Science.gov

Sample records for agalactiae streptococcus dysgalactiae

  1. Development of primer sets for loop-mediated isothermal amplification that enables rapid and specific detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three ...

  2. Diversity and Mobility of Integrative and Conjugative Elements in Bovine Isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae, and S. uberis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Haenni, Marisa; Saras, Estelle; Bertin, Stéphane; Leblond, Pierre; Madec, Jean-Yves; Payot, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Bovine isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 76), Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (n = 32), and Streptococcus uberis (n = 101) were analyzed for the presence of different integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) and their association with macrolide, lincosamide, and tetracycline resistance. The diversity of the isolates included in this study was demonstrated by multilocus sequence typing for S. agalactiae and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for S. dysgalactiae and S. uberis. Most of the erythromycin-resistant strains carry an ermB gene. Five strains of S. uberis that are resistant to lincomycin but susceptible to erythromycin carry the lin(B) gene, and one has both linB and lnuD genes. In contrast to S. uberis, most of the S. agalactiae and S. dysgalactiae tetracycline-resistant isolates carry a tet(M) gene. A tet(S) gene was also detected in the three species. A Tn916-related element was detected in 30 to 50% of the tetracycline-resistant strains in the three species. Tetracycline resistance was successfully transferred by conjugation to an S. agalactiae strain. Most of the isolates carry an ICE integrated in the rplL gene. In addition, half of the S. agalactiae isolates have an ICE integrated in a tRNA lysine (tRNALys) gene. Such an element is also present in 20% of the isolates of S. dysgalactiae and S. uberis. A circular form of these ICEs was detected in all of the isolates tested, indicating that these genetic elements are mobile. These ICEs could thus also be a vehicle for horizontal gene transfer between streptococci of animal and/or human origin. PMID:20952646

  3. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deguo; Liu, Yanhong

    2015-05-26

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. agalactiae. The detection limit of all four LAMP primer sets were 0.1 pg DNA template per reaction, the LAMP method with 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as the targets can differentiate the three pathogens, which is potentially useful in epidemiological studies.

  4. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deguo; Liu, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. agalactiae. The detection limit of all four LAMP primer sets were 0.1 pg DNA template per reaction, the LAMP method with 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as the targets can differentiate the three pathogens, which is potentially useful in epidemiological studies. PMID:26016433

  5. Neonatal Mortality in Puppies Due to Bacteremia by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Ana I.; Falsen, Enevold; Simarro, Isabel; Rollan, Eduardo; Collins, Matthew D.; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernandez-Garayzabal, Jose F.

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of bacteremia in puppies caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae. Identification was achieved by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. This is the first report of the recovery of S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae from dogs. PMID:16455943

  6. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  7. Multiplex PCR-based identification of Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies from dogs.

    PubMed

    Moriconi, M; Acke, E; Petrelli, D; Preziuso, S

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus canis (S. canis), Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies (S. dysgalactiae subspecies) are β-haemolytic Gram positive bacteria infecting animals and humans. S. canis and S. zooepidemicus are considered as two of the major zoonotic species of Streptococcus, while more research is needed on S. dysgalactiae subspecies bacteria. In this work, a multiplex-PCR protocol was tested on strains and clinical samples to detect S. canis, S. dysgalactiae subspecies and S. equi subspecies bacteria in dogs. All strains were correctly identified as S. canis, S. equi subspecies or S. dysgalactiae subspecies by the multiplex-PCR. The main Streptococcus species isolated from symptomatic dogs were confirmed S. canis. The multiplex-PCR protocol described is a rapid, accurate and efficient method for identifying S. canis, S. equi subspecies and S. dysgalactiae subspecies in dogs and could be used for diagnostic purposes and for epidemiological studies.

  8. Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, G P

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae continues to be a major cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle and a source of economic loss for the industry. Veterinarians are often asked to provide information on herd level control and eradication of S. agalactiae mastitis. This review collects and collates relevant publications on the subject. The literature search was conducted in 1993 on the Agricola database. Articles related to S. agalactiae epidemiology, pathogen identification techniques, milk quality consequences, and control, prevention, and therapy were included. Streptococcus agalactiae is an oblique parasite of the bovine mammary gland and is susceptible to treatment with a variety of antibiotics. Despite this fact, where state or provincial census data are available, herd prevalence levels range from 11% (Alberta, 1991) to 47% (Vermont, 1985). Infection with S. agalactiae is associated with elevated somatic cell count and total bacteria count and a decrease in the quantity and quality of milk products produced. Bulk tank milk culture has, using traditional milk culture techniques, had a low sensitivity for identifying S. agalactiae at the herd level. New culture methods, using selective media and large inocula, have substantially improved the sensitivity of bulk tank culture. Efficacy of therapy on individual cows remains high. Protocols for therapy of all infected animals in a herd are generally successful in eradicating the pathogen from the herd, especially if they are followed up with good udder hygiene techniques. PMID:9220132

  9. Aerobic Metabolism of Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, M. N.

    1967-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae cultures possess an aerobic pathway for glucose oxidation that is strongly inhibited by cyanide. The products of glucose oxidation by aerobically grown cells of S. agalactiae 50 are lactic and acetic acids, acetylmethylcarbinol, and carbon dioxide. Glucose degradation products by aerobically grown cells, as percentage of glucose carbon, were 52 to 61% lactic acid, 20 to 23% acetic acid, 5.5 to 6.5% acetylmethylcarbinol, and 14 to 16% carbon dioxide. There was no evidence for a pentose cycle or a tricarboxylic acid cycle. Crude cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae 50 possessed a strong reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase that is also cyanide-sensitive. Dialysis or ultrafiltration of the crude, cell-free extract resulted in loss of NADH2 oxidase activity. Oxidase activity was restored to the inactive extract by addition of the ultrafiltrate or by addition of menadione or K3Fe(CN)6. Noncytochrome iron-containing pigments were present in cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae. The possible participation of these pigments in the respiration of S. agalactiae is presently being studied. PMID:4291090

  10. Infection of human keratinocytes by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae isolated from milk of the bovine udder.

    PubMed

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Alves-Barroco, Cynthia; Raposo, Luís R; Costa, Mafalda N; Fortunato, Elvira; Baptista, Pedro Viana; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Santos-Sanches, Ilda

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (SDSD) are considered exclusive animal pathogens; however, a putative zoonotic upper limb cellulitis, a prosthetic joint infection and an infective endocarditis were described in humans. To unravel if bovine SDSD isolates are able to infect human cells, the adherence and internalization to human primary keratinocytes of two bovine SDSD strains isolated from milk collected from udder were analyzed. Bacterial adhesion assays and confocal microscopy indicate a high adherence and internalization of SDSD isolates to human cells, suggesting for the first time the ability of bovine isolates to infect human cells.

  11. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Bacteremia, Finland, 1995–2004

    PubMed Central

    Vähäkuopus, Susanna; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Vuento, Risto; Syrjänen, Jaana

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective population-based study of 140 episodes of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis bacteremia occurring in Finland during 1995–2004. Rare emm types were associated with more severe disease and increased mortality rates. Skin and soft tissue infections were more frequent clinical signs among cases caused by common emm types. PMID:20409380

  12. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Bacteremia, Finland, 1995-2004.

    PubMed

    Rantala, Sari; Vahakuopus, Susanna; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Vuento, Risto; Syrjanen, Jaana

    2010-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective population-based study of 140 episodes of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis bacteremia occurring in Finland during 1995-2004. Rare emm types were associated with more severe disease and increased mortality rates. Skin and soft tissue infections were more frequent clinical signs among cases caused by common emm types.

