of the hybrid hydrogel to the formation of additional cross-links between polymeric chains and the nano-sphere surface in the network. The effect of PS on cell adhesion and proliferation was evaluated in L929 mouse fibroblast cells that were seeded on the surface of various PEGDA-PS films. Cells density increased with a larger PS concentration, and the cells displayed a spreading morphology on the hybrid films, which promoted cell proliferation. Impressively, cellular stiffness could also be modulated simply by tuning the concentration of nano-spheres. Our results indicate that the addition of PS can effectively tailor the physical and biological properties of PEGDA as well as the mechanical properties of cells, with benefits for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  16. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  17. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  18. Quantum Hall effect on odd spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Ü. H.; Kürkçüoǧlu, S.; Toga, G. C.

    2017-03-01

    We solve the Landau problem for charged particles on odd dimensional spheres S2 k -1 in the background of constant SO (2 k -1 ) gauge fields carrying the irreducible representation (I/2 ,I/2 ,…,I/2 ). We determine the spectrum of the Hamiltonian, the degeneracy of the Landau levels and give the eigenstates in terms of the Wigner D -functions, and for odd values of I , the explicit local form of the wave functions in the lowest Landau level (LLL). The spectrum of the Dirac operator on S2 k -1 in the same gauge field background together with its degeneracies is also determined, and in particular, its number of zero modes is found. We show how the essential differential geometric structure of the Landau problem on the equatorial S2 k -2 is captured by constructing the relevant projective modules. For the Landau problem on S5, we demonstrate an exact correspondence between the union of Hilbert spaces of LLLs, with I ranging from 0 to Imax=2 K or Imax=2 K +1 to the Hilbert spaces of the fuzzy CP 3 or that of winding number ±1 line bundles over CP 3 at level K , respectively.

  19. Directed synthesis of stable large polyoxomolybdate spheres.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumyajit; Bossers, Lydia C A M; Meeldijk, Hans J D; Kuipers, Bonny W M; Kegel, Willem K

    2008-02-05

    Polyoxometalates or POMs, a class of inorganic transition metal-oxide based clusters, have gained significant interest owing to their catalytic, magnetic, and material science applications. All such applications require high surface area POM based materials. However, chemically synthesized POMs are still at most in the range of a few nanometers, with their size and morphology being difficult to control. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop design principles that allow easy control of POM morphology and size on mesoscopic (50-500 nm) length scales. Here, we report a design strategy to meet this need. Our method reported here avoids a complex chemical labyrinth by using a prefabricated cationic 1,2-dioleol-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) vesicle as a scaffold/structure directing agent and gluing simple anionic heptamolybdates by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonds to form large POM spheres. By this method, complexity in the resulting structure can be deliberately induced either via the scaffold or via the oxometalate. The high degree of control in the matter of the size and morphology of the resulting POM superstructures renders this method attractive from a synthetic standpoint.

  20. Haptic search for hard and soft spheres.

    PubMed

    van Polanen, Vonne; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2012-01-01

    In this study the saliency of hardness and softness were investigated in an active haptic search task. Two experiments were performed to explore these properties in different contexts. In Experiment 1, blindfolded participants had to grasp a bundle of spheres and determine the presence of a hard target among soft distractors or vice versa. If the difference in compliance between target and distractors was small, reaction times increased with the number of items for both features; a serial strategy was found to be used. When the difference in compliance was large, the reaction times were independent of the number of items, indicating a parallel strategy. In Experiment 2, blindfolded participants pressed their hand on a display filled with hard and soft items. In the search for a soft target, increasing reaction times with the number of items were found, but the location of target and distractors appeared to have a large influence on the search difficulty. In the search for a hard target, reaction times did not depend on the number of items. In sum, this showed that both hardness and softness are salient features.

  1. Dynamics of hard sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective is to perform on homogeneous, fully equilibrated dispersions the full set of experiments characterizing the transition from fluid to solid and the properties of the crystalline and glassy solid. These include measurements quantifying the nucleation and growth of crystallites, the structure of the initial fluid and the fully crystalline solid, and Brownian motion of particles within the crystal, and the elasticity of the crystal and the glass. Experiments are being built and tested for ideal microgravity environment. Here we describe the ground based effort, which exploits a fluidized bed to create a homogeneous, steady dispersion for the studies. The differences between the microgravity environment and the fluidized bed is gauged by the Peclet number Pe, which measures the rate of convection/sedimentation relative to Brownian motion. We have designed our experiment to accomplish three types of measurements on hard sphere suspensions in a fluidized bed: the static scattering intensity as a function of angle to determine the structure factor, the temporal autocorrelation function at all scattering angles to probe the dynamics, and the amplitude of the response to an oscillatory forcing to deduce the low frequency viscoelasticity. Thus the scattering instrument and the colloidal dispersion were chosen such as that the important features of each physical property lie within the detectable range for each measurement.

  2. Alternative approach of cell encapsulation by Volvox spheres.

    PubMed

    Teong, Benjamin; Manousakas, Ioannis; Chang, Shwu Jen; Huang, Han Hsiang; Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Kuo, Shyh Ming

    2015-10-01

    Volvox sphere is a bio-mimicking concept of a biomaterial structure design able to encapsulate chemicals, drugs and/or cells. The aim of this study was to prepare Volvox spheres encapsulating AML12 liver cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via a high voltage electrostatic field system. The results demonstrated that AML12 liver cells and MSCs could be successfully encapsulated into the inner spheres and the outer sphere of the Volvox spheres. The improved cell viability of MSCs was achieved by the addition of collagen and polyethylene glycol into the preparation components of the Volvox spheres. Collagen material potentially provides extracellular matrix-like structure for cell adhesion while polyethylene glycol provides a void/loose space for permeability of metabolites. The encapsulated MSCs were able to differentiate into hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells and express liver cell markers including albumin, alpha feto-protein and cytokeratin 18. The encapsulated cells secreted albumin to about 140 ng on day 14. Based on these observations, we conclude that Volvox spheres can be used as an alternative approach to encapsulate multiple types of cells, here AML12 hepatocyte cell line and MSCs. Nevertheless, efforts are still needed to improve the viability of the encapsulated cells and increase the differentiation of MSCs into functional liver cells.

  3. Local structure in hard-sphere chain-molecule fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid; Taylor, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solvent is coupled to the local structure of the solvent environment. For hard-sphere systems, a monomeric solvent acts to compress a flexible hard-sphere-solute chain and, for a dense system, the local solvent structure is imprinted onto the chain. Here we use Monte Carlo simulation, including bond-rebridging moves, to study the size and conformation of a hard sphere chain in a hard-sphere solvent as a function of both solvent density and solvent diameter. We also study the structure of a hard-sphere-chain solute in a hard-sphere-chain solvent. In the case of a 5-mer chain in 5-mer solvent we show that the effects of solvent can be mapped to a set of two-body solvation potentials. Following our previous work on hard-sphere chains in monomeric solvent [1], we explore the application of these short chain potentials to the study of longer chain-molecule fluids. [4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S. Ichida, J. Polym. Sci. B: Polym. Phys. 45, 3319 (2007).

  4. Local structure in hard-sphere chain-molecule fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid; Taylor, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solvent is coupled to the local structure of the solvent environment. For hard-sphere systems, a monomeric solvent acts to compress a flexible hard-sphere-solute chain and, for a dense system, the local solvent structure is imprinted onto the chain. Here we use Monte Carlo simulation, including bond-rebridging moves, to study the size and conformation of a hard sphere chain in a hard-sphere solvent as a function of both solvent density and solvent diameter. We also study the structure of a hard-sphere-chain solute in a hard-sphere-chain solvent. In the case of a 5-mer chain in 5-mer solvent we show that the effects of solvent can be mapped to a set of two-body solvation potentials. Following our previous work on hard-sphere chains in monomeric solvent [1], we explore the application of these short chain potentials to the study of longer chain-molecule fluids. [4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S. Ichida, J. Polym. Sci. B: Polym. Phys. 45, 3319 (2007).

  5. Public sphere as assemblage: the cultural politics of roadside memorialization.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates contemporary academic accounts of the public sphere. In particular, it takes stock of post-Habermasian public sphere scholarship, and acknowledges a lively and variegated debate concerning the multiple ways in which individuals engage in contemporary political affairs. A critical eye is cast over a range of key insights which have come to establish the parameters of what 'counts' as a/the public sphere, who can be involved, and where and how communicative networks are established. This opens up the conceptual space for re-imagining a/the public sphere as an assemblage. Making use of recent developments in Deleuzian-inspired assemblage theory - most especially drawn from DeLanda's (2006) 'new philosophy of society' - the paper sets out an alternative perspective on the notion of the public sphere, and regards it as a space of connectivity brought into being through a contingent and heterogeneous assemblage of discursive, visual and performative practices. This is mapped out with reference to the cultural politics of roadside memorialization. However, a/the public sphere as an assemblage is not simply a 'social construction' brought into being through a logic of connectivity, but is an emergent and ephemeral space which reflexively nurtures and assembles the cultural politics (and political cultures) of which it is an integral part. The discussion concludes, then, with a consideration of the contribution of assemblage theory to public sphere studies. (Also see Campbell 2009a).

  6. Radar Imaging of Spheres in 3D using MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2003-01-21

    We have shown that multiple spheres can be imaged by linear and planar EM arrays using only one component of polarization. The imaging approach involves calculating the SVD of the scattering response matrix, selecting a subset of singular values that represents noise, and evaluating the MUSIC functional. The noise threshold applied to the spectrum of singular values for optimal performance is typically around 1%. The resulting signal subspace includes more than one singular value per sphere. The presence of reflections from the ground improves height localization, even for a linear array parallel to the ground. However, the interference between direct and reflected energy modulates the field, creating periodic nulls that can obscure targets in typical images. These nulls are largely eliminated by normalizing the MUSIC functional with the broadside beam pattern of the array. The resulting images show excellent localization for 1 and 2 spheres. The performance for the 3 sphere configurations are complicated by shadowing effects and the greater range of the 3rd sphere in case 2. Two of the three spheres are easily located by MUSIC but the third is difficult to distinguish from other local maxima of the complex imaging functional. Improvement is seen when the linear array is replace with a planar array, which increases the effective aperture height. Further analysis of the singular values and their relationship to modes of scattering from the spheres, as well as better ways to exploit polarization, should improve performance. Work along these lines is currently being pursued by the authors.

  7. Extrinsic Calibration of Camera Networks Using a Sphere.

    PubMed

    Guan, Junzhi; Deboeverie, Francis; Slembrouck, Maarten; van Haerenborgh, Dirk; van Cauwelaert, Dimitri; Veelaert, Peter; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-08-04

    In this paper, we propose a novel extrinsic calibration method for camera networks using a sphere as the calibration object. First of all, we propose an easy and accurate method to estimate the 3D positions of the sphere center w.r.t. the local camera coordinate system. Then, we propose to use orthogonal procrustes analysis to pairwise estimate the initial camera relative extrinsic parameters based on the aforementioned estimation of 3D positions. Finally, an optimization routine is applied to jointly refine the extrinsic parameters for all cameras. Compared to existing sphere-based 3D position estimators which need to trace and analyse the outline of the sphere projection in the image, the proposed method requires only very simple image processing: estimating the area and the center of mass of the sphere projection. Our results demonstrate that we can get a more accurate estimate of the extrinsic parameters compared to other sphere-based methods. While existing state-of-the-art calibration methods use point like features and epipolar geometry, the proposed method uses the sphere-based 3D position estimate. This results in simpler computations and a more flexible and accurate calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is accurate, robust, flexible and easy to use.

  8. Polymer-organoclay nanocomposites by melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lili

    2009-12-01

    Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites based on a variety of polymer matrices and several organoclays were prepared by melt processing. A detailed characterization of the thermal degradation of several commercial and experimental organoclays often used to form polymer nanocomposites was reported. The surfactant type, loading, and purification level of organoclay significantly affect their thermal stability; however, broadly speaking, the results suggest that these differences in thermal stability do not appear to have much effect on the morphology and properties of the nanocomposites formed from them. It seems that the thermal stability of organoclays is not the key factor in organoclay exfoliation in melt processed polymer nanocomposites, since the exfoliation/dispersion process may have been completed on a time scale before the degradation of surfactant progresses to a detrimental level. Polymer nanocomposites have been made from a variety of polymers; however, few matrices have demonstrated the ability to readily exfoliate the organoclay as well as nylon 6, especially for highly hydrophobic materials like polyolefins. Hence, a significant part of this research work was devoted to explore various routes to improve polyolefin-organoclay interactions, and thus, organoclay exfoliation in these systems. Amine grafted polypropylenes and a conventionally used maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene were used as compatibilizers for polypropylene based nanocomposites to improve the organoclay exfoliation. A series of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymers, the polarity of which can be adjusted by varying their vinyl acetate contents, based nanocomposites were prepared as the model system to address the relationship between the polarity of the polymers and their preferences over various organoclay structures. Attempts were made to explore the effect of degree of neutralization of acid groups in ionomers on the morphology and properties of nanocomposites, and it seems that the

  9. Processing and characterization of unidirectional thermoplastic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Kameshwaran

    The manufacture of continuous fibre-reinforced thermoplastic nanocomposites is discussed for the case of E-Glass reinforced polypropylene (PP) matrix and for E-Glass reinforced Polyamide-6 (Nylon-6), with and without dispersed nanoclay (montmorillonite) platelets. The E-Glass/PP nanocomposite was manufactured using pultrusion, whereas the E-Glass/Nylon-6 nanocomposite was manufactured using compression molding. Mechanical characterization of nanocomposites were performed and compared with traditional microcomposites. Compressive as well as shear strength of nanocomposites was improved by improving the yield strength of the surrounding matrix through the dispersion of nanoclay. Significant improvements were achieved in compressive strength and shear strength with relatively low nanoclay loadings. Initially, polypropylene with and without nanoclay were melt intercalated using a single-screw extruder and the pultruded nanocomposite was fabricated using extruded pre-impregnated (pre-preg) tapes. Compression tests were performed as mandated by ASTM guidelines. SEM and TEM characterization revealed presence of nanoclay in an intercalated and partially exfoliated morphology. Mechanical tests confirmed significant improvements in compressive strength (˜122% at 10% nanoclay loading) and shear strength (˜60% at 3% nanoclay loading) in modified pultruded E-Glass/PP nanocomposites in comparison with baseline properties. Uniaxial tensile tests showed a small increase in tensile strength (˜3.4%) with 3% nanoclay loading. Subsequently, E-Glass/Nylon-6 nanocomposite panels were manufactured by compression molding. Compression tests were performed according to IITRI guidelines, whereas short beam shear and uni-axial tensile tests were performed according to ASTM standards. Mechanical tests confirmed strength enhancement with nanoclay addition, with a significant improvement in compressive strength (50% at 4% nanoclay loading) and shear strength (˜36% at 4% nanoclay loading

  10. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.; Fowler, Victor L.; Lloyd, Milton H.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified internal gelation process for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85.degree. C.) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column.

  11. Generation of Spheres from Dental Epithelial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Natsiou, Despoina; Granchi, Zoraide; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    The in vitro three-dimensional sphere model has already been established as an important tool in fundamental sciences. This model facilitates the study of a variety of biological processes including stem cell/niche functions and tissue responses to injury and drugs. Here we describe the complete protocol for the in vitro formation of spheres originated from the epithelium of rodent incisors. In addition, we show that in these spheres cell proliferation is maintained, as well as the expression of several key molecules characterizing stem cells such as Sox2 and p63. These epithelial dentospheres could be used as an in vitro model system for stem cell research purposes. PMID:28154538

  12. Bounds on the thermoelastic properties of suspensions of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torquato, S.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on computations of three-point upper and lower bounds on the effective thermal expansion coefficient, the effective constant-pressure specific heat, and the effective constant-volume specific heat of statistically isotropic suspensions of mutually impenetrable spheres. The effect of polydispersivity in sphere size on the thermoelastic properties is investigated by considering the cases of both equisized and multisized spheres. For reasons of mathematical analogy, the results obtained for the effective thermal expansion coefficient translate immediately into equivalent results for the hygroscopic expansion coefficient.

  13. Exact second virial coefficient for dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2013-11-20

    The second virial coefficient B2 for a fluid of dipolar hard spheres has been given several approximate forms valid in the limits of weak and strong interactions. They have been formulated as asymptotic expressions in a dimensionless interaction parameter λ. In this paper, B2 is determined exactly for all values of λ in both the three-dimensional case, where spheres may access the whole space and their dipole moments may be oriented in all directions, and in the quasi-two-dimensional case, where spheres have their centres bound to glide on a plane, while their dipole moments are still freely orientable in space.

  14. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of hollow silica spheres under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiyu; Wang, Pengpeng; Hu, Shi; Hui, Junfeng; Zhuang, Jing; Wang, Xun

    2011-06-07

    It is well-known that silica can be etched in alkaline media or in a unique hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution, which is widely used to prepare various kinds of hollow nanostructures (including silica hollow structures) via silica-templating methods. In our experiments, we found that stöber silica spheres could be etched in generic acidic media in a well-controlled way under hydrothermal conditions, forming well-defined hollow/rattle-type silica spheres. Furthermore, some salts such as NaCl and Na(2)SO(4) were found to be favorable for the formation of hollow/rattle-type silica spheres.

  16. Spherical interferometry for the characterization of precision spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, R. A.; Bartl, G.

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry with spherical wavefronts is usually used for characterizing precise optics. A special spherical interferometer was set up to measure the volume of high precision spheres used for the new definition of the SI unit kilogram, for which a fundamental constant, such as Planck’s constant h or Avogadro’s constant N A, was to be determined. Furthermore with this type of interferometer and with a special evaluating algorithm, absolute form deviations of spheres can be determined. With this knowledge, a sphere can be processed further to reach unrivaled small sphericity deviations.

  17. Optical properties of a suspension of metal spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, William T.

    1989-05-01

    The Mie theory is used to find the in situ electric dipole polarizability of a sphere of arbitrary size and material. This size-dependent polarizability, together with the Clausius-Mossotti equation, yields an effective dipole generalization of the Maxwell Garnett equation for spheres of nonzero size. Calculated effective optical constants are used to find the reflectance from a suspension of Ag spheres. The results are in good agreement with the recent reflectance measurements of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 37, 2918 (1988)] on porous glass media containing Ag particles.

  18. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, P.A.; Fowler, V.L.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1984-12-21

    A simplified internal gelation process is claimed for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85/sup 0/C) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column. 3 figs.

  19. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model.

  20. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  1. Dendritic Growth of Hard-Sphere Crystals. Experiment 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Meyer, W. V.; Rogers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations of the disorder-order transition for colloidal hard spheres under microgravity revealed dendritic crystallites roughly 1-2 mm in size for samples in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Order-of-magnitude estimates rationalize the absence of large or dendritic crystals under normal gravity and their stability to annealing in microgravity. A linear stability analysis of the Ackerson and Schaetzel model for crystallization of hard spheres establishes the domain of instability for diffusion-limited growth at small supersaturations. The relationship between hard-sphere and molecular crystal growth is established and exploited to relate the predicted linear instability to the well-developed dendrites observed.

  2. Biomimetic Nanocomposites of Calcium Phosphate and Self-Assembling Triblock and Pentablock Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Enlow, Drew Lenzen

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to mimic the growth of natural bone, self-assembling, micelle and gel-forming copolymers were used as a template for calcium phosphate precipitation. Because of the cationic characteristics imparted by PDEAEM end group additions to commercially available Pluronic{reg_sign} Fl27, a direct ionic attraction mechanism was utilized and a polymer-brushite nanocomposite spheres were produced. Brushite coated spherical micelles with diameters of ~40 nm, and agglomerates of these particles (on the order of 0.5 μm) were obtained. Thickness and durability of the calcium phosphate coating, and the extent of agglomeration were studied. The coating has been shown to be robust enough to retain its integrity even below polymer critical micelle concentration and/or temperature. Calcium phosphate-polymer gel nanocomposites were also prepared. Gel samples appeared as a single phase network of agglomerated spherical micelles, and had a final calcium phosphate concentration of up to 15 wt%. Analysis with x-ray diffraction and NMR indicated a disordered brushite phase with the phosphate groups linking inorganic phase to the polymer.

