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Sample records for ag-ps nanocomposite spheres

  1. Dopamine as a Carbon Source: The Controlled Synthesis of Hollow Carbon Spheres and Yolk-Structured Carbon Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Liu, Rui; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Li, Chen; Unocic, Raymond R; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Gao, Hongjun; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    A facile and versatile synthesis using dopamine as a carbon source gives hollow carbon spheres and yolk-shell Au{at}Carbon nanocomposites. The uniform nature of dopamine coatings and their high carbon yield endow the products with high structural integrity. The Au{at}C nanocomposites are catalytically active.

  2. MnO{sub 2}@colloid carbon spheres nanocomposites with tunable interior architecture for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuxin; Liu, Chuanpu; Wen, Zhongquan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MnO{sub 2}@CSs nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized in room temperature. • The composites exhibited three structures: core–shell, yolk–shell and hollow structure. • The yolk–shell structure exhibited a high specific capacitance and cycling stability. - Abstract: MnO{sub 2}@colloid carbon spheres nanocomposites with tunable interior architecture have been synthesized by a facile and cost-effective strategy at room temperature. The structure and morphology of as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nitrogen adsorption, focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The as-obtained composites exhibited a three-dimensional architecture with core–shell, yolk–shell and hollow interior structure. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties of composites were evaluated by cycle voltammetric (CV) and galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements. The yolk–shell structure exhibited the optimized pseudocapacitance performance, revealing a specific capacitance (273 F g{sup −1}) with a good rate and cycling stability, owing to its unique structure and the poor crystallinity of MnO{sub 2} nanofilms. Therefore, this facile synthetic strategy could be useful to design and synthesis of tunable nanostructures with enhanced supercapacitor behavior.

  3. Fabrication and lithium storage performance of sugar apple-shaped SiOx@C nanocomposite spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingqi; Zeng, Ying; Ren, Yurong; Zeng, Chunmei; Gu, Jingwei; Feng, Xiaofang; He, Hongyan

    2015-08-01

    Nonstoichiometric SiOx is a kind of very attractive anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries because of a high specific capacity and facile synthesis. However, the poor electrical conductivity and unstable electrode structure of SiOx severely limit its electrochemical performance as anode in lithium-ion batteries. In this work, highly durable sugar apple-shaped SiOx@C nanocomposite spheres are fabricated to achieve significantly improved electrochemical performance. The composite is synthesized by homogenous one-pot synthesis, using ethyltriethoxysilanes (EtSi(OEt)3) and resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF) as starting materials. The morphology, composition and structure of the composite are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis (EA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). At a current density of 50 mA g-1, the sugar apple-shaped SiOx@C spheres exhibit a stable discharge capacity of about 630 mAh g-1 calculated on the total mass of both SiOx and C. At a current density of 100 mA g-1, a stable discharge capacity of about 550 mAh g-1 is obtained and the capacity has been kept up to 400 cycles. The excellent cycling performance is attributed to the homogeneous dispersion of SiOx in disordered carbon at the nanometer scale and the unique structure of the composite.

  4. Skin cancer treatment by albumin/5-Fu loaded magnetic nanocomposite spheres in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Misak, H; Zacharias, N; Song, Z; Hwang, S; Man, K-P; Asmatulu, R; Yang, S-Y

    2013-03-10

    Albumin/drug loaded magnetic nanocomposite spheres were fabricated using an oil-in-oil emulsion/solvent evaporation method, and tested on a mouse model (experimental squamous cell carcinoma) to determine the efficacy of the drug delivery system (DDS) on skin cancer. This novel DDS consists of human serum albumin, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), magnetic nanoparticles (10 nm) and fluorescent labeling molecule (diphenylhexatriene). One of the major purposes of using albumin is that it likely provides internal binding to and retention by the inflammatory tissues to reduce the amount of magnetic nanoparticles needed in the drug loaded microspheres (750–1100 nm). This study is aimed at reducing many negative side effects of conventionally used chemotherapy drugs by localizing the chemotherapy drug, controlling the release of the therapeutic agent and encouraging uptake of the DDS into cancerous cells. A group of mice treated with (1) the magnetic targeted DDS were compared to the other three groups, including, (2) DDS without a magnet, (3) 5-Fu local injection, and (4) untreated groups. The fluorescent tracer was ubiquitously identified inside the tumor tissue, and the DDS/tumor tissue boundary presented a leaky interface. The test results clearly showed that the magnetic targeted DDS exhibited significantly superior therapeutic effects in treating the skin cancer, with the increased efficacy to halt the tumor growth. PMID:23395619

  5. Facile fabrication of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables based on the mixed mode of soft/hard templates

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Mimi; Zhao, Wenbo; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qi; Xu, Ping; Mao, Chun; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    A new kind of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be facilely synthesized by using soft/hard templates method. In order to effectively introduce Ag sources into porous polystyrene (PS) nanotubes which were trapped in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) hard template, Pluronic F127 (F127) was used as guiding agent, soft template and reductant. Meanwhile, ethylene glycol solution was also used as solvent and co-reducing agent to assist in the formation of silver nanowires. The influences of concentration of F127 and reducing reaction time on the formation of Ag/PS coaxial nanocables were discussed. Results indicated that the high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be obtained by the mixed mode of soft/hard templates under optimized conditions. This strategy is expected to be extended to design more metal/polymer coaxial nanocables for the benefit of creation of complex and functional nanoarchitectures and components. PMID:27477888

  6. Facile fabrication of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables based on the mixed mode of soft/hard templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mimi; Zhao, Wenbo; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qi; Xu, Ping; Mao, Chun; Shen, Jian

    2016-08-01

    A new kind of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be facilely synthesized by using soft/hard templates method. In order to effectively introduce Ag sources into porous polystyrene (PS) nanotubes which were trapped in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) hard template, Pluronic F127 (F127) was used as guiding agent, soft template and reductant. Meanwhile, ethylene glycol solution was also used as solvent and co-reducing agent to assist in the formation of silver nanowires. The influences of concentration of F127 and reducing reaction time on the formation of Ag/PS coaxial nanocables were discussed. Results indicated that the high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be obtained by the mixed mode of soft/hard templates under optimized conditions. This strategy is expected to be extended to design more metal/polymer coaxial nanocables for the benefit of creation of complex and functional nanoarchitectures and components.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Au-ZrO2-SiO2 Nanocomposite Spheres and Their Application in Enrichment and Detection of Organophosphorus Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuqi; Tu, Haiyang; Zhang, Aidong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-03-01

    Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite spheres were synthesized and used as selective sorbents for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of orananophosphorous agents. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor based on an Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} modified electrode was developed for selective detection of orananophosphorous pesticides (OPs). The Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite spheres were synthesized by hydrolysis and condensation of zirconia n-butoxide (TBOZ) on the surface of SiO{sub 2} spheres and then introduction of gold nanoparticles on the surface. Transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to characterize the formation of the nanocomposite sphere. Fast extraction of OP was achieved by Au-ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} modified electrode within 5 min via the specific affinity between zirconia and phosphoric group. The assay yields a broad concentration range of paraoxon-ethyl from 1.0 to 500 ng/mL{sup -1} with a detection limit 0.5 ng/mL{sup -1}. This selective and sensitive method holds great promise for the enrichment and detection of OPs.

  8. Sulfur/graphitic hollow carbon sphere nano-composite as a cathode material for high-power lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eon Sung; Kim, Min-Seop; Cho, Won Il; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2013-08-03

    The intrinsic low conductivity of sulfur which leads to a low performance at a high current rate is one of the most limiting factors for the commercialization of lithium-sulfur battery. Here, we present an easy and convenient method to synthesize a mono-dispersed hollow carbon sphere with a thin graphitic wall which can be utilized as a support with a good electrical conductivity for the preparation of sulfur/carbon nano-composite cathode. The hollow carbon sphere was prepared from the pyrolysis of the homogenous mixture of the mono-dispersed spherical silica and Fe-phthalocyanine powder in elevated temperature. The composite cathode was manufactured by infiltrating sulfur melt into the inner side of the graphitic wall. The electrochemical cycling shows a capacity of 425 mAh g-1 at 3 C current rate which is more than five times larger than that for the sulfur/carbon black nano-composite prepared by simple ball milling.

  9. Microscopic Theory for Entangled Polymer Dynamics in Rod-Sphere Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Umi; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a self-consistent microscopic theory for the long-time dynamics of needles in an array of static spherical fillers. The approach exactly enforces the dynamical two-body rod topological uncrossability and sphere impenetrability constraints, leading to a generalized concept of entanglements that includes the filler excluded volume effect. How the diffusion anisotropy (transverse versus longitudinal motion) depends on the filler-needle aspect ratio, polymer concentration, and filler volume fraction is established. Due to the steric blocking of the longitudinal reptative motion by obstacles, a literal localization transition is predicted that is generically controlled by the ratio of filler diameter to the pure polymer tube diameter or needle length. For a window of filler sizes and loadings, the needle is predicted to diffuse via a ``renormalized'' reptation dynamics where the tube is compressed and the longitudinal motion is retarded in a manner that depends on all system variables. At high filler volume fractions the needle diffusivity is strongly suppressed, and localization ultimately occurs in the unentangled needle regime. Generalization of the approach to treat mobile fillers, flexible chains, and nonrandom microstructure is also possible.

  10. Sulfur/graphitic hollow carbon sphere nano-composite as a cathode material for high-power lithium-sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic low conductivity of sulfur which leads to a low performance at a high current rate is one of the most limiting factors for the commercialization of lithium-sulfur battery. Here, we present an easy and convenient method to synthesize a mono-dispersed hollow carbon sphere with a thin graphitic wall which can be utilized as a support with a good electrical conductivity for the preparation of sulfur/carbon nano-composite cathode. The hollow carbon sphere was prepared from the pyrolysis of the homogenous mixture of the mono-dispersed spherical silica and Fe-phthalocyanine powder in elevated temperature. The composite cathode was manufactured by infiltrating sulfur melt into the inner side of the graphitic wall. The electrochemical cycling shows a capacity of 425 mAh g−1 at 3 C current rate which is more than five times larger than that for the sulfur/carbon black nano-composite prepared by simple ball milling. PMID:23914902

  11. Hierarchical Nanocomposite of Hollow N-Doped Carbon Spheres Decorated with Ultrathin WS2 Nanosheets for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaohui; Ding, Zhengping; Ma, Cheng; Wu, Laidi; Liu, Jiatu; Chen, Libao; Ivey, Douglas G; Wei, Weifeng

    2016-07-27

    Hierarchical nanocomposite of ultrathin WS2 nanosheets uniformly attached on the surface of hollow nitrogen-doped carbon spheres (WS2@HNCSs) were successfully fabricated via a facile synthesis strategy. When evaluated as an anode material for LIBs, the hierarchical WS2@HNCSs exhibit a high specific capacity of 801.4 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1), excellent rate capability (545.6 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 2 A g(-1)), and great cycling stability with a capacity retention of 95.8% after 150 cycles at 0.5 A g(-1). The Li-ion storage properties of our WS2@HNCSs nanocomposite are much better than those of the previously most reported WS2-based anode materials. The impressive electrochemical performance is attributed to the robust nanostructure and the favorable synergistic effect between the ultrathin (3-5 layers) WS2 nanosheets and the highly conductive hollow N-doped carbon spheres. The hierarchical hybrid can simultaneously facilitate fast electron/ion transfer, effectively accommodate mechanical stress from cycling, restrain agglomeration, and enable full utilization of the active materials. These characteristics make WS2@HNCSs a promising anode material for high-performance LIBs. PMID:27381381

  12. Hierarchical Nanocomposite of Hollow N-Doped Carbon Spheres Decorated with Ultrathin WS2 Nanosheets for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaohui; Ding, Zhengping; Ma, Cheng; Wu, Laidi; Liu, Jiatu; Chen, Libao; Ivey, Douglas G; Wei, Weifeng

    2016-07-27

    Hierarchical nanocomposite of ultrathin WS2 nanosheets uniformly attached on the surface of hollow nitrogen-doped carbon spheres (WS2@HNCSs) were successfully fabricated via a facile synthesis strategy. When evaluated as an anode material for LIBs, the hierarchical WS2@HNCSs exhibit a high specific capacity of 801.4 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1), excellent rate capability (545.6 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 2 A g(-1)), and great cycling stability with a capacity retention of 95.8% after 150 cycles at 0.5 A g(-1). The Li-ion storage properties of our WS2@HNCSs nanocomposite are much better than those of the previously most reported WS2-based anode materials. The impressive electrochemical performance is attributed to the robust nanostructure and the favorable synergistic effect between the ultrathin (3-5 layers) WS2 nanosheets and the highly conductive hollow N-doped carbon spheres. The hierarchical hybrid can simultaneously facilitate fast electron/ion transfer, effectively accommodate mechanical stress from cycling, restrain agglomeration, and enable full utilization of the active materials. These characteristics make WS2@HNCSs a promising anode material for high-performance LIBs.

  13. Characterization of silver/polystyrene nanocomposites prepared by in situ bulk radical polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Vukoje, Ivana D.; Vodnik, Vesna V.; Džunuzović, Jasna V.; Džunuzović, Enis S.; Marinović-Cincović, Milena T.; Jeremić, Katarina; Nedeljković, Jovan M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of polystyrene nanocomposites based on Ag nanoparticles. • The glass transition temperature decreased in nanocomposites with respect to the pure polymer. • Resistance of the polymer to thermal degradation enhanced with Ag nanoparticles content. - Abstract: Nanocomposites (NCs) with different content of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) embeded in polystyrene (PS) matrix were prepared by in situ bulk radical polymerization. The nearly monodisperse Ag NPs protected with oleylamine were synthesized via organic solvo-thermal method and further used as a filler. The as-prepared spherical Ag NPs with diameter of 7.0 ± 1.5 nm were well dispersed in the PS matrix. The structural properties of the resulting Ag/PS NCs were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while optical properties were characterized using optical absorption measurements. The gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurements showed that the presence of Ag NPs stabilized with oleylamine has no influence on the molecular weight and polydispersity of the PS matrix. The influence of silver content on the thermal properties of Ag/PS NCs was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that resistance of PS to thermal degradation was improved upon incorporation of Ag NPs. The Ag/PS NCs have lower glass transition temperatures than neat PS because loosely packed oleylamine molecules at the interface caused the increase of free volume and chain segments mobility near the surface of Ag NPs.

  14. Tubelike Gold Sphere-Attapulgite Nanocomposites with a High Photothermal Conversion Ability in the Near-Infrared Region for Enhanced Cancer Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Dan; Gao, Jingwen; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-04-27

    Near-infrared (NIR)-induced photothermal therapy (PTT) is now considered to be a promising and highly efficient method for tumor therapy. Photothermal agents play a crucial role in PTT, and they are required to possess the ability to harvest NIR light and transform the photon energy into heat energy. This work reports a facile method to synthesize a new PTT agent, which is based on the electrostatic binding of the Au nanospheres (Au NSs, ∼15 nm) to the surface of a nanometer-sized mineral, attapulgite, to form tubelike Au-attapulgite nanocomposites. These nanocomposites consist of numerous Au NSs, which are linked to each other along the attapulgite surface. The nanocomposites exhibit similar localized surface plasmon resonance absorption characteristics to those of Au nanorods with a longitudinal absorption mode that shifts to the NIR region (∼670 nm). Moreover, the nanocomposites have a high Cabs/Csca ratio (cross section of absorption to scattering) and photothermal conversion efficiency of 25.6%. Their photothermal therapy effect is studied using A549 cells and A549 cell-bearing nude mice as examples. The results indicate that the nanocomposites can be effectively taken up by the cells, and the nanocomposites show good biocompatibility. The A549 cells almost died after they were incubated with the nanocomposites (at 100 μg mL(-1)) for 12 h and irradiated by an 808 nm laser with a power density of 0.5 W cm(-2) for 15 min. The tumors of nude mice can also be effectively ablated without regrowth during the period of observation (at least 10 d) after photothermal therapy. PMID:27054373

  15. Comparison anti-bacterial effect of silver/polystyrene nanocomposites on gram negative and positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Akhtarolmolook; Raftari, Maryam; Tollabimazraehno, Sajjad; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Irajizad, Azam

    2012-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles/polystyrene nanocomposites were prepared via casting the solution of polystyrene in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and acetone containing silver nanoparticles. Colloidal silver nanoparticles in acetone were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of pure bulk silver. Casting the colloidal silver nanoparticles in a solution of polystyrene results in a yellowish transparent polymeric sheet. TEM images show rather spherical nanoparticles with mean diameter of 5 nm. Ag/PS nanocomposites were characterized by UV-VIS spectroscopy. In this study, we also investigated the antimicrobial activity of silver nanocomposites against Escherichia coli (E.coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) as a model for Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Antibacterial tests were performed against E. coli and S.aureus, on LB agar plates containing different amount of nanoparticles. Our results showed at all these concentrations, the nanoparticles caused a growth delay of E. coli, increasing the concentration of nanoparticles increased this growth delay.

  16. Ultrathin TiO2 layer coated-CdS spheres core-shell nanocomposite with enhanced visible-light photoactivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhang; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2013-12-26

    Development of various strategies for controllable fabrication of core-shell nanocomposites (CSNs) with highly active photocatalytic performance has been attracting ever-increasing research attention. In particular, control of the ultrathin layer TiO2 shell in constructing CSNs in an aqueous phase is a significant but technologically challenging issue. Here, this paper demonstrates the interface assembly synthesis of CdS nanospheres@TiO2 core-shell photocatalyst via the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged water-stable titania precursor with positively charged CdS nanospheres (CdS NSPs), followed by the formation of the ultrathin-layer TiO2 shell through a facile refluxing process in aqueous phase. The as-formed CdS NSPs@TiO2 core-shell nanohybrid exhibits a high visible-light-driven photoactivity for selective transformation and reduction of heavy metal ions. The ultrathin TiO2 layer coated on CdS NSPs results in excellent light transmission property, enhanced adsorption capacity, and improved transfer of charge carriers and lifespan of photoinduced electron-hole pairs, which would prominently contribute to the significant photoactivity enhancement. It is anticipated that this facile aqueous-phase synthesis strategy could be extended to design a variety of more efficient CSN photocatalysts with controllable morphology toward target applications in diverse photoredox processes.

  17. Ultrathin TiO2 layer coated-CdS spheres core-shell nanocomposite with enhanced visible-light photoactivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhang; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2013-12-26

    Development of various strategies for controllable fabrication of core-shell nanocomposites (CSNs) with highly active photocatalytic performance has been attracting ever-increasing research attention. In particular, control of the ultrathin layer TiO2 shell in constructing CSNs in an aqueous phase is a significant but technologically challenging issue. Here, this paper demonstrates the interface assembly synthesis of CdS nanospheres@TiO2 core-shell photocatalyst via the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged water-stable titania precursor with positively charged CdS nanospheres (CdS NSPs), followed by the formation of the ultrathin-layer TiO2 shell through a facile refluxing process in aqueous phase. The as-formed CdS NSPs@TiO2 core-shell nanohybrid exhibits a high visible-light-driven photoactivity for selective transformation and reduction of heavy metal ions. The ultrathin TiO2 layer coated on CdS NSPs results in excellent light transmission property, enhanced adsorption capacity, and improved transfer of charge carriers and lifespan of photoinduced electron-hole pairs, which would prominently contribute to the significant photoactivity enhancement. It is anticipated that this facile aqueous-phase synthesis strategy could be extended to design a variety of more efficient CSN photocatalysts with controllable morphology toward target applications in diverse photoredox processes. PMID:24245797

  18. SPHERES Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andres; Benavides, Jose Victor; Ormsby, Steve L.; GuarnerosLuna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized satellites that provide a test bed for development and research into multi-body formation flying, multi-spacecraft control algorithms, and free-flying physical and material science investigations. Up to three self-contained free-flying satellites can fly within the cabin of the International Space Station (ISS), performing flight formations, testing of control algorithms or as a platform for investigations requiring this unique free-flying test environment. Each satellite is a self-contained unit with power, propulsion, computers, navigation equipment, and provides physical and electrical connections (via standardized expansion ports) for Principal Investigator (PI) provided hardware and sensors.

  19. Polyolefin nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2007-01-02

    The present invention relates to methods for the preparation of clay/polymer nanocomposites. The methods include combining an organophilic clay and a polymer to form a nanocomposite, wherein the organophilic clay and the polymer each have a peak recrystallization temperature, and wherein the organophilic clay peak recrystallization temperature sufficiently matches the polymer peak recrystallization temperature such that the nanocomposite formed has less permeability to a gas than the polymer. Such nanocomposites exhibit 2, 5, 10, or even 100 fold or greater reductions in permeability to, e.g., oxygen, carbon dioxide, or both compared to the polymer. The invention also provides a method of preparing a nanocomposite that includes combining an amorphous organophilic clay and an amorphous polymer, each having a glass transition temperature, wherein the organophilic clay glass transition temperature sufficiently matches the polymer glass transition temperature such that the nanocomposite formed has less permeability to a gas than the polymer.

  20. SPHERES Smartphone Workbench

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Smart SPHERES space robot (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) equipped with an Android smartphone performs a video survey inside of the International Space S...

  1. Sphere based fluid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Systems are described for using multiple closely-packed spheres. In one system for passing fluid, a multiplicity of spheres lie within a container, with all of the spheres having the same outside diameter and with the spheres being closely nested in one another to create multiple interstitial passages of a known size and configuration and smooth walls. The container has an inlet and outlet for passing fluid through the interstitial passages formed between the nested spheres. The small interstitial passages can be used to filter out material, especially biological material such as cells in a fluid, where the cells can be easily destroyed if passed across sharp edges. The outer surface of the spheres can contain a material that absorbs a constitutent in the flowing fluid, such as a particular contamination gas, or can contain a catalyst to chemically react the fluid passing therethrough, the use of multiple small spheres assuring a large area of contact of these surfaces of the spheres with the fluid. In a system for storing and releasing a fluid such as hydrogen as a fuel, the spheres can include a hollow shell containing the fluid to be stored, and located within a compressable container that can be compressed to break the shells and release the stored fluid.

  2. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  3. Lorentzian fuzzy spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, A.; Lu, Lei; Stern, A.

    2015-09-01

    We show that fuzzy spheres are solutions of Lorentzian Ishibashi-Kawai-Kitazawa-Tsuchiya-type matrix models. The solutions serve as toy models of closed noncommutative cosmologies where big bang/crunch singularities appear only after taking the commutative limit. The commutative limit of these solutions corresponds to a sphere embedded in Minkowski space. This "sphere" has several novel features. The induced metric does not agree with the standard metric on the sphere, and, moreover, it does not have a fixed signature. The curvature computed from the induced metric is not constant, has singularities at fixed latitudes (not corresponding to the poles) and is negative. Perturbations are made about the solutions, and are shown to yield a scalar field theory on the sphere in the commutative limit. The scalar field can become tachyonic for a range of the parameters of the theory.

  4. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  5. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Besshapov, S. P.; Kabanova, N. V.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Antonov, R. A.; Anyuhina, A. M.; Bronvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2009-12-01

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10-10 eV.

  6. Polydopamine spheres as active templates for convenient synthesis of various nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Yang, Liping; Lin, Meng-Fang; Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong; Lee, Pooi See

    2013-02-25

    In this work, monodisperse polydopamine (PDA) spheres with tunable diameters have been synthesized through a facile and low cost method using a deionized water and alcohol mixed solvent. The PDA spheres possess surface functional groups (-OH, -NH(2)), exhibiting an extraordinary versatile active nature. It is demonstrated that the PDA spheres could serve as an active template for the convenient synthesis of various nanostructures, e.g., MnO(2) hollow spheres or PDA/Fe(3)O(4) and PDA/Ag core/shell nanostructures. No surface modification or special treatment is required for the synthesis of these nanostructures, which makes the fabrication process simple and very convenient. The novel application of PDA/Fe(3)O(4) spheres as fillers in nanocomposites for high-performance capacitors is demonstrated, indicating a promising practicality. The PDA spheres provide a new general platform not only for the facile assembly of nanostructures but also a green synthetic template for practical applications.

  7. ISS Update: Smart SPHERES

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries conducts a phone interview with Mark Micire, SPHERES Engineering Manager at Ames Research Center. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include ...

  8. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  9. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  10. Chinese Armillary Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The armillary sphere was perhaps the most important type of astronomical instrument in ancient China. It was first invented by Luoxia Hong in the first century BC. After Han times, the structure of the armillary sphere became increasingly sophisticated by including more and more rings representing various celestial movements as recognized by the Chinese astronomers. By the eighth century, the Chinese armillary sphere consisted of three concentric sets of rings revolving on the south-north polar axis. The relative position of the rings could be adjusted to reflect the precession of the equinoxes and the regression of the Moon's nodes along the ecliptic. To counterbalance the defect caused by too many rings, Guo Shoujing from the late thirteenth century constructed the Simplified Instruments which reorganized the rings of the armillary sphere into separate instruments for measuring equatorial coordinates and horizontal coordinates. The armillary sphere was still preserved because it was a good illustration of celestial movements. A fifteenth-century replica of Guo Shoujing's armillary sphere still exists today.

  11. Albumin-based nanocomposite spheres for advanced drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Misak, Heath E; Asmatulu, Ramazan; Gopu, Janani S; Man, Ka-Poh; Zacharias, Nora M; Wooley, Paul H; Yang, Shang-You

    2014-01-01

    A novel drug delivery system incorporating human serum albumin, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, magnetite nanoparticles, and therapeutic agent(s) was developed for potential application in the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and skin cancer. An oil-in-oil emulsion/solvent evaporation (O/OSE) method was modified to produce a drug delivery system with a diameter of 0.5–2 μm. The diameter was mainly controlled by adjusting the viscosity of albumin in the discontinuous phase of the O/OSE method. The drug-release study showed that the release of drug and albumin was mostly dependent on the albumin content of the drug delivery system, which is very similar to the drug occlusion-mesopore model. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that increasing the albumin content in the drug delivery system increased cell viability, possibly due to the improved biocompatibility of the system. Overall, these studies show that the proposed system could be a viable option as a drug delivery system in the treatment of many illnesses, such as rheumatoid arthritis, and skin and breast cancers. PMID:24106002

  12. High critical field NbC superconductor on carbon spheres.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Pati, Satya Prakash; Maity, Arjun

    2016-06-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) nanoparticles embedded on the surface of carbon spheres (CS) were synthesized at 1350 °C by the carbothermal reduction of niobium oxide precursor in flowing argon (Nbc@CS). The morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the hybrid nanocomposite were investigated by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and a superconducting quantum interference device. It was found that the NbC@CS nanocomposites exhibit type-II superconductivity with a critical temperature (Tc) of 8-12 K, typical for stoichiometric NbC. The superconducting hysteresis loop reveals several interesting traits, including strong vortex pinning, the presence of asymmetry and a high penetration field. Moreover, the sample shows much improved irreversible (Hirr), lower (Hc1) and upper (Hc2) critical fields. The coherence length (ξ), penetration depth (λ), and Ginzburg-Landau (κ) parameters for the sample were estimated to be 9.78 nm, 33 nm and 3.39, respectively.

  13. Sticky surface: sphere-sphere adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Sarthok; Younger, John G.; Bortz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-scale model to study the attachment of spherical particles with a rigid core, coated with binding ligands and suspended in the surrounding, quiescent fluid medium. This class of fluid-immersed adhesion is widespread in many natural and engineering settings, particularly in microbial surface adhesion. Our theory highlights how the micro-scale binding kinetics of these ligands, as well as the attractive / repulsive surface potential in an ionic medium affects the eventual macro-scale size distribution of the particle aggregates (flocs). The bridge between the micro-macro model is made via an aggregation kernel. Results suggest that the presence of elastic ligands on the particle surface lead to the formation of larger floc aggregates via efficient inter-floc collisions (i.e., non-zero sticking probability, g). Strong electrolytic composition of the surrounding fluid favors large floc formation as well. The kernel for the Brownian diffusion for hard spheres is recovered in the limit of perfect binding effectiveness (g → 1) and in a neutral solution with no dissolved salts. PMID:25159830

  14. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  15. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  16. Hypervelocity flow over spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chihyung

    The nature of the nonequilibrium flow of dissociating gases over spheres was investigated experimentally, numerically and theoretically. A series of experiments with three different gases, nitrogen, air and carbon dioxide, was performed in the shock tunnel T5 at GALCIT. Five spheres of different radii equipped with thermocouples for surface heat flux measurements were used. The state-of-the-art numerical method by Candler (1988) was used to conduct a parallel study which strongly complemented the experimental and theoretical efforts.Experimental heat flux measurements are presented. Good agreement was observed among the measured stagnation point heat transfer rates, computational results and Fay and Riddell's theoretical predictions. For nitrogen and air, the measured heat flux distributions were also in good agreement with numerical computation results and Lees' theory. For carbon dioxide, large deviations were observed. Early transition tripped by surface roughness is a possible cause for the deviation of heat flux distribution from the theory. The experimental differential interferograms were compared with the images constructed from computational flowfields. Good agreement of fringe pattern and shock shape was observed.An analytical solution is obtained for inviscid hypervelocity dissociating flow over spheres. The solution explains the correlation between the dimensionless stand-off distance and the dimensionless reaction rate parameter previously observed by Hornung (1972) for nitrogen. The physics of the correlation can be shown as the binary scaling. Based on the solution, a new dimensionless reaction rate parameter is defined to generalize Hornung's correlation for more complex gases than nitrogen. Experimental and numerical results confirm the new correlation.The effect of nonequilibrium recombination downstream of a curved two-dimensional shock was also addressed. An analytical solution for an ideal dissociating gas was obtained, giving an expression for

  17. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  18. Dynamical tachyons on fuzzy spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Berenstein, David; Trancanelli, Diego

    2011-05-15

    We study the spectrum of off-diagonal fluctuations between displaced fuzzy spheres in the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase plane wave matrix model. The displacement is along the plane of the fuzzy spheres. We find that when two fuzzy spheres intersect at angles, classical tachyons develop and that the spectrum of these modes can be computed analytically. These tachyons can be related to the familiar Nielsen-Olesen instabilities in Yang-Mills theory on a constant magnetic background. Many features of the problem become more apparent when we compare with maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a sphere, of which this system is a truncation. We also set up a simple oscillatory trajectory on the displacement between the fuzzy spheres and study the dynamics of the modes as they become tachyonic for part of the oscillations. We speculate on their role regarding the possible thermalization of the system.

  19. Periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-05-15

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through observation that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been observed in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.

  20. Studies of drag on the nanocomposite superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassard, Jean-Denis; Sarkar, D. K.; Perron, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The nanocomposite thin films of stearic acid (SA)-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles incorporated in epoxy polymer matrix have been achieved. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show the formation of zinc stearate on ZnO nanoparticles as the confirmation of SA-functionalization of ZnO nanoparticles in the thin films. Morphological analyses reveal the presence of micro-holes with the presence of irregular nanoparticles. The measured root mean square (rms) roughness of the thin film is found to be 12 ± 1 μm with the adhesion of 5B on both glass and aluminum substrates. The wetting property shows that the surface of the film is superhydrophobic with the contact angle of water of 156 ± 4° having contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of 4 ± 2°. The average terminal velocity in the water of the as-received glass spheres and superhydrophobic spheres were found to be 0.66 ± 0.01 m/s and 0.72 ± 0.01 m/s respectively. Consequently, the calculated average coefficients of the surface drag of the as-received glass sphere and superhydrophobic glass sphere were 2.30 ± 0.01 and 1.93 ± 0.03, respectively. Hence, the drag reduction on the surface of superhydrophobic glass sphere is found to be approximately 16% lower than as-received glass sphere.

  1. Science off the Sphere: Bistronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  2. Magnetic composites based on hybrid spheres of aluminum oxide and superparamagnetic nanoparticles of iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Tiago P.; Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Sasaki, José M.; Fabris, J. D.; de Oliveira, Diana Q. L.; Valentini, Antoninho

    2010-03-01

    Materials containing hybrid spheres of aluminum oxide and superparamagnetic nanoparticles of iron oxides were obtained from a chemical precursor prepared by admixing chitosan and iron and aluminum hydroxides. The oxides were first characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed the size distribution of the resulting spheres to be highly homogeneous. The occurrence of nano-composites containing aluminum oxides and iron oxides was confirmed from powder X-ray diffraction patterns; except for the sample with no aluminum, the superparamagnetic relaxation due to iron oxide particles were observed from Mössbauer spectra obtained at 298 and 110 K; the onset six line-spectrum collected at 20 K indicates a magnetic ordering related to the blocking relaxation effect for significant portion of small spheres in the sample with a molar ratio Al:Fe of 2:1.

  3. Hollow mesoporous aluminosilica spheres with perpendicular pore channels as catalytic nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Zhaohui; Hsieh, Ming-Feng; Chen, Mei; Liu, Pengxin; Chen, Cheng; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2012-05-22

    The design and synthesis of hollow/yolk-shell mesoporous structures with catalytically active ordered mesoporous shells can infuse new vitality into the applications of these attractive structures. In this study, we report that hollow/yolk-shell structures with catalytically active ordered mesoporous aluminosilica shells can be easily prepared by using silica spheres as the silica precursors. By simply treating with a hot alkaline solution in the presence of sodium aluminate (NaAlO(2)) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), solid silica spheres can be directly converted into high-quality hollow mesoporous aluminosilica spheres with perpendicular pore channels. On the basis of the proposed formation mechanism of etching followed by co-assembly, the synthesis strategy developed in this work can be extended as a general strategy to prepare ordered mesoporous yolk-shell structures with diverse compositions and morphologies simply by replacing solid silica spheres with silica-coated nanocomposites. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol with yolk-shell structured Au@ordered mesoporous aluminosilica as the catalyst has clearly demonstrated that the highly permeable perpendicular pore channels of mesoporous aluminosilica can effectively prevent the catalytically active yolk from aggregating. Furthermore, with accessible acidity, the yolk-shell structured ordered mesoporous aluminosilica spheres containing Pd yolk exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in a one-pot two-step synthesis involving an acid catalysis and subsequent catalytic hydrogenation for desired benzimidazole derivative, which makes the proposed hollow ordered aluminosilica spheres a versatile and practicable scaffold for advanced catalytic nanoreactor systems.

  4. Doxorubicin loaded nanodiamond-silk spheres for fluorescence tracking and controlled drug release

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Asma; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Marelli, Benedetto; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) based technologies have proved to be considerably beneficial for advances in biomedicine especially in the areas of disease detection, drug delivery and bioimaging. Over the last few decades, NPs have garnered interest for their exemplary impacts on the detection, treatment, and prevention of cancer. The full potential of these technologies are yet to be employed for clinical use. The ongoing research and development in this field demands single multifunctional composite materials that can be employed simultaneously for drug delivery and biomedical imaging. In this manuscript, a unique combination of silk fibroin (SF) and nanodiamonds (NDs) in the form of nanospheres are fabricated and investigated. The spheres were loaded with the anthracyline Doxorubicin (DoX) and the drug release kinetics for these ND-SF-DoX (NDSX) spheres were studied. NDs provided the fluorescence modality for imaging while the degradable SF spheres stabilized and released the drug in a controlled manner. The emission and structural properties of the spheres were characterized during drug release. The degradability of SF and the subsequent release of DoX from the spheres were monitored through fluorescence of NDs inside the spheres. This research demonstrates the enormous potential of the ND-SF nanocomposite platforms for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, which are both important for pharmaceutical research and clinical settings. PMID:26819823

  5. An Unusual Rolling-Sphere Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromer, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the theory behind a study of motion where a hollow plastic sphere racing against a steel sphere in two parallel sections of inclined channeling always reaches the bottom first; once on the floor, however, the steel sphere travels faster, speeding past the plastic sphere when both are about one meter from the base of the track. (JRH)

  6. Porous Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    This document is a slide presentation that examines the use of a simple templating process to produce hollow ceramic spheres with a pore size of 1 to 10 microns. Using ion exchange process it was determined that the method produces porous ceramic spheres with a unique structure: (i.e., inner sphere surrounded by an outer sphere.)

  7. Nanocomposite thermite ink

    DOEpatents

    Tappan, Alexander S.; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Stuecker, John N.

    2011-11-01

    A nanocomposite thermite ink for use in inkjet, screen, and gravure printing. Embodiments of this invention do not require separation of the fuel and oxidizer constituents prior to application of the ink to the printed substrate.

  8. Nano-composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  9. Multifunctional nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.; Komarneni, S.

    1991-11-01

    Objective is to examine the low temperature nanocomposite route in the synthesis of multifunctional materials using two-dimensional clays as hosts. After about 8 months, a significant advance was made in the design and synthesis of novel nanocomposite materials, which are nanometal intercalated clays prepared by a low temperature route. A layered V[sub 2]O[sub 5] gel has been made hydrothermally and its cation exchange properties measured. Several pillared clays have also been synthesized and characterized.

  10. Sphere forming method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngberg, C. L.; Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.; Finnerty, A. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided for forming small accurately spherical objects. Preformed largely spherical objects are supported at the opening of a conduit on the update of hot gas emitted from the opening, so the object is in a molten state. The conduit is suddenly jerked away at a downward incline, to allow the molten object to drop in free fall, so that surface tension forms a precise sphere. The conduit portion that has the opening, lies in a moderate vacuum chamber, and the falling sphere passes through the chamber and through a briefly opened valve into a tall drop tower that contains a lower pressure, to allow the sphere to cool without deformation caused by falling through air.

  11. High critical field NbC superconductor on carbon spheres.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Pati, Satya Prakash; Maity, Arjun

    2016-06-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) nanoparticles embedded on the surface of carbon spheres (CS) were synthesized at 1350 °C by the carbothermal reduction of niobium oxide precursor in flowing argon (Nbc@CS). The morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the hybrid nanocomposite were investigated by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and a superconducting quantum interference device. It was found that the NbC@CS nanocomposites exhibit type-II superconductivity with a critical temperature (Tc) of 8-12 K, typical for stoichiometric NbC. The superconducting hysteresis loop reveals several interesting traits, including strong vortex pinning, the presence of asymmetry and a high penetration field. Moreover, the sample shows much improved irreversible (Hirr), lower (Hc1) and upper (Hc2) critical fields. The coherence length (ξ), penetration depth (λ), and Ginzburg-Landau (κ) parameters for the sample were estimated to be 9.78 nm, 33 nm and 3.39, respectively. PMID:27212586

  12. Hierarchical multifunctional nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites; including nano-materials such as nano-particles, nanoclays, nanofibers, nanotubes, and nanosheets; are of significant importance in the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology. Due to the nanometer size of these inclusions, their physicochemical characteristics differ significantly from those of micron size and bulk materials. The field of nanocomposites involves the study of multiphase materials where at least one of the constituent phases has one dimension less than 100 nm. This is the range where the phenomena associated with the atomic and molecular interaction strongly influence the macroscopic properties of materials. Since the building blocks of nanocomposites are at nanoscale, they have an enormous surface area with numerous interfaces between the two intermix phases. The special properties of the nano-composite arise from the interaction of its phases at the interface and/or interphase regions. By contrast, in a conventional composite based on micrometer sized filler such as carbon fibers, the interfaces between the filler and matrix constitutes have a much smaller surface-to-volume fraction of the bulk materials, and hence influence the properties of the host structure to a much smaller extent. The optimum amount of nanomaterials in the nanocomposites depends on the filler size, shape, homogeneity of particles distribution, and the interfacial bonding properties between the fillers and matrix. The promise of nanocomposites lies in their multifunctionality, i.e., the possibility of realizing unique combination of properties unachievable with traditional materials. The challenges in reaching this promise are tremendous. They include control over the distribution in size and dispersion of the nanosize constituents, and tailoring and understanding the role of interfaces between structurally or chemically dissimilar phases on bulk properties. While the properties of the matrix can be improved by the inclusions of nanomaterials, the

  13. Fire retardant polyetherimide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Takekoshi, T.; Giannelis, E.P.

    1997-09-01

    Polyetherimide-layered silicates nanocomposites with increased char yield and fire retardancy are described. The use of nanocomposites is a new, environmentally-benign approach to improve fire resistance of polymers. An increase in the aromaticity yields high char residues that normally correlate with higher oxygen index and lower flammability. The often high cost of these materials and the specialized processing techniques required, however, have limited the use of these polymers to certain specialized applications. The effectiveness of fire retardant fillers is also limited since the large amounts required make processing difficult and might inadvertently affect mechanical properties.

  14. Science off the Sphere: Fun with Antibubbles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit injects air bubbles inside a sphere of water to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership betwe...

  15. Tessellating the Sphere with Regular Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Bechthold, Dawn

    2004-01-01

    Tessellations in the Euclidean plane and regular polygons that tessellate the sphere are reviewed. The regular polygons that can possibly tesellate the sphere are spherical triangles, squares and pentagons.

  16. Eddy currents in a conducting sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, John; Hestenes, David

    1986-01-01

    This report analyzes the eddy current induced in a solid conducting sphere by a sinusoidal current in a circular loop. Analytical expressions for the eddy currents are derived as a power series in the vectorial displacement of the center of the sphere from the axis of the loop. These are used for first order calculations of the power dissipated in the sphere and the force and torque exerted on the sphere by the electromagnetic field of the loop.

  17. Active swarms on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Henkes, Silke

    2015-02-01

    We show that coupling to curvature nontrivially affects collective motion in active systems, leading to motion patterns not observed in flat space. Using numerical simulations, we study a model of self-propelled particles with polar alignment and soft repulsion confined to move on the surface of a sphere. We observe a variety of motion patterns with the main hallmarks being polar vortex and circulating band states arising due to the incompatibility between spherical topology and uniform motion-a consequence of the "hairy ball" theorem. We provide a detailed analysis of density, velocity, pressure, and stress profiles in the circulating band state. In addition, we present analytical results for a simplified model of collective motion on the sphere showing that frustration due to curvature leads to stable elastic distortions storing energy in the band. PMID:25768504

  18. Active swarms on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Henkes, Silke

    2015-02-01

    We show that coupling to curvature nontrivially affects collective motion in active systems, leading to motion patterns not observed in flat space. Using numerical simulations, we study a model of self-propelled particles with polar alignment and soft repulsion confined to move on the surface of a sphere. We observe a variety of motion patterns with the main hallmarks being polar vortex and circulating band states arising due to the incompatibility between spherical topology and uniform motion-a consequence of the "hairy ball" theorem. We provide a detailed analysis of density, velocity, pressure, and stress profiles in the circulating band state. In addition, we present analytical results for a simplified model of collective motion on the sphere showing that frustration due to curvature leads to stable elastic distortions storing energy in the band.

  19. Vortical flow past a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattner, Trent; Chong, Min; Joubert, Peter

    2000-11-01

    Vortical flow past a sphere in a constant diameter pipe was studied experimentally in a guide vane apparatus similar to those used in fundamental experimental studies of vortex breakdown. The initial effect of swirl was to shorten the downstream separation bubble. For a small range of the swirl intensity, an almost stagnant upstream separation bubble formed. As the swirl intensity was increased, the bubble became unstable and an unsteady spiral formed. At high swirl intensity there was a mean recirculation region which penetrated far upstream while the flow on the downstream hemisphere was attached. Measurements of the velocity field were obtained using laser Doppler velocimetry. Analysis of these results suggests that the onset of upstream separation is associated with the formation of a negative azimuthal vorticity component which slows the axial flow near the axis of symmetry. This is consistent with inviscid distortion of the vortex filaments in the diverging flow approaching the sphere.

  20. Archaic artifacts resembling celestial spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    We present several bronze artifacts from the Archaic Age in Greece (750-480 BC) that resemble celestial spheres or forms of other astronomical significance. They are studied in the context of the Dark Age transition from Mycenaean Age astronomical themes to the philosophical and practical revival of astronomy in the Classical Age with its plethora of astronomical devices. These artifacts, mostly votive in nature are spherical in shape and appear in a variety of forms their most striking characteristic being the depiction of meridians and/or an equator. Most of those artifacts come from Thessaly, and more specifically from the temple of Itonia Athena at Philia, a religious center of pan-Hellenic significance. Celestial spheres, similar in form to the small artifacts presented in this study, could be used to measure latitudes, or estimate the time at a known place, and were thus very useful in navigation.

  1. Numerical simulation of a sphere moving down an incline with identical spheres placed equally apart

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Chen, Cheng-lung; Shen, Hsieh Wen

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of an elastic sphere moving down an incline with a string of identical spheres placed equally apart. Two momentum equations and a moment equation formulated for the moving sphere are solved numerically for the instantaneous velocity of the moving sphere on an incline with different angles of inclination. Input parameters for numerical simulation include the properties of the sphere (the radius, density, Poison's ratio, and Young's Modulus of elasticity), the coefficient of friction between the spheres, and a damping coefficient of the spheres during collision.

  2. Polyimide/carbon Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this product is to design and characterize well-defined conductive nanocomposite materials. The materials will be composed of a polymer matrix composed of rigid-backbone polyimides, and will be filled with modified or unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The ultimate design of this project is to create composite materials with optical clarity and a high conductivity.

  3. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  4. Underwater implosion of glass spheres.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stephen E

    2007-02-01

    Underwater implosion experiments were conducted with thin-wall glass spheres to determine the influence that structural failure has on the pressure pulse. Four experiments were conducted with glass spheres having an outside diameter of 7.62 cm, thickness of 0.762 mm, and an estimated buckling pressure of 7.57 MPa. The experiments were performed in a pressure vessel at a hydrostatic pressure of 6.996 MPa. The average peak pressure of the implosion pressure pulse was 26.1 MPa, measured at a radial distance of 10.16 cm from the sphere center. A computational fluid structure interaction model was developed to assess how the failure rate of the glass structure influences the pressure time history. The model employed a specified glass failure sequence that is uniform in time and space. It was found that for the conditions of the test, a glass failure rate of 275 m/s provided a reasonable representation of the test data. The test data and the model results show that the failure time history of the structure has a significant influence on an implosion pressure pulse. Computational prediction of an implosion pressure pulse needs to include the failure time history of the structure; otherwise it will overpredict the pressure time history.

  5. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-06-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild’s 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star—a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density—the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres.

  6. Steel and titanium hollow sphere foams

    SciTech Connect

    Hurysz, K.M.; Clark, J.L.; Nagel, A.R.; Lee, K.J.; Cochran, J.K.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Hardwicke, C.U.