  13. Streptococcus agalactiae Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Hanna, Rami; Reynolds, Nina; Thompson, Shellie; Hallit, Rabih; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present 2 patients with Streptococcus agalactiae toxic shock-like syndrome and review another 11 well-reported cases from the literature. Streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome is a devastating illness with a high mortality rate, therefore we stress the importance of early supportive management, antimicrobial therapy, and surgical intervention. Toxic shock-like syndrome is likely to be underestimated in patients with invasive Streptococcus agalactiae infection who present with shock. Early diagnosis requires high suspicion of the illness, along with a thorough mucocutaneous examination. Streptococcus agalactiae produces uncharacterized pyrogenic toxins, which explains the ability of the organism to cause toxic shock-like syndrome. PMID:23263717

  14. Molecular and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Streptococcus dysgalactiae isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; da Costa, Barbara L P; Matajira, Carlos E C; Gomes, Vasco T M; Mesquita, Renan E; Silva, Ana Paula S; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-10-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and dysgalactiae were isolated from swine clinical specimens. The subspecies equisimilis presented 2 clonal patterns with 85% genetic similarity, whereas subspecies dysgalactiae presented distinct band pattern with less than 80% similarity with equisimilis genotypes. Isolates presented high MIC values to tetracyclines, danofloxacin, spectinomycin, tiamulin, and clindamycin.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    McNeilly, Celia L.; McMillan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is a human pathogen that colonizes the skin or throat, and causes a range of diseases from relatively benign pharyngitis to potentially fatal invasive diseases. While not as virulent as the close relative Streptococcus pyogenes the two share a number of virulence factors and are known to coexist in a human host. Both pre- and post-genomic studies have revealed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination occurs between these two organisms and plays a major role in shaping the population structure of SDSE. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HGT and recombination in the evolution of SDSE. PMID:25566202

  16. Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae strains isolated from horses are a genetically distinct population within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae taxon.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Marcos D; Erol, Erdal; Ribeiro-Gonçalves, Bruno; Mendes, Catarina I; Carriço, João A; Matos, Sandra C; Preziuso, Silvia; Luebke-Becker, Antina; Wieler, Lothar H; Melo-Cristino, Jose; Ramirez, Mario

    2016-08-17

    The pathogenic role of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae in the equine host is increasingly recognized. A collection of 108 Lancefield group C (n = 96) or L (n = 12) horse isolates recovered in the United States and in three European countries presented multilocus sequence typing (MLST) alleles, sequence types and emm types (only 56% of the isolates could be emm typed) that were, with few exceptions, distinct from those previously found in human Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Characterization of a subset of horse isolates by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that most equine isolates could also be differentiated from S. dysgalactiae strains from other animal species, supporting the existence of a horse specific genomovar. Draft genome information confirms the distinctiveness of the horse genomovar and indicates the presence of potentially horse-specific virulence factors. While this genomovar represents most of the isolates recovered from horses, a smaller MLST and MLSA defined sub-population seems to be able to cause infections in horses, other animals and humans, indicating that transmission between hosts of strains belonging to this group may occur.

  17. Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae strains isolated from horses are a genetically distinct population within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae taxon

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Marcos D.; Erol, Erdal; Ribeiro-Gonçalves, Bruno; Mendes, Catarina I.; Carriço, João A.; Matos, Sandra C.; Preziuso, Silvia; Luebke-Becker, Antina; Wieler, Lothar H.; Melo-Cristino, Jose; Ramirez, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic role of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae in the equine host is increasingly recognized. A collection of 108 Lancefield group C (n = 96) or L (n = 12) horse isolates recovered in the United States and in three European countries presented multilocus sequence typing (MLST) alleles, sequence types and emm types (only 56% of the isolates could be emm typed) that were, with few exceptions, distinct from those previously found in human Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Characterization of a subset of horse isolates by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that most equine isolates could also be differentiated from S. dysgalactiae strains from other animal species, supporting the existence of a horse specific genomovar. Draft genome information confirms the distinctiveness of the horse genomovar and indicates the presence of potentially horse-specific virulence factors. While this genomovar represents most of the isolates recovered from horses, a smaller MLST and MLSA defined sub-population seems to be able to cause infections in horses, other animals and humans, indicating that transmission between hosts of strains belonging to this group may occur. PMID:27530432

  18. Expression, purification and crystallization of Streptococcus dysgalactiae-derived mitogen

    SciTech Connect

    Papageorgiou, Anastassios C. Saarinen, Susanna; Ramirez-Bartutis, Rosa; Kato, Hidehito; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Kirikae, Teruo; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Toru

    2006-03-01

    S. dysgalactiae-derived mitogen, a superantigen, was crystallized. Crystals diffract to 2.4 Å at a synchrotron-radiation source and belong to space group P3/P3{sub 1}/P3{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.7, c = 62.4 Å, γ = 120° and one molecule in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Superantigens are bacterial or viral toxins with potent immunostimulatory properties. Streptococcus dysgalactiae-derived mitogen, a 25 kDa protein, is a recently discovered superantigen isolated from S. dysgalactiae culture supernatant. Sequence considerations suggest that it belongs to a new superantigen family distinct from other superantigens. The protein was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were grown at pH 4.2–4.4 in the presence of 18–20%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.4 M lithium nitrate. A complete data set to 2.4 Å resolution was collected from a single crystal at liquid-nitrogen temperatures using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group P3/P3{sub 1}/P3{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.7, c = 62.4 Å, γ = 120° and one molecule in the crystallographic asymmetric unit.

  19. Differentiation of human and animal strains of Streptococcus dysgalactiae by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bert, F; Branger, C; Poutrel, B; Lambert-Zechovsky, N

    1997-05-01

    The genetic diversity among 54 human isolates and 33 animal isolates belonging to the species Streptococcus dysgalactiae (20 alpha-haemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae, 23 Streptococcus equisimilis, 43 group G streptococci and one group L streptococcus) was evaluated by macrorestriction analysis of chromosomal DNA with SmaI and resolution by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. This technique revealed a high degree of intraspecies polymorphism, leading to the differentiation of 80 distinct banding patterns, and identified the presence of two major clusters, one containing isolates of human origin and the other isolates of animal origin. These results suggest than human and animal isolates of S.dysgalactiae are genetically distinct, and support the recent proposal of the subspecies S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis for human isolates. The heterogeneity revealed within isolates from the same host type indicates that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a powerful epidemiological tool for studying S. dysgalactiae infections.

  20. Expression, genetic localization and phylogenic analysis of NAPlr in piscine Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae isolates and their patterns of adherence

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, M.; Fujino, M.; Eissa, A.E.; Chen, S.C.; Warda, M.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, the long recognized mammalian pathogen, has currently received a major concern regarding fish bacterial infection. Adhesion to host epithelial cells and the presence of wall-associated plasminogen binding proteins are prerequisites to Streptococcus infection. This is the first study of the occurrence of nephritis-associated plasminogen-binding receptor (NAPlr) and α-enolase genes in piscine S. dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae (SDSD) isolates. Further characterization of surface localized NAPlr of fish SDSD revealed a similar immune-reactive band of 43 KDa as that from porcine S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE). The phylogenetic analysis revealed that NAPlr of fish SDSD is more associated with those of mammalian SDSE and Streptococcus pyogenes rather than of other streptococci. Our findings warrant public attention to the possible implication of these virulence genes in dissemination of SDSD to different tissues of infected hosts and to get advantage to new niches. The SDSD adherence patterns were also studied to better understand their pathogenicity. The patterns of adherence of SDSD on two different cell lines showed a different pattern of adherence. Such difference gives an insight about the variance in host susceptibility to infection. PMID:26425363

  1. Genetic diversity and virulence properties of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis from different sources.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Giovanni; Imperi, Monica; Palmieri, Claudio; Magi, Gloria; Facinelli, Bruna; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Pataracchia, Marco; Creti, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    A recent increase in virulence of pathogenic Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has been widely proposed. Such an increase may be partly explained by the acquisition of new virulence traits by horizontal gene transfer from related streptococci such as Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) and Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS). A collection of 54 SDSE strains isolated in Italy in the years 2000-2010 from different sources (paediatric throat carriage, invasive and non-invasive diseases) was characterized by emm typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The virulence repertoire was evaluated by PCR for the presence of GAS superantigen (spe) genes, the streptolysin S (sagA) gene, the group G fibronectin-binding protein (gfbA) gene and GAS-GBS alpha-like protein family (alp) genes; moreover, the ability to invade human epithelial cells was investigated. Resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin was assessed. The combined use of emm typing and PFGE proved to be a reliable strategy for the epidemiological analysis of SDSE isolates. The most frequent emm types were the same as those more frequently reported in other studies, thus indicating the diffusion of a limited number of a few successful emm types fit to disseminate in humans. The speG gene was detected in SDSE strains of different genetic backgrounds. Erythromycin resistance determined by the erm(T) gene, and the unusual, foggy MLSB phenotype, observed in one and seven strains, respectively, have never previously, to our knowledge, been reported in SDSE. Moreover, a new member of the alp family was identified. The identification of new antibiotic and virulence determinants, despite the small size of the sample analysed, shows the importance of constant attention to monitoring the extent of lateral gene transfer in this emerging pathogen.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Japan.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Morozumi, Miyuki; Hanada, Shigeo; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Chiba, Naoko; Iwata, Satoshi; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2016-02-01