  3. Preferable removal of phosphate from water using hydrous zirconium oxide-based nanocomposite of high stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weixian; Hua, Ming; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming

    2015-03-02

    In this study, we employed a new nanocomposite adsorbent HZO-201, which featured high stability under varying solution chemistry, for preferable removal of phosphate from synthetic solution and a real effluent. An anion exchange resin (D-201) was employed as the host of HZO-201, where nano-hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO) was encapsulated as the active species. D-201 binds phosphate through nonspecific electrostatic affinity, whereas the loaded HZO nanoparticles capture phosphate through formation of the inner-sphere complexes. Quantitative contribution of both species to phosphate adsorption was predicted based on the double-Langmuir model. Preferable removal of phosphate by HZO-201 was observed in the presence of the competing anions at higher levels (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), HCO3(-)). Fixed-bed adsorption indicated that the effective volume capacity of a synthetic water (2.0 mg P-PO4(3-)/L) by using HZO-201 was ∼1600 BV in the first run (<0.5mg P-PO4(3-)/L), comparable to Fe(III)-based nanocomposite HFO-201 (∼1500 BV) and much larger than D-201 (<250 BV). The exhausted HZO-201 can be in situ regenerated by using a binary NaOH-NaCl solution for cyclic runs, whether fed with the synthetic solution or real effluent. In general, HZO-201 is a promising alternative to Fe(III)-based adsorbents for trace phosphate removal from effluent particularly at acidic pH.

  4. Polylactide nanocomposites for packaging materials: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiastuti, Indah

    2016-02-01

    This review aims at highlighting on an attempt for improving the properties of polylactide (PLA) as packaging material by application of nanocomposite technology. PLA is attracting considerable interest because of more eco-friendliness from its origin as contrast to the petrochemical-based polymers and its biodegradability. Despite possessing good mechanical and optical properties, deterioration of the material properties in PLA materials during their service time could occur after prolonged exposure to humidity and high temperature condition. Limited gas barrier is another drawback of PLA material that should be overcome to satisfy the requirement for packaging application. To further extend the range of mechanical and thermal properties achievable, several attempts have been made in modifying the material such as blending with other polymers, use of plasticizing material and development of PLA nanocomposites. Nanocomposite is a fairly new type of composite that has emerged in which the reinforcing filler has nanometer scale dimensions (at least one dimension of the filler is less than 100 nm). In this review, the critical properties of PLA as packaging materials and its degradation mechanism are presented. This paper discusses the current effort and key research challenges in the development of nanocomposites based on biodegradable polymer matrices and nano-fillers. The PLA layered silicate nanocomposites where the filler platelets can be dispersed in the polymer at the nanometer scale owing to the specific filler surface modification, frequently exhibits remarkable improvements of mechanical strength, gas barrier and thermal stability.

  5. Properties of polypropylene nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myung Wook; Kim, Ju-Young; Ihn, Kyo Jin

    2007-11-01

    Silver/polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm were prepared using a new synthetic method. AgNO3 crystals were dissolved into hydrophilic domain of polyoxyethylene maleate-based surfactant (PEOM), which gives self-assembly nano-structures. The AgNO3 in the nano-domains of PEOM was reduced by NaBH4 to form nanoparticles. The colloidal solutions with silver nanoparticles were diluted with ethanol and were mixed with PP pellets. Silver nanocomposites were prepared by extrusion compounding process after drying the pellets. Contents of silver nanoparticles dispersed within PP resin were changed from 100 to 1000 ppm. Formation of silver nanoparticles within PP was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM. Size and distribution of dispersed silver nanoparticles were also measured by TEM. Silver/PP nanocomposites films showed not only improved thermal stability but also increased mechanical properties compared to neat PP film. Tensile properties of PP nanocomposites were largely improved compared with neat PP resin, and elongation increased also by 175% for the nanocomposites containing 1000 ppm silver nanoparticles.

  6. Fire retardant effects of polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Hull, T Richard; Stec, Anna A; Nazare, Shonali

    2009-07-01

    Among the many and varied applications of nanotechnology, the dispersion of nanoscopic fillers to form polymer nanocomposites with improved fire behaviour illustrates the potential and diversity of nanoscience. Different polymers decompose in different ways and fire retardants act to inhibit the decomposition or flaming combustion processes. Polymer nanocomposites form barriers between the fuel and air, reducing the rate of burning, but beyond that there is little consistency in their effects. It is shown that the decomposition products of polypropylene are changed by the presence of nanoclay, although there is only a small influence on the mass loss rate. The rheological properties of molten polymer nanocomposites are radically different from those of virgin polymers, and these will profoundly affect the heat transfer through the material, resulting in a shorter time to ignition and lower peak in the heat release rate, typical of polymer nanocomposites. The dispersion of nanofillers within polymers is generally measured in the cold polymer, but since this does not reflect the condition at the time of ignition, it is proposed that temperature ramped rheological measurements are more appropriate indicators of dispersion. The influence of polymer nanocomposite formation on the yields of toxic products from fire is studied using the ISO 19700 steady state tube furnace, and it is found that under early stages of burning more carbon monoxide and organoirritants are formed, but under the more toxic under-ventilated conditions, less toxic products are formed.

  7. Synthesis of plasmonic nanocomposites for diverse applications.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, D K; Mishra, Y K; Singhal, R; Kabiraj, D; Mohapatra, S; Mohanta, B; Gohil, Nivedita K; Singh, N

    2010-04-01

    We report the synthesis of gold and silver nanostructures embedded in different dielectric matrices by atom beam co-sputtering, a novel technique. We have synthesized gold-silicon core shell nanostructures and Au-ZnO nanocomposite with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by atom beam co-sputtering and subsequent annealing. The Au-ZnO nanocomposite shows significant enhancement in intensity of Raman modes of fullerene molecules and therefore can help in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy investigation of organic molecules. The synthesized Ag-polymer nanocomposite thin films show excellent features of broad SPR absorption extending upto IR region and a narrow transmission of light in UV region approximately 320 nm which could be of technological interest in solar absorbers and UV light filters respectively. The Ag-silica nanocomposite thin films show their utility in glucose sensing. The gold-silica nanocomposite thin films exhibit their possible use in detection of human ovarian cancer cells in a preliminary study. The shift in SPR peak of Au nanoparticles (NPs) present at the surface of silica synthesized by thermal evaporation and annealing, after attachment of biological molecules like proteins has been studied.

  8. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) filled boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaiman, Hanisah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin; Zakaria, Sarani

    2015-09-25

    In this study, nanocomposite using cellulose nanofibrils filled with different percentage of boron nitride (CNF-BN) were prepared. The objective of this research is to study the effect of different percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite produced. The CNF-BN nanocomposite were characterization by FT-IR, SEM and thermal conductivity. The FT-IR analysis of the CNF-BN nanocomposite shows all the characteristic peaks of cellulose and BN present in all samples. The dispersion of BN in CNF were seen through SEM analysis. The effect of different loading percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite were also investigated.

  9. Tangible nanocomposites with diverse properties for heart valve application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh Vellayappan, Muthu; Balaji, Arunpandian; Priyadarshini Subramanian, Aruna; Aruna John, Agnes; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Murugesan, Selvakumar; Mohandas, Hemanth; Supriyanto, Eko; Yusof, Mustafa

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease claims millions of lives every year throughout the world. Biomaterials are used widely for the treatment of this fatal disease. With the advent of nanotechnology, the use of nanocomposites has become almost inevitable in the field of biomaterials. The versatile properties of nanocomposites, such as improved durability and biocompatibility, make them an ideal choice for various biomedical applications. Among the various nanocomposites, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-poly(carbonate-urea)urethane, bacterial cellulose with polyvinyl alcohol, carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide and nano-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites have gained popularity as putative choices for biomaterials in cardiovascular applications owing to their superior properties. In this review, various studies performed utilizing these nanocomposites for improving the mechanical strength, anti-calcification potential and hemocompatibility of heart valves are reviewed and summarized. The primary motive of this work is to shed light on the emerging nanocomposites for heart valve applications. Furthermore, we aim to promote the prospects of these nanocomposites in the campaign against cardiovascular diseases.

  10. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R. E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  11. Turbulent mixing in a precessing sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Susumu Shimizu, Masaki; Kawahara, Genta

    2014-11-15

    By numerically simulating turbulent flows at high Reynolds numbers in a precessing sphere, we propose a method to enhance the mixing of a fluid confined within a smooth cavity by its rotational motion alone. To precisely evaluate the mixing efficiency, we extend the quantification method proposed by Danckwerts [“The definition and measurement of some characteristics of mixtures,” Appl. Sci. Res. A 3, 279–296 (1952)] to the case in which only a finite number of fluid particle trajectories can be known. Our accurate numerical tracking of fluid particles in the flow, which is controlled by the Reynolds number (an indicator of the spin rate) and the Poincaré number (the precession rate), shows the following results. First, the mixing process on the time scale normalized by the spin period is independent of the Reynolds number as long as it is high enough for the flow to be developed turbulence. Second, fastest mixing is achieved under weak precession (Poincaré number ≈0.1); in such cases, perfect mixing requires only 10–15 spins of the container. Third, the power to sustain turbulence is a weakly increasing function of the Poincaré number, and the energy efficiency of the mixing is also maximized when the Poincaré number is about 0.1. Fourth, efficient mixing driven by the weak precession arises from the effective cooperation of complex large-scale flow and small-scale turbulence, which itself is sustained by the large-scale flow.

  12. Numerical simulation of negative Magnus force on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Flow characteristics and fluid force on a sphere rotating along with axis perpendicular to mean air flow were investigated using Large Eddy Simulation at two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 200,000. As a result of simulation, opposite flow characteristics around the sphere and displacement of the separation point were visualized depending on the Reynolds number even though the sphere rotates at the same rotation speed according to the Reynolds number. When Reynolds number is 10,000, flow characteristics agree with the flow field explained in the Magnus effect. However sphere rotates at the same rotation speed while increasing Reynolds number to 200,000, separation point moves in opposite direction and wake appears in the different direction. The reason of the negative Magnus force was discussed in terms of the boundary layer transition on the surface.

  13. On the motion of linked spheres in a Stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, F.; Han, E.; Tipton, C. R.; Mullin, T.

    2017-04-01

    The results of an experimental investigation into the motion of linked spheres at low Reynolds number are presented. Small permanent magnets were embedded in the spheres and torques were generated by application of an external magnetic field. Pairs of neutrally buoyant spheres, connected by either glass rods or thin elastic struts, move in a reciprocal orbit when driven by an oscillatory field. An array of three spheres linked by elastic struts buckles in a periodic, non-reciprocal manner. The induced magneto-elastic buckling propels the elemental swimmer and we find that the geometrical asymmetry of the device, introduced by the struts of different lengths, determines the swimming direction. We propose that this novel method of creating movement remotely is suitable for miniaturization.

  14. An elastic two-sphere swimmer in Stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn

    2016-11-01

    Swimming at low Reynolds number in Newtonian fluids is only possible through non-reciprocal body deformations due to the kinematic reversibility of the Stokes equations. We consider here a model swimmer consisting of two linked spheres, wherein one sphere is rigid and the other an incompressible neo-Hookean solid. The two spheres are connected by a rod which changes its length periodically. We show that the deformations of the body are non-reciprocal despite the reversible actuation and hence, the elastic two-sphere swimmer propels forward. Our results indicate that even weak elastic deformations of a body can qualitatively alter swimming dynamics and should not be neglected in analyzing swimming in Stokes flows.

  15. Liquid trampolines: droplets and spheres bouncing off soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbin, Laurent; Dubail, Jerome; Crotiere, Suzie; Quere, David

    2005-11-01

    We report on the impact of rigid spheres and liquid droplets on soap films. These systems exhibit a rich variety of dynamics including bouncing and adhesion. In the case of drop impact, at low speeds the drops bounce, while for intermediate speeds the drops can pass through the film without the film breaking. The bouncing can be analyzed using mechanical models. In the case of the impact of rigid spheres, by tuning the physical property of the surface of the impacting sphere, which may or may not be surrounded by a skin of oil, we experimentally observe two distinct regimes: the solid sphere can bounce off of the fluid film or get entrapped. In all cases the film can be considered an absorber of kinetic energy. Finally, the possibility of tuning the bounce of an object will be presented.

  16. Aminated hollow silica spheres for electrochemical DNA biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Eda Yuhana; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor for e.coli determination based on aminated hollow silica was successfully developed. Aminated hollow silica spheres were prepared through the reaction of Tween 20 template and silica precursor. The template was removed by the thermal decomposition at 620°C. Hollow silica spheres were modified with (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) to form aminated hollow silica spheres.Aminated DNA probe were covalently immobilized on to the amine functionalized hollow silica spheres through glutaradehyde linkers. The formation hollow silica was characterized using FTIR and FESEM. A range of 50-300nm particle size obtained from FESEM micrograph. Meanwhile for the electrochemical study, a quasi-reversible system has been obtain via cyclic voltammetry (CV).

  17. PREPARATION OF HIGH-DENSITY THORIUM OXIDE SPHERES

    DOEpatents

    McNees, R.A. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.

    1963-12-31

    A method of preparing high-density thorium oxide spheres for use in pellet beds in nuclear reactors is presented. Sinterable thorium oxide is first converted to free-flowing granules by means such as compression into a compact and comminution of the compact. The granules are then compressed into cubes having a density of 5.0 to 5.3 grams per cubic centimeter. The cubes are tumbled to form spheres by attrition, and the spheres are then fired at 1250 to 1350 deg C. The fired spheres are then polished and fired at a temperature above 1650 deg C to obtain high density. Spherical pellets produced by this method are highly resistant to mechanical attrition hy water. (AEC)

  18. Wind speed and direction measurements using the sphere anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Hoelling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2009-11-01

    In times of growing energy demand, the importance of wind energy is rapidly increasing and so is the need for accurate wind speed and direction measurements. The widely spread cup anemometers show significant over-speeding under turbulent wind conditions as inherent in atmospherical flows while being solely capable of detecting the wind speed. Therefore, we propose the newly developed sphere anemometer as a simple an robust sensor for direction and velocity measurements. The sphere anemometer exploits the velocity-dependent deflection of a tube, which is the order of μm and can be detected by means of a light pointer as used in atomic force microscopes. In comparative measurements under laboratory conditions the sphere anemometer showed a significantly higher temporal resolution then cup anemometers while it does not exhibit any over-speeding. Additionally, results of atmospherical wind measurements with the sphere anemometer and state-of-the-art cup anemometry are presented.

  19. Quality control and data flow operations of SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Wolfgang; Girard, Julien H. V.; Milli, Julien; Wahhaj, Zahed; Lundin, Lars; Vigan, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    ESO operates since April 2015 the new planet finder instrument SPHERE1 with three arms supported by a common path coronograph with extreme AO. Observing modes include dual band imaging, long slit spectroscopy, IFS and high contrast polarimetry. We report on the implementation of the SPHERE data flow and quality control system and on operational highlights in the first year of operations: This includes some unconventional parts of the SPHERE calibration plan like special rules for the selection of filters and the measures for an optimized calibration of the two polarimetric channels of the ZIMPOL arm. Finally we report on the significance of the SPHERE quality control system, its relation to the data reduction pipeline and which previously undocumented instrumental features have been revealed so far.

  20. 2. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF VACUUM SPHERES 146 AND 168 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF VACUUM SPHERES 146 AND 168 - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Supersonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  1. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST OF VACUUM SPHERES 168 AND 146 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST OF VACUUM SPHERES 168 AND 146 - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Supersonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  2. Diffusive wave spectroscopy of a random close packing of spheres.

    PubMed

    Crassous, J

    2007-06-01

    We are interested in the propagation of light in a random packing of dielectric spheres within the geometrical optics approximation. Numerical simulations are performed using a ray tracing algorithm. The effective refractive indexes and the transport mean free path are computed for different refractive indexes of spheres and intersticial media. The variations of the optical path length under small deformations of the spheres assembly are also computed and compared to the results of Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we propose a measure of the transport mean free path and a Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiment on a packing of glass spheres. The results of those experiments agree with the predictions of this ray tracing approach.

  3. Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy of a random close packing of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crassous, J.

    2007-06-01

    We are interested in the propagation of light in a random packing of dielectric spheres within the geometrical optics approximation. Numerical simulations are performed using a ray tracing algorithm. The effective refractive indexes and the transport mean free path are computed for different refractive indexes of spheres and intersticial media. The variations of the optical path length under small deformations of the spheres assembly are also computed and compared to the results of Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we propose a measure of the transport mean free path and a Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiment on a packing of glass spheres. The results of those experiments agree with the predictions of this ray tracing approach.

  4. Dynamic equivalences in the hard-sphere dynamic universality class.

    PubMed

    López-Flores, Leticia; Ruíz-Estrada, Honorina; Chávez-Páez, Martín; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2013-10-01

    We perform systematic simulation experiments on model systems with soft-sphere repulsive interactions to test the predicted dynamic equivalence between soft-sphere liquids with similar static structure. For this we compare the simulated dynamics (mean squared displacement, intermediate scattering function, α-relaxation time, etc.) of different soft-sphere systems, between them and with the hard-sphere liquid. We then show that the referred dynamic equivalence does not depend on the (Newtonian or Brownian) nature of the microscopic laws of motion of the constituent particles, and hence, applies independently to colloidal and to atomic simple liquids. Finally, we verify another more recently proposed dynamic equivalence, this time between the long-time dynamics of an atomic liquid and its corresponding Brownian fluid (i.e., the Brownian system with the same interaction potential).

  5. Packings of a charged line on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas

    2008-12-01

    We find equilibrium configurations of open and closed lines of charge on a sphere, and track them with respect to varying sphere radius. Closed lines transition from a circle to a spiral-like shape through two low-wave-number bifurcations—“baseball seam” and “twist”—which minimize Coulomb energy. The spiral shape is the unique stable equilibrium of the closed line. Other unstable equilibria arise through tip-splitting events. An open line transitions smoothly from an arc of a great circle to a spiral as the sphere radius decreases. Under repulsive potentials with faster-than-Coulomb power-law decay, the spiral is tighter in initial stages of sphere shrinkage, but at later stages of shrinkage the equilibria for all repulsive potentials converge on a spiral with uniform spacing between turns. Multiple stable equilibria of the open line are observed.

  6. Interferometric Measurement of the Diameters of Fused Quartz Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Shoichi

    1981-12-01

    This paper describes a method for the interferometric measurement of the diameter of a fused quartz sphere with Fabry-Perot etalon. Interference fringes are produced by laser radiation reflected from each surface of the etalon and the adjacent surface of the sphere and then their gaps are measured. The diameter of the sphere is derived by subtracting the two gaps from the plate separation of the etalon. Several lines from a free-running He-Se laser are used as the light sources for the exact fraction method together with the 633 nm line of a Lamb-dip stabilized He-Ne laser. The effects of fringe distortion, caused by laser radiation reflected from the other surface of the transparent sphere, are eliminated by placing a small circular stop at the image point of the light source. Experiments have shown that the precision of measurement of the diameter is about ± 0.16 ppm at 95% confidence interval.

  7. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    DOEpatents

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  8. Kinematics of spheres moving through yield-stress fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habdas, Piotr; de Bruyn, John R.

    2001-11-01

    When an object moves in a material with a yield stress τ_c, the material near the object generally experiences stresses higher than τc and so is fluid. Farther from the object the local stress is less than τc and so the material there is effectively solid. We have studied the motion of metal spheres being pulled through colloidal suspensions by a constant applied force in an Atwood's machine. By measuring the drag force on the sphere as a function of container size we can determine the extent of the fluidized region surrounding the sphere. We find that the drag force is not proportional to the velocity, as it is for Newtonian fluids, and so the form of the spheres' acceleration provides information about the rheology of the suspensions.

  9. Numerical Flow Visualization in Basic- and Hyper-Cluster Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Athavale, M. M.; Braun, M. J.; Lattime, S.

    1997-01-01

    Packed spherical particle beds have wide applications throughout the process industry and are usually analyzed using an appropriate combination of laminar and turbulent flows with empirically derived coefficients of which the Ergun (1952) relation is probably the best known. The 3-D complexity of the void distribution within the beds has precluded detailed studies of sphere clusters. Numerical modeling and flow vector visualization for the basic tetra- and hexa-sphere clusters and two hyper-sphere clusters are presented at two Reynolds numbers, 400 and 1200. Cutting planes are used to enable visualization of the complex flows generated within the sphere clusters and are discussed herein. The boundary conditions and flow fields for the simple clusters are also compared to the hyper-clusters with larger variations found for hexa-clusters.

  10. Periodically focused modes in chains of dielectric spheres

    PubMed Central

    Darafsheh, Arash; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2012-01-01

    We show that, theoretically, Brewster angle conditions for transverse magnetic polarized rays can be periodically reproduced in chains of spheres with index n = 3 giving rise to lossless periodically focused modes with 2D period, where D is the sphere diameter. Using ray tracing for a spherical emitter with the diameter D we show that chains of spheres work as filters of such modes at 1.72 < n < 1.85. This leads to tapering of the focused beams combined with the reduction of their attenuation along the chain. Experimentally, the “beam tapering” effect was observed in chains of 300 μm sapphire spheres with index ∼1.77 in visible. PMID:22396621

  11. Self-assembly of nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sellinger, Alan; Lu, Yunfeng

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a nanocomposite self-assembly is provided where at least one hydrophilic compound, at least one hydrophobic compound, and at least one amphiphilic surfactant are mixed in an aqueous solvent with the solvent subsequently evaporated to form a self-assembled liquid crystalline mesophase material. Upon polymerization of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds, a robust nanocomposite self-assembled material is formed. Importantly, in the reaction mixture, the amphiphilic surfactant has an initial concentration below the critical micelle concentration to allow formation of the liquid-phase micellar mesophase material. A variety of nanocomposite structures can be formed, depending upon the solvent evaporazation process, including layered mesophases, tubular mesophases, and a hierarchical composite coating composed of an isotropic worm-like micellar overlayer bonded to an oriented, nanolaminated underlayer.