    1998-12-31

    Metal hollow sphere foams are fabricated by bonding millimeter sized metal alloy hollow spheres at points of contact. The spheres are formed as powder shells from slurries. For stainless steel spheres, the starting powder is a mixture of iron and chromium oxide. Thermal treatment in hydrogen reduces the oxides to Fe/Cr alloys with less than 2% porosity in sphere walls. The nominal composition is close to that of 405 stainless. Carburization in CO/CO{sub 2} atmosphere followed by heat treatment produces foams of either 410 or 420 type stainless steels depending on carbon content. Compressive stress-strain behavior was measured on point contact bonded stainless foams both before and after carburization. Hardness measurements on steel sphere walls were used to estimate the yield strength. Relative strengths of the foams were positioned between open and closed cell models. This was encouraging because bonding in the foams was less than optimum and the hollow sphere walls contained defects. As processing improves, strengths should increase. To produce titanium alloy spheres, the starting powder is titanium alloy hydride. Thermal treatment in an inert atmosphere decomposes the hydride and sinters the titanium powder in the sphere walls to greater than 96% relative density. Both titanium and Ti-6V-4V spheres and foams have been produced. Oxygen contents are a concern for titanium compositions and processing is being altered to reduce oxygen levels to increase ductility.

  7. Perturbative Casimir Energies of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, G.

    The Casimir energies of single bodies (as opposed to the interaction between mutually disjoint bodies) have accumulated deceptive folklore which this talk will try to exorcise, by mean of calculations for atomic solids that, though optically dilute, are realistically dispersive. This is easy, because quantum electrodynamics then yields identically the same energy as one gets from the properly retarded interatomic potentials. The problem of regularizing (nominal) divergences turns out to be quite distinct from the appropriate process of renormalization: simply discarding all nominally divergent contributions would prevent one from understanding the physics. Contrary to legend, the pertinent Casimir energies for dielectric spheres are attractive.

  8. The dynamic sphere test problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chabaud, Brandon M.; Brock, Jerry S.; Smith, Brandon M.

    2012-05-16

    In this manuscript we define the dynamic sphere problem as a spherical shell composed of a homogeneous, linearly elastic material. The material exhibits either isotropic or transverse isotropic symmetry. When the problem is formulated in material coordinates, the balance of mass equation is satisfied automatically. Also, the material is assumed to be kept at constant temperature, so the only relevant equation is the equation of motion. The shell has inner radius r{sub i} and outer radius r{sub o}. Initially, the shell is at rest. We assume that the interior of the shell is a void and we apply a time-varying radial stress on the outer surface.

  9. Highly Thermal Conductive Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Veca, Lucia Monica (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for forming carbon-based fillers as may be utilized in forming highly thermal conductive nanocomposite materials. Formation methods include treatment of an expanded graphite with an alcohol/water mixture followed by further exfoliation of the graphite to form extremely thin carbon nanosheets that are on the order of between about 2 and about 10 nanometers in thickness. Disclosed carbon nanosheets can be functionalized and/or can be incorporated in nanocomposites with extremely high thermal conductivities. Disclosed methods and materials can prove highly valuable in many technological applications including, for instance, in formation of heat management materials for protective clothing and as may be useful in space exploration or in others that require efficient yet light-weight and flexible thermal management solutions.

  10. [Multifunctional nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    These novel nanocomposites are microporous nanometal intercalated clays which have been prepared by a polyol process at 200C and a novel microwave-hydrothermal process using ethylene glycol. These novel nanocomposites have been found to be useful in the conversion of coal to asphaltenes. A crystalline tin (IV) arsenate hydroxide hydrate has been made and its lithium selective ion exchange properties have been measured. This exchanger has shown high lithium selectivity. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure have also been studied. Several pillared clays have also been synthesized and their Mg[sup 2+], Li[sup +] and UO[sub 2][sup 2+] selectivity has been measured. The pillared clays appear to show some Li selectivity.

  11. Multifunctional reactive nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatis, Demitrios

    Many multifunctional nanocomposite materials have been developed for use in propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics, and reactive structures. These materials exhibit high reaction rates due to their developed reaction interfacial area. Two applications addressed in this work include nanocomposite powders prepared by arrested reactive milling (ARM) for burn rate modifiers and reactive structures. In burn rate modifiers, addition of reactive nanocomposite powders to aluminized propellants increases the burn rate of aluminum and thus the overall reaction rate of an energetic formulation. Replacing only a small fraction of aluminum by 8Al·MoO3 and 2B·Ti nanocomposite powders enhances the reaction rate with little change to the thermodynamic performance of the formulation; both the rate of pressure rise and maximum pressure measured in the constant volume explosion test increase. For reactive structures, nanocomposite powders with bulk compositions of 8Al·MoO3, 12Al·MoO3, and 8Al·3CuO were prepared by ARM and consolidated using a uniaxial die. Consolidated samples had densities greater than 90% of theoretical maximum density while maintaining their high reactivity. Pellets prepared using 8Al·MoO3 powders were ignited by a CO2 laser. Ignition delays increased at lower laser powers and greater pellet densities. A simplified numerical model describing heating and thermal initiation of the reactive pellets predicted adequately the observed effects of both laser power and pellet density on the measured ignition delays. To investigate the reaction mechanisms in nanocomposite thermites, two types of nanocomposite reactive materials with the same bulk compositions 8Al·MoO3 were prepared by different methods. One of the materials was manufactured by ARM and the other, so called metastable interstitial composite (MIC), by mixing of nano-scaled individual powders. Clear differences in the low-temperature redox reactions, welldetectable by differential scanning calorimetry

  12. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  13. Multilayer graphene rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard; Frasca, Daniele; Schulze, Dietmar; Wachtendorf, Volker; Krafft, Bernd; Morys, Michael; Böhning, Martin; Rybak, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer Graphene (MLG), a nanoparticle with a specific surface of BET = 250 m2/g and thus made of only approximately 10 graphene sheets, is proposed as a nanofiller for rubbers. When homogenously dispersed, it works at low loadings enabling the replacement of carbon black (CB), increase in efficiency, or reduction in filler concentration. Actually the appropriate preparation yielded nanocomposites in which just 3 phr are sufficient to significantly improve the rheological, curing and mechanical properties of different rubbers, as shown for Chlorine-Isobutylene-Isoprene Rubber (CIIR), Nitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Natural Rubber (NR), and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR). A mere 3 phr of MLG tripled the Young's modulus of CIIR, an effect equivalent to 20 phr of carbon black. Similar equivalents are observed for MLG/CB mixtures. MLG reduces gas permeability, increases thermal and electrical conductivities, and retards fire behavior. The later shown by the reduction in heat release rate in the cone calorimeter. The higher the nanofiller concentration is (3 phr, 5 phr, and 10 phr was investigated), the greater the improvement in the properties of the nanocomposites. Moreover, the MLG nanocomposites improve stability of mechanical properties against weathering. An increase in UV-absorption as well as a pronounced radical scavenging are proposed and were proved experimentally. To sum up, MLG is interesting as a multifunctional nanofiller and seems to be quite ready for rubber development.

  14. Metal-Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolais, Luigi; Carotenuto, Gianfranco

    2004-09-01

    A unique guide to an essential area of nanoscience Interest in nano-sized metals has increased greatly due to their special characteristics and suitability for a number of advanced applications. As technology becomes more refined-including the ability to effectively manipulate and stabilize metals at the nanoscale-these materials present ever-more workable solutions to a growing range of problems. Metal-Polymer Nanocomposites provides the first guide solely devoted to the unique properties and applications of this essential area of nanoscience. It offers a truly multidisciplinary approach, making the text accessible to readers in physical, chemical, and materials science as well as areas such as engineering and topology. The thorough coverage includes: * The chemical and physical properties of nano-sized metals * Different approaches to the synthesis of metal-polymer nanocomposites (MPN) * Advanced characterization techniques and methods for study of MPN * Real-world applications, including color filters, polarizers, optical sensors, nonlinear optical devices, and more * An extensive list of references on the topics covered A unique, cutting-edge resource for a vital area of nanoscience development, Metal-Polymer Nanocomposites is an invaluable text for students and practitioners of materials science, engineering, polymer science, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, and optics.

  15. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-20

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  16. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  17. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  18. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  19. Process for making hollow carbon spheres

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

    2013-04-16

    A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

  20. Impingement of Water Droplets on a Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Saper, Paul G.; Kadow, Charles F.

    1955-01-01

    Droplet trajectories about a sphere in ideal fluid flow were calculated. From the calculated droplet trajectories the droplet impingement characteristics of the sphere were determined. Impingement data and equations for determining the collection efficiency, the area, and the distribution of impingement are presented in terms of dimensionless parameters. The range of flight and atmospheric conditions covered in the calculations was extended considerably beyond the range covered by previously reported calculations for the sphere.

  1. Thermoset-Based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhembe, Pele

    2002-03-01

    The field of polymer-Clay nanocomposites has attracted considerable attention as a method of enhancing polymer properties and extending their utility, by using molecular or nanoscale reinforcements rather than conventional particulate field microcomposites. Layered silicates dispersed as a reinforcing phase in a polymer matrix are one of the most important forms of such inorganic-organic nanocomposites, making them the subject of intense research. While a significant amount of work has been published on thermoplastic based nanocomposites, however, comparatively few studies of thermoset-based systems have been published. Thus, our research is centered on elucidating the structure-property relationships of thermoset-based nanocomposites. We have developed a series of layered silicate/thermoset nanocomposites using several thermoset polymers (epoxies(di and tetrafunctional), cyanate esters and PMR-15 polyimide). Wide angle X-ray diffraction suggests that intercalated morphologies were obtained for the cases studied. The glass transition temperature has been found to vary as the organic modifier and its amount is varied. For difunctional epoxy samples dispersed with Cloisite 30B, a commercially available nanoclay, the Tg increased by twenty degrees upon addition of as little as 2viscoelastic behavior of these materials has also been investigated using dynamic mechanical analysis. A modest increase in the glassy storage modulus was obtained as the amount of nanoclay increased, with a significant increase in the plateau modulus. Additionally, master curves have been generated using time-temperature superposition, allowing further analysis of the effect of the nanoclay on the relaxation behavior. Activation energies calculated from Arrhenius plots increase as the clay contents increase. These effects will be discussed in the presentation. The fracture toughness increased upon addition of nanoclays while the CTE decreased. Interestingly, the onset of decomposition

  2. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1979-01-09

    Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  3. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-09

    Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

  4. The water entry of decelerating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristoff, Jeffrey M.; Truscott, Tadd T.; Techet, Alexandra H.; Bush, John W. M.

    2010-03-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the vertical impact of low-density spheres on a water surface. Particular attention is given to characterizing the sphere dynamics and the influence of its deceleration on the shape of the resulting air cavity. A theoretical model is developed which yields simple expressions for the pinch-off time and depth, as well as the volume of air entrained by the sphere. Theoretical predictions compare favorably with our experimental observations, and allow us to rationalize the form of water-entry cavities resulting from the impact of buoyant and nearly buoyant spheres.

  5. Science off the Sphere: Earth in Infrared

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit views cities, agricultural areas and deserts using an infrared camera for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA...

  6. Nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels mimic native tissue microenvironment due to their porous and hydrated molecular structure. An emerging approach to reinforce polymeric hydrogels and to include multiple functionalities focuses on incorporating nanoparticles within the hydrogel network. A wide range of nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, polymeric, ceramic, and metallic nanomaterials can be integrated within the hydrogel networks to obtain nanocomposites with superior properties and tailored functionality. Nanocomposite hydrogels can be engineered to possess superior physical, chemical, electrical, and biological properties. This review focuses on the most recent developments in the field of nanocomposite hydrogels with emphasis on biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In particular, we discuss synthesis and fabrication of nanocomposite hydrogels, examine their current limitations and conclude with future directions in designing more advanced nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:24264728

  7. Cellulose nanocrystal-filled poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite fibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2009-10-14

    Nanocomposite fibrous membranes have been fabricated by electrospinning cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-loaded poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) ethanol mixtures. Incorporating CNC in PAA significantly reduced fiber diameters and improved fiber uniformity. The average diameters of the as-spun nanocomposite fibers were significantly reduced from 349 nm to 162 nm, 141 nm, 90 nm and 69 nm at 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% CNC loading (by weight of a constant 4% PAA solution), respectively. CNC was well dispersed in the fibers as isolated rods oriented along the fiber axis and as spheres in the PAA matrix. The Young modulus and stress of the PAA/CNC nanocomposite fibers were significantly improved with increasing CNC loadings by up to 35-fold and 16-fold, respectively. Heat-induced esterification between the CNC surface hydroxyls and PAA carboxyl groups produced covalent crosslinks at the CNC-PAA interfaces, rendering the nanocomposite fibrous membranes insoluble in water, more thermally stable and far more superior in tensile strength. With 20% CNC, the crosslinked nanocomposite fibrous membrane exhibited a very impressive 77-fold increase in modulus and 58-fold increase in stress.

  8. Tandem spheres in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf; Hornung, Hans G

    2009-01-01

    The problem of determining the forces acting on a secondary body when it is travelling at some point within the shocked region created by a hypersonic primary body is of interest in such situations as store or stage separation, re-entry of multiple vehicles, and atmospheric meteoroid fragmentation. The current work is concerned with a special case of this problem, namely that in which both bodies are spheres and are stationary with respect to one another. We first present an approximate analytical model of the problem; subsequently, numerical simulations are described and results are compared with those from the analytical model. Finally, results are presented from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel in which a newly-developed force-measurement technique was employed.

  9. Soft-sphere soft glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Clarke, S. M.; Brańka, A. C.

    2009-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to compute physical properties of model fluids in which the particles interacted via the soft-sphere pair potential (SSP) ϕ(r )=ɛ(σ /r)n, where ɛ and σ are the characteristic energy and distance, respectively. The emphasis is on small values of n, tending to the lower theromodynamically allowed bound of 3+. An accurate equation of state for the SSP fluid is obtained, consisting of two terms, and as n→3+, the compressibility factor, Z tends to Z =B2ζn /3 for ζ >0, where B2 is the second virial coefficient, and ζ =πNσ3/6V is a nominal packing fraction for N particles in volume V. A simple formula for the position of the first peak in the radial distribution function in the soft particle limit is proposed and shown to agree with the simulation data. The fluid phase velocity autocorrelation function at fluid-solid coexistence becomes more oscillatory as n decreases. Values for the self-diffusion coefficient D and shear viscosity η were calculated as a function of n and density, and these were used to estimate the n-dependence of an ideal glass transition. The glass transition shifts relatively further into the solid part of the phase diagram as softness (˜1/n) increases. D decreases by ca. 75% and η increases by about a factor of 3 along the fluid-solid coexistence line from n =∞ to 3.25. Non-Gaussian behavior was calculated from the particle displacements as a function of particle softness. A screened soft-sphere potential, SSSP, was introduced to explore the effects for small n of the long range part of the potential in relation to the scale of the local structure. The SSSP with suitable analytic form and parameters can give statistically indistinguishable results from the full SSP for the static properties, D and η.

  10. The Circle and Sphere as Great Equalizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, Steven

    1991-01-01

    From the equality of the ratios of the surface areas and volumes of a sphere and its circumscribed cylinder, the exploration of theorems relating the ratios of surface areas and volumes of a sphere and other circumscribed solids in three dimensions, and analogous questions relating two-dimensional concepts of perimeter and area is recounted. (MDH)

  11. The "Magical" Sphere: Uncovering the Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Bukleski, Miha

    2006-01-01

    A red sphere is seen at the bottom of a sealed glass tube filled with a colorless, transparent liquid. Holding the tube for a short period makes the sphere rise slowly from the bottom until it finally floats on the surface of the liquid. Instructions for preparing the demonstration are given, together with an explanation of the phenomenon. A…

  12. An introduction to polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Gordon

    2015-11-01

    This review presents an overview of the formulation, characterization and range of applications for polymer nanocomposites. After explaining how material properties at the nanometre scale can vary compared to those observed at longer length scales, typical methods used to formulate and characterize nanocomposites at laboratory and industrial scale will be described. The range of mechanical, electrical and thermal properties obtainable from nanocomposite materials, with examples of current commercial applications, will be outlined. Formulation and characterization of nanoparticle, nanotube and graphene composites will be discussed by reference to nanoclay-based composites, as the latter are presently of most technological relevance. Three brief case studies are presented to demonstrate how structure/property relationships may be controlled in a variety of polymer nanocomposite systems to achieve required performance in a given application. The review will conclude by discussing potential obstacles to commercial uptake of polymer nanocomposites, such as inconsistent protocols to characterize nanocomposites, cost/performance balances, raw material availability, and emerging legislation, and will conclude by discussing the outlook for future development and commercial uptake of polymer nanocomposites.

  13. Polyolefin cubic silsesquioxane nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lei

    This thesis focuses on the synthesis and characterization of polyolefin nanocomposites containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) units. Two copolymerization methods were developed utilizing either ring-opening metathesis polymerization or metallocene-catalyzed reactions to incorporate cubic silsesquioxane into polyolefins. Ring-opening metathesis copolymerizations of cyclooctene and the POSS-norbornylene macromonomer have been performed using Grubbs' catalyst RuCl2(=CHPh)(PCy3)2. Random copolymers have been prepared and characterized with POSS loadings as high as 55 wt%. Diimide reduction of these copolymers affords polyethylene-POSS random copolymers. Polyethylene (PE) and isotactic polypropylene (PP) copolymers incorporating POSS have also been prepared using a metallocene/methylaluminoxane (MAO) cocatalyst system. A wide range of POSS concentrations was obtained in these polyolefin POSS copolymers under mild conditions; up to 56 wt% for PE-POSS copolymers and 73 wt% for PP-POSS copolymers were prepared. Copolymerizations of styrene and the POSS-styryl macromonomer have been performed using CpTiCl 3 in conjunction with MAO. Random copolymers of syndiotactic polystyrene and POSS copolymers have been formed and characterized. Novel nanocomposites of PE-POSS have been characterized using Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS). From both line broadening of the diffraction maxima and also the oriented diffraction in a drawn sample, we conclude that POSS forms anisotropically shaped crystallites. On the basis of this result, a novel approach to obtain nanocomposites containing inorganic nanolayers is proposed. Cubic silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles are used to achieve the nanolayered "clay-like" structure through controlled self-assembly. The organic polymer, covalently connected to POSS, is intended to regulate the POSS crystallization into a two-dimensional lattice. The concept is demonstrated by random copolymers of polybutadiene and POSS. The data from

  14. Fabrication of long lasting phosphorescence glass spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hao; Liu, Aimei; Tong, Jufang; Yi, Xunong; Li, Qianguang

    2008-12-01

    The long lasting phosphorescence glass spheres doped with Eu2O3 and Dy2O3 were prepared under the reducing atmosphere and characterized. XRD analysis indicated the glass spheres exhibited the typical diffraction peaks of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+. The emission spectra of the glass spheres showed broad bands peaking at 510nm. The excitation spectra of the glass spheres showed broad bands ranging from 300 to 480nm. These are believed due to the 5d4f-->4f transitions of Eu2+ in the SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors. The afterglow luminescence of the glass spheres excited by a 40W fluorescence lamp for 30min can be observed in the dark for about 15h with the naked eye.

  15. Polyamide 6/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dębowska, M.; Rudzińska-Girulska, J.; Pigłowski, J.; Dołęga, J.

    2008-05-01

    Polyamide 6 (PA6) and its two exfoliated nanocomposites (PA6/Nf919 and PA6/BZ-COCO), with bentonite (2.5 wt.%) organophilically treated with different cations, were studied. Improved mechanical properties, changes in crystallinity and morphology as well as higher glass transition temperature values were observed for the nanocomposites in comparison to the neat PA6. For the nanocomposite PA6/BZ-COCO, of better surface modification of platelets and better interaction between the polymeric matrix and the organobentonite, higher values of Young's modulus and yielding point together with higher contribution of larger free volume holes to free volume distributions occurred.

  16. Functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nanocomposite fibrous networks: Characterization by fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Neda

    2015-02-01

    The preparation and characterization of functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nano-composite fibrous material is described. Magnetite-cellulose nano-composite was prepared by a combination of the solution-based formation of magnetic nano-particles and subsequent coating with amino celluloses. Characterization was accomplished using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis. The peaks of Fe3O4 in the XRD pattern of nanocomposite confirm existence of the nanoparticles in the amino cellulose matrix. Magnetite-cellulose particles exhibit an average diameter of roughly 33 nm as demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles were irregular spheres dispersed in the cellulose matrix. The vibration corresponding to the Nsbnd CH3 functional group about 2850 cm-1 is assigned in the FTIR spectra. Functionalized magnetite-cellulose nano-composite polymers have a potential range of application as targeted drug delivery system in biomedical field.

  17. Some novel polymeric nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mark, James E

    2006-12-01

    The nanocomposites described here all involve polymers and were chosen because they are already of commercial importance, show some promise of becoming so, or simply seem interesting. The field is so broad that some topics are mentioned only very briefly, and there is considerable emphasis on the polysiloxane nanocomposites studied by the author's research group. Some are typically prepared using techniques very similar to those used in the new sol-gel approach to ceramics, with either the polymer or the ceramic being the continuous phase. Other dispersed phases include particles responsive to an applied magnetic field, intercalated or exfoliated platelets obtained from clays, mica, or graphite, silsesquioxane nanocages, nanotubes, dual fillers, porous particles, spherical and ellipsoidal polymeric particles, and nanocatalysts. Also described are some typical studies involving theory or simulations on such particle reinforcement. Experiments on ceramics modified by dispersed polymers are equally interesting, but there is less relevant theory. Many of the fields mentioned have become so vast that the approach taken here is simply to describe general approaches and characteristics of the composites, list some specific examples, and provide leading references (with some emphasis on studies that are relatively recent or in the nature of reviews).

  18. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space {M} is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail {N}=(2,2) and {N}=(0,2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and {N}=2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is Kähler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing Kähler class. For {N}=(2,2) theories in d = 2 and {N}=2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the Kähler potential of {M} follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  19. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads tomore » new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.« less

  20. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  1. Induced differentiation inhibits sphere formation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Craig, Brian T; Rellinger, Eric J; Alvarez, Alexandra L; Dusek, Haley L; Qiao, Jingbo; Chung, Dai H

    2016-08-19

    Neuroblastoma arises from the neural crest, the precursor cells of the sympathoadrenal axis, and differentiation status is a key prognostic factor used for clinical risk group stratification and treatment strategies. Neuroblastoma tumor-initiating cells have been successfully isolated from patient tumor samples and bone marrow using sphere culture, which is well established to promote growth of neural crest stem cells. However, accurate quantification of sphere-forming frequency of commonly used neuroblastoma cell lines has not been reported. Here, we show that MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines form spheres more frequently than non-MYCN-amplified cell lines. We also show that sphere formation is directly sensitive to cellular differentiation status. 13-cis-retinoic acid is a clinically used differentiating agent that induces a neuronal phenotype in neuroblastoma cells. Induced differentiation nearly completely blocked sphere formation. Furthermore, sphere formation was specifically FGF-responsive and did not respond to increasing doses of EGF. Taken together, these data suggest that sphere formation is an accurate method of quantifying the stemness phenotype in neuroblastoma. PMID:27297102

  2. Recent advances in biodegradable nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jitendra K; Kumar, A Pratheep; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K; Drzal, Lawrence T; Singh, Raj Pal

    2005-04-01

    There is growing interest in developing bio-based products and innovative process technologies that can reduce the dependence on fossil fuel and move to a sustainable materials basis. Biodegradable bio-based nanocomposites are the next generation of materials for the future. Renewable resource-based biodegradable polymers including cellulosic plastic (plastic made from wood), corn-derived plastics, and polyhydroxyalkanoates (plastics made from bacterial sources) are some of the potential biopolymers which, in combination with nanoclay reinforcement, can produce nanocomposites for a variety of applications. Nanocomposites of this category are expected to possess improved strength and stiffness with little sacrifice of toughness, reduced gas/water vapor permeability, a lower coefficient of thermal expansion, and an increased heat deflection temperature, opening an opportunity for the use of new, high performance, lightweight green nanocomposite materials to replace conventional petroleum-based composites. The present review addresses this green material, including its technical difficulties and their solutions.

  3. Flow around spheres by dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Fan, Xi Jun

    2006-10-01

    The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is used to study the flow behavior past a sphere. The sphere is represented by frozen DPD particles while the surrounding fluids are modeled by simple DPD particles (representing a Newtonian fluid). For the surface of the sphere, the conventional model without special treatment and the model with specular reflection boundary condition proposed by Revenga et al. [Comput. Phys. Commun. 121-122, 309 (1999)] are compared. Various computational domains, in which the sphere is held stationary at the center, are investigated to gage the effects of periodic conditions and walls for Reynolds number (Re)=0.5 and 50. Two types of flow conditions, uniform flow and shear flow are considered, respectively, to study the drag force and torque acting on the stationary sphere. It is found that the calculated drag force imposed on the sphere based on the model with specular reflection is slightly lower than the conventional model without special treatment. With the conventional model the drag force acting on the sphere is in better agreement with experimental correlation obtained by Brown and Lawler [J. Environ. Eng. 129, 222 (2003)] for the case of larger radius up to Re of about 5. The computed torque also approaches the analytical Stokes value when Re <1. For a force-free and torque-free sphere, its motion in the flow is captured by solving the translational and rotational equations of motion. The effects of different DPD parameters (a, γ, and σ) on the drag force and torque are studied. It shows that the dissipative coefficient (γ) mainly affects the drag force and torque, while random and conservative coefficient have little influence on them. Furthermore the settling of a single sphere in square tube is investigated, in which the wall effect is considered. Good agreement is found with the experiments of Miyamura et al. [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 7, 31 (1981)] and lattice-Boltzmann simulation results of Aidun et al. [J. Fluid Mech

  4. Multifunctional nanocomposite materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.; Komarneni, S.

    1991-11-01

    Objective is to examine the low temperature nanocomposite route in the synthesis of multifunctional materials using two-dimensional clays as hosts. After about 8 months, a significant advance was made in the design and synthesis of novel nanocomposite materials, which are nanometal intercalated clays prepared by a low temperature route. A layered V{sub 2}O{sub 5} gel has been made hydrothermally and its cation exchange properties measured. Several pillared clays have also been synthesized and characterized.

  5. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  6. The water entry of decelerating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristoff, Jeffrey; Truscott, Tadd; Techet, Alexandra; Bush, John

    2009-11-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the vertical impact of low-density spheres on a water surface. Particular attention is given to characterizing the sphere dynamics and the influence of its deceleration on the shape of the resulting air cavity. A theoretical model is developed that yields simple expressions for the pinch-off time and depth. Theoretical predictions compare favorably with our experimental observations, and allow us to rationalize the form of water-entry cavities resulting from the impact of buoyant and nearly buoyant spheres.

  7. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  8. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  9. Magnetoelectric polymer nanocomposite for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Alnassar, M. Alfadhel, A.; Ivanov, Yu. P.; Kosel, J.

    2015-05-07

    This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of a new type of magnetoelectric polymer nanocomposite that exhibits excellent ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity simultaneously at room temperature. The multiferroic nanocomposite consists of high aspect ratio ferromagnetic iron nanowires embedded inside a ferroelectric co-polymer poly(vinylindene fluoride-trifluoroethylene), P(VDF-TrFE). The nanocomposite has been fabricated via a simple low temperature spin coating technique. Structural, ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, and magnetoelectric properties of the developed nanocomposite have been characterized. The nanocomposite films showed isotropic magnetic properties due to the random orientation of the iron nanowires inside the film. In addition, the embedded nanowires did not hinder the ferroelectric phase development of the nanocomposite. The developed nanocomposite showed a high magnetoelectric coupling response of 156 mV/cmOe measured at 3.1 kOe DC bias field. This value is among the highest reported magnetoelectric coupling in two phase particulate polymer nanocomposites.

  10. Effect of Nanofiller Characteristics on Nanocomposite Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Working, Dennis C.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wise, Kristopher E.; Park, Cheol

    2016-01-01

    This report surveys the effect of nanofiller characteristics on nanocomposites fabricated with two polyimide matrices. Mechanical and electrical properties were determined. Microscopy results showed that matrix chemistry, nanofiller characteristics and processing conditions had significant impact on nanocomposite quality.

  11. Separate spheres and indirect benefits

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Dan W

    2003-01-01

    On any plausible account of the basis for health care resource prioritization, the benefits and costs of different alternative resource uses are relevant considerations in the prioritization process. Consequentialists hold that the maximization of benefits with available resources is the only relevant consideration. Non-consequentialists do not reject the relevance of consequences of benefits and costs, but insist that other considerations, and in particular the distribution of benefits and costs, are morally important as well. Whatever one's particular account of morally justified standards for the prioritization of different health interventions, we must be able to measure those interventions' benefits and costs. There are many theoretical and practical difficulties in that measurement, such as how to weigh extending life against improving health and quality of life as well as how different quality of life improvements should be valued, but they are not my concern here. This paper addresses two related issues in assessing benefits and costs for health resource prioritization. First, should benefits be restricted only to health benefits, or include as well other non health benefits such as economic benefits to employers from reducing the lost work time due to illness of their employees? I shall call this the Separate Spheres problem. Second, should only the direct benefits, such as extending life or reducing disability, and direct costs, such as costs of medical personnel and supplies, of health interventions be counted, or should other indirect benefits and costs be counted as well? I shall call this the Indirect Benefits problem. These two issues can have great importance for a ranking of different health interventions by either a cost/benefit or cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) standard. PMID:12773217

  12. #4 Simulated Solar Sphere from Data - Interpolated

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rotating solar sphere made from a combination of imagery from the two STEREO spacecraft, together with simultaneous data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory.This movie is made from data taken on Jan...

  13. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  14. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  15. Science off the Sphere: Thin Film Physics

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  16. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-02-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys.

  17. Science off the Sphere: Lenses and Vortices

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  18. Science off the Sphere: Knitting Needles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit uses knitting needles and water droplets to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between N...

  19. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  20. Elastic spheres can walk on water.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C; Jandron, Michael A; Bower, Allan F; Truscott, Tadd T

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  1. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  2. How Nano Are Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Dale W.; Justice, Ryan S.

    2010-10-22

    Composite materials loaded with nanometer-sized reinforcing fillers are widely believed to have the potential to push polymer mechanical properties to extreme values. Realization of anticipated properties, however, has proven elusive. The analysis presented here traces this shortfall to the large-scale morphology of the filler as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, light scattering, and electron imaging. We examine elastomeric, thermoplastic, and thermoset composites loaded with a variety of nanoscale reinforcing fillers such as precipitated silica, carbon nanotubes (single and multiwalled), and layered silicates. The conclusion is that large-scale disorder is ubiquitous in nanocomposites regardless of the level of dispersion, leading to substantial reduction of mechanical properties (modulus) compared to predictions based on idealized filler morphology.

  3. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  4. Liouville Quantum Gravity on the Riemann Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, François; Kupiainen, Antti; Rhodes, Rémi; Vargas, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we rigorously construct Liouville Quantum Field Theory on the Riemann sphere introduced in the 1981 seminal work by Polyakov. We establish some of its fundamental properties like conformal covariance under PSL{_2({C})}-action, Seiberg bounds, KPZ scaling laws, KPZ formula and the Weyl anomaly formula. We also make precise conjectures about the relationship of the theory to scaling limits of random planar maps conformally embedded onto the sphere.

  5. Hollow sphere ceramic particles for abradable coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.N.; Bader, N.F. III; Dorfman, M.R.

    1984-05-22

    A hollow sphere ceramic flame spray powder is disclosed. The desired constituents are first formed into agglomerated particles in a spray drier. Then the agglomerated particles are introduced into a plasma flame which is adjusted so that the particles collected are substantially hollow. The hollow sphere ceramic particles are suitable for flame spraying a porous and abradable coating. The hollow particles may be selected from the group consisting of zirconium oxide and magnesium zirconate.

  6. Approximating spheroid inductive responses using spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank

    2003-12-12

    The response of high permeability ({mu}{sub r} {ge} 50) conductive spheroids of moderate aspect ratios (0.25 to 4) to excitation by uniform magnetic fields in the axial or transverse directions is approximated by the response of spheres of appropriate diameters, of the same conductivity and permeability, with magnitude rescaled based on the differing volumes, D.C. magnetizations, and high frequency limit responses of the spheres and modeled spheroids.

  7. Growth of various Au Ag nanocomposites from gold seeds in amino acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Fen; Lin, Yang-Wei; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we describe an easy procedure for the preparation of differently shaped and sized Au-Ag nanocomposites from gold nanorod (AuNR) seeds in various amino acid solutions—arginine (Arg), cysteine (Cys), glycine (Gly), glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), histidine (His), lysine (Lys), and methionine (Met), respectively—at values of pH ranging from 8.0 to 11.5. Our results suggest that the pH, the nature of the amino acid, and its concentration all have significant impact on the preparation of Au-Ag nanocomposites; these factors exhibit their effects mainly through control over the reducing ability of ascorbate and/or its recognition capability, as well as through control over the surface charges of the amino acids on the AuNRs. Depending on the value of pH, we were able to prepare I-shaped, dumbbell-shaped, and/or sphere-shaped Au-Ag nanocomposites in 0.1 M solutions of Arg, Gly, Glu, Gln, Lys, and Met. In His solutions at pH 8.0 and 9.0, we obtained peanut-shaped Au-Ag nanocomposites. Corn-shaped Au-Ag nanocomposites were prepared in 0.1 M Met solutions (pH 9.0 and 10.0). By controlling the Lys concentration at pH 10.0, we synthesized pearl-necklace-shaped Au-Ag nanoparticles and Au-Ag wires. Based on the TEM images, we conclude that this simple and reproducible synthetic approach allows preparation of high-quality (>87%, beside>77% in His solutions) Au-Ag nanocomposites with various shapes and sizes under different conditions.

  8. Inverse Magnus effect on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of rotating spheres in the subcritical Reynolds number (Re) regime by measuring the drag and lift forces on the sphere and the two-dimensional velocity in the wake. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 6 ×105 - 2 . 6 ×105 and the spin ratio (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 0.5. The drag coefficient on a stationary sphere remains nearly constant at around 0.52. However, the magnitude of lift coefficient is nearly zero at Re < 2 . 0 ×105 , but rapidly increases to 0.3 and then remains constant with further increasing Reynolds number. On the other hand, with rotation, the lift coefficient shows negative values, called inverse Magnus effect, depending on the magnitudes of the Reynolds number and spin ratio. The velocity field measured from a particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that non-zero lift coefficient on a stationary sphere at Re > 2 . 0 ×105 results from the asymmetry of separation line, whereas the inverse Magnus effect for the rotating sphere results from the differences in the boundary-layer growth and separation along the upper and lower sphere surfaces. Supported by the WCU, Converging Research Center and Priority Research Centers Program, NRF, MEST, Korea.

  9. Geometry Dependence of Magnetization Reversal in Nanocomposite Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R; Manchanda, P; Takeuchi, I; Cui, J

    2014-05-31

    The geometrical optimization of aligned hard-soft permanent-magnet nanocomposites is investigated by model calculations. Considered criteria are the shapes of the soft and c-axis-aligned hard phases, the packing fraction of the soft phase, and magnetostatic interactions. Taking into account that the energy product is enhanced via the volume fraction of the soft phase, subject to maintaining coercivity, we find that the best structures are soft-magnetic cubes as well as long rods with a square cross section. Comparing embedded soft cubes with embedded soft spheres of the same size, our nucleation-field analysis shows that the volume fraction of the soft phase is enhanced by 91%, with a coercivity reduction of only 25%. Magnetostatic interactions often but not always deteriorate the permanent-magnet performance, as exemplified by the example of MnBi:FeCo bilayers and multilayers.

  10. Geometry Dependence of Magnetization Reversal in Nanocomposite Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, Ralph; Manchanda, Priyanka; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Cui, Jun

    2014-06-11

    The geometrical optimization of aligned hard-soft permanent-magnet nanocomposites is investigated by model calculations. Considered criteria are the shapes of the soft and c-axis-aligned hard phases, the packing fraction of the soft phase, and magnetostatic interactions. Taking into account that the energy product is enhanced via the volume fraction of the soft phase, subject to maintaining coercivity, we find that the best structures are soft-magnetic cubes as well as long rods with a square cross section. Comparing embedded soft cubes with embedded soft spheres of the same size, our nucleation-field analysis shows that the volume fraction of the soft phase is enhanced by 91%, with a coercivity reduction of only 25%. Magnetostatic interactions often but not always deteriorate the permanent-magnet performance, as exemplified by the example of MnBi:FeCo bilayers and multilayers.

  11. Collinear swimmer propelling a cargo sphere at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Felderhof, B U

    2014-11-01

    The swimming velocity and rate of dissipation of a linear chain consisting of two or three little spheres and a big sphere is studied on the basis of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The big sphere is treated as a passive cargo, driven by the tail of little spheres via hydrodynamic and direct elastic interaction. The fundamental solution of Stokes equations in the presence of a sphere with a no-slip boundary condition, as derived by Oseen, is used to model the hydrodynamic interactions between the big sphere and the little spheres.

  12. Terminal energy distribution of blast waves from bursting spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, A. A.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation results for the total energy delivered to the surroundings by the burst of an idealized massless sphere containing an ideal gas are presented. The logic development of various formulas for sphere energy is also presented. For all types of sphere bursts the fraction of the total initial energy available in the sphere that is delivered to the surroundings is shown to lie between that delivered for the constant pressure addition of energy to a source region and that delivered by isentropic expansion of the sphere. The relative value of E sub/Q increases at fixed sphere pressure/surrounding pressure as sphere temperature increases because the velocity of sound increases.

  13. The structure and dynamics of polymer nanocomposites containing anisotropic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Chun; Ohno, Kohji; Clarke, Nigel; Winey, Karen; Composto, Russell; Hore, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The tracer diffusion of deuterated polystyrene (dPS; 49-532 kg/mol) is measured in polystyrene (PS: 270 kg/mol) nanocomposites containing PS-grafted (132 kg/mol) anisotropic nanoparticles (NP). The NP's are small aggregates containing iron oxide spheres (5nm). These NP's uniformly disperse in PS up to 100% loading. The structure of the polymer nanocomposites is probed using (ultra)small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS,SAXS). Peaks shift to high Q region with increasing NP loadings, indicating a decrease in spacing between particles. The interparticle distance for the pure NP case is 30nm, consistent with TEM, and a brush thickness of 15nm. The brush profile is also measured using SANS. The reduced tracer diffusion coefficient initially decreases as NP loadings increase and then reaches a minimum (35% reduction) near 0.25 vol% (core) for all dPS. With a further increase in NP loading, diffusion recovers to 90% of the unfilled case. Penetration of the tracer (i.e., wetting) into the brush will affect the effective interparticle distance. Diffusion of dPS (1866 kg/mol) will be examined to determine if the dry brush case influences the recovery at high loading. These experiments demonstrate that polymer brushes grafted to anisotropic nano particles can affect the tracer diffusion pathway and indicate that diffusion models should incorporate the interfacial structure between brush and matrix.

  14. Nanocomposite thin films exhibiting high mechanical and optical flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druffel, Thad; Buazza, Omar; Lattis, Matt; Farmer, Scott

    2008-08-01

    Nanocomposites are created by doping host polymers with nanoparticles that typically have higher or lower refractive indices. The ability to tailor the mechanical and optical performance of these composites has led to their increased use in transparent materials. Nanocomposites maintain the elastic properties of the binding polymers and exhibit infinite refractive index tunability between the limits of the system. These unique properties provide distinct benefits for multilayer, thin-film optical filters. Because the nanoparticles are dispersed in a fluid or bound in a polymer matrix in use, toxicity risks that may be associated with raw particles are reduced. Using a stable dispersion of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and a UV curable monomer, we were able to design and produce several quarter-wave filters that demonstrate control of the height and width of the passband through adjustment of the organic/inorganic ratio and layer count. The volume loading of the metal oxides can be adjusted from zero to near the theoretical packing density of spheres, allowing refractive index to be controlled over a large range. Because metal oxide particles exhibit high UV absorption, these additives provide UV protection to the host polymer and the filter's substrate. Additionally, significant improvements in abrasion resistance are often observed in films loaded with nanoparticles at the concentrations of interest.

  15. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrea L.; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals’ endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  16. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrea L; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals' endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  17. Recent researches on the air resistance of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachsbart, O

    1928-01-01

    The following conclusions on air resistance of spheres are drawn: 1) disturbances in front of the sphere and even single fine wires affect the critical Reynolds Number; 2) disturbances around the sphere increased the drag of the sphere without martially affecting the value of the Reynolds Number(sub crith); 3) great disturbances of the boundary layer of the sphere likewise change R.N.(sub crith); 4) turbulence of the approaching air stream lowers critical R.N.

  18. Polycarbonate based three-phase nanocomposite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Goyal, R. K.; Prasad, Y. V. S. S.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Three-phase polycarbonate (PC) matrix nanocomposites are prepared using the solution method. One of the nanocomposite fillers is dielectric and the other is conducting. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is used as the dielectric filler. The conducting fillers, nano-Cu and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), are used to make two different nanocomposites, MWCNT–PZT–PC and Cu–PZT–PC. The prepared nanocomposites are characterized using density measurement, x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Percolation is absent in both three-phase nanocomposites within the study’s concentration window of conducting fillers. The dielectric properties of the nanocomposites are evaluated using a precision impedance analyser. The dielectric constant of the Cu–PZT–PC nanocomposite increases to 14 (a dissipation factor of 0.17), whereas in the case of the MWCNT–PZT–PC nanocomposite it increases to 8.5 (a dissipation factor of 0.002). The melting point of both nanocomposites decreases with respect to the control PC. The frequency (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and temperature (room temperature to 200 °C) dependence of the dielectric constant and dissipation factor are examined. For the Cu–PZT–PC nanocomposites, the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency, whereas in the case of the MWCNT–PZT–PC nanocomposites the dielectric constant is almost constant. The dielectric constant and dissipation factor exhibit a slight temperature dependence.

  19. Polycarbonate based three-phase nanocomposite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Goyal, R. K.; Prasad, Y. V. S. S.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Three-phase polycarbonate (PC) matrix nanocomposites are prepared using the solution method. One of the nanocomposite fillers is dielectric and the other is conducting. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is used as the dielectric filler. The conducting fillers, nano-Cu and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), are used to make two different nanocomposites, MWCNT-PZT-PC and Cu-PZT-PC. The prepared nanocomposites are characterized using density measurement, x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Percolation is absent in both three-phase nanocomposites within the study’s concentration window of conducting fillers. The dielectric properties of the nanocomposites are evaluated using a precision impedance analyser. The dielectric constant of the Cu-PZT-PC nanocomposite increases to 14 (a dissipation factor of 0.17), whereas in the case of the MWCNT-PZT-PC nanocomposite it increases to 8.5 (a dissipation factor of 0.002). The melting point of both nanocomposites decreases with respect to the control PC. The frequency (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and temperature (room temperature to 200 °C) dependence of the dielectric constant and dissipation factor are examined. For the Cu-PZT-PC nanocomposites, the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency, whereas in the case of the MWCNT-PZT-PC nanocomposites the dielectric constant is almost constant. The dielectric constant and dissipation factor exhibit a slight temperature dependence.

  20. Robotics Programming Competition Spheres, Russian Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Kukushkina, Natalia; Biryukova, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Spheres" such name was done to Russian part of the Zero Robotics project which is a student competition devoted to programming of SPHERES (SPHERES - Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites are the experimental robotics devices which are capable of rotation and translation in all directions, http://ssl.mit.edu/spheres/), which perform different operations on the board of International Space Station. Competition takes place online on http://zerorobotics.mit.edu. The main goal is to develop a program for SPHERES to solve an annual challenge. The end of the tournament is the real competition in microgravity on the board of ISS with a live broadcast. The Russian part of the tournament has only two years history but the problems, organization and specific are useful for the other educational projects especially for the international ones. We introduce the history of the competition, its scientific and educational goals in Russia and describe the participation of Russian teams in 2014 and 2015 tournaments. Also we discuss the organizational problems.

  1. Thermodynamic properties of non-conformal soft-sphere fluids with effective hard-sphere diameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Tonalli; del Río, Fernando

    2012-01-28

    In this work we study a set of soft-sphere systems characterised by a well-defined variation of their softness. These systems represent an extension of the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential widely used in statistical mechanics of fluids. This type of soft spheres is of interest because they represent quite accurately the effective intermolecular repulsion in fluid substances and also because they exhibit interesting properties. The thermodynamics of the soft-sphere fluids is obtained via an effective hard-sphere diameter approach that leads to a compact and accurate equation of state. The virial coefficients of soft spheres are shown to follow quite simple relationships that are incorporated into the equation of state. The approach followed exhibits the rescaling of the density that produces a unique equation for all systems and temperatures. The scaling is carried through to the level of the structure of the fluids. PMID:22158949

  2. Thermodynamic properties of non-conformal soft-sphere fluids with effective hard-sphere diameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Tonalli; del Río, Fernando

    2012-01-28

    In this work we study a set of soft-sphere systems characterised by a well-defined variation of their softness. These systems represent an extension of the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential widely used in statistical mechanics of fluids. This type of soft spheres is of interest because they represent quite accurately the effective intermolecular repulsion in fluid substances and also because they exhibit interesting properties. The thermodynamics of the soft-sphere fluids is obtained via an effective hard-sphere diameter approach that leads to a compact and accurate equation of state. The virial coefficients of soft spheres are shown to follow quite simple relationships that are incorporated into the equation of state. The approach followed exhibits the rescaling of the density that produces a unique equation for all systems and temperatures. The scaling is carried through to the level of the structure of the fluids.

  3. Absorption and scattering by bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres and their equivalent coated spheres.

    PubMed

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Sy, Ki Cheong; Pilon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the absorption and scattering cross sections and asymmetry factor of randomly oriented and optically soft bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres, with either monodisperse or polydisperse monomers, can be approximated by an equivalent coated sphere with identical volume and average projected area. This approximation could also apply to the angle-dependent scattering matrix elements for monomer size parameter less than 0.1. However, it quickly deteriorated with increasing monomer number and/or size parameter. It was shown to be superior to previously proposed approximations considering a volume equivalent homogeneous sphere and a coated sphere with identical volume and surface area. These results provide a rapid and accurate way of predicting the radiation characteristics of bispheres, quadspheres, and rings of spheres representative of various unicellular and multicellular cyanobacteria considered for producing food supplements, biofuels, and fertilizers. They could also be used in inverse methods for retrieving the monomers' optical properties, morphology, and/or concentration.