    We collected β-hemolytic streptococci (1,611 isolates) from patients with invasive streptococcal infections in Japan during April 2010-March 2013. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) was most common (n = 693); 99% of patients with SDSE infections were elderly (mean age 75 years, SD ±15 years). We aimed to clarify molecular and epidemiologic characteristics of SDSE isolates and features of patient infections. Bacteremia with no identified focus of origin and cellulitis were the most prevalent manifestations; otherwise, clinical manifestations resembled those of S. pyogenes infections. Clinical manifestations also differed by patient's age. SDSE isolates were classified into 34 emm types; stG6792 was most prevalent (27.1%), followed by stG485 and stG245. Mortality rates did not differ according to emm types. Multilocus sequence typing identified 46 sequence types and 12 novel types. Types possessing macrolide- and quinolone-resistance genes were 18.4% and 2.6%, respectively; none showed β-lactam resistance. Among aging populations, invasive SDSE infections are an increasing risk.

  3. Antigenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae extracellular products and vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, D J; Evans, J J; Panangala, V S; Klesius, P H; Shelby, R A; Shoemaker, C A

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major bacterial pathogen that is the cause of serious economic losses in many species of freshwater, marine and estuarine fish worldwide. A highly efficacious S. agalactiae vaccine was developed using extracellular products (ECP) and formalin-killed whole cells of S. agalactiae. The vaccine efficacy following storage of S. agalactiae ECP and formalin-killed S. agalactiae cells at 4 degrees C for 1 year was determined. The stored ECP containing S. agalactiae formalin-killed cells failed to prevent morbidity and mortality among the vaccinated fish, and the relative percentage survival was 29. Serum antibody responses of the stored ECP and freshly prepared ECP against soluble whole cell extract of S. agalactiae indicated that significantly less antibody was produced in fish immunized with stored ECP and S. agalactiae cells than in those fish immunized with freshly prepared ECP and S. agalactiae cells at day 31 post-vaccination. Silver staining of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gels and immunostaining of Western blots with tilapia antiserum to S. agalactiae revealed that predominant 54 and 55 kDa bands were present in the freshly prepared ECP fraction. The 55 kDa band was absent from the stored ECP and new bands below 54 kDa appeared on the Western blot. The results of this study on S. agalactiae ECP provide evidence for a correlation between protection and antibody production to ECP and for the importance of the 55 kDa ECP antigen for vaccine efficacy.

  4. Lancefield group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae infection responsible for fish mortalities in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, R; Munasinghe, L I; Jin, D-H; Shimahara, Y; Yasuda, H; Nakamura, A; Misawa, N; Itami, T; Yoshida, T

    2004-12-01

    A Lancefield serological group C Streptococcus sp. was isolated from cultured amberjack, Seriola dumerili Risso, and yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata Temminck and Schlegel, immunized with Lactococcus garvieae commercial vaccines in Japan. The isolated bacteria were Gram-positive cocci, auto-aggregating in saline, morphologically long chains in growth medium, catalase negative and alpha-haemolytic on blood agar. An almost complete gene sequence of the 16S rDNA of two isolates was determined and compared with that of bacterial strains in the database. The isolates were identified as Streptococcus dysgalactiae based on the results of the 16S rDNA sequence, the bacteriological properties and the Lancefield serological grouping. Oligonucleotide primers specifically designed for the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region of S. dysgalactiae amplified a gene from all the fish isolates, as well as the type strains alpha-haemolytic S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae ATCC430738 and beta-haemolytic S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis ATCC35666, but not those of S. equi ATCC33398, Lactococcus garvieae ATCC43921 and L. garvieae KG9408. The severe necrotic lesions of the caudal peduncle seen in experimentally infected fish were similar to those seen in naturally infected fish.

  5. Human Streptococcus agalactiae isolate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Evans, Joyce J; Klesius, Phillip H; Pasnik, David J; Bohnsack, John F

    2009-05-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B streptococcus (GBS) long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging concern with regard to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a clinical case of human neonatal meningitis caused disease and death in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

  6. Human Streptococcus agalactiae isolate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging pathogen to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia, multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a human neonatal meningitis clinical case causes disease signs and mortality in N...

  7. Streptococcus agalactiae Native Valve Endocarditis: Uncommon Presentation of Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pinho Oliveira, Ana; Delgado, Anne; Martins, Cláudia; Gama, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Adults with chronic immunosuppressive conditions are at an increased risk for Streptococcus agalactiae endocarditis, which is typically characterized by acute onset, presence of large vegetations, rapid valvular destruction and frequent complications. We report a rare case of a 74 years old man presenting with fever, renal infarction, ischemic stroke and uveitis. Infective endocarditis was diagnosed and Streptococcus agalactiae was isolated in blood cultures. A multiple myeloma Ig G-K was also diagnosed. The infective endocarditis was successfully treated with a course of benzylpenicillin and gentamicin. The authors highlight the severity of vascular embolic disease present in this case and the diagnostic challenge. They also intend to remind about the association between Streptococcus agalactiae endocarditis and chronic diseases, despite its low reported prevalence.

  8. Comparative Genomic Analysis of the Streptococcus dysgalactiae Species Group: Gene Content, Molecular Adaptation, and Promoter Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Haruo; Lefébure, Tristan; Hubisz, Melissa Jane; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina; Lang, Ping; Siepel, Adam; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomics of closely related bacterial species with different pathogenesis and host preference can provide a means of identifying the specifics of adaptive differences. Streptococcus dysgalactiae (SD) is comprised of two subspecies: S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis is both a human commensal organism and a human pathogen, and S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae is strictly an animal pathogen. Here, we present complete genome sequences for both taxa, with analyses involving other species of Streptococcus but focusing on adaptation in the SD species group. We found little evidence for enrichment in biochemical categories of genes carried by each SD strain, however, differences in the virulence gene repertoire were apparent. Some of the differences could be ascribed to prophage and integrative conjugative elements. We identified approximately 9% of the nonrecombinant core genome to be under positive selection, some of which involved known virulence factors in other bacteria. Analyses of proteomes by pooling data across genes, by biochemical category, clade, or branch, provided evidence for increased rates of evolution in several gene categories, as well as external branches of the tree. Promoters were primarily evolving under purifying selection but with certain categories of genes evolving faster. Many of these fast-evolving categories were the same as those associated with rapid evolution in proteins. Overall, these results suggest that adaptation to changing environments and new hosts in the SD species group has involved the acquisition of key virulence genes along with selection of orthologous protein-coding loci and operon promoters. PMID:21282711

  9. Specific detection by PCR of Streptococcus agalactiae in milk.

    PubMed

    Martinez, G; Harel, J; Gottschalk, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple and specific method for direct detection of Streptococcus agalactiae from cow's milk. The method was based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using species-specific and universal primers derived from the 16S rRNA gene. The amplification product was verified by restriction endonuclease digest and sequencing. Specific identification was proven on a collection of 147 S. agalactiae isolates of bovine and human origin. In addition, 17 strains belonging to different bacterial species that potentially can be found in milk samples also tested negative. The PCR developed was used for direct detection of S. agalactiae in milk, using for the first time with gram-positive bacteria the nucleic acid-binding properties of diatomaceous earth. The test, which has high specificity, high sensitivity (100 cfu/mL), and can be carried out in less than 24 h, represents an innovative diagnostic tool for the detection of S. agalactiae in milk.