  12. Nanocomposites with high thermoelectric figures of merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gang (Inventor); Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is generally directed to nanocomposite thermoelectric materials that exhibit enhanced thermoelectric properties. The nanocomposite materials include two or more components, with at least one of the components forming nano-sized structures within the composite material. The components are chosen such that thermal conductivity of the composite is decreased without substantially diminishing the composite's electrical conductivity. Suitable component materials exhibit similar electronic band structures. For example, a band-edge gap between at least one of a conduction band or a valence band of one component material and a corresponding band of the other component material at interfaces between the components can be less than about 5k.sub.BT, wherein k.sub.B is the Boltzman constant and T is an average temperature of said nanocomposite composition.

  13. Designing new ferrite/manganite nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Muscas, G; Anil Kumar, P; Barucca, G; Concas, G; Varvaro, G; Mathieu, R; Peddis, D

    2016-01-28

    Two kinds of nanocomposites of transition metal oxides were synthesized and investigated. Each nanocomposite comprises nanoparticles of La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 and CoFe2O4 in similar volume fractions, however arranged with different morphologies. The temperature-dependent magnetic and electrical properties of the two systems are found to greatly differ, suggesting different degrees of interaction and coupling of their constituents. This is confirmed by magnetic field-dependent experiments, which reveal contrasted magnetization reversal and magnetoresistance in the systems. We discuss this morphology-physical property relationship, and the possibility to further tune the magnetism and magneto-transport in such nanocomposites.

  14. Permeation properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalendova, A.; Merinska, D.; Gerard, J. F.

    2012-07-01

    The important characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposites are stability, barrier properties and in the case of polyvinyl chloride also plasticizer migration into other materials. Therefore, the permeation properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites are discussed in this paper. The attention was focused to the polyethylene (PE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Natural type of montmorillonite MMTNa+ and modified types of montmorillonite from Southern Clay Products were used as the inorganic phase. As the compounding machine, one screw Buss KO-kneader was employed. The principal aim is to fully exfoliate the clay into polymer matrix and enhanced the permeation properties. Prepared samples were tested for O2 and CO2 permeability. Polymer/clay nanocomposite structure was determined on the base of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy (TEM).

  15. Block copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticle nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jiang, Beibei; Iocozzia, James; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Hanzheng; Liu, Jin; Akinc, Mufit; Bowler, Nicola; Tan, Xiaoli; Lin, Zhiqun

    2013-08-01

    Nanocomposites composed of diblock copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticles were formed by selectively constraining ferroelectric nanoparticles (NPs) within diblock copolymer nanodomains via judicious surface modification of ferroelectric NPs. Ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO3) NPs with different sizes that are permanently capped with polystyrene chains (i.e., PS-functionalized BaTiO3NPs) were first synthesized by exploiting amphiphilic unimolecular star-like poly(acrylic acid)-block-polystyrene (PAA-b-PS) diblock copolymers as nanoreactors. Subsequently, PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs were preferentially sequestered within PS nanocylinders in the linear cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer upon mixing the BaTiO3 NPs with PS-b-PMMA. The use of PS-b-PMMA diblock copolymers, rather than traditional homopolymers, offers the opportunity for controlling the spatial organization of PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs in the PS-b-PMMA/BaTiO3 NP nanocomposites. Selective solvent vapor annealing was utilized to control the nanodomain orientation in the nanocomposites. Vertically oriented PS nanocylinders containing PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs were yielded after exposing the PS-b-PMMA/BaTiO3 NP nanocomposite thin film to acetone vapor, which is a selective solvent for PMMA block. The dielectric properties of nanocomposites in the microwave frequency range were investigated. The molecular weight of PS-b-PMMA and the size of BaTiO3 NPs were found to exert an apparent influence on the dielectric properties of the resulting nanocomposites.Nanocomposites composed of diblock copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticles were formed by selectively constraining ferroelectric nanoparticles (NPs) within diblock copolymer nanodomains via judicious surface modification of ferroelectric NPs. Ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO3) NPs with different sizes that are permanently capped with polystyrene chains (i.e., PS-functionalized BaTiO3NPs) were

  16. Semimetal/Semiconductor Nanocomposites for Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hong; Burke, Peter G.; Gossard, Arthur C.; Zeng, Gehong; Ramu, Ashok T.; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Bowers, John E.

    2011-04-15

    In this work, we present research on semimetal-semiconductor nanocomposites grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for thermoelectric applications. We study several different III-V semiconductors embedded with semimetallic rare earth-group V (RE-V) compounds, but focus is given here to ErSb:InxGa1-xSb as a promising p-type thermoelectric material. Nano­structures of RE-V compounds are formed and embedded within the III-V semiconductor matrix. By codoping the nanocomposites with the appropriate dopants, both n-type and p-type materials have been made for thermoelectric applications. The thermoelectric properties have been engineered for enhanced thermoelectric device performance. Segmented thermoelectric power generator modules using 50 μm thick Er-containing nanocomposites have been fabricated and measured. Research on different rare earth elements for thermoelectrics is discussed.

  17. Nanocomposites with high thermoelectric figures of merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gang (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor); Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention is generally directed to nanocomposite thermoelectric materials that exhibit enhanced thermoelectric properties. The nanocomposite materials include two or more components, with at least one of the components forming nano-sized structures within the composite material. The components are chosen such that thermal conductivity of the composite is decreased without substantially diminishing the composite's electrical conductivity. Suitable component materials exhibit similar electronic band structures. For example, a band-edge gap between at least one of a conduction band or a valence band of one component material and a corresponding band of the other component material at interfaces between the components can be less than about 5k.sub.BT, wherein k.sub.B is the Boltzman constant and T is an average temperature of said nanocomposite composition.

  18. Nanocomposites with High Thermoelectric Figures of Merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gang (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor); Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is generally directed to nanocomposite thermoelectric materials that exhibit enhanced thermoelectric properties. The nanocomposite materials include two or more components, with at least one of the components forming nano-sized structures within the composite material. The components are chosen such that thermal conductivity of the composite is decreased without substantially diminishing the composite's electrical conductivity. Suitable component materials exhibit similar electronic band structures. For example, a band-edge gap between at least one of a conduction band or a valence band of one component material and a corresponding band of the other component material at interfaces between the components can be less than about 5k(sub B)T, wherein k(sub B) is the Boltzman constant and T is an average temperature of said nanocomposite composition.

  19. Semimetal/semiconductor nanocomposites for thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Burke, Peter G; Gossard, Arthur C; Zeng, Gehong; Ramu, Ashok T; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Bowers, John E

    2011-05-24

    In this work, we present research on semimetal-semiconductor nanocomposites grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for thermoelectric applications. We study several different III-V semiconductors embedded with semimetallic rare earth-group V (RE-V) compounds, but focus is given here to ErSb:In(x)Ga(1−x)Sb as a promising p-type thermoelectric material. Nanostructures of RE-V compounds are formed and embedded within the III-V semiconductor matrix. By co-doping the nanocomposites with the appropriate dopants, both n-type and p-type materials have been made for thermoelectric applications. The thermoelectric properties have been engineered for enhanced thermoelectric device performance. Segmented thermoelectric power generator modules using 50 μ m thick Er-containing nanocomposites have been fabricated and measured. Research on different rare earth elements for thermoelectrics is discussed.

  20. SPHERES: From Ground Development to Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2015-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES Facility on ISS is managed and operated by the SPHERES National Lab Facility at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. To help make science a reality on the ISS, the SPHERES ARC team supports a Guest Scientist Program (GSP). This program allows anyone with new science the possibility to interface with the SPHERES team and hardware. In addition to highlighting the available SPHERES hardware on ISS and on the ground, this presentation will also highlight ground support, facilities, and resources available to guest researchers. Investigations on the ISS evolve through four main phases: Strategic, Tactical, Operations, and Post Operations. The Strategic Phase encompasses early planning beginning with initial contact by the Principle Investigator (PI) and the SPHERES program who may work with the PI to assess what assistance the PI may need. Once the basic parameters are understood, the investigation moves to the Tactical Phase which involves more detailed planning, development, and testing. Depending on the nature of the investigation, the tactical phase may be split into the Lab Tactical Phase or the ISS Tactical Phase due to the difference in requirements for the two destinations. The Operations Phase is when the actual science is performed; this can be either in the lab, or on the ISS. The Post Operations Phase encompasses data analysis and distribution, and generation of summary status and reports. The SPHERES Operations and Engineering teams at ARC is composed of

  1. The LED calibration system of the SPHERE-2 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Bonvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Podgrudkov, D. A.; Roganova, T. M.

    2016-04-01

    An absolute calibration method for the PMT mosaic used in the SPHERE-2 experiment is presented. The method is based on the relative calibration of all PMTs in the mosaic to a single stable PMT, incorporated in it, during each measurement event and subsequent absolute calibration of that single PMT using a known stable light source. The results of the SPHERE-2 detector PMTs calibration are presented and are discussed.

  2. Strictly Positive Definite Kernels on a Product of Spheres II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guella, Jean C.; Menegatto, Valdir A.; Peron, Ana P.

    2016-10-01

    We present, among other things, a necessary and sufficient condition for the strict positive definiteness of an isotropic and positive definite kernel on the cartesian product of a circle and a higher dimensional sphere. The result complements similar results previously obtained for strict positive definiteness on a product of circles [Positivity, to appear, arXiv:1505.01169] and on a product of high dimensional spheres [J. Math. Anal. Appl. 435 (2016), 286-301, arXiv:1505.03695].

  3. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E; Morrissey, Timothy G; Vuono, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  4. Discrete Model for Inner-Sphere Reorganization of Anions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    approaches can be followed to calculate the energy of inner-sphere reorganization in photoionization. (i) The terms not corresponding to nuclear ...motion and the outer-sphere Born solvation term are subtracted from the experimental solvation energy . (ii) Only the terms pertaining to nuclear motion...aq), respectively. The term U f(nucl) in eq. (1) represents the nuclear contribution to the solvation energy of the species A(aq) surrounded by its

  5. Block copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticle nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jiang, Beibei; Iocozzia, James; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Hanzheng; Liu, Jin; Akinc, Mufit; Bowler, Nicola; Tan, Xiaoli; Lin, Zhiqun

    2013-09-21

    Nanocomposites composed of diblock copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticles were formed by selectively constraining ferroelectric nanoparticles (NPs) within diblock copolymer nanodomains via judicious surface modification of ferroelectric NPs. Ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO3) NPs with different sizes that are permanently capped with polystyrene chains (i.e., PS-functionalized BaTiO3NPs) were first synthesized by exploiting amphiphilic unimolecular star-like poly(acrylic acid)-block-polystyrene (PAA-b-PS) diblock copolymers as nanoreactors. Subsequently, PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs were preferentially sequestered within PS nanocylinders in the linear cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer upon mixing the BaTiO3 NPs with PS-b-PMMA. The use of PS-b-PMMA diblock copolymers, rather than traditional homopolymers, offers the opportunity for controlling the spatial organization of PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs in the PS-b-PMMA/BaTiO3 NP nanocomposites. Selective solvent vapor annealing was utilized to control the nanodomain orientation in the nanocomposites. Vertically oriented PS nanocylinders containing PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs were yielded after exposing the PS-b-PMMA/BaTiO3 NP nanocomposite thin film to acetone vapor, which is a selective solvent for PMMA block. The dielectric properties of nanocomposites in the microwave frequency range were investigated. The molecular weight of PS-b-PMMA and the size of BaTiO3 NPs were found to exert an apparent influence on the dielectric properties of the resulting nanocomposites.

  6. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.

  7. Macromolecular Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gam, Sangah; Meth, Jeff; Zane, Steve; Winey, Karen; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Macromolecular diffusion in crowded systems is important in biological and engineered systems. We have studied macromolecular diffusion through a model polymer nanocomposite (PNC) containing phenyl grafted silica nanoparticles (NPs), randomly distributed in a polystyrene matrix. Over a wide range of NP loading and tracer molecular weight (M), the scaling of the diffusion coefficient with M is in excellent agreement with the entropic barrier model (EBM) previously used to describe diffusion of DNA through confined media (e.g., gels and nanopores). To investigate the effect of NP size, diffusion was measured in PNC's with silica NPs having diameters of 28 and 12 nm. The normalized diffusion coefficients (D / D0) plotted against the interparticle separation relative to probe size (i.e., ID/ 2 Rg) collapse on a master curve. Diffusion in a poly(methyl methacrylate):silica NP system was also investigated to understand how attractive interactions (i.e., enthalpy) perturb motion relative to the polystyrene and phenyl-silica NP system which is athermal. Finally, a flux-based model is proposed and compared with experimental results.

  8. Graphite Nanoreinforcements for Aerospace Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drzal, Lawrence T.

    2005-01-01

    New advances in the reinforcement of polymer matrix composite materials are critical for advancement of the aerospace industry. Reinforcements are required to have good mechanical and thermal properties, large aspect ratio, excellent adhesion to the matrix, and cost effectiveness. To fulfill the requirements, nanocomposites in which the matrix is filled with nanoscopic reinforcing phases having dimensions typically in the range of 1nm to 100 nm show considerably higher strength and modulus with far lower reinforcement content than their conventional counterparts. Graphite is a layered material whose layers have dimensions in the nanometer range and are held together by weak Van der Waals forces. Once these layers are exfoliated and dispersed in a polymer matrix as nano platelets, they have large aspect ratios. Graphite has an elastic modulus that is equal to the stiffest carbon fiber and 10-15 times that of other inorganic reinforcements, and it is also electrically and thermally conductive. If the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with excellent mechanical properties, superior thermal stability, and very good electrical and thermal properties at very low reinforcement loadings.

  9. Colorless and transparent copolyimide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hye-Jin; Kim, Yong Seok; Chang, Jin-Hae

    2014-12-01

    Copolyimides (Co-PIs) were synthesized from 2,2'-bis(trifluoromethyl) benzidine (TFB) and different ratios of 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) diphthalic anhydride (6FDA) and pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). The Co-PI films were obtained from poly(amic acid) (PAA) by solution-casting through typical chemical and thermal imidizations. The thermal properties and optical transparency of the Co-PI films with various PMDA monomer contents were investigated. It was found that with increasing PMDA content, the thermal transition temperatures of the Co-PI films increased. Co-PI nanocomposites were prepared with various amounts of organically modified hectorite (STN) on a TFB:6FDA:PMDA = 1.0:0.9:0.1 mole ratio Co-PI hybrid film to examine the thermal properties, morphology, and optical transparency. The thermo-optical properties of the Co-PI hybrid films deteriorated with increasing clay content. However, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and oxygen barrier properties of the PI hybrid films improved with increasing clay content.

  10. Internal charge behaviour of nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. Keith; Fothergill, John C.

    2004-05-01

    The incorporation of 23 nm titanium dioxide nanoparticles into an epoxy matrix to form a nanocomposite structure is described. It is shown that the use of nanometric particles results in a substantial change in the behaviour of the composite, which can be traced to the mitigation of internal charge when a comparison is made with conventional TiO2 fillers. A variety of diagnostic techniques (including dielectric spectroscopy, electroluminescence, thermally stimulated current and photoluminescence) have been used to augment pulsed electro-acoustic space charge measurement to provide a basis for understanding the underlying physics of the phenomenon. It would appear that, when the size of the inclusions becomes small enough, they act cooperatively with the host structure and cease to exhibit interfacial properties, leading to Maxwell-Wagner polarization. It is postulated that the particles are surrounded by high charge concentrations in the Gouy-Chapman-Stern layer. Since nanoparticles have very high specific areas, these regions allow limited charge percolation through nano-filled dielectrics. The practical consequences of this have also been explored in terms of the electric strength exhibited. It would appear that there was a window in which real advantages accrue from the nano-formulated material. An optimum loading of about 10% (by weight) is indicated.

  11. Polymeric nanocomposites: compounding and performance.

    PubMed

    Utracki, L A

    2008-04-01

    Polymeric nanocomposites (PNC) are binary mixtures of strongly interacting, inorganic platelets dispersed in a polymeric matrix. For full exfoliation, the thermodynamic miscibility is required. There are three basic methods of organically-modified clay dispersion that might result in PNC: (1) in polymer solution (followed by solvent removal), (2) in a monomer (followed by polymerization), and (3) in molten polymer (compounding). Most commercial PNC are produced by the second method, but it is the third one that has the greatest promise for the plastics industry. Similarly as during the manufacture of polymer blends, the layered silicates must be compatibilized by intercalation with organic salts and/or addition of functionalized macromolecules. Compounding affects the kinetics of dispersion process, but rarely the miscibility. Melt compounding is carried out either in a single-screw (SSE) or a twin-screw extruder (TSE). Furthermore, an extensional flow mixer (EFM) might be attached to an extruder. Two versions of EFM were evaluated: (1) designed for polymer homogenization and blending, and (2) designed for dispersing nano-particles. In this review, the dispersion of organoclay in polystyrene (PS), polyamide-6 (PA-6) or in polypropylene (PP) is discussed. The PNC based on PS or PA-6 contained two components (polymer and organoclay), whereas those based on PP in addition had a compatibilizer mixture of two maleated polypropylenes. Better dispersion was found compounding PNC's in a SSE + EFM than in TSE with or without EFM. The mechanical performance (tensile, flexural and impact) was examined.

  12. Global Calibration of Multiple Cameras Based on Sphere Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junhua; He, Huabin; Zeng, Debing

    2016-01-01

    Global calibration methods for multi-camera system are critical to the accuracy of vision measurement. Proposed in this paper is such a method based on several groups of sphere targets and a precision auxiliary camera. Each camera to be calibrated observes a group of spheres (at least three), while the auxiliary camera observes all the spheres. The global calibration can be achieved after each camera reconstructs the sphere centers in its field of view. In the process of reconstructing a sphere center, a parameter equation is used to describe the sphere projection model. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation are carried out to analyze the factors that affect the calibration accuracy. Simulation results show that the parameter equation can largely improve the reconstruction accuracy. In the experiments, a two-camera system calibrated by our method is used to measure a distance about 578 mm, and the root mean squared error is within 0.14 mm. Furthermore, the experiments indicate that the method has simple operation and good flexibility, especially for the onsite multiple cameras without common field of view. PMID:26761007

  13. Diagnosis of a poorly performing liquid hydrogen bulk storage sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Angela Gray

    2012-06-01

    There are two 3,218 cubic meter (850,000 gallon) Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A, the other at Launch Pad B. The Sphere at Pad B had a high boiloff rate when brought into service in the 1960s. In 2001, the daily commodity loss was approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the maximum allowed by the specification. After being re-painted in the 1990s a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere that resulted in poor paint bonding and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of service, which provided a unique opportunity to perform a series of visual inspections of the insulation. Boroscope examinations revealed a large Perlite void in the region where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and offloaded into the annular void region until full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  14. Solvation Sphere of I- and Br- in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    The solvation sphere of halides in water has been investigated using a combination of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis techniques. The results have indicated that I- and Br- both have an asymmetric, 8 water molecule primary solvation spheres. These spheres are identical, with the Br{sup -} sphere about .3 {angstrom} smaller than the I{sup -} sphere. This study utilized near-edge analysis to supplement EXAFS analysis which suffers from signal dampening/broadening due to thermal noise. This paper has reported on the solvation first sphere of I{sup -} and Br{sup -} in water. Using EXAFS and XANES analysis, strong models which describe the geometric configuration of water molecules coordinated to a central anion have been developed. The combination of these techniques has provided us with a more substantiated argument than relying solely on one or the other. An important finding of this study is that the size of the anion plays a smaller role than previously assumed in determining the number of coordinating water molecules Further experimental and theoretical investigation is required to understand why the size of the anion plays a minor role in determining the number of water molecules bound.

  15. Investigating hard sphere interactions through spin echo scattering angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Adam

    Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) allows neutron scattering instruments to perform real space measurements on large micron scale samples by encoding the scattering angle into the neutron's spin state via Larmor precession. I have built a SESAME instrument at the Low Energy Neutron Source. I have also assisted in the construction of a modular SESAME instrument on the ASTERIX beamline at Los Alamos National lab. The ability to tune these instruments has been proved mathematically and optimized and automated experimentally. Practical limits of the SESAME technique with respect to polarization analyzers, neutron spectra, Larmor elements, and data analysis were investigated. The SESAME technique was used to examine the interaction of hard spheres under depletion. Poly(methyl methacrylate) spheres suspended in decalin had previously been studied as a hard sphere solution. The interparticle correlations between the spheres were found to match the Percus-Yevick closure, as had been previously seen in dynamical light scattering experiments. To expand beyond pure hard spheres, 900kDa polystyrene was added to the solution in concentrations of less than 1% by mass. The steric effects of the polystyrene were expected to produce a short-range, attractive, "sticky" potential. Experiment showed, however, that the "sticky" potential was not a stable state and that the spheres would eventually form long range aggregates.