  4. Photocatalytical nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Matejka, Vlastimil; Tokarský, Jonás

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on photocatalytically active nanocomposites that are based on the photoactive nanoparticles, or nanostructured particles captured on the surface of the different powderized carriers. Nanosized and nanostructured oxides and sulfides with selected metal cations (Ti, Zn, Cd, Fe, etc.) are intensively studied as the photocatalysts for different purposes. The nanodimension of these particles brings several disadvantages, among them being the negative impact on human health, which is a widely discussed topic nowadays. The nanoparticles can permeate through living tissue and enter living cells and thus a strong effort focused on diminishing this problem is the subject of research activities by many groups. One possible way to achieve control of the nanoparticles' mobility is capturing them on the surface of suitable particulate carriers with dimensions on the order of tenths and hundredths of microns whereas this approach leads to formation of new composite material. Clay minerals, silicates, carbonaceous materials, and other particulate matter are intensively studied for these purposes and proper selection of the substrate can bring additional functionality to the final composite. Very often the photoactivity, antibacterial properties, electrical conductivity, and other properties are significantly enhanced in the case of this kind of composite materials. Strong adhesion between the nanoparticles and the surface of the selected substrate is essential for the stability of the final composites. Characterization of the adhesion energies using laboratory experiments is quite difficult and molecular modeling can bring valuable information about the character of interactions at the interface of nanoparticles and substrate. PMID:24749444

  5. Aerogel nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.J.; Ayers, M.; Cao, W.

    1995-05-01

    Aerogels are porous, low density, nanostructured solids with many unusual properties including very low thermal conductivity, good transparency, high surface area, catalytic activity, and low sound velocity. This research is directed toward developing new nanocomposite aerogel materials for improved thermal insulation and several other applications. A major focus of the research has been to further increase the thermal resistance of silica aerogel by introducing infrared opacification agents into the aerogel to produce a superinsulating composite material. Opacified superinsulating aerogel permit a number of industrial applications for aerogel-based insulation. The primary benefits from this recently developed superinsulating composite aerogel insulation are: to extend the range of applications to higher temperatures, to provide a more compact insulation for space sensitive-applications, and to lower costs of aerogel by as much as 30%. Superinsulating aerogels can replace existing CFC-containing polyurethane in low temperature applications to reduce heat losses in piping, improve the thermal efficiency of refrigeration systems, and reduce energy losses in a variety of industrial applications. Enhanced aerogel insulation can also replace steam and process pipe insulation in higher temperature applications to substantially reduce energy losses and provide much more compact insulation.

  6. Stretchable piezoelectric nanocomposite generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwi-Il; Jeong, Chang Kyu; Kim, Na Kyung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2016-06-01

    Piezoelectric energy conversion that generate electric energy from ambient mechanical and vibrational movements is promising energy harvesting technology because it can use more accessible energy resources than other renewable natural energy. In particular, flexible and stretchable piezoelectric energy harvesters which can harvest the tiny biomechanical motions inside human body into electricity properly facilitate not only the self-powered energy system for flexible and wearable electronics but also sensitive piezoelectric sensors for motion detectors and in vivo diagnosis kits. Since the piezoelectric ZnO nanowires (NWs)-based energy harvesters (nanogenerators) were proposed in 2006, many researchers have attempted the nanogenerator by using the various fabrication process such as nanowire growth, electrospinning, and transfer techniques with piezoelectric materials including polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer and perovskite ceramics. In 2012, the composite-based nanogenerators were developed using simple, low-cost, and scalable methods to overcome the significant issues with previously-reported energy harvester, such as insufficient output performance and size limitation. This review paper provides a brief overview of flexible and stretchable piezoelectric nanocomposite generator for realizing the self-powered energy system with development history, power performance, and applications.

  7. Based Adaptive Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazani, M.; Ashrafizadeh, F.; Mozaffarinia, R.

    2014-08-01

    A promising Ni(Al)-Cr2O3-Ag-CNT-WS2 self-lubricating wear-resistant coating was deposited via atmospheric plasma spray of Ni(Al), nano Cr2O3, nano silver and nano WS2 powders, and CNTs. Feedstock powders with various compositions prepared by spray drying were plasma sprayed onto carbon steel substrates. The tribological properties of coatings were tested by a high temperature tribometer in a dry environment from room temperature to 400 °C, and in a natural humid environment at room temperature. It was found that all nanocomposite coatings have better frictional behavior compared with pure Ni(Al) and Ni(Al)-Cr2O3 coatings; the specimen containing aproximately 7 vol.% Ag, CNT, and WS2 had the best frictional performance. The average room temperature friction coefficient of this coating was 0.36 in humid atmosphere, 0.32 in dry atmosphere, and about 0.3 at high temperature.

  8. Biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Kaiyan

    In this dissertation, various noncrosslinked and crosslinked biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites were fabricated and characterized. The properties of these polymer nanocomposites, and their relating mechanisms and corresponding applications were studied and discussed in depth. Chapter 1 introduces the research background and objectives of the current research. Chapter 2 presents the development of a novel low cost carbon source for bacterial cellulose (BC) production and fabrication and characterization of biobased polymer nanocomposites using produced BC and soy protein based resins. The carbon source, soy flour extract (SFE), was obtained from defatted soy flour (SF) and BC yield achieved using SFE medium was high. The results of this study showed that SFE consists of five sugars and Acetobacter xylinum metabolized sugars in a specific order. Chapter 3 discusses the fabrication and characterization of biodegradable polymer nanocomposites using BC and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). These polymer nanocomposites had excellent tensile and thermal properties. Crosslinking of PVA using glutaraldehyde (GA) not only increased the mechanical and thermal properties but the water-resistance. Chapter 4 describes the development and characterization of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) based biodegradable polymer nanocomposites by blending MFC suspension with PVA. Chemical crosslinking of the polymer nanocomposites was carried out using glyoxal to increase the mechanical and thermal properties as well as to make the PVA partially water-insoluble. Chapter 5 reports the development and characterization of halloysite nanotube (HNT) reinforced biodegradable polymer nanocomposites utilizing HNT dispersion and PVA. Several separation techniques were used to obtain individualized HNT dispersion. The results indicated uniform dispersion of HNTs in both PVA and malonic acid (MA) crosslinked PVA resulted in excellent mechanical and thermal properties of the materials, especially

  9. Polariton dispersion in nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K. S. Joseph Revathy, V.

    2015-06-24

    The several optical properties of crystals are modified due to nonlinearity associated with high intensity of the incident radiation. In the present work, the linear and nonlinear optical characterization of the nanocomposite materials are also discussed in detail. We explore the possibilities of nonlinear effects in the optical parameters in nanocomposite materials. New modes on the polaritonic gap where the propagation of electromagnetic wave is forbidden, are obtained due to nonlinearity. The presence of gap mode shows the propagation of electromagnetic radiation which may be exploited in optical communications.

  10. Physics of the granite sphere fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeijer, Jacco H.; der Weele, Ko van

    2014-11-01

    A striking example of levitation is encountered in the "kugel fountain" where a granite sphere, sometimes weighing over a ton, is kept aloft by a thin film of flowing water. In this paper, we explain the working principle behind this levitation. We show that the fountain can be viewed as a giant ball bearing and thus forms a prime example of lubrication theory. It is demonstrated how the viscosity and flow rate of the fluid determine (i) the remarkably small thickness of the film supporting the sphere and (ii) the surprisingly long time it takes for rotations to damp out. The theoretical results compare well with measurements on a fountain holding a granite sphere of one meter in diameter. We close by discussing several related cases of levitation by lubrication.

  11. The flow past a freely rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, David; Tchoufag, Joël; Citro, Vincenzo; Giannetti, Flavio; Luchini, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We consider the flow past a sphere held at a fixed position in a uniform incoming flow but free to rotate around a transverse axis. A steady pitchfork bifurcation is reported to take place at a threshold Re^OS=206 leading to a state with zero torque but nonzero lift. Numerical simulations allow to characterize this state up to Re≈ 270 and confirm that it substantially differs from the steady-state solution which exists in the wake of a fixed, non-rotating sphere beyond the threshold Re^SS=212 . A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out and is shown to successfully reproduce the results and to give substantial improvement over a previous analysis (Fabre et al. in J Fluid Mech 707:24-36, 2012). The connection between the present problem and that of a sphere in free fall following an oblique, steady (OS) path is also discussed.

  12. Unveiling the scattering behavior of small spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzarouchis, Dimitrios C.; Ylä-Oijala, Pasi; Sihvola, Ari

    2016-10-01

    A classical way for exploring the scattering behavior of a small sphere is to approximate Mie coefficients with a Taylor series expansion. This ansatz delivered a plethora of insightful results, mostly for small spheres supporting electric localized plasmonic resonances. However, many scattering aspects are still uncharted, especially with regards to magnetic resonances. Here, an alternative system ansatz is proposed based on the Padé approximants for the Mie coefficients. The results reveal the existence of a self-regulating radiative damping mechanism for the first magnetic resonance and general resonating aspects for the higher order multipoles. Hence, a systematic way of exploring the scattering response is introduced, sharpening our understanding of the sphere's scattering behavior and its emergent functionalities.

  13. Mesoporous hollow spheres from soap bubbling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianglin; Liang, Fuxin; Liu, Jiguang; Lu, Yunfeng; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2012-02-01

    The smaller and more stable bubbles can be generated from the large parent bubbles by rupture. In the presence of a bubble blowing agent, hollow spheres can be prepared by bubbling a silica sol. Herein, the trapped gas inside the bubble acts as a template. When the porogen, i.e., other surfactant, is introduced, a mesostructured shell forms by the co-assembly with the silica sol during sol-gel process. Morphological evolution emphasizes the prerequisite of an intermediate interior gas flow rate and high exterior gas flow rate for hollow spheres. The method is valid for many compositions from inorganic, polymer to their composites. PMID:22078340

  14. Mesoporous hollow spheres from soap bubbling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianglin; Liang, Fuxin; Liu, Jiguang; Lu, Yunfeng; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2012-02-01

    The smaller and more stable bubbles can be generated from the large parent bubbles by rupture. In the presence of a bubble blowing agent, hollow spheres can be prepared by bubbling a silica sol. Herein, the trapped gas inside the bubble acts as a template. When the porogen, i.e., other surfactant, is introduced, a mesostructured shell forms by the co-assembly with the silica sol during sol-gel process. Morphological evolution emphasizes the prerequisite of an intermediate interior gas flow rate and high exterior gas flow rate for hollow spheres. The method is valid for many compositions from inorganic, polymer to their composites.

  15. Dependence on sphere size of the phase behavior of mixtures of rods and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakami, Naohito; Imai, Masayuki

    2003-07-01

    By the addition of chondroitin sulfate (Chs) to the aqueous suspension of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the aggregation of TMV occurs at very dilute TMV concentration compared with the addition of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The difference of physical behavior between Chs and PEO is the chain conformation in solution. The Chs chain has a semirigid nature, whereas the PEO chain has a flexible nature. In this study, the Chs and PEO chains are simplified to spherical particles having different size, and we use the spherocylinder model for TMV particle. The effect of the sphere size on the phase behaviors in the mixtures of rods and spheres is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. By the addition of small spheres, the system transforms from the miscible isotropic phase to the miscible nematic phase. On the other hand, by the addition of large spheres, the system changes from the miscible isotropic phase to the immiscible nematic phase through the immiscible isotropic phase. The different phase behaviors between the small and the large spheres originate from the difference of overlapping volume of the depletion zone. In addition, we perform the Monte Carlo simulations in the case that semirigid chains are used as the Chs chain models. The same phase behaviors are observed as the mixtures of rods and large spheres. Thus the sphere model captures the phase behaviors of rod and polymer mixture systems.

  16. High performance thermoelectric nanocomposite device

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Jihui; Snyder, Dexter D.

    2011-10-25

    A thermoelectric device includes a nanocomposite material with nanowires of at least one thermoelectric material having a predetermined figure of merit, the nanowires being formed in a porous substrate having a low thermal conductivity and having an average pore diameter ranging from about 4 nm to about 300 nm.

  17. Concepts for smart nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pammi, SriLaxmi; Brown, Courtney; Datta, Saurabh; Kirikera, Goutham R.; Schulz, Mark J.

    2003-10-01

    This paper explores concepts for new smart materials that have extraordinary properties based on nanotechnology. Carbon and boron nitride nanotubes in theory can be used to manufacture fibers that have piezoelectric, pyroelectric, piezoresistive, and electrochemical field properties. Smart nanocomposites designed using these fibers will sense and respond to elastic, thermal, and chemical fields in a positive human-like way to improve the performance of structures, devices, and possibly humans. Remarkable strength, morphing, cooling, energy harvesting, strain and temperature sensing, chemical sensing and filtering, and high natural frequencies and damping will be the properties of these new materials. Synthesis of these unique atomically precise nanotubes, fibers, and nanocomposites is at present challenging and expensive, however, there is the possibility that we can synthesize the strongest and lightest actuators and most efficient sensors man has ever made. A particular advantage of nanotube transducers is their very high load bearing capability. Carbon nanotube electrochemical actuators have a predicted energy density at low frequencies that is thirty times greater than typical piezoceramic materials while boron nitride nanotubes are insulators and can operate at high temperatures, but they have a predicted piezoelectric induced stress constant that is about twenty times smaller than piezoceramic materials. Carbon nanotube fibers and composites exhibit a change in electrical conductivity due to strain that can be used for sensing. Some concepts for nanocomposite material sensors are presented and initial efforts to fabricate carbon nanocomposite load sensors are discussed.

  18. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  19. Electromagnetic resonant modes of dielectric sphere bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Andueza, A. Pérez-Conde, J.; Sevilla, J.

    2015-05-28

    Sphere bilayers have been proposed as promising structures for electromagnetic management in photonic crystal devices. These arrangements are made of two intertwined subsets of spheres of different size and refractive index, one subset filling the interstitial sites of the other. We present a systematic study of the electromagnetic resonant modes of the bilayers, in comparison with those of the constituent subsets of spheres. Three samples were built with glass and Teflon spheres and their transmission spectra measured in the microwave range (10–25 GHz). Simulations with finite integration time-domain method are in good agreement with experiments. Results show that the bilayer presents the same resonances as one of the subsets but modified by the presence of the other in its resonant frequencies and in the electric field distributions. As this distortion is not very large, the number of resonances in a selected spectral region is determined by the dominant subset. The degree of freedom that offers the bilayer could be useful to fine tune the resonances of the structure for different applications. A map of modes useful to guide this design is also presented. Scale invariance of Maxwell equations allows the translation of these results in the microwave range to the visible region; hence, some possible applications are discussed in this framework.

  20. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  1. The Sphere of Women in Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Robert

    This project is a unit of six lessons designed to study and understand the roles and expectations of women in the colonial period. The unit provides an historical perspective on those expectations, examines how both men and women viewed the sphere of women, and how enlightened thought on this topic began to emerge during this revolutionary time.…

  2. Spheres: from Ground Development to ISS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2016-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES National Lab Facility aboard ISS is managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. SPHERES has served to mature the adaptability of control algorithms of future formation flight missions in microgravity (6 DOF (Degrees of Freedom) / long duration microgravity), demonstrate key close-proximity formation flight and rendezvous and docking maneuvers, understand fault diagnosis and recovery, improve the field of human telerobotic operation and control, and lessons learned on ISS have significant impact on ground robotics, mapping, localization, and sensing in three-dimensions - among several other areas of study.

  3. Experimentation on recurrent sphere collision with Audacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Enoch Ming Wei; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-11-01

    Under the theme of collisions that occur repeatedly, we conducted easy and inexpensive experiments of rebounding spheres and Newton’s cradle with two spheres to determine the coefficients of restitution using the sound record feature in modern laptops and a free and open source software called Audacity. In the rebounding sphere experiment, the coefficients of restitution of the golf and ping pong balls used were found to be 0.727 ± 0.025 and 0.816 ± 0.041 respectively. With the Netwon’s cradle experiment, the coefficient of restitution of two steel sphere balls was found to be 0.987 ± 0.003. The contrasts in the results obtained from both experiments permit the operational principles of a pendulum to be emphasized, and engagements to be made to consider the transfer of kinetic energy in the form of vibrational energy of the bodies’ constituents. Using a one-dimensional two-mass model with spring and damper linkages to account for harmonic motions that occur during impact, we found it possible to perform a simple analysis to account for this, and how it can be linked to high energy transfer modes such as the phenomenon of resonance and impedance matching.

  4. Propulsion of a two-sphere swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotsa, Daphne; Baldwin, Kyle; Hill, Richard; Bowley, Roger; Swift, Michael

    We describe experiments and simulations demonstrating the propulsion of a neutrally-buoyant macroscopic swimming robot that consists of a pair of spheres attached by a spring, immersed in a vibrating fluid. The vibration of the fluid induces relative motion of the spheres which, for sufficiently large amplitudes, can lead to motion of the center of mass of the two spheres. We find that the swimming speed obtained from both experiment and simulation agree and collapse onto a single curve if plotted as a function of the streaming Reynolds number, suggesting that the propulsion is related to streaming flows. There appears to be a critical onset value of the streaming Reynolds number for swimming to occur. We observe a change in the streaming flows as the Reynolds number increases, from that generated by two independent oscillating spheres to a collective flow pattern around the swimmer as a whole. The mechanism for swimming is traced to a strengthening of a jet of fluid in the wake of the swimmer.

  5. Steel Spheres and Skydiver--Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa Leme, J.; Moura, C.; Costa, Cintia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of open source video analysis software in the study of the relationship between the velocity of falling objects and time. We discuss an experiment in which a steel sphere falls in a container filled with two immiscible liquids. The motion is similar to that of a skydiver falling through air.

  6. Properties of a Two-Sphere Singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkowski, Deborah A.; Helliwell, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently Böhmer and Lobo have shown that a metric due to Florides can be extended to reveal a classical singularity that has the form of a two-sphere. Here we discuss and expand on the classical singularity properties and then show the classical singularity is not healed by a quantum analysis.

  7. Propulsion of a Two-Sphere Swimmer.

    PubMed

    Klotsa, Daphne; Baldwin, Kyle A; Hill, Richard J A; Bowley, R M; Swift, Michael R

    2015-12-11

    We describe experiments and simulations demonstrating the propulsion of a neutrally buoyant swimmer that consists of a pair of spheres attached by a spring, immersed in a vibrating fluid. The vibration of the fluid induces relative motion of the spheres which, for sufficiently large amplitudes, can lead to motion of the center of mass of the two spheres. We find that the swimming speed obtained from both experiment and simulation agree and collapse onto a single curve if plotted as a function of the streaming Reynolds number, suggesting that the propulsion is related to streaming flows. There appears to be a critical onset value of the streaming Reynolds number for swimming to occur. We observe a change in the streaming flows as the Reynolds number increases, from that generated by two independent oscillating spheres to a collective flow pattern around the swimmer as a whole. The mechanism for swimming is traced to a strengthening of a jet of fluid in the wake of the swimmer.

  8. Life in the E-Sphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the survival of the human race in the Third Millennium. Considers environmental issues; shifting from a focus on economic growth to human development; the rate of technological change; the e-sphere, which goes beyond a global village to a global brain; technology in education and in health care; and educational reform. (LRW)

  9. Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A; Ospino, J.

    2006-08-15

    We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

  10. Domain-wall supergravities from sphere reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič , M.; Liu, James T.; Lü, H.; Pope, C. N.

    1999-10-01

    Kaluza-Klein sphere reductions of supergravities that admit Ads × Sphere vacuum solutions are believed to be consistent. The examples include the S4 and S7 reductions of eleven-dimensional supergravity, and the S5 reduction of ten-dimensional type IIB supergravity . In this paper we provide evidence that sphere reductions of supergravities that admit instead Domain-wallxSphere vacuum solutions are also consistent, where the background can be viewed as the near-horizon structure of a dilatonic p-brane of the theory. The resulting lower-dimensional theory is a gauged supergravity that admits a domain wall, rather than AdS, as a vacuum solution. We illustrate this consistency by taking the singular limits of certain modulus parameters, for which the original Sn compactifying spheres ( n = 4, 5 or 7) becomes Sp × Rq, with p = n - q < n. The consistency of the S4, S7 reductions then implies the consistency of the S p reductions of the lower-dimensional supergravities. In particular, we obtain explicit non-linear ansätze for the S3 reduction of type IIA and heterotic supergravities, restricting to the U(1) 2 subgroup of the SO(4) gauge group of S3. We also study the black-hole solutions in the lower-dimensional gauged supergravities with domain-wall backgrounds. We find new domain-wall black holes which are not the singular-modulus limits of the AdS black holes of the original theories, and we obtain their Killing spinors.

  11. Fabrication of cylindrical, microcellular foam-filled targets, containing aluminum spheres, for sphere drag experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Falconer, J.W.; Nazarov, W. ); Horsfield, C.J.; Sutton, D.W.; Rothman, S.D.; Freeman, N.J. )

    1994-09-01

    Hollow cylindrical fusion targets of 200--300 [mu]m diam and 500--600 [mu]m length, were fabricated and fitted at one end with a metallic ablator plate. The cylinders were then filled with a solution of polyfunctional acrylate monomer, which was subsequently polymerized to a gel using ultraviolet initiated polymerization. Either one or two aluminum spheres of diameter between 10 and 30 [mu]m were placed in the gel at defined locations, before the gel was precipitated to give, on drying by critical point dryer, a foam of the required density (about 100 mg cm[sup [minus]3]). The final targets had the sphere or spheres embedded in the foam at specified locations. Several techniques for placing the spheres were examined and the relative merits of the techniques are discussed.

  12. Polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites and their preparation

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2007-01-09

    Polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites that exhibit superior properties compared to the polymer alone, and methods-for producing these polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites, are provided. Polymeric surfactant compatabilizers are adsorbed onto the surface of hydrophilic or natural phyllosilicates to facilitate the dispersal and exfoliation of the phyllosilicate in a polymer matrix. Utilizing polymeric glycol based surfactants, polymeric dicarboxylic acids, polymeric diammonium surfactants, and polymeric diamine surfactants as compatabilizers facilitates natural phyllosilicate and hydrophilic organoclay dispersal in a polymer matrix to produce nanocomposites.

  13. Simulation of rotary-drum and repose tests for frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    The effects of rotation rate and interparticle friction on the bulk flow behavior in rotating horizontal cylinders are studied via particle-dynamic simulations. Assemblies of inelastic, frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters are utilized, and rotation rates from quasistatic to centrifuging are examined. Flow phenomena explored include size segregation, avalanching, slumping and centrifuging. Simulated drum flows with two sizes of frictional spheres showed very rapid segregation of species perpendicular to the drum axis; however, simulations of up to 10 revolutions, utilizing periodic-boundary ends, did not exhibit the experimentally observed axial segregation into stripes. Angles of repose for uniform-sized spheres in slowly rotating cylinders varied from 13 to 31 degrees as the friction coefficient varied from 0.02 to 1.0. For simulated rotation rates higher than the threshold to obtain uniform flow conditions, the apparent angle of repose increases as the rotation rats increases, consistent with experiments. Also, simulations with rigid clusters of 4 spheres in a tetrahedral shape or 8 spheres in a cubical arrangement, demonstrate that particle shape strongly influences the repose angle. Simulations of cubical 8-sphere clusters, with a surface coefficient of friction of 0.1, produced apparent angles of repose exceeding 35 degrees, compared to 23 degrees for assemblies of single spheres interacting with the same force model parameters. Centrifuging flows at very high rotation rates exist as stationary beds moving exactly as the outer rotating wall. At somewhat slower speeds the granular bed remains in contact with the wall but exhibits surface sliding down the rising inner bed surface, moving a short distance on each revolution. At still slower speeds particles rain from the surface of the upper half of the rotating bed.

  14. A novel solvent-free thermal reaction of ferrocene and sulfur for one-step synthesis of iron sulfide and carbon nanocomposites and their electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Ling; Jiang, Yufeng; Xu, Yun; Chen, Gen; Li, Yuling; Xu, Xun; Deng, Shuguang; Luo, Hongmei

    2014-11-01

    A novel solvent-free thermal reaction of ferrocene and sulfur is developed for preparing iron sulfide and carbon nanocomposites, where ferrocene acts as both iron and carbon source. The prepared composite has iron sulfide sandwiched in carbon matrix. Moreover, ferrocene and sulfur can turn to vapor phase at an elevated temperature, resulting in easy deposition of product on the surface of templates. Sodium chloride was selected as a template due to its nontoxic and water-soluble nature. The NaCl-templated composite shows "sphere on mattress" morphology and exhibits the highest capacity and the longest cyclability ever reported for iron pyrite anode. To obtain mesoporous nanocomposites, SBA-15 was also applied as templates. The mesoporous nanocomposite demonstrates excellent capacity retention capability, indicating the robust structural stability.

  15. Transient Temperature Behavior of a Sphere Heated by Microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Wagner, P.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a model for microwave heating of a sphere in a rectangular resonant cavity. The model calculates transient temperature distributions within a sphere during the approach to steady state conditions or on the path to thermal runaway.

  16. Black carbon measurements using an integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Dusek, U.; Berner, A.

    1996-08-01

    An integrating sphere was used to determine the black carbon (BC) content of aerosol filter samples dissolved in chloroform (method originally described by Heintzenberg [1982]). The specific absorption coefficient Ba (equal to absorption per mass) of the samples was also measured using the sphere as an integrating detector for transmitted light. Comparing the Ba of ambient samples taken in Vienna, Austria, to the BC concentrations measured on the dissolved filters, a value of approximately 6 m2/g was found to be a reasonable value for the Ba of the black carbon found at the site. The size dependence of Ba of a nebulized suspension of soot was measured using a rotating impactor, and a reasonable agreement between measured and calculated values was found.

  17. Chirality and Dirac Operator on Noncommutative Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, Ursula; Watamura, Satoshi

    1997-01-01

    We give a derivation of the Dirac operator on the noncommutative 2-sphere within the framework of the bosonic fuzzy sphere and define Connes' triple. It turns out that there are two different types of spectra of the Dirac operator and correspondingly there are two classes of quantized algebras. As a result we obtain a new restriction on the Planck constant in Berezin's quantization. The map to the local frame in noncommutative geometry is also discussed. Acknowledgement. The authors benefited from discussions with M. Bordemann, O. Grandjean and M. Pillin. S.W. would like to thank K. Osterwalder for his hospitality during the stay in ETH where this work began. He also thanks the Canon Foundation in Europe for supporting that stay. U.C. would like to acknowledge the Japan Society for Promotion of Science for financial support.-->

  18. Criticality of a {sup 237}Np Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Rene G.; Hayes, David K.; Cappiello, Charlene C.; Myers, William L.; Jaegers, Peter J.; Clement, Steven D.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.

    2003-07-22

    A critical mass experiment using a 6-kg {sup 237}Np sphere has been performed. The purpose of the experiment is to get a better estimate of the critical mass of {sup 237}Np. To attain criticality, the {sup 237}Np sphere was surrounded with 93 wt % {sup 235}U shells. A 1/M as a function of uranium mass was performed. An MCNP neutron transport code was used to model the experiment. The MCNP code yielded a k{sub eff} of 0.99089 {+-} 0.0003 compared with a k{sub eff} 1.0026 for the experiment. Based on these results, it is estimated that the critical mass of {sup 237}Np ranges from kilogram weights in the high fifties to low sixties.

  19. [Multifunctional nanocomposite materials]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    These novel nanocomposites are microporous nanometal intercalated clays which have been prepared by a polyol process at 200C and a novel microwave-hydrothermal process using ethylene glycol. These novel nanocomposites have been found to be useful in the conversion of coal to asphaltenes. A crystalline tin (IV) arsenate hydroxide hydrate has been made and its lithium selective ion exchange properties have been measured. This exchanger has shown high lithium selectivity. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure have also been studied. Several pillared clays have also been synthesized and their Mg{sup 2+}, Li{sup +} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} selectivity has been measured. The pillared clays appear to show some Li selectivity.

  20. Review: nanocomposites in food packaging.

    PubMed

    Arora, Amit; Padua, G W

    2010-01-01

    The development of nanocomposites is a new strategy to improve physical properties of polymers, including mechanical strength, thermal stability, and gas barrier properties. The most promising nanoscale size fillers are montmorillonite and kaolinite clays. Graphite nanoplates are currently under study. In food packaging, a major emphasis is on the development of high barrier properties against the migration of oxygen, carbon dioxide, flavor compounds, and water vapor. Decreasing water vapor permeability is a critical issue in the development of biopolymers as sustainable packaging materials. The nanoscale plate morphology of clays and other fillers promotes the development of gas barrier properties. Several examples are cited. Challenges remain in increasing the compatibility between clays and polymers and reaching complete dispersion of nanoplates. Nanocomposites may advance the utilization of biopolymers in food packaging. PMID:20492194

  1. Multiscale modeling of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheidaei, Azadeh

    In recent years, polymer nano-composites (PNCs) have increasingly gained more attention due to their improved mechanical, barrier, thermal, optical, electrical and biodegradable properties in comparison with the conventional micro-composites or pristine polymer. With a modest addition of nanoparticles (usually less than 5wt. %), PNCs offer a wide range of improvements in moduli, strength, heat resistance, biodegradability, as well as decrease in gas permeability and flammability. Although PNCs offer enormous opportunities to design novel material systems, development of an effective numerical modeling approach to predict their properties based on their complex multi-phase and multiscale structure is still at an early stage. Developing a computational framework to predict the mechanical properties of PNC is the focus of this dissertation. A computational framework has been developed to predict mechanical properties of polymer nano-composites. In chapter 1, a microstructure inspired material model has been developed based on statistical technique and this technique has been used to reconstruct the microstructure of Halloysite nanotube (HNT) polypropylene composite. This technique also has been used to reconstruct exfoliated Graphene nanoplatelet (xGnP) polymer composite. The model was able to successfully predict the material behavior obtained from experiment. Chapter 2 is the summary of the experimental work to support the numerical work. First, different processing techniques to make the polymer nanocomposites have been reviewed. Among them, melt extrusion followed by injection molding was used to manufacture high density polyethylene (HDPE)---xGnP nanocomposties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also was performed to determine particle size and distribution and to examine fracture surfaces. Particle size was measured from these images and has been used for calculating the probability density function for GNPs in chapter 1. A series of nanoindentation tests have

  2. Improved method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Rosencwaig, A.; Koo, J.C.; Dressler, J.L.

    An improved method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100..mu.. to about 500..mu.. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5 to 20..mu.. are described. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions.

  3. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro )

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  4. Probabilistic Simulation for Nanocomposite Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique probabilistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The simulation is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to simulate uniaxial strengths properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. These results show smooth distributions.

  5. Inorganic nanofluorides and related nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Sergei V.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Tkatchenko, E. A.; Fedorov, Pavel P.

    2006-12-01

    The properties and prospects of application of fluoride nanoparticles are discussed. Pyrohydrolysis is considered as the key process determining the chemistry and technology of fluorides; its role increases on going to the nanosize region. The physical and chemical methods for the synthesis of fluoride nanoparticles, one- and two-dimensional nanoobjects as well as approaches to the preparation of nanocomposites (glass ceramics, heterovalent solid solutions with defect clusters, eutectoid composites, etc.) are analysed. Nanotechnology techniques used to produce heterogeneous nanoobjects are outlined.

  6. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  7. Integrating spheres for improved skin photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Diana L; Farrell, Thomas J; Hayward, Joseph E; Patterson, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    The prescribed radiant exposures for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of superficial skin cancers are chosen empirically to maximize the success of the treatment while minimizing adverse reactions for the majority of patients. They do not take into account the wide range of tissue optical properties for human skin, contributing to relatively low treatment success rates. Additionally, treatment times can be unnecessarily long for large treatment areas if the laser power is not sufficient. Both of these concerns can be addressed by the incorporation of an integrating sphere into the irradiation apparatus. The light fluence rate can be increased by as much as 100%, depending on the tissue optical properties. This improvement can be determined in advance of treatment by measuring the reflectance from the tissue through a side port on the integrating sphere, allowing for patient-specific treatment times. The sphere is also effective at improving beam flatness, and reducing the penumbra, creating a more uniform light field. The side port reflectance measurements are also related to the tissue transport albedo, enabling an approximation of the penetration depth, which is useful for real-time light dosimetry. PMID:21054127

  8. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Rosencwaig, Allen; Koo, Jackson C.; Dressler, John L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100.mu. to about 500.mu. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5-20.mu.. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions. In one embodiment, one of the temperature regions is lower than both the preceeding region and the subsequent region. One region utilizes a temperature of at least 200.degree. C. higher than the melting point of the glass-forming material in the solution and, for example, may be at least 3 times higher than the temperature of the preceeding region. In addition, there is a sharp temperature gradient between these regions. As each droplet of solution passes through a first region it forms into a gel membrane having a spherical shape and encapsulates the rest of the drop retained in the elastic outer surface and the water entrapped within diffuses rapidly through the thin gel membrane which causes more of the glass-forming material to go out of solution and is incorporated into the gel membrane causing it to grow in size and become hollow. thus produced hollow glass sphere has a sphericity, concentricity, and wall uniformity of better than 5%. The sphere is capable of retaining material of up to at least 100 atmospheres therein over long periods of time. In one embodiment.

  9. Bidispersed Sphere Packing on Spherical Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy; Mascioli, Andrew; Burke, Christopher

    Packing problems on spherical surfaces have a long history, originating in the classic Thompson problem of finding the ground state configuration of charges on a sphere. Such packings contain a minimal number of defects needed to accommodate the curvature; this is predictable using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from knowledge of the topology of the surface and the local symmetry of the ordering. Famously, the packing of spherical particles on a sphere contains a 'scar' transition, where additional defects over those required by topology appear above a certain critical number of particles and self-organize into chains or scars. In this work, we study the packing of bidispersed packings on a sphere, and hence determine the interaction of bidispersity and curvature. The resultant configurations are nearly crystalline for low values of bidispersity and retain scar-like structures; these rapidly become disordered for intermediate values and approach a so-called Appollonian limit at the point where smaller particles can be entirely accommodated within the voids left by the larger particles. We connect our results with studies of bidispersed packings in the bulk and on flat surfaces from the literature on glassy systems and jamming. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  10. Rainbow Scattering by a Coated Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.; Jamison, J. Michael; Lin, Chih-Yang

    1994-01-01

    We examine the behavior of the first-order rainbow for a coated sphere by using both ray theory and Aden-Kerker wave theory as the radius of the core alpha(sub 12) and the thickness of the coating beta are varied. As the ratio beta/alpha(sub 12) increases from 10(sup -4) to 0.33, we find three classes of rainbow phenomena that cannot occur for a homogeneous-sphere rainbow. For beta/alpha(sub 12) approx less than 10(sup -3), the rainbow intensity is an oscillatory function of the coating thickness, for beta/alpha(sub 12) approx. 10(sup -2), the first-order rainbow breaks into a pair of twin rainbows, and for beta/alpha(sub 12) approx. 0.33, various rainbow-extinction transitions occur. Each of these effects is analyzed, and their physical interpretations are given. A Debye series decomposition of coated-sphere partial-wave scattering amplitudes is also performed and aids in the analysis.

  11. Integrating spheres for improved skin photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Diana L; Farrell, Thomas J; Hayward, Joseph E; Patterson, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    The prescribed radiant exposures for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of superficial skin cancers are chosen empirically to maximize the success of the treatment while minimizing adverse reactions for the majority of patients. They do not take into account the wide range of tissue optical properties for human skin, contributing to relatively low treatment success rates. Additionally, treatment times can be unnecessarily long for large treatment areas if the laser power is not sufficient. Both of these concerns can be addressed by the incorporation of an integrating sphere into the irradiation apparatus. The light fluence rate can be increased by as much as 100%, depending on the tissue optical properties. This improvement can be determined in advance of treatment by measuring the reflectance from the tissue through a side port on the integrating sphere, allowing for patient-specific treatment times. The sphere is also effective at improving beam flatness, and reducing the penumbra, creating a more uniform light field. The side port reflectance measurements are also related to the tissue transport albedo, enabling an approximation of the penetration depth, which is useful for real-time light dosimetry.

  12. Broadband Electromagnetic Transparency by Graded Metamaterial Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Yu, K. W.

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated the scattering of electromagnetic waves from a radially inhomogeneous metamaterial sphere whose dielectric permittivity is described by the graded Drude model ɛs(r)=1-φp^2(r)/2̂. The radial position dependent plasma frequency depends on r as φp^2=1/2-c(r/r0)^n, where c and n are positive constants and r0 is the radius of the sphere. The electromagnetic field distribution has been calculated within the full-wave Mie scattering theory. When n=2, exact analytic solutions can be obtained in terms of confluent Heun function and confluent hypergeometric function of Kummer. This allows us to obtain the full-wave total scattering cross section analytically from the scattering field amplitudes. While the total scattering cross section Qs depends on both the graded plasma frequency profile and the frequency of the incident electromagnetic wave, it is found that Qs can achieve extremely small values over a broad frequency band and graded parameters. The analytic solutions allow us to assess the conditions for achieving broadband electromagnetic transparency in the metamaterial sphere and make tunable electromagnetic transparency feasible.

  13. Rainbow scattering by a coated sphere.

    PubMed

    Lock, J A; Jamison, J M; Lin, C Y

    1994-07-20

    We examine the behavior of the first-order rainbow for a coated sphere by using both ray theory and Aden-Kerker wave theory as the radius of the core a(12) and the thickness of the coating δ are varied. As the ratio δ/a(12) increases from 10(-4) to 0.33, we find three classes of rainbow phenomena that cannot occur for a homogeneous-sphere rainbow. For δ/a(12) ≲ 10(-3), the rainbow intensity is an oscillatory function of the coating thickness, for δ/a(12) ≈ 10(-2), the first-order rainbow breaks into a pair of twin rainbows, and for δ/a(12) ≈ 0.33, various rainbow-extinction transitions occur. Each of these effects is analyzed, and their physical interpretations are given. A Debye series decomposition of coated-sphere partial-wave scattering amplitudes is also performed and aids in the analysis. PMID:20935838

  14. Hybrid polymer-inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomogailo, Anatolii D.

    2000-01-01

    Approaches to the preparation of organic-inorganic nanocomposites are considered from a unified viewpoint for the first time. The major problems in the development of this new line of research in materials technology, which has arisen on the border of the science of polymers, colloid chemistry and physical chemistry of the ultradisperse state, are discussed. The main methods for the formation of composite materials and polymer-inorganic cross-linked hybrids with interpenetrating networks are analysed. Primary attention is given to sol-gel procedures for their preparation, including template processes, which occur under conditions of strict stereochemical orientation of reactants, intercalation of monomers and polymers into porous and layered matrices and their intracrystalline and post-intercalation transformations. Methods for the synthesis and properties of metallopolymeric polymolecular Langmuir-Blodgett films, which are peculiar supramolecular ensembles incorporating nanosized metal-containing particles, are discussed. The generality of the processes of formation of organic-inorganic nanocomposites in living and nonliving natural objects is demonstrated and the major fields of application of nanocomposites are considered. The bibliography includes 566 references.

  15. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  16. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  17. "Green" composites and nanocomposites from soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we report preparation of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) based "green" composites and nanocomposites. The high strength and stiffness composites and nanocomposites are formed through flax fiber and organoclay reinforcement. The epoxy resin, 1,1,1-tris(p-hydroxyphenyl)ethane triglycidyl...

  18. Polymer nanocomposites: structure, interaction, and functionality.

    PubMed

    Keledi, Gergely; Hári, József; Pukánszky, Béla

    2012-03-21

    This feature article discusses the main factors determining the properties of polymer nanocomposites with special attention paid to structure and interactions. Usually more complicated structure develops in nanocomposites than in traditional particulate filled polymers, and that is especially valid for composites prepared from plate-like nanofillers. Besides the usually assumed exfoliated/intercalated morphology, i.e. individual platelets and tactoids, such nanocomposites often contain large particles, and a network structure developing at large extent of exfoliation. Aggregation and orientation are the most important structural phenomena in nanotube or nanofiber reinforced composites, and ag-gregation is a major problem also in composites prepared with spherical particles. The surface characteristics of nanofillers and interactions are rarely determined or known; the related problems are discussed in the paper in detail. The surface of these reinforcements is modified practically always. The goal of the modification is to improve dispersion and/or adhesion in nanotube and spherical particle reinforced composites, and to help exfoliation in nanocomposites containing platelets. However, modification decreases surface energy often leading to decreased interaction with the matrix. Very limited information exists about interphase formation and the properties of the interphase in nanocomposites, although they must influence properties considerably. The properties of nanocomposites are usually far from the expectations, the main reason being insufficient homogeneity, undefined structure and improper adhesion. In spite of considerable difficulties nanocomposites have great potentials especially in functional applications. Several nanocomposite products are already used in industrial practice demonstrated by a few examples in the article. PMID:22349033

  19. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-09-04

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

  20. Graphene-based artificial nacre nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gong, Shanshan; Zhang, Qi; Ming, Peng; Wan, Sijie; Peng, Jingsong; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2016-05-01

    With its extraordinary properties as the strongest and stiffest material ever measured and the best-known electrical conductor, graphene could have promising applications in many fields, especially in the area of nanocomposites. However, processing graphene-based nanocomposites is very difficult. So far, graphene-based nanocomposites exhibit rather poor properties. Nacre, the gold standard for biomimicry, provides an excellent example and guidelines for assembling two-dimensional nanosheets into high performance nanocomposites. The inspiration from nacre overcomes the bottleneck of traditional approaches for constructing nanocomposites, such as poor dispersion, low loading, and weak interface interactions. This tutorial review summarizes recent research on graphene-based artificial nacre nanocomposites and focuses on the design of interface interactions and synergistic effects for constructing high performance nanocomposites. This tutorial review also focuses on a perspective of the dynamic area of graphene-based nanocomposites, commenting on whether the concept is viable and practical, on what has been achieved to date, and most importantly, what is likely to be achieved in the future.

  1. Graphene-based artificial nacre nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gong, Shanshan; Zhang, Qi; Ming, Peng; Wan, Sijie; Peng, Jingsong; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2016-05-01

    With its extraordinary properties as the strongest and stiffest material ever measured and the best-known electrical conductor, graphene could have promising applications in many fields, especially in the area of nanocomposites. However, processing graphene-based nanocomposites is very difficult. So far, graphene-based nanocomposites exhibit rather poor properties. Nacre, the gold standard for biomimicry, provides an excellent example and guidelines for assembling two-dimensional nanosheets into high performance nanocomposites. The inspiration from nacre overcomes the bottleneck of traditional approaches for constructing nanocomposites, such as poor dispersion, low loading, and weak interface interactions. This tutorial review summarizes recent research on graphene-based artificial nacre nanocomposites and focuses on the design of interface interactions and synergistic effects for constructing high performance nanocomposites. This tutorial review also focuses on a perspective of the dynamic area of graphene-based nanocomposites, commenting on whether the concept is viable and practical, on what has been achieved to date, and most importantly, what is likely to be achieved in the future. PMID:27039951

  2. Highly Conductive Multifunctional Graphene Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Gaier, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Graphene nanosheet bisphenol A polycarbonate nanocomposites (0.027 2.2 vol %) prepared by both emulsion mixing and solution blending methods, followed by compression molding at 287 C, exhibited dc electrical percolation threshold of approx.0.14 and approx.0.38 vol %, respectively. The conductivities of 2.2 vol % graphene nanocomposites were 0.512 and 0.226 S/cm for emulsion and solution mixing. The 1.1 and 2.2 vol % graphene nanocomposites exhibited frequency-independent behavior. Inherent conductivity, extremely high aspect ratio, and nanostructure directed assembly of the graphene using PC nanospheres are the main factors for excellent electrical properties of the nanocomposites. Dynamic tensile moduli of nanocomposites increased with increasing graphene in the nanocomposite. The glass transition temperatures were decreased with increasing graphene for the emulsion series. High-resolution electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) showed isolated graphene with no connectivity path for insulating nanocomposites and connected nanoparticles for the conductive nanocomposites. A stacked disk model was used to obtain the average particle radius, average number of graphene layers per stack, and stack spacing by simulation of the experimental SANS data. Morphology studies indicated the presence of well-dispersed graphene and small graphene stacking with infusion of polycarbonate within the stacks.

  3. Nanocrystal-polymer nanocomposite electrochromic device

    SciTech Connect

    Milliron, Delia; Runnerstrom, Evan; Helms, Brett; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2015-12-08

    Described is an electrochromic nanocomposite film comprising a solid matrix of an oxide based material, the solid matrix comprising a plurality of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures dispersed in the solid matrix and a lithium salt dispersed in the solid matrix. Also described is a near infrared nanostructured electrochromic device having a functional layer comprising the electrochromic nanocomposite film.

  4. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-06-30

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  5. Absorption and scattering by bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres and their equivalent coated spheres.

    PubMed

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Sy, Ki Cheong; Pilon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the absorption and scattering cross sections and asymmetry factor of randomly oriented and optically soft bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres, with either monodisperse or polydisperse monomers, can be approximated by an equivalent coated sphere with identical volume and average projected area. This approximation could also apply to the angle-dependent scattering matrix elements for monomer size parameter less than 0.1. However, it quickly deteriorated with increasing monomer number and/or size parameter. It was shown to be superior to previously proposed approximations considering a volume equivalent homogeneous sphere and a coated sphere with identical volume and surface area. These results provide a rapid and accurate way of predicting the radiation characteristics of bispheres, quadspheres, and rings of spheres representative of various unicellular and multicellular cyanobacteria considered for producing food supplements, biofuels, and fertilizers. They could also be used in inverse methods for retrieving the monomers' optical properties, morphology, and/or concentration. PMID:26366489

  6. Fabrication and calibration of sensitively photoelastic biocompatible gelatin spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Henry; Ceniceros, Ericson; McCormick, Zephyr

    2013-11-01

    Photoelastic gelatin can be used to measure forces generated by organisms in complex environments. We describe manufacturing, storage, and calibration techniques for sensitive photoelastic gelatin spheres to be used in aqueous environments. Calibration yields a correlation between photoelastic signal and applied force to be used in future studies. Images for calibration were collected with a digital camera attached to a linear polariscope. The images were then processed in Matlab to determine the photoelastic response of each sphere. The effect of composition, gelatin concentration, glycerol concentration, sphere size, and temperature were all examined for their effect on signal response. The minimum detectable force and the repeatability of our calibration technique were evaluated for the same sphere, different spheres from the same fabrication batch, and spheres from different batches. The minimum force detectable is 10 μN or less depending on sphere size. Factors which significantly contribute to errors in the calibration were explored in detail and minimized.

  7. Dynamic Strength Ceramic Nanocomposites Under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-scale computer simulation approach has been applied to research of strength of nanocomposites under dynamic loading. The influence of mesoscopic substructures on the dynamic strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites, which can be formed using additive manufacturing were numerically investigated. At weak shock wave loadings the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites depends not only phase concentration and porosity, but size parameters of skeleton substructures. The influence of skeleton parameter on the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic nanocomposites with the same concentration of phases decreases with increasing amplitude of the shock pulse of microsecond duration above the double amplitude of the Hugoniot elastic limit of nanocomposites. This research carried out in 2014 -2015 was supported by grant from The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program and also Ministry of Sciences and Education of Russian Federation (State task 2014/223, project 1943, Agreement 14.132.