  10. Human Streptococcus agalactiae strains in aquatic mammals and fish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans, Streptococcus agalactiae or group B streptococcus (GBS) is a frequent coloniser of the rectovaginal tract, a major cause of neonatal infectious disease and an emerging cause of disease in non-pregnant adults. In addition, Streptococcus agalactiae causes invasive disease in fish, compromising food security and posing a zoonotic hazard. We studied the molecular epidemiology of S. agalactiae in fish and other aquatic species to assess potential for pathogen transmission between aquatic species and humans. Methods Isolates from fish (n = 26), seals (n = 6), a dolphin and a frog were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing and standardized 3-set genotyping, i.e. molecular serotyping and profiling of surface protein genes and mobile genetic elements. Results Four subpopulations of S. agalactiae were identified among aquatic isolates. Sequence type (ST) 283 serotype III-4 and its novel single locus variant ST491 were detected in fish from Southeast Asia and shared a 3-set genotype identical to that of an emerging ST283 clone associated with invasive disease of adult humans in Asia. The human pathogenic strain ST7 serotype Ia was also detected in fish from Asia. ST23 serotype Ia, a subpopulation that is normally associated with human carriage, was found in all grey seals, suggesting that human effluent may contribute to microbial pollution of surface water and exposure of sea mammals to human pathogens. The final subpopulation consisted of non-haemolytic ST260 and ST261 serotype Ib isolates, which belong to a fish-associated clonal complex that has never been reported from humans. Conclusions The apparent association of the four subpopulations of S. agalactiae with specific groups of host species suggests that some strains of aquatic S. agalactiae may present a zoonotic or anthroponotic hazard. Furthermore, it provides a rational framework for exploration of pathogenesis and host-associated genome content of S

  11. Pigment Production by Streptococcus agalactiae in Quasi-Defined Media

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Fraile, Manuel; Sampedro, Antonio; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier; García-Peña, Maria Luisa; Ruiz-Bravo, Alfonso; Haïdour, Ali

    2001-01-01

    A quasi-defined medium that supports the growth of Streptococcus agalactiae as pigmented colonies has been developed. The medium contains starch, a peptic digest of albumin, amino acids, nucleosides, vitamins, and salts. The presence of free cysteine, which could be replaced with other sulphur-containing compounds and to a lesser degree by reducing agents, was required for pigment formation. PMID:11133484

  12. Six-Month Multicenter Study on Invasive Infections Due to Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Lopardo, Horacio A.; Vidal, Patricia; Sparo, Monica; Jeric, Paola; Centron, Daniela; Facklam, Richard R.; Paganini, Hugo; Pagniez, N. Gaston; Lovgren, Marguerite; Beall, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    During a 6-month period, 95 invasive infections due to Streptococcus pyogenes and group C or group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis were recorded from 40 centers of 16 cities in Argentina. We describe here epidemiologic data available for 55 and 19 patients, respectively, associated with invasive infections due to S. pyogenes and S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. The associated isolates and 58 additional pharyngeal isolates were genotyped and subjected to serologic and/or antibiotic susceptibility testing. Group A streptococcal emm type distribution and strain association with toxic shock appeared to differ somewhat from results found within the United States; however, serologic characterization and sof sequence typing suggested that emm types found in both countries are reflective of shared clonal types. PMID:15695683

  13. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lianci; Kang, Shuai; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jia, Renyong; Song, Xu; Li, Li; Li, Zhengwen; Zou, Yuanfeng; Liang, Xiaoxia; Li, Lixia; He, Changliang; Ye, Gang; Yin, Lizi; Shi, Fei; Lv, Cheng; Jing, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae were investigated in this study by analyzing the growth, morphology and protein of the S. agalactiae cells treated with berberine. The antibacterial susceptibility test result indicated minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae was 78 μg/mL and the time-kill curves showed the correlation of concentration-time. After the bacteria was exposed to 78 μg/mL berberine, the fragmentary cell membrane and cells unequal division were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), indicating the bacterial cells were severely damaged. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) study demonstrated that berberine could damage bacterial cells through destroying cellular proteins. Meanwhile, Fluorescence microscope revealed that berberine could affect the synthesis of DNA. In conclusion, these results strongly suggested that berberine may damage the structure of bacterial cell membrane and inhibit synthesis of protein and DNA, which cause Streptococcus agalactiae bacteria to die eventually. PMID:26191220

  14. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lianci; Kang, Shuai; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jia, Renyong; Song, Xu; Li, Li; Li, Zhengwen; Zou, Yuanfeng; Liang, Xiaoxia; Li, Lixia; He, Changliang; Ye, Gang; Yin, Lizi; Shi, Fei; Lv, Cheng; Jing, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae were investigated in this study by analyzing the growth, morphology and protein of the S. agalactiae cells treated with berberine. The antibacterial susceptibility test result indicated minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae was 78 μg/mL and the time-kill curves showed the correlation of concentration-time. After the bacteria was exposed to 78 μg/mL berberine, the fragmentary cell membrane and cells unequal division were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), indicating the bacterial cells were severely damaged. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) study demonstrated that berberine could damage bacterial cells through destroying cellular proteins. Meanwhile, Fluorescence microscope revealed that berberine could affect the synthesis of DNA. In conclusion, these results strongly suggested that berberine may damage the structure of bacterial cell membrane and inhibit synthesis of protein and DNA, which cause Streptococcus agalactiae bacteria to die eventually.

  15. Neonatal necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Junpei; Inoue, Nobuaki; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Terakawa, Toshiro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-04-01

    We herein describe the case of a 27-day-old male infant who was brought to the emergency room for intermittent crying, and swelling of the left scrotum. Based on the clinical findings, necrotizing fasciitis was suspected, and surgical intervention was successfully completed within a few hours of admission. Streptococcus agalactiae type Ia was cultured from the drained abscess, and was considered the causative pathogen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of neonatal necrotizing fasciitis caused by S. agalactiae. Prompt diagnosis and immediate surgical debridement are crucial in the initial management of this disease.

  16. Clinical analysis of cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, S J; Tang, X S; Zhao, W L; Qiu, H X; Wang, H; Feng, Z C

    2016-06-17

    With the advent of antibiotic resistance, pathogenic bacteria have become a major threat in cases of neonatal sepsis; however, guidelines for treatment have not yet been standardized. In this study, 15 cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis from our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, nine cases showed early-onset and six cases showed late-onset sepsis. Pathogens were characterized by genotyping and antibiotic sensitivity tests on blood cultures. Results demonstrated that in cases with early-onset sepsis, clinical manifestations affected mainly the respiratory tract, while late-onset sepsis was accompanied by intracranial infection. Therefore, we suggest including a cerebrospinal fluid examination when diagnosing neonatal sepsis. Bacterial genotyping indicated the bacteria were mainly type Ib, Ia, and III S. agalactiae. We recommend treatment with penicillin or ampicillin, since bacteria were resistant to clindamycin and tetracycline. In conclusion, our results provide valuable information for the clinical treatment of S. agalactiae sepsis in neonatal infants.

  17. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine.

  18. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through selection of resistance to sparfloxacin, an attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar was obtained from its virulent parent strain S. agalactiae 138P. The full genome of S. agalactiae 138spar is 1,838,126 bp. The availability of this genome will allow comparative genomics to identi...

  19. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on the GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhou, Xue; Fan, Ziyao; Tang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Dai, Jian; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Xijing; Liu, Daolong; Yu, Liquan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Sun, Hunan; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactia) GapC is a highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among the streptococcus spp., which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. However, the B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactia GapC have not been well characterized. In this study, a monoclonal antibody 1F2 (mAb1F2) against S. dysgalactiae GapC was generated by the hybridoma technique and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12) for mapping the linear B-cell epitope. The mAb1F2 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif TRINDLT. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (30)TRINDLT(36) of the S. dysgalactia GapC. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenic analysis further demonstrated that residues R31, I32, N33, D34 and L35 formed the core of (30)TRINDLT(36), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1F2. The epitope (30)TRINDLT(36) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Overall, our findings characterized a conserved B-cell epitope, which will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines.

  20. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Isolated From Infections in Dogs and Humans: Are Current Subspecies Identification Criteria accurate?