  16. Thermally Stable Mesoporous Silica Spheres synthesized under Mild Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Christopher; You, Eunyoung; Watkins, James

    2009-03-01

    Thermally stable, mesoporous silica spheres were synthesized using a one-pot technique under mild conditions. As-calcined silica spheres were shown to be highly porous with surface areas greater than 1000 m^2/g and pore volumes on the order of 1 cc/g. Pore walls were found to be highly resistant to collapse as a consequence of thermal treatment at temperatures exceeding 750 C or hydrothermal treatment in boiling water at temperatures exceeding 100 C for over 100 hours. ^29Si-^1H cross polarization NMR data indicate that the silica is highly condensed at the surface providing rationale for the exceptional pore wall stability observed. The mesoporous silica spheres were synthesized from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) at room temperature and near-neutral pH using cysteamine and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in a mixed water and ethanol system. Sphere size was shown to be tunable by altering the relative amounts of ethanol, CTAB, or TEOS. Sphere diameters ranging from 30 nm to 560 nm were observed. The preparation method and characterization of these highly condensed, thermally stable, mesoporous silica spheres for applications including sensing, catalysis, purification, and payload encapsulation is presented.

  17. Rebound and jet formation of a fluid-filled sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killian, Taylor W.; Klaus, Robert A.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates the impact dynamics of hollow elastic spheres partially filled with fluid. Unlike an empty sphere, the internal fluid mitigates some of the rebound through an impulse driven exchange of energy wherein the fluid forms a jet inside the sphere. Surprisingly, this occurs on the second rebound or when the free surface is initially perturbed. Images gathered through experimentation show that the fluid reacts more quickly to the impact than the sphere, which decouples the two masses (fluid and sphere), imparts energy to the fluid, and removes rebound energy from the sphere. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of acceleration, momentum and an energy method suggesting an optimal fill volume in the neighborhood of 30%. While the characteristics of the fluid (i.e., density, viscosity, etc.) affect the fluid motion (i.e., type and size of jet formation), the rebound characteristics remain similar for a given fluid volume independent of fluid type. Implications of this work are a potential use of similar passive damping systems in sports technology and marine engineering.

  18. Series reactions A → B → C on successive spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strieder, William; Saddawi, Salma

    2016-07-01

    The twin spherical harmonic expansion method with iterative solution of the coefficient equations is used to generate a rigorous analytical solution for the rate of series reaction, A → B → C, occurring, respectively, on two successive spheres of radius a1 and a2, a center-to-center distance d apart. To investigate the influences of the intersphere diffusion and geometry, diffusion-controlled reactions are considered. Results are presented as a series expansion of the dimensionless reaction rate R in terms of the dimensionless center-to-center sphere separation d bar (= d / (a1 +a2)) reciprocals, and for various sphere radius ratios γ (=a1 /a2) . When the sphere radius ratio γ is less than unity, a maximum in the series reaction rate is found for a d bar of about 1.05. Also an exact value of the series dimensionless reaction rate of ln2 is obtained in the limit γ → 0 (very large a2 or very small a1) for spheres in contact. Results suggest that the plots of reaction rates for contacting spheres can be extrapolated versus γ to the ln2 limit at γ → 0, and that the rate maximum effect is large in the γ → 0 limit.

  19. Squeeze flow of a Carreau fluid during sphere impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, J.; Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    We present results from a combined numerical and experimental investigation into the squeeze flow induced when a solid sphere impacts onto a thin, ultra-viscous film of non-Newtonian fluid. We examine both the sphere motion through the liquid as well as the fluid flow field in the region directly beneath the sphere during approach to a solid plate. In the experiments we use silicone oil as the model fluid, which is well-described by the Carreau model. We use high-speed imaging and particle tracking to achieve flow visualisation within the film itself and derive the corresponding velocity fields. We show that the radial velocity either diverges as the gap between the sphere and the wall diminishes (Ztip → 0) or that it reaches a maximum value and then decays rapidly to zero as the sphere comes to rest at a non-zero distance (Ztip = Zmin) away from the wall. The horizontal shear rate is calculated and is responsible for significant viscosity reduction during the approach of the sphere. Our model of this flow, based on lubrication theory, is solved numerically and compared to experimental trials. We show that our model is able to correctly describe the physical features of the flow observed in the experiments.

  20. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; ...

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSsmore » but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.« less

  1. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Liu, Rui; Chuang, Yen -Jun; Dai, Sheng; Pan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSs but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.

  2. Agarose encapsulated mesoporous carbonated hydroxyapatite nanocomposites powder for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kolanthai, Elayaraja; Abinaya Sindu, P; Thanigai Arul, K; Sarath Chandra, V; Manikandan, E; Narayana Kalkura, S

    2017-01-01

    The powder composites are predominantly used for filling of voids in bone and as drug delivery carrier to prevent the infection or inflammatory reaction in the damaged tissues. The objective of this work was to study the synthesis of agarose encapsulation on carbonated hydroxyapatite powder and their biological and drug delivery properties. Mesoporous, nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite/agarose (CHAp/agarose) powder composites were prepared by solvothermal method and subsequently calcined to study the physico-chemical changes, if it subjected to thermal exposure. The phase of the as-synthesized powder was CHAp/agarose whereas the calcinated samples were non-stoichiometric HAp. The CHAp/agarose nanorods were of length 10-80nm and width 40-190nm for the samples synthesized at temperatures 120°C (ST120) and 150°C (ST150). The calcination process produced spheres (10-50nm) and rods with reduced size (40-120nm length and 20-30nm width). Composites were partially dissolved in SBF solution followed by exhibited better bioactivity than non-stoichiometric HAp confirmed by gravimetric method. Hemo and biocompatibility remained unaffected by presence of agarose or carbonate in the HAp. Specific surface area of the composites was high and exhibited an enhanced amoxicillin and 5-fluorouracil release than the calcined samples. The composites demonstrated a strong antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The ST120 showed prolonged drug (AMX and 5-Fcil) release and antimicrobial efficacy than ST150 and calcined samples. This technique would be simple and rapid for composites preparation, to produce high quality crystalline, resorbable, mesoporous and bioactive nanocomposite (CHAp/agarose) powders. This work provides new insight into the role of agarose coated on bioceramics by solvothermal technique and suggests that CHAp/agarose composites powders are promising materials for filling of void in bone and drug delivery applications.

  3. Examining the T Tauri system with SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csépány, Gergely; van den Ancker, Mario; Ábrahám, Péter; Brandner, Wolfgang; Hormuth, Felix

    2015-06-01

    Context. The prototypical low-mass young stellar object, T Tauri, is a well-studied multiple system with at least three components. Aims: We aim to explore the T Tau system with the highest spatial resolution, study the time evolution of the known components, and re-determine the orbital parameters of the stars. Methods: Near-infrared classical imaging and integral field spectrograph observations were obtained during the Science Verification of SPHERE, the new high-contrast imaging facility at the VLT. The obtained FWHM of the primary star varies between 0.050'' and 0.059'', making these the highest spatial resolution near-infrared images of the T Tauri system obtained to date. Results: Our near-infrared images confirm the presence of extended emission south of T Tau Sa, reported in the literature. New narrow-band images show, for the first time, that this feature shows strong emission in both the Br-γ and H2 1-0 S(1) lines. Broadband imaging at 2.27 μm shows that T Tau Sa is 0.92 mag brighter than T Tau Sb, which is in contrast to observations from Jan. 2014 (when T Tau Sa was fainter than Sb), and demonstrates that T Tau Sa has entered a new period of high variability. The newly obtained astrometric positions of T Tau Sa and Sb agree with orbital fits from previous works. The orbit of T Tau S (the centre of gravity of Sa and Sb) around T Tau N is poorly constrained by the available observations and can be fit with a range of orbits ranging from a nearly circular orbit with a period of 475 years to highly eccentric orbits with periods up to 2.7 × 104 years. We also detected a feature south of T Tau N, at a distance of 144 ± 3 mas, which shows the properties of a new companion. Based on observations made at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 60.A-9363(A) and 60.A-9364(A).Figures 3-5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Phase diagram of highly asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, M; van Roij, R; Evans, R

    1999-05-01

    We study the phase behavior and structure of highly asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures. By first integrating out the degrees of freedom of the small spheres in the partition function we derive a formal expression for the effective Hamiltonian of the large spheres. Then using an explicit pairwise (depletion) potential approximation to this effective Hamiltonian in computer simulations, we determine fluid-solid coexistence for size ratios q=0.033, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 1.0. The resulting two-phase region becomes very broad in packing fractions of the large spheres as q becomes very small. We find a stable, isostructural solid-solid transition for q< or =0.05 and a fluid-fluid transition for q< or =0.10. However, the latter remains metastable with respect to the fluid-solid transition for all size ratios we investigate. In the limit q-->0 the phase diagram mimics that of the sticky-sphere system. As expected, the radial distribution function g(r) and the structure factor S(k) of the effective one-component system show no sharp signature of the onset of the freezing transition and we find that at most points on the fluid-solid boundary the value of S(k) at its first peak is much lower than the value given by the Hansen-Verlet freezing criterion. Direct simulations of the true binary mixture of hard spheres were performed for q > or =0.05 in order to test the predictions from the effective Hamiltonian. For those packing fractions of the small spheres where direct simulations are possible, we find remarkably good agreement between the phase boundaries calculated from the two approaches-even up to the symmetric limit q=1 and for very high packings of the large spheres, where the solid-solid transition occurs. In both limits one might expect that an approximation which neglects higher-body terms should fail, but our results support the notion that the main features of the phase equilibria of asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures are accounted for by the effective

  5. Construction of adhesion maps for contacts between a sphere and a half-space: Considering size effects of the sphere.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Hanqing; Yang, Weixu

    2015-11-15

    Previous adhesion maps, such as the JG (Johnson-Greenwood) and YCG (Yao-Ciavarella-Gao) maps, are used to guide the selection of Bradley, DMT, M-D, JKR and Hertz models. However, when the size of the contact sphere decreases to the small scale, the applicability of JG and YCG maps is limited because the assumptions regarding the contact region profile, interaction between contact bodies and sphere shape in the classical models constituting these two maps are no longer valid. To avoid this limitation, in this paper, a new numerical model considering size effects of the sphere is established first and then introduced into the new adhesion maps together with the YGG (Yao-Guduru-Gao) model and Hertz model. Regimes of these models in the new map under a certain sphere radius are demarcated by the criteria related to the relative force differences and the ratio of contact radius to sphere radius. In addition, the approaches at pull-off, jump-in and jump-out for different Tabor parameters and sphere radii are provided in the new maps. Finally, to make the new maps more feasible, the numerical results of approaches, force and contact radius involved in the maps are formularized by using the piecewise fitting.

  6. Effects of sphere size on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ductile iron-steel hollow sphere syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazegaran, Hamid; Kiani-Rashid, Ali-Reza; Khaki, Jalil Vahdati

    2016-06-01

    The effects of sphere size on the microstructural and mechanical properties of ductile iron-steel hollow sphere (DI-SHS) syntactic foams were investigated in this study. The SHSs were manufactured by fluidized-bed coating via the Fe-based commercial powder-binder suspension onto expanded polystyrene spheres (EPSs). Afterwards, the DI-SHS syntactic foams were produced via a sand-mold casting process. The microstructures of specimens were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The microscopic evaluations of specimens reveal distinct regions composed of the DI matrix, SHS shells, and compatible interface. As a result, the microstructures and graphite morphologies of the DI matrix depend on sphere size. When the sphere size decreases, the area fractions of cementite and graphite phases are observed to increase and decrease, respectively. Compression tests were subsequently conducted at ambient temperature on the DI-SHS syntactic foams. The results reveal that the compression behavior of the syntactic foams is enhanced with increasing sphere size. Furthermore, the compressed specimens demonstrate that microcracks start and grow from the interface region.

  7. The lattice parameter of the 28Si spheres in the determination of the Avogadro constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, E.; Mana, G.; Ferroglio, L.; Kessler, E. G.; Schiel, D.; Zakel, S.

    2011-04-01

    The Avogadro constant has been determined by atom counting in two enriched 28Si spheres. Atoms were counted by exploiting their ordered arrangement in the spheres and calculating the ratio between sphere and the unit-cell volumes. This paper describes how the values of the sphere lattice parameters and, consequently, their unit-cell volumes were obtained.

  8. Combustion of a Polymer (PMMA) Sphere in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann C.; Hamins, Anthony; Donnelly, Michelle K.

    1999-01-01

    A series of low gravity, aircraft-based, experiments was conducted to investigate the combustion of supported thermoplastic polymer spheres under varying ambient conditions. The three types of thermoplastic investigated were polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polypropylene (PP). and polystyrene (PS). Spheres with diameters ranging from 2 mm to 6.35 mm were tested. The total initial pressure varied from 0.05 MPa to 0. 15 MPa whereas the ambient oxygen concentration varied from 19 % to 30 % (by volume). The ignition system consisted of a pair of retractable energized coils. Two CCD cameras recorded the burning histories of the spheres. The video sequences revealed a number of dynamic events including bubbling and sputtering, as well as soot shell formation and break-up during combustion of the spheres at reduced gravity. The ejection of combusting material from the burning spheres represents a fire hazard that must be considered at reduced gravity. The ejection process was found to be sensitive to polymer type. All average burning rates were measured to increase with initial sphere diameter and oxygen concentration, whereas the initial pressure had little effect. The three thermoplastic types exhibited different burning characteristics. For the same initial conditions, the burning rate of PP was slower than PMMA, whereas the burning rate of PS was comparable to PMMA. The transient diameter of the burning thermoplastic exhibited two distinct periods: an initial period (enduring approximately half of the total burn duration) when the diameter remained approximately constant, and a final period when the square of the diameter linearly decreased with time. A simple homogeneous two-phase model was developed to understand the changing diameter of the burning sphere. Its value is based on a competition between diameter reduction due to mass loss from burning and sputtering, and diameter expansion due to the processes of swelling (density decrease with heating) and bubble growth

  9. Tin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this effort was to develop a process for economically fabricating thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from conventional ceramic powders using dispersions. This process resulted in successful production of monosized spheres in the mm size range which were point contact bonded into foams. Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres of small (one to five millimeter) diameter have novel applications as high-temperature insulation and light structural materials when bonded into monolithic foams. During Phase 1 of this program the objective as to develop a process for fabricating thin-wall hollow spheres from powder slurries using the coaxial nozzle fabrication method. Based on the success during Phase 1, Phase 2 was revised to emphasize the assessment of the potential structural and insulation applications for the spheres and modeling of the sphere formation process was initiated. As more understanding developed, it was clear that to achieve successful structural application, the spheres had to be bonded into monolithic foams and the effort was further expanded to include both bonding into structures and finite element mechanical modeling which became the basis of Phase 3. Successful bonding techniques and mechanical modeling resulted but thermal conductivities were higher than desired for insulating activities. In addition, considerable interest had been express by industry for the technology. Thus the final Phase 4 concentrated on methods to reduce thermal conductivity by a variety of techniques and technology transfer through individualized visits. This program resulted in three Ph.D. theses and 10 M.S. theses and they are listed in the appropriate technical sections.

  10. Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R

    1999-07-16

    FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

  11. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings: Voronoi correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Michael A; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    We characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings by computing the Minkowski functionals (volume, surface area, and integrated mean curvature) of their associated Voronoi cells. The probability distribution functions of these functionals of Voronoi cells in MRJ sphere packings are qualitatively similar to those of an equilibrium hard-sphere liquid and partly even to the uncorrelated Poisson point process, implying that such local statistics are relatively structurally insensitive. This is not surprising because the Minkowski functionals of a single Voronoi cell incorporate only local information and are insensitive to global structural information. To improve upon this, we introduce descriptors that incorporate nonlocal information via the correlation functions of the Minkowski functionals of two cells at a given distance as well as certain cell-cell probability density functions. We evaluate these higher-order functions for our MRJ packings as well as equilibrium hard spheres and the Poisson point process. It is shown that these Minkowski correlation and density functions contain visibly more information than the corresponding standard pair-correlation functions. We find strong anticorrelations in the Voronoi volumes for the hyperuniform MRJ packings, consistent with previous findings for other pair correlations [A. Donev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 090604 (2005)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.090604], indicating that large-scale volume fluctuations are suppressed by accompanying large Voronoi cells with small cells, and vice versa. In contrast to the aforementioned local Voronoi statistics, the correlation functions of the Voronoi cells qualitatively distinguish the structure of MRJ sphere packings (prototypical glasses) from that of not only the Poisson point process but also the correlated equilibrium hard-sphere liquids. Moreover, while we did not find any perfect icosahedra (the locally densest possible structure in which a

  12. Polymer nanocomposites for lithium battery applications

    DOEpatents

    Sandi-Tapia, Giselle; Gregar, Kathleen Carrado

    2006-07-18

    A single ion-conducting nanocomposite of a substantially amorphous polyethylene ether and a negatively charged synthetic smectite clay useful as an electrolyte. Excess SiO2 improves conductivity and when combined with synthetic hectorite forms superior membranes for batteries. A method of making membranes is also disclosed.

  13. A novel piezoresistive polymer nanocomposite MEMS accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seena, V.; Hari, K.; Prajakta, S.; Pratap, Rudra; Ramgopal Rao, V.

    2017-01-01

    A novel polymer MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) accelerometer with photo-patternable polymer nanocomposite as a piezoresistor is presented in this work. Polymer MEMS Accelerometer with beam thicknesses of 3.3 µm and embedded nanocomposite piezoresistive layer having a gauge factor of 90 were fabricated. The photosensitive nanocomposite samples were prepared and characterized for analyzing the mechanical and electrical properties and thereby ensuring proper process parameters for incorporating the piezoresistive layer into the polymer MEMS accelerometer. The microfabrication process flow and unit processes followed are extremely low cost with process temperatures below 100 °C. This also opens up a new possibility for easy integration of such polymer MEMS with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) devices and circuits. The fabricated devices were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the devices exhibited a resonant frequency of 10.8 kHz and a response sensitivity of 280 nm g-1 at resonance. The main focus of this paper is on the SU-8/CB nanocomposite piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer technology development which covers the material and the fabrication aspects of these devices. CoventorWare FEA analysis performed using the extracted material properties from the experimental characterization which are in close agreement to performance parameters of the fabricated devices is also discussed. The simulated piezoresistive polymer MEMS devices showed an acceleration sensitivity of 126 nm g-1 and 82 ppm of ΔR/R per 1 g of acceleration.

  14. Quantifying the properties of nano-composites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daw, Murray; Zhang, Bo; He, Jian; Tritt, Terry

    2008-03-01

    With the proliferation of nano-composites produced for possible thermoelectric application, we ask the question: To what extent is a given nano-composite like other composites? Or, in other words, when do we know that we have something new? To address this we apply the classical theory of composites to specific nano-composites grown and characterized at Clemson. The theory is very simple and assumes explicitly very simple properties of the materials, the most important being Fourier's Law/Ohm's Law. Given this assumption, the theory of composites can be applied to the nano-composites based on what is known of the microstructure. This ``classical'' result then forms the basis by which the properties can be compared to determine if non-classical effects are being observed. One simple theory is the application of rigorous bounds, such as the Hashin-Strikman Bounds which are based only on very simple microstructural descriptors. Another simple theory is the application of FEM, which can be constructed directly from SEM images of the samples using the NIST code ``OOF''. The FEM produces specific predictions for the composite properties. We find that the Hashin-Strikman Bounds are very useful for analyzing the thermal conductivities of composites, but are too loose to be useful for low-temperature electrical conductivity of composites composed of metals and insulators, where the FEM technique can be applied successfully.

  15. PCL/MWCNT Nanocomposites as Nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozdanov, Anita; Buzarovska, Alexandra; Avella, Maurizio; Errico, Maria E.; Gentile, Gennaro

    Due to the unique electronic, metallic and structural properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as compared to other materials, researchers focused on utilizing these characteristics for engineering applications such as actuators, hydrogen storage materials, chemical sensors and nanoelectronic devices. Many papers have been published utilizing CNTs as the sensing material in pressure, flow, thermal, gas, optical, mass, strain, stress, chemical and biological sensors. Amongst many of their superior electro-mechanical properties, the piezoresistive effect in CNTs is attractive for designing strain sensors. When CNTs are subjected to a mechanical strain, a change in their chirality leads to modulation of the conductance. In this paper, a novel carbon nanotube/biopolymer nanocomposite was used to develop a piezoresistive strain nano bio-sensor. A biocompatible polymer matrix has been used to provide good interfacial bonding between the carbon nanotubes. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, diameter d = 30-50 nm, purity >95%) have been used for the preparation of polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanocomposites (PCL/MWCNT). The nanocomposites were prepared by mixing the MWCNTs and PCL in a tetrahydrofuran solution for 24 h. Characterization of the PCL/MWCNTs nanocomposite films was performed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as by mechanical and electrical measurements.