  8. Advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhixin; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2014-02-01

    The research advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes (rubber/HNTs) nanocomposites are reviewed. HNTs are environmentally-friendly natural nanomaterials, which could be used to prepare the rubber-based nanocomposites with high performance and low cost. Unmodified HNTs could be adopted to prepare the rubber/HNTs composites with improved mechanical properties, however, the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites with fine morphology and excellent properties were chiefly prepared with various modifiers by in situ mixing method. A series of rubber/HNTs nanocomposites containing several rubbers (SBR, NR, xSBR, NBR, PU) and different modifiers (ENR, RH, Si69, SA, MAA, ILs) have been investigated. The results showed that all the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites achieved strong interfacial interaction via interfacial covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds or multiple interactions, realized significantly improved dispersion of HNTs at nanoscale and exhibited excellent mechanical performances and other properties.

  9. Advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhixin; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2014-02-01

    The research advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes (rubber/HNTs) nanocomposites are reviewed. HNTs are environmentally-friendly natural nanomaterials, which could be used to prepare the rubber-based nanocomposites with high performance and low cost. Unmodified HNTs could be adopted to prepare the rubber/HNTs composites with improved mechanical properties, however, the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites with fine morphology and excellent properties were chiefly prepared with various modifiers by in situ mixing method. A series of rubber/HNTs nanocomposites containing several rubbers (SBR, NR, xSBR, NBR, PU) and different modifiers (ENR, RH, Si69, SA, MAA, ILs) have been investigated. The results showed that all the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites achieved strong interfacial interaction via interfacial covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds or multiple interactions, realized significantly improved dispersion of HNTs at nanoscale and exhibited excellent mechanical performances and other properties. PMID:24749454

  10. Equation of state for fluid mixtures of hard spheres and linear homonuclear fused hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largo, J.; Solana, J. R.

    1998-08-01

    This paper develops a theoretically based equation of state for fluid mixtures consisting of hard spheres and linear homonuclear fused hard spheres. The procedure is based on the equation of state previously developed for monocomponent athermal fluids. The equation of state only requires two parameters, namely the averaged effective molecular volume of the molecules in the mixture and the corresponding effective nonsphericity parameter. These parameters can be obtained from the geometry of the molecules forming the mixture. The results are in excellent agreement with simulation data and compare favorably with those obtained from other theories for athermal fluid mixtures.

  11. Micro-nanostructured CuO/C spheres as high-performance anode materials for Na-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanying; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Qing; Liang, Jing; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the synthesis of micro-nanostructured CuO/C spheres by aerosol spray pyrolysis and their application as high-performance anodes in sodium-ion batteries. Micro-nanostructured CuO/C spheres with different CuO contents were synthesized through aerosol spray pyrolysis by adjusting the ratio of reactants and heat-treated by an oxidation process. The as-prepared CuO/C spheres show uniformly spherical morphology, in which CuO nanoparticles (~10 nm) are homogeneously embedded in the carbon matrix (denoted as 10-CuO/C). The electrochemical performance of 10-CuO/C with a carbon weight of 44% was evaluated as the anode material for Na-ion batteries. It can deliver a capacity of 402 mA h g-1 after 600 cycles at a current density of 200 mA g-1. Furthermore, a capacity of 304 mA h g-1 was obtained at a high current density of 2000 mA g-1. The superior electrochemical performance of the micro-nanostructured CuO/C spheres leads to the enhancement of the electronic conductivity of the nanocomposite and the accommodation of the volume variation of CuO/C during charge/discharge cycling.In this paper, we report on the synthesis of micro-nanostructured CuO/C spheres by aerosol spray pyrolysis and their application as high-performance anodes in sodium-ion batteries. Micro-nanostructured CuO/C spheres with different CuO contents were synthesized through aerosol spray pyrolysis by adjusting the ratio of reactants and heat-treated by an oxidation process. The as-prepared CuO/C spheres show uniformly spherical morphology, in which CuO nanoparticles (~10 nm) are homogeneously embedded in the carbon matrix (denoted as 10-CuO/C). The electrochemical performance of 10-CuO/C with a carbon weight of 44% was evaluated as the anode material for Na-ion batteries. It can deliver a capacity of 402 mA h g-1 after 600 cycles at a current density of 200 mA g-1. Furthermore, a capacity of 304 mA h g-1 was obtained at a high current density of 2000 mA g-1. The superior

  12. Fear not the tectosphere (and other -spheres)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    Based on a highly unrepresentative sampling of the community, not unlike Fox news polls, it has been recognized that the use of words having the suffix "-sphere" is confused and often abused. Such words include lithosphere, asthenosphere, perisphere, tectosphere, and mesosphere. In addition, there appears to be equal confusion in the use of the related terms: mechanical boundary layer, thermal boundary layer, chemical boundary layer, low velocity zone, low viscosity zone, effective elastic thickness, etc. This confusion is not confined to beginning students of the Earth sciences but is also manifest in seasoned Earth scientists (including myself), that is, it is not uncommon to find a geochemist and a geophysicist with completely different definitions of "lithosphere" and "tectosphere", for example. In this poster, an attempt will be made to illustrate the concepts behind some of these terms using visual and verbal aids. One of the focuses, could be the concept of a tectosphere, which may go something like this: A Wise maN once said to me; That cOntinents float because they are light; Then said my dog - DiorITE; Oceans sInk because they are heavy; And so I ask, why miGht this be?; With a Laugh and a Bark, she says the oceans are cOld; And to test if she's rigHT; I stick a tHermometer in the continent's core; To my surprise coNtinents are cold, if not more; So something does not Jive; A parAdox has come alive; Perhaps you surMise that the story is not coMplete; Indeed, you may be right; BecausE under the contiNents lie Green rocks - PerIdotite!; InFertile as Hell and fortuitouslY light; Together they fOrm the TecToSphere; And this is why we are here; Fear not the TecToSphere.

  13. Synthesis and structural characterization of magnetic cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, and study of its activity for dyes degradation under ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite (CdS/CFO) nanocomposite was easily synthesized by one-step hydrothermal decomposition of cadmium diethyldithiocarbamate complex on the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at 200 °C. Spectroscopic techniques of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and magnetic measurements were applied for characterizing the structure and morphology of the product. The results of FT-IR, XRD and EDX indicated that the CdS/CFO was highly pure. SEM and TEM results revealed that the CdS/CFO nanocomposite was formed from nearly uniform and sphere-like nanoparticles with the size of approximately 20 nm. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the CdS/CFO nanocomposite showed the band gap of 2.21 eV, which made it suitable for sono-/photo catalytic purposes. By using the obtained CdS/CFO nanocomposite, an ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation process (AOP) has been developed for catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB), and methyl orange (MO)) in the presence of H2O2 as a green oxidant. CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited excellent sonocatalytic activity, so that, dyes were completely degraded in less than 10 min. The influences of crucial factors such as the H2O2 amount and catalyst dosage on the degradation efficiency were evaluated. The as-prepared CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited higher catalytic activity than pure CdS nanoparticles. Moreover, the magnetic property of CoFe2O4 made the nanocomposite recyclable.

  14. Diagnosis of a Poorly Performing Liquid Hydrogen Bulk Storage Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenn, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    There are two 850,000 gallon Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A and the other at Launch Pad B. The LH2 Sphere at Pad B has had a high boiloff rate since being brought into service in the 1960's. The daily commodity loss was estimated to be approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the minimum required by the sphere's specification. Additionally, after being re-painted in the late 1990's a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere which resulted in a poor paint bond, and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of Space Shuttle program service which provided a unique opportunity to diagnose the sphere's poor performance. The sphere was drained and inerted, and then opened from the annular relief device on the top where a series of boroscoping operations were accomplished. Boroscoping revealed a large Perlite insulation void in the region of the sphere where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and off-loaded into the annular void region until the annulus was full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  15. Hydrodynamics of linked sphere model swimmers.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G P; Pooley, C M; Yeomans, J M

    2009-05-20

    We describe in detail the hydrodynamics of a simple model of linked sphere swimmers. We calculate the asymptotic form of both the time averaged flow field generated by a single swimmer and the interactions between swimmers in a dilute suspension, showing how each depends on the parameters describing the swimmer and its swimming stroke. We emphasize the importance of time reversal symmetry in determining the far field flow around a swimmer and show that the interactions between swimmers are highly dependent on the relative phase of their swimming strokes. PMID:21825517

  16. Hydrodynamics of linked sphere model swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, G. P.; Pooley, C. M.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    We describe in detail the hydrodynamics of a simple model of linked sphere swimmers. We calculate the asymptotic form of both the time averaged flow field generated by a single swimmer and the interactions between swimmers in a dilute suspension, showing how each depends on the parameters describing the swimmer and its swimming stroke. We emphasize the importance of time reversal symmetry in determining the far field flow around a swimmer and show that the interactions between swimmers are highly dependent on the relative phase of their swimming strokes.

  17. Random packing of spheres in Menger sponge.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-06-01

    Random packing of spheres inside fractal collectors of dimension 2 < d < 3 is studied numerically using Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper focuses mainly on the measurement of random packing saturation limit. Additionally, scaling properties of density autocorrelations in the obtained packing are analyzed. The RSA kinetics coefficients are also measured. Obtained results allow to test phenomenological relation between random packing saturation density and collector dimension. Additionally, performed simulations together with previously obtained results confirm that, in general, the known dimensional relations are obeyed by systems having non-integer dimension, at least for d < 3.

  18. Further Investigations of NIST Water Sphere Discrepancies

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    2001-01-11

    Measurements have been performed on a family of water spheres at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) facilities. These measurements are important for criticality safety studies in that, frequently, difficulties have arisen in predicting the reactivity of individually subcritical components assembled in a critical array. It has been postulated that errors in the neutron leakage from individual elements in the array could be responsible for these problems. In these NIST measurements, an accurate determination of the leakage from a fission spectrum, modified by water scattering, is available. Previously, results for 3-, 4-, and 5-in. diam. water-filled spheres, both with and without cadmium covers over the fission chambers, were presented for four fissionable materials: {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu. Results were also given for ''dry'' systems, in which the water spheres were drained of water, with the results corresponding to essentially measurements of unmoderated {sup 252}Cf spontaneous-fission neutrons. The calculated-to-experimental (C/E) values ranged from 0.94 to 1.01 for the dry systems and 0.93 to 1.05 for the wet systems, with experimental uncertainties ranging from 1.5 to 1.9%. These results indicated discrepancies that were clearly outside of the experimental uncertainties, and further investigation was suggested. This work updates the previous calculations with a comparison of the predicted C/E values with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI transport cross sections. Variations in the predicted C/E values that arise from the use of ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, ENDL92, and LLLDOS for the response fission cross sections are also tabulated. The use of both a 45-group NIST fission spectrum and a continuous-energy fission spectrum for {sup 252}Cf are evaluated. The use of the generalized-linear-least-squares (GLLSM) procedures to investigate the reported discrepancies in the water sphere results for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu

  19. Nonlinear sequential laminates reproducing hollow sphere assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiart, Martín I.

    2007-07-01

    A special class of nonlinear porous materials with isotropic 'sequentially laminated' microstructures is found to reproduce exactly the hydrostatic behavior of 'hollow sphere assemblages'. It is then argued that this result supports the conjecture that Gurson's approximate criterion for plastic porous materials, and its viscoplastic extension of Leblond et al. (1994), may actually yield rigorous upper bounds for the hydrostatic flow stress of porous materials containing an isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary, distribution of porosity. To cite this article: M.I. Idiart, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  20. Free vibration of layered magnetoelectroelastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Heyliger, P R; Pan, E

    2016-08-01

    A discrete-layer model is presented and applied to the free vibration of layered anisotropic spheres with coupling among the elastic, electric, and magnetic fields. Through-thickness approximations in the radial direction are pre-integrated and combined with independent approximations in the azimuthal and circumferential directions to provide estimates of the natural frequencies for a variety of representative geometries. Results are in excellent agreement with existing analytical studies and additional results are presented for higher-order spheroidal modes. Predictions of the level of influence of magnetoelectric coupling are also given. PMID:27586731

  1. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  2. Movements of a Sphere Moving Over Smooth and Rough Inclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Chyan-Deng

    1992-01-01

    The steady movements of a sphere over a rough incline in air, and over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid were studied theoretically and experimentally. The principle of energy conservation was used to analyze the translation velocities, rolling resistances, and drag coefficients of a sphere moving over the inclines. The rolling resistance to the movement of a sphere from the rough incline was presumed to be caused by collisions and frictional slidings. A varnished wooden board was placed on the bottom of an experimental tilting flume to form a smooth incline and a layer of spheres identical to the sphere moving over them was placed on the smooth wooden board to form a rough incline. Spheres used in the experiments were glass spheres, steel spheres, and golf balls. Experiments show that a sphere moving over a rough incline with negligible fluid drag in air can reach a constant translation velocity. This constant velocity was found to be proportional to the bed inclination (between 11 ^circ and 21^circ) and the square root of the sphere's diameter, but seemingly independent of the sphere's specific gravity. Two empirical coefficients in the theoretical expression of the sphere's translation velocity were determined by experiments. The collision and friction parts of the shear stress exerted on the interface between the moving sphere and rough incline were determined. The ratio of collision to friction parts appears to increase with increase in the bed inclination. These two parts seem to be of the same order of magnitude. The rolling resistances and the relations between the drag coefficient and Reynolds number for a sphere moving over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid, such as water or salad oil, were determined by a regression analysis based on experimental data. It was found that the drag coefficient for a sphere over the rough incline is larger than that for a sphere over the smooth incline, and both of which are much larger than that for a sphere in free

  3. Probabilistic Simulation for Nanocomposite Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A unique probabilistic theory is described to predict the uniaxial strengths and fracture properties of nanocomposites. The simulation is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to simulate uniaxial strengths and fracture of a nanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. These results show smooth distributions from low probability to high.

  4. Extruded superparamagnetic saloplastic polyelectrolyte nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingcheng; Wang, Qifeng; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2015-01-14

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of diameter ca. 12 nm were dispersed into polyelectrolyte complexes made from poly(styrenesulfonate) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium). These nanocomposites were plasticized with salt water and extruded into dense, tough fibers. Magnetometry of these composites showed they retained the superparamagnetic properties of their constituent nanoparticles with saturation magnetization that scaled with the loading of nanoparticles. Their superparamagnetic response allowed the composites to be heated remotely by radiofrequency fields. While the modulus of fibers was unaffected by the presence of nanoparticles the toughness and tensile strength increased significantly. PMID:25525833

  5. Low TCR nanocomposite strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); Chen, Ximing (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high temperature thin film strain gage sensor capable of functioning at temperatures above 1400.degree. C. The sensor contains a substrate, a nanocomposite film comprised of an indium tin oxide alloy, zinc oxide doped with alumina or other oxide semiconductor and a refractory metal selected from the group consisting of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ni, W, Ir, NiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY deposited onto the substrate to form an active strain element. The strain element being responsive to an applied force.

  6. Facile synthesis of ultrasmall monodisperse ``raisin-bun''-type MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites with enhanced catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiasheng; Li, Xin; Zhang, Shufen; Lu, Rongwen

    2013-05-01

    We report the preparation of ultrasmall monodisperse MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites in reverse microemulsions formed by Brij-58/cyclohexane/water. The nanocomposites are of ``raisin-bun''-type with 1.0 +/- 0.2 nm MoO3 homogeneously dispersed in 23 +/- 2 nm silica spheres. Characterization is carried out based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), N2 sorption measurement, and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The as-prepared MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites are microporous and exhibit enhanced catalytic activities for acetalization of benzaldehyde with ethylene glycol and can be repeatedly used 5 times without obvious deactivation. The catalytic performance improvement is attributed to the unique structure and ultrasmall size of the nanocomposites.We report the preparation of ultrasmall monodisperse MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites in reverse microemulsions formed by Brij-58/cyclohexane/water. The nanocomposites are of ``raisin-bun''-type with 1.0 +/- 0.2 nm MoO3 homogeneously dispersed in 23 +/- 2 nm silica spheres. Characterization is carried out based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), N2 sorption measurement, and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The as-prepared MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites are microporous and exhibit enhanced catalytic activities for acetalization of benzaldehyde with ethylene glycol and can be repeatedly used 5 times without obvious deactivation. The catalytic performance improvement is attributed to the unique

  7. Characterizing HR 3549 B using SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, D.; Vigan, A.; D'Orazi, V.; Ginski, C.; Desidera, S.; Bonnefoy, M.; Gratton, R.; Langlois, M.; Marzari, F.; Messina, S.; Antichi, J.; Biller, B.; Bonavita, M.; Cascone, E.; Chauvin, G.; Claudi, R. U.; Curtis, I.; Fantinel, D.; Feldt, M.; Garufi, A.; Galicher, R.; Henning, Th.; Incorvaia, S.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Millward, M.; Perrot, C.; Salasnich, B.; Scuderi, S.; Sissa, E.; Wahhaj, Z.; Zurlo, A.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: In this work, we characterize the low-mass companion of the A0 field star HR 3549. Methods: We observed HR 3549B in imaging mode with the near-infrared branch (IFS and IRDIS) of SPHERE at the VLT, with IFS in YJ mode and IRDIS in the H band. We also acquired a medium-resolution spectrum with the IRDIS long-slit spectroscopy mode. The data were reduced using the dedicated SPHERE GTO pipeline, which is custom-designed for this instrument. We employed algorithms such as PCA and TLOCI to reduce the speckle noise. Results: The companion was clearly visible with both IRDIS and IFS. We obtained photometry in four different bands and also the astrometric position for the companion. Based on our astrometry, we confirm that it is a bound object and set constraints on its orbit. Although several uncertainties still remain, we estimate an age of ~100-150 Myr for this system, yielding a most probable mass for the companion of 40-50 MJup and Teff ~ 2300-2400 K. Compared with template spectra, this points to a spectral type between M9 and L0 for the companion, commensurate with its position on the color-magnitude diagram.

  8. Global warming in the public sphere.

    PubMed

    Corfee-Morlot, Jan; Maslin, Mark; Burgess, Jacquelin

    2007-11-15

    Although the science of global warming has been in place for several decades if not more, only in the last decade and a half has the issue moved clearly into the public sphere as a public policy issue and a political priority. To understand how and why this has occurred, it is essential to consider the history of the scientific theory of the greenhouse effect, the evidence that supports it and the mechanisms through which science interacts with lay publics and other elite actors, such as politicians, policymakers and business decision makers. This article reviews why and how climate change has moved from the bottom to the top of the international political agenda. It traces the scientific discovery of global warming, political and institutional developments to manage it as well as other socially mediated pathways for understanding and promoting global warming as an issue in the public sphere. The article also places this historical overview of global warming as a public issue into a conceptual framework for understanding relationships between society and nature with emphasis on the co-construction of knowledge.

  9. Mie scattering by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Geng Youlin; Wu Xinbao; Li Lewei; Guan Boran

    2004-11-01

    The field solution to the electromagnetic scattering of a plane wave by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere is obtained in terms of a spherical vector wave function expansion form. Using the source-free Maxwell's equations for uniaxial anisotropic media and making the Fourier transform of the field quantities, the electromagnetic fields in the spectral domain in uniaxial anisotropic media are assumed to have a form similar to the plane wave expanded also in terms of the spherical vector wave functions. Applying the continuous boundary conditions of electromagnetic fields on the surface between the air region and uniaxial anisotropic sphere, the coefficients of transmitted fields and the scattered fields in uniaxial anisotropic media can be obtained analytically in the expansion form of vector wave eigenfunctions. Numerical results for some special cases are obtained and compared with those of the classical Lorenz-Mie theory and the method of moments accelerated with the conjugate-gradient fast-Fourier-transform approach. We also present some new numerical results for the more general uniaxial dielectric material media.

  10. Mie scattering by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere.

    PubMed

    Geng, You-Lin; Wu, Xin-Bao; Li, Le-Wei; Guan, Bo-Ran

    2004-11-01

    The field solution to the electromagnetic scattering of a plane wave by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere is obtained in terms of a spherical vector wave function expansion form. Using the source-free Maxwell's equations for uniaxial anisotropic media and making the Fourier transform of the field quantities, the electromagnetic fields in the spectral domain in uniaxial anisotropic media are assumed to have a form similar to the plane wave expanded also in terms of the spherical vector wave functions. Applying the continuous boundary conditions of electromagnetic fields on the surface between the air region and uniaxial anisotropic sphere, the coefficients of transmitted fields and the scattered fields in uniaxial anisotropic media can be obtained analytically in the expansion form of vector wave eigenfunctions. Numerical results for some special cases are obtained and compared with those of the classical Lorenz-Mie theory and the method of moments accelerated with the conjugate-gradient fast-Fourier-transform approach. We also present some new numerical results for the more general uniaxial dielectric material media.

  11. The hydrodynamics of an oscillating porous sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Jason R.; Carnie, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    We determine the hydrodynamics of a rigid, weakly permeable sphere undergoing translational oscillations in an incompressible Newtonian fluid. We check using homogenization and scaling arguments that the flow inside the sphere may be modeled by Darcy's law and that the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman (BJS) boundary condition still applies for oscillatory flows, provided the frequency of oscillation is not too high. The BJS boundary condition introduces a slip velocity and to leading order in ɛ=√k /a, where k is the particle permeability and a is the radius, the particle may be regarded as impermeable with a slip length independent of frequency. Under these circumstances we solve for the flow field, pressure distribution and drag explicitly and show their behavior for 0⩽ɛ⩽0.05 and frequencies relevant to electroacoustics (1-10 MHz). From the drag we find the leading order corrections due to particle permeability of the pseudo-steady drag, Basset force and added mass.

  12. An evaluation of temperature profiles from falling sphere soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    An evaluation of 30 pairs of high-altitude inflatable falling spheres and independent thermistor soundings with a mean rocket-launch-time separation of 27 min shows average temperature differences within 6 C at 32-70 km, except for an average difference of 10 C at 68 km near Mach 1 in the sphere descent curve. The mean difference is exhibited as a negative bias (sphere temperature colder) for which various explanations are considered. The rms temperature differences are greatest near 50 km (7 C) and 68 km (11 C). From 70 to approximately 87.5 km, confidence in the reliability of the sphere temperature soundings is based on the 'repeatability' of pairs of sphere soundings taken within 20 min, temperature differences generally being less than 10 C. Illustrations of large atmospheric variations measured by the sphere soundings are given along with verification from independent measurements.

  13. Analysis of rainbow scattering by a chiral sphere.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qing-Chao; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Qu, Tan; Li, Zheng-Jun; Bai, Lu; Gong, Lei

    2013-09-23

    Based on the scattering theory of a chiral sphere, rainbow phenomenon of a chiral sphere is numerically analyzed in this paper. For chiral spheres illuminated by a linearly polarized wave, there are three first-order rainbows, with whose rainbow angles varying with the chirality parameter. The spectrum of each rainbow structure is presented and the ripple frequencies are found associated with the size and refractive indices of the chiral sphere. Only two rainbow structures remain when the chiral sphere is illuminated by a circularly polarized plane wave. Finally, the rainbows of chiral spheres with slight chirality parameters are found appearing alternately in E-plane and H-plane with the variation of the chirality.

  14. Photoelastic gelatin spheres for investigation of locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Ceniceros, Ericson; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; McCormick, Zephyr; Fu, Henry

    2014-11-01

    We describe a force measurement method in granular media which uses highly-sensitive photoelastic gelatin spheres and its application to measuring forces exerted as animals burrow through granular media. The method is applicable to both freshwater and marine organisms. We fabricate sensitively photoelastic gelatin spheres and describe a calibration method which relates forces applied to gelatin spheres with photoelastic signal. We show that photoelastic gelatin spheres can detect forces as small as 1 microNewton, and quantitatively measure forces with up to 60 microNewton precision, a two order of magnitude improvement compared to methods using plastic disks. Gelatin spheres can be fabricated with a range of sizes to investigate a variety of granular media. Finally, we used the calibrated gelatin spheres in a proof-of-principle experiment to measure forces during earthworm locomotion.

  15. The physics of anisotropic spheres in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Krsna

    2001-11-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic pressure on the properties of spherically symmetric, gravitationally bound spheres. We consider the full general-relativistic and Newtonian treatment of this problem and obtain exact solutions for various forms of the equation of state connecting the radial and tangential pressures. It is shown that pressure anisotropy can have significant effects on the structure and properties of both Newtonian and general relativistic spheres. We show that it is possible for Newtonian spheres to have an infinite core pressure without requiring the radius to be infinite and that there exists stable anisotropic spheres with adiabatic exponents less than 4/3. For general relativistic spheres we demonstrate that the maximum value of 2M/R can approach unity (2M/R < 8/9 for isotropic spheres) and the surface redshift can be arbitrarily large.

  16. Analysis of rainbow scattering by a chiral sphere.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qing-Chao; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Qu, Tan; Li, Zheng-Jun; Bai, Lu; Gong, Lei

    2013-09-23

    Based on the scattering theory of a chiral sphere, rainbow phenomenon of a chiral sphere is numerically analyzed in this paper. For chiral spheres illuminated by a linearly polarized wave, there are three first-order rainbows, with whose rainbow angles varying with the chirality parameter. The spectrum of each rainbow structure is presented and the ripple frequencies are found associated with the size and refractive indices of the chiral sphere. Only two rainbow structures remain when the chiral sphere is illuminated by a circularly polarized plane wave. Finally, the rainbows of chiral spheres with slight chirality parameters are found appearing alternately in E-plane and H-plane with the variation of the chirality. PMID:24104080

  17. Monoclinic sphere packings. I. Invariant, univariant and bivariant lattice complexes.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Heidrun; Fischer, Werner

    2016-05-01

    All homogeneous sphere packings were derived that refer to the two invariant, the four univariant and the three bivariant lattice complexes belonging to the monoclinic crystal system. In total, sphere packings of 29 types have been found. Only for five types is the maximal inherent symmetry of their sphere packings monoclinic whereas the inherent symmetry is orthorhombic for nine types, tetragonal for five types, hexagonal for six types and cubic for four types. PMID:27126112

  18. Three-sphere magnetic swimmer in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiloo, Maryam; Miri, MirFaez

    2013-08-01

    We consider a low-Reynolds-number swimmer made from three spheres linked by two slender arms, and explore its motion in a shear flow. This rodlike three-sphere swimmer finally follows the direction dictated by the shear flow. To overcome this shortcoming, we propose a model in which the two outer spheres have permanent magnetic moments along the arms. This magnetic swimmer can be navigated to a desired direction by applying an external static and uniform magnetic field.

  19. Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T.gtoreq.600.degree. C.). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  20. Swelling of cross-linked polystyrene spheres in toluene vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Graf, K.; Berger, R.

    2006-11-27

    The swelling behavior of individual micron-sized polystyrene (PS) spheres in toluene vapor was studied via mass loading by means of micromechanical cantilever sensors. For 4%-8% cross-linked PS a mass increase of 180% in saturated toluene vapor was measured. The mass of the swollen PS sphere decreases with increasing exposure time to ultraviolet light. In addition, the swelling response is significantly different between the first and the second exposure to toluene vapor. This is attributed to the formation of a cross-linked shell at the surface of the PS spheres. Shape persistent parts were observed for locally irradiated PS spheres.

  1. ISS Update: SPHERES with Telerobotics Project Manager Terry Fong

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Terry Fong, Telerobotics Project Manager, about how the Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, are ...

  2. Orbital dynamics of two electrically charged conducting spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K.; Meyer, Deseree A.; Atkins, Brad M.; Franks, Gavin A.; Fuchs, Joshua T.; Li, Lulu; Sliger, Chase W.; Thompson, Jennifer E.

    2010-10-01

    The similar forms of Coulomb's law of electrostatics and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two oppositely charged spheres can orbit each other by means of the electrostatic force. We demonstrate electrostatic binary orbits using two oppositely charged graphite coated Styrofoam® spheres. The experiment was conducted on the NASA aircraft Weightless Wonder which simulates weightless conditions. Videos of 23 orbital attempts were analyzed to investigate the dynamics and orbital stability of the two sphere system. The results support predictions of a recently developed theory that establishes criteria for stable orbits between two conducting, electrically charged spheres.

  3. Weighted Circle Actions on the Heegaard Quantum Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Tomasz; Fairfax, Simon A.

    2013-11-01

    Weighted circle actions on the quantum Heeqaard 3-sphere are considered. The fixed point algebras, termed quantum weighted Heegaard spheres, and their representations are classified and described on algebraic and topological levels. On the algebraic side, coordinate algebras of quantum weighted Heegaard spheres are interpreted as generalised Weyl algebras, quantum principal circle bundles and Fredholm modules over them are constructed, and the associated line bundles are shown to be non-trivial by an explicit calculation of their Chern numbers. On the topological side, the C*-algebras of continuous functions on quantum weighted Heegaard spheres are described and their K-groups are calculated.

  4. GRADIENT INDEX SPHERES BY THE SEQUENTIAL ACCRETION OF GLASS POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    MARIANO VELEZ

    2008-06-15

    The Department of Energy is seeking a method for fabricating mm-scale spheres having a refractive index that varies smoothly and continuously from the center to its surface [1]. The fabrication procedure must allow the creation of a range of index profiles. The spheres are to be optically transparent and have a refractive index differential greater than 0.2. The sphere materials can be either organic or inorganic and the fabrication technique must be capable of scaling to low cost production. Mo-Sci Corporation proposed to develop optical quality gradient refractive index (GRIN) glass spheres of millimeter scale (1 to 2 mm diameter) by the sequential accretion and consolidation of glass powders. Other techniques were also tested to make GRIN spheres as the powder-accretion method produced non-concentric layers and poor optical quality glass spheres. Potential ways to make the GRIN spheres were (1) by "coating" glass spheres (1 to 2 mm diameter) with molten glass in a two step process; and (2) by coating glass spheres with polymer layers.

  5. Anomalous absorption, plasmonic resonances, and invisibility of radially anisotropic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallén, Henrik; Kettunen, Henrik; Sihvola, Ari

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the response of a sphere with radially anisotropic permittivity dyadic (RA sphere), in both the electrostatic and full electrodynamic settings. Depending on the values and signs of the permittivity components, the quasistatic polarizability of the RA sphere exhibits several very different interesting properties, including invisibility, field concentration, resonant singularities, and emergent losses. Special attention is given to the anomalous losses that appear in the case of certain hyperbolic anisotropy values. We show that their validity can be justified in a limiting sense by puncturing the sphere at the origin and adding a small imaginary part into the permittivity components. A hyperbolic RA sphere with very small intrinsic losses can thus have significant effective losses making it an effective absorber. With different choices of permittivities, the RA sphere could also perform as a cloak or a sensor. The Mie scattering results by an RA sphere are used to justify the quasistatic calculations. It is shown that in the small parameter limit the absorption efficiency of an RA sphere is nonzero for certain lossless hyperbolic anisotropies. The absorption and scattering efficiencies agree with the quasistatic calculations fairly well for spheres with size parameters up to 1/3.

  6. Carbonaceous spheres—an unusual template for solid metal oxide mesoscale spheres: Application to ZnO spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Patrinoiu, Greta; Calderón-Moreno, Jose Maria; Culita, Daniela C.; Birjega, Ruxandra; Ene, Ramona; Carp, Oana

    2013-06-15

    A green template route for the synthesis of mesoscale solid ZnO spheres was ascertained. The protocol involves a double coating of the carbonaceous spheres with successive layers of zinc-containing species by alternating a non-ultrasound and ultrasound-assisted deposition, followed by calcination treatments. The composites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy while the obtained ZnO spheres by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms and photoluminescence investigations. A growth mechanism of the solid spheres is advanced based on these results. While the spheres' diameters and the mean size values of ZnO are independent on deposition order, the surface area and the external porosity are fairly dependent. The photoluminescence measurements showed interesting emission features, with emission bands in the violet to orange region. The spheres present high photocatalytical activity towards the degradation of phenol under UV irradiation, the main reaction being its mineralization. - Graphical abstract: A novel and eco-friendly methodology for the synthesis of mesoscale solid ZnO spheres was developed. The protocol involves a double coating of the starch-derived carbonaceous spheres with successive layers of zinc-containing species by alternating a non-ultrasound and ultrasound-assisted deposition, followed by calcination treatments. - Highlights: • ZnO solid spheres are obtained via a template route using carbonaceous spheres. • Two-step coatings of interchangeable order are used as deposition procedure. • The coating procedure influences the porosity and surface area. • ZnO spheres exhibited interesting visible photoluminescence properties. • Solid spheres showed photocatalytical activity in degradation of phenol.

  7. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption.

  8. Nanocomposite polymer electrolyte for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Wei, Zhehao; Gu, Meng; Deng, Xuchu; Xu, Suochang; Han, Kee Sung; Wang, Jiulin; Nie, Zimin; Li, Guosheng; Zavadil, K.; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong M.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Yong; Mueller, Karl T.; Persson, Kristin A.; Liu, Jun

    2014-12-28

    Nanocomposite polymer electrolytes present new opportunities for rechargeable magnesium batteries. However, few polymer electrolytes have demonstrated reversible Mg deposition/dissolution and those that have still contain volatile liquids such as tetrahydrofuran (THF). In this work, we report a nanocomposite polymer electrolyte based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), Mg(BH4)2 and MgO nanoparticles for rechargeable Mg batteries. Cells with this electrolyte have a high coulombic efficiency of 98% for Mg plating/stripping and a high cycling stability. Through combined experiment-modeling investigations, a correlation between improved solvation of the salt and solvent chain length, chelation and oxygen denticity is established. Following the same trend, the nanocomposite polymer electrolyte is inferred to enhance the dissociation of the salt Mg(BH4)2 and thus improve the electrochemical performance. The insights and design metrics thus obtained may be used in nanocomposite electrolytes for other multivalent systems.

  9. Electrical conduction of a XLPE nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Jun; Sim, Jae-Yong; Lim, Kee-Joe; Nam, Jin-Ho; Park, Wan-Gi

    2014-07-01

    The resistivity, breakdown strength, and formation of space charges are very important factors for insulation design of HVDC cable. It is known that a nano-sized metal-oxide inorganic filler reduces the formation of space charges in the polymer nanocomposite. Electrical conduction of cross-linked polyethylene(XLPE) nanocomposite insulating material is investigated in this paper. The conduction currents of two kinds of XLPE nanocomposites and XLPE without nano-filler were measured at temperature of 303 ~ 363 K under the applied electric fields of 10 ~ 50 kV/mm. The current of the nanocomposite specimen is smaller than that of XLPE specimen without nano-filler. The conduction mechanism may be explained in terms of Schottky emission and multi-core model.

  10. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption. PMID:26076611

  11. Large-Strain Transparent Magnetoactive Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses polymer nano - composite superparamagnetic actuators that were prepared by the addition of organically modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. The nanocomposite films exhibited large deformations under a magnetostatic field with a low loading level of 0.1 wt% in a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer (TPU) matrix. The maximum actuation deformation of the nanocomposite films increased exponentially with increasing nanoparticle concentration. The cyclic deformation actuation of a high-loading magnetic nanocomposite film was examined in a low magnetic field, and it exhibited excellent reproducibility and controllability. Low-loading TPU nanocomposite films (0.1-2 wt%) were transparent to semitransparent in the visible wavelength range, owing to good dispersion of the magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetoactuation phenomena were also demonstrated in a high-modulus, high-temperature polyimide resin with less mechanical deformation.

  12. Graphene oxide nanocomposites and their electrorheology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen Ling; Liu, Ying Dan; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GO-based PANI, NCOPA and PS nanocomposites are prepared. • The nanocomposites are adopted as novel electrorheological (ER) candidates. • Their critical ER characteristics and dielectric performance are analyzed. • Typical ER behavior widens applications of GO-based nanocomposites. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO), a novel one-atom carbon system, has become one of the most interesting materials recently due to its unique physical and chemical properties in addition to graphene. This article briefly reviews a recent progress of the fabrication of GO-based polyaniline, ionic N-substituted copolyaniline and polystyrene nanocomposites. The critical electrorheological characteristics such as flow response and yield stress from rheological measurement, relaxation time and achievable polarizability from dielectric analysis are also analyzed.

  13. A Bonner Sphere Spectrometer for pulsed fields.

    PubMed

    Aza, E; Dinar, N; Manessi, G P; Silari, M

    2016-02-01

    The use of conventional Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS) in pulsed neutron fields (PNF) is limited by the fact that proportional counters, usually employed as the thermal neutron detectors, suffer from dead time losses and show severe underestimation of the neutron interaction rate, which leads to strong distortion of the calculated spectrum. In order to avoid these limitations, an innovative BSS, called BSS-LUPIN, has been developed for measuring in PNF. This paper describes the physical characteristics of the device and its working principle, together with the results of Monte Carlo simulations of its response matrix. The BSS-LUPIN has been tested in the stray neutron field at the CERN Proton Synchrotron, by comparing the spectra obtained with the new device, the conventional CERN BSS and via Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Aging dynamics of colloidal hard sphere glasses.

    PubMed

    Martinez, V A; Bryant, G; van Megen, W

    2010-09-21

    We report the results of dynamic light scattering measurements of the coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) of glasses of colloidal hard spheres for several volume fractions and a range of scattering vectors around the primary peak of the static structure factor. The ISF shows a clear crossover from an initial fast decay to a slower nonstationary decay. Aging is quantified in several different ways. However, regardless of the method chosen, the perfect "aged" glass is approached in a power law fashion. In particular the coupling between the fast and slow decays, as measured by the degree of stretching of the ISF at the crossover, also decreases algebraically with waiting time. The nonstationarity of this coupling implies that even the fastest detectable processes are themselves nonstationary. PMID:20866156

  15. Unit quaternions and the Bloch sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, K. B.; Koch, D.

    2015-06-01

    The spinor representation of spin-1/2 states can equally well be mapped to a single unit quaternion, yielding a new perspective despite the equivalent mathematics. This paper first demonstrates a useable map that allows Bloch-sphere rotations to be represented as quaternionic multiplications, simplifying the form of the dynamical equations. Left-multiplications generally correspond to non-unitary transformations, providing a simpler (essentially classical) analysis of time-reversal. But the quaternion viewpoint also reveals a surprisingly large broken symmetry, as well as a potential way to restore it, via a natural expansion of the state space that has parallels to second order fermions. This expansion to ‘second order qubits’ would imply either a larger gauge freedom or a natural space of hidden variables.

  16. Carbon adsorption system protects LPG storage sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gothenquist, C.A.; Rooker, K.M.

    1996-07-01

    Chevron U.S.A. Products Co. installed a carbon adsorption system to protect an LPG storage sphere at its refinery in Richmond, Calif. Vessel damage can result when amine contamination leads to emulsion formation and consequent amine carry-over, thus promoting wet-H{sub 2}S cracking. In Chevron`s No. 5 H{sub 2}S recovery plant, a mixture of butane and propane containing H{sub 2}S is contacted with diethanolamine (DEA) in a liquid-liquid absorber. The absorber is a countercurrent contactor with three packed beds. Because the sweetening system did not include a carbon adsorption unit for amine purification, contaminants were building up in the DEA. The contaminants comprised: treatment chemicals, hydrocarbons, foam inhibitors, and amine degradation products. The paper describes the solution to this problem.

  17. Polysaccharide-based nanocomposites and their applications

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yingying; Monty, Jonathan; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharide nanocomposites have become increasingly important materials over the past decade. Polysaccharides offer a green alternative to synthetic polymers in the preparation of soft nanomaterials. They have also been used in composites with hard nanomaterials, such as metal nanoparticles and carbon-based nanomaterials. This mini review describes methods for polysaccharide nanocomposite preparation and reviews the various types and diverse applications for these novel materials. PMID:25498200

  18. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  19. Preliminary Tests in the Supersonic Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John E.

    1947-01-01

    This report presents preliminary data obtained in the Langley supersonic sphere. The supersonic sphere is essentially a whirling mechanism enclosed in a steel shell which can be filled with either air or Freon gas. The test models for two-dimensional study are of propeller form having the same plan form and diameter but varying only in the airfoil shape and thickness ratio. Torque coefficients for the 16-006, 65-110, and the 15 percent thick ellipse models are presented, as well as pressure distributions on a circular-arc supersonic airfoil section having a maximum thickness of 10 percent chord at the 1/3-chord position. Torque coefficients were measured in both Freon and air on the 15 percent thick ellipse, and the data obtained in air and Freon are found to be in close agreement. The torque coefficients for the three previously mentioned models showed large differences in magnitude at tip Mach numbers above 1, the model with the thickest airfoil section having the largest torque coefficient. Pressure distribution on the previously mentioned circular-arc airfoil section are presented at Mach numbers of 0.69, 1.26, and 1.42. At Mach numbers of 1.26 and 1.42 the test section is in the mixed flow region where both subsonic and supersonic speeds occur on the airfoil. No adequate theory has been developed for this condition of mixed flow, but the experimental data have been compared with values of pressure based on Ackeret's theory. The experimental data obtained at a Mach number of 1.26 on the rear portion of the airfoil section agree fairly well with the values calculated by Ackeret's theory. At a Mach number of 1.42 a larger percentage of the airfoil is in supersonic flow, and the experimental data for the entire airfoil agree fairly well with the values obtained using Ackeret's theory.

  20. Random lasing in a nanocomposite medium

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Basiev, Tasoltan T

    2013-01-31

    The characteristics of a random laser based on a nanocomposite medium consisting of a transparent dielectric and scattering doped nanocrystals are calculated. It is proposed to use ytterbium laser media with a high concentration of active ions as nanocrystals and to use gases, liquids, or solid dielectrics with a refractive index lower than that of nanocrystals as dielectric matrices for nanocrystals. Based on the concept of nonresonant distributed feedback due to the Rayleigh scattering, an expression is obtained for the minimum length of a nanocomposite laser medium at which the random lasing threshold is overcome. Expressions are found for the critical (maximum) and the optimal size of nanocrystals, as well as for the optimal relative refractive index of nanocomposites that corresponds not only to the maximum gain but also to the minimum of the medium threshold length at the optimal size of nanocrystals. It is shown that the optimal relative refractive index of a nanocomposite increases with increasing pump level, but is independent of the other nanocomposite parameters. (nanocomposites)

  1. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  2. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  3. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  4. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  5. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  6. Social Justice and Education in the Public and Private Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Sally; Taylor, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the complex relationship between social justice and education in the public and private spheres. The politics of education is often presented as a battle between left and right, the state and the market. In this representation, the public and the private spheres are neatly aligned on either side of the line of battle, and…

  7. Equations of state for fused-hard-sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeso, M. J.; Solana, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Analytical equations of state for fused-hard-sphere fluids are developed from a generalization of the Carnahan-Starling method for obtaining the equation of state of the hard-sphere fluid. The results are in good agreement with existing simulation data.

  8. Torsional oscillations of a sphere in a Stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, F.; Thompson, A. B.; Mullin, T.

    2015-12-01

    The results of an experimental investigation into a sphere performing torsional oscillations in a Stokes flow are presented. A novel experimental set-up was developed, which enabled the motion of the sphere to be remotely controlled through application of an oscillatory magnetic field. The response of the sphere to the applied field was characterised in terms of the viscous, magnetic and gravitational torques acting on the sphere. A mathematical model of the system was developed, and good agreement was found between experimental, numerical and theoretical results. The flow resulting from the motion of the sphere was measured, and the fluid velocity was found to have an inverse square dependence on radial distance from the sphere. The good agreement between measurements and the analytical solutions for both fluid velocity and angular displacement of the sphere indicates that the flow may be considered Stokesian, thus providing an excellent basis for experimental and theoretical characterisation of hydrodynamic interactions between multiple oscillating spheres at low Reynolds number.

  9. Dual-Purpose Millikan Experiment with Polystyrene Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, C. N.; Christensen, F. E.

    1975-01-01

    This procedure, using polystyrene spheres of specified diameter, renders the Millikan oil drop experiment more accurate than the conventional procedure of the polystyrene spheres, eliminates size estimation error, and removes the guesswork involved in assigning proper index integers to the observed charges. (MLH)

  10. Mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Meng; Yan Guojin; Hou Yonggai; Wang Chunhua

    2009-05-15

    NiO solid/hollow spheres with diameters about 100 nm have been successfully synthesized through thermal decomposition of nickel acetate in ethylene glycol at 200 deg. C. These spheres are composed of nanosheets about 3-5 nm thick. Introducing poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) surfactant to reaction system can effectively control the products' morphology. By adjusting the quantity of PVP, we accomplish surface areas-tunable NiO assembled spheres from {approx}70 to {approx}200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. Electrochemical tests show that NiO hollow spheres deliver a large discharge capacity of 823 mA h g{sup -1}. Furthermore, these hollow spheres also display a slow capacity-fading rate. A series of contrastive experiments demonstrate that the surface area of NiO assembled spheres has a noticeable influence on their discharge capacity. - Graphical abstract: The mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres have been achieved by a solvothermal method. N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms show the S{sub BET} of NiO is tunable. NiO spheres show large discharge capacity and slow capacity-fading rate.

  11. Segregation of Fluidized Binary Hard-Sphere Systems Under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul

    We have derived an analytic expression for the contact value of the local density of binary hard-sphere systems under gravity. We have obtained the crossover conditions for the Brazil-nut type segregation of binary hard-sphere mixtures and binary hard-sphere chain mixtures from the segregation criterion, where the segregation occurs when the density (or the pressure) of the small spheres at the bottom is higher than that of the large spheres, or vice versa. For the binary hard-sphere chain mixtures, the crossover condition for the segregation depends on the number of monomers composed of hard-sphere chains as well as the mass and the diameter of each species. The fundamental-measure theories (FMTs) and local density approximation (LDA) are employed to examine the crossover condition for the segregation of the gravity-induced hard-sphere mixtures. The calculated results show that the LDA does not explain the density oscillation near the bottom, whereas the modified fundamental-measure theory (MFMT) compares with molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Orbital Motion of Electrically Charged Spheres in Microgravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Shubho; Andring, Kevin; Campbell, Desmond; Janeski, John; Keedy, Daniel; Quinn, Sean; Hoffmeister, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The similar mathematical forms of Coulomb's law and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two uniformly charged spheres should be able to orbit each other just as two uniform spheres of mass are known to do. In this paper we describe an experiment that we performed to demonstrate such an orbit. This is the first published account of a…

  13. Experimental Visualization of Flows in Packed Beds of Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Lattime, S.; Braun, M. J.; Athavale, M. M.