    PubMed

    Ciszewski, Marcin; Zegarski, Kamil; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae is a pyogenic species pathogenic both for humans and animals. Until recently, it has been considered an exclusive animal pathogen causing infections in wild as well as domestic animals. Currently, human infections are being reported with increasing frequency, and their clinical picture is often similar to the ones caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. Due to the fact that S. dysgalactiae is a heterogeneous species, it was divided into two subspecies: S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) and S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (SDSD). The first differentiation criterion, described in 1996, was based on strain isolation source. Currently applied criteria, published in 1998, are based on hemolysis type and Lancefield group classification. In this study, we compared subspecies identification results for 36 strains isolated from clinical cases both in humans and animals. Species differentiation was based on two previously described criteria as well as MALDI-TOF and genetic analyses: RISA and 16S rRNA genes sequencing. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were also determined according to CLSI guidelines. The results presented in our study suggest that the subspecies differentiation criteria previously described in the above two literature positions seem to be inaccurate in analyzed group of strains, the hemolysis type on blood agar, and Lancefield classification should not be here longer considered as criteria in subspecies identification. The antimicrobial susceptibility tests indicate emerging of multiresistant human SDSE strains resistant also to vancomycin, linezolid and tigecycline, which might pose a substantial problem in treatment.

  1. DNA Microarray-Based Typing of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Heike; Slickers, Peter; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae frequently colonizes the urogenital tract, and it is a major cause of bacterial septicemia, meningitis, and pneumonia in newborns. For typing purposes, a microarray targeting group B streptococcus (GBS) virulence-associated markers and resistance genes was designed and validated with reference strains, as well as clinical and veterinary isolates. Selected isolates were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing. It was observed that putative typing markers, such as alleles of the alpha-like protein or capsule types, vary independently of each other, and they also vary independently from the affiliation to their multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-defined sequence types. Thus, it is not possible to assign isolates to sequence types based on the identification of a single distinct marker, such as a capsule type or alp allele. This suggests the occurrence of frequent genomic recombination. For array-based typing, a set of 11 markers (bac, alp, pil1 locus, pepS8, fbsB, capsule locus, hylB, abiG-I/-II plus Q8DZ34, pil2 locus, nss plus srr plus rogB2, and rgfC/A/D/B) was defined that provides a framework for splitting the tested 448 S. agalactiae isolates into 76 strains that clustered mainly according to MLST-defined clonal complexes. There was evidence for region- and host-specific differences in the population structure of S. agalactiae, as well as an overrepresentation of strains related to sequence type 17 among the invasive isolates. The arrays and typing scheme described here proved to be a convenient tool for genotyping large numbers of clinical/veterinary isolates and thus might help obtain insight into the epidemiology of S. agalactiae. PMID:25165085

  2. Spring forward with improved Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus resistant to Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae IB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tilapia aquaculture worldwide is valued around US $ 7 billion. Tilapia are an important source of protein for domestic (top 5 most consumed seafoods) and global food security. Two gram postitive bacteria, Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae, are responsible for billion dollar losses annually. Gen...

  3. Survival of Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Trueperella pyogenes in dry-cured Iberian pork shoulders and loins.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Toset, F; Luque, I; Morales-Partera, A; Galán-Relaño, A; Barrero-Domínguez, B; Hernández, M; Gómez-Laguna, J

    2017-02-01

    Dry-cured hams, shoulders and loins of Iberian pigs are highly appreciated in national and international markets. Salting, additive addition and dehydration are the main strategies to produce these ready-to-eat products. Although the dry curing process is known to reduce the load of well-known food borne pathogens, studies evaluating the viability of other microorganisms in contaminated pork have not been performed. In this work, the efficacy of the dry curing process to eliminate three swine pathogens associated with pork carcass condemnation, Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Trueperella pyogenes, was evaluated. Results of this study highlight that the dry curing process is a suitable method to obtain safe ready-to-eat products free of these microorganisms. Although salting of dry-cured shoulders had a moderate bactericidal effect, results of this study suggest that drying and ripening were the most important stages to obtain dry-cured products free of these microorganisms.

  4. Comparison of transmission dynamics between Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae intramammary infections.

    PubMed

    Leelahapongsathon, Kansuda; Schukken, Ynte Hein; Pinyopummintr, Tanu; Suriyasathaporn, Witaya

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of study were to determine the transmission parameters (β), durations of infection, and basic reproductive numbers (R0) of both Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus uberis as pathogens causing mastitis outbreaks in dairy herds. A 10-mo longitudinal study was performed using 2 smallholder dairy herds with mastitis outbreaks caused by Strep. agalactiae and Strep. uberis, respectively. Both herds had poor mastitis control management and did not change their milking management during the entire study period. Quarter milk samples were collected at monthly intervals from all lactating animals in each herd for bacteriological identification. The durations of infection for Strep. uberis intramammary infection (IMI) and Strep. agalactiae IMI were examined using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and the Kaplan-Meier survival functions for Strep. uberis IMI and Strep. agalactiae IMI were compared using log rank survival-test. The spread of Strep. uberis and Strep. agalactiae through the population was determined by transmission parameter, β, the probability per unit of time that one infectious quarter will infect another quarter, assuming that all other quarters are susceptible. For the Strep. uberis outbreak herd (31 cows), 56 new infections and 28 quarters with spontaneous cure were observed. For the Strep. agalactiae outbreak herd (19 cows), 26 new infections and 9 quarters with spontaneous cure were observed. The duration of infection for Strep. agalactiae (mean=270.84 d) was significantly longer than the duration of infection for Strep. uberis (mean=187.88 d). The transmission parameters (β) estimated (including 95% confidence interval) for Strep. uberis IMI and Strep. agalactiae IMI were 0.0155 (0.0035-0.0693) and 0.0068 (0.0008-0.0606), respectively. The R0 (including 95% confidence interval) during the study were 2.91 (0.63-13.47) and 1.86 (0.21-16.61) for Strep. uberis IMI and Strep. agalactiae IMI, respectively. In conclusion, the transmission

  5. Udder infections with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis at calving in dairy herds with suboptimal udder health.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Å; Nyman, A-K; Aspán, A; Börjesson, S; Unnerstad, H Ericsson; Waller, K Persson

    2016-03-01

    Udder infections with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis are common causes of bovine mastitis. To study these pathogens in early lactation, a 12-mo longitudinal, observational study was carried out in 13 herds with suboptimal udder health. The aims of the study were to investigate the occurrence of these pathogens and to identify if presence of the 3 pathogens, and of genotypes within the pathogens, differed with respect to herd, season, and parity. Quarter milk samples, collected at calving and 4 d in milk (DIM), were cultured for the 3 pathogens. Genotyping of staphylococcal and streptococcal isolates was performed using spa typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, respectively. For each of the 3 pathogens, cows with an udder infection at calving or 4 DIM were allocated to 1 of 4 infection types: cleared (pathogen present only at calving), persistent (pathogen present in the same quarter at calving and 4 DIM), new (pathogen present only at 4 DIM), or cleared/new (pathogen present in 1 quarter at calving and in another quarter at 4 DIM). Associations between season or parity and overall occurrence of pathogens or infection types were determined using univariable mixed-effect logistic-regression models and the Fisher's exact test, respectively. The most commonly occurring pathogen was Staph. aureus, followed by Strep. dysgalactiae and Strep. uberis. Persistent infections were the most common infection type among Staph. aureus-infected cows, whereas cleared infections were the most common among Strep. dysgalactiae- and Strep. uberis-positive cows. The proportion of cows with persistent Staph. aureus infections and the proportion of cows having a Strep. uberis infection at calving or 4 DIM were higher in the multiparous cows than in primiparous cows. Infections with Strep. dysgalactiae were less common during the early housing season than during the late housing or pasture seasons, whereas persistent Strep. uberis

  6. Genetic characteristics of Streptococcus dysgalactiae isolated from cage cultured cobia, Rachycentron canadum (L.).

    PubMed

    Tsai, M-A; Wang, P-C; Yoshida, T; Chen, S-C

    2015-12-01

    Disease outbreaks occurred during 2007-2013 in Taiwan with 2.5-10% mortality among the cage cultured cobia, Rachycentron canadum (L.), characterized by the presence of polyserositis, pericarditis and peritonitis. The micro-organisms isolated from internal organs were Gram-positive cocci. The isolates were confirmed as Streptococcus dysgalactiae by a polymerase chain reaction assay that yielded the expected specific 259 bp amplicon. Additionally, partial sequence of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region of the GCS strain isolates from fish was also compared and produced 100% sequence identity with S. dysgalactiae (GenBank accession number AB252398). The genetic characterization was then determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Based on PFGE, the Apa I or Sma I digestion patterns of chromosomal DNA of these isolates were grouped into three main clusters. Taiwanese strains were divided into two clusters, and the tet(M) gene was detected in cluster 1 (pulsotypes: A1-A2 and S1-S3), but not in cluster 2 strains (pulsotypes: A3-A4 and S4-S5). Three Japanese strains from amberjack, Seriola dumerili (Risso), were grouped into cluster 3 (pulsotypes: A5-A7 and S6-S8) and displayed no mortality to cobia in the challenge experiment. Conversely, Taiwanese strains from cobia and snubnose pompano, Trachinotus blochii (L.), displayed a mortality rate of 50-87.5% in cobia.

