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Sample records for aga khan university

  1. Mixed Salmonella infection: a report of two cases from the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Binish Arif; Fasih, Naima; Qaiser, Saba; Khan, Erum; Zafar, Afia; Irfan, Seema

    2013-04-01

    Enteric fever remains a major health problem in the developing world, including Pakistan. Poor sanitation and hygienic conditions are the major predisposing factors. Salmonella infection with different strains in the same patient has rarely been reported previously. We are reporting two cases of bacteraemia with simultaneous detection of two strains of Salmonella in a single episode of infection. In both the cases, 2 different serotypes of Salmonella were causing bacteraemia leading to fever. In highly endemic area, one must be aware of mixed Salmonella infections as inappropriate diagnosis of such infections may lead to treatment failure.

  2. Investigating Educational Change: The Aga Khan University Institute for Educational Development Teacher Education for School Improvement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khamis, Anil; Sammons, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    This article continues the analyses of the impact of an innovative teacher education programme aimed at school improvement in a developing country context (A. Khamis, P. Sammons, 2004. The development of a cadre of teacher educators: some lessons from Pakistan. International Journal of Educational Development, 24(3), 255-268). Building on recent…

  3. Appropriate for gestational age (AGA)

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal age; Gestation; Development - AGA; Growth - AGA; Neonatal care - AGA; Newborn care - AGA ... Gestational age is the common term used during pregnancy to describe how far along the pregnancy is. It is ...

  4. Reimagining Khan Analytics for Student Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Jim

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I describe preliminary work on a new research project in learning analytics at Arizona State University. In conjunction with an innovative remedial mathematics course using Khan Academy and student coaches, this study seeks to measure the effectiveness of visualized data in assisting student coaches as they help remedial math…

  5. Interview with Dr. Omar Khan, noted global health specialist.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rob; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2012-07-01

    Dr. Khan has had a distinguished career in global health. He has served as a faculty member at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. He is currently a family medicine physician at Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Delaware, and is President of the Delaware Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Khan has authored more than 55 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has conducted research and lead primary care and public health initiatives in numerous countries. Last year, Dr. Khan also coedited a book titled Megacities and Global Health sponsored by the American Public Health Association with Dr. Gregory Pappas, Deputy Health Commissioner for Washington, DC.

  6. Blending Instruction with Khan Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargile, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Khan Academy, the free Web-based tutorial program, landed on the education landscape in about 2011, when it was featured on the popular weekly news show "60 Minutes." The program is now used worldwide by more than 10 million learners each month and is used in more than 29,000 classrooms in 216 countries. Are classroom teachers using the…

  7. Quality improvement initiatives by Aga Khan Health Service in the mountains of northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jassani, Kashif; Essani, Rozina Roshan Ali; Abbas, Nadeem; Ahmed, Rashida

    2015-01-01

    Improving health care quality in a resource constraint environment in an emerging economy that is in a hard-to-reach geographic terrain can become a challenge especially when it has to follow the international standard which AKHS, P envisions to implement across the nation in all of its health facilities. Healthcare of the nation is a responsibility which is shouldered by both the government and the private sector. Private-sector, however, remains under pressure as its resource size is limited and it remains subject to stringent regulation and quality control requirements regardless of whether it is in the remotest corner of the country where proper land routes are either lacking or not safe. This article shares the unique experience of AKHS, P in achieving ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification. Particularly at one of the "world's highest valleys -situated at Gilgit Baltistan at an altitude of 13,083 ft. above sea level in Northern Pakistan. The experience was unique in terms of demonstrating and recording how a quality management system can be implemented in one of the most difficult to reach areas where compliance to international quality standards was previously unthinkable.

  8. Toward a One-World Schoolhouse: Interview with Sal Khan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkus, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, Salman Khan, with three degrees from MIT and an MBA from Harvard, agreed to help tutor his cousin Nadia, who was struggling in math. Using Yahoo's Doodle notepad, Khan offered Nadia a sequence of mini lessons designed to scaffold her learning. Over time, other friends and relatives heard about Khan's success and asked for similar…

  9. Can Khan Move the Bell Curve to the Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronholz, June

    2012-01-01

    This article features Khan Academy which offers an online math program and short video lectures embedded in the "module", or math concept, that fit students' goals. By now, more than 1 million people have watched the online video in which Salman Khan--a charming MIT math whiz, Harvard Business School graduate, and former Boston hedge-fund…

  10. Can Khan Move the Bell Curve to the Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronholz, June

    2012-01-01

    More than 1 million people have watched the online video in which Salman Khan--a charming MIT math whiz, Harvard Business School graduate, and former Boston hedge-fund analyst--explains how he began tutoring his cousins in math by posting short lessons for them on YouTube. Other people began watching the lessons and sending Khan adulatory notes.…

  11. Schools "Flip" for Lesson Model Promoted by Khan Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on a "flip model" of instruction that has gotten national media attention lately, thanks to its promotion by Khan Academy, the high-profile nonprofit online-tutoring library created by Salman A. Khan, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate who was looking for a way to help his young relatives with their homework. The…

  12. 78 FR 48539 - Designation of Bahawal Khan, Also Known as Salahuddin Ayubi, Also Known as Bahwal Khan, as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Designation of Bahawal Khan, Also Known as Salahuddin Ayubi, Also Known as Bahwal Khan, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to Section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224, as Amended Acting under the authority of and in accordance with section...

  13. Khan Academy: the world's free virtual school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijksman, Joshua A.; Khan, Salman

    2011-03-01

    Khan Academy offers an unprecedented set of educational material for science and math education, in the form of short, free, publicly available video clips. With a growing set of already over 2000 videos, it is easily the most exhaustive collection of structured educational material on the Internet. The content is made in digestible 10-20 minute chunks; the granular nature of the material allows learners to fill in almost any of their knowledge ``gaps.'' Importantly, the conversational style used in the videos offers a fresh, new perspective on math and science instruction. With our 2 M funding grant from Google and support from the Gates foundation, we envision covering all topics that would appear in typical high-school or collegiate-level Math and Science courses, and translating these videos to the major languages across the globe. Moreover, we also offer a free and fully integrated assessment system, which allows students to practice problems at their own pace and focus on the appropriate instruction to fill in their individual gaps. Many testimonials have already proven our methods to be a highly successful educational tool. Our goal is to allow educators to improve their teaching, but above all to bring simple, rewarding and enjoyable education to the minds of many young students. Supported by Google, the Gates Foundation, donors and volunteers.

  14. Commentary: The Khan Academy and the Day-Night Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parslow, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching by night and reflecting on a subject by day is the way that Salman Khan sees education evolving in the age of online lectures. Khan believes he is onto something in what he styles the "flipped classroom." In Khan's view, there is no need for students to be divided into grades by age. Instead, they should learn at their own pace, moving on…

  15. "Kubla Khan" and Its Narratives of Possible Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayar, Pramod K.

    2013-01-01

    This essay argues that Coleridge's "Kubla Khan" is a poem about narrative and specifically focuses on the narrative construction of possible worlds, or even utopian worlds. It notes two pairs of narratives. In pair one the utopian narrative of the monarch's decree which seeks to build a space of pure pleasure is in opposition to the…

  16. The Perceptions of the Preparedness of Medical Graduates to Take on Internship Responsibilities in Low Resource Hospitals in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muthaura, Patricia N.; Khamis, Tashmin K.

    2013-01-01

    The Aga Khan University is developing an Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) curriculum for implementation in East Africa in 2016, which aims to serve the health needs of the populations there. Pilot focus group discussions of recent interns were conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi to find out: (1) If Kenyan medical students…

  17. 76 FR 69318 - In the Matter of the Designation of Mali Khan also known as Madi Khan as a Specially Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Designation of Mali Khan also known as Madi Khan as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to Section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224, as Amended Acting under the authority of and in accordance with section 1(b) of...

  18. The molecular mechanism of thermostable α-galactosidases AgaA and AgaB explained by x-ray crystallography and mutational studies.

    PubMed

    Merceron, Romain; Foucault, Marine; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Gouet, Patrice

    2012-11-16

    The α-galactosidase AgaA from the thermophilic microorganism Geobacillus stearothermophilus has great industrial potential because it is fully active at 338 K against raffinose and can increase the yield of manufactured sucrose. AgaB has lower affinity for its natural substrates but is a powerful tool for the enzymatic synthesis of disaccharides by transglycosylation. These two enzymes have 97% identity and belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family GH36 for which few structures are available. To understand the structural basis underlying the differences between these two enzymes, we determined the crystal structures of AgaA and AgaB by molecular replacement at 3.2- and 1.8 Å-resolution, respectively. We also solved a 2.8-Å structure of the AgaA(A355E) mutant, which has enzymatic properties similar to those of AgaB. We observe that residue 355 is located 20 Å away from the active site and that the A355E substitution causes structural rearrangements resulting in a significant displacement of the invariant Trp(336) at catalytic subsite -1. Hence, the active cleft of AgaA is narrowed in comparison with AgaB, and AgaA is more efficient than AgaB against its natural substrates. The structure of AgaA(A355E) complexed with 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin reveals an induced fit movement; there is a rupture of the electrostatic interaction between Glu(355) and Asn(335) and a return of Trp(336) to an optimal position for ligand stacking. The structures of two catalytic mutants of AgaA(A355E) complexed with raffinose and stachyose show that the binding interactions are stronger at subsite -1 to enable the binding of various α-galactosides.

  19. Mixing mechanisms in siliciclastic-carbonate successions of Khan Formation (Permian), Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadan, Mahdi; Hosseini-Barzi, Mahboubeh

    2010-05-01

    Mixing mechanisms in siliciclastic-carbonate successions of Khan Formation (Permian), Central Iran M. Shadan & M. Hosseini-Barzi Geology Department, Faculty of Earth Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran shadangeo@gmail.com Mixing mechanisms in siliciclastic-carbonate successions of Khan Formation (Permian) have been studied in two sections (Chahroof with 197 m thick in north and Cheshmeh Bakhshi with 204 m thick in south) along basement Kalmard fault in Posht-e-Badam block, Central Iran. Siliciclastic units are characterized by well sorted, fine to medium grain quartzarenites with laterite interbeds, deposited in shoreline zone (foreshore, upper and lower shoreface) influencing wave and longshore currents. Longshore sands which have been transported along the coast made the sand bars in the shoreface. Further along the coast, returning of these currents as rip currents produced erosive channel inlets and caused to carry fine grain into the deeper regions of the basin. Based on this sedimentary model we introduced longshore currents as a probable agent for mixing, by transporting some volumes of sands into the adjacent carbonate environments. Vertically, clastic units of Khan Formation underlined by carbonate units of a tidal flat and high-energy inner ramp system. Repeating of this pattern produced 3 cycles in each section. Cyclic evolution, in studied sections, is accompanied with discrepancy in erosion and sedimentation. These factors caused to disperse local sub-aerial exposures in successions which are recognizable by laterite and conglomerate interbeds. These horizons of sub-aerial exposures are more often in Chahroof section than in Cheshmeh Bakhshi section and indicate more fluctuations of relative sea level probably due to more local tectonic activity in the northern part of the Kalmard fault than in the southern part of it. Also, thicker siliciclastic units in Chahroof section show higher rate of sediment supply and/or more accommodation space

  20. Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has been publishing monthly storage information for years. In order to address the need for more timely information, in 1994 the American Gas Association (AGA) began publishing weekly storage levels. Both the EIA and the AGA series provide estimates of the total working gas in storage, but use significantly different methodologies.

  1. Crowdsourcing the Unknown: The Satellite Search for Genghis Khan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Albert Yu-Min; Huynh, Andrew; Lanckriet, Gert; Barrington, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Massively parallel collaboration and emergent knowledge generation is described through a large scale survey for archaeological anomalies within ultra-high resolution earth-sensing satellite imagery. Over 10K online volunteers contributed 30K hours (3.4 years), examined 6,000 km2, and generated 2.3 million feature categorizations. Motivated by the search for Genghis Khan's tomb, participants were tasked with finding an archaeological enigma that lacks any historical description of its potential visual appearance. Without a pre-existing reference for validation we turn towards consensus, defined by kernel density estimation, to pool human perception for “out of the ordinary” features across a vast landscape. This consensus served as the training mechanism within a self-evolving feedback loop between a participant and the crowd, essential driving a collective reasoning engine for anomaly detection. The resulting map led a National Geographic expedition to confirm 55 archaeological sites across a vast landscape. A increased ground-truthed accuracy was observed in those participants exposed to the peer feedback loop over those whom worked in isolation, suggesting collective reasoning can emerge within networked groups to outperform the aggregate independent ability of individuals to define the unknown. PMID:25549335

  2. Alteration of P-type calcium channel gating by the spider toxin omega-Aga-IVA.

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, S I; Mintz, I M; Bean, B P

    1997-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of inhibition of P-type calcium channels in rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons by the peptide toxin omega-Aga-IVA. Saturating concentrations of omega-Aga-IVA (> 50 nM) inhibited inward current carried by 2-5 mM Ba almost completely. However, outward current at depolarizations of > +60 mV, carried by internal Cs, was inhibited much less, as was the tail current after such depolarizations. omega-Aga-IVA shifted the midpoint of the tail current activation curve by about +50 mV and made the curve less steep. The inactivation curve was also shifted in the depolarized direction and was made less steep. With omega-Aga-IVA, channels activated more slowly and deactivated more quickly than in control. Trains of repeated large depolarizations relieved the inhibition of current (as tested with moderate depolarizations), probably reflecting the unbinding of toxin. The relief of inhibition was faster with increasing depolarization, but did not require internal permeant ions. We conclude that omega-Aga-IVA alters voltage-dependent gating by stabilizing closed states of the channel and that omega-Aga-IVA dissociates much more rapidly from open channels than from closed. PMID:9129813

  3. A Case Study for Teaching Quantitative Biochemical Buffer Problems Using Group Work and "Khan Style" Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreto, Jose; Reilly, John; Brown, David; Frost. Laura; Coticone, Sulekha Rao; Dubetz, Terry Ann; Beharry, Zanna; Davis-McGibony, C. Michele; Ramoutar, Ria; Rudd, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    New technological developments have minimized training, hardware expense, and distribution problems for the production and use of instructional videos, and any science instructor can now make instructional videos for their classes. We created short "Khan style" videos for the topic of buffers in biochemistry and assigned them as…

  4. Shaping Influences on the Leadership of Genghis Khan, George Washington, and Nelson Mandela: Applications for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bongila, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Using a prosopographical methodology this study examines common leadership influences that might have existed among Genghis Khan, George Washington, and Nelson Mandela. Shoup (2005) suggests that the following seven influences have contributed to nurturing the leadership of 12 renowned individuals: involved parents, happy childhood, formal,…

  5. Parents' Attitude toward Daughters' Education in Tribal Area of Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzdar, Muhammad Ayub; Ali, Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    The paper aimed to investigate the parents' attitudes toward their daughters' education in tribal areas of district Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan). To achieve the objectives four research questions were established. Focus of the questions was to examine the significance of girls' education for tribal parents. Existing and expected role of tribal…

  6. AGA: Interactive pipeline for reproducible gene expression and DNA methylation data analyses.

    PubMed

    Considine, Michael; Parker, Hilary; Wei, Yingying; Xia, Xaio; Cope, Leslie; Ochs, Michael; Fertig, Elana

    2015-01-01

    Automated Genomics Analysis (AGA) is an interactive program to analyze high-throughput genomic data sets on a variety of platforms. An easy to use, point and click, guided pipeline is implemented to combine, define, and compare datasets, and customize their outputs. In contrast to other automated programs, AGA enables flexible selection of sample groups for comparison from complex sample annotations. Batch correction techniques are also included to further enable the combination of datasets from diverse studies in this comparison. AGA also allows users to save plots, tables and data, and log files containing key portions of the R script run for reproducible analyses. The link between the interface and R supports collaborative research, enabling advanced R users to extend preliminary analyses generated from bioinformatics novices.

  7. AGA: Interactive pipeline for reproducible gene expression and DNA methylation data analyses

    PubMed Central

    Considine, Michael; Parker, Hilary; Wei, Yingying; Xia, Xaio; Cope, Leslie; Ochs, Michael; Fertig, Elana

    2015-01-01

    Automated Genomics Analysis (AGA) is an interactive program to analyze high-throughput genomic data sets on a variety of platforms. An easy to use, point and click, guided pipeline is implemented to combine, define, and compare datasets, and customize their outputs. In contrast to other automated programs, AGA enables flexible selection of sample groups for comparison from complex sample annotations. Batch correction techniques are also included to further enable the combination of datasets from diverse studies in this comparison. AGA also allows users to save plots, tables and data, and log files containing key portions of the R script run for reproducible analyses. The link between the interface and R supports collaborative research, enabling advanced R users to extend preliminary analyses generated from bioinformatics novices. PMID:26535111

  8. Efficient expression of gene variants that harbour AGA codons next to the initiation codon

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-Romo, Efraín; Cruz-Vera, Luis Rogelio; Vivanco-Domínguez, Serafín; Magos-Castro, Marco Antonio; Guarneros, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to improve the knowledge about the rules which direct the effect of the early ORF sequences on translation efficiency, we have analyzed the effect of pairs of the six arginine codons at the second and third positions on the expression of lacZ variants. Whereas the pairs of identical AGA or AGG codons were favorable for the gene expression, identical pairs of each of the four CGN codons were very inefficient. This result was unexpected because tandems of AGA or AGG codons located in more internal gene positions provoke deficient expression whilst internally located CGU and CGC are the most abundant and efficiently translated arginine codons. The mixed combinations of AGA and each of the CGN codons usually resulted in efficient rates of lacZ expression independently of the peptidyl-tRNA propensity to dissociate from the ribosome. Thus, the variant harboring the pair of AGA codons was expressed as efficiently as the variant carrying a pair of AAA codons in the same positions, a configuration reported as one of the most common and efficient for gene expression. We explain these results assuming that the presence of adenines in these early positions enhance gene expression. As expected, specific mRNA levels correlated with the intensity of lacZ expression for each variant. However, the induction of lacZ AGA AGA gene in pth cells accumulated peptidyl-tRNAArg4 as well as a short 5′-proximal lacZ mRNA fragment suggesting ribosome stalling due to depletion of aminoacylated-tRNAArg4. PMID:17726048

  9. A 6-year Evaluation of 223 Tapered Dental Implants and associated prosthesis in 92 patients at a University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Sana Ehsen; Khan, Farhan Raza; Ali, Rabia

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the retrospective study was to assess the clinical and radiographic outcome of the dental implant surgery and prosthetics. It was conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised of medical charts and radiographic records of patients visiting between 2010 and 2015. Variables such as implant dimensions, final prosthesis, method of retention, loading protocol and patient factors were analysed. A total of 223 implants (143(64.1%) in maxilla and 80(35.9%) in mandible) were placed in 92 subjects (50(54.3%) males and 42(45.7%) females). All implants were Zimmer tapered screw-vent. Length of 108(48.4%) implants was 11.5mm and diameter of 84(37.7%) implants was 4.7mm. Besides, 6(2.7%) implants failed to osseointegrate, whereas 1(0.4%) implant failed at 12 months of loading. Among the 216(96.9%) successful implants, 140(64.8%) served as bridge abutments, 72(33.3%) were single crown abutments and 4(1.9%) were overdenture abutments. Also, 37(17.1%) implants were immediately loaded. The six-year survival rate of implants was 96.9%.

  10. Effect of different plant spacing on the production of cauliflower (Brassica oleraceae var. Botrytis) under the agro-climatic conditions of D.I. Khan.

    PubMed

    Mujeeb-ur-Rahman; Iqbal, Muhammad; Jilani, Muhammad Saleem; Waseem, Kashif

    2007-12-15

    A research project to evaluate the effect of different plant spacing on the production of cauliflower was conducted at Horticulture Research Area, Faculty of Agriculture, Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan, NWFP, Pakistan. Six different plant spacing viz., 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 cm were used. The results revealed significant variations in all the parameters and amongst various plant spacing, 45 cm spacing showed the best response for all the parameters. Maximum plant height (49.33 cm), curd diameter (19.13 cm), maximum curd weight (1.23 kg plant(-1)) and yield (30.77 t ha(-1)) were recorded in the plots where the plants were spaced 45 cm apart.

  11. Ex-vivo assessment and non-invasive in vivo imaging of internal hemorrhages in Aga2/+ mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolayev, Vladimir; Cohrs, Christian M.; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Aga2/+ mice, model for Osteogenesis imperfecta, have type I collagen mutation. ► Aga2/+ mice display both moderate and severe phenotypes lethal 6–11th postnatal. ► Internal hemorrhages studied in Aga2/+ vs. control mice at 6 and 9 days postnatal. ► Anatomical and functional findings in-vivo contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance. -- Abstract: Mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1/2) typically lead to Osteogenesis imperfecta, the most common heritable cause of skeletal fractures and bone deformation in humans. Heterozygous Col1a1{sup Aga2/+}, animals with a dominant mutation in the terminal C-propeptide domain of type I collagen develop typical skeletal hallmarks and internal hemorrhages starting from 6 day after birth. The disease progression for Aga2/+ mice, however, is not uniform differing between severe phenotype lethal at the 6–11th day of life, and moderate-to-severe one with survival to adulthood. Herein we investigated whether a new modality that combines X-ray computer tomography with fluorescence tomography in one hybrid system can be employed to study internal bleedings in relation to bone fractures and obtain insights into disease progression. The disease phenotype was characterized on Aga2/+ vs. wild type mice between 6 and 9 days postnatal. Anatomical and functional findings obtained in-vivo were contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance of the same tissues under cryo-slicing.

  12. Evaluation of AGA and Fukuoka Guidelines for EUS and surgical resection of incidental pancreatic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alexander; Kadiyala, Vivek; Lee, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Management of asymptomatic pancreatic cysts is challenging. Guidelines by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) and International Association of Pancreatology (Fukuoka) seek to identify high-risk patients. We assessed performance of these guidelines in selecting patients for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and/or surgery. Methods PART I – We retrospectively studied 143 asymptomatic cysts with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) followed by EUS. Appropriate selection for EUS was defined as: malignant cytology or surgical pathology, or development of concerning features on MRI as defined by the guidelines. PART II – We retrospectively studied 152 resected cysts to assess the performance of guidelines in selecting cysts for surgery using malignant histology as the outcome. Results PART I – Of 143 EUS, 43 (30.1 %) were male with median age 65.0 years (interquartile range [IQR] 58.0 – 73.0). AGA guideline demonstrated lower sensitivity (17.6 % versus 35.3 %, P = 0.03), higher specificity (94.5 % versus 66.1 %, p < 0.001), and higher accuracy (76.2 % versus 58.7 %, P = 0.002) than Fukuoka. There was no difference in positive predictive value (50.0 % versus 24.5 %, P = 0.15) and negative predictive value (78.6 % versus 76.6 %, p=0.75). PART II – Of 152 resected cysts, 45 (29.8 %) were male with median age 59.0 years (IQR 47.3 – 66.7). There was no difference in performance characteristics of the guidelines in selecting cysts for surgery. AGA and Fukuoka guidelines missed 25.0 % and 18.8 % of malignant cysts, respectively (P = 1.00). Conclusions For referral to EUS, the AGA guideline was highly specific compared to Fukuoka; both suffered from poor sensitivity, although the Fukuoka guideline was relatively more sensitive than AGA. For referral to surgery, both guidelines have modest sensitivity and specificity and miss a similar percentage of malignant lesions. PMID:28210708

  13. Extracellular production of a novel endo-β-agarase AgaA from Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103 that cleaves agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Pang-Hung; Wei, Chien-Han; Lu, Wen-Jung; Shen, Fen; Pan, Chorng-Liang; Lin, Hong-Ting Victor

    2015-03-11

    The gene agaA, of the isolated marine bacterium Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103, comprised 2958-bp nucleotides encoding a putative agarase AgaA of 985 amino acids, which was predicted to contain a signal peptide of 29 amino acids in the N-terminus, a catalytic domain of glycoside hydrolase 16 (GH16) family, a bacterial immunoglobulin group 2 (Big 2), and three carbohydrate binding modules 6 (CBM 6). The gene agaA was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the optimum temperatures for AgaA overexpression were 16, 20 and 24 °C. The agaA was cloned without its signal peptide for cytosolic production overexpression, whereas it was cloned with the heterologous signal peptide PelB and its endogenous signal peptide for periplasmic and extracellular productions, respectively. Extracellular and periplasmic rAgaA showed greater activity than that of cytosolic rAgaA, indicating that membrane translocation of AgaA may encourage proper protein folding. Time-course hydrolysis of agarose by rAgaA was accomplished and the products were analyzed using thin layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption inoization-time of flight mass spectrometry, indicating that AgaA from P. vesicularis was an endo-type β-1,4 agarase that cleaved agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose as the final products.

  14. Extracellular Production of a Novel Endo-β-Agarase AgaA from Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103 that Cleaves Agarose into Neoagarotetraose and Neoagarohexaose

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pang-Hung; Wei, Chien-Han; Lu, Wen-Jung; Shen, Fen; Pan, Chorng-Liang; Lin, Hong-Ting Victor

    2015-01-01

    The gene agaA, of the isolated marine bacterium Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103, comprised 2958-bp nucleotides encoding a putative agarase AgaA of 985 amino acids, which was predicted to contain a signal peptide of 29 amino acids in the N-terminus, a catalytic domain of glycoside hydrolase 16 (GH16) family, a bacterial immunoglobulin group 2 (Big 2), and three carbohydrate binding modules 6 (CBM 6). The gene agaA was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the optimum temperatures for AgaA overexpression were 16, 20 and 24 °C. The agaA was cloned without its signal peptide for cytosolic production overexpression, whereas it was cloned with the heterologous signal peptide PelB and its endogenous signal peptide for periplasmic and extracellular productions, respectively. Extracellular and periplasmic rAgaA showed greater activity than that of cytosolic rAgaA, indicating that membrane translocation of AgaA may encourage proper protein folding. Time-course hydrolysis of agarose by rAgaA was accomplished and the products were analyzed using thin layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption inoization-time of flight mass spectrometry, indicating that AgaA from P. vesicularis was an endo-type β-1,4 agarase that cleaved agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose as the final products. PMID:25768342

  15. Biodiversity and importance of floating weeds of Dara Ismail, Khan District of KPK, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Marwat, Sarfaraz Khan; Khan, Mir Ajab; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    The present paper is based on the results of taxonomic research work conducted in Dera Ismail Khan District of KPK, Pakistan, during 2005 - 2007. The area was extensively surveyed in order to collect floating aquatic weeds. From the study area 11 floating aquatic weed species belonging to 9 genera and 9 families were collected and identified in the light of available literature. These plants include Bryophytes: 1 species, Ricciocarpus natans (L.) Corda; Pteridophytes: 2 species, Azolla pinnata R.Br. and Marselia quadrifolia L., and Spermatophytes: 8 species, Lemna aequinoctialis Welw., L. gibba L., Marselia quadrifoliata L. Nelumbo nucifera Gaerth., Nymphoides cristata (Roxb.) O. Ketze. Nymphoides indica (L.) Kuntze:, Pistia stratiotes L. Potamogeton nodosus Poiret and Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid. Floating weeds on one hand cause serious problems and on the other hand they are used for various purposes. Data inventory consists of botanical name, family, major group, habit and habitat, flowering period, availability, distribution in D.I.Khan, Pakistan and world, beneficial and harmful effects. Key to the floating aquatic species of the area was developed for easy and correct identification and differentiation.

  16. Gastroparesis and Functional Dyspepsia: Excerpts from the AGA/ANMS Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Parkman, Henry P.; Camilleri, Michael; Farrugia, Gianrico; McCallum, Richard W.; Bharucha, Adil E.; Mayer, Emeran A.; Tack, Jan F.; Spiller, Robin; Horowitz, Michael; Vinik, Aaron I.; Galligan, James J.; Pasricha, P. Jay; Kuo, Braden; Szarka, Lawrence A.; Marciani, Luca; Jones, Karen; Parrish, Carol Rees; Sandroni, Paola; Abell, Thomas; Ordog, Tamas; Hasler, William; Koch, Kenneth L.; Sanders, Kenton; Norton, Nancy J.; Hamilton, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Despite the relatively high prevelance of gastroparesis and functional dyspepsia, the etiology and pathophysiology of these disorders remain incompletely understood. Similarly, the diagnostic and treatment options for these two disorders are relatively limited despite recent advances in our understanding of both disorders. This manuscript reviews the advances in the understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of gastroparesis and functional dyspepsia as discussed at a recent conference sponsored by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) and the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society (ANMS). Particular focus is placed on discussing unmet needs and areas for future research. PMID:20003077

  17. [The predictive value of antigliadin antibodies (AGA) in the diagnosis of non-celiac gastrointestinal disease in children].

    PubMed

    Bottaro, G; Failla, P; Rotolo, N; Azzaro, F; Spina, M; Castiglione, N; Patané, R

    1993-03-01

    Recent antigliadin antibody (AGA) determination has become an important diagnostic tool in coeliac disease (CD). Although this test has high sensibility for the disease, it is less specific, especially for IgG class, because of its having been found in some acute and chronic common intestinal childhood diseases. We studied the behaviour of AGA, IgA and IgG, in 234 children affected by various gastrointestinal diseases, comparing the results with those obtained in 125 coeliac children and 788 normal children. The intestinal diseases were as follows: irritable bowel syndrome, cow's milk protein intolerance, acute infectious diarrhoea, parasitosis, lactase deficiency, recurrent abdominal pain, cystic fibrosis, chronic constipation, gastroesophageal reflux, intestinal lymphangiectasia, chronic intractable diarrhoea and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia. Our results showed that while AGA-IgA were absent in all children studied, with the exception of 3 cases of acute diarrhoea, a moderate percentage of AGA-IgG was observed in subjects with cow's milk protein intolerance, acute diarrhoea, irritable bowel syndrome, lactase deficiency, chronic intractable diarrhoea and in a low percentage of children with parasitosis, intestinal lymphangiectasia and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia. There was no antibody movement in subjects with cystic fibrosis, gastroesophageal reflux, recurrent abdominal pains and chronic constipation. The different behaviour of the two antibody classes could be explained by the fact that AGA-IgG were detected in diseases where scattered areas of mucosal damage could allow the permeability of the macromolecules inducing passage of gliadin through the mucosal barrier and immune system-induced antibody stimulation.

  18. Ancient DNA analysis of human remains from the Upper Capital City of Kublai Khan.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuqin; Xie, Chengzhi; Xu, Xuelian; Li, Chunxiang; Zhang, Quanchao; Zhou, Hui; Zhu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of DNA from human archaeological remains is a powerful tool for reconstructing ancient events in human history. To help understand the origin of the inhabitants of Kublai Khan's Upper Capital in Inner Mongolia, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms in 21 ancient individuals buried in the Zhenzishan cemetery of the Upper Capital. MtDNA coding and noncoding region polymorphisms identified in the ancient individuals were characteristic of the Asian mtDNA haplogroups A, B, N9a, C, D, Z, M7b, and M. Phylogenetic analysis of the ancient mtDNA sequences, and comparison with extant reference populations, revealed that the maternal lineages of the population buried in the Zhenzishan cemetery are of Asian origin and typical of present-day Han Chinese, despite the presence of typical European morphological features in several of the skeletons.

  19. Distribution and Xe129 NMR chemical shifts of Xen clusters in the alpha cages of zeolite AgA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Lim, Hyung-Mi

    1997-09-01

    The distributions and 129Xe NMR chemical shifts of xenon in zeolite AgA have been measured in a series of experiments by Moudrakovski, Ratcliffe, and Ripmeester [Proc. Internat. Zeolite Conference, Quebec, 1995; unpublished]. We carry out grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of xenon in a rigid zeolite AgA lattice to provide the average Xen cluster shifts, and the distributions Pn for comparison with their experiments. The GCMC results for the distributions, the fraction Pn of the alpha cages containing n Xe atoms, are compared with the experimental distributions in 12 samples and the agreement is excellent. The distributions in NaA and in AgA are very similar, as can be established from the comparison of the dispersion of the distributions, {-2}, and both are different from the idealized hypergeometric distribution, in which the component atoms occupy eight lattice sites per cage under mutual exclusion. The calculated chemical shift increments [σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]AgA are in good agreement with experiment. The differences between these and the increments in zeolite NaA, {[σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]AgA-[σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]NaA}, are fairly small and are in good agreement with experiment. The absolute 129Xe chemical shifts of Xen in the alpha cages of AgA are nearly uniformly shifted by about 40 ppm compared to the Xen clusters in NaA. This is attributed to the Fermi contact shifts arising from the Ag0 metal atoms that form the linear Ag32+ complexes that are found within the beta cages of AgA.

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel beta-agarase, AgaB, from marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. CY24.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cuiping; Lu, Xinzhi; Shi, Chao; Li, Jingbao; Gu, Yuchao; Ma, Yiming; Chu, Yan; Han, Feng; Gong, Qianhong; Yu, Wengong

    2007-02-09

    Agarases are generally classified into glycoside hydrolase families 16, 50, and 86 and are found to degrade agarose to frequently generate neoagarobiose, neoagarotetraose, or neoagarohexaose as the main products. In this study we have cloned a novel endo-type beta-agarase gene, agaB, from marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. CY24. The novel agarase encoded by agaB gene has no significant sequence similarity with any known proteins including all glycoside hydrolases. It degrades agarose to generate neoagarooctaose and neoagarodecaose as the main end products. Based on the analyses of enzymatic kinetics and degradation patterns of different oligosaccharides, the agarase AgaB appears to have a large substrate binding cleft that accommodates 12 sugar units, with 8 sugar units toward the reducing end spanning subsites +1 to +8 and 4 sugar units toward the non-reducing end spanning subsites -4 to -1, and enzymatic cleavage taking place between subsites -1 and +1. In addition, 1H NMR analysis shows that this enzyme hydrolyzes the glycosidic bond with inversion of anomeric configuration, in contrast to other known agarases that are retaining. Altogether, AgaB is structurally and functionally different from other known agarases and appears to represent a new family of glycoside hydrolase.

  1. A simple algorithm for optimization and model fitting: AGA (asexual genetic algorithm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantó, J.; Curiel, S.; Martínez-Gómez, E.