    1997-01-01

    The flow experiment consisted of an oil tunnel, 76 x 76 mm in cross-section, packed with lucite spheres. The index of refraction of the working fluid and the spheres were matched such that the physical spheres invisible to the eye and camera. By seeding the oil and illuminating the packed bed with planar laser light sheet, aligned in the direction of the bulk flow, the system fluid dynamics becomes visible and the 2-D projection was recorded at right angles to the bulk flow. The planar light sheet was traversed from one side of the tunnel to the other providing a simulated 3-D image of the entire flow field. The boundary interface between the working fluid and the sphere rendered the sphere black permitting visualization of the exact locations of the circular interfaces in both the axial and transverse directions with direct visualization of the complex interstitial spaces between the spheres within the bed. Flows were observed near the surfaces of a plane and set of spheres as well as minor circles that appear with great circles and not always uniformly ordered. In addition to visualizing a very complex flow field, it was observed that flow channeling in the direction of the bulk flow occurs between sets of adjacent spheres. Still photographs and video recordings illustrating the flow phenomena will be presented.

  14. Comparing standard Bonner spheres and high-sensitivity Bonner cylinders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Wei; Yuan, Ming-Chen; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2014-10-01

    Standard Bonner spheres and proposed high-sensitivity Bonner cylinders were calibrated in a neutron calibration room, using a (252)Cf source. The Bonner sphere system consists of 11 polyethylene (PE) spheres of various diameters and 4 extended spheres that comprise embedded metal shells. Similar to the design of Bonner spheres, a set of Bonner cylinders was assembled using a large cylindrical (3)He tube as the central probe, which was wrapped using various thicknesses of PE. A layer of lead was employed inside one of the PE cylinders to increase the detection efficiency of high-energy neutrons. The central neutron probe used in the Bonner cylinders exhibited an efficiency of ∼17.9 times higher than that of the Bonner spheres. However, compared with the Bonner spheres, the Bonner cylinders are not fully symmetric in their geometry, exhibiting angular dependence in their responses to incoming neutrons. Using a series of calculations and measurements, this study presents a systematic comparison between Bonner spheres and cylinders in terms of their response functions, detection efficiencies, angular dependences and spectrum unfolding.

  15. Computational Analysis of Wake Field Flow between Multiple Identical Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Wesley; Greenslit, Morton; Klassen, Zach; Hastings, Jay; Matson, William

    2014-11-01

    It is well understood both that objects moving through a fluid perturb the motion of nearby objects in the same fluid and that some configurations of objects moving through a fluid have little inter-object perturbation, such as a flock of birds flying in a V-formation. However, there is presently no known method for predicting what configurations of objects will be stable while moving through a fluid. Previous work has failed to find such stable configurations because of the computational complexity of finding individual solutions. In this research, the motions of two spheres in water were simulated and combinations of those simulations were used to extrapolate the motions of multiple spheres and to find configurations where the lateral forces on each sphere were negligible and the vertical forces on each sphere were equivalent. Two and three sphere arrangements were simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics and Mathematica was used both to demonstrate that combinations of two sphere cases are identical to three sphere cases and to identify stable configurations of three or more spheres. This new approach is expected to simplify optimization of aerodynamic configurations and applications such as naval and aerospace architecture and racecar driving. Advisor.

  16. Seeded Synthesis of Monodisperse Core-Shell and Hollow Carbon Spheres.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Luz Karime; Blanco, Álvaro; Juárez, Beatriz H; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Monodisperse carbon spheres between 500 and 900 nm are hydrothermally synthesized from glucose on polystyrene seeds. Control over temperature, time, glucose concentration, and seed size yields hybrid spheres without aggregation and no additional spheres population. Pyrolysis transforms the hybrid into hollow carbon spheres preserving monodispersity. This approach provides a basis for functional carbon spheres applicable in photonics and energy storage. PMID:27337299

  17. Seeded Synthesis of Monodisperse Core-Shell and Hollow Carbon Spheres.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Luz Karime; Blanco, Álvaro; Juárez, Beatriz H; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Monodisperse carbon spheres between 500 and 900 nm are hydrothermally synthesized from glucose on polystyrene seeds. Control over temperature, time, glucose concentration, and seed size yields hybrid spheres without aggregation and no additional spheres population. Pyrolysis transforms the hybrid into hollow carbon spheres preserving monodispersity. This approach provides a basis for functional carbon spheres applicable in photonics and energy storage.

  18. Mapping a hard-sphere fluid mixture onto a single component hard-sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, C.; Solana, J. R.

    2005-06-01

    The possibility of obtaining the thermodynamic and structural properties of a binary additive hard-sphere fluid mixture on the basis of the corresponding properties of a suitable single-component hard-sphere fluid is analyzed. To this end, Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for binary mixtures of hard spheres for different densities, compositions and diameter ratios in order to obtain the compressibility factor Z and the partial radial distribution functions gij(r) for pairs ij of the mixtures. These data are used to test the reliability of different proposals available in the literature for mapping the thermodynamic and structural properties of conformal mixtures onto those of a single-component fluid. It is found that, while the averaged radial distribution function and the equation of state of the mixture can be reasonably well reproduced by means of those of an equivalent single-component fluid, the partial radial distribution functions cannot be obtained with enough accuracy from the radial distribution function of the equivalent fluid. A possible explanation for this fact is suggested.

  19. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  20. Flow past a porous sphere at small Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. C.; Srivastava, Neetu

    2005-09-01

    low of an incompressible viscous fluid past a porous sphere has been discussed. The flow has been divided in three regions. The Region-I is the region inside the porous sphere in which the flow is governed by Brinkman equation with the effective viscosity different from that of the clear fluid. In Regions II and III clear fluid flows and Stokes and Oseen solutions are respectively valid. In all the three regions Stokes stream function is expressed in powers of Reynolds number. Stream function of Region II is matched with that of Region I at the surface of the sphere by the conditions suggested by Ochao-Tapia and Whitaker and it is matched with that of Oseen’s solutions far away from the sphere. It is found that the drag on the sphere reduces significantly when it is porous and it decreases with the increase of permeability of the medium.

  1. Critical levitation loci for spheres on cryogenic fluids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Ohm, S. A.

    1972-01-01

    The conditions which allow a fluid to support a sphere having a higher specific gravity than its own are investigated. Three basic parameters which together define the maximum floating conditions are considered, including the Bond number, the wetting angle of the interface, and the ratio of solid-liquid specific gravities. The Bond number represents the ratio of buoyancy to surface tension forces. An analysis of the forces at the sphere-liquid interface is conducted to determine the optimum levitation loci, that is, the conditions permitting flotation of a maximum density sphere. Data for glycerine, carbon tetrachloride, and water spheres floating on a liquid nitrogen surface appear to be in good agreement with the analysis. Data for Teflon spheres on water also appear to be in agreement with the analytical results.

  2. Sampling theorems and compressive sensing on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Jason D.; Puy, Gilles; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Vandergheynst, Pierre; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Wiaux, Yves

    2011-09-01

    We discuss a novel sampling theorem on the sphere developed by McEwen & Wiaux recently through an association between the sphere and the torus. To represent a band-limited signal exactly, this new sampling theorem requires less than half the number of samples of other equiangular sampling theorems on the sphere, such as the canonical Driscoll & Healy sampling theorem. A reduction in the number of samples required to represent a band-limited signal on the sphere has important implications for compressive sensing, both in terms of the dimensionality and sparsity of signals. We illustrate the impact of this property with an inpainting problem on the sphere, where we show superior reconstruction performance when adopting the new sampling theorem.

  3. Surface roughness measurement of tooling spheres for laser measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarr, Dennis P.; Reed, Paul W.

    2001-02-01

    The usage of chrome or highly polished precision tooling (reference) spheres is common in the calibration and operational characterization of measurement systems such as a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM). The usage of a three-dimensional, (3D) laser triangulation, non-contact measurement system on CMMs and other scanning systems pose several obstacles. The highly specular mirror finish on the tooling sphere provides an accurate mechanical entity that has adverse results with laser sensors. The development of tooling spheres with a diffuse surface would benefit laser based measurement systems. The surface roughness and reflectivity properties have an effect on the laser measurements' accuracy. Efforts to develop spheres and establish meaningful measurements of spheres with modified surface finishes are investigated.

  4. Debye series for light scattering by a multilayered sphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Renxian; Han, Xiange; Jiang, Huifen; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2006-02-20

    We have derived the formula for the Debye-series decomposition for light scattering by a multilayered sphere. This formulism permits the mechanism of light scattering to be studied. An efficient algorithm is introduced that permits stable calculation for a large sphere with many layers. The formation of triple first-order rainbows by a three-layered sphere and single-order rainbows and the interference of different-order rainbows by a sphere with a gradient refractive index, are then studied by use of the Debye model and Mie calculation. The possibility of taking only one single mode or several modes for each layer is shown to be useful in the study of the scattering characteristics of a multilayered sphere and in the measurement of the sizes and refractive indices of particles. PMID:16523791

  5. Shape-Morphing Nanocomposite Origami

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nature provides a vast array of solid materials that repeatedly and reversibly transform in shape in response to environmental variations. This property is essential, for example, for new energy-saving technologies, efficient collection of solar radiation, and thermal management. Here we report a similar shape-morphing mechanism using differential swelling of hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayer inkjets deposited on an LBL carbon nanotube (CNT) composite. The out-of-plane deflection can be precisely controlled, as predicted by theoretical analysis. We also demonstrate a controlled and stimuli-responsive twisting motion on a spiral-shaped LBL nanocomposite. By mimicking the motions achieved in nature, this method offers new opportunities for the design and fabrication of functional stimuli-responsive shape-morphing nanoscale and microscale structures for a variety of applications. PMID:24689908

  6. MULTISCALE MODELING OF POLYMER NANOCOMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2007-07-16

    Polymer Nanocomposites are an important class of nanomaterials with potential applications including but not limited to structural and cushion materials, electromagnetic and heat shields, conducting plastics, sensors, and catalysts for various chemical and bio processes. Success in most such applications hinges on molecular-level control of structure and assembly, and a deep understanding of how the overall morphology of various components and the interfaces between them affect the composite properties at the macroscale. The length and time-scales associated with such assemblies are prohibitively large for a full atomistic modeling. Instead we adopt a multiscale methodology in which atomic-level interactions between different components of a composite are incorporated into a coarse-grained simulation of the mesoscale morphology, which is then represented on a numerical grid and the macroscopic properties computed using a finite-elements method.

  7. Green nanocomposites: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Laza, A L; Jaber, M; Miehé-Brendlé, J; Demais, H; Le Deit, H; Delmotte, L; Vidal, L

    2007-09-01

    A series of intercalated and exfoliated nanocomposites montmorillonite-ulvan was prepared. Ulvan, extracted from the green algae, is a water-soluble polysaccharide biopolymer. Depending on the drying process, air or freeze drying, ulvan were inserted in the interlayer space or adsorbed on the both sides of inorganic layers. The crystallization of water molecules bounded to the ulvan induced the delamination of the layers during the lyophilization. Thermogravimetric experiments show a high percentage (approximately 51%) of organic matter for the freeze dried samples and a lowest one (approximately 17%) for the air dried solids. X-Ray Diffraction patterns exhibit a d(001) varying with the content of organic matter. When the delamination occurs, the (001) reflection disappears. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs show individual layers for the highest amount of ulvan.

  8. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  9. Synthesis, structure and properties of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changchun

    Over the last decade, the concept of utilizing nanoparticles to enhance polymer performance has drawn a great deal of research interest. Significant property enhancement can be achieved with a small amount of addition of nanoparticles. Spherical, platelet or tube/fiber like particles have all been used in the fabrication of nanocomposites. In this study, we chose platelet like clay particles to study the particle dispersion and properties of polymer nanocomposites and polymer nanocomposite foams. Free radical polymerization of methylmethacrylate (MMA) and styrene (St) in the presence of clay nanoparticles were studied in detail. The effect of interactions between the monomer, the initiator and clay surface modification was studied. By careful surface modification of clay surface and choice of initiator, clay particles can be dispersed uniformly at the nanometer scale (exfoliation). Exfoliation was achieved for PS nanocomposites with a clay concentration as high as 20 wt%. For PMMA, although fully exfoliated nanocomposite was only observed for clay concentration of 5 wt%, substantial exfoliation was observed in the 20 wt% nanocomposite. Nanocomposites were also prepared by extrusion compounding, with or without the aid of CO2. The effect of processing conditions on the degree of clay dispersion was studied. The relationships between clay dispersion, surfactant thermal stability and the resulting thermal properties, e.g., thermal stability, dimension stability, fire resistance were investigated. Novel polymer clay nanocomposite foams were prepared using carbon dioxide as the foaming agent. The role of clay on the foaming process was thoroughly investigated. It was found that clay serves as an efficient nucleation agent. Nucleation efficiency increases as the degree of clay dispersion improves. The exfoliated clay provides the highest nucleation efficiency. Nucleation efficiency can be further improved by tuning the interaction between polymer, CO2 and the surface

  10. Thermoset polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen

    Nanocomposites are formed when phase mixing occurs on a nanometer length scale. Due to the improved phase morphology and interfacial properties, nanocomposites exhibit mechanical properties superior to conventional composites. Toyota researchers first demonstrated that organoclay could be exfoliated in a nylon-6 matrix to greatly improve the thermal and mechanical properties of the polymer, which has resulted in a practical application in the automobile industry. A great deal of research has been conducted on organic-inorganic hybrid composites in which smectite clays are used as reinforcement agents. However, little work has been devoted to derivatives of other layered inorganic solids. In the present work, the first examples of organic polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites have been prepared by formation of a cured epoxy polymer network in the presence of organo cation exchange forms of magadiite. The exfoliation of silicate nanolayers in the epoxy matrix was achieved by in-situ intragallery polymerization during the thermosetting process. In general, the tensile properties, solvent resistance, barrier properties and chemical stability of the polymer matrix are greatly improved by the embedded silicate nanolayers when the matrix is flexible (sub-ambient Tg). The improvement of properties are dependent on the silicate loading, the degree of nanolayer separation and interfacial properties. Interestingly, the exfoliation also affects the polymer elasticity in a favorable way. The mechanism leading to nanocomposite formation is proposed. One exfoliated epoxy-magadiite nanocomposite/composition possessed unique transparent optical properties. The exfoliation chemistry was successfully extended to the other members of the layered silicic acid family. A new approach also was developed to prepare thermoset epoxy polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites in which curing agents can be directly intercalated into the intragallery without the need for alkylammonium ions

  11. Nanoelectrical investigation and electrochemical performance of nickel-oxide/carbon sphere hybrids through interface manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Yan'ge; Wu, Guodong; Zhu, Congxu; Zou, Wei; Gao, Yuanhao; Tian, Jie; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Advanced hetero-nanostructured materials for electrochemical devices, such as Li-ion batteries (LiBs), dramatically depend on each functional component and their interfaces to transport and storage charges, where the bottleneck is the sluggish one in series. In this work, we prepare Ni(OH)2@C hybrids through a continuous feeding in reflux and followed by a hydrothermal treatment. The as-prepared Ni(OH)2@C can be further converted into NiO@C hybrids after thermal annealing. As a control, Ni(OH)2&C and NiO&C nanocomposites have also been prepared. Peakforce Tuna measurement shows the conductivity of the NiO@C hybrids is higher than that of NiO&C composites in nanoscale. To further investigate the quality of the interface, 100 charge/discharge cycles of the hybrids are performed in LiBs. The capacity retention of hybrid materials has significantly improved than the simple carbon composites. The enhancement of the electrochemical performance is attributed to the better electric conductivity and smaller charge transfer impedance and strong covalent interface between nickel species and carbon spheres obtained through the controlled seeded deposition.

  12. High Volumetric Capacity Three-Dimensionally Sphere-Caged Secondary Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Xi; Kim, Jinwoo; Zheng, Qiye; Ning, Hailong; Sun, Pengcheng; Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Niu, Junjie; Braun, Paul V

    2016-07-13

    High volumetric energy density secondary batteries are important for many applications, which has led to considerable efforts to replace the low volumetric capacity graphite-based anode common to most Li-ion batteries with a higher energy density anode. Because most high capacity anode materials expand significantly during charging, such anodes must contain sufficient porosity in the discharged state to enable the expansion, yet not excess porosity, which lowers the overall energy density. Here, we present a high volumetric capacity anode consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite formed in only a few steps which includes both a 3D structured Sn scaffold and a hollow Sn sphere within each cavity where all the free Sn surfaces are coated with carbon. The anode exhibits a high volumetric capacity of ∼1700 mA h cm(-3) over 200 cycles at 0.5C, and a capacity greater than 1200 mA h cm(-3) at 10C. Importantly, the anode can even be formed into a commercially relevant ∼100 μm thick form. When assembled into a full cell the anode shows a good compatibility with a commercial LiMn2O4 cathode. In situ TEM observations confirm the electrode design accommodates the necessary volume expansion during lithiation. PMID:27322627

  13. High Volumetric Capacity Three-Dimensionally Sphere-Caged Secondary Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Xi; Kim, Jinwoo; Zheng, Qiye; Ning, Hailong; Sun, Pengcheng; Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Niu, Junjie; Braun, Paul V

    2016-07-13

    High volumetric energy density secondary batteries are important for many applications, which has led to considerable efforts to replace the low volumetric capacity graphite-based anode common to most Li-ion batteries with a higher energy density anode. Because most high capacity anode materials expand significantly during charging, such anodes must contain sufficient porosity in the discharged state to enable the expansion, yet not excess porosity, which lowers the overall energy density. Here, we present a high volumetric capacity anode consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite formed in only a few steps which includes both a 3D structured Sn scaffold and a hollow Sn sphere within each cavity where all the free Sn surfaces are coated with carbon. The anode exhibits a high volumetric capacity of ∼1700 mA h cm(-3) over 200 cycles at 0.5C, and a capacity greater than 1200 mA h cm(-3) at 10C. Importantly, the anode can even be formed into a commercially relevant ∼100 μm thick form. When assembled into a full cell the anode shows a good compatibility with a commercial LiMn2O4 cathode. In situ TEM observations confirm the electrode design accommodates the necessary volume expansion during lithiation.

  14. Preparation and characterization of magnetic thermoplastic-based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu, T. V.; Takamura, T.; Tsetserukou, D.; Sandhu, A.

    2014-02-01

    We developed a facile method for the preparation of magnetic nanocomposites based on the popular thermoplastic, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). The nanocomposites were produced by liquid blending of ABS and Ni nanorods (NRs), followed by solvent evaporation. The characterizations showed that the nanocomposites were magnetic and Ni NRs were uniformly distributed in polymer matrix.

  15. Viscoelasticity of Epoxy nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2013-03-01

    Nanocomposites have been modeled in a multiscale covering from molecular scale (e.g., molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo), microscale (e.g., Brownian dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, lattice Boltzmann, time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau method, dynamic density functional theory method) to mesoscale and macroscale (e.g., micromechanics, equivalent-continuum and self-similar approaches, finite element method) The presence of layered silicates in nonaqueous polymers changes the viscoelastic behavior of the unfilled matrix from liquid-like to solid-like because of the formation of a three-dimensional percolating network of exfoliated or intercalated stacks. This gel-like behavior is a direct consequence of the highly anisotropic nature of the nanoclays which prevents their free rotation and the dissipation of stress. Particle to particle interactions is the dominant mechanism in fumed silica nanocomposites whereas particle to polymer interaction is the dominant one in colloidal silica nanocomposites at identical filler concentrations. These interactions are balanced in each nanocomposite systems by the silica surface treatments (chain grafting, silane modification) and the molecular weight of the matrix. Two different types of nanocomposite structures exist namely, intercalated nanocomposites where the polymer chains are sandwiched between silicate layers and exfoliated nanocomposites where the layers can be considered individually but remain more or less dispersed in the polymer matrix. Yield stress from Carreau-Yasuda model has been correlated to exfoliation. Also, equilibrium modulus and zero shear rate viscosity has been used to analyze percolation threshold and sol-gel transition. Nano clays organically functionalized were mixed with Epoxy in a high shear mixer.

  16. Experimental study on combustion of a methane hydrate sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yokomori, Takeshi; Ohmura, Ryo; Ueda, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    The combustion behavior of a methane hydrate sphere under normal gravity is experimentally investigated. The initial diameter of the sphere is 20 mm. Variation in temperature at the center of the sphere ( T c) is measured with a K-type thermocouple at ignition temperatures ( T c,i) from 193 to 253 K at 20 K intervals. Variation in the near-surface temperature of the sphere ( T s) is measured at ignition temperatures ( T s,i) from 233 to 263 K at 10 K intervals. Two combustion phases are observed. When the hydrate is ignited, a stable flame envelope is formed around the sphere (phase 1). In phase 1, the surface of the sphere is dry. After a few seconds, water formed by dissociation of the methane hydrate appears on the surface and methane bubbles are formed by methane ejected from inside the sphere (phase 2), thus destabilizing the flame and causing local extinction. Methane bubbles move down along the surface and merge into a large methane bubble at the bottom of the sphere. This bubble bursts, releasing methane to form a temporary flame, and the water drops from the hydrate sphere. Water on the surface is cooled by the hydrate inside, and an ice shell confines the methane gas that dissociated inside the sphere. Because the dissociation occurs continuously inside the hydrate, the inner pressure gradually increases and at some instant, the ice cracks and methane gas is ejected from the cracks, which results in a micro-explosion with a flame. In phase 1, the surface temperature is below the freezing point of water, and so the surface remains dry and a stable flame envelope is formed; in phase 2, the surface temperature is above the freezing point, and so water appears on the surface. When the temperature at the center of the sphere is lower (193, 213, or 233 K), some methane hydrate remains even after flame extinction because heat transfer from the flame decreases in phase 2 as a result of local extinction. The diameter of the sphere decreases during combustion in

  17. Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Low Friction, Nanocomposite AlMgB14-TiB2 Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Bruce A; Harringa, J; Anderegg, A; Russell, A M; Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Higdon, Clifton; Elmoursi, Alaa A

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in coating science and technology offer new opportunities to enhance the energy-efficiency and performance of industrial machinery such as hydraulic fluid pumps and motors. The lubricated friction and wear characteristics of two wear-resistant coatings, diamond-like carbon and a nanocomposite material based on AlMgB{sub 14}-50 vol.% TiB{sub 2}, were compared in pin-on-disk tribotests using Mobil DTE-24{trademark} oil as the lubricant. In each case, the pins were fixed 9.53 mm diameter spheres of AISI 52100 steel, the load was 10 N, and the speed 0.5 m/s in all tests. Average steady-state friction coefficient values of 0.10 and 0.08 were measured for the DLC and nanocomposite, respectively. The coatings and their 52100 steel counterfaces were analyzed after the tests by X-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy for evidence of material transfer or tribo-chemical reactions. The low-friction behavior of the boride nanocomposite coating is due to the formation of lubricative boric acid, B(OH){sub 3}. In contrast, the low-friction behavior of the DLC coating is related to the relatively low dielectric constant of the oil-based lubricant, leading to desorption of surface hydrogen from the coating.

  18. Facile synthesis of ultrasmall monodisperse "raisin-bun"-type MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites with enhanced catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiasheng; Li, Xin; Zhang, Shufen; Lu, Rongwen

    2013-06-01

    We report the preparation of ultrasmall monodisperse MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites in reverse microemulsions formed by Brij-58/cyclohexane/water. The nanocomposites are of "raisin-bun"-type with 1.0 ± 0.2 nm MoO3 homogeneously dispersed in 23 ± 2 nm silica spheres. Characterization is carried out based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), N2 sorption measurement, and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The as-prepared MoO3/SiO2 nanocomposites are microporous and exhibit enhanced catalytic activities for acetalization of benzaldehyde with ethylene glycol and can be repeatedly used 5 times without obvious deactivation. The catalytic performance improvement is attributed to the unique structure and ultrasmall size of the nanocomposites. PMID:23613166

  19. C{sub 60}: Sphere or polyhedron?

    SciTech Connect

    Haddon, R.C.

    1997-02-19

    In the original publication on the subject, C{sub 60} was depicted with the aid of a soccer ball, but this representation soon gave way to the familiar line drawing of chemical bonds between nucleii. To a large extent the dichotomy in the representation of the fullerenes remains today, and it is the purpose of this paper to pose and address the question that appears in the title. Of course, in reality the answer is well-known, and neither the sphere nor the polyhedron represent C{sub 60}, which like other molecules exists as a collection of nuclei with an associated distribution of electron density. Nevertheless, it is of interest to consider which of these conventional representations is most relevant for the fullerenes and in particular the language most appropriate to the description of the shape of these molecules and the geometry of the carbon atoms. The analysis presented here shows that topology of the molecule is paramount, and hence, C{sub 60} (and the fullerenes) are best modeled as polyhedra. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Dynamics of hard sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective is to perform on homogeneous, fully equilibrated dispersions the full set of experiments characterizing the transition from fluid to solid and the properties of the crystalline and glassy solid. These include measurements quantifying the nucleation and growth of crystallites, the structure of the initial fluid and the fully crystalline solid, and Brownian motion of particles within the crystal, and the elasticity of the crystal and the glass. Experiments are being built and tested for ideal microgravity environment. Here we describe the ground based effort, which exploits a fluidized bed to create a homogeneous, steady dispersion for the studies. The differences between the microgravity environment and the fluidized bed is gauged by the Peclet number Pe, which measures the rate of convection/sedimentation relative to Brownian motion. We have designed our experiment to accomplish three types of measurements on hard sphere suspensions in a fluidized bed: the static scattering intensity as a function of angle to determine the structure factor, the temporal autocorrelation function at all scattering angles to probe the dynamics, and the amplitude of the response to an oscillatory forcing to deduce the low frequency viscoelasticity. Thus the scattering instrument and the colloidal dispersion were chosen such as that the important features of each physical property lie within the detectable range for each measurement.

  1. Consistent Kaluza-Klein sphere reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, M.; Lü, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2000-09-01

    We study the circumstances under which a Kaluza-Klein reduction on an n-sphere, with a massless truncation that includes all the Yang-Mills fields of SO(n+1), can be consistent at the full non-linear level. We take as the starting point a theory comprising a p-form field strength and (possibly) a dilaton, coupled to gravity in the higher dimension D. We show that aside from the previously studied cases with (D,p)=(11,4) and (10,5) (associated with the S4 and S7 reductions of D=11 supergravity, and the S5 reduction of type IIB supergravity), the only other possibilities that allow consistent reductions are for p=2, reduced on S2, and for p=3, reduced on S3 or SD-3. We construct the fully non-linear Kaluza-Klein Ansätze in all these cases. In particular, we obtain D=3, N=8, SO(8) and D=7, N=2, SO(4) gauged supergravities from S7 and S3 reductions of N=1 supergravity in D=10.

  2. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  3. Radar Imaging of Spheres in 3D using MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2003-01-21

    We have shown that multiple spheres can be imaged by linear and planar EM arrays using only one component of polarization. The imaging approach involves calculating the SVD of the scattering response matrix, selecting a subset of singular values that represents noise, and evaluating the MUSIC functional. The noise threshold applied to the spectrum of singular values for optimal performance is typically around 1%. The resulting signal subspace includes more than one singular value per sphere. The presence of reflections from the ground improves height localization, even for a linear array parallel to the ground. However, the interference between direct and reflected energy modulates the field, creating periodic nulls that can obscure targets in typical images. These nulls are largely eliminated by normalizing the MUSIC functional with the broadside beam pattern of the array. The resulting images show excellent localization for 1 and 2 spheres. The performance for the 3 sphere configurations are complicated by shadowing effects and the greater range of the 3rd sphere in case 2. Two of the three spheres are easily located by MUSIC but the third is difficult to distinguish from other local maxima of the complex imaging functional. Improvement is seen when the linear array is replace with a planar array, which increases the effective aperture height. Further analysis of the singular values and their relationship to modes of scattering from the spheres, as well as better ways to exploit polarization, should improve performance. Work along these lines is currently being pursued by the authors.

  4. Public sphere as assemblage: the cultural politics of roadside memorialization.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates contemporary academic accounts of the public sphere. In particular, it takes stock of post-Habermasian public sphere scholarship, and acknowledges a lively and variegated debate concerning the multiple ways in which individuals engage in contemporary political affairs. A critical eye is cast over a range of key insights which have come to establish the parameters of what 'counts' as a/the public sphere, who can be involved, and where and how communicative networks are established. This opens up the conceptual space for re-imagining a/the public sphere as an assemblage. Making use of recent developments in Deleuzian-inspired assemblage theory - most especially drawn from DeLanda's (2006) 'new philosophy of society' - the paper sets out an alternative perspective on the notion of the public sphere, and regards it as a space of connectivity brought into being through a contingent and heterogeneous assemblage of discursive, visual and performative practices. This is mapped out with reference to the cultural politics of roadside memorialization. However, a/the public sphere as an assemblage is not simply a 'social construction' brought into being through a logic of connectivity, but is an emergent and ephemeral space which reflexively nurtures and assembles the cultural politics (and political cultures) of which it is an integral part. The discussion concludes, then, with a consideration of the contribution of assemblage theory to public sphere studies. (Also see Campbell 2009a).

  5. Extrinsic Calibration of Camera Networks Using a Sphere

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Junzhi; Deboeverie, Francis; Slembrouck, Maarten; van Haerenborgh, Dirk; van Cauwelaert, Dimitri; Veelaert, Peter; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel extrinsic calibration method for camera networks using a sphere as the calibration object. First of all, we propose an easy and accurate method to estimate the 3D positions of the sphere center w.r.t. the local camera coordinate system. Then, we propose to use orthogonal procrustes analysis to pairwise estimate the initial camera relative extrinsic parameters based on the aforementioned estimation of 3D positions. Finally, an optimization routine is applied to jointly refine the extrinsic parameters for all cameras. Compared to existing sphere-based 3D position estimators which need to trace and analyse the outline of the sphere projection in the image, the proposed method requires only very simple image processing: estimating the area and the center of mass of the sphere projection. Our results demonstrate that we can get a more accurate estimate of the extrinsic parameters compared to other sphere-based methods. While existing state-of-the-art calibration methods use point like features and epipolar geometry, the proposed method uses the sphere-based 3D position estimate. This results in simpler computations and a more flexible and accurate calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is accurate, robust, flexible and easy to use. PMID:26247950

  6. Cross section for absorption of partly shielded dielectric sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, S. S.; Sulima, A. V.

    1984-05-01

    The effect of an ideally conducting spherical metal cup, as a shield, on the microwave absorption characteristics of a dielectric sphere is evaluated on the basis of the known solution to the diffraction problem for a plane electromagnetic wave propagating along the axis of cup and sphere. The Debye electric and magnetic potentials are calculated for the shielded segment of the sphere and for the unshielded remainder of the dielectric sphere, the cup lying either on the front surface or the back surface of the sphere. The problem reduces to two coupled systems of linear algebraic equations of the second kind. The cross section for absorption, equal to the difference between total incident energy flux and scattered energy flux in accordance with power balance or conservation of diffraction energy, has been calculated as a function of kb (k- wave number in free space, b- radius of cup base circle). Numerical results indicate that within the resonance range (b- wavelength of incident radiation) correction must be made to include quasi-natural modes of the shield. A narrow shield behind the sphere increases the overall absorption level in the latter, while a narrow shield before the sphere has almost no effect on the absorption.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of oil-chitosan composite spheres.

    PubMed

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Wang, Chih-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hui; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Lin, Yung-Sheng; Kung, Chao-Pin; Lin, I-Yin; Chang, Yi-Ching; Weng, Wei-Jie; Wang, Wei-Ting

    2013-05-16

    Oil-chitosan composite spheres were synthesized by encapsulation of sunflower seed oil in chitosan droplets, dropping into NaOH solution and in situ solidification. Hydrophilic materials (i.e., iron oxide nanoparticles) and lipophilic materials (i.e., rhodamine B or epirubicin) could be encapsulated simultaneously in the spheres in a one step process. The diameters of the prepared spheres were 2.48 ± 0.11 mm (pure chitosan spheres), 2.31 ± 0.08 mm (oil-chitosan composites), 1.49 ± 0.15 mm (iron-oxide embedded oil-chitosan composites), and 1.69 ± 0.1 mm (epirubicin and iron oxide encapsulated oil-chitosan composites), respectively. Due to their superparamagnetic properties, the iron-oxide embedded oil-chitosan composites could be guided by a magnet. A lipophilic drug (epirubicin) could be loaded in the spheres with encapsulation rate measured to be 72.25%. The lipophilic fluorescent dye rhodamine B was also loadable in the spheres with red fluorescence being observed under a fluorescence microscope. We have developed a novel approach to an in situ process for fabricating oil-chitosan composite spheres with dual encapsulation properties, which are potential multifunctional drug carriers.

  8. Forming MOFs into spheres by use of molecular gastronomy methods.

    PubMed

    Spjelkavik, Aud I; Aarti; Divekar, Swapnil; Didriksen, Terje; Blom, Richard

    2014-07-14

    A novel method utilizing hydrocolloids to prepare nicely shaped spheres of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed. Microcrystalline CPO-27-Ni particles are dispersed in either alginate or chitosan solutions, which are added dropwise to solutions containing, respectively, either divalent group 2 cations or base that act as gelling agents. Well-shaped spheres are immediately formed, which can be dried into spheres containing mainly MOF (>95 wt %). The spheronizing procedures have been optimized with respect to maximum specific surface area, shape, and particle density of the final sphere. At optimal conditions, well-shaped 2.5-3.5 mm diameter CPO-27-Ni spheres with weight-specific surface areas <10 % lower than the nonformulated CPO-27-Ni precursor, and having sphere densities in the range 0.8 to 0.9 g cm(-3) and particle crushing strengths above 20 N, can be obtained. The spheres are well suited for use in fixed-bed catalytic or adsorption processes.

  9. Alternative approach of cell encapsulation by Volvox spheres.

    PubMed

    Teong, Benjamin; Manousakas, Ioannis; Chang, Shwu Jen; Huang, Han Hsiang; Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Kuo, Shyh Ming

    2015-10-01

    Volvox sphere is a bio-mimicking concept of a biomaterial structure design able to encapsulate chemicals, drugs and/or cells. The aim of this study was to prepare Volvox spheres encapsulating AML12 liver cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via a high voltage electrostatic field system. The results demonstrated that AML12 liver cells and MSCs could be successfully encapsulated into the inner spheres and the outer sphere of the Volvox spheres. The improved cell viability of MSCs was achieved by the addition of collagen and polyethylene glycol into the preparation components of the Volvox spheres. Collagen material potentially provides extracellular matrix-like structure for cell adhesion while polyethylene glycol provides a void/loose space for permeability of metabolites. The encapsulated MSCs were able to differentiate into hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells and express liver cell markers including albumin, alpha feto-protein and cytokeratin 18. The encapsulated cells secreted albumin to about 140 ng on day 14. Based on these observations, we conclude that Volvox spheres can be used as an alternative approach to encapsulate multiple types of cells, here AML12 hepatocyte cell line and MSCs. Nevertheless, efforts are still needed to improve the viability of the encapsulated cells and increase the differentiation of MSCs into functional liver cells. PMID:26117741

  10. Synthesis and characterization of oil-chitosan composite spheres.

    PubMed

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Wang, Chih-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hui; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Lin, Yung-Sheng; Kung, Chao-Pin; Lin, I-Yin; Chang, Yi-Ching; Weng, Wei-Jie; Wang, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Oil-chitosan composite spheres were synthesized by encapsulation of sunflower seed oil in chitosan droplets, dropping into NaOH solution and in situ solidification. Hydrophilic materials (i.e., iron oxide nanoparticles) and lipophilic materials (i.e., rhodamine B or epirubicin) could be encapsulated simultaneously in the spheres in a one step process. The diameters of the prepared spheres were 2.48 ± 0.11 mm (pure chitosan spheres), 2.31 ± 0.08 mm (oil-chitosan composites), 1.49 ± 0.15 mm (iron-oxide embedded oil-chitosan composites), and 1.69 ± 0.1 mm (epirubicin and iron oxide encapsulated oil-chitosan composites), respectively. Due to their superparamagnetic properties, the iron-oxide embedded oil-chitosan composites could be guided by a magnet. A lipophilic drug (epirubicin) could be loaded in the spheres with encapsulation rate measured to be 72.25%. The lipophilic fluorescent dye rhodamine B was also loadable in the spheres with red fluorescence being observed under a fluorescence microscope. We have developed a novel approach to an in situ process for fabricating oil-chitosan composite spheres with dual encapsulation properties, which are potential multifunctional drug carriers. PMID:23681059

  11. Extrinsic Calibration of Camera Networks Using a Sphere.

    PubMed

    Guan, Junzhi; Deboeverie, Francis; Slembrouck, Maarten; van Haerenborgh, Dirk; van Cauwelaert, Dimitri; Veelaert, Peter; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-08-04

    In this paper, we propose a novel extrinsic calibration method for camera networks using a sphere as the calibration object. First of all, we propose an easy and accurate method to estimate the 3D positions of the sphere center w.r.t. the local camera coordinate system. Then, we propose to use orthogonal procrustes analysis to pairwise estimate the initial camera relative extrinsic parameters based on the aforementioned estimation of 3D positions. Finally, an optimization routine is applied to jointly refine the extrinsic parameters for all cameras. Compared to existing sphere-based 3D position estimators which need to trace and analyse the outline of the sphere projection in the image, the proposed method requires only very simple image processing: estimating the area and the center of mass of the sphere projection. Our results demonstrate that we can get a more accurate estimate of the extrinsic parameters compared to other sphere-based methods. While existing state-of-the-art calibration methods use point like features and epipolar geometry, the proposed method uses the sphere-based 3D position estimate. This results in simpler computations and a more flexible and accurate calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is accurate, robust, flexible and easy to use.

  12. Self-assembled clusters of spheres related to spherical codes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Carolyn L; Jankowski, Eric; Marval, Michelle; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2012-10-01

    We consider the thermodynamically driven self-assembly of spheres onto the surface of a central sphere. This assembly process forms self-limiting, or terminal, anisotropic clusters (N-clusters) with well-defined structures. We use Brownian dynamics to model the assembly of N-clusters varying in size from two to twelve outer spheres and free energy calculations to predict the expected cluster sizes and shapes as a function of temperature and inner particle diameter. We show that the arrangements of outer spheres at finite temperatures are related to spherical codes, an ideal mathematical sequence of points corresponding to the densest possible sphere packings. We demonstrate that temperature and the ratio of the diameters of the inner and outer spheres dictate cluster morphology. We present a surprising result for the equilibrium structure of a 5-cluster, for which the square pyramid arrangement is preferred over a more symmetric structure. We show this result using Brownian dynamics, a Monte Carlo simulation, and a free energy approximation. Our results suggest a promising way to assemble anisotropic building blocks from constituent colloidal spheres. PMID:23214546

  13. Polymer-organoclay nanocomposites by melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lili

    2009-12-01

    Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites based on a variety of polymer matrices and several organoclays were prepared by melt processing. A detailed characterization of the thermal degradation of several commercial and experimental organoclays often used to form polymer nanocomposites was reported. The surfactant type, loading, and purification level of organoclay significantly affect their thermal stability; however, broadly speaking, the results suggest that these differences in thermal stability do not appear to have much effect on the morphology and properties of the nanocomposites formed from them. It seems that the thermal stability of organoclays is not the key factor in organoclay exfoliation in melt processed polymer nanocomposites, since the exfoliation/dispersion process may have been completed on a time scale before the degradation of surfactant progresses to a detrimental level. Polymer nanocomposites have been made from a variety of polymers; however, few matrices have demonstrated the ability to readily exfoliate the organoclay as well as nylon 6, especially for highly hydrophobic materials like polyolefins. Hence, a significant part of this research work was devoted to explore various routes to improve polyolefin-organoclay interactions, and thus, organoclay exfoliation in these systems. Amine grafted polypropylenes and a conventionally used maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene were used as compatibilizers for polypropylene based nanocomposites to improve the organoclay exfoliation. A series of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymers, the polarity of which can be adjusted by varying their vinyl acetate contents, based nanocomposites were prepared as the model system to address the relationship between the polarity of the polymers and their preferences over various organoclay structures. Attempts were made to explore the effect of degree of neutralization of acid groups in ionomers on the morphology and properties of nanocomposites, and it seems that the

  14. Systematic comparison of model polymer nanocomposite mechanics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Senbo; Peter, Christine; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites render a range of outstanding materials from natural products such as silk, sea shells and bones, to synthesized nanoclay or carbon nanotube reinforced polymer systems. In contrast to the fast expanding interest in this type of material, the fundamental mechanisms of their mixing, phase behavior and reinforcement, especially for higher nanoparticle content as relevant for bio-inorganic composites, are still not fully understood. Although polymer nanocomposites exhibit diverse morphologies, qualitatively their mechanical properties are believed to be governed by a few parameters, namely their internal polymer network topology, nanoparticle volume fraction, particle surface properties and so on. Relating material mechanics to such elementary parameters is the purpose of this work. By taking a coarse-grained molecular modeling approach, we study an range of different polymer nanocomposites. We vary polymer nanoparticle connectivity, surface geometry and volume fraction to systematically study rheological/mechanical properties. Our models cover different materials, and reproduce key characteristics of real nanocomposites, such as phase separation, mechanical reinforcement. The results shed light on establishing elementary structure, property and function relationship of polymer nanocomposites. PMID:27623170

  15. Fire retardant effects of polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Hull, T Richard; Stec, Anna A; Nazare, Shonali

    2009-07-01

    Among the many and varied applications of nanotechnology, the dispersion of nanoscopic fillers to form polymer nanocomposites with improved fire behaviour illustrates the potential and diversity of nanoscience. Different polymers decompose in different ways and fire retardants act to inhibit the decomposition or flaming combustion processes. Polymer nanocomposites form barriers between the fuel and air, reducing the rate of burning, but beyond that there is little consistency in their effects. It is shown that the decomposition products of polypropylene are changed by the presence of nanoclay, although there is only a small influence on the mass loss rate. The rheological properties of molten polymer nanocomposites are radically different from those of virgin polymers, and these will profoundly affect the heat transfer through the material, resulting in a shorter time to ignition and lower peak in the heat release rate, typical of polymer nanocomposites. The dispersion of nanofillers within polymers is generally measured in the cold polymer, but since this does not reflect the condition at the time of ignition, it is proposed that temperature ramped rheological measurements are more appropriate indicators of dispersion. The influence of polymer nanocomposite formation on the yields of toxic products from fire is studied using the ISO 19700 steady state tube furnace, and it is found that under early stages of burning more carbon monoxide and organoirritants are formed, but under the more toxic under-ventilated conditions, less toxic products are formed.

  16. Properties of polypropylene nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myung Wook; Kim, Ju-Young; Ihn, Kyo Jin

    2007-11-01

    Silver/polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm were prepared using a new synthetic method. AgNO3 crystals were dissolved into hydrophilic domain of polyoxyethylene maleate-based surfactant (PEOM), which gives self-assembly nano-structures. The AgNO3 in the nano-domains of PEOM was reduced by NaBH4 to form nanoparticles. The colloidal solutions with silver nanoparticles were diluted with ethanol and were mixed with PP pellets. Silver nanocomposites were prepared by extrusion compounding process after drying the pellets. Contents of silver nanoparticles dispersed within PP resin were changed from 100 to 1000 ppm. Formation of silver nanoparticles within PP was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM. Size and distribution of dispersed silver nanoparticles were also measured by TEM. Silver/PP nanocomposites films showed not only improved thermal stability but also increased mechanical properties compared to neat PP film. Tensile properties of PP nanocomposites were largely improved compared with neat PP resin, and elongation increased also by 175% for the nanocomposites containing 1000 ppm silver nanoparticles.

  17. Mesostructure Control of Polymer-Inorganic Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaia, R.

    2002-03-01

    Critical to forwarding polymer nanocomposite technology is the development of a detailed understanding of the spatial distribution of the various constituents (inorganic, polymeric and additives), the associated influence on thermodynamic and kinetic (rheological) aspects of the system and techniques to control nano (1-100nm) and meso (100-1000nm) scale morphology. With regard to these issues, in-situ small angle x-ray scattering, associated scattering models, coarse grain simulations, and rheology have been used to examine the phase behavior of organically modified layered silicates (OLS) suspended in pure and binary solvent mixtures. These serve as model systems for examining aspects of morphology development and phase behavior in thermoset and thermoplastic nanocomposites. The phase structure of solvent - OLS system is qualitatively described by Onsager arguments modified to include a crystal-solvate (intercalated phase) and a gelation point. Ternary behavior (binary solvent mixtures) provides evidence for preferential segregation of the polar component to the inorganic surface. The chemical structure of the organic surfactant modifier has a negligible influence on the structure of the intercalated phase, but has a marked effect on the extent and concentration of the dispersed phase. These studies provide insight into the use of polar activators for organosilicate rheolgical control agents and additives to enhance nanocomposite formation (e.g. H20 addition for optimal exfoliated PDMS nanocomposites and incorporation of malic anhydride to produce polypropylene nanocomposites).

  18. Molecular mechanisms of failure in polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersappe, Dilip

    2003-03-01

    With the emergence of synthetic methods that can produce nanometer sized fillers, resulting in an enormous increase of surface area, polymers reinforced with nanoscale particles should offer the possibility of vastly improved properties. However, experimental evidence suggests that the paradigms that have been used for conventional filled composites cannot account for the behavior of nanocomposites. We examine the role that spherical nanofillers play on the rheology and the strength of the nanocomposite by using Molecular Dynamics simulations. We find that the enhancement of properties in nanocomposites is a result of the equivalence of time scales for motion for the polymer and the filler. We show that the mobility of the nanofiller, rather than its surface area, is key to the performance of the nanocomposite and that this mobility is a complex function of the size of the filler, the attraction between the polymer and the filler, and the thermodynamic state of the matrix. Our results show similarities between the toughening mechanisms in polymer nanocomposites and those postulated for naturally occurring biological materials which also contain nanoscaled assemblies, such as spider silk and abalone adhesive.