  7. Characterization of Afb, a novel bifunctional protein in Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Dehbashi, Sanaz; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza; Mashhadi, Rahil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Streptococcus agalactiae is the leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in newborns and results in pneumonia and bacteremia in adults. A number of S. agalactiae components are involved in colonization of target cells. Destruction of peptidoglycan and division of covalently linked daughter cells is mediated by autolysins. In this study, autolytic activity and plasma binding ability of AFb novel recombinant protein of S. agalactiae was investigated. Materials and Methods: The gbs1805 gene was cloned and expressed. E. coli strains DH5α and BL21 were used as cloning and expression hosts, respectively. After purification, antigenicity and binding ability to plasma proteins of the recombinant protein was evaluated. Results: AFb, the 18KDa protein was purified successfully. The insoluble mature protein revealed the ability to bind to fibrinogen and fibronectin. This insoluble mature protein revealed that it has the ability to bind to fibrinogen and fibronectin plasma proteins. Furthermore, in silico analysis demonstrated the AFb has an autolytic activity. Conclusions: AFb is a novel protein capable of binding to fibrinogen and fibronectin. This findings lay a ground work for further investigation of the role of the bacteria in adhesion and colonization to the host. PMID:27092228

  8. Impact of identification of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis from throat cultures in an adult population.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Clarridge, Jill E

    2013-05-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) are isolated from the throat of patients with pharyngitis, although the clinical significance remains debated. We sought to determine the incidence and association with pharyngitis of SDSE in an adult veteran population. Organisms were phenotypically identified to subspecies and Lancefield group, with selective 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From 833 throat cultures, the overall frequency of SDSE was 3.4% (64% group C and 36% group G) as compared to 8.6% for S. pyogenes (GAS). SDSE was described as a large colony in only 29% of the original culture evaluations by bench technologists, and clinical symptoms were similar for GAS and SDSE. Laboratory algorithms that are limited to identification of only GAS or are based on Lancefield group or visual identification of "large-colony type" β hemolytic Lancefield group C and G streptococci may be missing or misidentifying SDSE along with Anginosus group streptococci.

  9. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY OF Streptococcus agalactiae ISOLATED FROM PREGNANT WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    de MELO, Simone Cristina Castanho Sabaini; SANTOS, Nathally Claudiane de Souza; de OLIVEIRA, Marcia; SCODRO, Regiane Bertin de Lima; CARDOSO, Rosilene Fressatti; PÁDUA, Rúbia Andreia Falleiros; SILVA, Flavia Teixeira Ribeiro; COSTA, Aline Balandis; CARVALHO, Maria Dalva de Barros; PELLOSO, Sandra Marisa

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction: Group B streptococcus (GBS) or Streptococcus agalactiae can colonize the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and has been considered one of the most important risk factors for the development of neonatal disease. The present study evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of GBS isolates from pregnant women who were attended at a public health service in Northern Paraná, Brazil. Methods: A descriptive analytical cross-sectional study was performed with 544 pregnant women, at ≥ 35 weeks of gestation. One hundred and thirty-six GBS isolates from pregnant women were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Results: All of the GBS isolates showed susceptibility to the drug that is most frequently used for intrapartum prophylaxis: penicillin. Resistance to clindamycin and erythromycin was detected, thus decreasing the options of prophylaxis in women who are allergic to penicillin. Conclusions: Additional studies should be conducted to increase the knowledge of GBS sensitivity profile to antimicrobials in other health centers. PMID:27828624

  10. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  11. Complete genome sequence of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P isolated from diseased Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P was isolated from the kidney of diseased Nile tilapia in Idaho during a 2007 streptococcal disease outbreak. The full genome of S. agalactiae 138P is 1,838,716 bp. The availability of this genome will allow comparative genomics to identify genes for antigen disco...

  12. Development of live attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae as potential vaccines by selecting for resistance to sparfloxacin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, sparfloxacin was used in this study to modify 40 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae. Majority of S. agalactiae used in this study were able to develop at least 80-fold resistance to sparfloxacin. When the virulence of the sparfloxacin-resi...

  13. Evaluation of nine teat dip formulations under experimental challenge to staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Pankey, J W; Philpot, W N; Boddie, R L; Watts, J L

    1983-01-01

    Nine postmilking teat dips were evaluated by an experimental challenge model against either Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, or both. Formulations containing .9 and .6% sodium hypochlorite, 1% sodium dichloro-s-triazene-trione, .55% chlorhexidine gluconate, and .35% povidone iodine reduced incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infections 56.8, 28.3, 75.9, 92.5, and 77.9%. Incidence of infections with Streptococcus agalactiae was reduced 48.1 and 63.2% by 1.7 and 1% sodium dichloro-s-triazene-trione formulations. The 1% chlorhexidine gluconate and .35% povidone iodine products reduced Streptococcus agalactiae infections 71.0 and 67.0%. Three experimental 1% iodophor formulations reduced Streptococcus agalactiae infections 28.9, 44.8, and 50.7%. The experimental challenge model was refined further and provided an efficient method to determine efficacy of postmilking teat dips.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of soiny mullet (Liza haematocheila) spleen in response to Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhitao; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Qihuan; Wei, Youchuan; Wang, Zisheng; Qiu, Ming; Shao, Rong; Li, Yao; Gao, Qian

    2016-02-01

    Soiny mullet (Liza haematocheila) is becoming an economically important aquaculture mugilid species in China and other Asian countries. However, increasing incidences of bacterial pathogenic diseases has greatly hampered the production of the soiny mullet. Deeper understanding of the soiny mullet immune system and its related genes in response to bacterial infections are necessary for disease control in this species. In this study, the transcriptomic profile of spleen from soiny mullet challenged with Streptococcus dysgalactiae was analyzed by Illumina-based paired-end sequencing method. After assembly, 86,884 unique transcript fragments (unigenes) were assembled, with an average length of 991 bp. Approximately 41,795 (48.1%) unigenes were annotated in the nr NCBI database and 57.9% of the unigenes were similar to that of the Nile tilapia. A total of 24,299 unigenes were categorized into three Gene Ontology (GO) categories (molecular function, cellular component and biological process), 13,570 unigenes into 25 functional Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG) categories, and 30,547 unigenes were grouped into 258 known pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. Following S. dysgalactiae infection, 11,461 differentially expressed unigenes were identified including 4658 up-regulated unigenes and 6803 down-regulated unigenes. Significant enrichment analysis of these differentially expressed unigenes identified major immune related pathways, including the Toll-like receptor, complement and coagulation cascades, T cell receptor signaling pathway and B cell receptor signaling pathway. In addition, 24,813 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 127,503 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified from the mullet spleen transcriptome. To this date, this study has globally analyzed the transcriptome profile from the spleen of L. haematocheila after S. dysgalactiae infection. Therefore, the results of our study

  15. Proteomic Biomarkers Associated with Streptococcus agalactiae Invasive Genogroups

    PubMed Central

    Lanotte, Philippe; Perivier, Marylise; Haguenoer, Eve; Mereghetti, Laurent; Burucoa, Christophe; Claverol, Stéphane; Atanassov, Christo