    2009-07-01

    Context: Mathematical optimization can be used as a computational tool to obtain the optimal solution to a given problem in a systematic and efficient way. For example, in twice-differentiable functions and problems with no constraints, the optimization consists of finding the points where the gradient of the objective function is zero and using the Hessian matrix to classify the type of each point. Sometimes, however it is impossible to compute these derivatives and other type of techniques must be employed such as the steepest descent/ascent method and more sophisticated methods such as those based on the evolutionary algorithms. Aims: We present a simple algorithm based on the idea of genetic algorithms (GA) for optimization. We refer to this algorithm as AGA (asexual genetic algorithm) and apply it to two kinds of problems: the maximization of a function where classical methods fail and model fitting in astronomy. For the latter case, we minimize the chi-square function to estimate the parameters in two examples: the orbits of exoplanets by taking a set of radial velocity data, and the spectral energy distribution (SED) observed towards a YSO (Young Stellar Object). Methods: The algorithm AGA may also be called genetic, although it differs from standard genetic algorithms in two main aspects: a) the initial population is not encoded; and b) the new generations are constructed by asexual reproduction. Results: Applying our algorithm in optimizing some complicated functions, we find the global maxima within a few iterations. For model fitting to the orbits of exoplanets and the SED of a YSO, we estimate the parameters and their associated errors.

  2. Molecular Genealogy of a Mongol Queen’s Family and Her Possible Kinship with Genghis Khan

    PubMed Central

    Lkhagvasuren, Gavaachimed; Shin, Heejin; Lee, Si Eun; Tumen, Dashtseveg; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kyung-Yong; Kim, Kijeong; Park, Ae Ja; Lee, Ho Woon; Kim, Mi Jin; Choi, Jaesung; Choi, Jee-Hye; Min, Na Young

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Mongol imperial family (designated the Golden family) are buried in a secret necropolis; therefore, none of their burial grounds have been found. In 2004, we first discovered 5 graves belonging to the Golden family in Tavan Tolgoi, Eastern Mongolia. To define the genealogy of the 5 bodies and the kinship among them, SNP and/or STR profiles of mitochondria, autosomes, and Y chromosomes were analyzed. Four of the 5 bodies were determined to carry the mitochondrial DNA haplogroup D4, while the fifth carried haplogroup CZ, indicating that this individual had no kinship with the others. Meanwhile, Y-SNP and Y-STR profiles indicate that the males examined belonged to the R1b-M343 haplogroup. Thus, their East Asian D4 or CZ matrilineal and West Eurasian R1b-M343 patrilineal origins reveal genealogical admixture between Caucasoid and Mongoloid ethnic groups, despite a Mongoloid physical appearance. In addition, Y chromosomal and autosomal STR profiles revealed that the four D4-carrying bodies bore the relationship of either mother and three sons or four full siblings with almost the same probability. Moreover, the geographical distribution of R1b-M343-carrying modern-day individuals demonstrates that descendants of Tavan Tolgoi bodies today live mainly in Western Eurasia, with a high frequency in the territories of the past Mongol khanates. Here, we propose that Genghis Khan and his family carried Y-haplogroup R1b-M343, which is prevalent in West Eurasia, rather than the Y-haplogroup C3c-M48, which is prevalent in Asia and which is widely accepted to be present in the family members of Genghis Khan. Additionally, Tavan Tolgoi bodies may have been the product of marriages between the lineage of Genghis Khan’s Borjigin clan and the lineage of either the Ongud or Hongirad clans, indicating that these individuals were members of Genghis Khan’s immediate family or his close relatives. PMID:27627454

  3. Overexpression and secretion of AgaA7 from Pseudoalteromonas hodoensis sp. nov in Bacillus subtilis for the depolymerization of agarose.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Kristine Rose M; Valdehuesa, Kris Niño G; Cabulong, Rhudith B; Moron, Llewelyn S; Nisola, Grace M; Hong, Soon-Kwang; Lee, Won-Keun; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2016-08-01

    Interest in agar or agarose-based pharmaceutical products has driven the search for potent agarolytic enzymes. An extracellular β-agarase (AgaA7) recently isolated from Pseudoalteromonas hodoensis sp. nov was expressed in Bacillus subtilis, which was chosen due to its capability to overproduce and secrete functional enzymes. Phenotypic analysis showed that the engineered B. subtilis secreted a functional AgaA7 when fused with the aprE signal peptide (SP) at the amino-terminus. The maximum agarolytic activity was observed during the late logarithmic phase. To further improve the secretion of AgaA7, an expression library of AgaA7 fused to different naturally occurring B. subtilis SPs was created. The amount of AgaA7 secreted by the clones was compared through activity assay, immuno-blot, and purification via affinity chromatography. Although the aprE SP can readily facilitate the secretion of AgaA7, other SPs such as yqgA, pel, and lipA were relatively more efficient. Among these SPs, lipA was the most efficient in improving the secretion of AgaA7.The use of B. subtilis as host for the expression and secretion of agarolytic and other hydrolytic enzymes can be a useful tool in the field of white biotechnology.

  4. Google, Mathletics and Khan Academy: students' self-initiated use of online mathematical resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Tracey

    2014-12-01

    Today's students increasingly engage in online environments, with ready access to digital resources and mobile technologies. While much of this activity is socially motivated, the internet is also a source of knowledge for students and frequently accessed for school assignments, projects and assessment purposes. As mathematics continues to be an area in which many students experience difficulties, it is not surprising that a recent Google search produced 57,600,000 results for `help with mathematics'. Current research, however, is limited in terms of documenting students' use of such resources, particularly when they are self-initiated and often accessed in an out of classroom environment. This paper reports on a study that investigated the use of mathematical online resources accessed by students in Grades 5-9, with a particular focus on evaluating the effectiveness of Khan Academy, an online tutorial site. Data collected through surveys and interviews showed that while students did access online sites, particularly in the later years of schooling, they varied in both their reasons for doing so and their perceptions of how useful these sites were. The findings add to the limited research in this area and have practical implications for students and teachers, including the potential to challenge the traditional role of the teacher.

  5. Cloning, Expression, and Biochemical Characterization of a Novel Acidic GH16 β-Agarase, AgaJ11, from Gayadomonas joobiniege G7.

    PubMed

    Jung, Subin; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Hong, Soon-Kwang; Lee, Chang-Ro

    2017-03-01

    A novel β-agarase AgaJ11 belonging to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) 16 family was identified from an agar-degrading bacterium Gayadomonas joobiniege G7. AgaJ11 was composed of 317 amino acids (35 kDa), including a 26-amino acid signal peptide, and had the highest similarity (44 % identity) to a putative β-agarase from an agarolytic marine bacterium Agarivorans albus MKT 106. The agarase activity of purified AgaJ11 was confirmed by zymogram analysis. The optimum pH and temperature for AgaJ11 activity were determined to be 4.5 and 40 °C, respectively. Notably, AgaJ11 is an acidic β-agarase that was active only at a narrow pH range from 4 to 5, and less than 30 % of its enzymatic activity was retained at other pH conditions. The K m and V max of AgaJ11 for agarose were 21.42 mg/ml and 25 U/mg, respectively. AgaJ11 did not require metal ions for its activity, but severe inhibition by several metal ions was observed. Thin layer chromatography and agarose-liquefying analyses revealed that AgaJ11 is an endo-type β-agarase that hydrolyzes agarose into neoagarohexaose, neoagarotetraose, and neoagarobiose. Therefore, this study shows that AgaJ11 from G. joobiniege G7 is a novel GH16 β-agarase with an acidic enzymatic feature that may be useful for industrial applications.

  6. Evaluation of the 2015 AGA guidelines on pancreatic cystic neoplasms in a large surgically confirmed multicenter cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Phillip S.; Muthusamy, V. Raman; Gaddam, Srinivas; Jaiyeola, Diana-Marie; Kim, Stephen; Sedarat, Alireza; Donahue, Timothy R.; Hosford, Lindsay; Wilson, Robert H.; Grande, David P.; Keswani, Rajesh N.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.; Mullady, Daniel; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Early, Dayna S.; Komanduri, Srinadh; Wani, Sachin; Watson, Rabindra R.

    2017-01-01

    Absract Background and study aims The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) recently published guidelines for the management of asymptomatic pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs). We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic characteristics of the AGA guidelines in appropriately recommending surgery for malignant PCNs. Patients and methods A retrospective multicenter study was performed of patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for evaluation of PCNs who ultimately underwent surgical resection from 2004 – 2014. Demographics, EUS characteristics, fine-needle aspiration (FNA) results, type of resection, and final pathologic diagnosis were recorded. Patients were categorized into 2 groups (surgery or surveillance) based on what the AGA guidelines would have recommended. Performance characteristics for the diagnosis of cancer or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) on surgical pathology were calculated. Results Three hundred patients underwent surgical resection for PCNs, of whom the AGA guidelines would have recommended surgery in 121 (40.3 %) and surveillance in 179 (59.7 %) patients. Among patients recommended for surgery, 45 (37.2 %) had cancer, whereas 76 (62.8 %) had no cancer/HGD. Among patients recommended for surveillance, 170 (95.0 %) had no cancer/HGD; however, 9 (5.0 %) patients had cancer that would have been missed. For the finding of cancer/HGD on surgical pathology, the AGA guidelines had 83.3 % sensitivity (95 % CI 70.7 – 92.1), 69.1 % specificity (95 % CI 62.9 – 74.8), 37.2 % positive predictive value (95 % CI 28.6 – 46.4), 95.0 % negative predictive value (95 % CI 90.7 – 97.7), and 71.7 % accuracy (95 % CI 67.4 – 74.6). Conclusions The 2015 AGA guidelines would have resulted in 60 % fewer patients being referred for surgical resection, and accurately recommended surveillance in 95 % of patients with asymptomatic PCNs. Future prospective studies are required to validate

  7. Investigating Learning Strategies for Vocabulary Development: A Comparative Study of Two Universities of Quetta, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatima, Irum; Pathan, Zahid Hussain

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research is to investigate the vocabulary learning strategies employed by the undergraduate students of Sardar Bahadur Khan Women's University (SBKWU) and University of Balochistan (UOB), Quetta, Pakistan. A quantitative design was employed in this study to answer the two research questions of the present study. The…

  8. Reclassification of Koreibacter algae as a later heterotypic synonym of Paraoerskovia marina and emended descriptions of the genus Paraoerskovia Khan et al. 2009 and of Paraoerskovia marina Khan et al. 2009.

    PubMed

    Schumann, P; Pukall, R; Spröer, C; Stackebrandt, E

    2013-01-01

    16S rRNA gene sequences deposited for the type strains of Paraoerskovia marina (CTT-37(T); GenBank accession no. AB445007) and Koreibacter algae (DSW-2(T); FM995611) show a similarity of 100 %. Consequently, the type strains were subjected to a polyphasic recharacterization under direct comparison in order to clarify their taxonomic position. PvuII RiboPrint patterns and quantitative ratios of cellular fatty acids revealed strain-specific differences between P. marina DSM 21750(T) ( = CTT-37(T)) and K. algae DSM 22126(T) ( = DSW-2(T)). The percentage of DNA-DNA binding of 94 % indicated that the two type strains belong to the same genomospecies. Agreement in the peptidoglycan structure and polar lipid pattern, highly similar fatty acid profiles and MALDI-TOF mass spectra, the ability to produce acid from the same carbon sources, corresponding enzymic activities and DNA G+C contents of 70.8 ± 0.3 mol%, in addition to the consistent characteristics reported in the original descriptions, support the view that the two strains should be affiliated to the same species. According to Rules 38 and 42 of the Bacteriological Code, Koreibacter algae should be reclassified as later heterotypic synonym of Paraoerskovia marina, and the descriptions of the genus Paraoerskovia Khan et al. 2009 and of Paraoerskovia marina Khan et al. 2009 are emended accordingly.

  9. Medicinal uses of honey (Quranic medicine) and its bee flora from Dera Ismail Khan District, KPK, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Marwat, Sarfaraz Khan; Khan, Muhammad Aslam; Rehman, Fazalur; Khan, Kaleemullah

    2013-03-01

    This study was carried out during 2005-2008 to identify existing plant species visited by workers of honeybees for nectar and pollen collection in Dera Ismail Khan (D.I.Khan) District, Pakistan. The honeybee species investigated in the area were, rock bee (Apis dorsata F.), little bee (A. florea F.) and European honeybee (A. mellifera L.). A detailed list of 86 plant species both wild and cultivated was prepared, out of which 12 species, Phulai (Acacia modesta Wall.), Sarsoon (Brassica campestris L.), Kaghzi nimboo (Citrus aurantifolia L.), Khatta (C. medica L.), Malta (C. sinensis (L.) Osbeck.), Shisham (Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.), Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.), Barseen (Trifolium alexandrianum L.), Shaftal (T. resupinatum L), Makai (Zea mays L.), Ber (Zizyphus mauritiana Lam.) and Jher beri (Z. numularia (Burm. f.) Wight & Arn.,) were found as major sources (table 1) for the production of surplus honey in a year at different localities in the District. Among the minor sources various plant species were included (table 2). These plants fill the flowering gaps between the major sources in various parts of the year and help in continuous supply of food to honey bees.

  10. Developing Understanding of Innovative Strategies of Teaching Science through Action Research: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis from Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halai, Nelofer

    2012-01-01

    This study is a meta-synthesis of 20 action research studies undertaken in the classroom by teachers to develop their understanding of an innovative strategy for teaching science. The studies were undertaken as part of the requirements for their 2-year M.Ed. program from the Aga Khan University, Institute for Educational Development (AKU-IED),…

  11. Findings and Recommendations From the Joint NIST-AGA Workshop on Odor Masking.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Nancy; Quraishi, Ali; Bruno, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Since the days of the alchemist, the observation that some substances have a smell while other substances do not has been a source of fascination. The sense of smell, or olfaction, is our least understood sense, however it is important for many human functions, including digestion, food selection and hazard avoidance. The detailed explanation of why individual chemicals (called odorants) might have a particular smell is still elusive. The situation with mixtures of odorants is even more complex and interesting. A number of distinct odorant mixture phenomena have been documented. Odorant suppression (sometimes called masking), conjugation (as described first by Zwaadermaker) and cross-adaptation are among a collection of such phenomena. They are related to the differential effects that one odorant species will have when mixed with another. Masking is a term that describes situations in which one odorant can overpower the sensation of another. There may be profound technological implications in a number of industrial sectors, most prominently in the fuel gas sector. Here, masking is suspected when the odorant that is added to natural gas can be detected by analytical instrumentation, but cannot be properly detected by an observer with a normal sense of smell. Note that this phenomenon is distinct from odor fade, which more properly describes a decrease in the concentration of an odorant rather than a decrease, disappearance or qualitative change in the perception of the odor in the absence of a change in absolute concentration. Anecdotal descriptions of masking events in the natural gas industry have persisted for over a decade, with the frequency of such events on the rise. Pursuant to the philosophy that the technological problem cannot be addressed until the basic science is understood, NIST, in collaboration with the American Gas Association (AGA), sponsored a workshop that brought together olfactory scientists and natural gas operations personnel in an effort to

  12. omega-Aga IVA selectively inhibits the calcium-dependent fraction of the evoked release of [3H]GABA from synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Sitges, M; Chiu, L M

    1995-09-01

    The effect of omega-Aga IVA, a P-type Ca2+ channel blocker, on the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and on the elevation of Cai induced by depolarization was investigated in [3H]GABA and fura-2 preloaded mouse brain synaptosomes, respectively. Two strategies (i.e. 20 mM external K+ and veratridine) that depolarize by different mechanisms the preparation were used. High K+ elevates Cai and induces [3H]GABA release in the absence of external Na+ and in the presence of TTX, conditions that abolish veratridine induced responses. The effect of omega-Aga IVA on the Ca2+ and Na+ dependent fractions of the depolarization evoked release of [3H]GABA were separately investigated in synaptosomes depolarized with high K+ in the absence of external Na+ and with veratridine in the absence of external Ca2+, respectively. The Ca2+ dependent fraction of the evoked release of [3H]GABA and the elevation of Ca2+ induced by high K+ are markedly inhibited (about 50%) in synaptosomes exposed to omega-Aga IVA (300 nM) for 3 min before depolarization, whereas the Na+ dependent, Ca2+ independent carrier mediated release of [3H]GABA induced by veratridine, which is sensitive to verapamil and amiloride, is not modified by omega-Aga IVA. Our results indicate that an omega-Aga IVA sensitive type of Ca2+ channel is highly involved in GABA exocytosis.

  13. A tribute to Sheik Humarr Khan and all the healthcare workers in West Africa who have sacrificed in the fight against Ebola virus disease: Mae we hush.

    PubMed

    Bausch, Daniel G; Bangura, James; Garry, Robert F; Goba, Augustine; Grant, Donald S; Jacquerioz, Frederique A; McLellan, Susan L; Jalloh, Simbirie; Moses, Lina M; Schieffelin, John S

    2014-11-01

    The Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Fever Ward in Sierra Leone, directed since 2005 by Dr. Sheikh Humarr Khan, is the only medical unit in the world devoted exclusively to patient care and research of a viral hemorrhagic fever. When Ebola virus disease unexpectedly appeared in West Africa in late 2013 and eventually spread to Kenema, Khan and his fellow healthcare workers remained at their posts, providing care to patients with this devastating illness. Khan and the chief nurse, Mbalu Fonnie, became infected and died at the end of July, a fate that they have sadly shared with more than ten other healthcare workers in Kenema and hundreds across the region. This article pays tribute to Sheik Humarr Khan, Mbalu Fonnie and all the healthcare workers who have acquired Ebola virus disease while fighting the epidemic in West Africa. Besides the emotional losses, the death of so many skilled and experienced healthcare workers will severely impair health care and research in affected regions, which can only be restored through dedicated, long-term programs.

  14. Vaccinia virus A12L protein and its AG/A proteolysis play an important role in viral morphogenic transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Su Jung; Hruby, Dennis E

    2007-01-01

    Like the major vaccinia virus (VV) core protein precursors, p4b and p25K, the 25 kDa VV A12L late gene product (p17K) is proteolytically maturated at the conserved Ala-Gly-Ala motif. However, the association of the precursor and its cleavage product with the core of mature virion suggests that both of the A12L proteins may be required for virus assembly. Here, in order to test the requirement of the A12L protein and its proteolysis in viral replication, a conditional lethal mutant virus (vvtetOA12L) was constructed to regulate A12L expression by the presence or absence of an inducer, tetracycline. In the absence of tetracycline, replication of vvtetOA12L was inhibited by 80% and this inhibition could be overcome by transient expression of the wild-type copy of the A12L gene. In contrast, mutation of the AG/A site abrogated the ability of the transfected A12L gene to rescue, indicating that A12L proteolysis plays an important role in viral replication. Electron microscopy analysis of the A12L deficient virus demonstrated the aberrant virus particles, which were displayed by the AG/A site mutation. Thus, we concluded that the not only A12L protein but also its cleavage processing plays an essential role in virus morphogenic transition. PMID:17625005

  15. Petrography, XRD and Wet Chemistry os Sassanid Rock Reliefs at Khan Tahkti (230 a.d.), Iran : A Case Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniana, Kouros; Shirvanib, Maryam; Bakhshaeia, Hooman

    At Khan Takhti at North West of Iran a sculpted monument commemorating a war waged against the Romans by Shapour I, the second Sassanid king, has been archaeometrically studied. This relief monument carved into the rock in the mountains has faced a considerable destruction process. Petrography, wet chemistry experiments and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were performed to identify rock samples for conservation and preservation purposes. The rock used in this monument is limestone and dolomite. According to XRD analysis, a significant amount of quartz is present in the stone structure. The results of analysis and stone type identification show that a significant quantity of surface sediments and dissolved sulphate, chloride and nitrate salts have been deposited on the surface of the monument due to its proximity to the salty Urmia Lake, which is considered an important factor in the destruction process.

  16. Isolation, characterization, and localization of AgaSGNH cDNA: a new SGNH-motif plant hydrolase specific to Agave americana L. leaf epidermis.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Guerrero, Consuelo; Heredia, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    GDSL and SGNH hydrolases are lipases involved in a wide range of functions, behaving in many cases as bifunctional enzymes. In this work, the isolation and characterization of AgaSGNH, a cDNA encoding a member of the SGNH-hydrolase superfamily from young leaf epidermis of the monocot Agave americana L., is reported. The protein possesses a typical signal peptide at its N-terminus that allows its secretion to the epidermis cell wall, as verified by immunolocalization experiments. In addition, the AgaSGNH sequence contains a His-Leu-Gly-Ala-Glu (HLGAE) motif which is similar to that observed in other plant acyltransferases. Expression levels by northern blot and in situ localization of the corresponding mRNA, as well as the immunolocalization of the protein in Agave young leaves indicate that the protein is specifically present in the epidermal cells. The detailed study performed in different parts of the Agave leaf confirms two aspects: first, the expression of AgaSGNH is limited to the epidermis, and second, the maximum mRNA levels are found in the epidermis of the youngest zones of the leaf which are especially active in cutin biosynthesis. These levels dramatically decrease in the oldest zone of the leaf, where the presence of AgaSGNH mRNA is undetectable, and the biosynthesis of different cuticle components is severely reduced. These data could be compatible with the hypothesis that AgaSGNH could carry out both the hydrolysis and the transfer, from an activated acyl-CoA to a crescent cutin in Agave americana leaves and, therefore, be involved in the still unknown mechanism of plant cutin biosynthesis.

  17. The Y-chromosome C3* star-cluster attributed to Genghis Khan's descendants is present at high frequency in the Kerey clan from Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Abilev, Serikbai; Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Wozniak, Marcin; Grzybowski, Tomasz; Zakharov, Ilya

    2012-02-01

    To verify the possibility that the Y-chromosome C3* star-cluster attributed to Genghis Khan and his patrilineal descendants is relatively frequent in the Kereys, who are the dominant clan in Kazakhstan and in Central Asia as a whole, polymorphism of the Y-chromosome was studied in Kazakhs, represented mostly by members of the Kerey clan. The Kereys showed the highest frequency (76.5%) of individuals carrying the Y-chromosome variant known as C3* star-cluster ascribed to the descendants of Genghis Khan. C3* star-cluster haplotypes were found in two subclans, Abakh-Kereys and Ashmaily-Kereys, diverged about 20-22 generations ago according to the historical data. Median network of the Kerey star-cluster haplotypes at 17 STR loci displays a bipartite structure, with two subclusters defined by the only difference at the DYS448 locus. Noteworthy is a strong correspondence of these subclusters with the Kerey subclans affiliation. The data obtained suggest that the Kerey clan appears to be the largest known clan in the world descending from a common Y-chromosome ancestor. Possible ways of Genghis Khan's relationship to the Kereys are discussed.

  18. Fluoride enrichment in groundwater of semi-arid urban area: Khan Younis City, southern Gaza Strip (Palestine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Jabal, Mohamed Shaban; Abustan, Ismail; Rozaimy, Mohd Remy; Al-Najar, Hussam

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine fluoride enhancement in the groundwater of semi-arid urban area of Khan Younis City, southern Gaza Strip. Physicochemical data for a total of 200 groundwater samples were analyzed. The fluoride concentrations were varied from 0.3 to 6.45 mg/L with average value of 2.87 mg/L. Correlations between fluorides with other measured ions were relatively observed, negative correlation with calcium and the positive correlation with pH, bicarbonate and sodium increase the dissolution/solubility of fluoride bearing minerals, leading to fluoride leaching into the groundwater. Fluoride enrichment in the groundwater of the area is due to water hydrochemistry, mineral-water interaction (mainly calcite and fluorite), fluorite resulted from fluorapatite dissolution. The saturation indexes evaluation indicated that 42% of the samples are over saturated with respect to calcite and 35.5% under saturated with respect to fluorite, while 40.5% approached equilibrium with respect to both calcite and fluorite. At fluoride concentrations of less than 2.2 mg/L fluorite saturation indexes show under-saturation condition for fluorite and at higher fluoride concentrations show near saturation condition.

  19. Association of cord blood des-acyl ghrelin with birth weight, and placental GHS-R1 receptor expression in SGA, AGA, and LGA newborns.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Martha I; Lazo-de-la-Vega-Monroy, Maria-Luisa; Zaina, Silvio; Sabanero, Myrna; Daza-Benítez, Leonel; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Although ghrelin in cord blood has been associated to birth weight, its role in fetal and postnatal growth has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to analyze total ghrelin, acyl ghrelin (AG), and des-acyl ghrelin (DAG) in cord blood of newborns with idiopathic birth weight alterations, and to evaluate protein expression of placental GHS-R1, in order to investigate their correlation with birth weight and placental weight. We performed a cross-sectional comparative study in umbilical cord blood and placentas from healthy mothers of SGA, AGA, and LGA (small, adequate and large for gestational age) term newborns (n = 20 per group). Cord blood total ghrelin, AG, and DAG were measured by ELISA, and placental GHS-R1 expression was evaluated by Western blot. Cord blood DAG was higher in SGA compared to AGA newborns (902.1 ± 109.1 and 597.4 ± 58.2 pg/ml, respectively, p = 0.01) while LGA and AGA showed similar values (627.2 ± 76.4 pg/ml for LGA, p = 0.80). DAG negatively correlated with birthweight (r = -0.31, p = 0.02) and placental weight (r = -0.33, p = 0.02). No differences in AG or total ghrelin were found. GHS-R1 protein in placenta was not differentially expressed among SGA, AGA, and LGA. Our results suggest a role of DAG in intrauterine growth. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which DAG participates in fetal growth.

  20. High-resolution NMR study of a GdAGA tetranucleotide loop that is an improved substrate for ricin, a cytotoxic plant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Orita, M; Nishikawa, F; Kohno, T; Senda, T; Mitsui, Y; Yaeta, E; Kazunari, T; Nishikawa, S

    1996-01-01

    Ricin is a cytotoxic plant protein that inactivates ribosomes by hydrolyzing the N-glycosidic bond at position A4324 in eukaryotic 28S rRNA. Recent studies showed that a four-nucleotide loop, GAGA, can function as a minimum substrate for ricin (the first adenosine corresponds to the site of depurination). We previously clarified the solution structure of this loop by NMR spectroscopy [Orita et al. (1993) Nucleic Acids Res. 21, 5670-5678]. To elucidate further details of the structural basis for recognition of its substrate by ricin, we studied the properties of a synthetic dodecanucleotide, r1C2U3C4A5G6dA7G8A9U10G11A12G (6dA12mer), which forms an RNA hairpin structure with a GdAGA loop and in which the site of depurination is changed from adenosine to 2'-deoxyadenosine. The N-glycosidase activity against the GdAGA loop of the A-chain of ricin was 26 times higher than that against the GAGA loop. NMR studies indicated that the overall structure of the GdAGA loop was similar to that of the GAGA loop with the exception of the sugar puckers of 6dA and 7G. Therefore, it appears that the 2'-hydroxyl group of adenosine at the depurination site (6A) does not participate in the recognition by ricin of the substrate. Since the 2'-hydroxyl group can potentially destabilize the developing positive charge of the putative transition state intermediate, an oxycarbonium ion, the electronic effect may explain, at least in part, the faster rate of depurination of the GdAGA loop compared to that of GAGA loop. We also show that the amino group of 7G is essential for substrate recognition the ricin A-chain. PMID:8604301

  1. Substrate Recognition and Hydrolysis by a Family 50 exo-β-Agarase, Aga50D, from the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans*

    PubMed Central

    Pluvinage, Benjamin; Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2013-01-01

    The bacteria that metabolize agarose use multiple enzymes of complementary specificities to hydrolyze the glycosidic linkages in agarose, a linear polymer comprising the repeating disaccharide subunit of neoagarobiose (3,6-anhydro-l-galactose-α-(1,3)-d-galactose) that are β-(1,4)-linked. Here we present the crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 50 exo-β-agarase, Aga50D, from the marine microbe Saccharophagus degradans. This enzyme catalyzes a critical step in the metabolism of agarose by S. degradans through cleaving agarose oligomers into neoagarobiose products that can be further processed into monomers. The crystal structure of Aga50D to 1.9 Å resolution reveals a (β/α)8-barrel fold that is elaborated with a β-sandwich domain and extensive loops. The structures of catalytically inactivated Aga50D in complex with non-hydrolyzed neoagarotetraose (2.05 Å resolution) and neoagarooctaose (2.30 Å resolution) provide views of Michaelis complexes for a β-agarase. In these structures, the d-galactose residue in the −1 subsite is distorted into a 1S3 skew boat conformation. The relative positioning of the putative catalytic residues are most consistent with a retaining catalytic mechanism. Additionally, the neoagarooctaose complex showed that this extended substrate made substantial interactions with the β-sandwich domain, which resembles a carbohydrate-binding module, thus creating additional plus (+) subsites and funneling the polymeric substrate through the tunnel-shaped active site. A synthesis of these results in combination with an additional neoagarobiose product complex suggests a potential exo-processive mode of action of Aga50D on the agarose double helix. PMID:23921382

  2. Enzymatic liquefaction of agarose above the sol-gel transition temperature using a thermostable endo-type β-agarase, Aga16B.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Yun, Eun Ju; Seo, Nari; Yu, Sora; Kim, Dong Hyun; Cho, Kyung Mun; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae-Han; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2017-02-01

    The main carbohydrate of red macroalgae is agarose, a heterogeneous polysaccharide composed of D-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose. When saccharifying agarose by enzymes, the unique physical properties of agarose, namely the sol-gel transition and the near-insolubility of agarose in water, limit the accessibility of agarose to the enzymes. Due to the lower accessibility of agarose to enzymes in the gel state than to the sol state, it is important to prevent the sol-gel transition by performing the enzymatic liquefaction of agarose at a temperature higher than the sol-gel transition temperature of agarose. In this study, a thermostable endo-type β-agarase, Aga16B, originating from Saccharophagus degradans 2-40(T), was characterized and introduced in the liquefaction process. Aga16B was thermostable up to 50 °C and depolymerized agarose mainly into neoagarooligosaccharides with degrees of polymerization 4 and 6. Aga16B was applied to enzymatic liquefaction of agarose at 45 °C, which was above the sol-gel transition temperature of 1 % (w/v) agarose (∼35 °C) when cooling agarose. This is the first systematic demonstration of enzymatic liquefaction of agarose, enabled by determining the sol-gel temperature of agarose under specific conditions and by characterizing the thermostability of an endo-type β-agarase.

  3. Metabolism of medium- and long-chain fatty acids by isolated hepatocytes from small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and appropriate for-gestational-age (AGA) piglets

    SciTech Connect

    Odle, J.; Benevenga, N.J.; Crenshaw, T.D. )

    1990-02-26

    Hepatocytes were isolated from full-term, SGA and AGA piglets at 6 or 48 hours postpartum and were incubated with 1 mM (1-{sup 14}C)-octanoate (C8), -nonanoate (C9) or-oleate (C18:1). The cells oxidized (natom 1-C/(h 10{sup 6} cells)) C9 to Co{sub 2} (12.5) and acid soluble products (28.9) faster than C8 (10.9, 20.6, respectively), and both were oxidized faster than C18:1 (3.9, 9.9) regardless of the piglet age or weight. Oleate accumulated in lipid products 8-fold faster than C8 and C9. No differences between cells from SGA and AGA piglets were detected. Recovery of 1-C in CO{sub 2} was 48% higher in incubations with cells from 48 hours old than from 6 hour old piglets. This increase was attributable to a 70% higher oxygen consumption by 48 hour old cells. Theoretical oxygen consumption rates were computed from the fatty acid flux data and compared to measured oxygen consumption. hepatocytes from SGA and AGA piglets were equally capable of satisfying more that 57% of their energy needs from fatty acid oxidation. The oxygen consumption attributable to C9 metabolism was 30% higher than observed for C8 and C18:1. All fatty acids apparently spared endogenous fuels to a greater degree in 6 hour than in 48 hour piglets.

  4. The Math of Khan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2013-01-01

    It's like a dream come true for educators: free resources available wherever a web browser can operate and with nary an iota of advertising. What's not to like? What is it about this organization, whose mission is "to provide a free, world-class education for anyone anywhere," that has provoked such vitriol? Part of it is that when its videos have…

  5. Screening for G6PD Deficiency Among Neonates with Neonatal Jaundice Admitted to Tertiary Care Center: A Need in Disguise.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kishwer; Sohaila, Arjumand; Tikmani, Shiyam Sunder; Khan, Iqtidar Ahmed; Zafar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among neonates admitted with jaundice at the neonatal intensive care unit, well baby nursery and neonatal step down nursery of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. A total of 205 neonates following the selection criteria were included. All selected neonates have their venous blood drawn, saved in EDTA bottle and sent to laboratory of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH). The laboratory results of whether G-6-PD deficiency was present or not was recorded in the proforma. G-6-PD was deficient in 19 neonates (9.3%). All neonates were male.

  6. Induction process of trainees in pathology residency

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ali, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the induction process of pathology residency at The Aga Khan University hospital. The Department of Postgraduate Medical Education was established in 1985. The induction process is an exhaustive exercise that includes an admission test held simultaneously in Karachi, Hyderabad, Lahore, and Rawalpindi, followed by an interview of the shortlisted candidates. The pathology residency program was started 25 years ago and since then the induction process has undergone major changes with the course of time. PMID:27313487

  7. Will screening colonoscopy disappear and transform gastroenterology practice? Threats to clinical practice and recommendations to reduce their impact: report of a consensus conference conducted by the AGA Institute Future Trends Committee.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Carol R

    2006-10-01

    The AGA Institute Future Trends Committee (FTC) developed this report based on a consensus conference it convened on April 1-2, 2006, in Washington, DC. The report was prepared for the FTC by Carol Regueiro, MD, a medical writer under contract to the AGA Institute, and Michael Stolar, PhD, staff liaison to the FTC. It was approved by the FTC on July 12, 2006, and accepted by the AGA Institute Governing Board on July 22, 2006. This report reflects the panel's assessment of information available at the time of the conference. Readers should view this report in the context of data that will continue to accumulate and facts that may change after its creation.