  16. Hierarchical cooperative binary ionic porphyrin nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongming; Busani, Tito; Uyeda, Gregory H; Martin, Kathleen E; van Swol, Frank; Medforth, Craig J; Montaño, Gabriel A; Shelnutt, John A

    2012-05-18

    Cooperative binary ionic (CBI) solids comprise a versatile new class of opto-electronic and catalytic materials consisting of ionically self-assembled pairs of organic anions and cations. Herein, we report CBI nanocomposites formed by growing nanoparticles of one type of porphyrin CBI solid onto a second porphyrin CBI substructure with complementary functionality.

  17. Versatile nanocomposites in phosphoproteomics: a review.

    PubMed

    Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Fahmida; Hussain, Dilshad; Saeed, Adeela; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2012-10-17

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications. Phosphorylated peptides are present in low abundance in blood serum but play a vital role in regulatory mechanisms and may serve as casual factors in diseases. The enrichment and analysis of phosphorylated peptides directly from human serum and mapping the phosphorylation sites is a challenging task. Versatile nanocomposites of different materials have been synthesized using simple but efficient methodologies for their enrichment. The nanocomposites include magnetic, coated, embedded as well as chemically derivatized materials. Different base materials such as polymers, carbon based and metal oxides are used. The comparison of nanocomposites with respective nanoparticles provides sufficient facts about their efficiency in terms of loading capacity and capture efficiency. The cost for preparing them is low and they hold great promise to be used as chromatographic materials for phosphopeptide enrichment. This review gives an overview of different nanocomposites in phosphoproteomics, discussing the improved efficiency than the individual counterparts and highlighting their significance in phosphopeptide enrichment.

  18. Nanocomposites in food packaging – A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nanocomposite is a multiphase material derived from the combination of two or more components, including a matrix (continuous phase) and a discontinuous nano-dimensional phase with at least one nano-sized dimension (i.e. less than 100 nm). The main types of nanostructures are presented in this ch...

  19. Modeling Nanocomposites for Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Maximum 200 Words) The minimum energy configuration for Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations is found for a carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer...Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs), Molecular Dynamics Simulations 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 18 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT...fiber composites have shown success in improving mechanical properties. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nanocomposites have been studied for

  20. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  1. Reactive Nanocomposites for Controllable Adhesive Debonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    noncontact debond initiations. It is also noted that the RNC provides the quickest debond found in published literature. 2. Nanocomposite Debond...With paste adhesives, the pressure is applied uniformly, and excess resin in the bond line is forced out of the interfacial area to the thickness

  2. Durable Nanocomposites for Superhydrophobicity and Superoleophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Adam

    Anti-wetting surfaces and materials have the potential for dramatic performance improvements such as drag reduction on marine vehicles and fluid power systems as well as anti-fouling on aircraft and wind turbines. Although a wide variety of synthetic superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed and investigated, several critical obstacles remain before industrial application can be realized, including: (1) large surface area application, (2) multi-liquid anti-wetting, (3) environmentally friendly compositions, (4) mechanical durability and adhesion, and (5) long-term performance. In this dissertation, nanocomposite coatings have been investigated to generate high performance anti-wetting surfaces that address these obstacles which may enable application on wind turbine blades. Solution processable materials were used which self-assemble to create anti-wetting nanocomposite surfaces upon spray coating and curing. As a result, the first superoleophobic nanocomposite, the first environmentally friendly superhydrophobic compositions, and the first highly durable superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings were created. Furthermore, the mechanisms leading to this improved performance were studied.

  3. Electrically Conductive Metal Nanowire Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaoxiong

    This thesis investigates electrically conductive polymer nanocomposites formulated with metal nanowires for electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic interference shielding. Copper nanowires (CuNWs) of an average length of 1.98 mum and diameter of 25 +/- 4 nm were synthesized. The oxidation reaction of the CuNWs in air can be divided into two stages at weight of 111.2% on TGA curves. The isoconversional activation energies determined by Starink method were used to fit the different master plots. Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation gave the best fit. The surface atoms of the CuNWs are the sites for the random nucleation and the crystallite strain in the CuNWs is the driving force for the growth of nuclei mechanism during the oxidation process. To improve the anti-oxidation properties of the CuNWs, silver was coated onto the surface of the CuNWs in Ag-amine solution. The prepared silver coated CuNWs (AgCuNWs) with silver content of 66.52 wt. %, diameter of 28--33 nm exhibited improved anti-oxidation behavior. The electrical resistivity of the AgCuNW/low density polyethylene (LDPE) nanocomposites is lower than that of the CuNW/LDPE nanocomposites with the same volume percentage of fillers. The nanocomposites formulated with CuNWs and polyethylenes (PEs) were compared to study the different interaction between the CuNWs and the different types of PE matrices. The electrical conductivity of the different PE matrices filled with the same concentrations of CuNWs correlated well with the level of the CuNW dispersion. The intermolecular force and entanglement resulting from the different macromolecular structures such as molecular weight and branching played an important role in the dispersion, electrical properties and rheological behaviour of the CuNW/PE nanocomposites. Ferromagnetic polycrystalline nickel nanowires (NiNWs) were synthesized with uniform diameter of ca. 38 nm and an average length of 2.68 mum. The NiNW linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE

  4. Graphene based nanocomposite hybrid electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aphale, Ashish N.

    There is an unmet need to develop high performance energy storage systems (ESS), capable of storing energy from both renewable and non-renewable sources to meet the current energy crisis and depletion of non-renewable sources. Amongst many available ESS, supercapacitors (ECs) are the most promising because they exhibit a high charge/discharge rate and power density, along with a long cycle life. The possibility of exploring the use of atomically thin carbon allotropes like graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and electrically conducting polymers (ECPs) such as polypyrrole (PPy) has been studied as a high performance conducting electrodes in supercapacitor application. A novel templated sustainable nanocomposite electrode has been fabricated using cellulose extracted from Cladophora c. aegagropila algae as component of the assembled supercapacitor device which later has been transitioned to a unique template-less freestanding nanocomposite supercapacitor electrode. The specific capacitance of polypyrrole-graphene-cellulose nanocomposite as calculated from cyclic voltammetry curve is 91.5 F g -1 at the scan rate 50 m Vs-1 in the presence of 1M NaCl electrolyte. The open circuit voltage of the device with polypyrrole -graphene-cellulose electrode was found to be around 225 m V and that of the polypyrrole -cellulose device is only 53 m V without the presence of graphene in the nanocomposite electrode. Understanding the fundamentals by fabricating template nanocomposite electrode, it led to fabricate a unique nanocomposite template-less freestanding film which comprises of polypyrrole-graphene-CNT hybrid. Various experiments have been performed using different electrolytes such ascorbic acid, sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid in different scan rates. The specific capacitance of polypyrrole-graphene-CNT nanocomposite with 0.1 wt% of graphene-CNT, as calculated from cyclic voltammetry curve is 450 F g-1 at the scan rate 5 m V s-1. For the first time a nanofibrous membrane has

  5. On the Armillary Sphere of Nam Byong-Chul - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Sam; Kim, Sang-Hyuk; Nam, Moon-Hyon

    2001-04-01

    In this paper we have reconstructed an armillary sphere based on the 'Method of an Armillary Sphere Making' described in the Volume 1 of 'The Collection of Writings on the Scientific Instruments - Uigijipsol'(two volumes) edited in the 1850's by Nam Byong-Chul(1817-1863) who was a famous Korean statesman-scientist. Nam achieved convenience and accuracy in the measurements of stellar positions in the manner of selective settings the equatorial, ecliptic and horizontal poles by adding a pole axis exchange ring called 'Jaigeukkwon' between the Three Arrangers of Time and Four Displacements. We made use of 3-dimensional graphic software for modelling Nam's armillary sphere which consisted of five layers-eight rings. Results of simulation showed that the pole axis exchange ring functioned properly in setting the equatorial, ecliptic and horizontal coordinates simply by exchange of positions of specified holes on the ring. We ascertained that the invention of 'Jaigeukkwon' solved inherent problems in the conventional Chinese armillary sphere in computation of real ecliptic coordinates. It was revealed that Nam Byong-Chul made great contributions in the East Asian history of armillary sphere making.

  6. Evaluation of Delayed Critical ORNL Unreflected HEU Metal Sphere (ORSphere)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, M. A.; Bess, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    In 1971 and 1972 experimenters at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiment Facility performed critical experiments using an unreflected metal sphere of highly enriched uranium (HEU). The sphere used for the criticality experiments, originally used for neutron leakage spectrum measurements by General Atomic Company, consisted of three main parts and were assembled with a vertical assembly machine. Two configurations were tested. The first was nearly spherical with a nominal radius of 3.467 inches and had a reactivity of 68.1 ± 2.0 cents. The sphere parts were then re-machined as a sphere with a nominal radius of 3.4425 inches. This assembly had a reactivity of -23 cents. The method, dimensions, and uncertainty of the critical experiment were extensively recorded and documented. The original purpose of the experiments was for comparison to GODIVA I experiments. The ORNL unreflected HEU Metal Spheres have been evaluated for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (scheduled for inclusion in the September 2013 edition).

  7. Scattering by two-component random distributions of spheres.

    PubMed

    Burke, J E; Kays, T H; Kulp, J L; Twersky, V

    1968-12-01

    Theory and prototype (at wavelength lambda = 5 mm) partial coherence scattering data for optical applications in diagnostic measurements on two component suspensions or gases are presented. Results are given for equal volume mixtures of two sizes of moving randomly distributed large spheres for all realizable values of the fractional volume w (the fraction of the slab region container filled by scattering material). The relative index of refraction of the spheres was about 1.017, and their diameters were 6.52lambda and 3.33lambda (so that we used about eight times as many small spheres as large ones for each value of w). The spheres were of lightweight Styrofoam, and their motion arose from turbulent air streams (flowing through grids that form the top and bottom of a Styrofoam container), and the data were obtained in real time by processing the instantaneous phase quadrature components of the scattered field with an electronic analog computer. We give results for the forward scattered coherent phase, for the coherent, incoherent, and total intensities, and for the covariant magnitude and phase which (together with the incoherent intensity) provide the variances and covariance of the instantaneous phase quadrature components. We also consider certain reduced data records (from which the major effects of scatterer size and material have been eliminated) to indicate the dependence of the scattering on the fractional volume and to facilitate comparison with earlier data for distributions of identical spheres.

  8. Packing of hard spheres in cylinders and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, Adil; Weaire, Denis; Hutzler, Stefan; Chan, Ho Kei

    2014-03-01

    We study the optimal packing of hard spheres in an infinitely long cylinder. Our simulations have yielded dozens of periodic, mechanically stable, structures as the ratio of the cylinder (D) to sphere (d) diameter is varied. Up to D/d =2.715 the densest structures are composed entirely of spheres which are in contact with the cylinder. The density reaches a maximum at discrete values of D/d when a maximum number of contacts are established. These maximal contact packings are of the classic ``phyllotactic'' type, familiar in biology. However, between these points we observe another type of packing, termed line-slip. An analytic understanding of these rigid structures follows by recourse to a yet simpler problem: the packing of disks on a cylinder. We show that maximal contact packings correspond to the perfect wrapping of a honeycomb arrangement of disks around a cylindrical tube. While line-slip packings are inhomogeneous deformations of the honeycomb lattice modified to wrap around the cylinder. Beyond D/d =2.715 the structures are more complex, since they incorporate internal spheres. We review some relevant experiments with hard spheres, small bubbles and discuss similar structures found in nature. We discuss the chirality of these packings and potential applications in photonics.

  9. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  10. Evaluation of the sphere anemometer for atmospheric wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Our contribution will compare the sphere anemometer and two standard sensors for wind energy and meteorology based on data from a near-shore measurement campaign. We will introduce the characteristics of the sphere anemometer - a drag-based sensor for simultaneous wind speed and direction measurements, which makes use of the highly resolving light pointer principle to detect the velocity-dependent deflection of sphere mounted on a flexible tube. Sphere anemometer, cup anemometer and 3D sonic anemometer were installed at near-shore site in the German Wadden Sea. A comparison of the anemometers was carried out based on several month of high frequency data obtained from this campaign. The measured wind speed and direction data were analyzed to evaluate the capability of the sphere anemometer under real operating conditions, while the sensor characteristics obtained from previous wind tunnel experiments under turbulent conditions served as a reference to assess the durability and to identify challenges of the new anemometer. A characterization of the atmospheric wind conditions at the test site is performed based on the recorded wind data. Wind speed and wind direction averages and turbulence intensities are analyzed as well as power spectra and probability density functions. Supported by the German Ministry of Economics and Energy.

  11. Hydrothermal Syntheses of Colloidal Carbon Spheres from Cyclodextrins

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Li Q.; Bae, In-Tae; Arey, Bruce W.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2008-09-18

    Colloidal carbon spheres have been prepared from aqueous alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrin (CD) solutions in closed systems under hydrothermal conditions at 160 oC. Both liquid and solid-state 13C NMR spectra taken for samples at different reaction times have been used to monitor the dehydration and carbonization pathways. CD slowly hydrolyzes to glucose and forms 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) followed by carbonization into colloidal carbon spheres. The isolated carbon spheres are 70-150 nm in diameter, exhibit a core-shell structure, and are comprised of a condensed core (C=C) peppered with resident chemical functionalities including carboxylate and hydroxyl groups. Evidence from 13C solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectra reveal that the evolving carbon spheres show a gradual increase in the amount of aromatic carbon as a function of reaction time and that the carbon spheres generated from gamma-CD contain significantly higher aromatic carbon than those derived from alpha- and beta-CD.

  12. ORSPHERE: CRITICAL, BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-09-01

    In the early 1970’s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950’s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” (Reference 1) While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0. 0001 in. for non-spherical parts), masses (±0.01 g), and material data The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. A three part sphere was initially assembled with an average radius of 3.4665 in. and was then machined down to an average radius of 3.4420 in. (3.4425 in. nominal). These two spherical configurations were evaluated and judged to be acceptable benchmark experiments; however, the two experiments are highly correlated.

  13. Grid-Sphere Electrodes for Contact with Ionospheric Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H.; Poe, Garrett D.

    2010-01-01

    Grid-sphere electrodes have been proposed for use on the positively biased end of electrodynamic space tethers. A grid-sphere electrode is fabricated by embedding a wire mesh in a thin film from which a spherical balloon is formed. The grid-sphere electrode would be deployed from compact stowage by inflating the balloon in space. The thin-film material used to inflate the balloon is formulated to vaporize when exposed to the space environment. This would leave the bare metallic spherical grid electrode attached to the tether, which would present a small cross-sectional area (essentially, the geometric wire shadow area only) to incident neutral atoms and molecules. Most of the neutral particles, which produce dynamic drag when they impact a surface, would pass unimpeded through the open grid spaces. However, partly as a result of buildup of a space charge inside the grid-sphere, and partially, the result of magnetic field effects, the electrode would act almost like a solid surface with respect to the flux of electrons. The net result would be that grid-sphere electrodes would introduce minimal aerodynamic drag, yet have effective electrical-contact surface areas large enough to collect multiampere currents from the ionospheric plasma that are needed for operation of electrodynamic tethers. The vaporizable-balloon concept could also be applied to the deployment of large radio antennas in outer space.

  14. Proprietes optiques lineaires et non-lineaires de nanocomposites metal/dielectrique anisotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarre, Jean-Michel

    In this thesis, we present the development and the analysis of advanced fabrication techniques allowing for the precise control of the synthesis of nanocomposites formed of gold nanoparticles embedded in a silica matrix. We have developed a three-step technique allowing us to fabricate nanocomposite films with particles of controlled size and shape. (1) The first paper describes the sample fabrication method and their linear optical properties. The nanocomposite materials are first deposited using a PECVD/sputtering hybrid technique. In order to increase the nanoparticule size, the sample are then submitted to a 900°C thermal annealing for several hours. The modification technique used to change the particles from spheres to ellipsoids is described. This technique consists of irradiating the samples using high energy copper ions (30 MeV). The resulting structure is anisotropic since the particles' long axis are aligned with the irradiation direction. This is the first use of this technique for samples with gold particles embedded in a solid matrix. The details of the ellipsometric and spectrophotometric characterization are discussed and the linear optical properties of these materials measured by these techniques are presented. These measurements allow one to find the nanostructural parameters of the layer (gold concentration, particle size, thickness and surface roughness) from the complex refractive index of the layer. We demonstrate the effect of the annealing and the irradiation on the optical properties of the nanocomposite system notably on the control of the characteristics of the SPR absorption band. Thus, we show that the thermal annealing induce a red-shift in the SPR position while the irradiation step corresponds to a blue-shift. We also demonstrate that a final post-irradiation annealing treatment allows to re-form spherical nanoparticles. (2) The second paper is focused on the nonlinear optical properties of Au/SiO2 nanocomposites. Polarized P

  15. Microscopic theory for dynamics in entangled polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Umi

    New microscopic theories for describing dynamics in polymer nanocomposites are developed and applied. The problem is addressed from two distinct perspectives and using two different theoretical approaches. The first half of this dissertation studies the long-time and intermediate-time dynamics of nanoparticles in entangled and unentangled polymer melts for dilute particle concentrations. Using a combination of mode-coupling, Brownian motion, and polymer physics ideas, the nanoparticle long-time diffusion coefficients is formulated in terms of multiple length-scales, packing microstructures, and spatially-resolved polymer density fluctuation dynamics. The key motional mechanism is described via the parallel relaxation of the force exerted on the particle controlled by collective polymer constraint-release and the particle self-motion. A sharp but smooth crossover from the hydrodynamic to the non-hydrodynamic regime is predicted based on the Stokes-Einstein violation ratio as a function of all the system variables. Quantitative predictions are made for the recovery of the Stokes-Einstein law, and the diffusivity in the crossover regime agrees surprisingly well with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for all particle sizes and chain lengths studied. The approach is also extended to address intermediate-time anomalous transport of a single nanoparticle and two-particle relative diffusion. The second half of this dissertation focuses on developing a novel dynamical theory for a liquid of infinitely-thin rods in the presence of hard spherical obstacles, aiming at a technical and conceptual extension of the existing paradigm for entangled polymer dynamics. As a fundamental theoretical development, the two-component generalization of a first-principles dynamic meanfield approach is presented. The theory enforces inter-needle topological uncrossability and needlesphere impenetrability in a unified manner, leading to a generalized theory of entanglements that

  16. Semi empirical hardness predictive model for AZ91 nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, N. H. A.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Zaidi, A. M. A.; Ahmad, K. R.

    2016-07-01

    AZ91 nanocomposite was exposed to several heat treatment processes and the effect of precipitation hardening on hardness was studied as a function of time and temperature. The investigation shows the significant of time and temperature are the main role in the precipitation hardening process of the nanocomposite. Kinetics study show a deceptive activation energy of 21 kJ/mol of the AZ91 nanocomposite. A relationship was derived to predict the maximum hardness at given time and temperature.

  17. Preparation of nanocomposites containing nanoclusters of transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, S.B.; Lukehart, C.M., Wittig, J.E.

    1996-10-01

    New nanocomposites containing nanoclusters of transition metals have been prepared and characterized by TEM, XRD, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Organometallic or other coordination compounds functionalized with trialkoxysilyl groups have been synthesized and covalently incorporated into silica xerogels using standard sol-gel techniques. Thermal oxidative treatment of these xerogels in air followed by reduction in hydrogen yielded the desired nanocomposite phases. Using these methods, Mo, Re, Fe, Ru, Os, Pd, Pt, Cu. and Ag nanocomposites have been prepared.

  18. Damped Arrow-Hurwicz algorithm for sphere packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, Pierre; Ferreira, Marina A.; Motsch, Sebastien

    2017-03-01

    We consider algorithms that, from an arbitrarily sampling of N spheres (possibly overlapping), find a close packed configuration without overlapping. These problems can be formulated as minimization problems with non-convex constraints. For such packing problems, we observe that the classical iterative Arrow-Hurwicz algorithm does not converge. We derive a novel algorithm from a multi-step variant of the Arrow-Hurwicz scheme with damping. We compare this algorithm with classical algorithms belonging to the class of linearly constrained Lagrangian methods and show that it performs better. We provide an analysis of the convergence of these algorithms in the simple case of two spheres in one spatial dimension. Finally, we investigate the behaviour of our algorithm when the number of spheres is large in two and three spatial dimensions.