  19. Polylactide nanocomposites for packaging materials: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiastuti, Indah

    2016-02-01

    This review aims at highlighting on an attempt for improving the properties of polylactide (PLA) as packaging material by application of nanocomposite technology. PLA is attracting considerable interest because of more eco-friendliness from its origin as contrast to the petrochemical-based polymers and its biodegradability. Despite possessing good mechanical and optical properties, deterioration of the material properties in PLA materials during their service time could occur after prolonged exposure to humidity and high temperature condition. Limited gas barrier is another drawback of PLA material that should be overcome to satisfy the requirement for packaging application. To further extend the range of mechanical and thermal properties achievable, several attempts have been made in modifying the material such as blending with other polymers, use of plasticizing material and development of PLA nanocomposites. Nanocomposite is a fairly new type of composite that has emerged in which the reinforcing filler has nanometer scale dimensions (at least one dimension of the filler is less than 100 nm). In this review, the critical properties of PLA as packaging materials and its degradation mechanism are presented. This paper discusses the current effort and key research challenges in the development of nanocomposites based on biodegradable polymer matrices and nano-fillers. The PLA layered silicate nanocomposites where the filler platelets can be dispersed in the polymer at the nanometer scale owing to the specific filler surface modification, frequently exhibits remarkable improvements of mechanical strength, gas barrier and thermal stability.

  20. Preferable removal of phosphate from water using hydrous zirconium oxide-based nanocomposite of high stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weixian; Hua, Ming; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we employed a new nanocomposite adsorbent HZO-201, which featured high stability under varying solution chemistry, for preferable removal of phosphate from synthetic solution and a real effluent. An anion exchange resin (D-201) was employed as the host of HZO-201, where nano-hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO) was encapsulated as the active species. D-201 binds phosphate through nonspecific electrostatic affinity, whereas the loaded HZO nanoparticles capture phosphate through formation of the inner-sphere complexes. Quantitative contribution of both species to phosphate adsorption was predicted based on the double-Langmuir model. Preferable removal of phosphate by HZO-201 was observed in the presence of the competing anions at higher levels (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), HCO3(-)). Fixed-bed adsorption indicated that the effective volume capacity of a synthetic water (2.0 mg P-PO4(3-)/L) by using HZO-201 was ∼1600 BV in the first run (<0.5mg P-PO4(3-)/L), comparable to Fe(III)-based nanocomposite HFO-201 (∼1500 BV) and much larger than D-201 (<250 BV). The exhausted HZO-201 can be in situ regenerated by using a binary NaOH-NaCl solution for cyclic runs, whether fed with the synthetic solution or real effluent. In general, HZO-201 is a promising alternative to Fe(III)-based adsorbents for trace phosphate removal from effluent particularly at acidic pH.

  1. Preferable removal of phosphate from water using hydrous zirconium oxide-based nanocomposite of high stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weixian; Hua, Ming; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we employed a new nanocomposite adsorbent HZO-201, which featured high stability under varying solution chemistry, for preferable removal of phosphate from synthetic solution and a real effluent. An anion exchange resin (D-201) was employed as the host of HZO-201, where nano-hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO) was encapsulated as the active species. D-201 binds phosphate through nonspecific electrostatic affinity, whereas the loaded HZO nanoparticles capture phosphate through formation of the inner-sphere complexes. Quantitative contribution of both species to phosphate adsorption was predicted based on the double-Langmuir model. Preferable removal of phosphate by HZO-201 was observed in the presence of the competing anions at higher levels (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), HCO3(-)). Fixed-bed adsorption indicated that the effective volume capacity of a synthetic water (2.0 mg P-PO4(3-)/L) by using HZO-201 was ∼1600 BV in the first run (<0.5mg P-PO4(3-)/L), comparable to Fe(III)-based nanocomposite HFO-201 (∼1500 BV) and much larger than D-201 (<250 BV). The exhausted HZO-201 can be in situ regenerated by using a binary NaOH-NaCl solution for cyclic runs, whether fed with the synthetic solution or real effluent. In general, HZO-201 is a promising alternative to Fe(III)-based adsorbents for trace phosphate removal from effluent particularly at acidic pH. PMID:25463215

  2. Biomimetic Nanocomposites of Calcium Phosphate and Self-Assembling Triblock and Pentablock Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Enlow, Drew Lenzen

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to mimic the growth of natural bone, self-assembling, micelle and gel-forming copolymers were used as a template for calcium phosphate precipitation. Because of the cationic characteristics imparted by PDEAEM end group additions to commercially available Pluronic{reg_sign} Fl27, a direct ionic attraction mechanism was utilized and a polymer-brushite nanocomposite spheres were produced. Brushite coated spherical micelles with diameters of ~40 nm, and agglomerates of these particles (on the order of 0.5 μm) were obtained. Thickness and durability of the calcium phosphate coating, and the extent of agglomeration were studied. The coating has been shown to be robust enough to retain its integrity even below polymer critical micelle concentration and/or temperature. Calcium phosphate-polymer gel nanocomposites were also prepared. Gel samples appeared as a single phase network of agglomerated spherical micelles, and had a final calcium phosphate concentration of up to 15 wt%. Analysis with x-ray diffraction and NMR indicated a disordered brushite phase with the phosphate groups linking inorganic phase to the polymer.

  3. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model.

  4. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  5. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  6. Submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres synthesized by autocatalytic reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Yida . E-mail: denyda@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhao Ling; Liu Lei; Shen Bin; Hu Wenbin

    2005-10-06

    A facile method to fabricate submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres by autocatalyzing the redox reaction around a sacrificial colloidal particle surface is presented in this paper. The size distribution of these spheres can be controlled by regulating the concentration of the alkali solution. The hollow nickel particles were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The hollow spheres produced by this process may have potential applications in many fields, including chemistry, biotechnology and materials science.

  7. Spherical interferometry for the characterization of precision spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, R. A.; Bartl, G.

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry with spherical wavefronts is usually used for characterizing precise optics. A special spherical interferometer was set up to measure the volume of high precision spheres used for the new definition of the SI unit kilogram, for which a fundamental constant, such as Planck’s constant h or Avogadro’s constant N A, was to be determined. Furthermore with this type of interferometer and with a special evaluating algorithm, absolute form deviations of spheres can be determined. With this knowledge, a sphere can be processed further to reach unrivaled small sphericity deviations.

  8. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.; Fowler, Victor L.; Lloyd, Milton H.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified internal gelation process for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85.degree. C.) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column.

  9. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) filled boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaiman, Hanisah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin; Zakaria, Sarani

    2015-09-25

    In this study, nanocomposite using cellulose nanofibrils filled with different percentage of boron nitride (CNF-BN) were prepared. The objective of this research is to study the effect of different percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite produced. The CNF-BN nanocomposite were characterization by FT-IR, SEM and thermal conductivity. The FT-IR analysis of the CNF-BN nanocomposite shows all the characteristic peaks of cellulose and BN present in all samples. The dispersion of BN in CNF were seen through SEM analysis. The effect of different loading percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite were also investigated.

  10. "Outer-sphere to inner-sphere" redox cycling for ultrasensitive immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Akanda, Md Rajibul; Choe, Yu-Lim; Yang, Haesik

    2012-01-17

    This paper reports chemical-chemical (CC) and electrochemical-chemical-chemical (ECC) redox cycling, for use in ultrasensitive biosensor applications. A triple chemical amplification approach using an enzymatic reaction, CC redox cycling, and ECC redox cycling is applied toward electrochemical immunosensors of cardiac troponin I. An enzymatic reaction, in which alkaline phosphatase converts 4-aminophenyl phosphate to 4-aminophenol (AP), triggers CC redox cycling in the presence of an oxidant and a reductant, and electrochemical signals are measured with ECC redox cycling after an incubation period of time in an air-saturated solution. To obtain high, selective, and reproducible redox cycling without using redox enzymes, two redox reactions [the reaction between AP and the oxidant and the reaction between the oxidized form of AP (4-quinone imine, QI) and the reductant] should be fast, but an unwanted reaction between the oxidant and reductant should be very slow. Because species that undergo outer-sphere reactions (OSR-philic species) react slowly with species that undergo inner-sphere reactions (ISR-philic species), highly OSR-philic Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+) and highly ISR-philic tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) are chosen as the oxidant and reductant, respectively. The OSR- and ISR-philic QI/AP couple allows fast redox reactions with both the OSR-philic Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+) and the ISR-philic TCEP. Highly OSR-philic indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes minimize unwanted electrochemical reactions with highly ISR-philic species. Although the formal potential of the Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+)/Ru(NH(3))(6)(2+) couple is lower than that of the QI/AP couple, the endergonic reaction between Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+) and AP is driven by the highly exergonic reaction between TCEP and QI (via a coupled reaction mechanism). Overall, the "outer-sphere to inner-sphere" redox cycling in the order of highly OSR-philic ITO, highly OSR-philic Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+)/Ru(NH(3))(6)(2+) couple, OSR- and ISR-philic QI

  11. Tangible nanocomposites with diverse properties for heart valve application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh Vellayappan, Muthu; Balaji, Arunpandian; Priyadarshini Subramanian, Aruna; Aruna John, Agnes; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Murugesan, Selvakumar; Mohandas, Hemanth; Supriyanto, Eko; Yusof, Mustafa

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease claims millions of lives every year throughout the world. Biomaterials are used widely for the treatment of this fatal disease. With the advent of nanotechnology, the use of nanocomposites has become almost inevitable in the field of biomaterials. The versatile properties of nanocomposites, such as improved durability and biocompatibility, make them an ideal choice for various biomedical applications. Among the various nanocomposites, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-poly(carbonate-urea)urethane, bacterial cellulose with polyvinyl alcohol, carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide and nano-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites have gained popularity as putative choices for biomaterials in cardiovascular applications owing to their superior properties. In this review, various studies performed utilizing these nanocomposites for improving the mechanical strength, anti-calcification potential and hemocompatibility of heart valves are reviewed and summarized. The primary motive of this work is to shed light on the emerging nanocomposites for heart valve applications. Furthermore, we aim to promote the prospects of these nanocomposites in the campaign against cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Self-assembly of nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sellinger, Alan; Lu, Yunfeng

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a nanocomposite self-assembly is provided where at least one hydrophilic compound, at least one hydrophobic compound, and at least one amphiphilic surfactant are mixed in an aqueous solvent with the solvent subsequently evaporated to form a self-assembled liquid crystalline mesophase material. Upon polymerization of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds, a robust nanocomposite self-assembled material is formed. Importantly, in the reaction mixture, the amphiphilic surfactant has an initial concentration below the critical micelle concentration to allow formation of the liquid-phase micellar mesophase material. A variety of nanocomposite structures can be formed, depending upon the solvent evaporazation process, including layered mesophases, tubular mesophases, and a hierarchical composite coating composed of an isotropic worm-like micellar overlayer bonded to an oriented, nanolaminated underlayer.

  13. Nanocomposites with High Thermoelectric Figures of Merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gang (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor); Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is generally directed to nanocomposite thermoelectric materials that exhibit enhanced thermoelectric properties. The nanocomposite materials include two or more components, with at least one of the components forming nano-sized structures within the composite material. The components are chosen such that thermal conductivity of the composite is decreased without substantially diminishing the composite's electrical conductivity. Suitable component materials exhibit similar electronic band structures. For example, a band-edge gap between at least one of a conduction band or a valence band of one component material and a corresponding band of the other component material at interfaces between the components can be less than about 5k(sub B)T, wherein k(sub B) is the Boltzman constant and T is an average temperature of said nanocomposite composition.

  14. Nanocomposites with high thermoelectric figures of merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gang (Inventor); Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is generally directed to nanocomposite thermoelectric materials that exhibit enhanced thermoelectric properties. The nanocomposite materials include two or more components, with at least one of the components forming nano-sized structures within the composite material. The components are chosen such that thermal conductivity of the composite is decreased without substantially diminishing the composite's electrical conductivity. Suitable component materials exhibit similar electronic band structures. For example, a band-edge gap between at least one of a conduction band or a valence band of one component material and a corresponding band of the other component material at interfaces between the components can be less than about 5k.sub.BT, wherein k.sub.B is the Boltzman constant and T is an average temperature of said nanocomposite composition.

  15. Nanocomposites with high thermoelectric figures of merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gang (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor); Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention is generally directed to nanocomposite thermoelectric materials that exhibit enhanced thermoelectric properties. The nanocomposite materials include two or more components, with at least one of the components forming nano-sized structures within the composite material. The components are chosen such that thermal conductivity of the composite is decreased without substantially diminishing the composite's electrical conductivity. Suitable component materials exhibit similar electronic band structures. For example, a band-edge gap between at least one of a conduction band or a valence band of one component material and a corresponding band of the other component material at interfaces between the components can be less than about 5k.sub.BT, wherein k.sub.B is the Boltzman constant and T is an average temperature of said nanocomposite composition.

  16. Semimetal/Semiconductor Nanocomposites for Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hong; Burke, Peter G.; Gossard, Arthur C.; Zeng, Gehong; Ramu, Ashok T.; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Bowers, John E.

    2011-04-15

    In this work, we present research on semimetal-semiconductor nanocomposites grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for thermoelectric applications. We study several different III-V semiconductors embedded with semimetallic rare earth-group V (RE-V) compounds, but focus is given here to ErSb:InxGa1-xSb as a promising p-type thermoelectric material. Nano­structures of RE-V compounds are formed and embedded within the III-V semiconductor matrix. By codoping the nanocomposites with the appropriate dopants, both n-type and p-type materials have been made for thermoelectric applications. The thermoelectric properties have been engineered for enhanced thermoelectric device performance. Segmented thermoelectric power generator modules using 50 μm thick Er-containing nanocomposites have been fabricated and measured. Research on different rare earth elements for thermoelectrics is discussed.

  17. Tidally Driven Dynamos in a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R.

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker & Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  18. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R. E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  19. Turbulent mixing in a precessing sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Susumu Shimizu, Masaki; Kawahara, Genta

    2014-11-15

    By numerically simulating turbulent flows at high Reynolds numbers in a precessing sphere, we propose a method to enhance the mixing of a fluid confined within a smooth cavity by its rotational motion alone. To precisely evaluate the mixing efficiency, we extend the quantification method proposed by Danckwerts [“The definition and measurement of some characteristics of mixtures,” Appl. Sci. Res. A 3, 279–296 (1952)] to the case in which only a finite number of fluid particle trajectories can be known. Our accurate numerical tracking of fluid particles in the flow, which is controlled by the Reynolds number (an indicator of the spin rate) and the Poincaré number (the precession rate), shows the following results. First, the mixing process on the time scale normalized by the spin period is independent of the Reynolds number as long as it is high enough for the flow to be developed turbulence. Second, fastest mixing is achieved under weak precession (Poincaré number ≈0.1); in such cases, perfect mixing requires only 10–15 spins of the container. Third, the power to sustain turbulence is a weakly increasing function of the Poincaré number, and the energy efficiency of the mixing is also maximized when the Poincaré number is about 0.1. Fourth, efficient mixing driven by the weak precession arises from the effective cooperation of complex large-scale flow and small-scale turbulence, which itself is sustained by the large-scale flow.

  20. Unusual thermodynamics on the fuzzy 2-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digal, Sanatan; Padmanabhan, Pramod

    2010-10-01

    Higher spin Dirac operators on both the continuum sphere( S 2) and its fuzzy analog( S {F/2}) come paired with anticommuting chirality operators. A consequence of this is seen in the fermion-like spectrum of these operators which is especially true even for the case of integer-spin Dirac operators. Motivated by this feature of the spectrum of a spin 1 Dirac operator on S {F/2}, we assume the spin 1 particles obey Fermi-Dirac statistics. This choice is inspite of the lack of a well defined spin-statistics relation on a compact surface such as S 2. The specific heats are computed in the cases of the spin 1/2 and spin 1 Dirac operators. Remarkably the specific heat for a system of spin 1/2 particles is more than that of the spin 1 case, though the number of degrees of freedom is more in the case of spin 1 particles. The reason for this is inferred through a study of the spectrums of the Dirac operators in both the cases. The zero modes of the spin 1 Dirac operator is studied as a function of the cut-off angular momentum L and is found to follow a simple power law. This number is such that the number of states with positive energy for the spin 1 and spin 1/2 system become comparable. Remarks are made about the spectrums of higher spin Dirac operators as well through a study of their zero-modes and the variation of their spectrum with degeneracy. The mean energy as a function of temperature is studied in both the spin 1/2 and spin 1 cases. They are found to deviate from the standard ideal gas law in 2+ 1 dimensions.

  1. Packings of a charged line on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas

    2008-12-01

    We find equilibrium configurations of open and closed lines of charge on a sphere, and track them with respect to varying sphere radius. Closed lines transition from a circle to a spiral-like shape through two low-wave-number bifurcations—“baseball seam” and “twist”—which minimize Coulomb energy. The spiral shape is the unique stable equilibrium of the closed line. Other unstable equilibria arise through tip-splitting events. An open line transitions smoothly from an arc of a great circle to a spiral as the sphere radius decreases. Under repulsive potentials with faster-than-Coulomb power-law decay, the spiral is tighter in initial stages of sphere shrinkage, but at later stages of shrinkage the equilibria for all repulsive potentials converge on a spiral with uniform spacing between turns. Multiple stable equilibria of the open line are observed.

  2. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST OF VACUUM SPHERES 168 AND 146 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST OF VACUUM SPHERES 168 AND 146 - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Supersonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  3. 2. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF VACUUM SPHERES 146 AND 168 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF VACUUM SPHERES 146 AND 168 - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Supersonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  4. Numerical Flow Visualization in Basic- and Hyper-Cluster Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Athavale, M. M.; Braun, M. J.; Lattime, S.

    1997-01-01

    Packed spherical particle beds have wide applications throughout the process industry and are usually analyzed using an appropriate combination of laminar and turbulent flows with empirically derived coefficients of which the Ergun (1952) relation is probably the best known. The 3-D complexity of the void distribution within the beds has precluded detailed studies of sphere clusters. Numerical modeling and flow vector visualization for the basic tetra- and hexa-sphere clusters and two hyper-sphere clusters are presented at two Reynolds numbers, 400 and 1200. Cutting planes are used to enable visualization of the complex flows generated within the sphere clusters and are discussed herein. The boundary conditions and flow fields for the simple clusters are also compared to the hyper-clusters with larger variations found for hexa-clusters.

  5. PREPARATION OF HIGH-DENSITY THORIUM OXIDE SPHERES

    DOEpatents

    McNees, R.A. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.

    1963-12-31

    A method of preparing high-density thorium oxide spheres for use in pellet beds in nuclear reactors is presented. Sinterable thorium oxide is first converted to free-flowing granules by means such as compression into a compact and comminution of the compact. The granules are then compressed into cubes having a density of 5.0 to 5.3 grams per cubic centimeter. The cubes are tumbled to form spheres by attrition, and the spheres are then fired at 1250 to 1350 deg C. The fired spheres are then polished and fired at a temperature above 1650 deg C to obtain high density. Spherical pellets produced by this method are highly resistant to mechanical attrition hy water. (AEC)

  6. Liquid trampolines: droplets and spheres bouncing off soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbin, Laurent; Dubail, Jerome; Crotiere, Suzie; Quere, David

    2005-11-01

    We report on the impact of rigid spheres and liquid droplets on soap films. These systems exhibit a rich variety of dynamics including bouncing and adhesion. In the case of drop impact, at low speeds the drops bounce, while for intermediate speeds the drops can pass through the film without the film breaking. The bouncing can be analyzed using mechanical models. In the case of the impact of rigid spheres, by tuning the physical property of the surface of the impacting sphere, which may or may not be surrounded by a skin of oil, we experimentally observe two distinct regimes: the solid sphere can bounce off of the fluid film or get entrapped. In all cases the film can be considered an absorber of kinetic energy. Finally, the possibility of tuning the bounce of an object will be presented.

  7. Numerical simulation of negative Magnus force on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Flow characteristics and fluid force on a sphere rotating along with axis perpendicular to mean air flow were investigated using Large Eddy Simulation at two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 200,000. As a result of simulation, opposite flow characteristics around the sphere and displacement of the separation point were visualized depending on the Reynolds number even though the sphere rotates at the same rotation speed according to the Reynolds number. When Reynolds number is 10,000, flow characteristics agree with the flow field explained in the Magnus effect. However sphere rotates at the same rotation speed while increasing Reynolds number to 200,000, separation point moves in opposite direction and wake appears in the different direction. The reason of the negative Magnus force was discussed in terms of the boundary layer transition on the surface.

  8. Analysis of integrating sphere performance for IR enhanced DT layering

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.B.,; Collins, G.W.

    1997-06-01

    Absorbed IR energy can supplement the beta decay energy from DT ice to improve the driving force toward uniform layers. A significant problem with this approach has been to deliver the added IR energy with sufficient uniformity to enhance rather than destroy the uniformity of the ice layers. Computer modeling has indicated that one can achieve {approximately}1% uniformity in the angular variation of the absorbed power using an integrating sphere containing holes large enough to allow external inspection of the ice layer uniformity. The power required depends on the integrating sphere size, a 25 mm diameter sphere requires {approximately}35 mW of IR to deposit as much energy in the ice as the 50 mW/cm{sup 3}(35 pW total) received from tritium decay in DT. Power absorbed in the plastic can cause unacceptable ice-layer non-uniformities for the integrating sphere design considered here.

  9. The Volume of a Sphere: A Chinese Derivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetz, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    Examines how ancient Chinese mathematicians attempted to correct an error concerning the volume of a sphere in the Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art, a compendium of the mathematics known and used in China in ancient times. (MKR)

  10. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    DOEpatents

    Pappano, Peter J; Rogers, Michael R

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  11. Packings of a charged line on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Alben, Silas

    2008-12-01

    We find equilibrium configurations of open and closed lines of charge on a sphere, and track them with respect to varying sphere radius. Closed lines transition from a circle to a spiral-like shape through two low-wave-number bifurcations-"baseball seam" and "twist"-which minimize Coulomb energy. The spiral shape is the unique stable equilibrium of the closed line. Other unstable equilibria arise through tip-splitting events. An open line transitions smoothly from an arc of a great circle to a spiral as the sphere radius decreases. Under repulsive potentials with faster-than-Coulomb power-law decay, the spiral is tighter in initial stages of sphere shrinkage, but at later stages of shrinkage the equilibria for all repulsive potentials converge on a spiral with uniform spacing between turns. Multiple stable equilibria of the open line are observed.

  12. Prototype sphere-on-sphere silica particles for the separation of large biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Rodriguez-Aller, Marta; Cusumano, Alessandra; Hayes, Richard; Zhang, Haifei; Edge, Tony; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-01-29

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the possibilities offered by a prototype HPLC column packed with ∼2.5μm narrow size distribution sphere-on-sphere (SOS) silica particles bonded with C4 alkyl chains, for the analytical characterization of large biomolecules. The kinetic performance of this material was evaluated in both isocratic and gradient modes using various model analytes. The data were compared to those obtained on other widepore state-of-the-art fully core-shell and fully porous materials commonly employed to separate proteins moreover to a reference 5μm wide pore material that is still often used in QC labs. In isocratic mode, minimum reduced plate height values of hmin=2.6, 3.3 and 3.3 were observed on butylparaben, decapeptide and glucagon, respectively. In gradient elution mode, the SOS column performs very high efficiency when working with fast gradients. This prototype column was also comparable (and sometimes superior) to other widepore stationary phases, whatever the gradient time and flow rate, when analyzing the largest model protein, namely BSA. These benefits may be attributed to the SOS particle morphology, minimizing the intra-particle mass transfer resistance. Finally, the SOS column was also applied for the analytical characterization of commercial monoclonal antibody (mAb) and antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) samples. With these classes of proteins, the performance of SOS column was similar to the best widepore stationary phases available on the market.

  13. Prototype sphere-on-sphere silica particles for the separation of large biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Rodriguez-Aller, Marta; Cusumano, Alessandra; Hayes, Richard; Zhang, Haifei; Edge, Tony; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-01-29

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the possibilities offered by a prototype HPLC column packed with ∼2.5μm narrow size distribution sphere-on-sphere (SOS) silica particles bonded with C4 alkyl chains, for the analytical characterization of large biomolecules. The kinetic performance of this material was evaluated in both isocratic and gradient modes using various model analytes. The data were compared to those obtained on other widepore state-of-the-art fully core-shell and fully porous materials commonly employed to separate proteins moreover to a reference 5μm wide pore material that is still often used in QC labs. In isocratic mode, minimum reduced plate height values of hmin=2.6, 3.3 and 3.3 were observed on butylparaben, decapeptide and glucagon, respectively. In gradient elution mode, the SOS column performs very high efficiency when working with fast gradients. This prototype column was also comparable (and sometimes superior) to other widepore stationary phases, whatever the gradient time and flow rate, when analyzing the largest model protein, namely BSA. These benefits may be attributed to the SOS particle morphology, minimizing the intra-particle mass transfer resistance. Finally, the SOS column was also applied for the analytical characterization of commercial monoclonal antibody (mAb) and antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) samples. With these classes of proteins, the performance of SOS column was similar to the best widepore stationary phases available on the market. PMID:26755414

  14. Graphite Nanoreinforcements for Aerospace Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drzal, Lawrence T.

    2005-01-01

    New advances in the reinforcement of polymer matrix composite materials are critical for advancement of the aerospace industry. Reinforcements are required to have good mechanical and thermal properties, large aspect ratio, excellent adhesion to the matrix, and cost effectiveness. To fulfill the requirements, nanocomposites in which the matrix is filled with nanoscopic reinforcing phases having dimensions typically in the range of 1nm to 100 nm show considerably higher strength and modulus with far lower reinforcement content than their conventional counterparts. Graphite is a layered material whose layers have dimensions in the nanometer range and are held together by weak Van der Waals forces. Once these layers are exfoliated and dispersed in a polymer matrix as nano platelets, they have large aspect ratios. Graphite has an elastic modulus that is equal to the stiffest carbon fiber and 10-15 times that of other inorganic reinforcements, and it is also electrically and thermally conductive. If the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with excellent mechanical properties, superior thermal stability, and very good electrical and thermal properties at very low reinforcement loadings.

  15. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.

  16. Internal charge behaviour of nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. Keith; Fothergill, John C.

    2004-05-01

    The incorporation of 23 nm titanium dioxide nanoparticles into an epoxy matrix to form a nanocomposite structure is described. It is shown that the use of nanometric particles results in a substantial change in the behaviour of the composite, which can be traced to the mitigation of internal charge when a comparison is made with conventional TiO2 fillers. A variety of diagnostic techniques (including dielectric spectroscopy, electroluminescence, thermally stimulated current and photoluminescence) have been used to augment pulsed electro-acoustic space charge measurement to provide a basis for understanding the underlying physics of the phenomenon. It would appear that, when the size of the inclusions becomes small enough, they act cooperatively with the host structure and cease to exhibit interfacial properties, leading to Maxwell-Wagner polarization. It is postulated that the particles are surrounded by high charge concentrations in the Gouy-Chapman-Stern layer. Since nanoparticles have very high specific areas, these regions allow limited charge percolation through nano-filled dielectrics. The practical consequences of this have also been explored in terms of the electric strength exhibited. It would appear that there was a window in which real advantages accrue from the nano-formulated material. An optimum loading of about 10% (by weight) is indicated.

  17. Hierarchical Nanocomposites for Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James

    We have outlined templating strategies for electronic and optical device fabrication that include self-assembly of well-ordered polymer/nanoparticle hybrids and nanoimprint lithography using novel materials sets. Using additive-driven self-assembly, for example, we demonstrate the formation of periodic nanocomposites with tunable magnetic and optical characteristics containing up to 70 wt. % of metal, metal oxide and/or semiconducting nanoparticles through phase specific interactions of the particles with either linear block copolymer or brush block copolymer (BBCP) templates. The BBCP templates provide direct access to large domain spacings for optical applications and spontaneous alignment within large volume elements. We have further developed highly filled nanoparticle/polymer hybrids for applications that require tailored dielectric constant or refractive index and a new imprinting process that allows direct printing of patterned 2-D and 3-D crystalline metal oxide films and composites with feature sizes of less than 100 nm. Applications in flexible electronics, light and energy management, and sensors and will be discussed.

  18. Silica hollow spheres with nano-macroholes like diatomaceous earth.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masahiro; Shiokawa, Kumi; Sakakura, Ikuko; Nakahara, Yoshiko

    2006-12-01

    Artificial synthesis of hollow cell walls of diatoms is an ultimate target of nanomaterial science. The addition of some water-soluble polymers such as sodium polymethacrylate to a solution of water/oil/water emulsion system, which is an essential step of the simple synthetic procedure of silica hollow spheres (microcapsules), led to the formation of silica hollow spheres with nano-macroholes (>100 nm) in their shell walls, the morphologies of which are analogous to those of diatom earth.

  19. Integrating sphere transmissometer for field measurement of leaf transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Dewitt, D. P.; Robinson, B. F.

    1987-12-01

    A simple field-rated transmissometer is described for rapidly determining the normal hemispherical transmittance T(0 deg, 2 pi) of leaves measured in situ in the four Landsat wavelength bands. The transmissometer requires direct solar illumination of the leaf sample. It collects the transmitted light with an integrating sphere and measures the collected light using a commercially available radiometer. The transmittances determined by the transmissometer are comparable with those measured by a labortory spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment.

  20. Microwave characterization of submicrometer-sized nickel hollow sphere composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yida; Zhao, Ling; Shen, Bin; Liu, Lei; Hu, Wenbin

    2006-07-01

    In this work, we report on the microwave properties of the nickel hollow spheres (NHSs) synthesized by a facile autocatalytic reduction method. The resonance characterization of the NHS-polyvinyl butyral composite, due to the skin effect, is observed in the microwave frequency. It is shown that the resonant and the matching frequencies of the composite largely depend on the particle size of the spheres.

  1. Economic dependency and divorce: implications for the private sphere.

    PubMed

    Clark, R

    1990-01-01

    "This paper asserts a connection between economic dependency and divorce. It argues that, because dependency deprives women of equal access to the public sphere and because it confines them, through normative definition, to the private sphere, it reduces their likelihood of seeking divorce. The paper also argues, contrary to recent findings, that socioeconomic development should be linearly and positively associated with divorce. Data from 51 nations are examined and multiple regression analysis [suggests] considerable support for these arguments." PMID:12283805

  2. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E; Morrissey, Timothy G; Vuono, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  3. Thermoelectric Properties of Polyacrylonitrile-Based Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, K.; Khovaylo, V.; Muratov, D.; Kozhitov, L.; Arkhipov, D.; Pryadun, V.; Vasiliev, A.

    2016-07-01

    A polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based nanocomposite with 20 wt.% Fe-Co/C has been prepared by infrared pyrolysis. Morphological and structural studies revealed that the composite consists of polyacrylonitrile as a plastifier, Fe-Co as a filler alloy, and carbon, which was formed during combustion of the polymer. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of the composite are rather low at ambient temperatures and do not exceed 1 Ohm m and 0.5 W/m K, respectively. However, due to a very low Seebeck coefficient, the calculated figure of merit ZT of the nanocomposite does not exceed 2.1 × 10-8.

  4. Long term property prediction of polyethylene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaito, Ali Al-Abed

    The amorphous fraction of semicrystalline polymers has long been thought to be a significant contributor to creep deformation. In polyethylene (PE) nanocomposites, the semicrystalline nature of the maleated PE compatibilizer leads to a limited ability to separate the role of the PE in the nanocomposite properties. This dissertation investigates blown films of linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) and its nanocomposites with montmorillonite-layered silicate (MLS). Addition of an amorphous ethylene propylene copolymer grafted maleic anhydride (amEP) was utilized to enhance the interaction between the PE and the MLS. The amorphous nature of the compatibilizer was used to differentiate the effect of the different components of the nanocomposites; namely the matrix, the filler, and the compatibilizer on the overall properties. Tensile test results of the nanocomposites indicate that the addition of amEP and MLS separately and together produces a synergistic effect on the mechanical properties of the neat PE. Thermal transitions were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine if the observed improvement in mechanical properties is related to changes in crystallinity. The effect of dispersion of the MLS in the matrix was investigated by using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mechanical measurements were correlated to the dispersion of the layered silicate particles in the matrix. The nonlinear time dependent creep of the material was analyzed by examining creep and recovery of the films with a Burger model and the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) relation. The effect of stress on the nonlinear behavior of the nanocomposites was investigated by analyzing creep-recovery at different stress levels. Stress-related creep constants and shift factors were determined for the material by using the Schapery nonlinear viscoelastic equation at room temperature. The effect of temperature on the tensile and creep

  5. Squeeze flow of a Carreau fluid during sphere impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, J.; Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    We present results from a combined numerical and experimental investigation into the squeeze flow induced when a solid sphere impacts onto a thin, ultra-viscous film of non-Newtonian fluid. We examine both the sphere motion through the liquid as well as the fluid flow field in the region directly beneath the sphere during approach to a solid plate. In the experiments we use silicone oil as the model fluid, which is well-described by the Carreau model. We use high-speed imaging and particle tracking to achieve flow visualisation within the film itself and derive the corresponding velocity fields. We show that the radial velocity either diverges as the gap between the sphere and the wall diminishes (Ztip → 0) or that it reaches a maximum value and then decays rapidly to zero as the sphere comes to rest at a non-zero distance (Ztip = Zmin) away from the wall. The horizontal shear rate is calculated and is responsible for significant viscosity reduction during the approach of the sphere. Our model of this flow, based on lubrication theory, is solved numerically and compared to experimental trials. We show that our model is able to correctly describe the physical features of the flow observed in the experiments.

  6. A new method for visualizing data on a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hon, David

    1991-01-01

    A method for visualizing data on a globe or unit sphere is described. Information that is distributed over a sphere - global oceanographic or geographic measurements, all-sky astronomy observations, or any quantities that are best represented in spherical coordinates - can benefit from this technique. Retaining a better sense of the geometry and information content of the data, 3D graphics can provide an unobstructed view of the entire sphere, without undue deformation of its surface area. A 'parameterized ray trace' produces look-up tables (LUTs) that can be used for all visualizations. The ray-trace result shows one or more spheres with the data as a texture map and three reflecting rectangles that 'mirror' the far sides of the sphere(s) into view. The LUTs need only be created once. No special purpose hardware is required beyond a PC or workstation that supports color. Examples from astronomical and geophysical datasets, which are commonly displayed with an area deforming (2D) projection, are presented.

  7. Solvation Sphere of I- and Br- in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    The solvation sphere of halides in water has been investigated using a combination of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis techniques. The results have indicated that I- and Br- both have an asymmetric, 8 water molecule primary solvation spheres. These spheres are identical, with the Br{sup -} sphere about .3 {angstrom} smaller than the I{sup -} sphere. This study utilized near-edge analysis to supplement EXAFS analysis which suffers from signal dampening/broadening due to thermal noise. This paper has reported on the solvation first sphere of I{sup -} and Br{sup -} in water. Using EXAFS and XANES analysis, strong models which describe the geometric configuration of water molecules coordinated to a central anion have been developed. The combination of these techniques has provided us with a more substantiated argument than relying solely on one or the other. An important finding of this study is that the size of the anion plays a smaller role than previously assumed in determining the number of coordinating water molecules Further experimental and theoretical investigation is required to understand why the size of the anion plays a minor role in determining the number of water molecules bound.

  8. Investigating hard sphere interactions through spin echo scattering angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Adam

    Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) allows neutron scattering instruments to perform real space measurements on large micron scale samples by encoding the scattering angle into the neutron's spin state via Larmor precession. I have built a SESAME instrument at the Low Energy Neutron Source. I have also assisted in the construction of a modular SESAME instrument on the ASTERIX beamline at Los Alamos National lab. The ability to tune these instruments has been proved mathematically and optimized and automated experimentally. Practical limits of the SESAME technique with respect to polarization analyzers, neutron spectra, Larmor elements, and data analysis were investigated. The SESAME technique was used to examine the interaction of hard spheres under depletion. Poly(methyl methacrylate) spheres suspended in decalin had previously been studied as a hard sphere solution. The interparticle correlations between the spheres were found to match the Percus-Yevick closure, as had been previously seen in dynamical light scattering experiments. To expand beyond pure hard spheres, 900kDa polystyrene was added to the solution in concentrations of less than 1% by mass. The steric effects of the polystyrene were expected to produce a short-range, attractive, "sticky" potential. Experiment showed, however, that the "sticky" potential was not a stable state and that the spheres would eventually form long range aggregates.

  9. STRENGTH OF A C-SPHERE FLEXURE SPECIMEN

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, Wei; Jadaan, Osama M.; Lance, Michael J; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2007-01-01

    A 'C-Sphere' flexure strength specimen geometry was conceived and developed to measure a relevant strength of bearing-grade Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and to relate that to surface-located strength-limiting flaws and to ultimately link those flaw populations to rolling contact fatigue performance. A slot was machined into the balls to a set depth to produce the C-sphere geometry. C-sphere specimens were then diametrally compressed to produce a monotonically increasing flexure or hoop tensile stress at their surface that caused their fracture. The strength was determined using the combination of failure load, C-sphere geometry, and FEA, and the stress field was used to determine C-sphere effective areas and effective volumes as a function of Weibull modulus. A description of the specimen and the aforementioned analysis are provided and a comparison of C-sphere flexure strength distributions of two bearing grade Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials (NBD200 and SN101C) is given.

  10. Diagnosis of a poorly performing liquid hydrogen bulk storage sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Angela Gray

    2012-06-01

    There are two 3,218 cubic meter (850,000 gallon) Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A, the other at Launch Pad B. The Sphere at Pad B had a high boiloff rate when brought into service in the 1960s. In 2001, the daily commodity loss was approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the maximum allowed by the specification. After being re-painted in the 1990s a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere that resulted in poor paint bonding and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of service, which provided a unique opportunity to perform a series of visual inspections of the insulation. Boroscope examinations revealed a large Perlite void in the region where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and offloaded into the annular void region until full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  11. Global Calibration of Multiple Cameras Based on Sphere Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junhua; He, Huabin; Zeng, Debing

    2016-01-01

    Global calibration methods for multi-camera system are critical to the accuracy of vision measurement. Proposed in this paper is such a method based on several groups of sphere targets and a precision auxiliary camera. Each camera to be calibrated observes a group of spheres (at least three), while the auxiliary camera observes all the spheres. The global calibration can be achieved after each camera reconstructs the sphere centers in its field of view. In the process of reconstructing a sphere center, a parameter equation is used to describe the sphere projection model. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation are carried out to analyze the factors that affect the calibration accuracy. Simulation results show that the parameter equation can largely improve the reconstruction accuracy. In the experiments, a two-camera system calibrated by our method is used to measure a distance about 578 mm, and the root mean squared error is within 0.14 mm. Furthermore, the experiments indicate that the method has simple operation and good flexibility, especially for the onsite multiple cameras without common field of view. PMID:26761007

  12. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Liu, Rui; Chuang, Yen -Jun; Dai, Sheng; Pan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSsmore » but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.« less

  13. Examining the T Tauri system with SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csépány, Gergely; van den Ancker, Mario; Ábrahám, Péter; Brandner, Wolfgang; Hormuth, Felix

    2015-06-01

    Context. The prototypical low-mass young stellar object, T Tauri, is a well-studied multiple system with at least three components. Aims: We aim to explore the T Tau system with the highest spatial resolution, study the time evolution of the known components, and re-determine the orbital parameters of the stars. Methods: Near-infrared classical imaging and integral field spectrograph observations were obtained during the Science Verification of SPHERE, the new high-contrast imaging facility at the VLT. The obtained FWHM of the primary star varies between 0.050'' and 0.059'', making these the highest spatial resolution near-infrared images of the T Tauri system obtained to date. Results: Our near-infrared images confirm the presence of extended emission south of T Tau Sa, reported in the literature. New narrow-band images show, for the first time, that this feature shows strong emission in both the Br-γ and H2 1-0 S(1) lines. Broadband imaging at 2.27 μm shows that T Tau Sa is 0.92 mag brighter than T Tau Sb, which is in contrast to observations from Jan. 2014 (when T Tau Sa was fainter than Sb), and demonstrates that T Tau Sa has entered a new period of high variability. The newly obtained astrometric positions of T Tau Sa and Sb agree with orbital fits from previous works. The orbit of T Tau S (the centre of gravity of Sa and Sb) around T Tau N is poorly constrained by the available observations and can be fit with a range of orbits ranging from a nearly circular orbit with a period of 475 years to highly eccentric orbits with periods up to 2.7 × 104 years. We also detected a feature south of T Tau N, at a distance of 144 ± 3 mas, which shows the properties of a new companion. Based on observations made at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 60.A-9363(A) and 60.A-9364(A).Figures 3-5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Critical Masses for Unreflected Metal Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Wright, Richard Q

    2009-01-01

    Calculated critical masses of bare metal spheres for 28 actinide isotopes, using the SCALE/XSDRNPM one-dimensional, discrete-ordinates system, are presented. ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, and JENDL-3.3 cross sections were used in the calculations. Results are given for isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, californium, and for one isotope of einsteinium. Calculated k values for these same nuclides are also given. We show that, for non-threshold or low-threshold fission nuclides, a good approximation for the nuclide k is the value of nubar at 1 MeV. A plot of the critical mass versus k values is given for 19 nuclides with A-numbers between 232 and 250. The peaks in the critical mass curve (for seven nuclides) correspond to dips in the k curve. For the seven cases with the largest critical mass, six are even-even nuclides. Neptunium-237, with a critical mass of about 62.7 kg (ENDF/B-VI calculation), has an odd number of protons and an even number of neutrons. However, two cases with quite small critical masses, 232U and 236Pu, are also even-even. These two nuclides do not exhibit threshold fission behavior like most other even-even nuclides. The largest critical mass is 208.8 kg for 243Am and the smallest is 2.44 kg for 251Cf. The calculated k values vary from 1.5022 for 234U to 4.4767 for 251Cf. A correlation between the calculated critical mass (kg) and the fission spectrum averaged value of is given for the elements U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf. For each of the five elements, a fit to the data for that element is provided. In each case the fit employs a negative exponential of the form mass = exp(A + B ~ ln( ) The values of A and B are element dependent and vary slightly for each of the five elements. The method described here is mainly applicable for non-threshold fission nuclides (15 of the 28 nuclides considered in this paper). There are three exceptions, 238Pu, 244Cm, and 250Cf, which all exhibit threshold fission behavior.

  15. One-pot synthesis of magnetic Ni@Mg(OH)2 core-shell nanocomposites as a recyclable removal agent for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Weiqiang; Chen, Qiuling; Miao, Baoji; He, Weichun

    2015-01-28

    A surfactant-assisted hydrothermal route has been presented to one-pot synthesized Ni nanoparticles encapsulated in Mg(OH)2 hollow spheres. The diameter of Ni cores and the thickness of Mg(OH)2 shells are about 60-80 and 15 nm, respectively, and the size of a whole composite sphere is approximately 70-100 nm. Benefiting from the ferrimagnetic behavior of Ni cores and the high surface area of Mg(OH)2 shells, Ni@Mg(OH)2 nanocomposites exhibit excellent heavy metals adsorption capacity and recyclable property. The first removal efficiency is almost 100% for target metals, and after five cycles, the adsorption capacity remains 95%. A series of experiments show the adsorption of heavy metal ions on Ni@Mg(OH)2 follows a pseudo-second order kinetic equation and can be described by a Langmuir isotherm model.

  16. Effects of sphere size on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ductile iron-steel hollow sphere syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazegaran, Hamid; Kiani-Rashid, Ali-Reza; Khaki, Jalil Vahdati

    2016-06-01

    The effects of sphere size on the microstructural and mechanical properties of ductile iron-steel hollow sphere (DI-SHS) syntactic foams were investigated in this study. The SHSs were manufactured by fluidized-bed coating via the Fe-based commercial powder-binder suspension onto expanded polystyrene spheres (EPSs). Afterwards, the DI-SHS syntactic foams were produced via a sand-mold casting process. The microstructures of specimens were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The microscopic evaluations of specimens reveal distinct regions composed of the DI matrix, SHS shells, and compatible interface. As a result, the microstructures and graphite morphologies of the DI matrix depend on sphere size. When the sphere size decreases, the area fractions of cementite and graphite phases are observed to increase and decrease, respectively. Compression tests were subsequently conducted at ambient temperature on the DI-SHS syntactic foams. The results reveal that the compression behavior of the syntactic foams is enhanced with increasing sphere size. Furthermore, the compressed specimens demonstrate that microcracks start and grow from the interface region.

  17. Durable Nanocomposites for Superhydrophobicity and Superoleophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Adam

    Anti-wetting surfaces and materials have the potential for dramatic performance improvements such as drag reduction on marine vehicles and fluid power systems as well as anti-fouling on aircraft and wind turbines. Although a wide variety of synthetic superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed and investigated, several critical obstacles remain before industrial application can be realized, including: (1) large surface area application, (2) multi-liquid anti-wetting, (3) environmentally friendly compositions, (4) mechanical durability and adhesion, and (5) long-term performance. In this dissertation, nanocomposite coatings have been investigated to generate high performance anti-wetting surfaces that address these obstacles which may enable application on wind turbine blades. Solution processable materials were used which self-assemble to create anti-wetting nanocomposite surfaces upon spray coating and curing. As a result, the first superoleophobic nanocomposite, the first environmentally friendly superhydrophobic compositions, and the first highly durable superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings were created. Furthermore, the mechanisms leading to this improved performance were studied.

  18. Co-continuous Metal-Ceramic Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Harley, Gabriel; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2005-01-31

    A room temperature technique was developed to produce continuous metal nanowires embedded in random nanoporous ceramic skeletons. The synthesis involves preparation of uniform, nanoporous ceramic preforms, and subsequent electrochemical metal infiltration at room temperature, so to avoid materials incompatibilities frequently encountered in traditional high temperature liquid metal infiltration. Structure and preliminary evaluations of mechanical and electronic properties of copper/alumina nanocomposites are reported.

  19. Memory-effects of magnetic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaq, Muhammad Yasar; Behl, Marc; Lendlein, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    The thermally induced shape memory effect (SME) is the capability of a material to fix a temporary (deformed) shape and recover a `memorized' permanent shape in response to heat. SMEs in polymers have enabled a variety of applications including deployable space structures, biomedical devices, adaptive optical devices, smart dry adhesives and fasteners. By the incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) into shape-memory polymer (SMP), a magnetically controlled SME has been realized. Magnetic actuation of nanocomposites enables remotely controlled devices based on SMP, which might be useful in medical technology, e.g. remotely controlled catheters or drug delivery systems. Here, an overview of the recent advances in the field of magnetic actuation of SMP is presented. Special emphasis is given on the magnetically controlled recovery of SMP with one switching temperature Tsw (dual-shape effect) or with two Tsws (triple-shape effect). The use of magnetic field to change the apparent switching temperature (Tsw,app) of the dual or triple-shape nanocomposites is described. Finally, the capability of magnetic nanocomposites to remember the magnetic field strength (H) initially used to deform the sample (magnetic-memory effect) is addressed. The distinguished advantages of magnetic heating over conventional heating methods make these multifunctional nanocomposites attractive candidates for in vivo applications.