  8. Water resources and related geology of Dera Ismail Khan district, West Pakistan, with reference to the availability of ground water for development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, J.W.; Khan, Lutfe Ali; Jawaid, Khalid

    1970-01-01

    Dera Ismail (D.I.) Khan District contains an area of 3,450 square miles between the right bank of the Indus River and the Sulaiman Range in westcentral West Pakistan. Agriculture is the principal source of income in the District, but only a small part of the arable land is fully utilized. The region is semiarid and has an average annual rainfall of about 9 inches and a potential evapotranspirational rate of eight to nine times the annual rainfall. Thus, rainfall alone is not adequate for high-intensity cropping. Irrigation is practiced near the Indus River; the Paharpur Canal is used, as well as the traditional inundation method. Elsewhere in the District, adequate water is supplied to local areas by karezes, perennial streams from the mountains, and some recently installed tubewells (see 'Glossary'). Further development of ground-water supplies would permit a more effective utilization of most of the presently tilled land and would allow additional land to be farmed. D.I. Khan District is primarily an alluvial plain that slopes from the mountain ranges in the northern and western parts of the District toward the Indus River. Rocks in the bordering mountains are of Paleozoic to early or middle Pleistocene age. The unconsolidated rocks of the plain, of middle (?) Pleistocene to Holocene (Recent) age, consist of piedmont deposits derived from the hills to the north and west and of alluvium laid down by the Indus River. These deposits interfinger in a transitional zone about 8 to 12 miles west of the river. Lithologic and structural features indicate that the unconsolidated rocks possibly may be divided into broad units. The investigations in D.I. Khan District have revealed two main areas of potential ground-water development based on considerations of both permeability and chemical quality of the ground water: 1. A belt about 10 miles wide parallels the Indus River from the Khisor Range southward to the area immediately south of D.I. Khan town. In this belt, the

  9. Cochlear implant in a patient with mondini's deformity of the cochlea: pilot patient in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Sadaf; Junaid, Montasir; Sobani, Zainul Abedeen; Nadeem, Naila; Awans, Mohammad Sohail

    2013-07-01

    Autosomal-recessive genes account for about 80% of the patients of non-syndromic deafness, and a major portion of those lead to cochlear pathology. Given the strong cultural practice of consanguineous marriages and the lack of awareness regarding screening modalities, a high prevalence of hereditary pre-lingual deafness is seen in Pakistan. Considering the situation, cochlear implant surgery was introduced by Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, Pakistan, in 2003. Recently we decided to expand the profile and services available and conducted the first ever cochlear implant on an anatomically-challenged cochlea. The case report relates to the experience of our pilot patient who was suffering from Mondini's deformity.

  10. Implementation lessons on the use of innovation in information technology in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Hasham, Salim; Sayani, Saleem

    2013-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) innovation and its impact on health care is of particular relevance to the developing world, which spends a fraction of what health systems spend in OECD countries. Given the issues of accessibility, affordability and quality health services in the developing world, IT can play an important role by bringing marginalized communities closer to health care systems. Aga Khan University (AKU) and the eHealth Resource Center (eHRC), which are part of Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), are active in the developing regions of East Africa, Central Asia and South East Asia and are currently initiating new changes in the use of IT and also the manner in which it is deployed. The eHealth programmes implemented and the lessons learned by AKU and eHRC in achieving its core values of impact, access, relevance, and quality through implementation of these innovations are described. These can be of value to health systems and academic medical centres in the developing world wanting to leverage scarce resources to create meaningful impact using IT.

  11. Universal Usability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Sarah; Leventhal, Laura

    Universal usability of World Wide Web (Web) environments—that is, having 90% of households as successful users—requires universal access, usability, and universal design. Factors such as Web technology and user-centered design contribute to universal access and usability, but key to universal usability is a universal design methodology. Universal design principles for the Web follow from universal design principles for the built environment, and emphasize perceptibility, self-explanation, and tailorability for the user. Universally usable Web environments offer the benefit of expanded participation, as well as the unanticipated benefits that generally follow from innovative design initiatives. However, to achieve Web universal usability, Web designers need tools that facilitate the design of intuitive interfaces without sacrificing universal access.

  12. Brown University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The computing at Brown University was formalized in 1960. Computing history, current university computing, and a description of the Institute for Research in Information and Scholarship are discussed. The installation of a broadband communications network (BRUNET) was recently completed. (MLW)

  13. Scotland's Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the Scottish university tradition and the origins and particulars of Scottish-Anglo differences in higher education. Discusses the 19th-century growth of Scottish universities, which lacked formal entrance requirements; students' rights and power in the university; academic degrees awarded; relationship with the state; and student…

  14. Baby universes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TOPOLOGY CHANGE AND THIRD QUANTIZATION IN 0+1 DIMENSIONS * Third Quantization of Free One-dimensional Universes * Third Quantization of Interacting One-Dimensional Universes * The Single-Universe Approximation and Dynamical Determination of Coupling Constants * The Third Quantized Uncertainty Principle * THIRD QUANTIZATION IN 3+1 DIMENSIONS * The Gauge Invariant Action * Relation to Other Formalisms * PARENT AND BABY UNIVERSES * The Hybrid Action * Baby Universe Field Operators and Spacetime Couplings * INSTANTONS-FROM QUANTUM MECHANICS TO QUANTUM GRAVITY * Quantum Mechanics * Quantum Field Theory * Quantum Gravity * Axionic Instantons * The Small Expansion Parameter * THE AXION MODEL AND THE INSTANTON APPROXIMATION * THE COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT * The Hawking-Baum Argument * Baby Universes and Coleman's Argument * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  15. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  16. Overseas Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas, London (England).

    The following articles and reports are presented in this publication of "Overseas Universities:""Appropriate Technology and University Education," by John Twidell; "The Training of Engineering Staff for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries," by D. W. Daniel, C. A. Leal, J. H. Maynes and T. Wilmore;…

  17. University Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Recent radical changes to university education in England have been discussed largely in terms of the arrangements for transferring funding from the state to the student as consumer, with little discussion of what universities are for. It is important, while challenging the economic rationale for the new system, to resist talking about higher…

  18. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  19. Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  20. Universal Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, John

    1990-01-01

    Described is a symposium of Nobel laureates held in the summer of 1990 to discuss cosmology. Different views on the structure and evolution of the universe are presented. Evidence for different theories of cosmology is discussed. (CW)

  1. Majestic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Serge; Dunlop, Storm

    1999-10-01

    Foreword; 1. The history of cosmology; 2. The galaxy, an island in space; 3. A thousand generations of stars; 4. The next supernova; 5. Planets by the billion?; 6. The enigma at the heart of the Milky Way; 7. A sea of galaxies; 8. The architecture of the universe; 9. The Big Bang, and the history of the universe; 10. Gravitational lenses; 11. The mystery of the missing mass; 12. Searching for the ultimate; 13. Towards the cosmological horizon; Appendices; Glossary; Index; Bibliography.

  2. Undulant Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  3. Plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  4. GA-SVM Based Lungs Nodule Detection and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffar, M. Arfan; Hussain, Ayyaz; Jabeen, Fauzia; Nazir, M.; Mirza, Anwar M.

    In this paper we have proposed a method for lungs nodule detection from computed tomography (CT) scanned images by using Genetic Algorithms (GA) and morphological techniques. First of all, GA has been used for automated segmentation of lungs. Region of interests (ROIs) have been extracted by using 8 directional searches slice by slice and then features extraction have been performed. Finally SVM have been used to classify ROI that contain nodule. The proposed system is capable to perform fully automatic segmentation and nodule detection from CT Scan Lungs images. The technique was tested against the 50 datasets of different patients received from Aga Khan Medical University, Pakistan and Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset.

  5. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma of the Parotid Gland: A Third World Country Perspective-A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Salat, Huzaifah; Mumtaz, Ramiz; Ikram, Mubasher; Din, Nasir Ud

    2015-01-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described pathological entity in major salivary glands, which was first described by Skálová et al. in 2010. Since then only a limited number of case reports/series have been published describing this tumor with the majority of them discussing the genetic and cytoarchitectural aspect of this tumor. Keeping this in view with the lack of clinical correlation with regard to this tumor, we present our approach to management of two such cases which, according to the best of our knowledge, are the first 2 cases presenting in the South Asian continent. Both patients were diagnosed and managed at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan.

  6. Osteoid Osteoma of acetabulum, a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Irfan; Kanwal, Sidra; Hashmi, Pervaiz

    2015-05-01

    The case of a relatively frequent benign osteoblastic tumour, osteoid osteoma at an atypical site is presented. It was in a 20 year old man who attended the outpatient department of Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi with pain in left groin since last 6 months which often occurred at night and was relieved by taking NSAIDs. X-ray failed to reveal the cause. CT scan showed central radiolucent nidus with surrounding sclerosis suggestive of osteoid osteoma in the left acetabulum. Acetabulum is a rare site for osteoid osteoma, the usual sites are diaphysis of long bones. Hence, the diagnosis is often difficult and delayed in such cases. CT scan, Bone scan and MRI, helped in diagnosing the condition. Resection of the lesion by open technique under fluoroscopic control was performed and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis.

  7. Hookworm infestation as a cause of melena and severe anaemia in farmer.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Marvi; Muzammil, Syeda Maria; Shaikh, Fareed Ahmed; Pal, K M Inam

    2017-02-01

    Hookworm infections remain a major cause of morbidity in the developing world. Prevalence is highest in agricultural areas, where use of waste water for irrigation and poor hygiene increases infection rates among farmers. Infections present with gastrointestinal symptoms and chronic anaemia, and there are usually no signs of overt blood loss. The following report describes a case of melena in a middle-aged farmer, where the diagnosis of hookworm infestation was delayed due to the unusual presentation. The patient underwent multiple blood transfusions before referral to the Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi and was managed conservatively with mebendazole at our hospital after exclusion of other possible causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. This case highlights the importance of considering hookworm infestations as a cause of melena in the older age group, where other critical differentials such as peptic ulcer disease and occult malignancy may result in delay in initiation of treatment and a significant financial burden on the patient.

  8. Quantum Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhanov, V. F.

    2016-10-01

    In March 2013, following an accurate processing of available measurement data, the Planck Scientific Collaboration published the highest-resolution photograph ever of the early Universe when it was only a few hundred thousand years old. The photograph showed galactic seeds in sufficient detail to test some nontrivial theoretical predictions made more than thirty years ago. Most amazing was that all predictions were confirmed to be remarkably accurate. With no exaggeration, we may consider it established experimentally that quantum physics, which is normally assumed to be relevant on the atomic and subatomic scale, also works on the scale of the entire Universe, determining its structure with all its galaxies, stars, and planets.

  9. Universities 2035

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrift, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the future of Western higher education. Situated midway between an analysis and a polemic, it concerns itself with how we might begin to actively design the universities of the future. That will require a productionist account of higher education which is so far sadly lacking. But there are signs that such an account might be…

  10. University Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Alexis N.

    1977-01-01

    Academic communities are under intense pressures to balance expenditures with income. Strategies are offered here to increase productivity drawn from the experiences of the University of New Haven. Emphasis is on revenue-cost ratios, class size, and faculty teaching schedules as primary factors in productivity improvement. (Editor/LBH)

  11. New Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The public-private alliance signals a future in which self-serving agreements could become the coin of the realm. Such a future would be a betrayal of the historical promise of public universities to innovate in ways that expand access to higher education. Given the rise of market-based models in educational policy circles, the threat of the…

  12. University Builders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Martin

    This publication explores a diverse collection of new university buildings. Ranging from the design of vast new campuses, such as that by Wilford and Stirling at Temasek, Singapore, through to the relatively modest yet strategically important, such as the intervention by Allies and Morrison at Southampton, this book examines the new higher…

  13. Effect of L-type calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) on myocardial iron deposition in patients with thalassaemia with moderate-to-severe myocardial iron deposition: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Amarah; Zahoor, Maaman; Sadaf, Alina; Alvi, Najveen; Fadoo, Zehra; Rizvi, Arjumand; Quadri, Farheen; Tipoo, Fateh Ali; Khurshid, Mohammad; Sajjad, Zaffar; Colan, Steven; Hasan, Babar S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sideroblastic cardiomyopathy secondary to repeated blood transfusions is a feared complication in thalassaemia. Control of myocardial iron is thus becoming the cornerstone of thalassaemia management. Recent evidence suggests a role for L-type Ca2+ channels in mediating iron uptake by the heart. Blocking the cellular iron uptake through these channels may add to the benefit of therapy to standard chelation in reducing myocardial iron. We aim to determine the efficacy of amlodipine (a calcium channel blocker) as an adjunct to standard aggressive chelation in retarding myocardial iron deposition in thalassaemics with or without cardiomyopathy. Outcomes The primary outcome is to compare the efficacy of amlodipine+chelation (intervention) versus standard chelation (control) in retarding myocardial iron deposition. Secondary outcomes include the effect of amlodipine therapy on systolic and diastolic function, strain and strain rate and liver iron content. Methods and analysis This is a single-centre, parallel-group, prospective randomised control trial. Twenty patients will be randomised in a 1:1 allocation ratio into the intervention and control arms. In addition to conventional echocardiography, MRI T2* values for assessment of cardiac and liver iron load will be obtained at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. Cardiac T2* will be reported as the geometric mean and per cent coefficient of variation, and an increase in cardiac T2* values from baseline will be used as an end point to compare the efficacy of therapy. A p Value of <0.05 will be considered significant. Study setting Department of Pediatric and Child Health, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Ethics Review Committee and Clinical Trials Unit at The Aga Khan University with respect to scientific content and compliance with applicable research and human subjects regulations. Findings will be reported through scientific

  14. University lobbying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In the past year, an increasing number of individual academic institutions have lobbied in Congress for new science facilities funds thus circumventing the traditional peer review process of evaluating the merits of such facilities. As an attempt to stem this rising tide, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) governing council and the Association of American Universities (AAU) recently and independently issued strong statements condemning lobbying by individual universities and enthusiastically supporting the peer review system.“Informed peer judgments on the scientific merits of specific proposals, in open competition, should be a central element in the awarding of all federal funds for science,” the NAS resolution stated. AAU, meanwhile, implored “scientists, leaders of America's universities, and members of Congress” to “refrain from actions that would make scientific decisions a test of political influence rather than a judgment on the quality of the work to be done.” Roughly 50 research institutions constitute AAU; the two AAU Canadian members did not vote on the consortium's statement.

  15. Recapturing the Universal in the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The idea of "the university" has stood for universal themes--of knowing, of truthfulness, of learning, of human development, and of critical reason. Through its affirming and sustaining of such themes, the university came itself to stand for universality in at least two senses: the university was neither partial (in its truth criteria) nor local…

  16. Child health and education in Kenyan schools programmes.

    PubMed

    Fleming, J

    1991-03-01

    Jane Fleming describes the health education in schools programme launched by the Aga Khan Health Services in Kisumu, Kenya. The project has brought major improvements in child health and mortality rates as well as better health awareness to the community as a whole.

  17. Ian's Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Bella

    Everyone has their own private universe. Ian's was immense and diverse. But there are two main parts that determined his world. One was of course PHYSICS. He was one of the rare breed for whom there was only one possible way of life. 10 years ago when his job prospects were bleak he was thinking of quitting physics and becoming a "taxi driver" which meant a financial analyst, a programmer, anything. For him all professions divided into two categories — physics and non-physics, a "taxi driver"…

  18. Open University

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  19. Purdue University

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.; Grabowski, Z.; Mayer, R.H.

    1995-08-01

    The Purdue University group, including several thesis students, is working on a measurement of high-spin nuclear states at ATLAS. They use in-beam gamma-ray techniques to investigate several aspects of nuclear structure at high spin, testing the validity of shell-model calculations for high-spin-yrast states near Z = 50. The nuclei are produced via deep inelastic reactions, rather than with the more conventional fusion reactions. This technique allows the study of neutron-rich nuclei that cannot be studied by other means. The group is studying proton-rich nuclei with N{approximately}82 using the FMA and an electron spectrometer. Furthermore, D. Nisius is a Ph.D. student, resident at ANL, performing his thesis work under the supervision of R.V.F. Janssens.

  20. New series of triple molybdates AgA3R(MoO4)5 (A=Mg, R=Cr, Fe; A=Mn, R=Al, Cr, Fe, Sc, In) with framework structures and mobile silver ion sublattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Irina Yu.; Solodovnikov, Sergey F.; Solodovnikova, Zoya A.; Belov, Dmitry A.; Stefanovich, Sergey Yu.; Savina, Aleksandra A.; Khaikina, Elena G.

    2016-06-01

    Triple molybdates AgA3R(MoO4)5 (A=Mg, R=Cr, Fe; A=Mn, R=Al, Cr, Fe, Sc, In) of the NaMg3In(MoO4)5 type were synthesized and single crystals of AgMg3R(MoO4)5 (R=Cr, Fe) were grown. In their structures, the MoO4 tetrahedra, pairs and trimers of edge-shared (Mg, R)O6 octahedra are connected by common vertices to form a 3D framework. Large framework cavities involve Ag+ cations disordered on three nearby positions with CN=3+1 or 4+1. Alternating (Mg, R)O6 octahedra and MoO4 tetrahedra in the framework form quadrangular windows penetrable for Ag+ at elevated temperatures. Above 653-673 K, the newly obtained molybdates demonstrate abrupt reduction of the activation energy to 0.4-0.6 eV. At 773 K, AgMg3Al(MoO4)5 shows electric conductivity 2.5·10-2 S/cm and Ea=0.39 eV compatible with characteristics of the best ionic conductors of the NASICON type.

  1. Boston University: College and University Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Two major Boston University computer installations--the Academic Computing Center and the office of University Information Systems--are described. Policies and priorities for information systems within the university are established by a committee and proposals for the development of new systems are approved through this committee. (MLW)

  2. The Global University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  3. Universities as Management Arenas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Donald E.

    1973-01-01

    The process of university leadership is examined in terms of (1) the development of more sophisticated models of the kind of organization a university is, and (2) the development of more precise delineations of the nature of the multiple leadership tasks that must be performed in a university setting. The university is viewed as an "organized…

  4. Masks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward

    2003-05-01

    Preface; Introducing the masks; Part I. Worlds in the Making: 1. The magic Universe; 2. The mythic Universe; 3. The geometric Universe; 4. The medieval Universe; 5. The infinite Universe; 6. The mechanistic Universe; Part II. The Heart Divine: 7. Dance of the atoms and waves; 8. Fabric of space and time; 9. Nearer to the heart's desire; 10. The cosmic tide; 11. Do dreams ever come true?; Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: 12. The witch universe; 13. The spear of Archytas; 14. All that is made; 15. The cloud of unknowing; 16. Learned ignorance.

  5. [To promote the change of health education orientation and to incorporate the Spanish universities to the task].

    PubMed

    García Martínez, Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    The problem health education faces in Spanish schools is the inconsistency between objectives and means. Therefore, it is common to find health education initiatives limited by not only lack of institutional support and training of professionals, but also by its adherence to a theory-based learning. This article analyses the need for a practical alternative, which would involve researchers/teachers and students in thinking and building the best health practices for them and their community. Parent-like behaviour, based on information and/or persuasion, looks to protect adolescent health and well-being until they are able to take on responsibility of their own, despite the fact that adolescents' search for knowledge influences their own perceptions of what is best for individual and community health. In order to tackle this challenge faced by health educators, in contrast to the theory-based teaching model, it is necessary to implicate the people into the learning process. An in depth study on the definition of health education paradigms (informative, persuasive and political-ecological) (García et al., 2001) has been developed, and which Jensen (1997) divides into two types: moral (informative) and democratic (ecological). As part of this process to transform health education into a participatory practice, and given its social impact, there is also a need to implement health education at higher educational levels and not only in primary and secondary school as occurs in Spain. Turning universities into 'health promoting agencies' (Dooris, 2001) would imply coordinating education with personal, professional and community action, and would be supported and driven by organisational change at university level and would require the participation of all involved when defining the course of action. As a consequence, the people involved in health education learning processes at university level would improve not only their quality of life, but they would also build

  6. The A. Q. Khan Network: Causes and Implications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    control over nuclear technology ever. For the first time in history all of the keys to a nuclear weapon—the supplier networks, the material, the...enrichment technology, and the warhead designs—were outside of state oversight and control . This thesis demonstrates that Khan’s nuclear enterprise...managed, and oversaw its nuclear weapons laboratories. This thesis provides extensive documentation of command and control challenges faced by

  7. Metaphor and Universal Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blown, Eric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to identify elements of universal language and probes the limitations of the communication metaphor. Universal language is discussed in terms of the theory of quantum nonlocality and the implications of this theory for communication with extraterrestrial beings. (PCB)

  8. Gambling with the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  9. Situated University, Situated Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that teaching as a situated, civic activity must be a core intellectual activity in the engaged metropolitan university. Situated writing provides the key pedagogy for the Chicago Civic Leadership Certificate Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, an engaged public research university. The role of writing, or…

  10. International Space University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassler, Maggie (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) is described in this video, hosted by Marina Sirtis from the 'Star Trek' television show's Starship Enterprise. A complete explanation of what ISU is, how the university functions, and the benefits that the university provides are described. Included are brief comments from former ISU graduates.

  11. Program Budgeting: Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual recognizes there is a wide spectrum of budgeting practices in today's colleges and universities. In particular, universities in Ohio are at different stages in their utilization of program budgeting principles and also have different needs. Thus, this program budgeting manual was written to meet the specific needs of universities in…

  12. University-Community Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ira

    1986-01-01

    Common issues in university-community relationships, such as neighborhood problems and their solutions, facility expansion, traffic and parking, crime, housing, recreation facilities, and city services, are discussed. Findings from a study of the university-community relationship at Ohio State University are outlined. (MSE)

  13. Universities That Litigate Patents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooksby, Jacob H.

    2012-01-01

    American research universities frequently obtain and license patents to their faculty members' inventions. While university licensing is carefully tracked and thoroughly studied, little is known about university decisions to assertively litigate their patents through filing patent infringement lawsuits in federal court. Which universities…

  14. Sierra University in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celis, Francisco Manuel Orozco

    2003-01-01

    Sierra University was designed to promote the development of the mountain communities in the State of Sonora, Mexico. The university offers high school graduates an opportunity to pursue their studies in their home region, in order to stimulate economic development and contribute to social cohesion in the highlands area. The university is equipped…

  15. The University Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  16. John Carroll University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  17. Our Listless Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Allan

    1983-01-01

    Students in the best universities do not believe in anything, and those universities are doing nothing about it. The great questions--God, freedom, and immortality--hardly touch the young. The universities have no vision, no view of what a human being must know in order to be considered educated. (MLW)

  18. The Latin American University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Joseph, Ed.; Weatherhead, Richard W., Ed.

    A comparative overview is presented of the Latin American university, which is seen as an institution with a particular history and definite role. Chapters are as follows: "The Latin American University: An Introduction," by Joseph Maier and Richard W. Weatherhead; "Origin and Philosophy of the Spanish American University," by…

  19. Establishing a University Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemish, Donald L.

    A handbook on how to establish a university foundation is presented. It presupposes that a foundation will be used as the umbrella organization for receiving all private gifts, restricted and unrestricted, for the benefit of a public college or university; and hence it chiefly addresses readers from public colleges and universities. Information is…

  20. Northern Arizona University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Michael F.; Saltonstall, Margot; Bickel, Sarah; Brandel, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Northern Arizona University (NAU) is a public university nestled below the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, Arizona. It enrolls more than 21,000 undergraduate and graduate students at its main campus in Flagstaff, through its 35 statewide sites, and via online program offerings. Within the university organizational system, Student Affairs has a…

  1. What Are Good Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Raewyn

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers how we can arrive at a concept of the good university. It begins with ideas expressed by Australian Vice-Chancellors and in the "league tables" for universities, which essentially reproduce existing privilege. It then considers definitions of the good university via wish lists, classic texts, horror lists, structural…

  2. The Moral University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Maurice R.; Berube, Clair T.

    2010-01-01

    The Moral University examines the ways that universities act morally toward students, faculty, their communities and the nation. It considers the effectiveness of moral reasoning courses in the curriculum and the growth of leadership courses. The book deals with the myriad ways in which universities act positively toward their communities. It also…

  3. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  4. A lightweight universe?

    PubMed

    Bahcall, N A; Fan, X

    1998-05-26

    How much matter is there in the universe? Does the universe have the critical density needed to stop its expansion, or is the universe underweight and destined to expand forever? We show that several independent measures, especially those utilizing the largest bound systems known-clusters of galaxies-all indicate that the mass-density of the universe is insufficient to halt the expansion. A promising new method, the evolution of the number density of clusters with time, provides the most powerful indication so far that the universe has a subcritical density. We show that different techniques reveal a consistent picture of a lightweight universe with only approximately 20-30% of the critical density. Thus, the universe may expand forever.

  5. Selling University Reform: The University of Melbourne and the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the "Times Higher Education Supplement World University Rankings" and the "Academic Rankings of World Universities" by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, some Australian universities have become especially concerned with being ranked among the 100 leading universities. The University of Melbourne, Australia's…

  6. College and University Challenge

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA's Green Power Partnership Challenge tracks and recognizes U.S. colleges and universities recognizes the largest single green power users within each participating collegiate athletic conferences.

  7. Universal design in housing.

    PubMed

    Mace, R L

    1998-01-01

    Universal design in housing is a growing and beneficial concept. It is subtle in its differences from barrier-free, accessible, and industry standard housing. Accessibility standards and codes have not mandated universal design and do not apply to most housing. Universal design exceeds their minimum specifications for accessible design and results in homes that are usable by and marketable to almost everyone. Universal homes avoid use of special assistive technology devices and, instead, incorporate consumer products and design features that are easily usable and commonly available.

  8. From Universal Access to Universal Proficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne C.

    2003-01-01

    Panel of five education experts--Elliot Eisner, John Goodlad, Patricia Graham, Phillip Schlechty, and Warren Simons--answer questions related to recent school reform efforts, such as the No Child Left Behind Act, aimed at achieving universal educational proficiency. (PKP)

  9. New Openings in University-Industry Cooperation: Aalto University as the Forerunner of European University Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markkula, Markku; Lappalainen, Pia

    2009-01-01

    The Innovation University (IU)--to be called the Aalto University after Alvav Aalto, a famous Finnish architect and MIT professor--is a new university which will be created through a merger of three existing universities: the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), the Helsinki School of Economics (HSE) and the University of Art and Design…

  10. Universe: Thermal History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    HUBBLE's discovery of the expansion of the universe in 1929 revealed our beginning from a much smaller and much denser initial state (BIG BANG THEORY). Penzias and Wilson's discovery of the COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND radiation (CMBR) in 1964 implied further that just after creation the universe was a hot soup of the fundamental particles whose dynamics was controlled by the energy density of the...

  11. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  12. Ethics in the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Lawrence K.

    The issues of ethics in the university and the role of higher education in society are addressed. Distinctions are made between legal behavior and ethical behavior, and the question of how the university needs to balance the two in order to fulfill its unique role in society while it simultaneously strives to reside and survive within it is…

  13. Marketing University Outreach Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Ralph S., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of 12 essays and model program descriptions addresses issues in the marketing of university extension, outreach, and distance education programs. They include: (1) "Marketing and University Outreach: Parallel Processes" (William I. Sauser, Jr. and others); (2) "Segmenting and Targeting the Organizational Market"…

  14. The Universal Playground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The universal playground, designed for the full spectrum of developmental abilities, works to the advantage of children with special needs. The universal playground includes spring rides, work and play tables, sympathetic swings, sand tables, steering wheels, gadget panels, wide slides, adjustable basketball hoops, and music panels. (JDD)

  15. Talent Management for Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores human resource management practices in the university sector with a specific focus on talent pools and talent management more generally. The paper defines talent management in the context of the university sector and then explores its interdependence with organisational strategy, the metrics used to measure academic performance…

  16. The Pennsylvania State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlingame, Philip J.; Dowhower, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1855 as the Farmer's High School, the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) began as a small college in Centre County providing agricultural education to young men from regional farm families. Penn State became a land-grant university in 1863 following passage of the Morrill Act. Today, Penn State enrolls more than 83,000 students…

  17. Slippery Rock University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnhold, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Slippery Rock University (SRU), located in western Pennsylvania, is one of 14 state-owned institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania. The university has a rich tradition of providing professional preparation programs in special education, therapeutic recreation, physical education, and physical therapy for individuals with disabilities.…

  18. University-industry interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    It is posited that university industry interaction is highly desirable from the viewpoint of the long term economic development of the country as well as being desirable for the Space Grant Programs. The present and future possible interactions are reviewed for the three university levels namely, undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research.

  19. Universality or Specialisation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allies, Christian; Troquet, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Trade globalisation is beginning to affect universities worldwide. In response to this outside pressure, institutions have become more geared to gaining international repute through research than to maintaining their reputation at home for the quality of their teaching. As a result of this focus on research, French universities, for example, are…

  20. Universe of constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  1. [The University in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Morris B.

    The university reflects the revolution in the world. Large numbers of "find out" students are not goal oriented and are affected by malaise; many approve of the use of violence in certain situations. Part of the revolution must be accepted and part rejected. The university is extremely vulnerable to violence and, unless it is contained, American…

  2. Managing Tomorrow's University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalak, Craig L., Ed.

    The issues addressed in this conference report concern budgeting, the resourceful manager, extramural funding, employer-employee interaction, management information systems, and management of the university in the future. Contents include: the keynote address by F. E. Balderston; "University Budgeting in an Era of Scarce Resources," by F. M. Bowen…

  3. Reeducation at Heidelberg University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Geoffrey J.

    1997-01-01

    Utilizes German archival records to illuminate crucial post-war events at Heidelberg University. The university became the focal point of attempts to define the theoretical and practical meaning of "geistige Umerziehung" (spiritual reeducation). Discusses the conflict between U.S. authorities and such esteemed German scholars as Karl…

  4. Universals, Typologies and Interlanguage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckman, Fred R.

    Two questions are raised: Is it possible to characterize the notion human language in terms of absolute and typological universals? And if so, what is the relationship between these universals and those formulated for primary languages? Given these questions, the purpose of the paper is to: (1) investigate some of the methodological considerations…

  5. The United Nations University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salam, Abdus

    1973-01-01

    Reports the progress already made toward the establishment of a postgraduate international university under United Nations auspices. The resolution adopted by the U.N. General Assembly provides a concise statement of the nature and aims of the United Nations University, which is likely to start operating in 1974. (JR)

  6. The Medical University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piel, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    Success, it is suggested, has brought the medical school into critical new responsibility for the welfare of the university as a whole. An urgent topic for inquiry in the university is seen as the expansion of the medical economy and the attendant growth of medical schools. (MLW)

  7. University HRD Programs. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of four papers on university human resource development (HRD) programs. "Passions for Excellence: HRD Graduate Programs at United States Universities" (K. Peter Kuchinke) presents an analysis of case studies that reveals convergent and divergent themes related to the genesis of programs and subsequent…

  8. Universal Noiseless Coding Subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlutsmeyer, A. P.; Rice, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Software package consists of FORTRAN subroutines that perform universal noiseless coding and decoding of integer and binary data strings. Purpose of this type of coding to achieve data compression in sense that coded data represents original data perfectly (noiselessly) while taking fewer bits to do so. Routines universal because they apply to virtually any "real-world" data source.

  9. Modelling University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakman, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Twentieth century governance models used in public universities are subject to increasing doubt across the English-speaking world. Governments question if public universities are being efficiently governed; if their boards of trustees are adequately fulfilling their trust obligations towards multiple stakeholders; and if collegial models of…

  10. University Rankings in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Nian Cai; Liu, Li

    2005-01-01

    Since the mid 1990s of last Century, university rankings have become very popular in China. Six institutions have published such rankings; some of them have also detailed their ranking methodologies. This paper features a general introduction to university ranking in China, and to the methodologies of each ranking discussed. The paper also…

  11. The Kept University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Eyal; Washburn, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Examines the trend of increasing collaboration between American universities and corporations, including issues such as the academic-industrial complex, secrecy and science, the university as a business/commercial enterprise, who controls the research agenda, downsizing the humanities, and on-line marketing of course material. Expresses concerns…

  12. Universal Design Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    Universal design is made up of four elements: accessibility, adaptability, aesthetics, and affordability. This article addresses the concept of universal design problem solving through experiential learning for an interior design studio course in postsecondary education. Students' experiences with clients over age 55 promoted an understanding of…

  13. A Universal Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Mike; Walsh, Jean

    2001-01-01

    Describes universal challenge programs, in which all participants, regardless of ability or disability, work as an integrated group. Discusses planning for participant needs and creating a physically and emotionally safe environment. Presents brief instructions for 12 universal activities, including games, problem-solving activities, and high and…

  14. The early universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, E. W.; Turner, M. S.

    This monograph is a broad survey that provides an insightful look at cosmology and an up-to-date accounting of modern ideas in particle physics as they relate to cosmology, particularly to the early history of the universe. A companion volume "The early universe: reprints" is published in 1988 (see 46.003.074).

  15. Cancer Nurses in Africa Finding Their Footing

    PubMed Central

    Makumi, David

    2017-01-01

    David Makumi is an award-winning cancer control leader. The US Oncology Nursing Society. (ONS) awarded him the prestigious Distinguished Award for contribution to cancer care in 2011. The following year, the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care presented him with the Past President Award for his work in designing low-cost models of increasing access to breast cancer screening. David is the East Africa Regional Cancer Programs Manager for the Aga Khan University Hospital. He has been involved in cancer advocacy on policy and legislation for over 10 years. David is currently the Chair of the Kenya Network of Cancer Organizations, thus he represents civil society on the Board of the National Cancer Institute of Kenya. At the international level, David sits on the International Advisory Panel of the ONS. David, a registered nurse, has a Postgraduate Diploma in Palliative Care from Dundee University and a Higher Education Diploma in the same from Oxford Brookes University. He has been involved in several initiatives aimed at networking cancer care nurses in Africa to share knowledge, experience, and expertise. PMID:28217723

  16. Imagine the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains compilations of three NASA Website pages from the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The three sites on the CD-ROM are: (1) the Imagine the Universe!, (for ages 14 on up), which is dedicated to discussion of the Universe, what we know, how it is evolving and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains; (2) StarChild: A learning center for young astronomers, (for ages 4-14), contains information about the Solar System, the Universe and space explorations; and (3) the Astronomy picture of the day, which offers a new astronomical image and caption for each calendar day.

  17. Imagine the Universe. 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains compilations of three NASA Website pages from the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The three sites on the CD-ROM are: (1) the Imagine the Universe!, (for ages 14 on up), which is dedicated to discussion of the Universe, what we know, how it is evolving and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains; (2) StarChild: A learning center for young astronomers, (for ages 4-14), contains information about the Solar System, the Universe and space explorations; and (3) the Astronomy picture of the day, which offers a new astronomical image and caption for each calendar day.

  18. University Presses: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeker, Robert B.

    Historical information on university presses and their problems are considered. University presses in the United States have their roots in 15th century England when the Oxford University Press was established in 1478. The first U.S. press to use the term "university press" was Cornell University; the press operated from 1869 until it…

  19. Georgetown University and Hampton University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    TITLE: Georgetown University and Hampton University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Anatoly...University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  20. University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of Florida Campus Quad Bounded by West University Avenue, US 441/Southwest 13th Street, Stadium Road, and North-South Drive, Gainesville, Alachua County, FL

  1. 2017 TRI University Challenge

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Details about the 2017 TRI University Challenge, in which EPA is looking to academic institutions to help build a diverse portfolio of practical and replicable projects that benefit communities, the environment, academic institutions, and the TRI Program.