  19. Probing the evolution and morphology of hard carbon spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Pol, Vilas G.; Wen, Jianguo; Lau, Kah Chun; Callear, Samantha; Bowron, Daniel T.; Lin, Chi-Kai; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Curtiss, Larry A.; David, William; Miller, Dean J.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2014-03-01

    Monodispersed hard carbon spheres can be synthesized quickly and reproducibly by autogenic reactions of hydrocarbon precursors, notably polyethylene (including plastic waste), at high temperature and pressure. The carbon microparticles formed by this reaction have a unique spherical architecture, with a dominant internal nanometer layered motif, and they exhibit diamond-like hardness and electrochemical properties similar to graphite. In the present study, in-situ monitoring by X-ray diffraction along with electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, neutron pair-distribution function analysis, and computational modeling has been used to elucidate the morphology and evolution of the carbon spheres that form from the autogenic reaction of polyethylene at high temperature and pressure. A mechanism is proposed on how polyethylene evolves from a linear chain-based material to a layered carbon motif. Heating the spheres to 2400-2800 °C under inert conditions increases their graphitic character, particularly at the surface, which enhances their electrochemical and tribological properties.

  20. Complex Ordering of Soft Spheres in Block Polymer Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwoo; Zhang, Jingwen; Bates, Frank S.

    2014-03-01

    Hard sphere systems, such as low-z metallic elements and colloids, generally form densely packed crystalline states with BCC, FCC and HCP symmetry. In contrast, a certain self-assembling soft materials including block polymers, surfactants, and dendrimers have the capacity to order into more open crystalline structures. Recently, we have identified five discrete sphere-packing symmetries in poly(styrene- b-isoprene- b-styrene- b-ethylene oxide) (SISO) tetrablock terpolymers: BCC, Frank-Kasper σ-phase, dodecagonal quasicrystal (DQC), Pm 3 n(A15), and non-close-packed hexagonal (sHEX). Some of these packing symmetries have been documented in certain heavy metals and organic dendrimers, and interestingly Landau theory anticipated a similar set of non-close-packed symmetries more than three decades ago. This talk will draw analogies between the ordering of spheres in soft and hard materials. Present address: Rensselaser polytechnic institute, 110 8th st., Tory, NY 12180.

  1. Statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics of self-propelled hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Benjamin; Baskaran, Aparna

    2017-03-01

    Starting from a microscopic model of self-propelled hard spheres we use tools of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and the kinetic theory of hard spheres to derive a Smoluchowski equation for interacting Active Brownian particles. We illustrate the utility of the statistical mechanics framework developed with two applications. First, we derive the steady state pressure of the hard sphere active fluid in terms of the microscopic parameters and second, we identify the critical density for the onset of motility-induced phase separation in this system. We show that both these quantities agree well with overdamped simulations of active Brownian particles with excluded volume interactions given by steeply repulsive potentials. The results presented here can be used to incorporate excluded volume effects in diverse models of self-propelled particles.

  2. Capturing stealthy microswimmers into sphere-bound orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Daisuke; Palacci, Jeremie; Braunschweig, Adam; Shelley, Michael; Zhang, Jun

    2013-11-01

    In potential applications ranging from microfluidic mixing to cargo transport, microscopic swimmers must propel themselves through complex environments. However the interaction of swimmers and obstacles is not well understood. Here we study the autonomous movement of catallytically-driven Au-Pt nanorods through a suspension of solid spheres resting on a horizontal plane. Though the spheres exert no net force or torque on the rods, the rods experience a short-range attraction and orbit around the spheres with essentially no decrease in their speed. We propose that the apparent attraction and speed conservation are a consequence of lubrication effects and the phoretic propulsion mechanism of nanorods. This suggests strategies to capture various self-propelled bodies and motile cells in confined spaces.

  3. Anomalous Motion of a Sphere Falling through Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Goro; Chiba, Seiji; Kono, Kimitoshi

    1983-10-01

    A pendulum motion of a sphere falling through water under the action of gravity was studied experimentally for the Reynolds number between 1.5× 103 and 4.0× 104, and its explanation is given. The quantitative analysis of the path with stereoscopic photographs showed that the bending of the path from the vertical line occured through the action of a side force L acting perpendicularly to the path and alternating its direction with a frequency whose Strouhal number was about 0.2. Visual observation with a VIDEO revealed that the force L arose from a circulating flow around the sphere, which was generated and alternated its sense of rotation by shedding asymmetric vortex loops from alternate sides of the sphere. The lift coefficient was found to be about 0.3. The drag coefficient increased from 0.4 to 0.9 when the circulating flow reversed.

  4. The Sphere Anemometer - A Fast Alternative to Cup Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heißelmann, Hendrik; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    The main problem of cup anemometry is the different response time for increasing and decreasing wind velocities due to its moment of inertia. This results in an overestimation of wind speed under turbulent wind conditions, the so-called over-speeding. Additionally, routine calibrations are necessary due to the wear of bearings. Motivated by these problems the sphere anemometer, a new simple and robust sensor for wind velocity measurements without moving parts, was developed at the University of Oldenburg. In contrast to other known thrust-based sensors, the sphere anemometer uses the light pointer principle to detect the deflection of a bending tube caused by the drag force acting on a sphere mounted at its top. This technique allows the simultaneous determination of wind speed and direction via a two-dimensional position sensitive detector.

  5. Loop Integrands for Scattering Amplitudes from the Riemann Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Yvonne; Mason, Lionel; Monteiro, Ricardo; Tourkine, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    The scattering equations on the Riemann sphere give rise to remarkable formulas for tree-level gauge theory and gravity amplitudes. Adamo, Casali, and Skinner conjectured a one-loop formula for supergravity amplitudes based on scattering equations on a torus. We use a residue theorem to transform this into a formula on the Riemann sphere. What emerges is a framework for loop integrands on the Riemann sphere that promises to have a wide application, based on off-shell scattering equations that depend on the loop momentum. We present new formulas, checked explicitly at low points, for supergravity and super-Yang-Mills amplitudes and for n -gon integrands at one loop. Finally, we show that the off-shell scattering equations naturally extend to arbitrary loop order, and we give a proposal for the all-loop integrands for supergravity and planar super-Yang-Mills theory.

  6. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model. PMID:27386951

  7. Concept Mapping: Linking Spheres in Earth System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, K. P.; Hedley, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) distance learning courses focus teachers on linking spheres of the earth: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. The University of Toledo has offered the ESSEA middle school grade course using jigsaw pedagogy nine times since 2002. Traditionally, the ESSEA course has teachers link spheres in linear causal chains. This past year we used concept mapping as a way for the teachers and pre-service students in the class to organize their study of the events: melting of ice sheets, Mt. Pinatubo eruption, Hurricane Katrina and draining of the Great Black Swamp. Concept mapping is a good way to visualize linkages between events and spheres. The outcome was that teachers and pre-service students enjoyed concept mapping, it fostered teamwork and helped with grading the material.

  8. Radiation of charge bunches revolving around a metamaterial sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Mahmoud; Shokri, Babak

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of a relativistic uniformly rotating charge with a metamaterial sphere in the microwave range. The charge revolves around the sphere at the equatorial plane. The root mean square of the radiation field for different types of metamaterial spheres is presented and its dependence on some usual parameters is considered. They demonstrate that the radiation field is concentrated near the surface and shifts towards the centre by increasing charge energy for conventional and double-negative metamaterials. The stopping and deflection forces acting on the charge are also calculated. Finally, we generalize these results to a line charge bunch. This study has potential application in the area of high-power radiation sources and accelerators.

  9. Single particle friction tests with cellulose acetate sphere samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tuezen, U.

    1989-05-31

    This reporter represents a detailed account of all the experimental work carried out for LLNL using the ''single particle shear cell'' in the department of Chemical Process Engineering of Surrey University, Guildford, United Kingdom. Experimental work with two spheres in contact was performed. Particles were positioned into the specially made sample holders by the micro screws. The contact centres were lined up under the magnifying glass. The behavior of the interparticle contact region between the two spheres was examined by performing the following series of tests: (i) normal force versus normal displacement test, (ii) tangential force limit at gross sliding with increased normal load and decreasing normal load, (iii) tangential force versus micro displacement during initial loading to friction limit and during unloading from friction limit. Work was also performed on single sphere against a flat wall surface. Results are discussed. 34 figs.

  10. Mesoporous hollow sphere titanium dioxide photocatalysts through hydrothermal silica etching.

    PubMed

    Leshuk, Tim; Linley, Stuart; Baxter, George; Gu, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Robust, monodisperse, mesoporous titanium dioxide (TiO₂) submicrometer hollow spheres were synthesized through a single step hydrothermal silica etching reaction under mild conditions. Efficient silica (SiO₂) removal was achieved without the use of toxic reagents, and a unique controllable silica redeposition mechanism was identified, imparting the hollow spheres with excellent structural integrity. The parameters of the hydrothermal reaction affecting the etching process, including pH, temperature, and silica concentration, were systematically investigated and optimized for the production of silica-templated hollow structures. The resulting processing conditions yielded TiO₂ hollow spheres with a surface area of ∼300 m² g⁻¹ and anatase phase crystallization, which exhibited high adsorption capacity for methylene blue dye and good photocatalytic activity without requiring high-temperature calcination.

  11. Polystyrene/MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Altavilla, Claudia; Ciambelli, Paolo; Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-15

    The effects of adding different concentrations of MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nano particles on the thermal and mechanical properties of polystyrene (PS) nanocomposites have been investigated. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy were used to characterize the morphology of the resulting nanocomposites. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis. It has been found that the MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanoparticles have a good compatibility with the PS matrix forming homogeneous dispersion even at high concentrations. The PS/MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanocomposites showed enhanced thermal stability in comparison with neat polystyrene.

  12. Porous alumina based ordered nanocomposite coating for wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Arti; Muthukumar, M.; Bobji, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Uniformly dispersed nanocomposite coating of aligned metallic nanowires in a matrix of amorphous alumina is fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition of copper into the pores of porous anodic alumina. Uniform deposition is obtained by controlling the geometry of the dendritic structure at the bottom of pores through stepwise voltage reduction followed by mild etching. The tribological behaviour of this nanocomposite coating is evaluated using a ball on flat reciprocating tribometer under the dry contact conditions. The nanocomposite coating has higher wear resistance compared to corresponding porous alumina coating. Wear resistant nanocomposite coating has wide applications especially in protecting the internal surfaces of aluminium internal combustion engines.

  13. Development and characterization of piezoresistive porous TPU-MWNT nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, R.; Naguib, H.

    2014-05-01

    This study reports on the piezoresistance characterization of pressure sensing porous nanocomposites. A thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) was chosen as an elastomeric matrix, which was reinforced with multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) by high shear twin screw extrusion mixing. Porosity was introduced to the composites through the phase separation of a single TPU-carbon-dioxide gas solution. Interactions between MWNT and TPU were elucidated through rheology and electrical conductivity measurements and microstructure imaging. The piezoresistance (pressure-resistance) behavior of the nanocomposites was investigated and found to be dependent on MWNT concentration and nanocomposite microstructure. Mechanisms of piezoresistance in solid and porous nanocomposites are proposed.

  14. Sparsity-Aware Sphere Decoding: Algorithms and Complexity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Somsubhra; Vikalo, Haris

    2014-05-01

    Integer least-squares problems, concerned with solving a system of equations where the components of the unknown vector are integer-valued, arise in a wide range of applications. In many scenarios the unknown vector is sparse, i.e., a large fraction of its entries are zero. Examples include applications in wireless communications, digital fingerprinting, and array-comparative genomic hybridization systems. Sphere decoding, commonly used for solving integer least-squares problems, can utilize the knowledge about sparsity of the unknown vector to perform computationally efficient search for the solution. In this paper, we formulate and analyze the sparsity-aware sphere decoding algorithm that imposes $\\ell_0$-norm constraint on the admissible solution. Analytical expressions for the expected complexity of the algorithm for alphabets typical of sparse channel estimation and source allocation applications are derived and validated through extensive simulations. The results demonstrate superior performance and speed of sparsity-aware sphere decoder compared to the conventional sparsity-unaware sphere decoding algorithm. Moreover, variance of the complexity of the sparsity-aware sphere decoding algorithm for binary alphabets is derived. The search space of the proposed algorithm can be further reduced by imposing lower bounds on the value of the objective function. The algorithm is modified to allow for such a lower bounding technique and simulations illustrating efficacy of the method are presented. Performance of the algorithm is demonstrated in an application to sparse channel estimation, where it is shown that sparsity-aware sphere decoder performs close to theoretical lower limits.

  15. Animating Impacting Spheres with the Elastic Leidenfrost Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott; Souslov, Anton; van Hecke, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Liquid droplets impacting on hot surfaces above the Leidenfrost temperature can squeeze out the vapor layer and enter the contact boiling regime. What happens to soft but vaporizable solids, such as hydrogel spheres, under such conditions? I will show how this combination leads to sustained bouncing dynamics. The key physics is the coupling between the sphere's elastic deformations and vaporization. Beyond being a new facet of the Leidenfrost effect, this phenomenon promises to be useful in fields such as fluid dynamics, microfluidics, and active matter. NWO Veni and Vici Programs.

  16. Mesoporous Trimetallic PtPdRu Spheres as Superior Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Ataee-Esfahani, Hamed; Li, Cuiling; Alshehri, Saad M; Ahamad, Tansir; Henzie, Joel; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-05-17

    Mesoporous Trimetallic PtPdRu Spheres with well-defined spherical morphology and uniformly sized pores were synthesized in an aqueous solution using ascorbic acid as the reducing agent and triblock copolymer F127 as the pore directing agent. These mesoporous PtPdRu spheres exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity compared to commercial Pt black, resulting in a ∼4.9 times improvement in mass activity for the methanol oxidation reaction. The excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability are due to the unique mesoporous architecture and electronic landscape between different elements.

  17. Measurement of Blast Waves from Bursting Pressureized Frangible Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

  18. Torque on a sphere inside a rotating cylinder.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, B.; Levinson, E.; Caswell, B.

    1972-01-01

    A circular cylinder of finite dimensions is made to rotate around a sphere fixed in the center of the cylinder. The couple on the sphere is measured over a wide range of rotational speeds for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For the Newtonian liquids a comparison of the experimental results is made with Collins' (1955) expansion of the couple as a series in even powers of the angular Reynolds number. For non-Newtonian liquids the apparatus proves to be extremely useful for an accurate determination of the zero shear rate viscosity using only a small amount of fluid.

  19. Theoretical study of the freezing of polystyrene sphere suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical study of melting in aqueous suspensions of polystyrene spheres is presented. The Helmholtz free energies of the liquid and solid phase of the suspensions are calculated as functions of sphere number density and electrolyte concentrations. The results tend to show that the freezing curve of such suspensions is that of a conventional classical liquid with repulsive short-range interactions. The interactions can be treated satisfactorily within a slightly modified Debye-Hueckel approximation. The modifications include size correction and a correction for nonlinear screening. The results are confirmed by analogous calculations for the solid phase, and for the line along which liquid and solid free energies are equal.

  20. Stability of equilibrium of a compressible hyperelastic hollow sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipova, E. B.

    2015-07-01

    An analytical algorithm for studying the stability of the equilibrium of compressible hyperelastic sphere with Lagrange variables is proposed. The problem is solved in a spherical coordinate system in a general three-dimensional formulation using linearized stability theory and the method of separation of variables with respect to the radial displacement, the displacement due to the rotation, and the resulting strain in the principal directions. Results of numerical and graphical analysis of the stress-strain state for a three-layer-sphere are used to analyze the gravity stress-strain state of the lithosphere of the Kuril island arc system.

  1. Cluster analysis in systems of magnetic spheres and cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyanzina, E. S.; Gudkova, A. V.; Donaldson, J. G.; Kantorovich, S. S.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work we use molecular dynamics simulations and graph-theory based cluster analysis to compare self-assembly in systems of magnetic spheres, and cubes where the dipole moment is oriented along the side of the cube in the [001] crystallographic direction. We show that under the same conditions cubes aggregate far less than their spherical counterparts. This difference can be explained in terms of the volume of phase space in which the formation of the bond is thermodynamically advantageous. It follows that this volume is much larger for a dipolar sphere than for a dipolar cube.

  2. Is Random Close Packing of Spheres Well Defined?

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, S.; Truskett, T. M.; Debenedetti, P. G.

    2000-03-06

    Despite its long history, there are many fundamental issues concerning random packings of spheres that remain elusive, including a precise definition of random close packing (RCP). We argue that the current picture of RCP cannot be made mathematically precise and support this conclusion via a molecular dynamics study of hard spheres using the Lubachevsky-Stillinger compression algorithm. We suggest that this impasse can be broken by introducing the new concept of a maximally random jammed state, which can be made precise. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. Slip and flow of hard-sphere colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, P; Besseling, R; Isa, L; Petekidis, G; Poon, W C K

    2008-12-19

    We study the flow of concentrated hard-sphere colloidal suspensions along smooth, nonstick walls using cone-plate rheometry and simultaneous confocal microscopy. In the glass regime, the global flow shows a transition from Herschel-Bulkley behavior at large shear rate to a characteristic Bingham slip response at small rates, absent for ergodic colloidal fluids. Imaging reveals both the "solid" microstructure during full slip and the local nature of the "slip to shear" transition. Both the local and global flow are described by a phenomenological model, and the associated Bingham slip parameters exhibit characteristic scaling with size and concentration of the hard spheres.

  4. Thermoinertial bouncing of a relativistic collapsing sphere: A numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A.; Barreto, W.

    2006-01-15

    We present a numerical model of a collapsing radiating sphere, whose boundary surface undergoes bouncing due to a decreasing of its inertial mass density (and, as expected from the equivalence principle, also of the 'gravitational' force term) produced by the 'inertial' term of the transport equation. This model exhibits for the first time the consequences of such an effect, and shows that under physically reasonable conditions this decreasing of the gravitational term in the dynamic equation may be large enough as to revert the collapse and produce a bouncing of the boundary surface of the sphere.

  5. The Diverging Sphere and the Rib in Prompt Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; McGuire, E; Garza, R; Roeske, F; Vitello, P

    2002-05-03

    Steady state corner-turning in the rib is possible if R{sub 0}/R{sub 1} << 0.15, where R{sub 0} is the half-width and R{sub 1} the inner radius. For thicker ribs, the kinetics will further slow the turn. A steady state turn will have a symmetrical detonation front. The inverse radius relation appears to hold for the diverging sphere, at least for large radii. The reaction zone lengths for diverging spheres and ratesticks increase with the radius of curvature and are comparable.

  6. Chemical potential of a test hard sphere of variable size in a hard-sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, David M.; Santos, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    The Labík and Smith Monte Carlo simulation technique to implement the Widom particle insertion method is applied using Molecular Dynamics (MD) instead to calculate numerically the insertion probability, P0(η ,σ0) , of tracer hard-sphere (HS) particles of different diameters, σ0, in a host HS fluid of diameter σ and packing fraction, η , up to 0.5. It is shown analytically that the only polynomial representation of -ln ⁡P0 (η ,σ0) consistent with the limits σ0→0 and σ0→∞ has necessarily a cubic form, c0(η ) +c1(η ) σ0 /σ +c2(η ) (σ0/σ ) 2 +c3(η ) (σ0/σ ) 3 . Our MD data for -ln ⁡P0 (η ,σ0) are fitted to such a cubic polynomial and the functions c0(η ) and c1(η ) are found to be statistically indistinguishable from their exact solution forms. Similarly, c2(η ) and c3(η ) agree very well with the Boublík-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland and Boublík-Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa formulas. The cubic polynomial is extrapolated (high density) or interpolated (low density) to obtain the chemical potential of the host fluid, or σ0→σ , as β μex =c0+c1+c2+c3 . Excellent agreement between the Carnahan-Starling and Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa theories with our MD data is evident.