  20. Polymer nanocomposites for lithium battery applications

    DOEpatents

    Sandi-Tapia, Giselle; Gregar, Kathleen Carrado

    2006-07-18

    A single ion-conducting nanocomposite of a substantially amorphous polyethylene ether and a negatively charged synthetic smectite clay useful as an electrolyte. Excess SiO2 improves conductivity and when combined with synthetic hectorite forms superior membranes for batteries. A method of making membranes is also disclosed.

  1. Thermal transport in Si/Ge nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Huai, Xiulan; Liang, Shiqiang; Wang, Xinwei

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, a systematic study is carried out to investigate the thermal transport in Si/Ge nanocomposites by using molecular dynamics simulation. Emphasis is placed on the effect of nanowire size, heat flux, Si/Ge interface, atomic ratio and defects (voids). The results show that the thermal conductivity of nanowire composites is much lower than that of alloy, which accounts mainly for ZT enhancement and owes a great deal to the effect of interface thermal resistance. A 'reflecting effect' in temperature distribution is observed at the Si/Ge interface, which is largely due to the lack of right quantum temperature correction in the region adjacent to the interface. The thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite is found to have weak dependence on the bulk temperature (200-900 K) and the heat flux in the range (0.5-3.5) × 1010 W m-2. Simulation results reveal that for a constant Si wire dimension, the thermal conductivity of the Si1-xGex nanocomposites increases with x. Our study on the influence of the defects (voids) has the same order of relative thermal conductivity reduction with increasing void density in comparison with the experimental data. Due to the small size (10 nm) of Si nanowires in our nanocomposites, the voids show less effect on thermal conductivity reduction in comparison with the experimental data with 100 nm Si wires.

  2. Nanocomposites in food packaging – A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nanocomposite is a multiphase material derived from the combination of two or more components, including a matrix (continuous phase) and a discontinuous nano-dimensional phase with at least one nano-sized dimension (i.e. less than 100 nm). The main types of nanostructures are presented in this ch...

  3. Versatile nanocomposites in phosphoproteomics: a review.

    PubMed

    Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Fahmida; Hussain, Dilshad; Saeed, Adeela; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2012-10-17

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications. Phosphorylated peptides are present in low abundance in blood serum but play a vital role in regulatory mechanisms and may serve as casual factors in diseases. The enrichment and analysis of phosphorylated peptides directly from human serum and mapping the phosphorylation sites is a challenging task. Versatile nanocomposites of different materials have been synthesized using simple but efficient methodologies for their enrichment. The nanocomposites include magnetic, coated, embedded as well as chemically derivatized materials. Different base materials such as polymers, carbon based and metal oxides are used. The comparison of nanocomposites with respective nanoparticles provides sufficient facts about their efficiency in terms of loading capacity and capture efficiency. The cost for preparing them is low and they hold great promise to be used as chromatographic materials for phosphopeptide enrichment. This review gives an overview of different nanocomposites in phosphoproteomics, discussing the improved efficiency than the individual counterparts and highlighting their significance in phosphopeptide enrichment. PMID:22986130

  4. Memory-effects of magnetic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Razzaq, Muhammad Yasar; Behl, Marc; Lendlein, Andreas

    2012-10-21

    The thermally induced shape memory effect (SME) is the capability of a material to fix a temporary (deformed) shape and recover a 'memorized' permanent shape in response to heat. SMEs in polymers have enabled a variety of applications including deployable space structures, biomedical devices, adaptive optical devices, smart dry adhesives and fasteners. By the incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) into shape-memory polymer (SMP), a magnetically controlled SME has been realized. Magnetic actuation of nanocomposites enables remotely controlled devices based on SMP, which might be useful in medical technology, e.g. remotely controlled catheters or drug delivery systems. Here, an overview of the recent advances in the field of magnetic actuation of SMP is presented. Special emphasis is given on the magnetically controlled recovery of SMP with one switching temperature T(sw) (dual-shape effect) or with two T(sw)s (triple-shape effect). The use of magnetic field to change the apparent switching temperature (T(sw,app)) of the dual or triple-shape nanocomposites is described. Finally, the capability of magnetic nanocomposites to remember the magnetic field strength (H) initially used to deform the sample (magnetic-memory effect) is addressed. The distinguished advantages of magnetic heating over conventional heating methods make these multifunctional nanocomposites attractive candidates for in vivo applications.

  5. Polarizing properties of silver/glass nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemer, Mark J.; Haus, Joseph W.

    1997-10-01

    The absorption of visible light by metal colloids provides beautiful colored glass for aesthetic as well as practical purposes. Since the metal particles dispersed in the colloid have diameters much smaller than the wavelength of light, on the order of 10nm, the elastic scattering cross section is negligible. In typical colloidal solutions the metal particles are approximately spherical and therefore the optical constants are isotropic. Some metal/glass nanocomposites such as RG6 Schott glass contain nonspherical metal particles but the orientation of the particles in the host is random. In order to obtain a polarizing nanocomposite, the nonspherical metal particles must be aligned along a common axis. A fabrication technique based on ultrathin metal deposition has been found to provides the necessary size, shape, and orientation of the metal particles for highly anisotropic optical constants in the visible and near-IR. The measured absorption spectra of the films are analyzed by Maxwell-Garnett theory. The nanocomposite films have extinction coefficients that vary by 2 orders of magnitude depending on the polarization of the incident light. These metal nanocomposite films are useful for micro-optic and waveguide polarizers.

  6. Exchange coupled ferrite nanocomposites through chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qilin; Patel, Ketan; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-08-16

    Exchange coupling between magnetically hard and soft phases has the potential to yield a large gain in the energy product. In this work, we present a scalable chemical synthetic route to produce magnetic iron oxide based nanocomposites, consisting of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) and strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19) components. PMID:27476744

  7. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  8. Combustion of a Polymer (PMMA) Sphere in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann C.; Hamins, Anthony; Donnelly, Michelle K.

    1999-01-01

    A series of low gravity, aircraft-based, experiments was conducted to investigate the combustion of supported thermoplastic polymer spheres under varying ambient conditions. The three types of thermoplastic investigated were polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polypropylene (PP). and polystyrene (PS). Spheres with diameters ranging from 2 mm to 6.35 mm were tested. The total initial pressure varied from 0.05 MPa to 0. 15 MPa whereas the ambient oxygen concentration varied from 19 % to 30 % (by volume). The ignition system consisted of a pair of retractable energized coils. Two CCD cameras recorded the burning histories of the spheres. The video sequences revealed a number of dynamic events including bubbling and sputtering, as well as soot shell formation and break-up during combustion of the spheres at reduced gravity. The ejection of combusting material from the burning spheres represents a fire hazard that must be considered at reduced gravity. The ejection process was found to be sensitive to polymer type. All average burning rates were measured to increase with initial sphere diameter and oxygen concentration, whereas the initial pressure had little effect. The three thermoplastic types exhibited different burning characteristics. For the same initial conditions, the burning rate of PP was slower than PMMA, whereas the burning rate of PS was comparable to PMMA. The transient diameter of the burning thermoplastic exhibited two distinct periods: an initial period (enduring approximately half of the total burn duration) when the diameter remained approximately constant, and a final period when the square of the diameter linearly decreased with time. A simple homogeneous two-phase model was developed to understand the changing diameter of the burning sphere. Its value is based on a competition between diameter reduction due to mass loss from burning and sputtering, and diameter expansion due to the processes of swelling (density decrease with heating) and bubble growth

  9. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings: Voronoi correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Michael A.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    We characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings by computing the Minkowski functionals (volume, surface area, and integrated mean curvature) of their associated Voronoi cells. The probability distribution functions of these functionals of Voronoi cells in MRJ sphere packings are qualitatively similar to those of an equilibrium hard-sphere liquid and partly even to the uncorrelated Poisson point process, implying that such local statistics are relatively structurally insensitive. This is not surprising because the Minkowski functionals of a single Voronoi cell incorporate only local information and are insensitive to global structural information. To improve upon this, we introduce descriptors that incorporate nonlocal information via the correlation functions of the Minkowski functionals of two cells at a given distance as well as certain cell-cell probability density functions. We evaluate these higher-order functions for our MRJ packings as well as equilibrium hard spheres and the Poisson point process. It is shown that these Minkowski correlation and density functions contain visibly more information than the corresponding standard pair-correlation functions. We find strong anticorrelations in the Voronoi volumes for the hyperuniform MRJ packings, consistent with previous findings for other pair correlations [A. Donev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 090604 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.090604], indicating that large-scale volume fluctuations are suppressed by accompanying large Voronoi cells with small cells, and vice versa. In contrast to the aforementioned local Voronoi statistics, the correlation functions of the Voronoi cells qualitatively distinguish the structure of MRJ sphere packings (prototypical glasses) from that of not only the Poisson point process but also the correlated equilibrium hard-sphere liquids. Moreover, while we did not find any perfect icosahedra (the locally densest possible structure in which a central

  10. Tin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this effort was to develop a process for economically fabricating thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from conventional ceramic powders using dispersions. This process resulted in successful production of monosized spheres in the mm size range which were point contact bonded into foams. Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres of small (one to five millimeter) diameter have novel applications as high-temperature insulation and light structural materials when bonded into monolithic foams. During Phase 1 of this program the objective as to develop a process for fabricating thin-wall hollow spheres from powder slurries using the coaxial nozzle fabrication method. Based on the success during Phase 1, Phase 2 was revised to emphasize the assessment of the potential structural and insulation applications for the spheres and modeling of the sphere formation process was initiated. As more understanding developed, it was clear that to achieve successful structural application, the spheres had to be bonded into monolithic foams and the effort was further expanded to include both bonding into structures and finite element mechanical modeling which became the basis of Phase 3. Successful bonding techniques and mechanical modeling resulted but thermal conductivities were higher than desired for insulating activities. In addition, considerable interest had been express by industry for the technology. Thus the final Phase 4 concentrated on methods to reduce thermal conductivity by a variety of techniques and technology transfer through individualized visits. This program resulted in three Ph.D. theses and 10 M.S. theses and they are listed in the appropriate technical sections.

  11. Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R

    1999-07-16

    FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

  12. Phase behavior of mixtures of colloidal rods and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Marie Elizabeth

    In this thesis we study entropy driven order in mixtures of rods and spheres. Systems of rod-like particles, as pure systems, exhibit rich liquid crystalline phase behavior. We chose to work with aqueous suspensions of either TMV or fd virus particles, both rod-like lyotropic systems. We complicate the phase behavior by adding a second component, colloidal spheres (PEG/PEO, BSA, polystyrene latex, or Dextran). Our first paper explores the phase behavior of TMV mixed with BSA or PEO, mapping out a phase diagram based on optical microscopy observations. We found our qualitative observations of TMV mixtures to be consistent with theoretical models of the depletion force. The second paper extends our study of phase behavior to mixtures of fd virus and polystyrene latex spheres. We qualitatively observe bulk demixing for very small diameter added spheres and for very large diameter added spheres. In addition, we observed microphase separation morphologies, such as lamellar and columnar structures, which formed for fd mixed with polystyrene latex spheres 0.1 microns in diameter. All of these microphase samples were viewed with differential interference microscopy (a few samples were further investigated using electron microscopy). Both our data and theoretical calculations illustrated that 0.1 micron diameter spheres have a stabilizing effect on the smectic phase. Our final work focused on fd virus mixed with Dextran. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the effect of added polymer on the isotropic-cholesteric co-existence region. I-Ch samples were prepared and fd and Dextran concentrations were measured using a spectrophotometer. Several conditions were explored, including two different molecular weights of Dextran and a range of ionic strengths. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the I-Ch coexistence region widens with added Dextran with the polymer preferentially partioned into the isotropic phase.

  13. Graphene based nanocomposite hybrid electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aphale, Ashish N.

    There is an unmet need to develop high performance energy storage systems (ESS), capable of storing energy from both renewable and non-renewable sources to meet the current energy crisis and depletion of non-renewable sources. Amongst many available ESS, supercapacitors (ECs) are the most promising because they exhibit a high charge/discharge rate and power density, along with a long cycle life. The possibility of exploring the use of atomically thin carbon allotropes like graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and electrically conducting polymers (ECPs) such as polypyrrole (PPy) has been studied as a high performance conducting electrodes in supercapacitor application. A novel templated sustainable nanocomposite electrode has been fabricated using cellulose extracted from Cladophora c. aegagropila algae as component of the assembled supercapacitor device which later has been transitioned to a unique template-less freestanding nanocomposite supercapacitor electrode. The specific capacitance of polypyrrole-graphene-cellulose nanocomposite as calculated from cyclic voltammetry curve is 91.5 F g -1 at the scan rate 50 m Vs-1 in the presence of 1M NaCl electrolyte. The open circuit voltage of the device with polypyrrole -graphene-cellulose electrode was found to be around 225 m V and that of the polypyrrole -cellulose device is only 53 m V without the presence of graphene in the nanocomposite electrode. Understanding the fundamentals by fabricating template nanocomposite electrode, it led to fabricate a unique nanocomposite template-less freestanding film which comprises of polypyrrole-graphene-CNT hybrid. Various experiments have been performed using different electrolytes such ascorbic acid, sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid in different scan rates. The specific capacitance of polypyrrole-graphene-CNT nanocomposite with 0.1 wt% of graphene-CNT, as calculated from cyclic voltammetry curve is 450 F g-1 at the scan rate 5 m V s-1. For the first time a nanofibrous membrane has

  14. Interfacial stress transfer in graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheling; Young, Robert J; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-01-23

    Raman spectroscopy has been used for the first time to monitor interfacial stress transfer in poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposites reinforced with graphene oxide (GO). The graphene oxide nanocomposites were prepared by a simple mixing method and casting from aqueous solution. They were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and polarized Raman spectroscopy and their mechanical properties determined by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. It was found that GO was fully exfoliated during the nanocomposite preparation process and that the GO nanoplatelets tended align in the plane of the films. The stiffness and yield stress of the nanocomposites were found to increase with GO loading but the extension to failure decreased. It was shown that the Raman D band at ~1335 cm(-1) downshifted as the nanocomposites were strained as a result of the interfacial stress transfer between the polymer matrix and GO reinforcement. From knowledge of the Grüneisen parameter for graphene, it was possible to estimate the effective Young's modulus of the GO from the Raman D band shift rate per unit strain to be of the order of 120 GPa. A similar value of effective modulus was found from the tensile mechanical data using the "rule of mixtures" that decreased with GO loading. The accepted value of Young's modulus for GO is in excess of 200 GPa and it is suggested that the lower effective Young's modulus values determined may be due to a combination of finite flake dimensions, waviness and wrinkles, aggregation, and misalignment of the GO flakes.

  15. Graphene oxide - Polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposite based electrode material for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Shukla, Shobha; Saxena, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    Supercapacitors are high capacitive energy storage devices and find applications where rapid bursts of power are required. Thus materials offering high specific capacitance are of fundamental interest in development of these electrochemical devices. Graphene oxide based nanocomposites are mechanically robust and have interesting electronic properties. These form potential electrode materials efficient for charge storage in supercapacitors. In this perspective, we investigate low cost graphene oxide based nanocomposites as electrode material for supercapacitor. Nanocomposites of graphene oxide and polyvinyl alcohol were synthesized in solution phase by integrating graphene oxide as filler in polyvinyl alcohol matrix. Structural and optical characterizations suggest the formation of graphene oxide and polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposites. These nanocomposites were found to have high specific capacitance, were cyclable, ecofriendly and economical. Our studies suggest that nanocomposites prepared by adding 0.5% wt/wt of graphene oxide in polyvinyl alcohol can be used an efficient electrode material for supercapacitors.

  16. Faster response of NO₂ sensing in graphene-WO₃ nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shubhda; Jain, Kiran; Singh, V N; Singh, Sukhvir; Vijayan, N; Dilawar, Nita; Gupta, Govind; Senguttuvan, T D

    2012-05-25

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have proven to be very promising materials for gas sensing applications. In this paper, we present a general approach for the preparation of graphene-WO(3) nanocomposites. Graphene-WO(3) nanocomposite thin-layer sensors were prepared by drop coating the dispersed solution onto the alumina substrate. These nanocomposites were used for the detection of NO(2) for the first time. TEM micrographs revealed that WO(3) nanoparticles were well distributed on graphene nanosheets. Three different compositions (0.2, 0.5 and 0.1 wt%) of graphene with WO(3) were used for the gas sensing measurements. It was observed that the sensor response to NO(2) increased nearly three times in the case of graphene-WO(3) nanocomposite layer as compared to a pure WO(3) layer at room temperature. The best response of the graphene-WO(3) nanocomposite was obtained at 250 °C. PMID:22543228

  17. Locating responsibility: the Sphere Humanitarian Charter and its rationale.

    PubMed

    Darcy, James

    2004-06-01

    Criticised by some as a technical initiative that neglects core principles, Sphere was seen by its originators precisely as an articulation of principle. The Humanitarian Charter was the main vehicle through which this was expressed, but its relationship to the Minimum Standards has remained a matter of uncertainty. Specifically, it was unclear in the original (1999) edition of Sphere how the concept of rights informed the Minimum Standards. The revised (2004) edition goes some way to clarifying this in the way the standards are framed, yet the link between the standards and the charter remains unclear. The concern with the quality and accountability of humanitarian assistance, which motivated the attempt to establish system-wide standards through the Sphere Project, was accompanied by a desire to establish such actions in a wider framework of legal and political responsibility. In part, this reflects the conditional nature of the undertaking that agencies make when they adopt Sphere. This aspect of the charter has been neglected, but it is fundamental to an understanding of the standards and their application. This paper considers the rationale of the Sphere Humanitarian Charter and the conceptual model that underpins it. It discusses the relationship between the charter and the Minimum Standards, and the sense in which the latter are properly called "rights-based" (explored further in a related paper herein by Young and Taylor). The author was closely involved in the conception and drafting of the charter, and this paper attempts to convey some of the thinking that lay behind it.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and photocatalytic activity of zinc oxide hollow spheres.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaguo; Yu, Xiaoxiao

    2008-07-01

    ZnO hollow spheres with porous crystalline shells were one-pot fabricated by hydrothermal treatment of glucose/ZnCl2 mixtures at 180 degrees C for 24 h, and then calcined at different temperatures for 4 h. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples was evaluated by photocatalytic decolorization of Rhodamine B aqueous solution at ambient temperature. The results indicated that the average crystallite size, shell thickness, specific surface areas, pore structures, and photocatalytic activity of ZnO hollow spheres could be controlled by varying the molar ratio of glucose to zinc ions (R). With increasing R, the photocatalytic activity increases and reaches a maximum value at R = 15, which can be attributed to the combined effects of several factors such as specific surface area, the porous structure and the crystallite size. Further results show that hollow spheres can be more readily separated from the slurry system by filtration or sedimentation after photocatalytic reaction and reused than conventional powder photocatalyst. After many recycles for the photodegradation of RhB, the catalyst does not exhibit any great loss in activity, confirming ZnO hollow spheres is stability and not photocorroded. The prepared ZnO hollow spheres are also of great interest in solar cell, catalysis, separation technology, biomedical engineering, and nanotechnology.

  19. ORSPHERE: CRITICAL, BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-09-01

    In the early 1970’s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950’s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” (Reference 1) While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0. 0001 in. for non-spherical parts), masses (±0.01 g), and material data The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. A three part sphere was initially assembled with an average radius of 3.4665 in. and was then machined down to an average radius of 3.4420 in. (3.4425 in. nominal). These two spherical configurations were evaluated and judged to be acceptable benchmark experiments; however, the two experiments are highly correlated.

  20. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-01

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  1. Computational polymer physics: Hard-sphere chain in solvent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Avinash; Gavazzi, Daniel; Taylor, Mark

    2009-10-01

    In this work we present results for chain conformation in two simple chain-in-solvent systems constructed from hard-sphere monomers of diameter D. The first system consists of a flexible chain of fused hard spheres (i.e., bond length L=D) in a monomeric hard-sphere solvent. The second system consists of a flexible tangent hard-sphere chain (L=D) in a dimeric hard-sphere solvent with L=D. These systems are studied using Monte Carlo simulations which employ both single-site crankshaft and multi-site pivot moves to sample the configuration space of the chain. We report chain structure, in terms of site-site probability functions, as a function of solvent density. In all cases, increasing solvent density leads to an overall compression of the chain. At high solvent density the chain conformation is closely coupled to the local solvent structure and we speculate that incommensurate structures may lead to interesting conformational transitions.

  2. Grid-Sphere Electrodes for Contact with Ionospheric Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H.; Poe, Garrett D.

    2010-01-01

    Grid-sphere electrodes have been proposed for use on the positively biased end of electrodynamic space tethers. A grid-sphere electrode is fabricated by embedding a wire mesh in a thin film from which a spherical balloon is formed. The grid-sphere electrode would be deployed from compact stowage by inflating the balloon in space. The thin-film material used to inflate the balloon is formulated to vaporize when exposed to the space environment. This would leave the bare metallic spherical grid electrode attached to the tether, which would present a small cross-sectional area (essentially, the geometric wire shadow area only) to incident neutral atoms and molecules. Most of the neutral particles, which produce dynamic drag when they impact a surface, would pass unimpeded through the open grid spaces. However, partly as a result of buildup of a space charge inside the grid-sphere, and partially, the result of magnetic field effects, the electrode would act almost like a solid surface with respect to the flux of electrons. The net result would be that grid-sphere electrodes would introduce minimal aerodynamic drag, yet have effective electrical-contact surface areas large enough to collect multiampere currents from the ionospheric plasma that are needed for operation of electrodynamic tethers. The vaporizable-balloon concept could also be applied to the deployment of large radio antennas in outer space.

  3. Fuel Fabrication for Surrogate Sphere-Pac Rodlet

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2005-07-19

    Sphere-pac fuel consists of a blend of spheres of two or three different size fractions contained in a fuel rod. The smear density of the sphere-pac fuel column can be adjusted to the values obtained for light-water reactor (LWR) pellets (91-95%) by using three size fractions, and to values typical of the fast-reactor oxide fuel column ({approx}85%) by using two size fractions. For optimum binary packing, the diameters of the two sphere fractions must differ by at least a factor of 7 (ref. 3). Blending of spheres with smaller-diameter ratios results in difficult blending, nonuniform loading, and lower packing fractions. A mixture of about 70 vol% coarse spheres and 30 vol% fine spheres is needed to obtain high packing fractions. The limiting smear density for binary packing is 86%, with about 82% achieved in practice. Ternary packing provides greater smear densities, with theoretical values ranging from 93 to 95%. Sphere-pac technology was developed in the 1960-1990 period for thermal and fast spectrum reactors of nearly all types (U-Th and U-Pu fuel cycles, oxide and carbide fuels), but development of this technology was most strongly motivated by the need for remote fabrication in the thorium fuel cycle. The application to LWR fuels as part of the DOE Fuel Performance Improvement Program did not result in commercial deployment for a number of reasons, but the relatively low production cost of existing UO{sub 2} pellet fuel is probably the most important factor. In the case of transmutation fuels, however, sphere-pac technology has the potential to be a lower-cost alternative while also offering great flexibility in tailoring the fuel elements to match the exact requirements of any particular reactor core at any given time in the cycle. In fact, the blend of spheres can be adjusted to offer a different composition for each fuel pin or group of pins in a given fuel element. Moreover, it can even provide a vertical gradient of composition in a single fuel pin. For

  4. Hydrothermal Syntheses of Colloidal Carbon Spheres from Cyclodextrins

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Li Q.; Bae, In-Tae; Arey, Bruce W.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2008-09-18

    Colloidal carbon spheres have been prepared from aqueous alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrin (CD) solutions in closed systems under hydrothermal conditions at 160 oC. Both liquid and solid-state 13C NMR spectra taken for samples at different reaction times have been used to monitor the dehydration and carbonization pathways. CD slowly hydrolyzes to glucose and forms 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) followed by carbonization into colloidal carbon spheres. The isolated carbon spheres are 70-150 nm in diameter, exhibit a core-shell structure, and are comprised of a condensed core (C=C) peppered with resident chemical functionalities including carboxylate and hydroxyl groups. Evidence from 13C solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectra reveal that the evolving carbon spheres show a gradual increase in the amount of aromatic carbon as a function of reaction time and that the carbon spheres generated from gamma-CD contain significantly higher aromatic carbon than those derived from alpha- and beta-CD.

  5. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  6. Acoustical imaging of spheres above a reflecting surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David; Berryman, James

    2003-04-01

    An analytical study using the MUSIC method of subspace imaging is presented for the case of spheres above a reflecting boundary. The field scattered from the spheres and the reflecting boundary is calculated analytically, neglecting interactions between spheres. The singular value decomposition of the response matrix is calculated and the singular vectors divided into signal and noise subspaces. Images showing the estimated sphere locations are obtained by backpropagating the noise vectors using either the free space Green's function or the Green's function that incorporates reflections from the boundary. We show that the latter Green's function improves imaging performance after applying a normalization that compensates for the interference between direct and reflected fields. We also show that the best images are attained in some cases when the number of singular vectors in the signal subspace exceeds the number of spheres. This is consistent with previous analysis showing multiple eigenvalues of the time reversal operator for spherical scatterers [Chambers and Gautesen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109 (2001)]. [Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  7. Microscopic theory for dynamics in entangled polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Umi

    New microscopic theories for describing dynamics in polymer nanocomposites are developed and applied. The problem is addressed from two distinct perspectives and using two different theoretical approaches. The first half of this dissertation studies the long-time and intermediate-time dynamics of nanoparticles in entangled and unentangled polymer melts for dilute particle concentrations. Using a combination of mode-coupling, Brownian motion, and polymer physics ideas, the nanoparticle long-time diffusion coefficients is formulated in terms of multiple length-scales, packing microstructures, and spatially-resolved polymer density fluctuation dynamics. The key motional mechanism is described via the parallel relaxation of the force exerted on the particle controlled by collective polymer constraint-release and the particle self-motion. A sharp but smooth crossover from the hydrodynamic to the non-hydrodynamic regime is predicted based on the Stokes-Einstein violation ratio as a function of all the system variables. Quantitative predictions are made for the recovery of the Stokes-Einstein law, and the diffusivity in the crossover regime agrees surprisingly well with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for all particle sizes and chain lengths studied. The approach is also extended to address intermediate-time anomalous transport of a single nanoparticle and two-particle relative diffusion. The second half of this dissertation focuses on developing a novel dynamical theory for a liquid of infinitely-thin rods in the presence of hard spherical obstacles, aiming at a technical and conceptual extension of the existing paradigm for entangled polymer dynamics. As a fundamental theoretical development, the two-component generalization of a first-principles dynamic meanfield approach is presented. The theory enforces inter-needle topological uncrossability and needlesphere impenetrability in a unified manner, leading to a generalized theory of entanglements that

  8. Semi empirical hardness predictive model for AZ91 nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, N. H. A.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Zaidi, A. M. A.; Ahmad, K. R.

    2016-07-01

    AZ91 nanocomposite was exposed to several heat treatment processes and the effect of precipitation hardening on hardness was studied as a function of time and temperature. The investigation shows the significant of time and temperature are the main role in the precipitation hardening process of the nanocomposite. Kinetics study show a deceptive activation energy of 21 kJ/mol of the AZ91 nanocomposite. A relationship was derived to predict the maximum hardness at given time and temperature.

  9. Polystyrene/MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Altavilla, Claudia; Ciambelli, Paolo; Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-15

    The effects of adding different concentrations of MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nano particles on the thermal and mechanical properties of polystyrene (PS) nanocomposites have been investigated. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy were used to characterize the morphology of the resulting nanocomposites. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis. It has been found that the MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanoparticles have a good compatibility with the PS matrix forming homogeneous dispersion even at high concentrations. The PS/MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanocomposites showed enhanced thermal stability in comparison with neat polystyrene.

  10. Porous alumina based ordered nanocomposite coating for wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Arti; Muthukumar, M.; Bobji, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Uniformly dispersed nanocomposite coating of aligned metallic nanowires in a matrix of amorphous alumina is fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition of copper into the pores of porous anodic alumina. Uniform deposition is obtained by controlling the geometry of the dendritic structure at the bottom of pores through stepwise voltage reduction followed by mild etching. The tribological behaviour of this nanocomposite coating is evaluated using a ball on flat reciprocating tribometer under the dry contact conditions. The nanocomposite coating has higher wear resistance compared to corresponding porous alumina coating. Wear resistant nanocomposite coating has wide applications especially in protecting the internal surfaces of aluminium internal combustion engines.

  11. Silver-enhanced fluorescence emission of single quantum dot nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2009-01-21

    A novel plasmon-coupled quantum dot (QD) nanocomposite via covalently interfacing the QD surfaces with silver nanoparticles was developed with greatly reduced blinking and enhanced emission fluorescence.

  12. Equation of state for fused-hard-sphere fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largo, J.; Solana, J. R.

    This paper develops a theoretically-based equation of state for fused-hard-sphere fluid mixtures on the basis of an equation of state previously derived for hard-convex-body fluid mixtures. The equation uses as a reference the equation of state for an equivalent hard-sphere fluid mixture in which each component has the same molecular volume as the effective molecular volume of one of the components of the fused-hard-sphere mixture. The two parameters required by the theory, namely the averaged effective molecular volume of the molecules in the mixture and the corresponding effective non-sphericity parameter, are obtained from the geometrical characteristics of the molecules that form the mixture. The results are, on the whole, in closer agreement with simulation data than those obtained with other theories developed for this kind of mixture.

  13. Burning molten metallic spheres: One class of ball lightning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Karl D.; Massey, Nathan

    2008-08-01

    Abrahamson and Dinniss [2000. Ball lightning caused by oxidation of nanoparticle networks from normal lightning strikes on soil. Nature 403, 519-521] proposed a theory of ball lighting in which silicon nanoparticles undergo slow oxidation and emit light. Paiva et al. [2007. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon. Physical Review Letters 98, 048501] reported that an electric arc to silicon produced long-lasting luminous white spheres showing many characteristics of ball lightning. We show experimentally that these consist of burning molten silicon spheres with diameters in the 0.1-1 mm range. The evidence of our experiments leads us to propose that a subset of ball lightning events may consist of macro-scale molten spheres of burning metallic materials likely to be ejected from a conventional lightning strike to earth.

  14. Demixing in binary mixtures of apolar and dipolar hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarza, N. G.; Lomba, E.; Martín, C.; Gallardo, A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the demixing transition of mixtures of equal size hard spheres and dipolar hard spheres using computer simulation and integral equation theories. Calculations are carried out at constant pressure, and it is found that there is a strong correlation between the total density and the composition. The critical temperature and the critical total density are found to increase with pressure. The critical mole fraction of the dipolar component on the contrary decreases as pressure is augmented. These qualitative trends are reproduced by the theoretical approaches that on the other hand overestimate by far the value of the critical temperature. Interestingly, the critical parameters for the liquid-vapor equilibrium extrapolated from the mixture results in the limit of vanishing neutral hard sphere concentration agree rather well with recent estimates based on the extrapolation of charged hard dumbbell phase equilibria when dumbbell elongation shrinks to zero [G. Ganzenmüller and P. J. Camp, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 191104 (2007)].

  15. Loop Integrands for Scattering Amplitudes from the Riemann Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Yvonne; Mason, Lionel; Monteiro, Ricardo; Tourkine, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    The scattering equations on the Riemann sphere give rise to remarkable formulas for tree-level gauge theory and gravity amplitudes. Adamo, Casali, and Skinner conjectured a one-loop formula for supergravity amplitudes based on scattering equations on a torus. We use a residue theorem to transform this into a formula on the Riemann sphere. What emerges is a framework for loop integrands on the Riemann sphere that promises to have a wide application, based on off-shell scattering equations that depend on the loop momentum. We present new formulas, checked explicitly at low points, for supergravity and super-Yang-Mills amplitudes and for n -gon integrands at one loop. Finally, we show that the off-shell scattering equations naturally extend to arbitrary loop order, and we give a proposal for the all-loop integrands for supergravity and planar super-Yang-Mills theory.

  16. Probing the evolution and morphology of hard carbon spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Pol, Vilas G.; Wen, Jianguo; Lau, Kah Chun; Callear, Samantha; Bowron, Daniel T.; Lin, Chi-Kai; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Curtiss, Larry A.; David, William; Miller, Dean J.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2014-03-01

    Monodispersed hard carbon spheres can be synthesized quickly and reproducibly by autogenic reactions of hydrocarbon precursors, notably polyethylene (including plastic waste), at high temperature and pressure. The carbon microparticles formed by this reaction have a unique spherical architecture, with a dominant internal nanometer layered motif, and they exhibit diamond-like hardness and electrochemical properties similar to graphite. In the present study, in-situ monitoring by X-ray diffraction along with electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, neutron pair-distribution function analysis, and computational modeling has been used to elucidate the morphology and evolution of the carbon spheres that form from the autogenic reaction of polyethylene at high temperature and pressure. A mechanism is proposed on how polyethylene evolves from a linear chain-based material to a layered carbon motif. Heating the spheres to 2400-2800 °C under inert conditions increases their graphitic character, particularly at the surface, which enhances their electrochemical and tribological properties.

  17. Concept Mapping: Linking Spheres in Earth System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, K. P.; Hedley, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) distance learning courses focus teachers on linking spheres of the earth: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. The University of Toledo has offered the ESSEA middle school grade course using jigsaw pedagogy nine times since 2002. Traditionally, the ESSEA course has teachers link spheres in linear causal chains. This past year we used concept mapping as a way for the teachers and pre-service students in the class to organize their study of the events: melting of ice sheets, Mt. Pinatubo eruption, Hurricane Katrina and draining of the Great Black Swamp. Concept mapping is a good way to visualize linkages between events and spheres. The outcome was that teachers and pre-service students enjoyed concept mapping, it fostered teamwork and helped with grading the material.

  18. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model. PMID:27386951

  19. Multishelled Metal Oxide Hollow Spheres: Easy Synthesis and Formation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjing; Wu, Guanglei; Ren, Yanyan; Li, Xinghua; Wang, Liuding

    2016-06-20

    Uniform multishelled NiO, Co3 O4 , ZnO, and Au@NiO hollow spheres were synthesized (NiO and Co3 O4 hollow spheres for the first time) by a simple shell-by-shell self-assembly allowing for tuning of the the size, thickness and shell numbers by controlling the heat treatment, glucose/metal salt molar ratio, and hydrothermal reaction time. These findings further the development of synthetic methodologies for multishelled hollow structures and could open up new opportunities for deeper understanding of the mechanisms of shell-by-shell self-assembly. Moreover, the double-shelled NiO hollow sphere exhibits a higher photocatalytic activity for degradation of methyl orange than its morphological counterparts. PMID:27164001

  20. Cermet sphere-pac concept for inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouchon, M. A.; Nakamura, M.; Hellwig, Ch.; Ingold, F.; Degueldre, C.

    2003-06-01

    In the inert matrix fuel concept, plutonium reprocessed from spent fuel is burned in an inert matrix, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia. Coming from wet reprocessing, the internal gelation can perform an easy micro-spheres production. Utilization of these particles in a sphere-pac realizes a direct fuel production. Besides being economical, this direct usage offers an almost dustless fabrication. One disadvantage of yttria-stabilized zirconia as matrix is its low thermal conductivity. A further reduction by the macroscopic structure of a sphere bed seems unacceptable. This can be eluded by the insertion of a highly conducting phase. Similar to the cermet concept with the embedment of ceramic fuel into metal, the infiltration of a fine metal fraction into a coarse ceramic fuel fraction is studied here. The initial thermal conductivity shows much higher calculated values and the sintering behaviour is also clearly enhanced compared to the pure ceramic bed.

  1. Two-sphere low-Reynolds-number propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Ali; Zargar, Rojman

    2010-06-01

    A three-dimensional model of a low-Reynolds-number swimmer is introduced and analyzed in this Brief Report. This model consists of two large and small spheres connected by two perpendicular thin rods. The geometry of this system is motivated by the microorganisms that use a single tail to swim; the large sphere represents the head of microorganism and the small sphere resembles its tail. Each rod changes its length and orientation in a nonreciprocal manner that effectively propels the system. Translational and rotational velocities of the swimmer are studied for different values of parameters. Our findings show that by changing the parameters we can adjust both the velocity and the direction of motion of the swimmer.

  2. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model. PMID:27386951

  3. The viscosity of colloidal spheres in deionized suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    1987-12-01

    Viscosities of colloidal spheres, i.e., colloidal silica (diameter 8 and 45 nm) and monodisperse polystyrene latices (diameter 85 to 780 nm), are measured in deionized (``salt-free'') suspensions and in the presence of a small amount of NaCl. The reduced viscosities (specific viscosity divided by concentration) of deionized silica (diameter 8 nm) are much higher than would be expected by Einstein's prediction and decrease sharply with increasing concentration. A sharp peak is observed in the reduced viscosity vs concentration curves of deionized colloidal silica of 45 nm diameter and the deionized latex spheres. The peak corresponds to the transition between ``liquid-like'' and ``crystal-like'' structures. These results show that electrostatic intersphere repulsion and the elongated Debye-screening length around the colloidal spheres are essential to explain the extraordinary properties.

  4. Accelerated UV weathering device based on integrating sphere technology

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Joannie; Byrd, Eric; Embree, Ned; Garver, Jason; Dickens, Brian; Finn, Tom; Martin, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) weathering device based on integrating sphere technology has been designed, fabricated, and implemented for studying the accelerated weathering of polymers. This device has the capability of irradiating multiple test specimens with uniform, high intensity UV radiation while simultaneously subjecting them to a wide range of precisely and independently controlled temperature and relative humidity environments. This article describes the integrating sphere-based weathering system, its ability to precisely control temperature and relative humidity, and its ability to produce a highly uniform UV irradiance.

  5. Packing confined hard spheres denser with adaptive prism phases.

    PubMed

    Oğuz, Erdal C; Marechal, Matthieu; Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Rodriguez, Isabelle; Messina, René; Meseguer, Francisco J; Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-21

    We show that hard spheres confined between two parallel hard plates pack denser with periodic adaptive prismatic structures which are composed of alternating prisms of spheres. The internal structure of the prisms adapts to the slit height which results in close packings for a range of plate separations, just above the distance where three intersecting square layers fit exactly between the plates. The adaptive prism phases are also observed in real-space experiments on confined sterically stabilized colloids and in Monte Carlo simulations at finite pressure.

  6. Measurement of Blast Waves from Bursting Pressureized Frangible Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

  7. Slip and flow of hard-sphere colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, P; Besseling, R; Isa, L; Petekidis, G; Poon, W C K

    2008-12-19

    We study the flow of concentrated hard-sphere colloidal suspensions along smooth, nonstick walls using cone-plate rheometry and simultaneous confocal microscopy. In the glass regime, the global flow shows a transition from Herschel-Bulkley behavior at large shear rate to a characteristic Bingham slip response at small rates, absent for ergodic colloidal fluids. Imaging reveals both the "solid" microstructure during full slip and the local nature of the "slip to shear" transition. Both the local and global flow are described by a phenomenological model, and the associated Bingham slip parameters exhibit characteristic scaling with size and concentration of the hard spheres.

  8. Absolute calibration of the RADSCAT scatterometer using precision spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. L.; Schroeder, L. C.; Mitchell, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Tests using precision sphere targets suspended from balloons were conducted to calibrate the received-power/transmitted-power tatio of the RADSCAT scatterometer. Comparisons were made of these measured results with theoretical return from spheres. The RADSCAT scatterometer measurements at 13.9 GHz should be corrected by -2.4 dB, and those at 9.3 GHz, by -4.3 dB. The techniques described should be generally applicable to calibration of scatterometers where measurement precision is of prime importance. Inferred from the magnitude of these RADSCAT corrections was the present state of technology in building precision scatterometers.

  9. Theoretical study of the freezing of polystyrene sphere suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical study of melting in aqueous suspensions of polystyrene spheres is presented. The Helmholtz free energies of the liquid and solid phase of the suspensions are calculated as functions of sphere number density and electrolyte concentrations. The results tend to show that the freezing curve of such suspensions is that of a conventional classical liquid with repulsive short-range interactions. The interactions can be treated satisfactorily within a slightly modified Debye-Hueckel approximation. The modifications include size correction and a correction for nonlinear screening. The results are confirmed by analogous calculations for the solid phase, and for the line along which liquid and solid free energies are equal.

  10. Structure of ternary additive hard-sphere fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexander; Malijevský, Anatol; Yuste, Santos B.; Santos, Andrés; López de Haro, Mariano

    2002-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations on the structural properties of ternary fluid mixtures of additive hard spheres are reported. The results are compared with those obtained from a recent analytical approximation [S. B. Yuste, A. Santos, and M. López de Haro, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 3683 (1998)] to the radial distribution functions of hard-sphere mixtures and with the results derived from the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation with both the Martynov-Sarkisov and the Percus-Yevick closures. Very good agreement between the results of the first two approaches and simulation is observed, with a noticeable improvement over the Percus-Yevick predictions especially near contact.

  11. Free volume distribution of nearly jammed hard sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Sastry, Srikanth

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the free volume distributions of nearly jammed packings of monodisperse and bidisperse hard sphere configurations. These distributions differ qualitatively from those of the fluid, displaying a power law tail at large free volumes, which constitutes a distinct signature of nearly jammed configurations, persisting for moderate degrees of decompression. We reproduce and explain the observed distribution by considering the pair correlation function within the first coordination shell for jammed hard sphere configurations. We analyze features of the equation of state near jamming, and discuss the significance of observed asphericities of the free volumes to the equation of state.

  12. Magnetism of iron-containing MCM-41 spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shiquan; Wang, Qi; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Cool, Pegie; Vansant, Etienne F.; Jiang, Minhua

    2004-09-01

    Iron species were loaded into the mesopores of MCM-41 spheres by incipient wetness impregnation procedure with Fe(ACAC) 3 as the precursor. The magnetism of the samples was studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible (DRUV-vis) spectra and Mossbauer spectra. The results show that the magnetic behavior of the iron-loaded MCM-41 spheres depends on the content of iron loading, valence, and coordination state of iron ions, testing temperature and the atmosphere for the pyrolysis of the iron precursor.

  13. Mesoporous Trimetallic PtPdRu Spheres as Superior Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Ataee-Esfahani, Hamed; Li, Cuiling; Alshehri, Saad M; Ahamad, Tansir; Henzie, Joel; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-05-17

    Mesoporous Trimetallic PtPdRu Spheres with well-defined spherical morphology and uniformly sized pores were synthesized in an aqueous solution using ascorbic acid as the reducing agent and triblock copolymer F127 as the pore directing agent. These mesoporous PtPdRu spheres exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity compared to commercial Pt black, resulting in a ∼4.9 times improvement in mass activity for the methanol oxidation reaction. The excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability are due to the unique mesoporous architecture and electronic landscape between different elements. PMID:27072776

  14. Torque on a sphere inside a rotating cylinder.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, B.; Levinson, E.; Caswell, B.

    1972-01-01

    A circular cylinder of finite dimensions is made to rotate around a sphere fixed in the center of the cylinder. The couple on the sphere is measured over a wide range of rotational speeds for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For the Newtonian liquids a comparison of the experimental results is made with Collins' (1955) expansion of the couple as a series in even powers of the angular Reynolds number. For non-Newtonian liquids the apparatus proves to be extremely useful for an accurate determination of the zero shear rate viscosity using only a small amount of fluid.

  15. The Diverging Sphere and the Rib in Prompt Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; McGuire, E; Garza, R; Roeske, F; Vitello, P

    2002-05-03

    Steady state corner-turning in the rib is possible if R{sub 0}/R{sub 1} << 0.15, where R{sub 0} is the half-width and R{sub 1} the inner radius. For thicker ribs, the kinetics will further slow the turn. A steady state turn will have a symmetrical detonation front. The inverse radius relation appears to hold for the diverging sphere, at least for large radii. The reaction zone lengths for diverging spheres and ratesticks increase with the radius of curvature and are comparable.

  16. Thermoinertial bouncing of a relativistic collapsing sphere: A numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A.; Barreto, W.

    2006-01-15

    We present a numerical model of a collapsing radiating sphere, whose boundary surface undergoes bouncing due to a decreasing of its inertial mass density (and, as expected from the equivalence principle, also of the 'gravitational' force term) produced by the 'inertial' term of the transport equation. This model exhibits for the first time the consequences of such an effect, and shows that under physically reasonable conditions this decreasing of the gravitational term in the dynamic equation may be large enough as to revert the collapse and produce a bouncing of the boundary surface of the sphere.

  17. Nano-composite Structures for OPV Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Henning

    2010-11-23

    Improved material for use in organic photovoltaics (OPV) devices, also called polymer-solar cells (PSC), has been developed. Increased ordering of the active layer of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) cells has been achieved by the use of inert silica spheres in conjunction with suitable fullerene derivatives. Silica spheres with average diameters between 10 and 15 nm, consistent with the exciton diffusion length in the active layer, have been added. The potential for significantly improved device performance due to a higher degree of photon absorption, enabled by increased light scattering, and a maximized interface between electron donor and acceptor, ensuring efficient exciton dissociation, has been demonstrated. A method allowing for the covalent attachment of fullerene derivatives to the silica sphere surface has been developed.

  18. Scattering theory for finitely many sphere interactions supported by concentric spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hounkonnou, M.N.; Hounkpe, M.; Shabani, J.

    1997-06-01

    We study stationary scattering theory for finitely many sphere interactions formally given by the Hamiltonian H={minus}{Delta}+{summation}{sub j=1}{sup N}{alpha}{sub j}{delta}({vert_bar}x{vert_bar}{minus}R{sub j}) and its generalizations to the case of interactions of the second type and interactions with nonseparated boundary conditions. In a previous publication [J. Math. Phys. {bold 29}, 660{endash}664 (1988)], it was shown that the self-adjoint Hamiltonian H{sub {l_brace}{alpha}{sub l}{r_brace},{l_brace}R{r_brace}} corresponding to H may be defined as a limit in norm resolvent convergence of a family H{sub {var_epsilon}} of local scaled short-range Hamiltonians. In this paper we also study scattering theory corresponding to H{sub {var_epsilon}} and show that the scattering quantities associated with H{sub {var_epsilon}} converge to those of H{sub {l_brace}{alpha}{sub l}{r_brace},{l_brace}R{r_brace}} as {var_epsilon}{r_arrow}0. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Laser-assisted photothermal imprinting of nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Shao, D.B.; Chen, S.C.