  2. Many Universes POSSIBLE!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Pankaj K.

    An innovative scientific work on the evolution of the universe unravels a fresh phenomenon about the birth and evolution of a Big Bang. We see why Big Bang is not the earliest evolutionary stage of the universe rather it is necessarily just a part of the Universe which couldn't be revered more than a womb for clusters. SYNTESIS: The Big Bang starts from a black hole i.e. prior to Big Bang there was a black hole and there is expected a number of Big Bang in the universe going similar to our Big Bang and the whole process of the expansion and contraction of the Big Bang as described in the paper.

  3. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  4. Perelman's Universal Audience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the concept of the universal audience as the basic factor of Chaim Perelman's rhetorical theory and concludes that it is subject to the same criticism as Rousseau's general will and Kant's categorical imperative. (JMF)

  5. Expanding the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Leedjärv, Laurits; Tempel, Elmo

    2011-12-01

    Proceedings of the International Conference EXPANDING THE UNIVERSE, On the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the Tartu Observatory, Tartu, Estonia 2011 April 27-29. C. Sterken, L. Leedjarv, E. Tempel (Eds.)

  6. California's "Free" Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cudhea, David

    1974-01-01

    Heliotrope, Orpheus, and Communiversity, San Francisco's three free universities, offer curricula with combinations of alchemy, magic, Volkswagen repairs, options in education, dance, conversational Mandarin, basic plumbing, and brain wave experiences. (Author/PG)

  7. Universal router concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesch, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Portable universal router can cut holes of large diameter and irregular shapes, machine recesses, and drill holes with certain edge-distance limitations. Rectangular and round holes may be cut without a template.

  8. Universality in string interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-tin; Schlotterer, Oliver; Wen, Congkao

    2016-09-01

    In this note, we provide evidence for universality in the low-energy expansion of tree-level string interactions. More precisely, in the α'-expansion of tree-level scattering amplitudes, we conjecture that the leading transcendental coefficient at each order in α' is universal for all perturbative string theories. We have checked this universality up to seven points and trace its origin to the ability to restructure the disk integrals of open bosonic string into those of the superstring. The accompanying kinematic functions have the same low-energy limit and do not introduce any transcendental numbers in their α'-corrections. Universality in the closed-string sector then follows from KLT-relations.

  9. University Presidents: Academic Chameleons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Thomas H.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Sampling the opinions of at least one college or university president in each state and at schools of all sizes, the authors measure the degree of job satisfaction experienced by presidents. (Editor/LBH)

  10. Decay of oscillating universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  11. Universe opacity and EBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2017-02-01

    The observed extragalactic background light (EBL) is affected by light attenuation due to absorption of light by galactic and intergalactic dust in the Universe. Even galactic opacity of 10-20 per cent and minute universe intergalactic opacity of 0.01 mag h Gpc-1 at the local Universe have a significant impact on the EBL because obscuration of galaxies and density of intergalactic dust increase with redshift as (1 + z)3. Consequently, intergalactic opacity increases and the Universe becomes considerably opaque at z > 3. Adopting realistic values for galactic and intergalactic opacity, the estimates of the EBL for the expanding dusty universe are close to observations. The luminosity density evolution fits well measurements. The model reproduces a steep increase of the luminosity density at z < 2, its maximum at z = 2-3, and its decrease at higher redshifts. The increase of the luminosity density at low z is not produced by the evolution of the star formation rate but by the fact that the Universe occupied a smaller volume in previous epochs. The decline of the luminosity density at high z originates in the opacity of the Universe. The calculated bolometric EBL ranges from 100 to 200 nW m-2 sr-1 and is within the limits of 40 and 200 nW m-2 sr-1 of current EBL observations. The model predicts 98 per cent of the EBL coming from radiation of galaxies at z < 3.5. Accounting for light extinction by intergalactic dust implies that the Universe was probably more opaque than dark for z > 3.5.

  12. University Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. W.D. Reece

    1999-09-01

    The University Reactor Sharing Program provides funding for reactor experimentation to institutions that do not normally have access to a research reactor. Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material to producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding also gives small colleges and universities the opportunity to use the facility for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy.

  13. The Endless Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhardt, Paul

    2003-09-24

    This talk will introduce the Cyclic Model of the Universe, a radical alternative to standard big bang/inflationary cosmology in which space and time exist indefinitely, high energy inflation is avoided, dark energy is given a prominent role, and the universe undergoes periodic epochs of expansion and cooling. The model, which is motivated by recent ideas in superstring theory, seems capable of reproducing all of the successes of the standard picture and leads to distinctive predictions.

  14. Wormholes and Child Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, E. I.

    Evidence to the case that classical gravitation provides the clue to make sense out of quantum gravity is presented. The key observation is the existence in classical gravitation of child universe solutions or "almost" solutions, "almost" because of some singularity problems. The difficulties of these child universe solutions that are due to their generic singularity problems will be very likely be cured by quantum effects, just like for example "almost" instanton solutions are made relevant in gauge theories with the breaking of conformal invariance. Some well-motivated modifcations of general relativity where these singularity problems are absent even at the classical level are discussed. High energy density excitations, responsible for UV divergences in quantum field theories, including quantum gravity, are likely to be the source of child universes which carry them out of the original space-time. This decoupling could prevent these high UV excitations from having any influence on physical amplitudes. Child universe production could therefore be responsible for UV regularization in quantum field theories which take into account semiclassically gravitational effects. Child universe production in the last stages of black hole evaporation, the prediction of absence of trans-Planckian primordial perturbations, connection to the minimum length hypothesis, and in particular the connection to the maximal curvature hypothesis are discussed. Some discussion of superexcited states in the case these states such as Kaluza-Klein excitations are carried out. Finally, the possibility of obtaining "string like" effects from the wormholes associated with the child universes is discussed.

  15. Physics at Fisk University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald

    2005-03-01

    Fisk University was chartered in 1866 to educate former slaves at the end of the civil war. The physics department was started in 1931 under the chairmanship of Dr. Elmer Imes, Fisk 1903, a research physicist in the field of infrared (IR) spectroscopy. After Imes' death in 1941, one of his early physics majors, James Lawson, became chair and soon obtained a research IR instrument from the University of Michigan. By the early 1950's Fisk's IR research findings began to be published in the scientific journals and Fisk graduate students began to read the results of their M.A. thesis at the meeting of the Southeastern Section of the American Physical Society (SESAPS). This active participation in SESAPS in the mid-1950's was the impetus which caused SESAPS to switch its meetings from segregated to unsegregated facilities. During the next four decades physics at Fisk University expanded to include the annual Fisk Infrared Institute (FIRI) and the formation of strong research collaborations with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, Bordeaux University (France), and NASA. Our presentation will expand on these issues and also include a discussion of the ``McCarthyite Problem'' of the mid-fifties as it impacted both Fisk University and the physics department.

  16. University contracts summary book

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  17. Is the universe a sponge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Does the large-scale universe look more like meatballs, like Swiss cheese or like a sponge? The differences between these types of universe are described in J Richard Gott's The Cosmic Web: Mysterious Architecture of the Universe.

  18. Frequent Questions About Universal Waste

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Frequent questions such as Who is affected by the universal waste regulations? What is “mercury-containing equipment”? How are waste batteries managed under universal waste? How are waste pesticides managed under universal waste?

  19. Physics at Fisk University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuson, Nelson

    1997-11-01

    Fisk University was started in 1866 for predominantly Black students at the end of the Civil War. Its Department of Physics was started in 1931, under the chairmanship of Dr. Elmer Imes, Fisk '03, a research physicist in the field of infrared spectroscopy. Imes set the stage for Fisk's development of an infrared spectroscopy research laboratory. After Imes' untimely death in 1942, one of his early physics majors, James Lawson, chaired the Fisk Physics Department and soon obtained a research type infrared instrument from the University of Michigan. By the early 50's, five Fisk graduate students in physics published with their faculty mentors, the results of their M.A. degree research in infrared spectroscopy and read papers at the meetings of SESAPS. This active participation in SESAPS of Fisk's Black physicists was the impetus which caused SESAPS in 1954 to switch its meetings from segregated to unsegregated facilities. SESAPS then accepted the invitation of Fisk University to hold its 1955 annual meeting on the Fisk campus. But there is lots more to tell of Physics at Fisk University: research in ion optics and the solid state (like growing crystals in ``zero gravity"); research collaboration with Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt and Bordeaux, France; diversification of the physics student population; the impact of Fisk's physicists on the University's financial ``ups and downs"; etc. We will touch on all this and more!

  20. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  1. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  2. A Non Singular Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The last chapter of my PhD thesis, contained my first singularity theorem. This showed that under certain reasonable conditions, any cosmological solution of the field equations, would have a big bang singularity. At this singularity, classical general relativity would break down, so one could not use it to predict how the universe began. It was therefore necessary to develop a quantum theory of gravity, in order to understand the origin of the universe. In this talk, I explore if the origin of the universe can be semi classical, and non singular. This is possible despite the singularity theorems, because like so many other no go theorems, they have a get out clause. In this case, the get out is the strong energy condition.

  3. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1999-12-01

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. The Biological Universe provides a rich and colorful history of the attempts during the twentieth century to answer questions such as whether "biological law" reigns throughout the universe and whether there are other histories, religions, and philosophies outside those on Earth. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, Steven J. Dick shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a "biophysical cosmology" that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe. This book will fascinate astronomers, historians of science, biochemists, and science fiction readers.

  4. Universal Heliophysical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2011-01-01

    The physical processes in the heliospace are a direct consequence of the Sun s mass and electromagnetic emissions. There has been enormous progress in studying these processes since the dawn of the space age half a century ago. The heliospace serves as a great laboratory to study numerous physical processes, using the vast array of ground and spacebased measurements of various physical quantities. The observational capabilities collectively form the Great Observatory to make scientific investigations not envisioned by individual instrument teams. The International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program has been promoting scientific investigations on the universality of physical processes such as shocks, particle acceleration, dynamo, magnetic reconnection, magnetic flux ropes, plasma-neutral matter interactions, turbulence, and several other topics. This chapter highlights scientific deliberations on these and related topics that took place during the IAGA session on "Universal Heliophysical Processes" in Sopron, Hungary. The session featured several invited and contributed papers that focused on observations, theory and modeling of the universal heliophysical processes.

  5. Do closed universes recollapse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    The conditions for recollapse in universes with compact maximal hypersurfaces are investigated theoretically, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The importance of recollapse for observational astrophysics is briefly discussed, and particular attention is given to the implications of maximal hypersurfaces and to recollapse in S3 Friedmann universes. It is conjectured that all globally hyperbolic C2 maximally extended spatially homogeneous closed universes with S3 or S2 x S1 topology and with stress-energy tensors obeying the strong-energy, positive-pressure, dominant-energy, and matter-regularity conditions do expand from an all-encompassing initial singularity to a maximal hypersurface and then recollapse to an all-encompassing final singularity.

  6. Music of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Scientists are quite familiar with what a supernova looks like — when these stars are destroyed in the most massive explosions in the universe, they leave their mark as one of the brightest objects in space, at least for several weeks. While the supernova can be seen, it cant be heard, as sound waves cannot travel through space. But what if the light waves emitted by the exploding star and other cosmological phenomena could be translated into sound? Thats the idea behind a Rhythms of the Universe, a musical project to sonify the universe by Grateful Dead percussionist and Grammy award-winning artist Mickey Hart that caught the attention of Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sounds courtesy of Keith Jackson. Images courtesy of NASA

  7. Phonology without universal grammar

    PubMed Central

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns. PMID:26388791

  8. The anamorphic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ``anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  9. The anamorphic universe

    SciTech Connect

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J. E-mail: steinh@princeton.edu

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ''anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  10. Phonology without universal grammar.

    PubMed

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns.

  11. Creation of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li Zhi; Li, Shu Xian

    Philosophical aspects of current cosmological theories are explored in an introduction for general readers. Chapters are devoted to the physical implications of an ancient Chinese story, expansion without a center, the age of the universe, the finiteness or infiniteness of space, visible and invisible matter, the birth of order from chaos, and the thermal history of the universe. Consideration is given to the synthesis of elements, the origin of asymmetry, the inflation of vacuum, the physics of the first move, and the anthropic principle and physical constants. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  12. Imaging the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Krupa, Tyler J.

    2000-07-01

    An international team of cosmologists has released the first detailed images of the universe in its infancy. The images reveal the structure that existed when the universe was a tiny fraction of its current age and 1,000 times smaller and hotter than it is today. Research carried out as part of this project is shedding light on some of cosmology's long-standing mysteries, such as the nature of the matter and energy that dominate intergalactic space and whether space is ''curved'' or ''flat.''(c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  13. The Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacox, William D.

    2015-11-01

    Introducing the Universe; Part I. Conceptual Foundations: 1. Newtonian cosmology; 2. General relativity; 3. Relativistic cosmology; Part II. General Relativity: 4. General covariance; 5. Equivalence principle; 6. Space-time curvature; 7. Einstein field equations of gravitation; Part III. Universal Expansion: 8. Cosmological field equations; 9. Cosmography; 10. Expansion dynamics; Part IV. Expansion Models: 11. Radiation; 12. Matter; 13. Dark energy; 14. Observational constraints; 15. Concordance cosmological model; Part V. Expansion History: 16. Particle era; 17. Plasma era; 18. Galaxy era; 19. Afterword: the new modern cosmology; Part VI: Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  14. Reconstructing the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Ambjoern, J.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Loll, R.

    2005-09-15

    We provide detailed evidence for the claim that nonperturbative quantum gravity, defined through state sums of causal triangulated geometries, possesses a large-scale limit in which the dimension of spacetime is four and the dynamics of the volume of the universe behaves semiclassically. This is a first step in reconstructing the universe from a dynamical principle at the Planck scale, and at the same time provides a nontrivial consistency check of the method of causal dynamical triangulations. A closer look at the quantum geometry reveals a number of highly nonclassical aspects, including a dynamical reduction of spacetime to two dimensions on short scales and a fractal structure of slices of constant time.

  15. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1996-09-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  16. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2000-03-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  17. An Early Cyclic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhe, William; Biswas, Tirthibir

    2014-03-01

    We provide a comprehensive numerical study of the Emergent Cyclic Inflation scenario. This is a scenario where instead of traditional monotonic slow roll inflation, the universe expands over numerous short asymmetric cycles due to the production of entropy via interactions among different species. This is one of the very few scenarios of inflation which provides a nonsingular geodesically complete space-time and does not require any ``reheating'' mechanism. A special thanks to Loyola University for an excellent community to help this project grow.

  18. The Observable Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy

    2009-10-01

    This is a tour of the universe as we have come to understand it through observations taken at many different wavelengths. Stunning images from the Hubble Space Telescope and surprising observations from other space telescopes like Spitzer and Chandra have given us a deeper understanding of the universe, both near and far. Equally important have been observations taken with ground-based observatories such as the Very Large Telescope in Chile. I will describe the most recent advances astronomers have made using these observatories and what we hope to learn in the near future.

  19. Hands-on Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduori, Susan

    Science education in the 21st Century necessitates an introduction to the current and emerging tools and techniques of modern scientific research. We have recently launched a pilot, researchbased astronomy and astrophysics curriculum into Kenya High in Nairobi, Kenya as a vehicle to introducing the methodologies of scientific research into secondary education. Our program leverages global, web-accessible science education resources and connects to the online, international, science education community via the Global Hands-On Universe network. I describe the status and future plans of Hands-On Universe Africa.'

  20. UTM: Universal Transit Modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Transit Modeller (UTM) is a light-curve simulator for all kinds of transiting or eclipsing configurations between arbitrary numbers of several types of objects, which may be stars, planets, planetary moons, and planetary rings. A separate fitting program, UFIT (Universal Fitter) is part of the UTM distribution and may be used to derive best fits to light-curves for any set of continuously variable parameters. UTM/UFIT is written in IDL code and its source is released in the public domain under the GNU General Public License.

  1. A universal functional object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A scheme is presented for realizing any function, combinational or sequential, in a single universal function scheme, termed the universal function object UF. This scheme is addressed to the problem of the proliferation of the number of parts (cards, chips) necessary for conventional implementation in an LSI technology of a computer system. The UF implementation will use about ten times more circuits than a conventional implementation regardless of the size of the design. The UF approach also includes general-purpose spares for failing circuits. The procedure could be used both at manufacture to increase yields, as well as to achieve automatic repair.

  2. The Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Brian P.

    2012-05-01

    In 1998 two teams traced back the expansion of the universe over billions of years and discovered that it was accelerating, a startling discovery that suggests that more than 70% of the cosmos is contained in a previously unknown form of matter, called Dark Energy. The 2011 Nobel Laureate for Physics, Brian Schmidt, leader of the High-Redshift Supernova Search Team, will describe this discovery and explain how astronomers have used observations to trace our universe's history back more than 13 billion years, leading them to ponder the ultimate fate of the cosmos.

  3. Universal Design for Academic Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmen, John P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Universal design (UD) can play a role in many aspects of academic life and is often thought of in the context of learning. However, this chapter focuses on the impact of UD on the design of facilities in a university or campus setting. Universal design has the potential for transforming universities into truly egalitarian institutions that…

  4. Directory of Canadian Universities, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Directory of Canadian Universities is the authoritative guide to Canadian universities. It includes everything from scholarship information and fees, to programs and housing facilities, at over 90 Canadian universities. The book offers the following helpful information to college and university students: (1) updated annually; (2) compiled by…

  5. Technology Transfer and the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matkin, Gary W.

    The commercialization of university research and the growing importance of technology transfer is examined through discussing and comparing the history of technology transfer and its organization in four major American research universities: University of California, Berkley; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Stanford University; and…

  6. State University System of Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some information about the State University System of Florida. The following are presented in this paper: (1) University Work Plans and Annual Reports; (2) State University System 2009 Annual Report; (3) Quick Facts: Planned New Degree Programs--2010 to 2013; (4) State University System Tuition Differential Summary, FY…

  7. University research in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The contributions which universities can make to aeronautical research projects are discussed. The activities of several facilities are presented to show the effectiveness of the educational and research programs. Reference is made to the Intergovernmental Personnel Act of 1970 which permits an exchange of federal agency personnel with state and local governments and with public and private higher education schools.

  8. Perceptions of University Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenzel, N. J.

    1977-01-01

    Survey results concerning the role of university supervisors as perceived by student teachers, classroom supervisors, and principals of schools serving the student teachers reflected positively on present program administration, on the role of the supervisor student teaching programs, and the continuation of the supervisory position. (MB)

  9. A Universe of Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeldovich, Yakov

    1992-01-01

    Reprinted from the original Russian manuscript of Yakov Zeldovich, this article chronicles his studies of the universe and his attempts to construct a theory of its evolution. He provides the high school student with compelling cosmological discussions about uniformity, galactic clusters, radiation, evolution, the big bang, and gravitational…

  10. Radiation in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Truemper, Joachim; Weisskopf, Martin

    1992-01-01

    When Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered radiation one hundred years ago, it seemed that what was discovered was one of the rarest and most volatile members of the family of the basic modules of our natural world. Today cosmologists report that a substantial part of the universe's radiation energy consists of X-rays, which travel through cosmic space with the speed of light.

  11. Designing cyclic universe models.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Justin; Steinhardt, Paul J; Turok, Neil

    2004-01-23

    The phenomenological constraints on the scalar field potential in cyclic models of the Universe are presented. We show that cyclic models require a comparable degree of tuning to that needed for inflationary models. The constraints are reduced to a set of simple design rules including "fast-roll" parameters analogous to the "slow-roll" parameters in inflation.

  12. A Universal Phylogenetic Tree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a universal phylogenetic tree suitable for use in high school and college-level biology classrooms. Illustrates the antiquity of life and that all life is related, even if it dates back 3.5 billion years. Reflects important evolutionary relationships and provides an exciting way to learn about the history of life. (SAH)

  13. The Universal Aspiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James Q.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that the most remarkable change in the moral history of humankind has been the rise (and the occasional application) of the view that all people, not just one's own kind, are entitled to fair treatment. Ethnic conflict and the role of universal dispositions of human behavior are discussed. (SLD)

  14. Teaching Geomorphology at University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, David; Hamilton, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Geomorphology courses in British universities emphasize the main landform/process systems rather than more abstract concepts. Recommends a more theoretical focus on fundamental geomorphic processes and methodological problems. Available from: Faculty of Modern Studies, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford OX3 OBP, England. (Author/AV)

  15. Universality of particle multiplicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e(+)e(-) interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  16. Revisiting the University Front

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Grahame; Lorenz, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The article argues that the most important trends in the recent metamorphosis of higher education, especially of university teaching and research, cannot be understood without placing them in the context of general developments in political life. Both processes reveal alarming features and there is a link between them. In recent decades a religion…

  17. A University Admissions System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ittig, Peter T.

    1977-01-01

    Presents a mathematical programming model that will make admit/reject decisions for freshman university applicants. The model is intended to aid reviewers in producing better, more consistent decisions. The author shows that a linear programming formulation will provide an efficient and practical solution for all but a very few applicants.…

  18. Observatory of Shiraz University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbar, G. H.; Bahrani, F.

    2016-12-01

    Here we write about the observatory of Shiraz University, which has the largest active telescope in Iran but now, because of problems like light pollution of the nearby city and exhaustion of its largest telescope we need a plan for modernization and automatization in a new place.

  19. Alternatives to Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellert, Claudius; And Others

    This report charts the recent development of the non-university sector of higher education in some OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries. It shows that during the 1980s this sector most often succeeded in enhancing its standing and recognition among students, employers, and the academic world alike. Its progress in…

  20. Universal fungal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Mawieh

    2012-01-01

    The complex nature of fungal pathogens, the intricate host-pathogen relationship and the health status of subjects in need of antifungal vaccination continue to hamper efforts to develop fungal vaccines for clinical use. That said, the rise of the universal vaccine concept is hoped to revive fungal vaccine research by expanding the pool of vaccine candidates worthy of clinical evaluation. It can do so through antigenic commonality-based screening for vaccine candidates from a wide range of pathogens and by reassessing the sizable collection of already available experimental and approved vaccines. Development of experimental vaccines protective against multiple fungal pathogens is evidence of the utility of this concept in fungal vaccine research. However, universal fungal vaccines are not without difficulties; for instance, development of vaccines with differential effectiveness is an issue that should be addressed. Additionally, rationalizing the development of universal fungal vaccines on health or economic basis could be contentious. Herein, universal fungal vaccines are discussed in terms of their potential usefulness and possible drawbacks. PMID:22922769

  1. Should Universities Promote Employability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Employability is becoming increasingly central to the mission and functioning of universities, spurred on by national and supranational agencies, and the demands of marketisation. This article provides a response to the normative dimensions of the question, progressing through four stages: first, there is a brief consideration of the meaning and…

  2. Universal Teller Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPage Area Vocational Education Authority, Addison, IL.

    This curriculum guide has been designed to provide the teacher with a basis for planning a comprehensive program in the career field of universal teller, and to allow the teacher and learner maximum flexibility. The teaching or instruction, in both educational and financial institutions, can be accomplished through large formal groups, small…

  3. Discovering the Invisible Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of radio waves, infrared, and x-rays and their importance in describing the universe and its origins is discussed. Topics include radio waves from space, the radio pioneers of World War II, radio telescopes, infrared radiation, satellites, space missions, and x-ray telescopes. (KR)

  4. Life in the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The belief that life exists in the universe is an optimism shared by many. With several manned missions expected to be carried out in the future, the possibility of discovering life in outer space will revolutionize the field of astrobiology. In this article, the author presents a summary of recent developments and discoveries made in the search…

  5. The Catholic University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danneels, Godfried

    2001-01-01

    Explores the nature and mission of the Catholic university, addressing a wide range of topics, including the search for truth, the full depth of humanity, institutional autonomy, harmonization of knowledge, ties to the church, cross-cultural dialogue, evangelization, academic freedom, pluralism, the Catholic sensibility, and leadership. (EV)

  6. University Instruction in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains three papers presented at a symposium on university instruction in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Janice Black at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Facilitating Transfer of Learning from the Classroom to the Workplace" (Brenda S. Gardner, Sharon J. Korth)…

  7. Islamist Movement Challenges Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    In Tunisian and Egyptian universities, scholars face a growing Islamist resolve to remake their countries on the basis of religious principles. Both Tunisia and Egypt face questions that could affect higher education across the Middle East and North Africa: Can their new Islamist governments spread conservative religious values and also create…

  8. University Student Online Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  9. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  10. University for Masses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Motilal

    Education, a basic need, is the foundation of developing countries such as Bangladesh. Ignorance and illiteracy are obstacles to growth and technological progress. Formal schooling must be supplemented with nonformal education, distance education, and out-of-school education for workers who want to continue their studies. Universities must develop…

  11. Universal Index System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Steve; Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timos; Wallace, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    The Universal Index System (UIS) is an index management system that uses a uniform interface to solve the heterogeneity problem among database management systems. UIS provides an easy-to-use common interface to access all underlying data, but also allows different underlying database management systems, storage representations, and access methods.

  12. Creating Adaptable Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanier, Graham B.

    2010-01-01

    Shifting demographics, rising costs of operations, a changing competitive landscape, reductions in state appropriations, pressures for accountability, and a widespread economic decline characterize the environment in which today's colleges and universities operate. This article examines some of the current responses to these challenges and…

  13. [University of California Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Carol S.

    The historical development of the University of California Archives is traced. In 1929 the U.S. Bureau of the Budget foresaw the need to develop a method to rapidly separate valuable from routine documents and to establish guidelines for the evaluation of records. Records management -- a system to store, service, analyze, and weed documents -- has…

  14. Entropy of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Humitaka

    2010-06-01

    Charles Darwin's calculation of a life of Earth had ignited Kelvin's insight on a life of Sun, which had eventually inherited to the physical study of stellar structure and energy source. Nuclear energy had secured a longevity of the universe and the goal of the cosmic evolution has been secured by the entropy of black holes.

  15. Toward the Multicultural University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowser, Benjamin P., Ed.; And Others

    This book is about the growing need for a more inclusive curriculum and university. The debate about multicultural education is moved from an ideological debate to the realm of the practical in these selections. The first part of the book outlines the demographic and historic realities that make multiculturalism imperative. The second part gives…

  16. The University as Microcosm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaldis, Byron

    2009-01-01

    This paper puts forward the model of "microcosm-macrocosm" isomorphism encapsulated in certain philosophical views on the form of university education. The human being as a "microcosm" should reflect internally the external "macrocosm". Higher Education is a socially instituted attempt to guide human beings into forming themselves as microcosms of…

  17. Evolution of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primack, Joel

    2006-04-01

    Cosmology is in the midst of a scientific revolution that is establishing its lasting foundations. The good agreement between many different sorts of observations and the predictions of the now-standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) theory gives us hope that this is humanity's first picture of the history of the universe as a whole that might actually be true. An unexpected feature of this new picture is that we humans appear to be central or special in many ways -- for example, we are made of the rarest stuff in the universe (stardust); we are intermediate in size between the smallest possible size (the Planck length) and the largest size (the cosmic horizon); and we are living at a pivotal time: the period in the history of the universe when its expansion began to accelerate rather than slow down, and in the middle of the ten-billion-year lifetime of our solar system and of the billion year most habitable period of our planet, and at what must be the end of the exponential growth of human impact on the earth. This talk will review key observations that support modern cosmology, describe some symbolic ways of understanding the modern cosmos, and discuss some possible implications of a cosmic perspective for our 21st century worldview. Based on a new book, The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos, by Joel R. Primack and Nancy Ellen Abrams (Riverhead Books, April 2006).

  18. Overseas Universities 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, R. G., Ed.

    Educational policies and programs in overseas universities of developing nations are explored in a series of nine articles. In "Development and the Role of the Humanities," Sir Cyril Philips calls for a reconsideration of the role of the humanities in the educational policies of developing nations and international aid-giving agencies.…

  19. Defining the University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Janet

    1978-01-01

    Reports discussion at the annual meeting of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) on such topics as overproduction, government support, "on demand" publishing, profitability, library photocopying, and selection in library acquisitions, as they relate to the roles of librarians and publishers. (JPF)

  20. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  1. Organizing University Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Thomas E.

    During a period of projected declining enrollments some years ago, colleges and universities began looking to business and industry for models and methods to achieve stability and exhibit accountability. Zero-based budgeting, computerized record keeping, and planned-programmed-budgeting systems found their way to college campuses. A trend to…

  2. Entrepreneurial Planning: Tufts University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on key strategic decisions taken at Tufts University (Massachusetts) under President Jean Mayer noting the role of formal planning and institutional research. Initiatives in the following areas are described: the School of Veterinary Medicine, nutrition, environmental management, entrepreneurial liberation, fund raising, and a…

  3. Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracken, Bruce A.; McCallum, R. Steve

    This kit presents all components of the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT), a newly developed instrument designed to measure the general intelligence and cognitive abilities of children and adolescents (ages 5 through 17) who may be disadvantaged by traditional verbal and language-loaded measures such as children with speech, language,…

  4. Universities Are Funny Places!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Universities are funny places. They have a strong sense of hierarchy and rank. They have an amazing disparity in salary levels and status between staff, are class conscious, and are run by a large bureaucracy that oils and keeps the machinery going. They operate as educational institutions and yet also are entrepreneurial, marketing themselves in…

  5. Censorship and University Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, Stewart

    Official censorship should not exist in university theatre productions. What censorship does exist is primarily unofficial--often unspoken--and consists of group, authority, and financial pressures on the director and the production staff, influencing them to avoid risks necessary for artistic growth and intellectual development. This sort of…

  6. Personnel Management. Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual is one of 10 completed in the Ohio Management Improvement Program (MIP) during the 1971-73 biennium. In this project, Ohio's 34 public universities and colleges, in an effort directed and staffed by the Ohio Board of Regents, have developed manuals of management practices, in this case, concerning personnel management. Emphasis in this…

  7. Universities in Their Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Universities often seem to be far more concerned about their international connections than their local relationships. The local context seems not to matter much either to their jetsetting vice-chancellors or to their lecturers and researchers under pressure to get papers published in obscure journals. That is how it may seem, but it is not…

  8. NRC Targets University Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Eliot

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) wants universities to convert to low-grade fuel in their research reactions. Researchers claim the conversion, which will bring U.S. reactors in line with a policy the NRC is trying to impress on foreigners, could be financially and scientifically costly. Impact of the policy is considered. (JN)

  9. The Open University Opens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy, Ed.

    Conceived by the British Labor Government in the 1960's the Open University was viewed as a way to extend higher education to Britain's working class, but enrollment figures in classes that represent traditional academic disciplines show that the student population is predominantly middle class. Bringing education into the home presents numerous…

  10. Masters of the universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Matt; Stock, Dave

    2010-08-01

    MEETING REPORT Massive stars make a profound impact on their surroundings, their galaxies and the evolution of the universe as a whole. Matt Austin and Dave Stock report on an RAS Discussion Meeting that considered current progress in understanding these complex stars.

  11. The University Needs "You"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Colleges and universities need English education professors who know what it is to teach five classes a day, accommodate IEPs, and still take on extracurricular activities. They need English education professors who not only present at NCTE Annual Conventions, but who also want to be in schools talking to teachers on a regular basis. They need…

  12. The Changing University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom, Ed.

    This collection of papers investigates change and compares university education experiences worldwide, looking at it from the perspective of numbers of students, range of institutions, funding, institutional functions, boundaries, and directions, orientation of students and staff, and institutional change. After an introduction by Tom Schuler,…

  13. The Universe's First Fireworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster VersionFigure 1Figure 2

    This is an image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of stars and galaxies in the Ursa Major constellation. This infrared image covers a region of space so large that light would take up to 100 million years to travel across it. Figure 1 is the same image after stars, galaxies and other sources were masked out. The remaining background light is from a period of time when the universe was less than one billion years old, and most likely originated from the universe's very first groups of objects -- either huge stars or voracious black holes. Darker shades in the image on the left correspond to dimmer parts of the background glow, while yellow and white show the brightest light.

    Brief History of the Universe In figure 2, the artist's timeline chronicles the history of the universe, from its explosive beginning to its mature, present-day state.

    Our universe began in a tremendous explosion known as the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago (left side of strip). Observations by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer and Wilkinson Anisotropy Microwave Probe revealed microwave light from this very early epoch, about 400,000 years after the Big Bang, providing strong evidence that our universe did blast into existence. Results from the Cosmic Background Explorer were honored with the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics.