    2013-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae) is a leading cause of meningitis and sepsis in newborns and an etiological agent of meningitis, endocarditis, osteoarticular and soft tissue infections in adults. GBS isolates are routinely clustered in serotypes and in genotypes. At present one GBS sequence type (i.e. ST17) is considered to be closely associated with bacterial invasiveness and novel proteomic biomarkers could make a valuable contribution to currently available GBS typing data. For that purpose we analyzed the protein profiles of 170 genotyped GBS isolates by Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI). Univariate statistical analysis of the SELDI profiles identified four protein biomarkers significantly discriminating ST17 isolates from those of the other sequence types. Two of these biomarkers (MW of 7878 Da and 12200 Da) were overexpressed and the other two (MW of 6258 Da and 10463 Da) were underexpressed in ST17. The four proteins were isolated by mass spectrometry-assisted purification and their tryptic peptides analyzed by LC-MS/MS. They were thereby identified as the small subunit of exodeoxyribonuclease VII, the 50S ribosomal protein L7/L12, a CsbD-like protein and thioredoxin, respectively. In conclusion, we identified four candidate biomarkers of ST17 by SELDI for high-throughput screening. These markers may serve as a basis for further studies on the pathophysiology of GBS infection, and for the development of novel vaccines. PMID:23372719

  16. Assessment and characterization of biofilm formation among human isolates of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis.

    PubMed

    Genteluci, Gabrielle Limeira; Silva, Ligia Guedes; Souza, Maria Clara; Glatthardt, Thaís; de Mattos, Marcos Corrêa; Ejzemberg, Regina; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    The capacity to form biofilm is considered a protective mechanism that allows the bacteria to survive and proliferate in hostile environments, facilitating the maintenance of the infectious process. Recently, biofilm has become a topic of interest in the study of the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Although GAS has not been associated with infection on medical implants, the presence of microcolonies embedded in an extracellular matrix on infected tissues has been reported. Despite the similarity between GAS and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE), there are no studies in the literature describing the production of biofilm by SDSE. In this work, we assessed and characterized biofilm development among SDSE human isolates of group C. The in vitro data showed that 59.3% of the 118 isolates tested were able to form acid-induced biofilm on glass, and 28% formed it on polystyrene surfaces. More importantly, biofilm was also formed in a foreign body model in mice. The biofilm structure was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Long fibrillar-like structures were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the expression of a pilus associated gene of SDSE was increased for in vitro sessile cells compared with planktonics, and when sessile cells were collected from biofilms formed in the animal model compared with that of in vitro model. Results obtained from the immunofluorescence microscopy indicated the biofilm was immunogenic. Our data also suggested a role for proteins, exopolysaccharide and extracellular DNA in the formation and accumulation of biofilm by SDSE.

  17. [Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS)--the characteristic of isolated strains from productive women's vagina].

    PubMed

    Wolny, Katarzyna; Gołda-Matuszak, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of my research: to determine the frequency of colonisation Streptococcus agalactiae from productive women's vagina, an evaluation of usefulness microbiological diagnostic methods to detect GBS, to define serotype of analysed strains of S. agalactiae. After all, I tried to define fenotypic differential, biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility between GBS with and without hemolysis. All of strains S. agalactiae (n = 380) belong to bacteria Gram(+), they had B serologic group and didn't produce catalase. On the basis of TSA+5% sheep blood streptococcus with beta-hemolysis grew like a small, grey and shiny colonies with a narrow, bright ring. On the same base we had S. agalactiae without beta-hemolysis, in examine material--6% (n = 22). On the basis of Strepto B ID S. agalactiae grew like a small, round red colonies and on the base Granada agar like an orange, white colonies. The level of colonisation S. agalactiae was 22% (380GBS/1727women). Identification of analysed strains of S. agalactiae was made by test API 20 Strep. The susceptibility was examined to ampicilin, azithromycin, erythromycin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, doxycyclin, cotrimoxasol, ciprofloxacin. Serotypes III (50%), Ia (18%) and V (14%) prevailed.

  18. Identification of a novel insertion sequence element in Streptococcus agalactiae. bspeller@imib.rwth-aachen.de.

    PubMed

    Spellerberg, B; Martin, S; Franken, C; Berner, R; Lütticken, R

    2000-01-04

    Gain and loss of bacterial pathogenicity is often associated with mobile genetic elements. A novel insertion sequence (IS) element designated ISSa4 was identified in Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci). The 963bp IS element is flanked by 25bp perfect inverted repeats and led to the duplication of a 9bp target sequence at the insertion site. ISSa4 contains one open reading frame coding for a putative transposase of 287 aa and exhibits closest similarities to insertion elements of the IS982 family which has previously not been identified in streptococci. Analysis of different S. agalactiae strains showed that the copy number of ISSa4 in S. agalactiae varies significantly between strains. The S. agalactiae strain with the highest copy number of ISSa4 was nonhemolytic and harbored one copy inserted in cylB, which encodes the membrane-spanning domain of the putative hemolysin transporter (Spellerberg et al., 1999. Identification of genetic determinants for the hemolytic activity of Streptococcus agalactiae by ISS1 transposition. J. Bacteriol. 181, 3212-3219). Determination of the distribution of ISSa4 in different S. agalactiae strains revealed that ISSa4 could be detected only in strains isolated after 1996, which might indicate a recent acquisition of this novel insertion element by S. agalactiae.

  19. Refractory Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis and Intravenous Immunoglobulin as Salvage Therapy: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Dennis; Altshuler, Jerry; Altshuler, Diana; Schwartz, David; Torregrossa, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Infections from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from mild cellulitis to invasive disease, such as endocarditis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). Despite prompt and appropriate antibiotics, mortality rates associated with shock have remained exceedingly high, prompting the need for adjunctive therapy. IVIG has been proposed as a possible adjunct, given its ability to neutralize a wide variety of superantigens and modulate a dysregulated inflammatory response. We present the first reported cases of successful IVIG therapy for reversing shock in the treatment of SDSE TSLS. PMID:27597908

  20. Comparative proteome analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae strains from cultured tilapia with different virulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Su, You-Lu; Mai, Yong-Zhan; Li, Yan-Wei; Mo, Ze-Quan; Li, An-Xing

    2014-05-14

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major piscine pathogen, which causes significant morbidity and mortality among numerous fish species, and results in huge economic losses to aquaculture. Many S. agalactiae strains showing different virulence characteristics have been isolated from infected tilapia in different geographical regions throughout South China in the recent years, including natural attenuated S. agalactiae strain TFJ0901 and virulent S. agalactiae strain THN0901. In the present study, survival of tilapia challenged with S. agalactiae strain TFJ0901 and THN0901 (10(7)CFU/fish) were 93.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Moreover, there are severe lesions of the examined tissues in tilapia infected with strain THN0901, but no significant histopathological changes were observed in tilapia infected with the strain TFJ0901. In order to elucidate the factors responsible for the invasive potential of S. agalactiae between two strains TFJ0901 and THN0901, a comparative proteome analysis was applied to identify the different protein expression profiles between the two strains. 506 and 508 cellular protein spots of S. agalactiae TFJ0901 and THN0901 were separated by two dimensional electrophoresis, respectively. And 34 strain-specific spots, corresponding to 27 proteins, were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Among them, 23 proteins presented exclusively in S. agalactiae TFJ0901 or THN0901, and the other 4 proteins presented in different isomeric forms between TFJ0901 and THN0901. Most of the strain-specific proteins were just involved in metabolic pathways, while 7 of them were presumed to be responsible for the virulence differences of S. agalactiae strain TFJ0901 and THN0901, including molecular chaperone DnaJ, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, thioredoxin, manganese-dependent inorganic pyrophosphatase, elongation factor Tu, bleomycin resistance protein and cell division protein DivIVA. These virulence-associated proteins may contribute to identify new