    2004-08-30

    We report on a laser-assisted photothermal imprinting method for directly patterning carbon nanofiber-reinforced polyethylene nanocomposite. A single laser pulse from a solid state Nd:YAG laser (10 ns pluse, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths) is used to melt/soften a thin skin layer of the polymer nanocomposite. Meanwhile, a fused quartz mold with micro sized surface relief structures is pressed against the surface of the composite. Successful pattern transfer is realized upon releasing the quartz mold. Although polyethylene is transparent to the laser beam, the carbon nanofibers in the high density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix absorb the laser energy and convert it into heat. Numerical heat conduction simulation shows the HDPE matrix is partially melted or softened, allowing for easier imprinting of the relief pattern of the quartz mold.

  20. Frictional microscopy of polymers and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotomin, S. V.; Ezhov, A. A.; Sollogoub, C.; Yarikov, D.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical and frictional properties of polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate and nanocomposites with montmorillonite were studied by using the microindentation technique and frictional microscopy. The micromechanical tests revealed a decrease in the modulus and microhardness of the composite compared with those of a neat polystyrene, with a minimum of their values at 1-3 wt.% of the filler, but a local maximum of the tensile modulus of the filled polymer arose and increased at the same filler concentration. The frictional microscopy revealed anisotropy of the friction coefficient of the nanocomposite and to its noticeable dependence on the content of the filler. The maximum value of the friction coefficient was also reached at 1-3 wt.% of the filler and corresponds to the greatest degree of interplanar distance in the layered silicate and to minimum microhardness and elastic modulus of the composite surface.

  1. Surface modifications of some nanocomposites containing starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, M.-C.; Popescu, M.-C.; Vasile, C.

    2008-09-01

    Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites have attracted strong interest in today's materials research, due to the possible impressive enhancements of material properties, comparatively with those of pure polymers. Several starch/poly(vinylalcohol)/montmorillonite nanocomposites have been subjected to surface modification by physical treatments such as dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) exposure and coating with proteins (albumin) or polysaccharides (chitosan), for improving their biocompatibility. Untreated and treated surfaces have been comparatively studied by contact angle measurements, FT-IR and 2D-FT-IR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. It has been established that enhancement of the surface characteristics depends on the type and number of incorporated nanoparticles as well as on the treatment applied. Coupling of DBD exposure and coating techniques appears to be highly efficient.

  2. Reversible Thermal Stiffening in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Senses, Erkan; Isherwood, Andrew; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-07-15

    Miscible polymer blends with different glass transition temperatures (Tg) are known to create confined interphases between glassy and mobile chains. Here, we show that nanoparticles adsorbed with a high-Tg polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), and dispersed in a low-Tg matrix polymer, poly(ethylene oxide), exhibit a liquid-to-solid transition at temperatures above Tg's of both polymers. The mechanical adaptivity of nanocomposites to temperature underlies the existence of dynamically asymmetric bound layers on nanoparticles and more importantly reveals their impact on macroscopic mechanical response of composites. The unusual reversible stiffening behavior sets these materials apart from conventional polymer composites that soften upon heating. The presented stiffening mechanism in polymer nanocomposites can be used in applications for flexible electronics or mechanically induced actuators responding to environmental changes like temperature or magnetic fields.

  3. Cellulose nanocrystal reinforced oxidized natural rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Marcos; El Kissi, Nadia; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-02-10

    Natural rubber (NR) latex particles were oxidized using KMnO4 as oxidant to promote the insertion of hydroxyl groups in the surface polyisoprene chains. Different degrees of oxidation were investigated. Both unoxidized and oxidized NR (ONR) latex were used to prepare nanocomposite films reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by casting/evaporation. The oxidation of NR was carried out to promote chemical interactions between the hydroxyl groups of ONR with those of CNCs through hydrogen bonding. The effect of the degree of oxidation of the NR latex on the rheological behavior of CNC/NR and CNC/ONR suspensions, as well as on the mechanical, swelling and thermal properties of ensuing nanocomposites was investigated. Improved properties were observed for intermediate degrees of oxidation but they were found to degrade for higher oxidation levels.

  4. Cellulose nanocrystal reinforced oxidized natural rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Marcos; El Kissi, Nadia; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-02-10

    Natural rubber (NR) latex particles were oxidized using KMnO4 as oxidant to promote the insertion of hydroxyl groups in the surface polyisoprene chains. Different degrees of oxidation were investigated. Both unoxidized and oxidized NR (ONR) latex were used to prepare nanocomposite films reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by casting/evaporation. The oxidation of NR was carried out to promote chemical interactions between the hydroxyl groups of ONR with those of CNCs through hydrogen bonding. The effect of the degree of oxidation of the NR latex on the rheological behavior of CNC/NR and CNC/ONR suspensions, as well as on the mechanical, swelling and thermal properties of ensuing nanocomposites was investigated. Improved properties were observed for intermediate degrees of oxidation but they were found to degrade for higher oxidation levels. PMID:26686118

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Novel Montmorillonite Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansa, Rola

    Clay minerals have historically played a consequential role in human health. While the beginnings were rooted in geophagy, a primitive act of consuming earth, the health-related uses of clay minerals have evolved and diversified over time.. As excipients in pharmaceutical formulations, clay minerals can attribute novel properties onto intercalated compounds. Intercalating oxybenzone, a UV filter, within the interlamellar space of montmorillonite is desirable in order to minimize direct contact with skin. Intercalating resveratrol, a compound known for attributing beneficial effects onto human health, may be advantageous since this compound is susceptible to cis-trans isomerisation. The strategy of using alkylammonium--modified clay was undertaken and proved successful for the intercalation of oxybenzone. The field of biopolymer/layered silicate nanocomposites is heavily researched for use in a multitude of applications. Novel montmorillonite nanocomposites were prepared with neutral guar gum and cationic guar gum, using an environmentally friendly process and are fully characterized.

  6. Dynamics in Polymer Melts and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gerald

    Intense research has led to substantial progress in the field of polymer melts and nanocomposites, both regarding the fundamental understanding and the relationship to applications. From a fundamental point of view, knowing the microscopic single chain dynamics is important. It may even lead to optimized materials ranging from the classical car tire to battery or fuel cell applications. In polymer melts, different processes, such as diffusion, reptation, contour length fluctuations, etc. occur and determine the macroscopic results, e.g. obtained by rheology. In nanocomposites confinement effects and interactions of chains with surfaces play an important role. High resolution techniques, such as small-angle neutron scattering or neutron spin echo spectroscopy are suited to explore the structure and dynamics of chains. The presentation illuminates the fundamental relationship between the microscopic dynamics and the mesoscopic properties, exploiting different experimental techniques, such as dielectric spectroscopy, rheology, neutron scattering and neutron spin echo spectroscopy.

  7. Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes

    DOEpatents

    Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-21

    Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

  8. Nanocomposite and method of making thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Milliron, Delia J.; Llordes, Anna

    2016-03-15

    An embodiment of an inorganic nanocomposite includes a nanoparticle phase and a matrix phase. The nanoparticle phase includes nanoparticles that are arranged in a repeating structure. In an embodiment, the nanoparticles have a spherical or pseudo-spherical shape and are incompatible with hydrazine. In another embodiment, the nanoparticles have neither a spherical nor pseudo-spherical shape. The matrix phase lies between the nanoparticles of the nanoparticle phase. An embodiment of a method of making an inorganic nanocomposite of the present invention includes forming a nanoparticle superlattice on a substrate. The nanoparticle superlattice includes nanoparticles. Each nanoparticle has organic ligands attached to a surface of the nanoparticle. The organic ligands separate adjacent nanoparticles within the nanoparticle superlattice. The method also includes forming a solution that includes an inorganic precursor. The nanoparticle superlattice is placed in the solution for a sufficient time for the inorganic precursor to replace the organic ligands.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Polyimide Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Many properties of polymeric materials can be enhanced by dispersing small quantities of clay nanocomposites throughout the polymer. Among the enhancements are increases in modulus and resistance to erosion by atomic oxygen and reductions in thermal expansivity, gas permeability, and flammability. To achieve the full extent of enhancement with these polymer-clay nanocomposites, the clay nanoparticles, which have thicknesses of only one-to-several nanometers and lengths and widths of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers, must be exfoliated one from another and then individually dispersed throughout the polymer. This dispersion is achieved only after alkali metal cations (usually Na(+)) that reside on the surfaces of the nanoparticles have been replaced by organocations (typically a quaternary amine cation). This renders the surface of the nanoparticle a more hospitable interface for the organic polymer matrix. Following the cation exchange, the organic clay is either mixed directly into the polymer or is dispersed in monomer which is later polymerized around the nanoparticle.

  10. Reversible Thermal-Stiffening in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-03-01

    Silica nanoparticles adsorbed with a high glass-transition temperature polymer, PMMA (Tg: 130 °C) are shown to uniformly disperse in a low-Tg polymer matrix, PEO (Tg: -60 °C). These nanocomposites exhibit an unusual reversible liquid-to-solid transition at temperatures above Tg's of both polymers. Mechanical adaptivity of PEO nanocomposites to temperatures underlies the existence of dynamically asymmetric bound layers on particles, and more importantly their impact on mechanical behavior, which sets these materials apart from conventional polymer composites that soften upon heating. Moreover, the growth rate of elastic moduli at temperatures above Tg of PMMA presents an Arrhenius-type relaxation with activation energy well-matching with the α- β merging region of PMMA. These results suggest that the mobility of the surface-bound polymer is essential for reinforcement contrary to commonly accepted glassy-layer hypothesis.

  11. Bonded hard-sphere theory and computer simulation of the equation of state of linear fused-hard-sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largo, J.; Maeso, M. J.; Solana, J. R.; Vega, C.; MacDowell, L. G.

    2003-11-01

    The bonded hard-sphere (BHS) theory is extended to fluids consisting of rigid, linear, homonuclear molecules, each of them formed by n fused hard spheres. The theory shows excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo NpT simulation data which are also reported for reduced bond lengths l*=0.5 and n=2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10. The accuracy of the BHS prediction in comparison to simulation is similar to that of generalized Flory-dimer theory and superior to that of thermodynamic perturbation theory.

  12. Graphene-silicone elastomer nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shuyang

    The incorporation of fillers to improve the Young's modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at failure of polymeric matrices is ubiquitous. While Young's modulus and tensile strength of the matrix increase with the filler concentration, a threshold filler concentration must be achieved for the elongation at failure to increase. Furthermore, a decrease in elongation at failure has also been observed beyond a critical filler concentration. While the increases in modulus and tensile strength have been attributed to the transfer of mechanical load to the stronger filler, the onset and reversal in elongation at failure are not understood. In this thesis, we use a functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) -- silicone elastomer (SE) nanocomposite as a model system to demonstrate the mechanisms responsible for this observed filler concentration-dependant elongation at failure as well its subsequent reversal. We will also demonstrate the mechanisms that create the continual increase in tensile strength as filler concentration increases. As the lateral size of FGS strongly influences the tensile strength of the resulting composite, in the first part of this thesis, we show that the oxidation path and the mechanical energy input influence the size of graphene oxide sheets derived from graphite oxide. The cross-planar oxidation of graphite from the (0002) plane results in periodic cracking of the uppermost graphene oxide layer, limiting its lateral dimension to less than 30 microm. We use an energy balance between the elastic strain energy associated with the undulation of graphene oxide sheets at the hydroxyl and epoxy sites, the crack formation energy, and the interaction energy between graphene layers to determine the cell size of the cracks. Under both edge-to-center and cross-planar oxidations, the size of graphene oxide sheets is determined by the aspect ratio of graphite and the mechanical energy input in processing the sheets. In the second part of this thesis, we use

  13. [Preparation and characterization of tetrandrine-loaded PLGA nanocomposite particles by premix membrane emulsification coupled with spray-drying method].

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Zhu, Hua-Xu; Guo, Li-Wei; Pan, Lin-Mei; Li, Bo; Shi, Fei-Yan; Lu, Jin

    2014-11-01

    For effective inhalable dry-powder drug delivery, tetrandrine-PLGA (polylactic-co-glycolic acid) nanocomposite particles have been developed to overcome the disadvantages of nanoparticles and microparticles. The primary nanoparticles were prepared by using premix membrane emulsification method. To prepare second particles, they were spray dried. The final particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dry laser particle size analysis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared analysis (IR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The average size of the primary particles was (337.5 ± 6.2) nm, while that second particles was (3.675 ± 0.16) μm which can be decomposed into primary nanoparticles in water. And the second particles were solid sphere-like with the drug dispersed as armorphous form in them. It is a reference for components delivery to lung in a new form. PMID:25757290

  14. Multifunctional iron-carbon nanocomposites through an aerosol-based process for the in situ remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jingjing; Kolesnichenko, Igor; Sunkara, Bhanukiran; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Piringer, Gerhard; John, Vijay T

    2011-03-01

    Spherical iron-carbon nanocomposites were developed through a facile aerosol-based process with sucrose and iron chloride as starting materials. These composites exhibit multiple functionalities relevant to the in situ remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE). The distribution and immobilization of iron nanoparticles on the surface of carbon spheres prevents zerovalent nanoiron aggregation with maintenance of reactivity. The aerosol-based carbon microspheres allow adsorption of TCE, thus removing dissolved TCE rapidly and facilitating reaction by increasing the local concentration of TCE in the vicinity of iron nanoparticles. The strongly adsorptive property of the composites may also prevent release of any toxic chlorinated intermediate products. The composite particles are in the optimal range for transport through groundwater saturated sediments. Furthermore, those iron-carbon composites can be designed at low cost, the process is amenable to scale-up for in situ application, and the materials are intrinsically benign to the environment.

  15. Template method synthesis of mesoporous carbon spheres and its applications as supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon spheres (MCS) have been fabricated from structured mesoporous silica sphere using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ethylene as a carbon feedstock. The mesoporous carbon spheres have a high specific surface area of 666.8 m2/g and good electrochemical properties. The mechanism of formation mesoporous carbon spheres (carbon spheres) is investigated. The important thing is a surfactant hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), which accelerates the process of carbon deposition. An additional advantage of this surfactant is an increase the yield of product. These mesoporous carbon spheres, which have good electrochemical properties is suitable for supercapacitors. PMID:22643113

  16. Graphitic carbon nitride based nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaiwang; Sun, Yanjuan; Dong, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C(3)N(4)), as an intriguing earth-abundant visible light photocatalyst, possesses a unique two-dimensional structure, excellent chemical stability and tunable electronic structure. Pure g-C(3)N(4) suffers from rapid recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pairs resulting in low photocatalytic activity. Because of the unique electronic structure, the g-C(3)N(4) could act as an eminent candidate for coupling with various functional materials to enhance the performance. According to the discrepancies in the photocatalytic mechanism and process, six primary systems of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites can be classified and summarized: namely, the g-C(3)N(4) based metal-free heterojunction, the g-C(3)N(4)/single metal oxide (metal sulfide) heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/composite oxide, the g-C(3)N(4)/halide heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/noble metal heterostructures, and the g-C(3)N(4) based complex system. Apart from the depiction of the fabrication methods, heterojunction structure and multifunctional application of the g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites, we emphasize and elaborate on the underlying mechanisms in the photocatalytic activity enhancement of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites. The unique functions of the p-n junction (semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures), the Schottky junction (metal/semiconductor heterostructures), the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, photosensitization, superconductivity, etc. are utilized in the photocatalytic processes. Furthermore, the enhanced performance of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites has been widely employed in environmental and energetic applications such as photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, photocatalytic hydrogen generation, carbon dioxide reduction, disinfection, and supercapacitors. This critical review ends with a summary and some perspectives on the challenges and new directions in exploring g-C(3)N(4)-based advanced nanomaterials. PMID:25407808

  17. Graphitic carbon nitride based nanocomposites: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zaiwang; Sun, Yanjuan; Dong, Fan

    2014-11-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), as an intriguing earth-abundant visible light photocatalyst, possesses a unique two-dimensional structure, excellent chemical stability and tunable electronic structure. Pure g-C3N4 suffers from rapid recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pairs resulting in low photocatalytic activity. Because of the unique electronic structure, the g-C3N4 could act as an eminent candidate for coupling with various functional materials to enhance the performance. According to the discrepancies in the photocatalytic mechanism and process, six primary systems of g-C3N4-based nanocomposites can be classified and summarized: namely, the g-C3N4 based metal-free heterojunction, the g-C3N4/single metal oxide (metal sulfide) heterojunction, g-C3N4/composite oxide, the g-C3N4/halide heterojunction, g-C3N4/noble metal heterostructures, and the g-C3N4 based complex system. Apart from the depiction of the fabrication methods, heterojunction structure and multifunctional application of the g-C3N4-based nanocomposites, we emphasize and elaborate on the underlying mechanisms in the photocatalytic activity enhancement of g-C3N4-based nanocomposites. The unique functions of the p-n junction (semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures), the Schottky junction (metal/semiconductor heterostructures), the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, photosensitization, superconductivity, etc. are utilized in the photocatalytic processes. Furthermore, the enhanced performance of g-C3N4-based nanocomposites has been widely employed in environmental and energetic applications such as photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, photocatalytic hydrogen generation, carbon dioxide reduction, disinfection, and supercapacitors. This critical review ends with a summary and some perspectives on the challenges and new directions in exploring g-C3N4-based advanced nanomaterials.

  18. Insitu grafting silica nanoparticles reinforced nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-Rui; Duan, Jiu-Fang; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-10-01

    Highly flexible nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared by using silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as fillers and multi-functional cross-links to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by free radical polymerization from an aqueous solution. The SNPs were collected by neighboring polymer chains and dispersed uniformly within a PAA matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were tailored by the concentration of SNPs according to the percolation model. It was proposed that covalent bonds of adsorbed chains on the filler surface resulted in the formation of a shell of an immobilized glassy layer and trapped entanglements, where the glassy polymer layer greatly enhanced the elastic modulus and the release of trapped entanglements at deformation contributed to the viscoelastic properties.Highly flexible nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared by using silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as fillers and multi-functional cross-links to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by free radical polymerization from an aqueous solution. The SNPs were collected by neighboring polymer chains and dispersed uniformly within a PAA matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were tailored by the concentration of SNPs according to the percolation model. It was proposed that covalent bonds of adsorbed chains on the filler surface resulted in the formation of a shell of an immobilized glassy layer and trapped entanglements, where the glassy polymer layer greatly enhanced the elastic modulus and the release of trapped entanglements at deformation contributed to the viscoelastic properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: FTIR spectra of SNP after silane treatment, dynamic oscillatory shear measurements as a function of frequency, constrained polymer chain analysis by a change in the peak height in loss factor spectra, molecular weight of grafted chains at different stages of gelation, prediction of the SNP reinforcing mechanism in the

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Failure in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersappe, Dilip

    2002-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of polymers reinforced with nanoscopic filler particles reveal the mechanisms by which nanofillers improve the toughness of the material. We find that the mobility of the nanofiller particle, rather than its surface area, controls its ability to dissipate energy. Our results show similarities between the toughening mechanisms observed in polymer nanocomposites and those postulated for biological structural materials such as spider silk and abalone adhesive.

  20. Asphaltenes-based polymer nano-composites

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, III, Daniel E

    2013-12-17

    Inventive composite materials are provided. The composite is preferably a nano-composite, and comprises an asphaltene, or a mixture of asphaltenes, blended with a polymer. The polymer can be any polymer in need of altered properties, including those selected from the group consisting of epoxies, acrylics, urethanes, silicones, cyanoacrylates, vulcanized rubber, phenol-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde, urea-formaldehyde, imides, esters, cyanate esters, allyl resins.

  1. Superhydrophobic nanocomposite surface topography and ice adhesion.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander; Yeong, Yong Han; Steele, Adam; Bayer, Ilker S; Loth, Eric

    2014-06-25

    A method to reduce the surface roughness of a spray-casted polyurethane/silica/fluoroacrylic superhydrophobic nanocomposite coating was demonstrated. By changing the main slurry carrier fluid, fluoropolymer medium, surface pretreatment, and spray parameters, we achieved arithmetic surface roughness values of 8.7, 2.7, and 1.6 μm on three test surfaces. The three surfaces displayed superhydrophobic performance with modest variations in skewness and kurtosis. The arithmetic roughness level of 1.6 μm is the smoothest superhydrophobic surface yet produced with these spray-based techniques. These three nanocomposite surfaces, along with a polished aluminum surface, were impacted with a supercooled water spray in icing conditions, and after ice accretion occurred, each was subjected to a pressurized tensile test to measure ice-adhesion. All three superhydrophobic surfaces showed lower ice adhesion than that of the polished aluminum surface. Interestingly, the intermediate roughness surface yielded the best performance, which suggests that high kurtosis and shorter autocorrelation lengths improve performance. The most ice-phobic nanocomposite showed a 60% reduction in ice-adhesion strength when compared to polished aluminum.

  2. Design and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Park, Cheol; Rouse, Jason H.

    2003-01-01

    Revolutionary design concepts in future aerospace vehicles will depend on extraordinary material properties to permit significant reduction of mass and size of components, while imparting intelligence. Due to their combination of remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are expected to enable this paradigm shift in design concepts. However, significant challenges still exist in translating these CNT properties into the macrostructures required for future generations of aerospace vehicles. While an accepted route for making the leap from nanostructures to useful macrostructures has not been fully charted, this paper will give an overview of the approach taken by some researchers at NASA Langley Research Center to sort out issues involved in the development of CNT nanocomposites for multifunctional structures. Specifically, the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices, characterization of nanocomposites, the role of quantum computation in providing guidance for processing and the use of computational analysis in data interpretation will be covered. Significant improvements in mechanical and electrical properties of CNT nanocomposites with very low loadings of CNTs are described and lend credence to the potential for using CNTs in achieving technological leaps in composite development.

  3. Modeling diffusion in foamed polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Ippalapalli, Sandeep; Ranaprathapan, A Dileep; Singh, Sachchida N; Harikrishnan, G

    2013-04-15

    Two-way multicomponent diffusion processes in polymeric nanocomposite foams, where the condensed phase is nanoscopically reinforced with impermeable fillers, are investigated. The diffusion process involves simultaneous outward permeation of the components of the dispersed gas phase and inward diffusion of atmospheric air. The transient variation in thermal conductivity of foam is used as the macroscopic property to track the compositional variations of the dispersed gases due to the diffusion process. In the continuum approach adopted, the unsteady-state diffusion process is combined with tortuosity theory. The simulations conducted at ambient temperature reveal distinct regimes of diffusion processes in the nanocomposite foams owing to the reduction in the gas-transport rate induced by nanofillers. Simulations at a higher temperature are also conducted and the predictions are compared with experimentally determined thermal conductivities under accelerated diffusion conditions for polyurethane foams reinforced with clay nanoplatelets of varying individual lamellar dimensions. Intermittent measurements of foam thermal conductivity are performed while the accelerated diffusion proceeded. The predictions under accelerated diffusion conditions show good agreement with experimentally measured thermal conductivities for nanocomposite foams reinforced with low and medium aspect-ratios fillers. The model shows higher deviations for foams with fillers that have a high aspect ratio.

  4. Cellulose nanocrystal-filled carboxymethyl cellulose nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Choi, YongJae; Simonsen, John

    2006-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are one of the important application areas for nanotechnology. Naturally derived organic nanophase materials are of special interest in the case of polymer nanocomposites. Carboxymethyl cellulose is a polyelectrolyte derived from natural materials. It has been extensively studied as a hydrogel polymer. Methods to modify the mechanical properties of gels and films made from CMC are of interest in our lab and in the commercial marketplace. The effect of nano-sized fillers on the properties of CMC-based composites is of interest in the development of novel or improved applications for hydrogel polymers in general and CMC in particular. This project investigated cellulose nanocrystals (CNXLs) as a filler in CMC and compared the effects to microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The composite material was composed of CMC, MCC or CNXL, with glycerin as a plasticizer. CNXL and MCC concentrations ranged from 5% to 30%. Glycerin concentrations were kept constant at 10%. CNXLs improved the strength and stiffness of the resulting composite compared to MCC. In addition, a simple heat treatment was found to render the nanocomposite water resistant.

  5. FIRST Robotics, Gulfport High, StenniSphere, Bo Clarke, mentor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Bo Clarke, mentor for Gulfport High School's Team Fusion, offers strategy tips to students and coaches during the FIRST Robotics Competition kickoff held at StenniSphere on Jan. 7. Clarke is the lead building and infrastructure specialist for NASA's Shared Services Center at Stennis Space Center.

  6. Hydrodynamic capture of microswimmers into sphere-bound orbits.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke; Palacci, Jérémie; Braunschweig, Adam B; Shelley, Michael J; Zhang, Jun

    2014-03-21

    Self-propelled particles can exhibit surprising non-equilibrium behaviors, and how they interact with obstacles or boundaries remains an important open problem. Here we show that chemically propelled micro-rods can be captured, with little change in their speed, into close orbits around solid spheres resting on or near a horizontal plane. We show that this interaction between sphere and particle is short-range, occurring even for spheres smaller than the particle length, and for a variety of sphere materials. We consider a simple model, based on lubrication theory, of a force- and torque-free swimmer driven by a surface slip (the phoretic propulsion mechanism) and moving near a solid surface. The model demonstrates capture, or movement towards the surface, and yields speeds independent of distance. This study reveals the crucial aspects of activity–driven interactions of self-propelled particles with passive objects, and brings into question the use of colloidal tracers as probes of active matter.

  7. Superconducting Sphere in an External Magnetic Field Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sazonov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give the intelligible procedure for undergraduate students to grasp proof of the fact that the magnetic field outside the hollow superconducting sphere (superconducting shell) coincides with the field of a point magnetic dipole both when an uniform external magnetic field is applied as when a ferromagnetic sphere…

  8. Passive control of a sphere by complex-shaped appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Olivieri, Stefano; Mazzino, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Appendages of various shapes and sizes (e.g. plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins) play an important role in dispersion and locomotion. In our previous work (Lacis, U. et al. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking. Nat. Commun. 5:5310, doi: 10.1038/ncomms6310, 2014), we showed that a free-falling cylinder with a splitter plate turns and drifts due to a symmetry-breaking instability (called inverted-pendulum instability or IPL). In other words, in a separated flow, the straight position of a short splitter plate is unstable and as a consequence a side force and a torque are induced on the cylinder. In this work, we seek the three-dimensional (3D) appendage shape (on a sphere at Re =200) that induces the largest drift of the sphere. We find that highly non-trivial shapes of appendages on a sphere increase the side force significantly compared to trivial shapes (such as an elliptic sheet). We also find that appendages may be designed to generate drift in either direction, that is, a free-falling sphere can drift either in the direction in which appendage is tilted or in the opposite direction depending on the particular geometry of the appendage. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind these optimal appendage shapes in the context of the IPL instability.

  9. Dyadic Green's function of an eccentrically stratified sphere.

    PubMed

    Moneda, Angela P; Chrissoulidis, Dimitrios P

    2014-03-01

    The electric dyadic Green's function (dGf) of an eccentrically stratified sphere is built by use of the superposition principle, dyadic algebra, and the addition theorem of vector spherical harmonics. The end result of the analytical formulation is a set of linear equations for the unknown vector wave amplitudes of the dGf. The unknowns are calculated by truncation of the infinite sums and matrix inversion. The theory is exact, as no simplifying assumptions are required in any one of the analytical steps leading to the dGf, and it is general in the sense that any number, position, size, and electrical properties can be considered for the layers of the sphere. The point source can be placed outside of or in any lossless part of the sphere. Energy conservation, reciprocity, and other checks verify that the dGf is correct. A numerical application is made to a stratified sphere made of gold and glass, which operates as a lens. PMID:24690648

  10. Optimizing packing fraction in granular media composed of overlapping spheres.

    PubMed

    Roth, Leah K; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-28

    What particle shape will generate the highest packing fraction when randomly poured into a container? In order to explore and navigate the enormous search space efficiently, we pair molecular dynamics simulations with artificial evolution. Arbitrary particle shape is represented by a set of overlapping spheres of varying diameter, enabling us to approximate smooth surfaces with a resolution proportional to the number of spheres included. We discover a family of planar triangular particles, whose packing fraction of ϕ ∼ 0.73 is among the highest experimental results for disordered packings of frictionless particles. We investigate how ϕ depends on the arrangement of spheres comprising an individual particle and on the smoothness of the surface. We validate the simulations with experiments using 3D-printed copies of the simplest member of the family, a planar particle consisting of three overlapping spheres with identical radius. Direct experimental comparison with 3D-printed aspherical ellipsoids demonstrates that the triangular particles pack exceedingly well not only in the limit of large system size but also when confined to small containers.

  11. "Sighting" the Public: Iconoclasm and Public Sphere Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnegan, Cara A.; Kang, Jiyeon

    2004-01-01

    This essay considers the ways that iconoclasm, or the will to control images and vision, appears in canonical and contemporary public sphere theory. John Dewey and Jurgen Habermas enact a paradoxical relation to visuality by repudiating a mass culture of images while preferring "good" images and vision. Yet even when advocating for good vision,…

  12. The Polyakov relation for the sphere and higher genus surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menotti, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    The Polyakov relation, which in the sphere topology gives the changes of the Liouville action under the variation of the position of the sources, is also related in the case of higher genus to the dependence of the action on the moduli of the surface. We write and prove such a relation for genus 1 and for all hyperelliptic surfaces.

  13. Towards composite spheres as building blocks for structured molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lloyd L; Pellicane, Giuseppe

    2016-10-19

    In order to design a flexible molecular model that mimics the chemical moieties of a polyatomic molecule, we propose the 'composite-sphere' model that can assemble the essential elements to produce the structure of the target molecule. This is likened to the polymerization process where monomers assemble to form the polymer. The assemblage is built into the pair interaction potentials which can 'react' (figuratively) with selective pieces into various bonds. In addition, we preserve the spherical symmetries of the individual pair potentials so that the isotropic Ornstein-Zernike equation (OZ) for multi-component mixtures can be used as a theoretical framework. We first test our approach on generating a dumbbell molecule. An equimolar binary mixture of hard spheres and square-well spheres are allowed to react to form a dimer. As the bond length shrinks to zero, we create a site-site model of a Janus-like molecule with a repulsive moiety and an attractive moiety. We employ the zero-separation (ZSEP) closure to solve the OZ equations. The structure and thermodynamic properties are calculated at three isotherms and at several densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The close agreement achieved demonstrates that the ZSEP closure is a reliable theory for this composite-sphere fluid model. PMID:27546819

  14. Inexpensive, large-diameter, radar tracking and calibration spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdren, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Plastic models of polystyrene beads are produced to within 0.02 cm accuracy, in various diameters designed to meet exact requirements of particular radar system frequency spectrum. They are inexpensive and do not require special handling imposed on metal spheres.

  15. Epitaxial growth of ordered and disordered granular sphere packings.

    PubMed

    Panaitescu, Andreea; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that epitaxy can be used to obtain a wide range of ordered to disordered granular packings by simply changing the deposition flux. We show that a defect-free face-centered-cubic (fcc) monocrystal can be obtained by depositing athermal granular spheres randomly into a container with a templated surface in a gravitational field without direct manipulation. This packing corresponds to the maximum sphere packing fraction and is obtained when the substrate is templated corresponding to the (100) plane of a fcc crystal and the container side is an integer multiple of the sphere diameter. We find that the maximum sphere packing is obtained when the deposited grains come to rest, one at a time, without damaging the substrate. A transition to a disordered packing is observed when the flux is increased. Using micro x-ray computed tomography, we find that defects nucleate at the boundaries of the container in which the packing is grown as grains cooperatively come to rest above their local potential minimum. This leads to a transition from ordered to disordered loose packings that grow in the form of an inverted cone, with the apex located at the defect nucleation site. We capture the observed decrease in order using a minimal model in which a defect leads to growth of further defects in the neighboring sites in the layer above with a probability that increases with the deposition flux.

  16. Collapse of radiating fluid spheres and cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, W.G.

    1985-05-15

    The radiating-fluid-sphere model studied by Lake and Hellaby is reanalyzed to show that flat spacetime is a valid C/sup 1/ extension to their model and thus it does not force a violation of strong cosmic censorship.

  17. Elucidations on the Reciprocal Lattice and the Ewald Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foadi, J.; Evans, G.

    2008-01-01

    The reciprocal lattice is derived through the Fourier transform of a generic crystal lattice, as done previously in the literature. A few key derivations are this time handled in detail, and the connection with x-ray diffraction is clearly pointed out. The Ewald sphere is subsequently thoroughly explained and a few comments on its representation…

  18. Determination of meteor flux distribution over the celestial sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Belkovich, O. I.; Filimonova, T. K.; Sidorov, V. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of determination of meteor flux density distribution over the celestial sphere is discussed. The flux density was derived from observations by radar together with measurements of angles of arrival of radio waves reflected from meteor trails. The role of small meteor showers over the sporadic background is shown.

  19. Neutron spectrometry using LNL bonner spheres and FLUKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarchiapone, L.; Zafiropoulos, D.

    2013-07-01

    The characterization of neutron fields has been made with a system based on a scintillation detector and multiple moderating spheres. The system, together with the unfolding procedure, have been tested in quasi-monochromatic neutron energy fields and in complex, mixed, cyclotron based environments. FLUKA simulations have been used to produce response functions and reference energy spectra.

  20. Rowlinson's concept of an effective hard sphere diameter.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Attention is drawn to John Rowlinson's idea that the repulsive portion of the intermolecular interaction may be replaced by a temperature-dependent hard sphere diameter. It is this approximation that made the development of perturbation theory possible for realistic fluids whose intermolecular interactions have a steep, but finite, repulsion at short separations.

  1. Rowlinson’s concept of an effective hard sphere diameter

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Attention is drawn to John Rowlinson’s idea that the repulsive portion of the intermolecular interaction may be replaced by a temperature-dependent hard sphere diameter. It is this approximation that made the development of perturbation theory possible for realistic fluids whose intermolecular interactions have a steep, but finite, repulsion at short separations. PMID:20953320

  2. Spinning of a submicron sphere by Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Youm; Kim, Saehwa

    2016-01-01

    We show that by employing two incoherent counter-propagating Airy beams, we can manipulate a submicron sphere to spin around a transverse axis. We can control not only the spinning speed, but also the direction of the spinning axis by changing the polarization directions of Airy beams.

  3. Measuring rotational diffusion of colloidal spheres with confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Böker, Alexander

    2016-07-13

    We report an experimental method to measure the translational and rotational dynamics of colloidal spheres in three dimensions with confocal microscopy and show that the experimental values reasonably agree with the theoretical values. This method can be extended to study rotational dynamics in concentrated colloidal systems and complex bio-systems. PMID:27353601

  4. Gravitation- And Conduction-Driven Melting In A Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    Simplifying assumptions lead to approximate closed-form solution. Theoretical paper discusses melting of solid sphere in spherical container. Develops mathematical model of melting process, based in part on simplifying assumptions like those used in theories of lubrication and film condensation. Resulting equation for melting speed as function of melting distance solved approximately in closed form.

  5. Fabrication of large area nanostructures with surface modified silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2014-03-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the CO stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  6. Temperature dependent surface modification of silica spheres with methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Jo, Dong-Hyun; Lim, Sae-Han; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Do-gyun

    2014-09-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the C=O stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  7. Tangent Sphere Model. An Analog to Chemical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Ethel L.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Tangent Sphere Model (TSM) in introducing chemical structure to beginning chemistry students at both the secondary school and college levels. Describes various applications of the use of such models, including instruction of the atom's kernel and valence electrons. (TW)

  8. Universal jamming phase diagram in the hard-sphere limit.

    PubMed

    Haxton, Thomas K; Schmiedeberg, Michael; Liu, Andrea J

    2011-03-01

    We present a new formulation of the jamming phase diagram for a class of glass-forming fluids consisting of spheres interacting via finite-ranged repulsions at temperature T, packing fraction ϕ or pressure p, and applied shear stress Σ. We argue that the natural choice of axes for the phase diagram are the dimensionless quantities T/pσ³, pσ³/ε, and Σ/p, where T is the temperature, p is the pressure, Σ is the stress, σ is the sphere diameter, ε is the interaction energy scale, and m is the sphere mass. We demonstrate that the phase diagram is universal at low pσ³/ε; at low pressure, observables such as the relaxation time are insensitive to details of the interaction potential and collapse onto the values for hard spheres, provided the observables are nondimensionalized by the pressure. We determine the shape of the jamming surface in the jamming phase diagram, organize previous results in relation to the jamming phase diagram, and discuss the significance of various limits.

  9. Theory of the sphering of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Tong, P

    1968-02-01

    A rigorous mathematical solution of the sphering of a red blood cell is obtained under the assumptions that the red cells is a fluid-filled shell and that it can swell into a perfect sphere in an appropriate hypotonic medium. The solution is valid for finite strain of the cell membrane provided that the membrane is isotropic, elastic and incompressible. The most general nonlinear elastic stress-strain law for the membrane in a state of generalized plane stress is used. A necessary condition for a red cell to be able to sphere is that its extensional stiffness follow a specific distribution over the membrane. This distribution is strongly influenced by the surface tension in the cell membrane. A unique relation exists between the extensional stiffness, pressure differential, surface tension, and the ratio of the radius of the sphere to that of the undeformed red cell. The functional dependence of this stiffness distribution on various physical parameters is presented. A critique of some current literature on red cell mechanics is presented. PMID:5639934

  10. Assembly of Viral Hydrogels for Three-Dimensional Conducting Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Yen; Hyder, Md Nasim; Mackanic, David; Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle Dorval; Qi, Jifa

    2014-01-01

    M13 bacteriophages act as versatile scaffolds capable of organizing single-walled carbon nanotubes and fabricating three-dimensional conducting nanocomposites. The morphological, electrical, and electrochemical properties of the nanocomposites are presented, as well as its ability to disperse and utilize single-walled carbon nanotubes effectively. PMID:24782428

  11. Self-assembled polymer nanocomposites and their networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Nitin Vikas

    This dissertation describes new routes to synthesize polymer nanocomposite networks via self-assembly. Polymerizable structure directing agents (referred to as surfmers) obtained by end-group functionalization preserves the structure-directing capabilities of the surfactant for templating ordered mesoporous silica particle growth, while simultaneously generating a reactive matrix for polymer network formation through reactive end groups in the presence of intimately mixed mesoporous silicates. A combination of small angle X-ray scattering, surface area, and microscopy experiments on mesoporous silica indicated the structure directing capabilities of surfmers. Free-radical polymerization of the surfmer leads to novel crosslinked nanocomposites networks. Multiple experiments, including gel permeation chromatography, swelling, and solid state NMR experiments on polymer nanocomposites gave evidence of the polymerization of surfmer leading to formation of crosslink networks. Polymer nanocomposites with varied silica content were prepared. Effects of silica content on polymer nanocomposites were studied on rheometer. Results obtained from rheological experiments indicate that the storage (G') and loss modulus (G") increases with increase in the content of mesoporous silica. In this way, the nanocomposites networks obtained via self-assembly shows independent behavior with respect to frequency in rheological experiments. Additionally, this self-assembled route was extended to synthesize biodegradable and biocompatible polymer nanocomposites networks. The nanocomposite networks obtained with 15% of silica content showed the increase in storage modulus by two orders of magnitude in rheological experiments.

  12. Barrier and Mechanical Properties of Starch-Clay Nanocomposite Films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poor barrier and mechanical properties of biopolymer-based food packaging can potentially be enhanced by the use of layered silicates (nanoclay) to produce nanocomposites. In this study, starch-clay nano-composites were synthesized by a melt extrusion method. Natural (MMT) and organically modifi...

  13. A new approach to raising heat resistance of epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobko, Anatoliy P.; Levakova, Irina V.; Krasheninnikov, Sergey V.

    2012-07-01

    A new approach to enhancing heat resistance of epoxy nanocomposites is offered. Complete exfoliation of montmorillonite particles into individual platelets (nanoparticles) is not sufficient condition for increasing the glass transition temperature of the epoxy nanocomposite. A much higher contribution to the increase in the heat resistance is ensured by grafting of epoxy molecular chains onto the surface of aluminosilicate platelets.

  14. Preparation of magnetite-fullerene nanocomposite with enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Kalska-Szostko, B; Rogowska, M

    2012-09-01

    This study presents modification of magnetite nanoparticles and fullerene for biocompatibility. It show also specific fabrication of magnetite-carbon nanocomposite with immobilized biomolecule. The composites were created by joining individual components step-by-step manner (fullerene to magnetite and glucose oxidase or glucose oxidase to magnetite and fullerene). The resulting nanocomposites were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  15. Electron-microscopic study of Sn-chrisotile asbestos nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, L. M.; Kalmykov, A. E.; Fokin, A. V.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2014-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the structural state of tin in Sn-chrisotile asbestos nanocomposite. It is shown that tin in the nanocomposite forms a system of nanowires, which, in turn, consist of crystallites of different lengths. Various orientational relations between the matrix and crystallites are revealed.

  16. Protein location and elemental composition of urine spheres in different avian species.

    PubMed

    Casotti, Giovanni; Braun, Eldon J

    2004-07-01

    We examined the internal morphology, location of protein, and identity and location of elements, in avian urate-containing spheres in 9 species of birds. The urine spheres were collected from voided samples. The spheres ranged in size from 0.5-5.0 microm, except in the domestic fowl, where they ranged up to 10 microm in diameter. The internal morphology of the spheres was examined using freeze-fracture microscopy. Protein location within the spheres was identified using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The urine spheres were analyzed for content and internal location of elements using Energy Dispersal System Analysis (EDS). Internally, the spheres consisted of a central nidus surrounded by 3-4 concentric narrow rings of protein. Elements found within the spheres included nitrogen, potassium, calcium, sodium, phosphorus, chloride and sulfur; however, only nitrogen, potassium and chloride were common in the spheres of all species. Nitrogen comprised the majority of the elemental content of the spheres (77-90%) followed by potassium (8-45%), with all other ions present in trace amounts. Unlike protein, the location of elements was random within the spheres. Protein and urate are both negatively charged and known to associate to form the spheres and as potassium is the only cation common to all spheres, it too may play a role in their formation. PMID:15229868

  17. Locating responsibility: the Sphere Humanitarian Charter and its rationale.

    PubMed

    Darcy, James

    2004-06-01

    Criticised by some as a technical initiative that neglects core principles, Sphere was seen by its originators precisely as an articulation of principle. The Humanitarian Charter was the main vehicle through which this was expressed, but its relationship to the Minimum Standards has remained a matter of uncertainty. Specifically, it was unclear in the original (1999) edition of Sphere how the concept of rights informed the Minimum Standards. The revised (2004) edition goes some way to clarifying this in the way the standards are framed, yet the link between the standards and the charter remains unclear. The concern with the quality and accountability of humanitarian assistance, which motivated the attempt to establish system-wide standards through the Sphere Project, was accompanied by a desire to establish such actions in a wider framework of legal and political responsibility. In part, this reflects the conditional nature of the undertaking that agencies make when they adopt Sphere. This aspect of the charter has been neglected, but it is fundamental to an understanding of the standards and their application. This paper considers the rationale of the Sphere Humanitarian Charter and the conceptual model that underpins it. It discusses the relationship between the charter and the Minimum Standards, and the sense in which the latter are properly called "rights-based" (explored further in a related paper herein by Young and Taylor). The author was closely involved in the conception and drafting of the charter, and this paper attempts to convey some of the thinking that lay behind it. PMID:15186359

  18. Sphere-plate Casimir interaction in (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we derive the formula for the Casimir interaction energy between a sphere and a plate in (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. It is assumed that the scalar field satisfies the Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the sphere and the plate. As in the D = 3 case, the formula is of TGTG type. One of our main contributions is deriving the translation matrices which express the change of bases between plane waves and spherical waves for general D. Using orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials, it turns out that the final TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy can be simplified to one that is similar to the D = 3 case. To illustrate the application of the formula, both large separation and small separation asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir interaction energy are computed. The large separation leading term is proportional to L-D+1 if the sphere is imposed with Dirichlet boundary condition, and to L-D-1 if the sphere is imposed with Neumann boundary condition, where L is distance from the center of the sphere to the plane. For the small separation asymptotic behavior, it is shown that the leading term is equal to the one obtained using proximity force approximation. The next-to-leading order term is also computed using perturbation method. It is shown that when the space dimension D is larger than 5, the next-to-leading order has sign opposite to the leading order term. Moreover, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading order term is linear in D, indicating a larger correction at higher dimensions.

  19. Sphere-plate Casimir interaction in (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we derive the formula for the Casimir interaction energy between a sphere and a plate in (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. It is assumed that the scalar field satisfies the Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the sphere and the plate. As in the D = 3 case, the formula is of TGTG type. One of our main contributions is deriving the translation matrices which express the change of bases between plane waves and spherical waves for general D. Using orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials, it turns out that the final TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy can be simplified to one that is similar to the D = 3 case. To illustrate the application of the formula, both large separation and small separation asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir interaction energy are computed. The large separation leading term is proportional to L{sup −D+1} if the sphere is imposed with Dirichlet boundary condition, and to L{sup −D−1} if the sphere is imposed with Neumann boundary condition, where L is distance from the center of the sphere to the plane. For the small separation asymptotic behavior, it is shown that the leading term is equal to the one obtained using proximity force approximation. The next-to-leading order term is also computed using perturbation method. It is shown that when the space dimension D is larger than 5, the next-to-leading order has sign opposite to the leading order term. Moreover, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading order term is linear in D, indicating a larger correction at higher dimensions.

  20. Poly(acrylic acid) modified lanthanide-doped GdVO4 hollow spheres for up-conversion cell imaging, MRI and pH-dependent drug release.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojiao; Yang, Dongmei; Dai, Yunlu; Shang, Mengmeng; Cheng, Ziyong; Zhang, Xiao; Lian, Hongzhou; Ma, Ping'an; Lin, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, multifunctional poly(acrylic acid) modified lanthanide-doped GdVO(4) nanocomposites [PAA@GdVO(4): Ln(3+) (Ln = Yb/Er, Yb/Ho, Yb/Tm)] were constructed by filling PAA hydrogel into GdVO(4) hollow spheres via photoinduced polymerization. The up-conversion (UC) emission colors (green, red and blue) can be tuned by changing the codopant compositions in the matrices. The composites have potential applications as bio-probes for cell imaging. Meanwhile, the hybrid spheres can act as T(1) contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) owing to the existence of Gd(3+) ions on the surface of composites. Due to the nature of PAA, DOX-loaded PAA@GdVO(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+) system exhibits pH-dependent drug releasing kinetics. A lower pH offers a faster drug release rate. Such character makes the loaded DOX easily released at cancer cells. The cell uptake process of drug-loaded composites was observed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The results indicate the potential application of the multifunctional composites as theragnostics (effective bimodal imaging probes and pH-responsive drug carriers).