    A period of darkness ensued, until about a few hundred million years later, when the first objects flooded the universe with light. This first light is believed to have been captured in data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The light detected by Spitzer would have originated as visible and ultraviolet light, then stretched, or redshifted, to lower-energy infrared wavelengths during its long voyage to reach us across expanding space. The light detected by the

  14. The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  15. Universe or Multiverse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    Part I. Overviews: 1. Introduction and overview Bernard Carr; 2. Living in the multiverse Steven Weinberg; 3. Enlightenment, knowledge, ignorance, temptation Frank Wilczek; Part II. Cosmology and Astrophysics: 4. Cosmology and the multiverse Martin J. Rees; 5. The anthropic principle revisited Bernard Carr; 6. Cosmology from the top down Stephen Hawking; 7. The multiverse hierarchy Max Tegmark; 8. The inflationary universe Andrei Linde; 9. A model of anthropic reasoning: the dark to ordinary matter ratio Frank Wilczek; 10. Anthropic predictions: the case of the cosmological constant Alexander Vilenkin; 11. The definition and classification of universes James D. Bjorken; 12. M/string theory and anthropic reasoning Renata Kallosh; 13. The anthropic principle, dark energy and the LHC Savas Dimopoulos and Scott Thomas; Part III. Particle Physics and Quantum Theory: 14. Quarks, electrons and atoms in closely related universes Craig J. Hogan; 15. The fine-tuning problems of particle physics and anthropic mechanisms John F. Donoghue; 16. The anthropic landscape of string theory Leonard Susskind; 17. Cosmology and the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics Viatcheslav Mukhanov; 18. Anthropic reasoning and quantum cosmology James B. Hartle; 19. Micro-anthropic principle for quantum theory Brandon Carter; Part IV. More General Philosophical Issues: 20. Scientific alternatives to the anthropic principle Lee Smolin; 21. Making predictions in a multiverse: conundrums, dangers, coincidences Anthony Aguirre; 22. Multiverses: description, uniqueness and testing George Ellis; 23. Predictions and tests of multiverse theories Don N. Page; 24. Observation selection theory and cosmological fine-tuning Nick Bostrom; 25. Are anthropic arguments, involving multiverses and beyond, legitimate? William R. Stoeger; 26. The multiverse hypothesis: a theistic perspective Robin Collins; 27. Living in a simulated universe John D. Barrow; 28. Universes galore: where will it all end? Paul

  16. Are "universal" DNA primers really universal?

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pranay; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi

    2014-11-01

    "Universal" DNA primers LCO 1490 and HCO 2198 were originally designed from three coding and six anticoding strands by comparing highly conserved regions of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) genes across 15 taxa. These primers have been successful in amplifying a 710-bp fragment of highly conserved regions of the COI gene for more than 80 invertebrate species from 11 phyla. In the present study, 130,843 variations were reviewed in the primer region of mitochondrial molecular markers by comparing 725 COI sequences from the kingdom Animalia. It was found that, for 177 invertebrate species, the forward primer (LCO 1490) showed only four conserved regions, compared to 12 in the original study. For ascidians, fungi and vertebrates, it showed approximately 50 % conserved regions, dropping to one conserved region for echinoderms. However, the reverse primer (HCO 2198) was highly conserved across 725 COI primer sequences. A similar pattern was observed in amino acid distributions. There was a significant difference in the means of base pair differences from the level of family, genus and species for LCO 1490 [analysis of variance (ANOVA), F 6,188 = 8.193, P < 0.001] and at the level of genus and species for HCO 2198 (ANOVA, F 6,77 = 2.538, P < 0.027). We conclude that, at different taxonomic levels, it is possible to design forward primers from reference sequences belonging to the level of order (maximum 5 bp differences), family (maximum 6 bp differences) or genus (maximum 1 bp difference). Reverse primers can be designed from the level of family (maximum 5 bp differences) or genus (maximum 2 bp differences).

  17. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughery, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  18. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  19. The Mechanical Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frautschi, Steven C.; Olenick, Richard P.; Apostol, Tom M.; Goodstein, David L.

    2008-04-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction to the mechanical universe; 2. The law of falling bodies; 3. The language of nature: derivatives and integrals; 4. Inertia; 5. Vectors; 6. Newton's laws and equilibrium; 7. Universal gravitation and circular motion; 8. Forces; 9. Forces in accelerating reference frames; 10. Energy: conservation and conversion; 11. The conservation of momentum; 12. Oscillatory motion; 13. Angular momentum; 14. Rotational dynamics for rigid bodies; 15. Gyroscopes; 16. Kepler's laws and the conic sections; 17. Solving the Kepler problem; 18. Navigating in space; 19. Temperatures and the gas laws; 20. The engine of nature; 21. Entropy; 22. The quest for low temperature; Appendix A. The international system of units; Appendix B. Conversion factors; Appendix C. Formulas from algebra, geometry, and trigonometry; Appendix D. Astronomical data; Appendix E. Physical constraints; Selected bibliography; Index.

  20. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2010-04-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  1. The Universe at Large

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, Guido; Mampaso, Antonio; Sánchez, Francisco

    1997-11-01

    The Universe at Large presents a unique survey of key questions outstanding in contemporary astronomy and cosmology. In this timely volume, eleven of the world's greatest living astronomers and cosmologists present personal views of what problems must be addressed by future research. Allan Sandage presents a 23-point plan to reach a full understanding of the large-scale structure in the Universe; Geoffrey Burbidge looks at the future of the Quasi Steady State alternative to the Big Bang; E. Margaret Burbidge, Donald Osterbrock and Malcolm Longair discuss active galactic nuclei (AGN); Igor Novikov, Donald Lynden-Bell, Martin Rees and Rashid Sunyaev look at the physics of black holes; and Bernard Pagel and Hubert Reeves concentrate on what we don't yet understand about elements in the cosmos. This book provides a unique review of our current understanding in astronomy and cosmology and a host of profitable research ideas for graduate students and researchers.

  2. Life in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    Live Webcast from Europe's Leading Research Organisations Summary Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 50 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists, astronomers and other scientists have worked tirelessly to answer these fundamental questions. And now this November via webcast, all the world will have the opportunity to see and hear the latest news on extraterrestrial life from the most prestigious research centers and how for the past three months, European students have had the chance to jump into the scientists' shoes and explore these questions for themselves. The event is being sponsored by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , in cooperation with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). "Life in the Universe" is being mounted in collaboration with the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission for the European Week of Science and Technology in November 2001 . "Life in the Universe" competitions are already underway in 23 European countries to find the best projects from school students between 14 and 18. Two winning teams from each country will be invited to a final event at CERN in Geneva on 8-11 November 2001 to present their projects and discuss them with a panel of International Experts at a special three-day event. They will also compete for the "Super Prize" - a free visit to ESA's and ESO's research and technology facilities at Kourou and Paranal in South America. Students participating in the programme are encouraged to present their views on extraterrestrial life creatively. The only requirement is that the views be based upon scientific evidence. Many projects are being submitted just now - among them are scientific essays

  3. Beyond universal precautions.

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, J W

    1995-01-01

    Universal precautions have gained wide acceptance in the literature and are promoted by major health care regulatory bodies as a measure to prevent nosocomial transmission of bloodborne diseases. Nevertheless, Dr. James G. Wright and associates (see pages 1089 to 1095 of this issue) provide evidence of the infrequent use of universal precautions by surgeons in Toronto. Their findings are consistent with those of similar studies and point to the limitations of any safety approach that relies on the active compliance of individuals rather than on passive, environmental controls. Successful approaches to optimizing workplace safety should first emphasize passive measures for risk abatement, including firm policies, the use of safer equipment and techniques, procedural safeguards and regular monitoring. Routine voluntary screening of patients undergoing procedures that pose a high risk of contamination may improve compliance to safety procedures by health care personnel. Further study is required. PMID:7712416

  4. Mapping the universe.

    PubMed

    Geller, M J; Huchra, J P

    1989-11-17

    Maps of the galaxy distribution in the nearby universe reveal large coherent structures. The extent of the largest features is limited only by the size of the survey. Voids with a density typically 20 percent of the mean and with diameters of 5000 km s(-1) are present in every survey large enough to contain them. Many galaxies lie in thin sheet-like structures. The largest sheet detected so far is the "Great Wall" with a minimum extent of 60 h(-1) Mpc x 170 h(-1) Mpc, where h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The frequent occurrence of these structures is one of several serious challenges to our current understanding of the origin and evolution of the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe.

  5. University Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    W.D. Reese

    2004-02-24

    Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center.

  6. Universality of particle multiplicities

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K. |

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  7. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-06

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  8. Inflation in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    The hot big bang cosmology, or the standard cosmology as it is appropriately known, is a highly successful model, providing a reliable and tested accounting of the Universe from 0.01 sec after the bang until today, some 15 Gyr later. However, very special initial data seem to be required in order to account for the observed smoothness and flatness of our Hubble volume and for the existence of the small primeval density inhomogeneities required for the formation of structure in the Universe. Inflation offers a means of accounting for these special initial data, which is based upon physics at sub-planck energy scales (<< m/sub pl/ approx. = 10/sup 19/ GeV) and is motivated by contemporary ideas in particle theory. Here I review the status of the 'Inflationary Paradigm'. At present essentially all inflationary models involve a very weakly-coupled (quantified by the presence of a dimensionless parameter of order 10/sup -12/ or so) scalar field which is displaced from the minimum of its potential. Regions of the Universe where the scalar field is initially displaced from its minimum undergo inflation as the scalar field relaxes, resulting in a Universe today which resembles ours in regions much larger than our present Hubble volume (approx. = 10/sup 28/ cm), but which on very large scales (>> 10/sup 28/ cm) may be highly irregular. The most conspicuous blemish on the paradigm is the lack of a compelling particle physics model to implement it. I also review some other unresolved issues, and discuss in detail the all important confrontation between inflation and observational data. Finally, I discuss the possibility that inflation leads to large-scale, primeval magnetic fields of sufficient strength to be of astrophysical interest. 123 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Astronomy in Romanian universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosu, Mihail

    In this work we present characteristics of the Romanian higher education related to the study of Astronomy. In spite of Romanian economic problems, opportunities for Bachelor's degree, Master's degree (at "Babes-Bolyai" University of Cluj-Napoca) and Ph.D. degree are provided for students enrolled at the faculties of Mathematics or Physics. General regulations, description of courses, research resources and job opportunities are also described and discussed in this paper.

  10. Kansas State University

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, T.; Carnes, K.; Needham, V.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has fabricated the niobium resonators and some other linac components required for the superconducting accel/decel linac now in operation at Kansas State University. Several staff members from KSU spent a substantial period of time at ANL during FY 1985 in order to learn the technology, and they return occasionally to assemble and test the resonators. There is a continuing interchange of technical information between ANL and KSU related to linac operations, tuning, and resonator maintenance.

  11. Sustainability of Universal ILE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    64.71 % Moderately Important 5 9.41 % 1 5.88 % ree from a Civilian Un Extremely Important 1 6.25 % Moderately Important 5 31.25...Undecided 1 5.88 % 7 00.00 % ree from a Extremely Important 4 4 23.53 % Undecided 1 5.88 % 7 00.00 % ee... Laurence I. Radway. Soldiers and Scholars: M National Policy. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1957. ick, David. The Downsized

  12. Imagine the Universe!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Welcome to Imagine the Universe! Contained on this CD-ROM you will find three astronomy and space science learning centers, individually captured from the World Wide Web in December of 2000. Each site contains its own learning adventure full of facts, fun, beautiful images, movies, and excitement. (1) Imagine The Universe: this site is dedicated to a discussion about our Universe... what we know about it, how it is evolving, and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains. Emphasizing the X-ray and gamma-ray parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, it also discusses how scientists know what they know, what mysteries remain, and how the answers to remaining mysteries may one day be found. Lots of movies, quizzes, and a special section for educators. Geared for ages 14 and up. This site can be viewed on-line at http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/. (2) StarChild- a learning center for young astronomers: the 1998 Webby Award Winner for Best Education Website, StarChild is aimed at ages 4-14. It contains easy-to-understand information about our Solar System, the Universe, and space exploration. There are also activities, songs, movies, and puzzles. This site can be viewed on-line at http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/. (3) Astronomy Picture of the Day: APOD offers a new astronomical image and caption each calendar day. We have captured the year 2000 entries of this award-winning site and included them on the disk. The images and information provide a wonderful resource for all ages. This site can be viewed on-line at http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html.

  13. Dark matter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter-a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations-from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology-a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)-fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  14. Dark matter universe

    PubMed Central

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  15. Universal Stoppers Are Rupert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Richard P.; Wetzel, John E.

    2008-01-01

    A stopper is called "universal" if it can be used to plug pipes whose cross-sections are a circle, a square, and an isosceles triangle, with the diameter of the circle, the side of the square, and the base and altitude of the triangle all equal. Echoing the well-known result for equal cubes that is attributed to Prince Rupert, we show that it is…

  16. Universality and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas Christian

    The first run at the Large Hadron Collider has deeply challenged conventional notions of naturalness, and CMB polarization experiments are about to open a new window to early universe cosmology. As a compelling candidate for the ultraviolet completion of the standard model, string theory provides a prime opportunity to study both early universe cosmology and particle physics. However, relating low energy observations to ultraviolet physics requires knowledge of the metastable states of string theory through the study of vacua. While it is difficult to directly obtain infrared data from explicit string theory constructions, string theory imposes constraints on low energy physics. The study of ensembles of low energy theories consistent with ultra-violet constraints provides insight on generic features we might expect to occur in string compactifications. In this thesis we present a statistical treatment of vacuum stability and vacuum properties in the context of random supergravity theories motivated by string theory. Early universe cosmology provides another avenue to high energy physics. From the low energy perspective large field inflation is typically considered highly unnatural: the scale relevant for the diameter of flat regions in moduli space is sub-Planckian in regions of perturbative control. To approach this problem, we consider generic Calabi-Yau compactifications of string theory and find that super-Planckian diameters of axion fundamental domains in fact arise generically. We further demonstrate that such super-Planckian flat regions are plausibly consistent with theWeak Gravity Conjecture.

  17. Unfolding our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, Iain

    1999-10-01

    The beauty of the stars, the planets, and other faraway objects of wonder is readily apparent, while the reason for their splendor is not. Now, there exists a source of expert advice that amateur astronomers and interested stargazers can actually understand: Unfolding Our Universe. Popular science writer and award winning author Iain Nicolson opens the world of astronomy to a wide audience. He takes readers into the heart of the Universe, clearly detailing the facts, concepts, methods, and current findings of astronomical science. This unique book strikes a perfect balance between the fundamentals of the subject and cutting-edge research. Step by step, the volume leads to a complete understanding of astronomy. Readers can access the material without referring to any mathematical principles or formulas. The well-designed text allows more ambitious readers to easily delve more deeply into key points and consult basic mathematics found within self-contained boxes. More than 100 full-color photographs beautifully and clearly illustrate all concepts. The wealth of color illustrations and very readable chapters make this book a delight for the casual reader to browse, while the clear and concise explanations will appeal to anyone with an interest in the science of astronomy. Iain Nicolson is the author or co-author of some 17 books, including The Universe (with Patrick Moore) and Heavenly Bodies. In 1995, he received the Eric Zucker Award from the Federation of Astronomical Societies (UK) for his work in popularizing the subject.

  18. The Flying University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Catherine

    The Flying University is solo theater performance framed as an academic lecture about Marie Curie and her discovery of radium, delivered to a group of women who have gathered in secret to further their education. As the lecture proceeds, the professor brings in her own research based on a study of Esther Horsch (1905-1991) who lived on a farm in central Illinois. She introduces data from Esther's journals, personal memories, and dreams about Esther's life. The professor's investigation of radium plays at the intersections of magical and mundane, decay and the transformation of life, and the place of ambition in these two women's lives. The intention of this piece is to explore these themes, which are full of mystery, through the traces of the daily lives of Mme. Curie and Esther. Their words and photos are used as roots from which to imagine the things that echo beyond their familiar work; elemental and also fantastically radiant. The Flying University was written and performed by Catherine Friesen April 27-29, 2012 in the Center for Performance Experiment at Hamilton College as part of the University of South Carolina MFA Acting Class of 2013 showcase, Pieces of Eight.

  19. [Universal electrogustometer EG-2].

    PubMed

    Wałkanis, Andrzej; Czesak, Michał; Pleskacz, Witold A

    2011-01-01

    Electrogustometry is a method for taste diagnosis and measurement. The EG-2 project is being developed in cooperation between Warsaw University of Technology and Military institute of Medicine in Warsaw. The device is an evolution of the recent universal electrogustometer EG-1 prototype. Due to considerations and experiences acquired during prototype usage, many enhancements have been incorporated into device. The aim was to create an easy-to-use, portable, battery powered device, enabled for fast measurements. Developed electrogustometer is using innovative, low-power microprocessor system, which control whole device. User interface is based on 5.7" graphical LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) and touchscreen. It can be directly operated by finger or with optional stylus. Dedicated GUI (Graphical User Interface) offers simple, predefined measurements and advance settings of signal parameters. It is also possible to store measurements results and patients data in an internal memory. User interface is multilanguage. Signals for patients examinations, supplied with bipolar electrode, are generated by an on-board circuit using DDS (Direct-Digital Synthesis) and DAC (Digital-to-Analog Converter). Electrogustometer is able to generate DC, sinus, triangle or rectangle signals with current amplitude from 0 to 500 pA and frequency form 0 to 500 Hz. Device is designed for manual and automeasurement modes. By using USB (Universal Serial Bus) port it is possible to retrieve data stored in internal memory and charging of built-in Li-lon battery as a source of power.

  20. Reinventing the research university

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Research universities today, are defined qualitatively by the amount of research carried out and by the relative mix of the educational activities of the faculty members and their research programs. This reflects a successful model, emulated by other countries. However, this model may not be well suited for the next fifty years. The author describes the characteristics of Research Universities and the past and present situations. The American society expectations have changed for science and technology. The technological sophistication of overseas competitions have brought economic growth to the the forefront as an important client of the benefits that would accrue from the national Research and Development (R&D) investments. Future R&D will require attention to costs and benefits as decisions to fund competing programs will be largely economically based. The transformation of research universities to make them appropriate social institutions for the 21st century requires reinvention which is very different from reengineering. The author offers a framework and rationales for bringing about these needed changes. 3 refs.

  1. The universal ancestor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C.

    1998-01-01

    A genetic annealing model for the universal ancestor of all extant life is presented; the name of the model derives from its resemblance to physical annealing. The scenario pictured starts when "genetic temperatures" were very high, cellular entities (progenotes) were very simple, and information processing systems were inaccurate. Initially, both mutation rate and lateral gene transfer levels were elevated. The latter was pandemic and pervasive to the extent that it, not vertical inheritance, defined the evolutionary dynamic. As increasingly complex and precise biological structures and processes evolved, both the mutation rate and the scope and level of lateral gene transfer, i.e., evolutionary temperature, dropped, and the evolutionary dynamic gradually became that characteristic of modern cells. The various subsystems of the cell "crystallized," i.e., became refractory to lateral gene transfer, at different stages of "cooling," with the translation apparatus probably crystallizing first. Organismal lineages, and so organisms as we know them, did not exist at these early stages. The universal phylogenetic tree, therefore, is not an organismal tree at its base but gradually becomes one as its peripheral branchings emerge. The universal ancestor is not a discrete entity. It is, rather, a diverse community of cells that survives and evolves as a biological unit. This communal ancestor has a physical history but not a genealogical one. Over time, this ancestor refined into a smaller number of increasingly complex cell types with the ancestors of the three primary groupings of organisms arising as a result.

  2. Nosocomial infections in the ICU: Pens and spectacles as fomites.

    PubMed

    Murad, Haris Farooq; Inam Pal, Khowaja Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Non-medical objects known as fomites may have a role in their genesis. We investigated the significance of writing pens and spectacles as fomites. The study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from July 2013 to September 2013. Cultures were taken from pens and/or spectacles of resident nurses, doctors and nursing assistants in intensive care unit (ICU). Organisms important in ICU nosocomial infections were targeted. Seven rounds of sampling over 3 weeks led to 55 pen and 5 spectacle samples. Growth was seen in 3(5.5%) pen samples and 1(20%) spectacle sample. Two (3.6%) pen cultures grew acinetobacter, 1)1.8%) grew candida and acinetobacter, and i spectacle culture grew vancomycin-resistant enterococcus faecium (VRE). Two out of the 4 (50%) personnel managing all ICU beds had growth. During the study, one or more ICU patients had infection with the same organisms. Pens and spectacles may be responsible for the spread of organisms like acinetobacter and VRE. Personnel managing multiple beds are more likely to carry contaminated fomites.

  3. Stretching the boundaries of medical education A case of medical college embracing humanities and social sciences in medical education

    PubMed Central

    Ghias, Kulsoom; Khan, Kausar S; Ali, Rukhsana; Azfar, Shireen; Ahmed, Rashida

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Aga Khan University, a private medical college, had a vision of producing physicians who are not only scientifically competent, but also socially sensitive, the latter by exposure of medical students to a broad-based curriculum. The objective of this study was to identify the genesis of broad-based education and its integration into the undergraduate medical education program as the Humanities and Social Sciences (HASS) course. Methods: A qualitative methodology was used for this study. Sources of data included document review and in-depth key informant interviews. Nvivo software was utilized to extract themes. Results: The study revealed the process of operationalization of the institutional vision to produce competent and culturally sensitive physicians. The delay in the establishment of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, which was expected to take a lead role in the delivery of a broad-based education, led to the development of an innovative HASS course in the medical curriculum. The study also identified availability of faculty and resistance from students as challenges faced in the implementation and evolution of HASS. Conclusions: The description of the journey and viability of integration of HASS into the medical curriculum offers a model to medical colleges seeking ways to produce socially sensitive physicians. PMID:27648038

  4. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever nosocomial infection in a immunosuppressed patient, Pakistan: case report and virological investigation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Zahra; Mahmood, Faisal; Jamil, Bushra; Atkinson, Barry; Mohammed, Murtaza; Samreen, Azra; Altaf, Lamia; Moatter, Tariq; Hewson, Roger

    2013-03-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is endemic in the Baluchistan province, Pakistan. Sporadic outbreaks of CCHF occur throughout the year especially in individuals in contact with infected livestock. Nosocomial transmission remains a risk due to difficulties in the diagnosis of CCHF and limited availability of facilities for the isolation of suspected patients. Rapid diagnosis of CCHF virus infection is required for early management of the disease and to prevent transmission. This study describes the case of a 43-year-old surgeon who contracted CCHF during a surgical procedure in Quetta, Baluchistan and who was transferred to a tertiary care facility at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi within 1 week of contracting the infection. Diagnosis of CCHF was made using a rapid real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for CCHF viral RNA. The patient had chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis D infection for which he had previously received a liver transplant. He proceeded to develop classic hemorrhagic manifestations and succumbed to the infection 14 days post-onset of disease. There was no further nosocomial transmission of the CCHF during the hospital treatment of the surgeon. Early diagnosis of CCHF enables rapid engagement of appropriate isolation, barrier nursing and infection control measures thus preventing nosocomial transmission of the virus.

  5. New Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus as an Unusual Presentation of a Suspected Organophosphate Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Shahan; Sabeen, Amber; Ullah Khan, Nadeem

    2014-01-01

    New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a new entity in medical literature. It has different infectious and noninfectious etiologies showing a devastating impact onto the clinical outcome of patients. Therapy with anaesthetic and antiepileptic agents often fails to improve the condition, unless the primary cause is rectified. Here is presented the case of a young female with a history of depression who after a recent bereavement came to the Emergency Department of Aga Khan University Hospital with complaints of drowsiness that lasted for few hours. Though she had no history of organophosphate poisoning, her physical examination and further investigations were suggestive of the diagnosis. During her hospital stay, she developed refractory status epilepticus. Her seizures did not respond to standard antiepileptic and intravenous anesthetic agents and subsided only after intravenous infusion of atropine for a few days. Organophosphate poisoning is a very common presentation in the developing world and the associated status epilepticus poses a devastating problem for emergency physicians. In patients with suspected organophosphate poisoning with favoring clinical exam findings, the continuation of atropine intravenous infusion can be a safe option to abate seizures. PMID:25580311

  6. The first competency-based higher education programme for midwives in the South Asian region--Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jan, Rafat; Lakhani, Arusa; Kaufman, Karyn; Karimi, Sadia

    2016-02-01

    Midwives in Pakistan and the South Asian region who complete a diploma program face many challenges for career growth and development. The absence of higher education in professional midwifery in the region has contributed to general non-acceptance and invisibility of midwifery. In response to the interest, Aga Khan University (AKU) developed bachelors program in midwifery based on the Global Standards for Midwifery Education developed by the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) with the vision to equip midwives to provide full-scope practice, develop confidence to practice midwifery independently, become clinical leaders and contribute to the future of midwifery. The final curriculum had a balance of theory and clinical practice in order to develop a high level of clinical competence that would meet the ICM standards and guidelines. The two year bachelors program is currently in progress. The first cohort of 21 midwives graduated in 2014 and a second cohort was enrolled in 2015. There is a planning for a future graduate program in midwifery to prepare individuals for leadership roles in practice, teaching, maternal-child health provision and policy making through a master's degree in midwifery.

  7. Prevalence of Acanthamoeba and superbugs in a clinical setting: coincidence or hyperparasitism?

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Sagheer, Mehwish; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Antibacterial strategies to eradicate superbugs from hospitals/nursing homes have had limited success, suggesting the need for employing innovative preventative measures and better understanding of the prevalence of microbial pathogens in close proximity of susceptible populations. A total of 120 environmental samples were collected from the Aga Khan University hospital. Amoebae were identified using morphological characteristics as well as PCR using genus-specific primers, while bacteria were identified using standard biochemical testing. Out of 120 samples tested, 52 (43.3 %) samples were positive for Acanthamoeba, while all 120 (100 %) samples were positive for bacteria. Following bacterial identification, samples showed mixed bacterial populations. Out of 120 samples, 76 (63.3 %) samples were positive for Bacillus spp., 64 (53.3 %) samples were positive for Corynebacterium spp., 32 (26.6 %) samples were positive for Staphylococcus spp., and 9 (7.5 %) samples were positive for Micrococcus spp. The antibiotic susceptibility showed that all bacterial isolates recovered were multiple drug-resistant. The current findings suggest that Acanthamoeba and bacteria coexist in a clinical environment. Given that Acanthamoeba can harbor bacteria, anti-amoebic approaches may represent a strategy in eradicating "superbugs" from the clinical setting in addition to the current measures.

  8. Olfactory neuroblastoma: A clinicopathological experience of a rare entity from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Saroona; Tariq, Muhammad Usman; Memon, Aisha; Fatima, Saira; Hasan, Sheema Habibul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To present the clinicopathological experience of Olfactory Neuroblastoma (ONB) with emphasis on histopathological and immunohistochemical features. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was done on 36 cases of ONB, selected by non-probability purposive sampling. Theses cases of ONB were retrieved and reviewed from surgical pathology database of Aga Khan University Hospital reported between January 1993 and March 2015. Results: Tumor size and age of presentation was wide in range without any distinct bimodal distribution. Nasal cavity was most common site along with involvement of paranasal sinuses. More than 50% cases had Kadish stage A. Microscopically, most cases were Grade-1 and majority showed partial or complete lobular architecture. Neurofibrillary matrix was observed in 2/3rd of cases. Among immunohistochemical markers, Neuron Specific Enolase was most frequently expressed. Unusual positive expression of Cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and Cytokeratin CAM5.2 was also seen focally in few cases. Conclusion: The ONB has great variability of histological and clinical presentation, and immunohistochemical markers are useful to differentiate from more common small round blue cell tumours of nasal cavity. PMID:27375694

  9. Early-onset neonatal sepsis in Pakistan: a case control study of risk factors in a birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Z A; Yusuf, K

    1997-10-01

    We prospectively evaluated risk factors for early-onset neonatal (EON) sepsis in a case-control study among inborn patients at the Aga Khan University Medical Centre in Karachi between 1990-1993. A total of 38 cases with blood culture proven bacterial sepsis were identified within 72 hr of birth (prevalence 5.6 of 1000 live births) and matched with two consecutive gender matched births with no complications. The most common isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (18%), group B Streptococci (13%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (13%). Univariate analysis of maternal risk factors revealed a significant association between maternal urinary tract infection (UTI) (odds ratio [OR]20, 95% confidence interval [CI]2.4-166.9), maternal pyrexia (P < 0.0001), vaginal discharge (P < 0.05), vaginal examinations during labor (P = 0.03), and EON sepsis. The infected newborns also had significantly lower apgar scores at birth (P < 0.0001) and a significantly greater number were intubated at birth (Fisher's exact test P = 0.04). Infected newborn infants were transferred out of the labor room earlier than noninfected controls and significantly fewer received exclusive breastfeeds (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.1-0.8). Our data suggest the possibility that both vertical transmission from the mother as well as postnatal acquisition of infection from the environment may be of importance in the pathogenesis of EON sepsis in Karachi. Preventive measures should focus at recognition of high-risk infants, strict asepsis during labor, and early institution of exclusive breastfeeding.

  10. Determinants of childhood mortality in slums of Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    D'souza, R M; Bryant, J H

    1999-01-01

    Pakistan has an infant mortality rate (IMR) of 90.5/1000 live births, and the country's child mortality level of 117.5 is worse than in other South Asian countries. Rapid population growth combined with rural-to-urban migration has led to the creation of urban slums in which morbidity levels are usually higher than in rural populations. A study was conducted in January 1993 in 6 slums of Karachi where the Aga Khan University has operated primary health care programs since 1985. Researchers recorded the deaths of 347 children under age 5 years old due to diarrhea and acute respiratory infections (ARI) during 1989-93. 235 mothers of these children were interviewed. The following are discussed as risk factors for under-5 child mortality: the use of traditional healers, poor nutritional status, incomplete or no immunization, the quick change of healers, inappropriate child care arrangements, mother's literacy, who decides about outside treatment, short birth interval, bottle feeding, and nuclear family structure. Maternal autonomy, appropriate health-seeking behavior, and child-rearing processes identified in the study point to the need for intervention strategies which go beyond the usual primary health care initiatives and involve communities in developing social support systems for mothers.

  11. SU-E-J-81: Adaptive Radiotherapy for IMRT Head & Neck Patient in AKUH

    SciTech Connect

    Yousuf, A; Qureshi, B; Qadir, A; Abbasi, N; Hussain, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study we proposed Adaptive radiotherapy for IMRT patients which will brought an additional dimension to the management of patients with H&N cancer in Aga Khan University Hospital. Methods: In this study 5 Head and Neck (H&N) patients plan where selected, who’s Re-CT were done during the course of their treatment, they were simulated with IMRT technique to learn the consequence of anatomical changes that may occur during the treatment, as they are more dramatic changes can occur as compare to conventional treatment. All the organ at risk were drawn according RTOG guidelines and doses were checked as per NCCN guidelines. Results: The reduction in size of Planning target volume (PTV) is more than 20% in all the cases which leads to 3 to 5 % overdose to normal tissues and Organ at Risk. Conclusion: Through this study we would like to emphasis the importance of Adaptive Radiotherapy practice in all IMRT (H&N) patients, although prospective studies are required with larger sample sizes to address the safety and the clinical effect of such approaches on patient outcome, also one need to develop protocols before implementation of this technique in practice.

  12. Obstetric patients in intensive care unit: Perspective from a teaching hospital in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Irfan Ahmed, Sheikh; Raza, Amir; Khurshid, Ayesha; Chishti, Uzma

    2016-01-01

    Objective Review of obstetric cases admitted to the intensive care unit. Design Ten year retrospective review of individual patients' medical records. Participants Records of obstetric patients admitted from 2005–2014. Setting Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi Main Outcome measures Diagnosis at the time of admission, associated risk factors, and intervention required aspects of management and rate of mortality. Findings A total of 194 obstetric patients were admitted out of which 86.2% of patients had ventilator support. Mortality was not seen to be significantly associated with parity and antenatal/postnatal status. The median age of patients was 34 years, minimum length of stay was 24 hours and maximum stay was 53 days. Sixty one percent of patients were admitted to with organ system failure. The overall mortality rate was 21.64% (42/194). The mortality rate was five times more likely in patients who had gastro-intestinal complication {Odds Ratio=4.87; 95%CI: 1.65-14.36}. The largest group of patients {28.4%} presented with hematological diagnosis. Conclusion When the intensive care unit admission became essential, primary diagnosis included: postpartum hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, sepsis and infectious diseases. An increased vigilance of high-risk pregnant women and a stabilization of their condition before intervention is administered, improves the outcome of these women. PMID:27895930

  13. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Faheem, Muhammad; Fahim, Ammad; Innocent, Haran; Mansoor, Zainab; Rizvi, Shehrbano; Farrukh, Hizra

    2016-01-01

    Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS). Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7%) patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient's awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7%) uneducated patients, 85 (59.4%) were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients. PMID:27752508

  14. Evaluation of the Parasight Platform for Malaria Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Yochay; Houri-Yafin, Arnon; Benkuzari, Hagai; Lezmy, Natalie; Soni, Mamta; Charles, Malini; Swaminathan, Jayanthi; Solomon, Hilda; Sampathkumar, Pavithra; Premji, Zul; Mbithi, Caroline; Nneka, Zaitun; Onsongo, Simon; Maina, Daniel; Levy-Schreier, Sarah; Cohen, Caitlin Lee; Gluck, Dan; Pollak, Joseph Joel; Salpeter, Seth J

    2017-03-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that nearly 500 million malaria tests are performed annually. While microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are the main diagnostic approaches, no single method is inexpensive, rapid, and highly accurate. Two recent studies from our group have demonstrated a prototype computer vision platform that meets those needs. Here we present the results from two clinical studies on the commercially available version of this technology, the Sight Diagnostics Parasight platform, which provides malaria diagnosis, species identification, and parasite quantification. We conducted a multisite trial in Chennai, India (Apollo Hospital [n = 205]), and Nairobi, Kenya (Aga Khan University Hospital [n = 263]), in which we compared the device to microscopy, RDTs, and PCR. For identification of malaria, the device performed similarly well in both contexts (sensitivity of 99% and specificity of 100% at the Indian site and sensitivity of 99.3% and specificity of 98.9% at the Kenyan site, compared to PCR). For species identification, the device correctly identified 100% of samples with Plasmodium vivax and 100% of samples with Plasmodium falciparum in India and 100% of samples with P. vivax and 96.1% of samples with P. falciparum in Kenya, compared to PCR. Lastly, comparisons of the device parasite counts with those of trained microscopists produced average Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.84 at the Indian site and 0.85 at the Kenyan site.

  15. Worth the Journey: The University Museum, University of Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academe: Bulletin of the AAUP, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Described is the University of Pennsylvania's University Museum, which is the nation's largest museum devoted to archaeology and anthropology. Though not an art museum, the University Museum contains objects of artistic quality as well as artifacts that reveal whole cultures of such areas as the Near East, Mediterranean, and Egypt. (JMD)

  16. Green University Initiatives in China: A Case of Tsinghua University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Wanxia; Zou, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine green university initiatives in the context of China, using Tsinghua University, which is China's green university pioneer, as a case study. Design/methodology/approach: The research method used for this paper is a case study based on participant observation and document analysis. The approach to…

  17. Critiquing Neoliberalism in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rea, Jeannie

    2016-01-01

    While students chanting "No cuts, No fees, No corporate universities" may be dismissed as youthful hyperbole by some, it is not as superficial a characterisation of the state of our public university system as it seems.

  18. The University of Southern California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Dawn Marie

    1985-01-01

    The University of Southern California's commitment to excellence as well as the significance of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps program in the university's mission to prepare the community's future leaders are discussed. ROTC faculty selection criteria are identified. (MLW)

  19. Nigerian University Libraries: What Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguolu, I. E.

    1996-01-01

    Nigerian university libraries are threatened by underfunding and inadequate collections and facilities. This article examines factors influencing the future prospects of Nigerian university libraries. Discusses Nigeria's mineral oil resources; political instability and stratification of ethnic groups; and the National Universities Commission, the…

  20. Reflections on Commercializing University Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hum, Derek

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the extent of commercialization of research in Canadian universities, explains why copyright enforcement is difficult, and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of licensing an innovation versus creating a spinoff company to exploit university discoveries. Explores issues related to sharing benefits of university discoveries. (SLD)

  1. The RAE and University Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, John

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates effects of the new British funding formula for universities, based on the research assessment exercise (RAE). Compares effects of the RAE on two contrasting universities and finds the RAE has dramatically affected university organization, teaching, and research. RAE may have increased efficiency in teaching and research but encourages…

  2. Remembering the University of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Nineteen essays comprise this personal and historical look at the University of Utah and the relationship between the university, its people, and the community. Essays include: "One Cannot Live Long Enough to Outgrow a University" (Ramona Wilcox Cannon); "Ever in the Freshness of Its Youth" (G. Homer Durham); "The Final…

  3. Colleges and Universities as Citizens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringle, Robert G., Ed.; Games, Richard, Ed.; Malloy, Edward A., Ed.