  7. Self-assembly in colloidal hard-sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filion, L. C.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we examine the phase behaviour and nucleation in a variety of hard-sphere systems. In Chapter 1 we present a short introduction and describe some of the simulation techniques used in this thesis. One of the main difficulties in predicting the phase behaviour in colloidal, atomic and nanoparticle systems is in determining the stable crystalline phases. To address this problem, in Chapters 2 and 4 we present two different methods for predicting possible crystal phases. In Chapter 2, we apply a genetic algorithm to binary hard-sphere mixtures and use it to predict the best-packed structures for this system. In Chapter 4 we present a novel method based on Monte Carlo simulations to predict possible crystalline structures for a variety of models. When the possible phases are known, full free-energy calculations can be used to predict the phase diagrams. This is the focus of Chapters 3 and 5. In Chapter 3, we examine the phase behaviour for binary hard-sphere mixtures with size ratios of the large and small spheres between 0.74 and 0.85. Between size ratios 0.76 and 0.84 we find regions where the binary Laves phases are stable, in addition to monodisperse face-centered-cubic (FCC) crystals of the large and small spheres and a binary liquid. For size ratios 0.74 and 0.85 we find only the monodisperse FCC crystals and the binary liquid. In Chapter 5 we examine the phase behaviour of binary hard-sphere mixtures with size ratios between 0.3 and 0.42. In this range, we find an interstitial solid solution (ISS) to be stable, as well as FCC crystals of the small and large spheres, and a binary fluid. The ISS phase consists of an FCC crystal of the large particles with some of the octahedral holes filled by smaller particles. We show that this filling fraction can be tuned from 0 to 100%. Additionally, we examine the diffusive properties of the small particles in the ISS for size ratio 0.3. In contrast to most systems, we find a region where the diffusion

  8. Polyimide nanocomposites based on cubic zirconium tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian Sharma, Gayathri

    2009-12-01

    In this research, cubic zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) was used as a filler to reduce the CTE of polyimides (PI), and the effect of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles on the bulk polymer properties was studied. Polyimides are high performance polymers with exceptional thermal stability, and there is a need for PIs with low CTEs for high temperature applications. The nanofiller, cubic ZrW2O8, is well known for its isotropic negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide temperature range from -272.7 to 777°C. The preparation of nanocomposites involved the synthesis of ZrW 2O8 nanofiller, engineering the polymer-filler interface using linker groups and optimization of processing strategies to prepare free-standing PI nanocomposite films. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles. Polyimide-ZrW2O8 interface interaction was enhanced by covalently bonding linker moieties to the surface of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. Specifically, ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles were functionalized with two different linker groups: (1) a short aliphatic silane, and (2) low molecular weight PI. The surface functionalization was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Reprecipitation blending was used to prepare the freestanding PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposite films with up to 15 volume% filler loading. SEM images showed the improvements in polymer-filler wetting behavior achieved using interface engineering. SEM images indicated that there was better filler dispersion in the PI matrix using reprecipitation blending, compared to the filler dispersion achieved in the nanocomposites prepared using conventional blending technique. The structure-property relationships in PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposites were investigated by studying the thermal degradation, glass transition, tensile and thermal expansion properties of the nanocomposites. The properties were studied as a function of filler loading and interface linker groups. Addition of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not

  9. Nano-composite Structures for OPV Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Henning

    2010-11-23

    Improved material for use in organic photovoltaics (OPV) devices, also called polymer-solar cells (PSC), has been developed. Increased ordering of the active layer of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) cells has been achieved by the use of inert silica spheres in conjunction with suitable fullerene derivatives. Silica spheres with average diameters between 10 and 15 nm, consistent with the exciton diffusion length in the active layer, have been added. The potential for significantly improved device performance due to a higher degree of photon absorption, enabled by increased light scattering, and a maximized interface between electron donor and acceptor, ensuring efficient exciton dissociation, has been demonstrated. A method allowing for the covalent attachment of fullerene derivatives to the silica sphere surface has been developed.

  10. Preparation of nanocrystals and nanocomposites of nanocrystal-conjugated polymer, and their photophysical properties in confined geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductors nanocrystals (NCs), also called quantum dots (QDs), have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade in the fields of physics, chemistry, and engineering. Due to the quantum-confined nature of QDs, the variation of particle size provides continuous and predictable changes in fluorescence emission. On the other hand, conjugated polymers (CPs) have been extensively studied for two decades due to their semiconductor-like optical and electronic properties. The electron and energy transfer between NCs and CPs occur in solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs), respectively. Placing CPs in direct contact with a NC (i.e., preparing NC-CP nanocomposites) carries advantage over cases where NC aggregation dominates. Such NC-CP nanocomposites possess a well-defined interface that significantly promotes the charge or energy transfer between these two components. However, very few studies have centered on such direct integration. We prepared NCs and NC-CP nanocomposites based on heck coupling and investigated the energy and charge transfer between semiconductor NCs (i.e., CdSe QDs), CPs (i.e., poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT)) in the nanocomposites in confined geometries. Two novel strategies were used to confine NC and/or NC-CP nanocomposites: (a) directly immobilizing nanohybrids, QDs and nanorods in nanoscopic porous alumina membrane (PAM) , and (b) confining the QDs and CPs in sphere-on-flat geometry to induce self-assembly. While investigating the confinement effect, gradient concentric ring patterns of high regularity form spontaneously simply by allowing a droplet of solution containing either conjugated polymer or semiconductor nanocrystal in a consecutive stick-slip mothion in a confined geometry. Such constrained evaporation can be utilized as a simple, cheap, and robust strategy for self-assembling various materials with easily tailored optical and electronic properties into spatially ordered, two-dimensional patterns. These self

  11. Preparation of nanocrystals and nanocomposites of nanocrystal-conjugated polymer, and their photophysical properties in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun

    Semiconductors nanocrystals (NCs), also called quantum dots (QDs), have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade in the fields of physics, chemistry, and engineering. Due to the quantum-confined nature of QDs, the variation of particle size provides continuous and predictable changes in fluorescence emission. On the other hand, conjugated polymers (CPs) have been extensively studied for two decades due to their semiconductor-like optical and electronic properties. The electron and energy transfer between NCs and CPs occur in solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs), respectively. Placing CPs in direct contact with a NC (i.e., preparing NC-CP nanocomposites) carries advantage over cases where NC aggregation dominates. Such NC-CP nanocomposites possess a well-defined interface that significantly promotes the charge or energy transfer between these two components. However, very few studies have centered on such direct integration. We prepared NCs and NC-CP nanocomposites based on heck coupling and investigated the energy and charge transfer between semiconductor NCs (i.e., CdSe QDs), CPs (i.e., poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT)) in the nanocomposites in confined geometries. Two novel strategies were used to confine NC and/or NC-CP nanocomposites: (a) directly immobilizing nanohybrids, QDs and nanorods in nanoscopic porous alumina membrane (PAM), and (b) confining the QDs and CPs in sphere-on-flat geometry to induce self-assembly. While investigating the confinement effect, gradient concentric ring patterns of high regularity form spontaneously simply by allowing a droplet of solution containing either conjugated polymer or semiconductor nanocrystal in a consecutive stick-slip motion in a confined geometry. Such constrained evaporation can be utilized as a simple, cheap, and robust strategy for self-assembling various materials with easily tailored optical and electronic properties into spatially ordered, two-dimensional patterns. These self

  12. PBS/chitosan and polyolefin nanocomposites: Synthesis, properties and biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwary, Md. Fakhruddin

    The current study focuses on the synthesis of biodegradable polymer nanocomposites as alternative to conventional composite systems. In this study, biodegradable nanocomposites of chitosan and PBS blend were generated (type 1 composites) utilizing graphene, silica and silicate as fillers. Nanocomposites of non-biodegradable PE and PP were also produced using the same fillers along with a functional additive, which enables the polymers to degrade (type 2 composites). Suitable weight ratio of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and chitosan (Cs) to prepare nanocomposites was identified based on the ease of processing, better mixing ability of the fillers with the matrix materials and the mechanical properties of the composites. The nanocomposites were characterized for their thermal, rheological, mechanical and morphological properties. It was observed that graphene incorporation provided the best improvement in Young's modulus and storage modulus in all cases. Thermal degradation resistance of the graphene nanocomposites was also the highest. Storage modulus, loss modulus and viscosity of nano-composites enhanced as a function of filler content. XRD analysis indicated that chitosan was well mixed with PBS and slight changes in crystallinity for both PE and PP nanocomposites were observed on incorporation of filler. The chitosan-PBS nanocomposites were observed to biodegrade as a function of time during the soil burial test. Bio-degradation was, in general, slowed down by the presence of fillers. MINITAB 16 software could be utilized to model and predict the elastic modulus of PBS-Cs nanocomposites based on DMA and shear rheology data. The preliminary degradation studies of PE and PE nanocomposites with 2.5% additive exhibited varying degrees of degradation in all the samples.

  13. Template method synthesis of mesoporous carbon spheres and its applications as supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon spheres (MCS) have been fabricated from structured mesoporous silica sphere using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ethylene as a carbon feedstock. The mesoporous carbon spheres have a high specific surface area of 666.8 m2/g and good electrochemical properties. The mechanism of formation mesoporous carbon spheres (carbon spheres) is investigated. The important thing is a surfactant hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), which accelerates the process of carbon deposition. An additional advantage of this surfactant is an increase the yield of product. These mesoporous carbon spheres, which have good electrochemical properties is suitable for supercapacitors. PMID:22643113

  14. Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes

    DOEpatents

    Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-21

    Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

  15. Graphite oxide flame-retardant polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Amanda L; Lomeda, Jay R; Morgan, Alexander B; Tour, James M

    2009-10-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) polymer nanocomposites were developed at 1, 5, and 10 wt % GO with polycarbonate (PC), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, and high-impact polystyrene for the purpose of evaluating the flammability reduction and material properties of the resulting systems. The overall morphology and dispersion of GO within the polymer nanocomposites were studied by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy; GO was found to be well-dispersed throughout the matrix without the formation of large aggregates. Mechanical testing was performed using dynamic mechanical analysis to measure the storage modulus, which increased for all polymer systems with increased GO loading. Microscale oxygen consumption calorimetry revealed that the addition of GO reduced the total heat release and peak heat release rates in all systems, and GO-PC composites demonstrated very fast self-extinguishing times in vertical open flame tests, which are important to some regulatory fire safety applications.

  16. Investigation on Curcumin nanocomposite for wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubbu, G Devanand; Anusuya, T

    2017-02-03

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has a long history of use in medicine as a treatment for inflammatory conditions. The primary active constituent of turmeric and the one responsible for its vibrant yellow color is curcumin. Curcumin is used for treatment of wound and inflammation. It had antimicrobial and antioxidant property. It has low intrinsic toxicity and magnificent properties like with comparatively lesser side-effects. Cotton cloth is one of the most successful wound dressings which utilize the intrinsic properties of cotton fibers. Modern wound dressings, however, require other properties such as antibacterial and moisture maintaining capabilities. In this study, conventional cotton cloth was coated with Curcumin composite for achieving modern wound dressing properties. Curcumin nanocomposite is characterized. The results show that coated cotton cloth with Curcumin nanocomposite has increased drying time (74%) and water absorbency (50%). Furthermore, they show antibacterial efficiency against bacterial species present in wounds.

  17. Cuprous Ion Conducting Montmorillonite- Polypyrrole Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishantha, D. M. M.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Tennakoon, D. T. B.; Bandara, W. M. A. T.; Thilakarathna, P. N. L.

    2006-06-01

    Solid state polymer-Silicate nanocomposite based on Polypyrrole-Cu+-montmorilonite were prepared and electrical properties were investigated. In this preparation, Na-montmorillonite (Na+-MMT) was purified by repeated washing with distilled water and the intergallery cations were exchanged for Cu(II). The cupric ions exchanged-MMT(Cu(II)-- MMT) was again exposed to pyrrole in aqueous acidic solution to yield polypyrrole-Cu+-MMT nanocomposite. DC polarization test and AC impedance measurement reveal that the materials are mixed conductors. The ionic conductivity is due to the motion of cuprous ions which is facilitated by microstructure of polypyrrrole present in the intergalleries. An electrochemical cell was fabricated using the materials which can be represented by Cu(s)/ Cu+-PPY-MMT/Cu2SO4 (s)/Na2SO4(S)-Na2S2O8(s)/ and gave a 1.00 V. The cell is rechargeable.

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Novel Montmorillonite Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansa, Rola

    Clay minerals have historically played a consequential role in human health. While the beginnings were rooted in geophagy, a primitive act of consuming earth, the health-related uses of clay minerals have evolved and diversified over time.. As excipients in pharmaceutical formulations, clay minerals can attribute novel properties onto intercalated compounds. Intercalating oxybenzone, a UV filter, within the interlamellar space of montmorillonite is desirable in order to minimize direct contact with skin. Intercalating resveratrol, a compound known for attributing beneficial effects onto human health, may be advantageous since this compound is susceptible to cis-trans isomerisation. The strategy of using alkylammonium--modified clay was undertaken and proved successful for the intercalation of oxybenzone. The field of biopolymer/layered silicate nanocomposites is heavily researched for use in a multitude of applications. Novel montmorillonite nanocomposites were prepared with neutral guar gum and cationic guar gum, using an environmentally friendly process and are fully characterized.

  19. Cellulose nanocrystal reinforced oxidized natural rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Marcos; El Kissi, Nadia; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-02-10

    Natural rubber (NR) latex particles were oxidized using KMnO4 as oxidant to promote the insertion of hydroxyl groups in the surface polyisoprene chains. Different degrees of oxidation were investigated. Both unoxidized and oxidized NR (ONR) latex were used to prepare nanocomposite films reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by casting/evaporation. The oxidation of NR was carried out to promote chemical interactions between the hydroxyl groups of ONR with those of CNCs through hydrogen bonding. The effect of the degree of oxidation of the NR latex on the rheological behavior of CNC/NR and CNC/ONR suspensions, as well as on the mechanical, swelling and thermal properties of ensuing nanocomposites was investigated. Improved properties were observed for intermediate degrees of oxidation but they were found to degrade for higher oxidation levels.

  20. Dynamics in Polymer Melts and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gerald

    Intense research has led to substantial progress in the field of polymer melts and nanocomposites, both regarding the fundamental understanding and the relationship to applications. From a fundamental point of view, knowing the microscopic single chain dynamics is important. It may even lead to optimized materials ranging from the classical car tire to battery or fuel cell applications. In polymer melts, different processes, such as diffusion, reptation, contour length fluctuations, etc. occur and determine the macroscopic results, e.g. obtained by rheology. In nanocomposites confinement effects and interactions of chains with surfaces play an important role. High resolution techniques, such as small-angle neutron scattering or neutron spin echo spectroscopy are suited to explore the structure and dynamics of chains. The presentation illuminates the fundamental relationship between the microscopic dynamics and the mesoscopic properties, exploiting different experimental techniques, such as dielectric spectroscopy, rheology, neutron scattering and neutron spin echo spectroscopy.

  1. Reversible Thermal Stiffening in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Senses, Erkan; Isherwood, Andrew; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-07-15

    Miscible polymer blends with different glass transition temperatures (Tg) are known to create confined interphases between glassy and mobile chains. Here, we show that nanoparticles adsorbed with a high-Tg polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), and dispersed in a low-Tg matrix polymer, poly(ethylene oxide), exhibit a liquid-to-solid transition at temperatures above Tg's of both polymers. The mechanical adaptivity of nanocomposites to temperature underlies the existence of dynamically asymmetric bound layers on nanoparticles and more importantly reveals their impact on macroscopic mechanical response of composites. The unusual reversible stiffening behavior sets these materials apart from conventional polymer composites that soften upon heating. The presented stiffening mechanism in polymer nanocomposites can be used in applications for flexible electronics or mechanically induced actuators responding to environmental changes like temperature or magnetic fields.

  2. Nanocomposite and method of making thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Milliron, Delia J.; Llordes, Anna

    2016-03-15

    An embodiment of an inorganic nanocomposite includes a nanoparticle phase and a matrix phase. The nanoparticle phase includes nanoparticles that are arranged in a repeating structure. In an embodiment, the nanoparticles have a spherical or pseudo-spherical shape and are incompatible with hydrazine. In another embodiment, the nanoparticles have neither a spherical nor pseudo-spherical shape. The matrix phase lies between the nanoparticles of the nanoparticle phase. An embodiment of a method of making an inorganic nanocomposite of the present invention includes forming a nanoparticle superlattice on a substrate. The nanoparticle superlattice includes nanoparticles. Each nanoparticle has organic ligands attached to a surface of the nanoparticle. The organic ligands separate adjacent nanoparticles within the nanoparticle superlattice. The method also includes forming a solution that includes an inorganic precursor. The nanoparticle superlattice is placed in the solution for a sufficient time for the inorganic precursor to replace the organic ligands.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Polyimide Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Many properties of polymeric materials can be enhanced by dispersing small quantities of clay nanocomposites throughout the polymer. Among the enhancements are increases in modulus and resistance to erosion by atomic oxygen and reductions in thermal expansivity, gas permeability, and flammability. To achieve the full extent of enhancement with these polymer-clay nanocomposites, the clay nanoparticles, which have thicknesses of only one-to-several nanometers and lengths and widths of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers, must be exfoliated one from another and then individually dispersed throughout the polymer. This dispersion is achieved only after alkali metal cations (usually Na(+)) that reside on the surfaces of the nanoparticles have been replaced by organocations (typically a quaternary amine cation). This renders the surface of the nanoparticle a more hospitable interface for the organic polymer matrix. Following the cation exchange, the organic clay is either mixed directly into the polymer or is dispersed in monomer which is later polymerized around the nanoparticle.

  4. Graphitic carbon nitride based nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaiwang; Sun, Yanjuan; Dong, Fan

    2015-01-07

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C(3)N(4)), as an intriguing earth-abundant visible light photocatalyst, possesses a unique two-dimensional structure, excellent chemical stability and tunable electronic structure. Pure g-C(3)N(4) suffers from rapid recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pairs resulting in low photocatalytic activity. Because of the unique electronic structure, the g-C(3)N(4) could act as an eminent candidate for coupling with various functional materials to enhance the performance. According to the discrepancies in the photocatalytic mechanism and process, six primary systems of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites can be classified and summarized: namely, the g-C(3)N(4) based metal-free heterojunction, the g-C(3)N(4)/single metal oxide (metal sulfide) heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/composite oxide, the g-C(3)N(4)/halide heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/noble metal heterostructures, and the g-C(3)N(4) based complex system. Apart from the depiction of the fabrication methods, heterojunction structure and multifunctional application of the g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites, we emphasize and elaborate on the underlying mechanisms in the photocatalytic activity enhancement of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites. The unique functions of the p-n junction (semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures), the Schottky junction (metal/semiconductor heterostructures), the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, photosensitization, superconductivity, etc. are utilized in the photocatalytic processes. Furthermore, the enhanced performance of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites has been widely employed in environmental and energetic applications such as photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, photocatalytic hydrogen generation, carbon dioxide reduction, disinfection, and supercapacitors. This critical review ends with a summary and some perspectives on the challenges and new directions in exploring g-C(3)N(4)-based advanced nanomaterials.

  5. Cirrus Dopant Nano-Composite Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Nickel Phosphorus versus cirrus Zr nano-composite Nickel Phosphorus on Magnesium cirrus wear resistance 590 1025 1,045 0 200 400 600 800...micron duplex Nickel versus cirrus Ti nano- composite Nickel on Mild Steel cirrus corrosion resistance Duplex Ni Cirrus Ti doped Ni 340 430 503 0...100 200 300 400 500 600 HARDNESS (HV) MICROHARDNESS - ELECTROPLATED NICKEL STANDARD DC PLATED DOPED DC PLATED DOPED PULSE PLATED ↑48% 10

  6. Silver Sodalites Novel Optically Responsive Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    00 0 01- SILVER SODALITES 00 NOVEL OPTICALLY RESPONSIVE NANOCOMPOSITES By Geoffrey A. Ozin+, Andreas Stein+, John P. Godber* and Galen D. Stucky# D...93106 2 A range of novel silver sodalites have been synthesized. These solid state microstructures are viewed as p g silver salts omprised of nar...enployed to interrogate the structre and properties of the parent silver sodalites , as well as the dmical and physical transformations of the

  7. Insitu grafting silica nanoparticles reinforced nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-Rui; Duan, Jiu-Fang; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-10-01

    Highly flexible nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared by using silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as fillers and multi-functional cross-links to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by free radical polymerization from an aqueous solution. The SNPs were collected by neighboring polymer chains and dispersed uniformly within a PAA matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were tailored by the concentration of SNPs according to the percolation model. It was proposed that covalent bonds of adsorbed chains on the filler surface resulted in the formation of a shell of an immobilized glassy layer and trapped entanglements, where the glassy polymer layer greatly enhanced the elastic modulus and the release of trapped entanglements at deformation contributed to the viscoelastic properties.Highly flexible nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared by using silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as fillers and multi-functional cross-links to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by free radical polymerization from an aqueous solution. The SNPs were collected by neighboring polymer chains and dispersed uniformly within a PAA matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were tailored by the concentration of SNPs according to the percolation model. It was proposed that covalent bonds of adsorbed chains on the filler surface resulted in the formation of a shell of an immobilized glassy layer and trapped entanglements, where the glassy polymer layer greatly enhanced the elastic modulus and the release of trapped entanglements at deformation contributed to the viscoelastic properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: FTIR spectra of SNP after silane treatment, dynamic oscillatory shear measurements as a function of frequency, constrained polymer chain analysis by a change in the peak height in loss factor spectra, molecular weight of grafted chains at different stages of gelation, prediction of the SNP reinforcing mechanism in the

  8. Casimir Forces Between Thermally Activated Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    M6xico, Circuito de la Investigaci6n Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria , M6xico, DF, 04510, M6xico. ABSTRACT We present a theoretical study of the...function of the slabs is needed. For a nanocomposite slab made of a host material with a dielectric function cj,(o) and inclusions with dielectric...8-2a wheref is the volume fraction of the inclusions and ox is the effective polarizability given by the Maxwell Garnett theory. This expression for

  9. Asphaltenes-based polymer nano-composites

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, III, Daniel E

    2013-12-17

    Inventive composite materials are provided. The composite is preferably a nano-composite, and comprises an asphaltene, or a mixture of asphaltenes, blended with a polymer. The polymer can be any polymer in need of altered properties, including those selected from the group consisting of epoxies, acrylics, urethanes, silicones, cyanoacrylates, vulcanized rubber, phenol-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde, urea-formaldehyde, imides, esters, cyanate esters, allyl resins.