    This collection of 10 essays focuses on the role of colleges and universities as engaged citizens seeking to better their communities. The essays include: (1) "Colleges and Universities as Citizens: Issues and Perspectives" (Robert G. Bringle, Richard Games, and Edward A. Malloy); (2) "Ernest L. Boyer: Colleges and Universities as Citizens"…

  4. Texas A&M University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osters, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Texas A&M University is a research extensive institution located in College Station. More than 45,000 students attend the university (about 20% are graduate or professional students). Academically, the university is known for its engineering, business, and agricultural and veterinary medicine programs, although there are more than 150 programs…

  5. Downsizing the University: Bonne Chance!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelbaum, Steven H.; Patton, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Begins with a general discussion of downsizing and its outcomes, then offers an analysis of downsizing in higher education with an emphasis on three points: the factors causing universities to consider downsizing, the special nature of universities that makes downsizing particularly difficult, and the downsizing methods used by universities. (EV)

  6. Do Universities Have "Successful" Brands?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapleo, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Branding in universities is a topical issue, but arguably few UK universities have fully developed "successful" brands in the manner of commercial organizations. This qualitative paper explores the opinions of 40 opinion formers on which UK universities have successful brands and the associations these brands have. Current literature on…

  7. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  8. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Rempe, J. L.; Chase, B. M.

    2014-09-22

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  9. Flordia State University

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Frawley, A.; Myers, E.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne fabricated the niobium resonators and some auxiliary devices for the superconducting-linac energy booster built at Florida State University. Personnel from FSU came to ANL to assemble and test the resonators. The main resonator fabrication work for FSU was completed during 1986, but we continue to interact with personnel concerning ongoing refinements in the technology. Topics in which we were most recently involved are (1) a change in the method of cooling the FSU resonators and (2) the transfer of information about fast tuner upgrades. During the past year there was very little interaction.

  10. Universal optimal quantum correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscemi, Francesco; Dall'Arno, Michele; Ozawa, Masanao; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-10-01

    Recently, a novel operational strategy to access quantum correlation functions of the form Tr[AρB] was provided in [F. Buscemi, M. Dall'Arno, M. Ozawa and V. Vedral, arXiv:1312.4240]. Here we propose a realization scheme, that we call partial expectation values, implementing such strategy in terms of a unitary interaction with an ancillary system followed by the measurement of an observable on the ancilla. Our scheme is universal, being independent of ρ, A, and B, and it is optimal in a statistical sense. Our scheme is suitable for implementation with present quantum optical technology, and provides a new way to test uncertainty relations.

  11. Universality in Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Holian, B. L.; Timonen, J.

    2000-04-01

    Fragmentation of a two-dimensional brittle solid by impact and ``explosion,'' and a fluid by ``explosion'' are all shown to become critical. The critical points appear at a nonzero impact velocity, and at infinite explosion duration, respectively. Within the critical regimes, the fragment-size distributions satisfy a scaling form qualitatively similar to that of the cluster-size distribution of percolation, but they belong to another universality class. Energy balance arguments give a correlation length exponent that is exactly one-half of its percolation value. A single crack dominates fragmentation in the slow-fracture limit, as expected.

  12. Alone in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard

    Recent measurements of over 1056 confirmed exoplanets reveal details about their masses, compositions, orbital parameters, possible evolutionary histories, and even their atmospheres. These results, though marking just the beginnings of a dramatic new period of exoplanet discovery, suggest that for all practical purposes we are alone in the universe, at least in the sense implied by SETI: extraterrestrial intelligence. This talk will summarize the evidence to date, offer conclusions about the critical importance of increased exoplanet research, and emphasize the need for a renewed appreciation of the rare value of the Earth, its fragile environment, and its inhabitants.

  13. Universality classes of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, David B.

    We give several criteria of complexity and define different universality classes. According to our classification, at the lowest class of complexity are random graph, Markov Models and Hidden Markov Models. At the next level is Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass, connected with neuron-network models. On a higher level are critical theories, spin glass phase of Random Energy Model, percolation, self organized criticality (SOC). The top level class involves HOT design, error threshold in optimal coding, language, and, maybe, financial market. Alive systems are also related with the last class.

  14. Mapping the Baby Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    In June, NASA plans to launch the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) to survey the ancient radiation in unprecedented detail. MAP will map slight temperature fluctuations within the microwave background that vary by only 0.00001 C across a chilly radiation that now averages 2.73 C above absolute zero. The temperature differences today point back to density differences in the fiery baby universe, in which there was a little more matter here and a little less matter there. Areas of slightly enhanced density had stronger gravity than low-density areas. The high-density areas pulled back on the background radiation, making it appear slightly cooler in those directions.

  15. Scaling the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Norman E.

    2014-04-01

    A model is presented for the origin of the large scale structure of the universe and their Mass-Radius scaling law. The physics is conventional, orthodox, but it is used to fashion a highly unorthodox model of the origin of the galaxies, their groups, clusters, super-clusters, and great walls. The scaling law fits the observational results and the model offers new suggestions and predictions. These include a largest, a supreme, cosmic structure, and possible implications for the recently observed pressing cosmological anomalies.

  16. On separate universes

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2015-10-01

    The separate universe conjecture states that in General Relativity a density perturbation behaves locally (i.e. on scales much smaller than the wavelength of the mode) as a separate universe with different background density and curvature. We prove this conjecture for a spherical compensated tophat density perturbation of arbitrary amplitude and radius in ΛCDM. We then use Conformal Fermi Coordinates to generalize this result to scalar perturbations of arbitrary configuration and scale in a general cosmology with a mixture of fluids, but to linear order in perturbations. In this case, the separate universe conjecture holds for the isotropic part of the perturbations. The anisotropic part on the other hand is exactly captured by a tidal field in the Newtonian form. We show that the separate universe picture is restricted to scales larger than the sound horizons of all fluid components. We then derive an expression for the locally measured matter bispectrum induced by a long-wavelength mode of arbitrary wavelength, a new result which in standard perturbation theory is equivalent to a relativistic second-order calculation. We show that nonlinear gravitational dynamics does not generate observable contributions that scale like local-type non-Gaussianity f{sup loc}{sub NL}, and hence does not contribute to a scale-dependent galaxy bias Δ b ∝ k{sup −2} on large scales; rather, the locally measurable long-short mode coupling assumes a form essentially identical to subhorizon perturbation theory results, once the long-mode density perturbation is replaced by the synchronous-comoving gauge density perturbation. Apparent f{sup loc}{sub NL}-type contributions arise through projection effects on photon propagation, which depend on the specific large-scale structure tracer and observable considered, and are in principle distinguishable from the local mode coupling induced by gravity. We conclude that any observation of f{sup loc}{sub NL} beyond these projection effects

  17. Underground "jewish University"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, B.

    What a strange thing, memory. Its selectivity and countless gaps are terribly annoying. The events in a twenty-year span of my life, the functioning of a so-called "Jewish People's University", graduate school at Mechmat, failing the defense of my thesis, defending my thesis in Stockholm, a mass exodus from Moscow of everyone and everybody, two immigrations, the fall of the Soviet Union, a long line of professional and personal successes and no fewer the number of defeats, overshadow the period when all my mathematical activities began (and when they could just as easily never have begun)…

  18. VLSI Universal Noiseless Coder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Robert F.; Lee, Jun-Ji; Fang, Wai-Chi

    1989-01-01

    Proposed universal noiseless coder (UNC) compresses stream of data signals for efficient transmission in channel of limited bandwidth. Noiseless in sense original data completely recoverable from output code. System built as very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit, compressing data in real time at input rates as high as 24 Mb/s, and possibly faster, depending on specific design. Approach yields small, lightweight system operating reliably and consuming little power. Constructed as single, compact, low-power VLSI circuit chip. Design of VLSI circuit chip made specific to code algorithms. Entire UNC fabricated in single chip, worst-case power dissipation less than 1 W.

  19. Optimal Universal Uncertainty Relations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Xiao, Yunlong; Ma, Teng; Fei, Shao-Ming; Jing, Naihuan; Li-Jost, Xianqing; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2016-01-01

    We study universal uncertainty relations and present a method called joint probability distribution diagram to improve the majorization bounds constructed independently in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 230401 (2013)] and [J. Phys. A. 46, 272002 (2013)]. The results give rise to state independent uncertainty relations satisfied by any nonnegative Schur-concave functions. On the other hand, a remarkable recent result of entropic uncertainty relation is the direct-sum majorization relation. In this paper, we illustrate our bounds by showing how they provide a complement to that in [Phys. Rev. A. 89, 052115 (2014)]. PMID:27775010

  20. Universal Number Library

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, G. Scott

    2016-09-17

    This floating-point arithmetic library contains a software implementation of Universal Numbers (unums) as described by John Gustafson [1]. The unum format is a superset of IEEE 754 floating point with several advantages. Computing with unums provides more accurate answers without rounding errors, underflow or overflow. In contrast to fixed-sized IEEE numbers, a variable number of bits can be used to encode unums. This all allows number with only a few significant digits or with a small dynamic range to be represented more compactly.

  1. Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six Florida universities: Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida State University (FSU) and Florida A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, and University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of Florida. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of Florida, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.

  2. Open Universities in India 2000: Brief Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhushan, Bharat, Comp.; Lele, Nalini A., Comp.; Rausaria, R. R., Comp.

    This report contains information on the following open universities in India: (1) Indira Gandhi National Open University; (2) Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Open University; (3) Kota Open University; (4) Nalanda Open University; (5) Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University; (6) Madhya Pradesh Bhoj (Open) University; (7) Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Open…

  3. Models of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Arthur E.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a theory of models of the universe is proposed. We refer to such models ascosmological models, where a cosmological model is defined as an Einstein-inextendible Einstein spacetime. A cosmological model isabsolute if it is a Lorentz-inextendible Einstein spacetime,predictive if it is globally hyperbolic, andnon-predictive if it is nonglobally-hyperbolic. We discuss several features of these models in the study of cosmology. As an example, any compact Einstein spacetime is always a non-predictive absolute cosmological model, whereas a noncompact complete Einstein spacetime is an absolute cosmological model which may be either predictive or non-predictive. We discuss the important role played by maximal Einstein spacetimes. In particular, we examine the possible proper Lorentz-extensions of such spacetimes, and show that a spatially compact maximal Einstein spacetime is exclusively either a predictive cosmological model or a proper sub-spacetime of a non-predictive cosmological model. Provided that the Strong Cosmic Censorship conjecture is true, a generic spatially compact maximal Einstein spacetime must be a predictive cosmological model. It isconjectured that the Strong Cosmic Censorship conjecture isnot true, and converting a vice to a virtue it is argued that the failure of the Strong Cosmic Censorship conjecture would point to what may be general relativity's greatest prediction of all, namely,that general relativity predicts that general relativity cannot predict the entire history of the universe.

  4. The Mechanical Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenick, Richard P.; Apostol, Tom M.; Goodstein, David L.

    2008-06-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction to the mechanical universe; 2. The law of falling bodies; 3. Derivatives; 4. Inertia; 5. Vectors; 6. Newton's law; 7. Integration; 8. The apple and the moon; 9. Moving in circles; 10. Forces; 11. Gravity, electricity, and magnetism; 12. The Milliken oil-drop experiment; 13. The law of conservation of energy; 14. Energy and stability; 15. Temperature and the gas laws; 16. The engine of nature; 17. Entropy; 18. The quest for low temperatures; 19. The conservation of momentum; 20. Harmonic motion; 21. Resonance; 22. Coupled oscillators and waves; 23. Angular momentum; 24. Gyroscopes; 25. Kepler's laws and the conic sections; 26. Solving the Kepler problem; 27. Energy and eccentricity; 28. Navigating in space; 29. Loose ends and black holes; 30. The harmony of the spheres: an overview of the mechanical universe; Appendix A. The international system of units; Appendix B. Conversion factors; Appendix C. Formulas from algebra, geometry, and trigonometry; Appendix D. Astronomical data; Appendix E. Physical constants; Selected bibliography; Index.

  5. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  6. Universal Memcomputing Machines.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Fabio Lorenzo; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the notion of universal memcomputing machines (UMMs): a class of brain-inspired general-purpose computing machines based on systems with memory, whereby processing and storing of information occur on the same physical location. We analytically prove that the memory properties of UMMs endow them with universal computing power (they are Turing-complete), intrinsic parallelism, functional polymorphism, and information overhead, namely, their collective states can support exponential data compression directly in memory. We also demonstrate that a UMM has the same computational power as a nondeterministic Turing machine, namely, it can solve nondeterministic polynomial (NP)-complete problems in polynomial time. However, by virtue of its information overhead, a UMM needs only an amount of memory cells (memprocessors) that grows polynomially with the problem size. As an example, we provide the polynomial-time solution of the subset-sum problem and a simple hardware implementation of the same. Even though these results do not prove the statement NP = P within the Turing paradigm, the practical realization of these UMMs would represent a paradigm shift from the present von Neumann architectures, bringing us closer to brain-like neural computation.

  7. Universality of fragment shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  8. Carbon in the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, NASA missions have revealed that we live in a Universe that is not a hydrogen-dominated, physicist's paradise, but in a molecular Universe with complex molecules directly interwoven into its fabric. These missions have shown that molecules are an abundant and important component of astronomical objects at all stages of their evolution and that they play a key role in many processes that dominate the structure and evolution of galaxies. Closer to home in our galaxy, the Milky Way, they have revealed a unique and complex organic inventory of regions of star and planet formation that may well represent some of the prebiotic roots to life. Astrobiology emerges from the great interest in understanding astrochemical evolution from simple to complex molecules, especially those with biogenic potential and the roles they may play as primordial seeds in the origin of life on habitable worlds. The first part of this talk will highlight how infrared spectroscopic studies of interstellar space, combined with dedicated laboratory simulations, have revealed the widespread presence of complex organics across deep space. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the evolution of these materials and astrobiology.

  9. Simulating the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    In the local Universe, cosmic structures can be observed down to very small scales, scales on which the standard cosmological model might fail. Such detailed observations have to be compared with simulations in order to verify the predictions of different cosmological models. However, the cosmic variance can obscure the tests. More precisely, comparisons on a one-to-one basis are feasible only with simulations that look like the local Universe. Constrained by observed positions and peculiar velocities of galaxies, the simulations presented here reproduce locally the three-dimensional distribution of matter. Within a sphere of radius 100 hMpc, the observed nearby Large and Small Scale Structure is simulated with an accuracy of a few megaparsecs. These simulations include our nearest cluster neighbor, Virgo, allowing a detailed study of its formation history. It follows that the Virgo cluster has had a quiet merging history within the last seven gigayears. In the near future, zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations of the later will permit deeper comparisons with observations.

  10. Universal Payload Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Ralph B.

    2003-01-01

    As the overall manager and integrator of International Space Station (ISS) science payloads, the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at Marshall Space Flight Center has a critical need to provide an information management system for exchange and control of ISS payload files as well as to coordinate ISS payload related operational changes. The POIC's information management system has a fundamental requirement to provide secure operational access not only to users physically located at the POIC, but also to remote experimenters and International Partners physically located in different parts of the world. The Payload Information Management System (PIMS) is a ground-based electronic document configuration management and collaborative workflow system that was built to service the POIC's information management needs. This paper discusses the application components that comprise the PIMS system, the challenges that influenced its design and architecture, and the selected technologies it employs. This paper will also touch on the advantages of the architecture, details of the user interface, and lessons learned along the way to a successful deployment. With PIMS, a sophisticated software solution has been built that is not only universally accessible for POIC customer s information management needs, but also universally adaptable in implementation and application as a generalized information management system.

  11. An Open University Course in a Conventional University: Some Implications for the Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela

    1978-01-01

    Electrical engineering students at the University of Essex have been following as an integral part of their degree program, a credit course at the Open University. The effects of introducing a multimedia independent learning package into a conventional university are examined, the evaluation method is discussed, and differences in student…

  12. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  13. Physics in Universe's Youth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-05-01

    Using a quasar located 12.3 billion light-years away as a beacon, a team of astronomers detected the presence of molecular hydrogen in the farthest system ever, an otherwise invisible galaxy that we observe when the Universe was less than 1.5 billion years old, that is, about 10% of its present age. The astronomers find that there is about one hydrogen molecule for 250 hydrogen atoms. A similar set of observations for two other quasars, together with the most precise laboratory measurements, allows scientists to infer that the ratio of the proton to electron masses may have changed with time. If confirmed, this would have important consequences on our understanding of physics. "Detecting molecular hydrogen and measuring its properties in the most remote parts of the Universe is important to understand the gas environment and determine the rate of star formation in the early Universe", said Cédric Ledoux, lead-author of the paper presenting the results [1]. Although molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the Universe, it is very difficult to detect directly. For the time being, the only way to detect it directly in the far Universe is to search for its telltale signatures in the spectra of quasars or gamma-ray burst afterglows. This requires high spectral resolution and large telescopes to reach the necessary precision. A team of astronomers, comprised of Cédric Ledoux (ESO), Patrick Petitjean (IAP, Paris, France) and Raghunathan Srianand (IUCAA, Pune, India), is conducting a survey for molecular hydrogen at high redshift using the Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at ESO's Very Large Telescope. Out of the 75 systems observed up to now, 14 have firm detection of molecular hydrogen. Among these, one is found having a redshift of 4.224. While using the 12.3 billion light-years distant quasar PSS J 1443+2724 as a beacon, the astronomers detected several features belonging to an unseen galaxy having a redshift of 4.224. In particular

  14. Imagine the Universe!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N.

    2003-01-01

    Welcome to the 2004 edition of the education CD from the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. We hope that you will find it to be an exciting and fun learning experience. We have tried very hard to make this CD as user-friendly as possible and along the way we have discovered some things that every user may need to know. Please read the README file found on the CD if you have any questions or problems using the disk. Then, after that, if you still have problems, email us at itu@athena.gsfc.nasa.gov. We will be happy to help you 'get going'! Below are links to all of the sites included on the CD. You will also find the addresses for the on-line version of each of these sites. If you have a good Internet connection available, we recommend that you view the sites on-line. There you will find the latest updated information, interactive activities, and active links to other sites. Included on the disk are: Imagine The Universe! This site is dedicated to a discussion about our Universe... what we know about it, how it is evolving, and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains. Emphasizing the X-ray and gamma-ray parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, it also discusses how scientists know what they know, what mysteries remain, and how the answers to remaining mysteries may one day be found. Lots of movies, quizzes, and a special section for educators. Geared for ages 14 and up. This site can be viewed on-line at http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/. StarChild: A learning center for young astronomers The 1998 Webby Award Winner for Best Education Website, StarChild is aimed at ages 4-14. It contains easy-to-understand information about our Solar System, the Universe, and space exploration. There are also activities, songs, movies, and puzzles! This site can be viewed on-line at http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Astronomy Picture of the Day APOD offers a new astronomical image and caption each calendar day. We have captured the year 2003

  15. Universe exploration vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Handley, D.; Swan, P.; Sadeh, W.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. space policy is discussed in terms of present and planned activities in the solar system and beyond to develop a concept for expanding space travel. The history of space exploration is briefly reviewed with references to the Mariner II, Apollo, and Discoverer programs. Attention is given to the issues related to return trips to the moon, sprint vs repetitive missions to Mars, and the implications of propulsion needs. The concept of terraforming other bodies within the solar system so that they can support human activity is identified as the next major phase of exploration. The following phase is considered to be the use of robotic or manned missions that extend beyond the solar system. Reference is given to a proposed Thousand Astronomical Units mission as a precursor to exploratory expansion into the universe, and current robotic mission activities are mentioned.

  16. Revealing the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, James; Lightman, Alan

    1983-05-01

    Contributors include Owen Gingerich, Kenneth Bracher, Robert F. C. Vessot, Fred L. Whipple, Fred Franklin, Robert W. Noyes, Robert Rosner, Harvey Tananbaum, Alan P. Lightman, Walter H. G. Lewin, William H. Press, John Huchra, and George B. Field. Alan Lightman, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences since 1996, is adjunct professor of humanities at MIT. He is the author of several books on science, including "Ancient Light: Our Changing View of the Universe" (1991) and "Origins: The Lives and Worlds of Modern Cosmologists" (with R. Brawer, 1990). His works of fiction include "Einstein's Dreams" (1993), "The Diagnosis" (2000), which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and, most recently, "Reunion" (2003).

  17. Zöllner's Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2012-12-01

    The idea that space is not Euclidean by necessity, and that there are other kinds of "curved" spaces, diffused slowly to the physical and astronomical sciences. Until Einstein's general theory of relativity, only a handful of astronomers contemplated a connection between non-Euclidean geometry and real space. One of them, the German astrophysicist Johann Carl Friedrich Zöllner (1834-1882), suggested in 1872 a remarkable cosmological model describing a finite universe in closed space. I examine Zöllner's little-known contribution to cosmology and also his even more unorthodox speculations of a four-dimensional space including both physical and spiritual phenomena. I provide an overview of Zöllner's scientific work, of his status in the German scientific community, and of the controversies caused by his polemical style of science. Zöllner's cosmology was effectively forgotten, but there is no reason why it should remain an unwritten chapter in the history of science.

  18. University Engagement at INL

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, Sean Robert; Rynes, Amanda Renee

    2014-07-01

    There are currently over 900 facilities in over 170 countries which fall under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. As additional nations look to purse civilian nuclear programs or to expand infrastructure already in place, the number of reactors and accompanying facilities as well as the quantity of material has greatly increased. Due to the breadth of the threat and the burden placed on the IAEA as nuclear applications expand, it has become increasingly important that safeguards professionals have a strong understanding of both the technical and political aspects of nonproliferation starting early in their career. To begin overcoming this challenge, Idaho National Laboratory, has partnered with local universities to deliver a graduate level nuclear engineering course that covers both aspects of the field with a focus on safeguards applications. To date over 60 students across multiple disciplines have participated in this course with many deciding to transition into a nonproliferation area of focus in both their academic and professional careers.

  19. Rocket University at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    "Rocket University" is an exciting new initiative at Kennedy Space Center led by NASA's Engineering and Technology Directorate. This hands-on experience has been established to develop, refine & maintain targeted flight engineering skills to enable the Agency and KSC strategic goals. Through "RocketU", KSC is developing a nimble, rapid flight engineering life cycle systems knowledge base. Ongoing activities in RocketU develop and test new technologies and potential customer systems through small scale vehicles, build and maintain flight experience through balloon and small-scale rocket missions, and enable a revolving fresh perspective of engineers with hands on expertise back into the large scale NASA programs, providing a more experienced multi-disciplined set of systems engineers. This overview will define the Program, highlight aspects of the training curriculum, and identify recent accomplishments and activities.

  20. Universal freezing of asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Jian; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Hua-Lin; Tong, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    Asymmetry of quantum states is a useful resource in applications such as quantum metrology, quantum communication, and reference frame alignment. However, asymmetry of a state tends to be degraded in physical scenarios where environment-induced noise is described by covariant operations, e.g., open systems constrained by superselection rules, and such degradations weaken the abilities of the state to implement quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we investigate under which dynamical conditions asymmetry of a state is totally unaffected by the noise described by covariant operations. We find that all asymmetry measures are frozen for a state under a covariant operation if and only if the relative entropy of asymmetry is frozen for the state. Our finding reveals the existence of universal freezing of asymmetry, and provides a necessary and sufficient condition under which asymmetry is totally unaffected by the noise.

  1. The International Space University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) was founded on the premise that any major space program in the future would require international cooperation as a necessary first step toward its successful completion. ISU is devoted to being a leading center for educating future authorities in the world space industry. ISU's background, goals, current form, and future plans are described. The results and benefits of the type of education and experience gained from ISU include technical reports describing the design projects undertaken by the students, an exposure to the many different disciplines which are a part of a large space project, an awareness of the existing activities from around the world in the space community, and an international professional network which spans all aspects of space activities and covers the globe.

  2. Universal thermoelectric unit

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M.I.; Engalychev, A.E.; Zaitsev, V.K.; Kaliazin, A.E.; Solomkin, F.Y.

    1994-08-10

    The problems of energy supply of low power electric devices very often can be solved with thermoelectric generator even with low coefficient of performance, when other electric energy sources are not convenient. The problems of thermoelectric and construction choice for such generators are discussed in the paper. A series of domestic thermoelectric generators was designed by the authors. The work is based on designing an universal thermoelectric unit---a battery which consist of ten thermoelements. The coefficient of performance of the unit is about 4%. Any thermoelectric generator can be made as a combination of these units. Principal opportunity of production such thermoelectric generators on industrial scale was proved. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  3. Fred Hoyle's Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Jane

    2005-08-01

    Fred Hoyle was a Yorkshire truant who became the voice of British astronomy. For fifty years, he spoke out for astronomy in the newspapers, on government committees, at scientific meetings, in popular books and on the radio. He devised a never-ending history of the universe, and worked out how the elements were made. He founded a prestigious institute for theoretical astronomy and built a giant telescope, and if it rained on his summer holiday, he sat in his caravan and wrote science fiction novels for his legions of fans around the world. Fred Hoyle also claimed that diseases fall from the sky, that the big bang never happened, and that the Astronomer Royal should be abolished. When the outspoken Fred Hoyle spoke out for astronomy, some astronomers really wished he had kept his mouth shut. This book tells the behind-the-scenes story of Hoyle's widely acclaimed and deeply controversial role in the ideas, organization and public face of astronomy in post-war Britain. It chronicles the triumphs, acrimony, jealousies, rewards and bitter feuds of a field in turmoil, and meets the astronomers, contemplating cosmic questions, keeping secrets, losing their tempers, winkling information out of distant stars and, over tea on the lawn, discussing the finer points of libel law. Fred Hoyle's Universe draws on previously confidential government documents, recently released personal correspondence and interviews with Hoyle's friends, colleagues and critics, as well as with Hoyle himself, to bring you the man, the science, and the scandal behind the genial and genteel facade of the most exciting period in the history of astronomy.

  4. Austin Peay State University: College and University Computing Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Planning for information technology, computer services, computer hardware, administrative computing, academic computing, and office automation/networking at Austin Peay State University are described. (MLW)

  5. 77 FR 60012 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... submit grant applications for the University Transportation Centers (UTCs) program. The Department... national university transportation Centers, regional university transportation Centers, and Tier...

  6. Achieving Research University: Indonesian Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utama, Yos Johan; Ambariyanto

    2017-02-01

    Today many universities have the vision to become a research university, including in Indonesia. It is based on the desire to play a role in advancing science for the benefit of humanity as well as to enhance the university reputation at the international level. However, in the case of Indonesia, it can only be done by several universities, given the large number of universities with very different capabilities. In addition, another problem is human resources, infrastructure, and research funding. Various targets indicator used to determine its success include the number of publications, patents and industrial products. There is an urgent need to improve all factors that can accelerate the increase in research in Indonesia universities, and has been started by the policy of the current government.

  7. Is the Universe logotropic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2015-07-01

    We consider the possibility that the universe is made of a single dark fluid described by a logotropic equation of state P = A ln( ρ/ρ*, where ρ is the rest-mass density, ρ * is a reference density, and A is the logotropic temperature. The energy density ɛ is the sum of two terms: a rest-mass energy term ρ c 2 that mimics dark matter and an internal energy term u( ρ) = - P( ρ) - A that mimics dark energy. This decomposition leads to a natural, and physical, unification of dark matter and dark energy, and elucidates their mysterious nature. In the early universe, the rest-mass energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as pressureless dark matter ( P ≃ 0, ɛ ∝ a -3. In the late universe, the internal energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as dark energy ( P ˜ - ɛ, ɛ ∝ ln a. The logotropic model depends on a single parameter B = A / ρ Λ c 2 (dimensionless logotropic temperature), where ρ Λ = 6.72 × 10-24 g m-3 is the cosmological density. For B = 0, we recover the ΛCDM model with a different justification. For B > 0, we can describe deviations from the ΛCDM model. Using cosmological constraints, we find that 0 ≤ B ≤ 0.09425. We consider the possibility that dark matter halos are described by the same logotropic equation of state. When B > 0, pressure gradients prevent gravitational collapse and provide halo density cores instead of cuspy density profiles, in agreement with the observations. The universal rotation curve of logotropic dark matter halos is consistent with the observational Burkert profile (Burkert, Astrophys. J. 447, L25 (1995)) up to the halo radius. It decreases as r -1 at large distances, similarly to the profile of dark matter halos close to the core radius (Burkert, arXiv:1501.06604). Interestingly, if we assume that all the dark matter halos have the same logotropic temperature B, we find that their surface density Σ 0 = ρ0 r h is constant. This result is in agreement with the observations (Donato et al., Mon

  8. Inter-Universal Quantum Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Pérez, S. J.; González-Díaz, P. F.

    2015-01-01

    The boundary conditions to be imposed on the quantum state of the whole multiverse could be such that the universes would be created in entangled pairs. Then, interuniversal entanglement would provide us with a vacuum energy for each single universe that might be fitted with observational data, making testable not only the multiverse proposal but also the boundary conditions of the multiverse. Furthermore, the second law of the entanglement thermodynamics would enhance the expansion of the single universes.

  9. Universe acceleration and nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    A new model of nonlinear electrodynamics with a dimensional parameter β coupled to gravity is considered. We show that an accelerated expansion of the universe takes place if the nonlinear electromagnetic field is the source of the gravitational field. A pure magnetic universe is investigated, and the magnetic field drives the universe to accelerate. In this model, after the big bang, the universe undergoes inflation and the accelerated expansion and then decelerates approaching Minkowski spacetime asymptotically. We demonstrate the causality of the model and a classical stability at the deceleration phase.

  10. Our Astounding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The philosophy of my life is to keep encouraging children to think beyond they could achieve easily. I understand children are adaptive to change and take things with an open mind. They are ready to experiment with new things and dare to dream big. I am fortunate to being a teacher by profession and thus I always attempt experimenting, observing, and participating with other children and adults. Children learn through play. From birth, children are active participants in building their own understanding. Teachers prepare the environment to help each child build on what they already know. It is such a great pleasure to observe every young kid that becomes excited and curious to know when we show them the Universe pictures and tell them about the strange objects in our Universe. So my aim is to keep them ignited by doing different activities throughout the year related to Space. I am always a firm believer of: Creativity is the key to success in the future, and primary education is where teachers can bring creativity in children at that level. One of my main ways of teaching is to conduct various presentations on The Solar System and beyond and debates on Space explorations. A Planet making project is one of the all-time favorite project for my students where they dare to dream to fly in the universe, and with their imagination, kids make different celestial objects and present them. To inculcate scientific attitude I arrange film screening, simulation exercises and quizzes on various topics of astronomy. Every year we celebrate World Space Week 4th to 10th of Oct. The motivation among all came through different hands-on activities like-painting, slogan competition, topics related to space, poetry and essay writing on various topics related to astronomy, assembly presentations in school. I am indeed overwhelmed when I started the very special Space and Astronomy club where young toddlers are involved in different activities like a star gazing program, conducting

  11. The Medieval German University: Transformation and Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinges, Rainer Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the development of the university system within the Holy Roman Empire, especially in Germany, explaining that the University of Prague in 1348 was the Empire's first university. Reports that after the University of Prague, the new university type, or the "German type," developed by combining types of universities in Bologna and…

  12. Assessing Civic Engagement at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Gary R.; Bringle, Robert G.; Hatcher, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty and staff at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) have developed several tools to assess campus civic engagement initiatives. This chapter describes the IUPUI Faculty Survey and the Civic-Minded Graduate Scale, and reports on findings from campus-based assessment and research.

  13. The European System for Electing University Presidents and University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Huaide

    2014-01-01

    The system of electing university presidents in Spain, Switzerland, Italy, and the United Kingdom has distinctive characteristics. Almost all university presidents are elected by teachers and students, either directly or indirectly through elections with government approval of the appointment a mere formality. Principles of these elections include…

  14. University of Missouri: College and University Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The computing and information systems at the University of Missouri are described. All computing activity was centralized beginning in 1973 with the formation of the university computer network. Administrative data processing, financial systems, student systems, and office automation are discussed. (MLW)

  15. Building Effective Community-University Partnerships: Are Universities Truly Ready?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Susan Eckerle; Munger, Felix; Mitchell, Terry; Mackeigan, Mary; Farrar, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Community service learning and community-based research necessitate the development of strong community-university partnerships. In this paper, students, faculty, and a community partner critically reflect upon the process of establishing a long-term community-university partnership through the integration of a community service learning component…

  16. McMaster University`s artificial computing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, A.; Bentley, M.

    1996-12-31

    This will be McMaster University`s first entry into the AAAI Mobile Robotics competition. As such, this year will serve as a testing ground for future developments. It is the goal of the designers to experiment with new techniques and approaches based on their engineering background.

  17. The University Library: The Center of a University Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frade, Patricia A.; Washburn, Allyson

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses a formal study conducted in 2001 at Brigham Young University to determine the value of the library to the university community. Methods used to collect data for the study included an e-mail survey, usage statistics, naturalistic observations, and interviews. Two years after the study, the authors wondered if the conclusions of…

  18. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Hallberg, Carl; Cecil, Jim

    1994-01-01

    A state-of-the-art instrumentation amplifier capable of being used with most types of transducers has been developed at the Kennedy Space Center. This Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) can eliminate costly measurement setup item and troubleshooting, improve system reliability and provide more accurate data than conventional amplifiers. The USCA can configure itself for maximum resolution and accuracy based on information read from a RAM chip attached to each transducer. Excitation voltages or current are also automatically configured. The amplifier uses both analog and digital state-of-the-art technology with analog-to-digital conversion performed in the early stages in order to minimize errors introduced by offset and gain drifts in the analog components. A dynamic temperature compensation scheme has been designed to achieve and maintain 12-bit accuracy of the amplifier from 0 to 70 C. The digital signal processing section allows the implementation of digital filters up to 511th order. The amplifier can also perform real-time linearizations up to fourth order while processing data at a rate of 23.438 kS/s. Both digital and analog outputs are available from the amplifier.

  19. Universities and Patent Demands

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Andrew K.; Feldman, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Research universities have made enormous contributions to the field of medicine and the treatment of human disease. Alone or in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies, academic researchers have added to the store of knowledge that has led to numerous life science breakthroughs. A new chapter may be opening for academic researchers, however, that could lead to a darker tale. ‘The mouse that trolled: the long and tortuous history of a gene mutation patent that became an expensive impediment to Alzheimer's research, by Bubela et al., chronicles one such tale.’ The authors do an excellent job of bringing to life the twisting saga that engulfed numerous academic and non-profit Alzheimer's researchers over many years. The authors note that the story is an outlier, but sadly, that may not be the case. There are increasing signs that academic researchers and their institutions are being caught up in the rush for gold that is accompanying the proliferation of the non-practicing entity business model. As I have noted before, academic institutions have a dual role, as keepers of the academic flame and guardians of the public monies entrusted to them through state and federal research funding. The specter of taxpayer money being used, not to advance research and for the betterment of society, but as part of schemes to extract money from productive companies may not sit well with voters, and ultimately, with legislators. In that case, researchers and institutions themselves may have much to lose. PMID:27774221

  20. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  1. Hydrogen fuel - Universal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, A. G.; Burg, J. A.

    The technology for the production, storage, transmission, and consumption of hydrogen as a fuel is surveyed, with the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen examined as they affect its use as a fuel. Sources of hydrogen production are described including synthesis from coal or natural gas, biomass conversion, thermochemical decomposition of water, and electrolysis of water, of these only electrolysis is considered economicially and technologically feasible in the near future. Methods of production of the large quantities of electricity required for the electrolysis of sea water are explored: fossil fuels, hydroelectric plants, nuclear fission, solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, tidal power, wave motion, electrochemical concentration cells, and finally ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The wind power and OTEC are considered in detail as the most feasible approaches. Techniques for transmission (by railcar or pipeline), storage (as liquid in underwater or underground tanks, as granular metal hydride, or as cryogenic liquid), and consumption (in fuel cells in conventional power plants, for home usage, for industrial furnaces, and for cars and aircraft) are analyzed. The safety problems of hydrogen as a universal fuel are discussed, noting that they are no greater than those for conventional fuels.

  2. University of Sao Paulo

    SciTech Connect

    Acquadro, J.C.; Added, N.; Ferraretto, M.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has agreed to assist the University of Sao Paulo (USP) in the construction of a small superconducting heavy-ion linac to serve as an energy booster for projectiles from their 8-MV tandem. This booster will be similar in many respects to the ANL booster linac built in the late 1970s. The ANL contribution to this project will be (1) to build (at USP expense) 14 split-ring niobium resonators and some of the associated rf electronics, (2) to provide technical information, and (3) to train USP staff members in several phases of superconducting-linac technology. Two Brazilian engineers worked at Argonne for one year, gaining experience in cryogenics and in superconducting-resonator technology. Another engineer worked on the new control system at ATLAS for two years, the first year supported by Sao Paulo and the second with direct ANL support. Sao Paulo personnel returned to ANL in 1993 for assembly and testing of the first batch of completed resonators. The fabrication of the resonators will be completed by early 1995 when the Sao Paulo personnel will come back for final assembly and testing. Fabrication of electronics modules at ANL is still in progress.

  3. HACCing the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Simulations of large-scale structure formation that can simultaneously encompass a representative volume of the universe and resolve the dark matter halos that host galaxies are required for both planning and analyzing current and future astronomical surveys of galaxies across the sky. In order to harness the power of modern supercomputing systems for running such simulations we have developed the Hardware/Hybrid Cosmology Code (HACC) to address the issues of massive concurrency and heterogeneity. HACC uses n-body methods and splits the calculation of the gravitational force into a long-range component that is highly portable and a short-range component that is tuned to specific compute node architectures. We have developed and used variants of HACC for x86, IBM Cell (LANL/Roadrunner), IBM Blue Gene (ANL/Mira), and GPGPU (ORNL/Titan) systems. This talk will focus on how our experiences with various memory hierarchies and potential performance bottlenecks has influenced our iterations of code design in order to achieve better load-balancing and higher performance.

  4. Nonminimal universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Flacke, Thomas; Menon, A.; Phalen, Daniel J.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phenomenological implications of boundary localized terms (BLTs) in the model of universal extra dimensions (UED). In particular, we study the electroweak Kaluza-Klein mass spectrum resulting from BLTs and their effect on electroweak symmetry breaking via the five-dimensional Higgs mechanism. We find that the addition of BLTs to massive five-dimensional fields induces a nontrivial extra-dimensional profile for the zero and nonzero Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes. Hence BLTs generically lead to a modification of standard model parameters and are therefore experimentally constrained, even at tree level. We study standard model constraints on three representative nonminimal UED models in detail and find that the constraints on BLTs are weak. On the contrary, nonzero BLTs have a major impact on the spectrum and couplings of nonzero KK modes. For example, there are regions of parameter space where the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle is either the Kaluza-Klein Higgs boson or the first KK mode of the W{sup 3}.

  5. Universal mechatronics coordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Patrick F.

    1999-11-01

    Mechatronic systems incorporate multiple actuators and sensor which must be properly coordinated to achieve the desired system functionality. Many mechatronic systems are designed as one-of-a-kind custom projects without consideration for facilitating future system or alterations and extensions to the current syste. Thus, subsequent changes to the system are slow, different, and costly. It has become apparent that manufacturing processes, and thus the mechatronics which embody them, need to be agile in order to more quickly and easily respond to changing customer demands or market pressures. To achieve agility, both the hardware and software of the system need to be designed such that the creation of new system and the alteration and extension of current system is fast and easy. This paper describes the design of a Universal Mechatronics Coordinator (UMC) which facilitates agile setup and changeover of coordination software for mechatronic systems. The UMC is capable of sequencing continuous and discrete actions that are programmed as stimulus-response pairs, as state machines, or a combination of the two. It facilitates the modular, reusable programing of continuous actions such as servo control algorithms, data collection code, and safety checking routines; and discrete actions such as reporting achieved states, and turning on/off binary devices. The UMC has been applied to the control of a z- theta assembly robot for the Minifactory project and is applicable to a spectrum of widely differing mechatronic systems.

  6. Universal ripper miner

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  7. Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The Technological Research and Development Authority (TRDA) and NASA-KSC entered into a cooperative agreement in March of 1994 to achieve the utilization and commercialization of a technology development for benefiting both the Space Program and U.S. industry on a "dual-use basis". The technology involved in this transfer is a new, unique Universal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) used in connection with various types of transducers. The project was initiated in partnership with I-Net Corporation, Lockheed Martin Telemetry & Instrumentation (formerly Loral Test and Information Systems) and Brevard Community College. The project consists of designing, miniaturizing, manufacturing, and testing an existing prototype of USCA that was developed for NASA-KSC by the I-Net Corporation. The USCA is a rugged and field-installable self (or remotely)- programmable amplifier that works in combination with a tag random access memory (RAM) attached to various types of transducers. This summary report comprises performance evaluations, TRDA partnership tasks, a project summary, project milestones and results.

  8. Universities and Patent Demands.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Andrew K; Feldman, Robin

    2015-11-01

    Research universities have made enormous contributions to the field of medicine and the treatment of human disease. Alone or in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies, academic researchers have added to the store of knowledge that has led to numerous life science breakthroughs. A new chapter may be opening for academic researchers, however, that could lead to a darker tale. 'The mouse that trolled: the long and tortuous history of a gene mutation patent that became an expensive impediment to Alzheimer's research, by Bubela et al., chronicles one such tale.' The authors do an excellent job of bringing to life the twisting saga that engulfed numerous academic and non-profit Alzheimer's researchers over many years. The authors note that the story is an outlier, but sadly, that may not be the case. There are increasing signs that academic researchers and their institutions are being caught up in the rush for gold that is accompanying the proliferation of the non-practicing entity business model. As I have noted before, academic institutions have a dual role, as keepers of the academic flame and guardians of the public monies entrusted to them through state and federal research funding. The specter of taxpayer money being used, not to advance research and for the betterment of society, but as part of schemes to extract money from productive companies may not sit well with voters, and ultimately, with legislators. In that case, researchers and institutions themselves may have much to lose.

  9. Universality of cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, Carson; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the kinetics of cluster formation for dynamical systems of dimensions up to n=8 interacting through elastic collisions or coalescence. These systems could serve as possible models for gas kinetics, polymerization, and self-assembly. In the case of elastic collisions, we found that the cluster size probability distribution undergoes a phase transition at a critical time which can be predicted from the average time between collisions. This enables forecasting of rare events based on limited statistical sampling of the collision dynamics over short time windows. The analysis was extended to Lp -normed spaces (p=1,…,∞) to allow for some amount of interpenetration or volume exclusion. The results for the elastic collisions are consistent with previously published low-dimensional results in that a power law is observed for the empirical cluster size distribution at the critical time. We found that the same power law also exists for all dimensions n=2,…,8 , two-dimensional Lp norms, and even for coalescing collisions in two dimensions. This broad universality in behavior may be indicative of a more fundamental process governing the growth of clusters.

  10. Is the Universe homogeneous?

    PubMed

    Maartens, Roy

    2011-12-28

    The standard model of cosmology is based on the existence of homogeneous surfaces as the background arena for structure formation. Homogeneity underpins both general relativistic and modified gravity models and is central to the way in which we interpret observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the galaxy distribution. However, homogeneity cannot be directly observed in the galaxy distribution or CMB, even with perfect observations, since we observe on the past light cone and not on spatial surfaces. We can directly observe and test for isotropy, but to link this to homogeneity we need to assume the Copernican principle (CP). First, we discuss the link between isotropic observations on the past light cone and isotropic space-time geometry: what observations do we need to be isotropic in order to deduce space-time isotropy? Second, we discuss what we can say with the Copernican assumption. The most powerful result is based on the CMB: the vanishing of the dipole, quadrupole and octupole of the CMB is sufficient to impose homogeneity. Real observations lead to near-isotropy on large scales--does this lead to near-homogeneity? There are important partial results, and we discuss why this remains a difficult open question. Thus, we are currently unable to prove homogeneity of the Universe on large scales, even with the CP. However, we can use observations of the cosmic microwave background, galaxies and clusters to test homogeneity itself.

  11. The Universe of Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidharth, B. G.

    We discuss the recent model of a Quantum Mechanical Black Hole (QMBH) which describes the most fundamental known particles, the leptons and approximately the quarks in terms of the Kerr-Newman Black Hole with a naked singularity shielded by Zitterbewegung effects. This goes beyond the Zitterbewegung and self interaction models of Barut and Bracken, Hestenes, Chacko and others and provides a unified picture which amongst other things gives a rationale for and an insight into: (1) The apparently inexplicable reason why complex space-time transformations lead to the Kerr-Newman metric in General Relativity. (2) The value of the fine structure constant. (3) The ratio between electromagnetic and gravitational interaction strengths. (4) The anomalous gyromagnetic ratio for the electron. (5) Why the neutrino is left-handed. (6) Why the charge is discrete. In the spirit of Effective Field Theories, this model provides an alternative formalism for Quantum Theory and also for its combination with General Relativity. Finally a mechanism for the formation of these QMBH or particles is explored within the framework of Stochastic Electrodynamics, QED and Quantum Statistical Mechanics. The cosmological implications are then examined. It turns out that a surprisingly large number of facts, including some which were hitherto inexplicable. follow as a consequence of the model. These include a theoretical deduction of the Mass, Radius and Age of the Universe, also the values of Hubble's constant and the Cosmological constant.

  12. A Self Organizing Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Orvin E.

    2001-05-01

    First Feynman and Wheeler suggested in-out waves associated with elementary particles. Quantum field theory has waves propagating backward in time producing standing waves. The math suggests that the sun also produces its own in-out waves which spaced and now stabilize the planets. The same is true for the gaseous planets with their sattelites. I propose two postulates (suggested by my work). (1) Longitudinal waves are produced by electromagnetic sources. These waves become standing waves because space(or the vacuum)responds with an automatic return wave related to the inertial nature of space.(2)Larger sources such as the sun excite smaller sources such as the planets with successively smaller sources producing shorter and shorter wavelengths at lower and lower power. The hierarchical nature is suggested by 1/f phenomena. The standing waves from larger sources produce the organizing forces for galaxy and star formation as well as the repeating structures of the universe. The wave effects were first found in plant organization and then it was observed that the waves are everywhere. See the Wagner web site.

  13. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  14. Universals of Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckman, Fred R., Ed.; And Others

    Works on second language acquisition theories, affective variables and communicative competence, and interlanguage were compiled as a result of a symposium on universals of second language acquisition at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. The papers include: "On the Variability of Interlangauge Systems" (Elaine Tarone); "Memory, Learning, and…

  15. The Future of the Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Don N.; McKee, M. Randall

    1983-01-01

    The future of the universe is discussed in terms of several models. These include the closed, open, and critical models of the universe. Black holes and speculation on what may happen to life in the cosmological models are also discussed. (JN)

  16. Student Leadership at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Ann T.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is about the utilization of student leadership at the University. Based on research, student leadership opportunities at the university have been frequently at a low percentage (Zimmerman, Burkhart, 2002). The researcher identifies practical ways to involve students in various leadership activities. Emphases are placed on…

  17. Agnosis in the University Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    One significant, tangible and interesting challenge for the privatised university is its impedance of particular forms of effective engagement and action in teaching and research, notably with respect to inequities in the broader social context, and the position of the university within that context. In the face of significant resource constraints…

  18. Sustainability in Brazilian Federal Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palma, Lisiane Celia; de Oliveira, Lessandra M.; Viacava, Keitiline R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the number of courses related to sustainability offered in bachelor degree programs of business administration in Brazilian federal universities. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory research was carried out based on a descriptive scope. The process of mapping federal universities in Brazil…

  19. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  20. Infra-red soft universality

    SciTech Connect

    Jack, I.

    1997-06-15

    In a special class of supersymmetric grand unified theories, the commonly assumed universal form of the soft supersymmetry-breaking terms is approached in the infra-red limit. The resulting universal scalar mass and trilinear coupling are predicted in terms of the gaugino mass.

  1. The Overseas University Leadership Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the content and format of the Overseas University Leadership Program organized by the National Academy of Education Administration in Beijing, China. Universities provide the country with scientific and technological expertise, pave the path to individual advancement, and are major economic engines. China's new mission is to…

  2. Quantum entanglement of baby universes

    SciTech Connect

    Essman, Eric P.; Aganagic, Mina; Okuda, Takuya; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2006-12-07

    We study quantum entanglements of baby universes which appear in non-perturbative corrections to the OSV formula for the entropy of extremal black holes in type IIA string theory compactified on the local Calabi-Yau manifold defined as a rank 2 vector bundle over an arbitrary genus G Riemann surface. This generalizes the result for G=1 in hep-th/0504221. Non-perturbative terms can be organized into a sum over contributions from baby universes, and the total wave-function is their coherent superposition in the third quantized Hilbert space. We find that half of the universes preserve one set of supercharges while the other half preserve a different set, making the total universe stable but non-BPS. The parent universe generates baby universes by brane/anti-brane pair creation, and baby universes are correlated by conservation of non-normalizable D-brane charges under the process. There are no other source of entanglement of baby universes, and all possible states are superposed with the equal weight.

  3. Universities: Engaging with Local Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet illustrates the many ways in which universities impact on the local area. Universities are a major contributor to the economy in their own right, both as employers and purchasers of goods. Their social and cultural influence is also felt through their provision of: (1) art galleries, museums and exhibitions; (2) cinemas and theatres;…

  4. Reading Neoliberalism at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shear, Boone W.; Zontine, Angelina I.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing transformations of the university--from changing working conditions to issues of affordability and access, increasing "accountability" measures and commodification of academic production--are increasingly referred to as university corporatisation and are unfolding within and concomitant to neoliberal globalisation. In this paper…

  5. Research and the Universities' Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Rui; Carvalho, Teresa; Relva, Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, and from a Humboltian perspective, research was conceived as an important part of the tripartite mission of universities, with teaching and services to the community being the other two. The traditional idea of universities as cultural and social institutions is increasingly being replaced by another: the entrepreneurial, capitalist…

  6. URBAN INSTITUTIONS AS UNIVERSITY CLIENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KRAVITZ, SANFORD L.

    THE AUTHOR DISCUSSES THE WAYS IN WHICH THE UNIVERSITY CAN AND MUST HELP THE CITY SOLVE ITS PROBLEMS. HE SEES THE TWO MAJOR NEEDS OF URBAN INSTITUTIONS AS A MANPOWER SHORTAGE AND A KNOWLEDGE PROBLEM. THE UNIVERSITY MUST MOBILIZE ITS RESOURCES RAPIDLY AND RESPONSIBLY NOT ONLY TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF WORKERS AVAILABLE BUT TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND…

  7. `Universal' FitzGerald contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2009-09-01

    The model of a universe with a preferred frame, which nevertheless shares the main properties with traditional special and general relativity theories, is considered. We adopt Mach’s interpretation of inertia and show that the energy balance equation, which includes the Machian energy of gravitational interactions with the universe, can imitate standard relativistic formulas.

  8. The Philosophy of University Housing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, James A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines a stated philosophy of university housing and the philosophy's effect on the facilitation of the personal and intellectual growth of students residing in the residence halls and the development of a sense of community. This particular philosophy governs the housing operations at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.…

  9. The Universities and Federal Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John C.

    The impact of increasing federal regulation on American universities is discussed based on an informal survey of senior academic and administrative officials in 13 public and private universities. As government regulation is becoming more intensive and compliance more resource- and time-consuming, government is perceived as having little…

  10. Millersville University Secondary Education PDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum-Dietrich, Nanette I.; Mahoney, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Millersville University of Pennsylvania (MU) has over 150 years of proud heritage in the preparation of teachers. This article describes how the Secondary Education Professional Development School (PDS) Program model has transformed Millersville University's secondary teacher education from a traditional teacher preparation program into a dynamic…

  11. Quality Assurance for University Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Roger, Ed.

    This book, written from a British perspective, presents 17 papers on quality assurance in teaching at the university level. The first eight papers address issues of assuring quality and include: (1) "Quality Assurance for University Teaching; Issues and Approaches" (Roger Ellis); (2) "A British Standard for University…

  12. Positioning the Undervalued Metropolitan University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Herbert E.

    1993-01-01

    It is noted that "undervalued metropolitan universities," which generally have open enrollment, low tuition, and a large proportion of nontraditional students, often also have a diffuse and unclear public image. A model positioning concept for these institutions, used by Wright State University (Ohio) is proposed and described. (MSE)

  13. A University for the People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Over the past year lifelong learning in universities has come under the spotlight of politicians, educationalists, journalists and adult learners. For some, the concern has been about countering the fall-out from changes in public funding and challenging the reduction in provision--and even closure--of university departments. A number of…

  14. The Marine Corps University Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramkey, Carol E.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Marine Corps University (Virginia) Library's collections and reserves. States that the library's resources focus on military doctrine, history, arts, and sciences, and that they include Web- and CD-ROM-based specialized military databases. Describes the library's mission to serve the university community and Marine Corps patrons…

  15. University--Science Fair Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Erika; Taylor, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Describes a partnership between a fifth-grade teacher and a university methods professor that involved developing an elementary science fair project mentored by university students. Provides opportunities for elementary students to conduct scientific investigations to learn about science, and opportunities for education majors to have firsthand…

  16. Jaspers' Concept of the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Robert

    1976-01-01

    The general character of Jaspers' idea of the university is outlined, and some basic objections to that view are examined. Throughout the paper an attempt is made to establish the relevance of Jaspers' work to current university problems. (Author/LBH)

  17. The End of the University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tehranian, Majid

    1996-01-01

    Discusses three important functions of the university (the creation, preservation, and transmission of knowledge) and how those functions are being usurped by new telecommunications and network technologies. Argues that universities must meet the technological challenge by reinventing themselves and offering vocational education, moral guidance,…

  18. Employability and Finnish University Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhakka, Antero; Rautopuro, Juhani; Tuominen, Visa

    2010-01-01

    In this article the authors concentrate on the change in the concept of employability during the Bologna process. They show that employability has gradually moved from a peripheral to a core presence in the most recent Bologna process documents. Using a Finnish university merger (University of Eastern Finland) as an example, the authors…

  19. Environmental Management at Swedish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvidsson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Since 1996, all Swedish public authorities, which includes most universities, have been made responsible for contributing to the sustainable development of the society. Swedish universities are thus required to submit annual environmental reports about their policies, structures and actions. This study provides a review of the activities that…

  20. Education in a Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrow, Kenneth J. Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 30 essays on the character, administration, and management of research universities research university emphasizes the perspective of statistics and operations research: The essays are: "A Robust Faculty Planning Model" (Frederick Biedenweg); "Looking Back at Computer Models Employed in the Stanford University…

  1. University Rankings and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  2. Outdoor Recreation at Brock University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breunig, Mary; O'Connell, Tim; Hutson, Garrett

    2007-01-01

    Brock University offers both undergraduate and graduate programs and is host to approximately 17,000 students. It is the only Canadian university located in a World Biosphere Reserve--the Niagara Escarpment. The Bruce Trail passes through campus, and offers ample opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, nature interpretation and outdoor…

  3. Are Universities Becoming More Unequal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Lau; Rosen, Harvey S.

    2016-01-01

    Observers have expressed concern about growing inequality in resources across universities. But are universities really becoming more unequal? We argue that the typical approach of examining endowment growth alone is not sensible. In line with the literature on household inequality, we focus instead on a comprehensive income measure. We find that…

  4. University Satellite Campus Management Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Doug; Stott, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Among the 60 or so university satellite campuses in Australia are many that are probably failing to meet the high expectations of their universities and the communities they were designed to serve. While in some cases this may be due to the demand driven system, it may also be attributable in part to the ways in which they are managed. The…

  5. Quantum entanglement of baby universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganagic, Mina; Okuda, Takuya; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2007-08-01

    We study quantum entanglements of baby universes which appear in non-perturbative corrections to the OSV formula for the entropy of extremal black holes in type IIA string theory compactified on the local Calabi Yau manifold defined as a rank 2 vector bundle over an arbitrary genus G Riemann surface. This generalizes the result for G=1 in hep-th/0504221. Non-perturbative terms can be organized into a sum over contributions from baby universes, and the total wave-function is their coherent superposition in the third quantized Hilbert space. We find that half of the universes preserve one set of supercharges while the other half preserve a different set, making the total universe stable but non-BPS. The parent universe generates baby universes by brane/anti-brane pair creation, and baby universes are correlated by conservation of non-normalizable D-brane charges under the process. There are no other source of entanglement of baby universes, and all possible states are superposed with the equal weight.

  6. The Architect as University President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Architecture blends the arts and sciences in a vigorous way--one well suited to a university presidency. In this article, the author shares how his architectural education and background prepared and helped him for his responsibility as president of Clemson University. A big part of his responsibility is to help plan, financially support, build,…

  7. Integrating Environmental Sustainability into Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Meredith; Stubbs, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Universities play a fundamental role in addressing global environmental challenges as their education, research and community involvement can produce long-lasting environmental effects and societal change. By demonstrating best practice in their operations, research and teaching, universities have both multiple and multiplier effects on society.…

  8. Growing an Emerging Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birx, Donald L.; Anderson-Fletcher, Elizabeth; Whitney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The emerging research college or university is one of the most formidable resources a region has to reinvent and grow its economy. This paper is the first of two that outlines a process of building research universities that enhance regional technology development and facilitate flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. Although the…

  9. University Research: Understanding Its Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Since World War II, the federal government has maintained a partnership with the nation's research universities, based on the bipartisan consensus that (1) the nation needs to invest its resources in curiosity-driven, competitively awarded basic research, and (2) basic research is best conducted at the nation's universities. As a result of that…

  10. Managing University Research Microdata Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolfrey, Lynn; Fry, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the management of microdata collections in a university context. It is a cross-country analysis: Collection management at data services in Canada and South Africa are considered. The case studies are of two university sub-contexts: One collection is located in a library; the other at a Faculty-based Data Service. Stages in…

  11. Towards a Cosmopolitan African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waghid, Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this article I offer a defence of cosmopolitanism as an enabling condition for university education in Africa. Recent xenophobic outbursts in South Africa suggests that the enactment of defensible virtues in societies remain distant from the practices of many people. My contention is that university education ought to take seriously the…

  12. The Work of the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Richard C.

    The essays and speeches in this collection, published on Richard Levins 10th anniversary as president of Yale University, reflects his intellectual passions and the depth of his understanding of the work of the university.The first section, "From the Beginning," contains: (1) "Calm Seas, Auspicious Gales"; and (2) "Beyond…

  13. The Recapitalization of Research Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Thomas A.; Vaughn, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Erosion of the financial base for university research is becoming alarmingly clear, while costs rise steadily. There is a critical need to recapitalize American research universities, but also a need to clarify the purpose of federal support: specific research, basic research, research staff training, or some combination of these. (MSE)

  14. Islamic Universities Spread through Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on new universities for Muslims, many supported by groups in the Middle East, which are spreading through the sub-Saharan region. The Islamic University in Uganda is a prime example of a new kind of institution that has slowly been spreading its way across the continent. Embracing both conservative Muslim values and modern…

  15. The Economics of University Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, David A.

    The behavior of universities is considered from an economic perspective. It is assumed that both the administration and the faculty pursue goals consistent with their own self-interests. In addition to reviewing studies from other disciplines, the market in which institutions compete is described, and a formal model of the university as a…

  16. Technical Pitfalls in University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bougnol, Marie-Laure; Dulá, Jose H.

    2015-01-01

    Academicians, experts, and other stakeholders have contributed extensively to the literature on university rankings also known as "league tables". Often the tone is critical usually focused on the subjective aspects of the process; e.g., the list of the universities' attributes used in the rankings, their respective weights, and the size…

  17. What Is the University Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Conor

    2015-01-01

    What is the University today? In this paper, a Foucault and Deleuzo-Guattarian inspired approach is taken. I argue that the University is, today, a site of "neoliberal governmentality," which governs students and academics as sites of human capital. That is, students and academics are governed to self-govern themselves as sites of human…

  18. What is an Urban University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Edward M.

    Today, the urban university is becoming the principal force in higher education. Although new to the American scene, it is educating thousands of students while also answering some of the community's basic needs. The growth of the urban university has been and will continue to be rapid and tremendous. For the purpose of this study, a simple…

  19. Directory of Canadian Universities, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statistics Canada, Ottawa (Ontario). Education, Science, and Culture Div.

    Information about the colleges and universities of Canada is presented in this twentieth edition of the Directory of Canadian Universities for 1977. The history and development of the Canadian system of higher education is discussed in an introductory article that focuses on changes in the structure, governance, students, curriculum, and…

  20. University Autonomy: The Ethiopian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebru, Demewoz Admasu

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses and analyzes the state of university autonomy in Ethiopia at a time when the country has embarked on massive expansion of the sector, and universities are established out of urban centers based on regional equity. Legislative provisions and case study reports were reviewed, and lived experiences documented with emphasis on…

  1. Water Recycling in Schools & Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeten, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Consider the waste streams generated in schools and universities. So what is in the typical used water generated in schools and universities? It is typically about 99 percent water, with the remaining 1 percent mainly made up of organic compounds. Used water contains nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. When one judges it on its quality, it…

  2. Open Universities: A British Tradition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Robert; Tight, Malcolm

    This book challenges the notion that the open university is a recent invention and argues that in Britain there is a long and varied tradition of similar developments, and that there has been a significant 20th century reduction in the openness of universities, particularly in the period from the 1950s to the 1970s. Selected examples of open…

  3. The Black Hole Universe Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2014-06-01

    The black hole universe model is a multiverse model of cosmology recently developed by the speaker. According to this new model, our universe is a fully grown extremely supermassive black hole, which originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up from a supermassive black hole with million to billion solar masses to the present state with trillion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient matter or merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers or universes hierarchically. The innermost three layers include the universe that we live, the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes, and the outside space called mother universe. The outermost layer is infinite in mass, radius, and entropy without an edge and limits to zero for both the matter density and absolute temperature. All layers are governed by the same physics and tend to expand physically in one direction (outward or the direction of increasing entropy). The expansion of a black hole universe decreases its density and temperature but does not alter the laws of physics. The black hole universe evolves iteratively and endlessly without a beginning. When one universe expands out, a new similar one is formed from inside star-like and supermassive black holes. In each of iterations, elements are resynthesized, matter is reconfigurated, and the universe is renewed rather than a simple repeat. The black hole universe is consistent with the Mach principle, observations, and Einsteinian general relativity. It has only one postulate but is able to explain all phenomena occurred in the universe with well-developed physics. The black hole universe does not need dark energy for acceleration and an inflation epoch for flatness, and thus has a devastating impact on the big bang model. In this talk, I will present how this new cosmological model explains the various aspects of the universe, including the origin

  4. University cardiology clinic.

    PubMed

    Borozanov, V

    2013-01-01

    In distant 1972, within framework of the Internal Clinic, a cardiologic department was organized which was soon, on 29.XII.1974, transformed into the Cardiology Clinic, later the Institute for Heart Diseases, and in 2008 was renamed the University Cardiology Clinic. The greater part of its foundation was possible owing to Prof. Dimitar Arsov and Prof. Radovan Percinkovski, who was the clinic's first director in the period from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, the Clinic moved into its own new building, and in that way was physically detached from the Internal Clinics. Until its move to the new building, the Clinic functioned in the Internal Clinics building, organized as an outpatient polyclinic and inpatient infirmary department with clinical beds, a coronary intensive care unit and a haemodynamics laboratory equipped with the most modern equipment of that time. Today the Clinic functions through two integral divisions: an inpatient infirmary department which comprises an intensive coronary care unit and fourteen wards which altogether have 139 clinical beds, and the diagnostic centre which comprises an emergency clinic and day hospital, a communal and consultative outpatients' clinic functioning on a daily basis, through which some 300-350 patients pass every day, and diagnostic laboratories with a capacity of nearly 100 non-invasive and 20-30 invasive diagnostic procedures daily. The Clinic is a teaching base, and its doctors are educators of students at the Medical, Dental and Pharmacy Faculties, and also of students at the High School for Nurses and X-ray technicians, but also for those in Internal Medicine and especially Cardiology. The Clinic is also a base for scientific Masters' and post-doctoral studies, and such higher degrees are achieved not only by doctors who work here, but also by doctors from Medical Centres both in the country and abroad. Doctors working in this institution publish widely, not only a great number of books and monographs, but also original

  5. Soldier universal robot controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyams, Jeffrey; Batavia, Parag; Liao, Elizabeth; Somerville, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    The Soldier Universal Robot Controller (SURC) is a modular OCU designed for simultaneous control of heterogeneous unmanned vehicles. It has a well defined, published API., defined using XML schemas, that allows other potential users of the system to develop their own modules for rapid integration with SURC. The SURC architecture is broken down into three layers: User Interface, Core Functions, and Transport. The User Interface layer is the front end module which provides the human computer interface for user control of robots. The Core layer is further divided into the following modules: Capabilities, Tactical, Mobility, and World Model. The Capabilities module keeps track of the known robots and provides a list of specifications and services. The Mobility module provides path planning via D*, while the Tactical module provides higher level mission planning (multi-agent/multi-mission) capabilities for collaborative operations. The World Model module is a relational database which stores world model objects. Finally, a Transport module provides translation from the SURC architecture to the robot specific messaging protocols (such as JAUS). This allows fast integration of new robot protocols into an existing SURC implementation to enable a new system to rapidly leverage existing SURC capabilities. The communication between different modules within the SURC architecture is done via XML. This gives developers and users the flexibility to extend existing messages without breaking backwards compatibility. The modularity of SURC offers users and developers alike the capability to create custom modules and plug them into place, as long as they follow the pre defined messaging API for that module.

  6. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

  7. TIGER: the universal biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstadler, Steven A.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Hall, Thomas A.; Jiang, Yun; Drader, Jared J.; Hannis, James C.; Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Cummins, Lendell L.; Libby, Brian; Walcott, Demetrius J.; Schink, Amy; Massire, Christian; Ranken, Raymond; Gutierrez, Jose; Manalili, Sheri; Ivy, Cristina; Melton, Rachael; Levene, Harold; Barrett-Wilt, Greg; Li, Feng; Zapp, Vanessa; White, Neill; Samant, Vivek; McNeil, John A.; Knize, Duane; Robbins, David; Rudnick, Karl; Desai, Anjali; Moradi, Emily; Ecker, David J.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, we describe a strategy for the detection and characterization of microorganisms associated with a potential biological warfare attack or a natural outbreak of an emerging infectious disease. This approach, termed TIGER (Triangulation Identification for the Genetic Evaluation of Risks), relies on mass spectrometry-derived base composition signatures obtained from PCR amplification of broadly conserved regions of the microbial genome(s) in a sample. The sample can be derived from air filtration devices, clinical samples, or other sources. Core to this approach are "intelligent PCR primers" that target broadly conserved regions of microbial genomes that flank variable regions. This approach requires that high-performance mass measurements be made on PCR products in the 80-140 bp size range in a high-throughput, robust modality. As will be demonstrated, the concept is equally applicable to bacteria and viruses and could be further applied to fungi and protozoa. In addition to describing the fundamental strategy of this approach, several specific examples of TIGER are presented that illustrate the impact this approach could have on the way biological weapons attacks are detected and the way that the etiologies of infectious diseases are determined. The first example illustrates how any bacterial species might be identified, using Bacillus anthracis as the test agent. The second example demonstrates how DNA-genome viruses are identified using five members of Poxviridae family, whose members includes Variola virus, the agent responsible for smallpox. The third example demonstrates how RNA-genome viruses are identified using the Alphaviruses (VEE, WEE, and EEE) as representative examples. These examples illustrate how the TIGER technology can be applied to create a universal identification strategy for all pathogens, including those that infect humans, livestock, and plants.

  8. [Universal electrogustometer EG-1].