  10. Labeling Cells with Silver/Dendrimer Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    labeling. A PAMAME5.NH 2 dendrimer was used as a template to prepare first a silver -dendrimer complex in an aqueous solution at biologic pH=7.4...electron microscope operating at 200 kV. Samples were prepared by mounting a drop of aqueous solutions of nanoparticles on carbon-coated copper grids...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP019741 TITLE: Labeling Cells with Silver /Dendrimer Nanocomposites

  11. Improved transmittance measurement with a magnesium oxide coated integrating sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. L.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Simple and convenient technique has been found for extending transmittance measurement capability of conventional magnesium oxide coated integrating sphere system at low (near ultraviolet) wavelengths. Technique can be used to determine effect of contaminants on window materials and can also be used for measurements on thermal control coatings and telescope mirrors.

  12. Galileon hairs of Dyson spheres, Vainshtein's coiffure and hirsute bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio; Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2011-10-01

    We study the fields of spherically symmetric thin shell sources, a.k.a. Dyson spheres, in a fully nonlinear covariant theory of gravity with the simplest galileon field. We integrate exactly all the field equations once, reducing them to first order nonlinear equations. For the simplest galileon, static solutions come on six distinct branches. On one, a Dyson sphere surrounds itself with a galileon hair, which far away looks like a hair of any Brans-Dicke field. The hair changes below the Vainshtein scale, where the extra galileon terms dominate the minimal gradients of the field. Their hair looks more like a fuzz, because the galileon terms are suppressed by the derivative of the volume determinant. It shuts off the `hair bunching' over the `angular' 2-sphere. Hence the fuzz remains dilute even close to the source. This is really why the Vainshtein's suppression of the modifications of gravity works close to the source. On the other five branches, the static solutions are all singular far from the source, and shuttered off from asymptotic infinity. One of them, however, is really the self-accelerating branch, and the singularity is removed by turning on time dependence. We give examples of regulated solutions, where the Dyson sphere explodes outward, and its self-accelerating side is nonsingular. These constructions may open channels for nonperturbative transitions between branches, which need to be addressed further to determine phenomenological viability of multi-branch gravities.

  13. Network and the Fragmentation of the Public Sphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassi, Sinikka

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on two main communication technology themes: debate on the contemporary cultural turn predicted by new technologies; and implications of that disputed turn for some core concepts of the public sphere. Presents a series of elemental analyses regarding whether the Internet strengthens the political model of representation and lobbyism rather…

  14. Determination of meteor flux distribution over the celestial sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Belkovich, O. I.; Filimonova, T. K.; Sidorov, V. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of determination of meteor flux density distribution over the celestial sphere is discussed. The flux density was derived from observations by radar together with measurements of angles of arrival of radio waves reflected from meteor trails. The role of small meteor showers over the sporadic background is shown.

  15. Affine sphere spacetimes which satisfy the relativity principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Lorentz-Finsler spacetime theories the relativity principle holds at a spacetime point if the indicatrix (observer space) is homogeneous. We point out that in four spacetime dimensions there are just three kinematical models which respect an exact form of the relativity principle and for which all observers agree on the spacetime volume. They have necessarily affine sphere indicatrices. For them every observer which looks at a flash of light emitted by a point would observe, respectively, an expanding (a) sphere, (b) tetrahedron, or (c) cone, with barycenter at the point. The first model corresponds to Lorentzian relativity, the second one has been studied by several authors though the relationship with affine spheres passed unnoticed, and the last one has not been previously recognized and it is studied here in some detail. The symmetry groups are O+(3 ,1 ),R3,O+(2 ,1 )×R , respectively. In the second part, devoted to the general relativistic theory, we show that the field equations can be obtained by gauging the Finsler Lagrangian symmetry while avoiding direct use of Finslerian curvatures. We construct some notable affine sphere spacetimes which in the appropriate velocity limit return the Schwarzschild, Kerr-Schild, Kerr-de Sitter, Kerr-Newman, Taub, and Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetimes, respectively.

  16. Elucidations on the Reciprocal Lattice and the Ewald Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foadi, J.; Evans, G.

    2008-01-01

    The reciprocal lattice is derived through the Fourier transform of a generic crystal lattice, as done previously in the literature. A few key derivations are this time handled in detail, and the connection with x-ray diffraction is clearly pointed out. The Ewald sphere is subsequently thoroughly explained and a few comments on its representation…

  17. Process for the production of sintered bauxite spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lunghofer, E.P.; Mortensen, S.; Ward, A.P.

    1984-04-03

    A process is disclosed for producing high strength sintered bauxite spheres usable as fracture propping agents in oil or gas wells. Proppants are produced by continuous spray-granulation of an aqueous binder-containing aluminous ore suspension to form granules which are subsequently sintered. Suitable starting materials include ores of high aluminum silicate content.

  18. Topological lifetimes of polydisperse colloidal hard spheres at a wall.

    PubMed

    Dullens, Roel P A; Kegel, Willem K

    2005-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study the behavior of dense suspensions of model colloidal hard spheres at a single wall. Due to the slight polydispersity, our system shows a reentrant melting transition at high densities involving a hexatic structure [Phys. Rev. Lett 92, 195702 (2004)

  19. Rotation-triggered path instabilities of rising spheres and cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathai, Varghese; Zhu, Xiaojue; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    Path-instabilities are a common observation in the dynamics of buoyant particles in flows. However, the factors leading to the onset of oscillatory motion have remained difficult to predict even for simple bodies such as bubbles, spheres and cylinders. In literature, two quantities are considered to control the buoyancy-driven dynamics for isotropic bodies (spheres and cylinders); they are the particle's density relative to the fluid (Γ ≡ρp /ρf) and its Galileo number (Ga). In contrast to this picture, we show that buoyant spheres (as well as cylinders) can exhibit dramatically different modes of vibration and wake-shedding patterns under seemingly identical conditions (Γ and Ga fixed). These effects stem from the simplest of changes in the mass distribution of the particle (hollow to solid sphere), which changes its rotational inertia. We show that rotation can couple with the particle's translational motion and trigger distinctly different wake-induced oscillatory motions. The present findings also provide an explanation for the wide variation that is witnessed in the dynamics of buoyant isotropic bodies.

  20. Stability of solid phases in the dipolar hard sphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, D.; Weis, J.-J.

    2011-12-01

    Free energy differences between solid phases of dipolar hard spheres are estimated by Monte Carlo simulation using a nonequilibrium work method. These calculations allow one to determine which of the considered phases has the minimum free energy. The phase diagram which we obtain is confirmed by simulations in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble over a wide region of the density and temperature domain.

  1. Sphere-based calibration method for trinocular vision sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rui; Shao, Mingwei

    2017-03-01

    A new method to calibrate a trinocular vision sensor is proposed and two main tasks are finished in this paper, i.e. to determine the transformation matrix between each two cameras and the trifocal tensor of the trinocular vision sensor. A flexible sphere target with several spherical circles is designed. As the isotropy of a sphere, trifocal tensor of the three cameras can be determined exactly from the feature on the sphere target. Then the fundamental matrix between each two cameras can be obtained. Easily, compatible rotation matrix and translation matrix can be deduced base on the singular value decomposition of the fundamental matrix. In our proposed calibration method, image points are not requested one-to-one correspondence. When image points locates in the same feature are obtained, the transformation matrix between each two cameras with the trifocal tensor of trinocular vision sensor can be determined. Experiment results show that the proposed calibration method can obtain precise results, including measurement and matching results. The root mean square error of distance is 0.026 mm with regard to the view field of about 200×200 mm and the feature matching of three images is strict. As a sphere projection is not concerned with its orientation, the calibration method is robust and with an easy operation. Moreover, our calibration method also provides a new approach to obtain the trifocal tensor.

  2. FIRST Robotics, Gulfport High, StenniSphere, Bo Clarke, mentor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Bo Clarke, mentor for Gulfport High School's Team Fusion, offers strategy tips to students and coaches during the FIRST Robotics Competition kickoff held at StenniSphere on Jan. 7. Clarke is the lead building and infrastructure specialist for NASA's Shared Services Center at Stennis Space Center.

  3. Tangent Sphere Model. An Analog to Chemical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Ethel L.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Tangent Sphere Model (TSM) in introducing chemical structure to beginning chemistry students at both the secondary school and college levels. Describes various applications of the use of such models, including instruction of the atom's kernel and valence electrons. (TW)

  4. Passive control of a sphere by complex-shaped appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Olivieri, Stefano; Mazzino, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Appendages of various shapes and sizes (e.g. plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins) play an important role in dispersion and locomotion. In our previous work (Lacis, U. et al. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking. Nat. Commun. 5:5310, doi: 10.1038/ncomms6310, 2014), we showed that a free-falling cylinder with a splitter plate turns and drifts due to a symmetry-breaking instability (called inverted-pendulum instability or IPL). In other words, in a separated flow, the straight position of a short splitter plate is unstable and as a consequence a side force and a torque are induced on the cylinder. In this work, we seek the three-dimensional (3D) appendage shape (on a sphere at Re =200) that induces the largest drift of the sphere. We find that highly non-trivial shapes of appendages on a sphere increase the side force significantly compared to trivial shapes (such as an elliptic sheet). We also find that appendages may be designed to generate drift in either direction, that is, a free-falling sphere can drift either in the direction in which appendage is tilted or in the opposite direction depending on the particular geometry of the appendage. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind these optimal appendage shapes in the context of the IPL instability.

  5. Temperature dependent surface modification of silica spheres with methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Jo, Dong-Hyun; Lim, Sae-Han; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Do-gyun

    2014-09-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the C=O stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  6. Fabrication of large area nanostructures with surface modified silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2014-03-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the CO stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  7. Superconducting Sphere in an External Magnetic Field Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sazonov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give the intelligible procedure for undergraduate students to grasp proof of the fact that the magnetic field outside the hollow superconducting sphere (superconducting shell) coincides with the field of a point magnetic dipole both when an uniform external magnetic field is applied as when a ferromagnetic sphere…

  8. Gravitation- And Conduction-Driven Melting In A Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    Simplifying assumptions lead to approximate closed-form solution. Theoretical paper discusses melting of solid sphere in spherical container. Develops mathematical model of melting process, based in part on simplifying assumptions like those used in theories of lubrication and film condensation. Resulting equation for melting speed as function of melting distance solved approximately in closed form.

  9. Rowlinson’s concept of an effective hard sphere diameter

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Attention is drawn to John Rowlinson’s idea that the repulsive portion of the intermolecular interaction may be replaced by a temperature-dependent hard sphere diameter. It is this approximation that made the development of perturbation theory possible for realistic fluids whose intermolecular interactions have a steep, but finite, repulsion at short separations. PMID:20953320

  10. Graphene-silicone elastomer nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shuyang

    The incorporation of fillers to improve the Young's modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at failure of polymeric matrices is ubiquitous. While Young's modulus and tensile strength of the matrix increase with the filler concentration, a threshold filler concentration must be achieved for the elongation at failure to increase. Furthermore, a decrease in elongation at failure has also been observed beyond a critical filler concentration. While the increases in modulus and tensile strength have been attributed to the transfer of mechanical load to the stronger filler, the onset and reversal in elongation at failure are not understood. In this thesis, we use a functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) -- silicone elastomer (SE) nanocomposite as a model system to demonstrate the mechanisms responsible for this observed filler concentration-dependant elongation at failure as well its subsequent reversal. We will also demonstrate the mechanisms that create the continual increase in tensile strength as filler concentration increases. As the lateral size of FGS strongly influences the tensile strength of the resulting composite, in the first part of this thesis, we show that the oxidation path and the mechanical energy input influence the size of graphene oxide sheets derived from graphite oxide. The cross-planar oxidation of graphite from the (0002) plane results in periodic cracking of the uppermost graphene oxide layer, limiting its lateral dimension to less than 30 microm. We use an energy balance between the elastic strain energy associated with the undulation of graphene oxide sheets at the hydroxyl and epoxy sites, the crack formation energy, and the interaction energy between graphene layers to determine the cell size of the cracks. Under both edge-to-center and cross-planar oxidations, the size of graphene oxide sheets is determined by the aspect ratio of graphite and the mechanical energy input in processing the sheets. In the second part of this thesis, we use

  11. Can the Equivalent Sphere Model Approximate Organ Doses in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    For space radiation protection it is often useful to calculate dose or dose,equivalent in blood forming organs (BFO). It has been customary to use a 5cm equivalent sphere to. simulate the BFO dose. However, many previous studies have concluded that a 5cm sphere gives very different dose values from the exact BFO values. One study [1] . concludes that a 9 cm sphere is a reasonable approximation for BFO'doses in solar particle event environments. In this study we use a deterministic radiation transport [2] to investigate the reason behind these observations and to extend earlier studies. We take different space radiation environments, including seven galactic cosmic ray environments and six large solar particle events, and calculate the dose and dose equivalent in the skin, eyes and BFO using their thickness distribution functions from the CAM (Computerized Anatomical Man) model [3] The organ doses have been evaluated with a water or aluminum shielding of an areal density from 0 to 20 g/sq cm. We then compare with results from the equivalent sphere model and determine in which cases and at what radius parameters the equivalent sphere model is a reasonable approximation. Furthermore, we address why the equivalent sphere model is not a good approximation in some cases. For solar particle events, we find that the radius parameters for the organ dose equivalent increase significantly with the shielding thickness, and the model works marginally for BFO but is unacceptable for the eye or the skin. For galactic cosmic rays environments, the equivalent sphere model with an organ-specific constant radius parameter works well for the BFO dose equivalent, marginally well for the BFO dose and the dose equivalent of the eye or the skin, but is unacceptable for the dose of the eye or the skin. The ranges of the radius parameters are also being investigated, and the BFO radius parameters are found to be significantly, larger than 5 cm in all cases, consistent with the conclusion of

  12. Electrical Properties of PVDF Based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Jerry; Foltz, Heinrich D.; Duan, Yuping; Hhuq, Hasina F.; Tidrow, Steven C.; Chipara, Mircea

    2015-03-01

    Nanocomposites based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) have been obtained by melt mixing, loading the polymeric matrix with various weight fraction (between 0 % to 40 %) of different fillers (multiwalled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and barium titanate). Pellets of nanocomposites have been obtained by hot pressing at about 175 oC. Copper contacts have been deposited on the as obtained pellets and the electrical features have been measured by using the two point technique. PVDF is a semicrystalline ferroelectric and piezoelectric polymer with a glass transition temperature of -35 oC and a melting temperature of about 175 oC. Electrical measurements have been performed in a wide range of frequencies starting from dc to ac (up to about 250 MHz). The dependence of the resistivity and dielectric constant on frequency and temperature (between -50 oC to 150 oC) was investigated in detail. Supplementary DSC, WAXS, and Raman data provided detailed information regarding the effect of fillers on phase transitions (glass, crystallization, and melting) and crystalline composition/structure of these nanocomposites.

  13. Design and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Park, Cheol; Rouse, Jason H.

    2003-01-01

    Revolutionary design concepts in future aerospace vehicles will depend on extraordinary material properties to permit significant reduction of mass and size of components, while imparting intelligence. Due to their combination of remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are expected to enable this paradigm shift in design concepts. However, significant challenges still exist in translating these CNT properties into the macrostructures required for future generations of aerospace vehicles. While an accepted route for making the leap from nanostructures to useful macrostructures has not been fully charted, this paper will give an overview of the approach taken by some researchers at NASA Langley Research Center to sort out issues involved in the development of CNT nanocomposites for multifunctional structures. Specifically, the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices, characterization of nanocomposites, the role of quantum computation in providing guidance for processing and the use of computational analysis in data interpretation will be covered. Significant improvements in mechanical and electrical properties of CNT nanocomposites with very low loadings of CNTs are described and lend credence to the potential for using CNTs in achieving technological leaps in composite development.

  14. Optical properties of polyimide/silica nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommalieh, M. J.; Zihlif, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    The optical properties of thin films of polyimide/silica nanocomposites prepared via sol-gel process were investigated as a function of nanosilica particles content. Absorption and reflectance spectra were collected by a spectrophotometer giving UV-radiation of wavelength range 200-800 nm. The optical data obtained were analyzed in terms of absorption formula for non-crystalline materials. The calculated values of the optical energy gap and the width of the energy tails of the localized states exhibited silica concentration dependence. The direct optical energy gap for neat polyimide is about 1.95 eV, and decreases to a value of 1.8 eV for nanocomposite of 25 wt% nanosilica content. It was found that the calculated refractive index and dielectric constants of nanocomposites increase with silica particles content. The overall dependence of the optical and dielectrical constants on silica content in polyimide matrix is argued on the basis of the observed morphology and overlap of the localized energy sates of different color centers. The EMT model was fitted to the observed dielectric data.

  15. Activated Dynamics in Dense Model Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shijie; Schweizer, Kenneth

    The nonlinear Langevin equation approach is applied to investigate the ensemble-averaged activated dynamics of small molecule liquids (or disconnected segments in a polymer melt) in dense nanocomposites under model isobaric conditions where the spherical nanoparticles are dynamically fixed. Fully thermalized and quenched-replica integral equation theory methods are employed to investigate the influence on matrix dynamics of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium nanocomposite structure, respectively. In equilibrium, the miscibility window can be narrow due to depletion and bridging attraction induced phase separation which limits the study of activated dynamics to regimes where the barriers are relatively low. In contrast, by using replica integral equation theory, macroscopic demixing is suppressed, and the addition of nanoparticles can induce much slower activated matrix dynamics which can be studied over a wide range of pure liquid alpha relaxation times, interfacial attraction strengths and ranges, particle sizes and loadings, and mixture microstructures. Numerical results for the mean activated relaxation time, transient localization length, matrix elasticity and kinetic vitrification in the nanocomposite will be presented.

  16. Sphere-plate Casimir interaction in (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we derive the formula for the Casimir interaction energy between a sphere and a plate in (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. It is assumed that the scalar field satisfies the Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the sphere and the plate. As in the D = 3 case, the formula is of TGTG type. One of our main contributions is deriving the translation matrices which express the change of bases between plane waves and spherical waves for general D. Using orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials, it turns out that the final TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy can be simplified to one that is similar to the D = 3 case. To illustrate the application of the formula, both large separation and small separation asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir interaction energy are computed. The large separation leading term is proportional to L{sup −D+1} if the sphere is imposed with Dirichlet boundary condition, and to L{sup −D−1} if the sphere is imposed with Neumann boundary condition, where L is distance from the center of the sphere to the plane. For the small separation asymptotic behavior, it is shown that the leading term is equal to the one obtained using proximity force approximation. The next-to-leading order term is also computed using perturbation method. It is shown that when the space dimension D is larger than 5, the next-to-leading order has sign opposite to the leading order term. Moreover, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading order term is linear in D, indicating a larger correction at higher dimensions.

  17. Electron-microscopic study of Sn-chrisotile asbestos nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, L. M.; Kalmykov, A. E.; Fokin, A. V.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2014-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the structural state of tin in Sn-chrisotile asbestos nanocomposite. It is shown that tin in the nanocomposite forms a system of nanowires, which, in turn, consist of crystallites of different lengths. Various orientational relations between the matrix and crystallites are revealed.

  18. A biodegradable polymer nanocomposite: Mechanical and barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilichenko, N.; Maksimov, R. D.; Zicans, J.; Merijs Meri, R.; Plume, E.

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of an environmentally friendly nanocomposite based on plasticized potato starch and unmodified montmorillonite clay is described. Data on the influence of montmorillonite concentration on the mechanical properties of the materials obtained are reported. The effective elastic constants of the nanocomposites are calculated. The calculation results are compared with experimental data. The influence of montmorillonite content on the moisture permeability is also investigated.

  19. Assembly of Viral Hydrogels for Three-Dimensional Conducting Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Yen; Hyder, Md Nasim; Mackanic, David; Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle Dorval; Qi, Jifa

    2014-01-01

    M13 bacteriophages act as versatile scaffolds capable of organizing single-walled carbon nanotubes and fabricating three-dimensional conducting nanocomposites. The morphological, electrical, and electrochemical properties of the nanocomposites are presented, as well as its ability to disperse and utilize single-walled carbon nanotubes effectively. PMID:24782428

  20. Efficient and Safe Chemical Gas Generators with Nanocomposite Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    customized chemical gas generators based on novel energetic materials that will exhibit improved effectiveness, process stability, and fire safety...2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Efficient and Safe Chemical Gas Generators with Nanocomposite Reactive Materials...Building, Room 209 El Paso, TX 79968 -0587 12-Sep-2015 ABSTRACT Final Report: Efficient and Safe Chemical Gas Generators with Nanocomposite Reactive