    PubMed

    Pleskacz, Witold A; Wałkanis, Andrzej; Rapiejko, Piotr; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Electrogustometry has been used as a clinical tool for diagnosis and assessment of a variety of conditions. Since the lack of versatile electrogustometer for research and diagnosis, the new electrogustometer EG-1 was developed in 2006. It was done in cooperation between Warsaw University of Technology and Military Institute of Medicine in Warsaw. EG-1 allows quantitative estimation of taste perception threshold using both static and impulse electrogustometry with bipolar electrode. It is a fully autonomous, battery powered and portable instrument. Because of small size and weight, it can be easily placed in any environment. Microprocessor controlled measurement system and user-friendly interface (LCD display with simple keyboard) make EG-1 electrogustometer very handy and flexible in operation. Data obtained during measurements is stored in the internal device memory. After taste examinations measurement data can be transferred to a personal computer via inbuilt USB port for further analysis and storage. EG-1 can generate three predefined variously shaped current impulses: sinus-, saw- and rectangle-shaped. There is an optional possibility of creating own shapes of stimulus puls by the user. The electrical parameters of generated pulses are as follow: current amplitude 1-2000 microA regulated with 1 microA step, stimulus frequency 0(DC)-500 Hz regulated with 5 Hz step, controlable fulfillment factor and signal rise time (optional for automatic measurements). The operator can trigger the stimuli via a hand switch on the bipolar electrode (with gold-plated endings), via keyboard or via additional independent hand switch. Three years of experience collected during EG-1 exploitation allowed to design a new version of electrogustometer EG-2 with a touch panel and color graphical display.

  9. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

  10. Universality of market superstatistics.

    PubMed

    Denys, Mateusz; Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard; Jagielski, Maciej; Stanley, H Eugene

    2016-10-01

    We use a key concept of the continuous-time random walk formalism, i.e., continuous and fluctuating interevent times in which mutual dependence is taken into account, to model market fluctuation data when traders experience excessive (or superthreshold) losses or excessive (or superthreshold) profits. We analytically derive a class of "superstatistics" that accurately model empirical market activity data supplied by Bogachev, Ludescher, Tsallis, and Bunde that exhibit transition thresholds. We measure the interevent times between excessive losses and excessive profits and use the mean interevent discrete (or step) time as a control variable to derive a universal description of empirical data collapse. Our dominant superstatistic value is a power-law corrected by the lower incomplete gamma function, which asymptotically tends toward robustness but initially gives an exponential. We find that the scaling shape exponent that drives our superstatistics subordinates itself and a "superscaling" configuration emerges. Thanks to the Weibull copula function, our approach reproduces the empirically proven dependence between successive interevent times. We also use the approach to calculate a dynamic risk function and hence the dynamic VaR, which is significant in financial risk analysis. Our results indicate that there is a functional (but not literal) balance between excessive profits and excessive losses that can be described using the same body of superstatistics but different calibration values and driving parameters. We also extend our original approach to cover empirical seismic activity data (e.g., given by Corral), the interevent times of which range from minutes to years. Superpositioned superstatistics is another class of superstatistics that protects power-law behavior both for short- and long-time behaviors. These behaviors describe well the collapse of seismic activity data and capture so-called volatility clustering phenomena.

  11. Universality of market superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denys, Mateusz; Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard; Jagielski, Maciej; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-10-01

    We use a key concept of the continuous-time random walk formalism, i.e., continuous and fluctuating interevent times in which mutual dependence is taken into account, to model market fluctuation data when traders experience excessive (or superthreshold) losses or excessive (or superthreshold) profits. We analytically derive a class of "superstatistics" that accurately model empirical market activity data supplied by Bogachev, Ludescher, Tsallis, and Bunde that exhibit transition thresholds. We measure the interevent times between excessive losses and excessive profits and use the mean interevent discrete (or step) time as a control variable to derive a universal description of empirical data collapse. Our dominant superstatistic value is a power-law corrected by the lower incomplete gamma function, which asymptotically tends toward robustness but initially gives an exponential. We find that the scaling shape exponent that drives our superstatistics subordinates itself and a "superscaling" configuration emerges. Thanks to the Weibull copula function, our approach reproduces the empirically proven dependence between successive interevent times. We also use the approach to calculate a dynamic risk function and hence the dynamic VaR, which is significant in financial risk analysis. Our results indicate that there is a functional (but not literal) balance between excessive profits and excessive losses that can be described using the same body of superstatistics but different calibration values and driving parameters. We also extend our original approach to cover empirical seismic activity data (e.g., given by Corral), the interevent times of which range from minutes to years. Superpositioned superstatistics is another class of superstatistics that protects power-law behavior both for short- and long-time behaviors. These behaviors describe well the collapse of seismic activity data and capture so-called volatility clustering phenomena.

  12. The age of universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zeeshan

    The presence of short-lived isotope Curium-247 in the early Solar System complicates the job of dating the earliest events in the solar nebula. Primitive components in meteorites contain a detailed record of the conditions and processes in the solarnebula, the cloud of dust and gas surrounding the infant Sun. Determining accurately when the first materialsformed re-quires the lead-lead (Pb-Pb) dating method, a method based on the decay of uranium (U) isotopes toPb isotopes. The initial ratio of U-238 to U-235 is critical to determining theages correctly, and many studies have concluded that the ratio is constant for any given age. How-ever, my colleagues at Arizona State University(Frankfurt, Germany), and the Senckenberg Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum (also in Frankfurt) and I have found that some calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in chondritic meteorites deviate from the conventional value for the U-238/U-235 ratio. This could lead to inaccuracies of up to 5 million years in the age of these objects, if no correction is made.Variations in the concentrations of thorium and neodymium with the U-238/U-235 ratio suggest that the ratio may have been lowered by the decay of curium-247, which decays to U-235 with a half-life of 15.6 million years. Curium-247 is created in certain types of energetic supernovae, so its presence suggests that a supernova added material to the pre-solar interstellar cloud between 110 and 140 million years before theSolar System began to form.

  13. The University for Older Adults: On Cuba's Universalization of the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Clara Lig Long; Proenza, Antonia Zenaida Sanchez

    2006-01-01

    In this study we focus on a new program in Cuba, university studies for older adults or seniors. Specifically, we look at the Special Municipality of the Isla de la Juventud (Isle of Youth) in the context of the larger policy of "universalization of higher education." We provide information about Cuban perspectives on adult education,…

  14. Deep Learning the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shiwangi; Bard, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is an effective tool to map the structure of matter in the universe, and has been used for more than ten years as a probe of the nature of dark energy. Beyond the well-established two-point summary statistics, attention is now turning to methods that use the full statistical information available in the lensing observables, through analysis of the reconstructed shear field. This offers an opportunity to take advantage of powerful deep learning methods for image analysis. We present two early studies that demonstrate that deep learning can be used to characterise features in weak lensing convergence maps, and to identify the underlying cosmological model that produced them.We developed an unsupervised Denoising Convolutional Autoencoder model in order to learn an abstract representation directly from our data. This model uses a convolution-deconvolution architecture, which is fed with input data (corrupted with binomial noise to prevent over-fitting). Our model effectively trains itself to minimize the mean-squared error between the input and the output using gradient descent, resulting in a model which, theoretically, is broad enough to tackle other similarly structured problems. Using this model we were able to successfully reconstruct simulated convergence maps and identify the structures in them. We also determined which structures had the highest “importance” - i.e. which structures were most typical of the data. We note that the structures that had the highest importance in our reconstruction were around high mass concentrations, but were highly non-Gaussian.We also developed a supervised Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for classification of weak lensing convergence maps from two different simulated theoretical models. The CNN uses a softmax classifier which minimizes a binary cross-entropy loss between the estimated distribution and true distribution. In other words, given an unseen convergence map the trained CNN determines

  15. Life in the Cosmic Context. An Astrobiology Course as an Experiment in Transdisciplinarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friaça, A. C. S.; Janot Pacheco, E.

    2014-10-01

    ``Life in the Cosmic Context" (AGA0316) is the astrobiology course offered by University of São Paulo to undergraduate students of science and humanities majors. The variety of background of the population attending AGA0316 and the broad scope of the addresssed issues makes this course a laboratory of transdisciplinarity.

  16. Female physicists in Ugandan universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ujanga, Florence M.; Ssentongo, Grace Spencer; Ayugi, Gertrude; Akoba, Rashida; Saphina, Biira

    2015-12-01

    For a long time, only one public university in Uganda had a department of physics. Several women graduated from this department, but not many showed much interest in pursuing higher degrees in physics. Currently, there are five public universities in Uganda with departments of physics, and there has been an increase in the number of female graduates in physics. At the same time, the number of women pursuing higher degrees in physics has increased, and the universities have registered an increase in female physics lecturers.

  17. The role of the university.

    PubMed Central

    Starck, P L

    1987-01-01

    The role of the university, and particularly the health sciences university, in promoting positive health for women is twofold. First, the dissemination of existing knowledge raises awareness of special health needs and identifies gaps in the present research and literature base. Second, universities must project future needs of women in a rapidly changing society where such things as space travel may become commonplace. Reduction of the risk of debilitating disease and promotion of positive attitudes will enhance the quality of life for women. A logotherapeutic approach to choosing one's own attitudes toward life's challenges promotes successful coping in a dynamic society. PMID:3120225

  18. The Pragmatic University: A Feasible Utopia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badley, Graham

    2016-01-01

    "Imaginings" of the modern university include such ideas as "the ecological university" and "the pragmatic university". In his attempt to separate utopian from dystopian visions of the university, Ronald Barnett concentrates on an analysis of the ecological university and ignores, for example, the case of the…

  19. Teacher Education Program Reviews at University of North Florida, Florida State University, Florida Atlantic University, University of South Florida, March 1994-April 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, David A.

    This report offers the review of four joint teacher education reviews conducted in the Florida State University System (SUS). Institutions reviewed are: University of North Florida (UNF), Florida State University (FSU), Florida Atlantic University (FAU), and the University of South Florida (USF). Joint teams were composed of the National Council…

  20. Twenty Practices of an Entrepreneurial University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjerding, Allan N.; Wilderom, Celeste P. M.; Cameron, Shona P. B.; Taylor, Aadam; Scheunert, Klaus-Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The idea of an entrepreneurial university caught on fast after the American sociologist Burton R. Clark published his books on entrepreneurship in universities ("Creating Entrepreneurial Universities," 1998; "Sustaining Changes in Universities," 2004). Inspired by the alluring of the notion of an entrepreneurial university, and…

  1. An International Student's Guide to Mexican Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Alan, Ed.; Salazar, Sylvia Ortega, Ed.

    This guide for students interested in studying at Mexican universities covers 50 universities including all state universities, the National University of Mexico, as well as a representative selection of the leading private universities. Introductory material provides a brief history of Mexico, a discussion of differences from and similarities to…

  2. Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics) G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, kochem.36@mail.ru The wave planetology [1-3 & others] proceeds from the following: "planetary structures are made by orbits and rotations". A uniform reason makes uniform structures. Inertia-gravity waves arising in planetary bodies due to their movements in Keplerian elliptical orbits with periodically changing accelerations warp these bodies in such way that they acquire polyhedron shapes (after interference of standing waves of four directions). Strong Newtonian gravity makes bodies larger than ~400 to 500 km in diameter globular and polyhedra are rarely seen. Only geomorphologic, geologic and geophysical mapping can develop these hidden structures. But small bodies, normally less than ~ 300 to 400 km in diameter, often show parts of the polyhedra, rarely fully developed forms (the asteroid Steins and satellite Amalthea present rather perfect forms of "diamond"). Depending on warping wavelengths (they make harmonics) various Plato's figures superimposed on each other can be distinguished. The fundamental wave 1 produces a tetrahedron, intrinsically dichotomic figure in which a vertex (contraction) always is opposed to a face (expansion). From the recent examples the best is the saturnian northern hexagon (a face) opposed to the southern hurricane (a vertex). The first overtone wave 2 is responsible for creation of structural octahedra. Whole ‘diamonds" and their parts are known [4, 5]. Other overtones produce less developed (because of smaller wave amplitudes) planetary shapes complicating main forms. Thus, the first common structural peculiarity of planetary bodies is their polyhedron nature. Not less important is the second common structural peculiarity. As all globular or smaller more or less isometric bodies rotate, they have an angular momentum. It is inevitably different in tropic and extra-tropic belts having uneven radii or distances to

  3. Dynamics of compact homogeneous universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, M.; Koike, T.; Hosoya, A.

    1997-01-01

    A complete description of dynamics of compact locally homogeneous universes is given, which, in particular, includes explicit calculations of Teichm{umlt u}ller deformations and careful counting of dynamical degrees of freedom. We regard each of the universes as a simply connected four-dimensional space{endash}time with identifications by the action of a discrete subgroup of the isometry group. We then reduce the identifications defined by the space{endash}time isometries to ones in a homogeneous section, and find a condition that such spatial identifications must satisfy. This is essential for explicit construction of compact homogeneous universes. Some examples are demonstrated for Bianchi II, VI{sub 0}, VII{sub 0}, and I universal covers. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Office Automation Boosts University's Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh has a 2-year agreement designating the Xerox Corporation as the primary supplier of word processing and related office automation equipment in order to increase productivity and more efficient use of campus resources. (MLF)

  5. Flinders University Electric Vehicle Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the specifications and principles involved in the operation of an electric car developed by the Institute of Solar and Electochemical Energy Conversion at Flinders University in South Australia. (JR)

  6. Astronomy in the Digital Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Lindblom, J.; Terzian, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Digital Universe is an Internet project whose mission is to provide free, accurate, unbiased information covering all aspects of human knowledge, and to inspire humans to learn, make use of, and expand this knowledge. It is planned to be a decades long effort, inspired by the Encyclopedia Galactica concept popularized by Carl Sagan, and is being developed by the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation. A worldwide network of experts is responsible for selecting content featured within the Digital Universe. The first publicly available content is the Encyclopedia of Earth, a Boston University project headed by Prof. Cutler Cleveland, which will be part of the Earth Portal. The second major content area will be an analogous Encyclopedia of the Cosmos to be part of the Cosmos Portal. It is anticipated that this will evolve into a major resource for astronomy education. Authors and topic editors are now being recruited for the Encyclopedia of the Cosmos.

  7. Beyond Divestment: The Moral University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Alan

    1986-01-01

    Issues in university divestment of stock in American corporations doing business in South Africa, in protest of apartheid, are discussed in light of the American experience with discrimination. Divestment options are examined. (MSE)

  8. Goal Congruence in the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Lily; Neumann, Yoram

    1983-01-01

    A questionnaire administered to 150 undergraduates and 90 faculty members compared their relative levels of goal congruence with those of their university. Programs in medicine, social sciences, and engineering were studied. (JW)

  9. Public Support for Autonomous Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piel, Gerard

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between colleges and universities and the federal government is examined. The author suggests that public funding should continue but the funds should be used for teaching and learning rather than government oriented research. (DE)

  10. The TR University Research Scorecard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacks, Rebecca

    2000-01-01

    Presents a ranking of the top United States universities in their quest for intellectual property, commercial partners, and profits. Bases rankings on a consideration of patent numbers, patent quality, and licensing revenues. (WRM)

  11. Physics in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qing-Guo

    In this paper, I will give a brief overview of the physics in the early universe, in particular, the inflation scenario. The predictions and the latest constraints on the inflation models will be discussed in detail.

  12. Universe creation on a computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Gordon

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the epistemology and metaphysics of universe creation on a computer. The paper begins with F.J. Tipler's argument that our experience is indistinguishable from the experience of someone embedded in a perfect computer simulation of our own universe, hence we cannot know whether or not we are part of such a computer program ourselves. Tipler's argument is treated as a special case of epistemological scepticism, in a similar vein to 'brain-in-a-vat' arguments. It is argued that Tipler's hypothesis that our universe is a program running on a digital computer in another universe, generates empirical predictions, and is therefore a falsifiable hypothesis. The computer program hypothesis is also treated as a hypothesis about what exists beyond the physical world, and is compared with Kant's metaphysics of noumena. It is argued that if our universe is a program running on a digital computer, then our universe must have compact spatial topology, and the possibilities of observationally testing this prediction are considered. The possibility of testing the computer program hypothesis with the value of the density parameter Ω0 is also analysed. The informational requirements for a computer to represent a universe exactly and completely are considered. Consequent doubt is thrown upon Tipler's claim that if a hierarchy of computer universes exists, we would not be able to know which 'level of implementation' our universe exists at. It is then argued that a digital computer simulation of a universe, or any other physical system, does not provide a realisation of that universe or system. It is argued that a digital computer simulation of a physical system is not objectively related to that physical system, and therefore cannot exist as anything else other than a physical process occurring upon the components of the computer. It is concluded that Tipler's sceptical hypothesis, and a related hypothesis from Bostrom, cannot be

  13. Phenomenology of universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; /Florida U.

    2006-10-01

    In this proceeding, the phenomenology of Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which all the Standard Model fields propagate, is explored. We focus on models with one universal extra dimension, compactified on an S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. We revisit calculations of Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter without an assumption of the KK mass degeneracy including all possible coannihilations. We then contrast the experimental signatures of low energy supersymmetry and UED.

  14. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  15. The Civic Mission of Australian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lawrence; Muirhead, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the origins and meaning of civic responsibility in the Australian model of the university, beginning with medieval European universities and progressing through Australian reforms of the 20th century. Warns against the university without a civic mission. (SLD)

  16. 78 FR 69173 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... opportunity to submit applications for a grant as a Regional Center in the University Transportation Centers... will solicit competitive grant applications for two regional university transportation centers,...

  17. University Program Management Information System: NASA's University Program Active Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Office of Education/N.

  18. Can the Universe create itself?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Li, Li-Xin

    1998-07-01

    The question of first-cause has troubled philosophers and cosmologists alike. Now that it is apparent that our universe began in a big bang explosion, the question of what happened before the big bang arises. Inflation seems like a very promising answer, but as Borde and Vilenkin have shown, the inflationary state preceding the big bang could not have been infinite in duration-it must have had a beginning also. Where did it come from? Ultimately, the difficult question seems to be how to make something out of nothing. This paper explores the idea that this is the wrong question-that that is not how the Universe got here. Instead, we explore the idea of whether there is anything in the laws of physics that would prevent the Universe from creating itself. Because spacetimes can be curved and multiply connected, general relativity allows for the possibility of closed timelike curves (CTCs). Thus, tracing backwards in time through the original inflationary state we may eventually encounter a region of CTCs-giving no first-cause. This region of CTCs may well be over by now (being bounded toward the future by a Cauchy horizon). We illustrate that such models-with CTCs-are not necessarily inconsistent by demonstrating self-consistent vacuums for Misner space and a multiply connected de Sitter space in which the renormalized energy-momentum tensor does not diverge as one approaches the Cauchy horizon and solves Einstein's equations. Some specific scenarios (out of many possible ones) for this type of model are described. For example, a metastable vacuum inflates producing an infinite number of (big-bang-type) bubble universes. In many of these, either by natural causes or by action of advanced civilizations, a number of bubbles of metastable vacuum are created at late times by high energy events. These bubbles will usually collapse and form black holes, but occasionally one will tunnel to create an expanding metastable vacuum (a baby universe) on the other side of the

  19. Goldman - Georgetown University | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Principal Investigator: Radoslav (Rado) Goldman, PhDInstitution: Georgetown University, Washington, DC Subcontract Principal Investigator: Raja Mazumder, PhDInstitution: George Washington University |

  20. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

    2008-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

  1. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  2. Effective theories of universal theories

    DOE PAGES

    Wells, James D.; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2016-01-20

    It is well-known but sometimes overlooked that constraints on the oblique parameters (most notably S and T parameters) are generally speaking only applicable to a special class of new physics scenarios known as universal theories. The oblique parameters should not be associated with Wilson coefficients in a particular operator basis in the effective field theory (EFT) framework, unless restrictions have been imposed on the EFT so that it describes universal theories. Here, we work out these restrictions, and present a detailed EFT analysis of universal theories. We find that at the dimension-6 level, universal theories are completely characterized by 16more » parameters. They are conveniently chosen to be: 5 oblique parameters that agree with the commonly-adopted ones, 4 anomalous triple-gauge couplings, 3 rescaling factors for the h3, hff, hV V vertices, 3 parameters for hV V vertices absent in the Standard Model, and 1 four-fermion coupling of order yf2. Furthermore, all these parameters are defined in an unambiguous and basis-independent way, allowing for consistent constraints on the universal theories parameter space from precision electroweak and Higgs data.« less

  3. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

  4. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  5. Effective theories of universal theories

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, James D.; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2016-01-20

    It is well-known but sometimes overlooked that constraints on the oblique parameters (most notably S and T parameters) are generally speaking only applicable to a special class of new physics scenarios known as universal theories. The oblique parameters should not be associated with Wilson coefficients in a particular operator basis in the effective field theory (EFT) framework, unless restrictions have been imposed on the EFT so that it describes universal theories. Here, we work out these restrictions, and present a detailed EFT analysis of universal theories. We find that at the dimension-6 level, universal theories are completely characterized by 16 parameters. They are conveniently chosen to be: 5 oblique parameters that agree with the commonly-adopted ones, 4 anomalous triple-gauge couplings, 3 rescaling factors for the h3, hff, hV V vertices, 3 parameters for hV V vertices absent in the Standard Model, and 1 four-fermion coupling of order yf2. Furthermore, all these parameters are defined in an unambiguous and basis-independent way, allowing for consistent constraints on the universal theories parameter space from precision electroweak and Higgs data.

  6. Euclid and the Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellier, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    The ESA Euclid mission aims to understand why the expansion of the Universe is accelerating and pin down the source responsible for the acceleration. It will uncover the very nature of dark energy and gravitation by measuring with exquisite accuracy the expansion rate of the Universe and the growth rate of structure formation in the Universe. To achieve its objectives Euclid will observe the distribution of dark matter in the Universe by measuring shapes of weakly distorted distant galaxies lensed by foreground cosmic structures with the VIS imaging instrument. In parallel, Euclid will analyse the clustering of galaxies and the distribution of clusters of galaxies by using spectroscopy and measuring redshifts of galaxies with the NISP photometer and spectrometer instrument. The Euclid mission will observe one third of the sky (15,000 deg2) to collect data on several billion galaxies spread over the last ten billion years. In this presentation I will report on the considerable technical and scientific progresses made since COSPAR 2014, on behalf of the Euclid Collaboration. The recent mission PDR that has been passed successfully shows that Euclid should meet its requirements and achieve its primary scientific objectives to map the dark universe. The most recent forecasts and constraints on dark energy, gravity, dark matter and inflation will be presented.

  7. Agreement between Oakland University and the Oakland University Chapter, American Association of University Professors, 1985-88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Univ. Professors, Washington, DC.

    The collective bargaining agreement between Oakland University and the University's chapter (370 members) of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) covering the period 1985-1988 is presented. Items covered in the agreement include: definitions and recognition of AAUP, academic titles, AAUP rights, university management,…

  8. Factors Negatively Affecting University Adjustment from the Views of First-Year University Students: The Case of Mersin University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevinç, Seda; Gizir, Cem Ali

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study aims to investigate the most common factors that negatively affect adjustment to university and coping strategies used by first-year university students in the adaptation process from the viewpoint of first-year university students. The participants were 25 first-year university students from various faculties at Mersin…

  9. Big questions about the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, Magda

    2011-06-01

    Astronomy is not only a branch of science but also an important part of the culture and civilisations of peoples. Starting with archeoastronomy to the present day, it has always contributed to a better understanding of life, of humanity. After 400 years of modern astronomy, it still addresses major problems such as: Why there is something rather than nothing? Why is nature comprehensible to humans? How is cosmos related to humanity? Do multiverses exist? Is there life on other planets? Are we alone in the universe? Does the universe have a beginning? If so, what does it mean? How did the universe originate? All these questions are a challenge for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary investigations, for philosophers, physicists, cosmologists, mathematicians, theologians. The new insights gained by pursuing in depth these common investigations will shape the society we live in and have important consequences on the future we are creating.

  10. Universal mortality law and immortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbel', Mark Ya.

    2004-10-01

    Well-protected human and laboratory animal populations with abundant resources are evolutionarily unprecedented. Physical approach, which takes advantage of their extensively quantified mortality, establishes that its dominant fraction yields the exact law, which is universal for all animals from yeast to humans. Singularities of the law demonstrate new kinds of stepwise adaptation. The law proves that universal mortality is an evolutionary by-product, which at any given age is reversible, independent of previous life history, and disposable. Life expectancy may be extended, arguably to immortality, by minor biological amendments in the animals. Indeed, in nematodes with a small number of perturbed genes and tissues it increased 6-fold (to 430 years in human terms), with no apparent loss in health and vitality. The law relates universal mortality to specific processes in cells and their genetic regulation.

  11. Fate of an accelerating universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.-A.; Hwang, W-Y. P.

    2006-01-15

    The presently accelerating universe may keep accelerating forever, eventually run into the event horizon problem, and thus be in conflict with the superstring idea. On the other hand, the current accelerating phase as well as the fate of the universe may be swayed by a negative cosmological constant, which dictates a big crunch. Based on the current observational data, in this paper we investigate how large the magnitude of a negative cosmological constant is allowed to be. In addition, for distinguishing the sign of the cosmological constant via observations, we point out that a measure of the evolution of the dark energy equation-of-state may be a good discriminator. Hopefully future observations will provide much more detailed information about dark energy and thereby indicate the sign of the cosmological constant as well as the fate of the presently accelerating universe.

  12. Supernovae and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    2003-01-01

    Orbiting high above the turbulence of the earth's atmosphere, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided breathtaking views of astronomical objects never before seen in such detail. The steady diffraction-limited images allow this medium-size telescope to reach faint galaxies of 30th stellar magnitude. Some of these galaxies are seen as early as 2 billion years after the Big Bang in a 15 billion year old universe. Up until recently, astronomers assumed that all of the laws of physics and astronomy applied back then as they do today. Now, using the discovery that certain supernovae are standard candles, astronomers have found that the universe is expanding faster today than it was back then: the universe is accelerating in its expansion.

  13. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  14. Dark matter in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe? This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand. Most of the radiation in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation; it is dark. The dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10 and 30 percent of the critical density; baryonic matter contributes between 1.1 and 12 percent of the critical. The case for the spatially flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments - structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation - and by some observational data. If Omega is indeed unity, or even just significantly greater than 0.1, then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark matter candidates: an axion of mass 10 (exp -6) eV to 10 (exp -4) eV; a neutrino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either planned or are underway.

  15. Dark matter in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1991-03-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: most of the material in the universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments -- structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation -- and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 71 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Dark matter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: Most of the material in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments--structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation--and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 63 refs.

  17. Universe Awareness For Young Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorza, C.; Miley, G.; Ödman, C.; Madsen, C.

    2006-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that will expose economically disadvantaged young children aged between 4 and 10 years to the inspirational aspects of modern astronomy. The programme is motivated by the premise that access to simple knowledge about the Universe is a basic birth right of everybody. These formative ages are crucial in the development of a human value system. This is also the age range in which children can learn to develop a 'feeling' for the vastness of the Universe. Exposing young children to such material is likely to broaden their minds and stimulate their world-view. The goals of Universe Awareness are in accordance with two of the United Nations Millennium goals, endorsed by all 191 UN member states, namely (i) the achievement of universal primary education and (ii) the promotion of gender equality in schools. We propose to commence Universe Awareness with a pilot project that will target disadvantaged regions in about 4 European countries (possibly Spain, France, Germany and The Netherlands) and several non-EU countries (possibly Chile, Colombia, India, Tunisia, South Africa and Venezuela). There will be two distinct elements in the development of the UNAWE program: (i) Creation and production of suitable UNAWE material and delivery techniques, (ii) Training of educators who will coordinate UNAWE in each of the target countries. In addition to the programme, an international network of astronomy outreach will be organised. We present the first results of a pilot project developed in Venezuela, where 670 children from different social environments, their teachers and members of an indigenous tribe called Ye´kuana from the Amazon region took part in a wonderful astronomical and cultural exchange that is now being promoted by the Venezuelan ministry of Education at the national level.

  18. The University of Michigan: College and University Computing Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A major change is underway at the University of Michigan as a new telecommunications network is being installed to become the central focus for information technology on the campus as voice communication, mainframe, minicomputer, and microcomputer installations all become part of the network. (MLW)

  19. El Espanol como Idioma Universal (Spanish as a Universal Language)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijares, Jose

    1977-01-01

    A proposal to transform Spanish into a universal language because it possesses the prerequisites: it is a living language, spoken in several countries; it is a natural language; and it uses the ordinary alphabet. Details on simplification and standardization are given. (Text is in Spanish.) (AMH)

  20. Michigan State University: College and University Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The administrative data processing department at Michigan State provides support to all colleges and departments, and designs, programs, tests, and implements university management systems. A steering committee determines priorities for development projects and provides a sounding board for long-range plans of information systems. (MLW)

  1. College and University Systems Environment: University of Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The management systems office at the University of Hawaii assists in the development and operation of an effective management information systems service. A shared computer system approach was developed to provide service in the areas of office automation and data processing. (MLW)

  2. Understanding Catholic Universities' Organizational Identity: Perspectives from University Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Suzanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, American Catholic social institutions have struggled with issues related to their organizational and religious identities (Dosen, 2009; Gallin, 2000; Weakland, 1994). For Catholic colleges and universities, these issues are evidenced by the difficulty some institutions have with being readily able to recognize their distinctive…

  3. Arizona State University: Student Tracking in a University System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John D.; Gebel, Melinda A.

    1995-01-01

    Arizona State University has created longitudinal student files capable of tracking each student's curricular and financial aid history from entry until graduation. The structure of the files, their creation and maintenance, and their evolution over the years are described. Uses of the files to conduct different kinds of studies to inform…

  4. Loyola University of Chicago: College and University Computing Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Four major goals of Loyola University affect decisions concerning computing resources. These goals include: excellence in education and the growing role of computers; emphasis on research and attracting quality faculty, competition for students, and meeting administrative and health care needs. (MLW)

  5. University Autonomy in a Third-Generation University in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arikewuyo, M. Olalekan; Ilusanya, Gboyega

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the level of autonomy in one of Nigeria's third-generation universities. Findings indicated that generally government intervention was rated as not unreasonable. Specifically, the study discovered that government never exerts any influence on the appointment, discipline, tenure and dismissal of staff; entry standards and pass…

  6. The Creation of the Universe

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  7. Sustainable Chemistry at Sungkyunkwan University.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-07-20

    Special Issue: Sustainable Chemistry at Sungkyunkwan University. Sustainable chemistry is key to the development of efficient renewable energies, which will become more and more important in order to combat global warming. In this Editorial, guest editor Prof. Nam-Gyu Park describes the context of this Special Issue on top-quality research towards sustainability performed at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU) in Korea. Scientists at SKKU work on, for example, photovoltaic solar cells to generate low-cost electricity, lithium batteries and capacitors to store electricity, piezoelectric nanogenerators, thermoelectric devices, hydrogen generation, and fuel cells.

  8. The trouble with universal declarations.

    PubMed

    Benatar, David

    2005-09-01

    A number of problems plague universal declarations. To the extent that those drafting and adopting the declaration represent a range of different views, consensus can only be obtained if the declaration makes minimalist claims that all can support, or makes claims that are vague enough that they can be interpreted to everybody's satisfaction. To the extent that a universal declaration avoids these problems, and takes an unequivocal and controversial stand, it does so by privileging the view that is hegemonic (at least among those responsible for the declaration). After discussing these problems I ask whether such declarations could nonetheless do any good.

  9. The Creation of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-09

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  10. University Sponsorship of Charter Schools in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Simmons, Ada B.; Eckes, Suzanne E.; Rapp, Kelly E.; Benton, Sarah A.; Nowak, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    There is a dearth of research on the subject of university sponsorship of charter schools. This report intends to increase the knowledge base on university sponsorship of charter schools by examining the climate in Indiana, specifically in regard to the decision by only one (Ball State) of the eligible five universities (Ball State University,…

  11. Governing Public Universities in Arab Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ElObeidy, Ahmed A.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally in Arab public universities, presidents are appointed by government authorities. Recently, in uprising Arab countries universities' presidents have been elected by universities' faculty members. Neither traditional nor self-governance pattern succeeded to modernise Arab universities. Reforming patterns of governance is critical for…

  12. The Right to Speak in American Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minerva, 1975

    1975-01-01

    In March and April 1974 guest lecturers from other universities were prevented from speaking at the University of Chicago and at Yale University because of disruptive demonstrations of protest. This article contains reports of committees from each university, requested by their respective presidents, regarding the issues involved in such…

  13. A Christian Critique of the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Charles Habib

    Views on the place and power of the university, the church's role in the university, and the sciences and humanities are presented. The secularization of western universities raises fundamental criticisms from the Christian point of view that the university atmosphere is not congenial to Christian spiritual values, and that higher education…

  14. Joint Big Decision Committees and University Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Myrtle M.

    1991-01-01

    Four case studies concerning joint faculty-administration committees established to make major decisions (Princeton University, New Jersey; Northwestern University, Illinois; Teacher's College Columbia University, New York; Ohio University) suggest that, although the committees have potential to improve campus management, they are neither as…

  15. Yale University Press: Disseminating "Lux et Veritas"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, John B.

    2010-01-01

    America's university presses are situated within a network of over one hundred universities, learned societies, and scholarly associations. According to a pamphlet put out by the American Association of University Presses, these presses "make available to the broader public the full range and value of research generated by university faculty."…

  16. The American University: Problems, Prospects, and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blits, Jan H., Ed.

    Issues and trends relating to science and technology, liberal education and the aims of the university, and academic governance in U.S. universities are considered in 10 essays. Questions are raised concerning: whether universities should be linked to industrial research projects, how America's universities should respond to the wave of computer…

  17. Adjusting to University: The Hong Kong Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Hon Keung; Sun, Hongyi; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong

    2012-01-01

    Students' adjustment to the university environment is an important factor in predicting university outcomes and is crucial to their future achievements. University support to students' transition to university life can be divided into three dimensions: academic adjustment, social adjustment and psychological adjustment. However, these…

  18. Approaches of Improving University Assets Management Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jingliang

    2015-01-01

    University assets management, as an important content of modern university management, is generally confronted with the issue of low efficiency. Currently, to address the problems exposed in university assets management and take appropriate modification measures is an urgent issue in front of Chinese university assets management sectors. In this…

  19. The Managerialist University: An Economic Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspromourgos, Tony

    2012-01-01

    The rise of the managerialist university, in terms of a shift towards supposed corporate forms of governance in universities, associated also with greater competition between universities, has been the subject of considerable controversy. Dissent with respect to these developments has commonly appealed to the notion of the university as a special…

  20. Campus Capitalists: Universities as Development Entrepreneurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Douglas

    1983-01-01

    The trend for universities to use their excess land for profitable real estate ventures in conjunction with private developers and builders is considered. One of the first institutions to embark on development was the University of Washington, Seattle, and one of the best known examples of university-sponsored development is Stanford University,…