  1. Multiple Evolutionary Selections Involved in Synonymous Codon Usages in the Streptococcus agalactiae Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan-Ping; Ke, Hao; Liang, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Hao, Le; Ma, Jiang-Yao; Li, Yu-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an important human and animal pathogen. To better understand the genetic features and evolution of S. agalactiae, multiple factors influencing synonymous codon usage patterns in S. agalactiae were analyzed in this study. A- and U-ending rich codons were used in S. agalactiae function genes through the overall codon usage analysis, indicating that Adenine (A)/Thymine (T) compositional constraints might contribute an important role to the synonymous codon usage pattern. The GC3% against the effective number of codon (ENC) value suggested that translational selection was the important factor for codon bias in the microorganism. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that (i) mutational pressure was the most important factor in shaping codon usage of all open reading frames (ORFs) in the S. agalactiae genome; (ii) strand specific mutational bias was not capable of influencing the codon usage bias in the leading and lagging strands; and (iii) gene length was not the important factor in synonymous codon usage pattern in this organism. Additionally, the high correlation between tRNA adaptation index (tAI) value and codon adaptation index (CAI), frequency of optimal codons (Fop) value, reinforced the role of natural selection for efficient translation in S. agalactiae. Comparison of synonymous codon usage pattern between S. agalactiae and susceptible hosts (human and tilapia) showed that synonymous codon usage of S. agalactiae was independent of the synonymous codon usage of susceptible hosts. The study of codon usage in S. agalactiae may provide evidence about the molecular evolution of the bacterium and a greater understanding of evolutionary relationships between S. agalactiae and its hosts. PMID:26927064

  2. Identification of immunoreactive proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from cultured tilapia in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangjin; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chengping

    2013-12-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is an important zoonotic pathogen that can cause lethal infections in humans and animals, including aquatic species. Immunoreactive proteins of the S. agalactiae strain, GD201008-001, isolated from cultured tilapia in China, were screened by immunoproteomics using hyperimmune sera, convalescent guinea pig sera and GD201008-001-infected tilapia antisera as primary detection antibodies. A total of 16 different proteins were identified including 13 novel immunoreactive proteins of S. agalactiae. Four proteins, serine-rich repeat glycoprotein 1, branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BKD) subunit E2, 5'-nucleotidase family protein and ornithine carbamoyltransferase, were shown to react with the three types of sera and thus were considered to represent novel S. agalactiae vaccine candidate antigens. Our findings represent the basis for vaccine development for piscine S. agalactiae and are necessary for understanding virulence factors and immunogenicity of S. agalactiae with different hosts.

  3. Recombination between Streptococcus suis ICESsu32457 and Streptococcus agalactiae ICESa2603 yields a hybrid ICE transferable to Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Marini, Emanuela; Palmieri, Claudio; Magi, Gloria; Facinelli, Bruna

    2015-07-09

    Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are mobile genetic elements that reside in the chromosome but retain the ability to undergo excision and to transfer by conjugation. Genes involved in drug resistance, virulence, or niche adaptation are often found among backbone genes as cargo DNA. We recently characterized in Streptococcus suis an ICE (ICESsu32457) carrying resistance genes [tet(O/W/32/O), tet(40), erm(B), aphA, and aadE] in the 15K unstable genetic element, which is flanked by two ∼1.3kb direct repeats. Remarkably, ∼1.3-kb sequences are conserved in ICESa2603 of Streptococcus agalactiae 2603V/R, which carry heavy metal resistance genes cadC/cadA and mer. In matings between S. suis 32457 (donor) and S. agalactiae 2603V/R (recipient), transconjugants were obtained. PCR experiments, PFGE, and sequence analysis of transconjugants demonstrated a tandem array between ICESsu32457 and ICESa2603. Matings between tandem array-containing S. agalactiae 2603V/R (donor) and Streptococcus pyogenes RF12 (recipient) yielded a single transconjugant containing a hybrid ICE, here named ICESa2603/ICESsu32457. The hybrid formed by recombination of the left ∼1.3-kb sequence of ICESsu32457 and the ∼1.3-kb sequence of ICESa2603. Interestingly, the hybrid ICE was transferable between S. pyogenes strains, thus demonstrating that it behaves as a conventional ICE. These findings suggest that both tandem arrays and hybrid ICEs may contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance in streptococci, creating novel mobile elements capable of disseminating new combinations of antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. Visualization of the role of host heme on the virulence of the heme auxotroph Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Laetitia; Dagieu, Jean-Baptiste; Fernandez, Annabelle; Derré-Bobillot, Aurélie; Borezée-Durant, Elise; Fleurot, Isabelle; Gruss, Alexandra; Lechardeur, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Heme is essential for several cellular key functions but is also toxic. Whereas most bacterial pathogens utilize heme as a metabolic cofactor and iron source, the impact of host heme during bacterial infection remains elusive. The opportunist pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae does not synthesize heme but still uses it to activate a respiration metabolism. Concomitantly, heme toxicity is mainly controlled by the HrtBA efflux transporter. Here we investigate how S. agalactiae manages heme toxicity versus benefits in the living host. Using bioluminescent bacteria and heme-responsive reporters for in vivo imaging, we show that the capacity of S. agalactiae to overcome heme toxicity is required for successful infection, particularly in blood-rich organs. Host heme is simultaneously required, as visualized by a generalized infection defect of a respiration-negative mutant. In S. agalactiae, HrtBA expression responds to an intracellular heme signal via activation of the two-component system HssRS. A hssRS promoter-driven intracellular luminescent heme sensor was designed to identify host compartments that supply S. agalactiae with heme. S. agalactiae acquires heme in heart, kidneys, and liver, but not in the brain. We conclude that S. agalactiae response to heme is organ-dependent, and its efflux may be particularly relevant in late stages of infection. PMID:28091535

  5. Identification of immunoreactive extracellular proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae in bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Gabriela; Ferreira, Paula; Ribeiro, Niza; Dinis, Márcia; Andrade, Elva Bonifácio; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário; Tavares, Delfina

    2008-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a common pathogen that causes bovine mastitis. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antibody response against S. agalactiae extracellular proteins in the whey and serum of naturally infected bovines and to identify possible immunodominant extracellular antigens. IgG1 antibodies against S. agalactiae extracellular proteins were elevated in the whey and serum of naturally infected bovines. In the whey, the levels of IgG1 specific for S. agalactiae extracellular proteins were similar in infected and noninfected milk quarters from the same cow, and the production of antibodies specific for S. agalactiae extracellular proteins was induced only by infection with this bacterium. The immunoreactivity of extracellular proteins with bovine whey was clearly different in infected versus control animals. Group B protective surface protein and 5'-nucleotidase family protein were 2 major immunoreactive proteins that were detected only in the whey of infected cows, suggesting that these proteins may be important in the pathogenesis of S. agalactiae-induced mastitis. This information could be used to diagnose S. agalactiae infection. In addition, these antigens may be useful as carrier proteins for serotype-specific polysaccharides in conjugate vaccines.

  6. [Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae in healthy adults. Description of 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Rivero Marcotegui, M; Hidalgo Ovejero, A; Lecumberri, M Cía; Otermin Maya, I; Pereda García, A

    2009-10-01

    The importance of Streptococcus agalactiae as a pathogen in nonpregnant adults has been widely recognized in recent years, especially in the elderly or immunocompromised patients. Two cases of vertebral osteomyelitis caused by S. agalactiae in young patients with no known underlying diseases or predisposing factor to infection are reported. A systematic review of the literature (MEDLINE, 1976-May 2008) was performed, 10 cases previously reported in the literature of vertebral osteomyelitis due to S. agalactiae being found in adults under 65 years of age with no predisposing risk factors for infection, most of which have been reported over the last 10 years. We believe that this microbial etiology should be considered in patients of any age and immunological status. Other factors, other than increasing the number of patients with chronic diseases, explaining the increased rate of S. agalactiae infections in adults need to be studied.

  7. Complete genome sequence of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P isolated from disease Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P is 1838701 bp in size, containing 1831 genes. The genome has 1593 coding sequences, 152 pseudo genes, 16 rRNAs, 69 tRNAs, and 1 non-coding RNA. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipel...

  8. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome of a sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine strain 138spar is 1,838,126 bp in size. The genome has 1892 coding sequences and 82 RNAs. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline. The publishing of this genome will allo...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of an Attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae Strain Isolated from the Gut of a Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Angen; Lan, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Yulei; Zhang, Hua; Li, Yuhui; Hu, Minqiang; Cheng, Jiewei

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus agalactiae is a pathogen that causes severe anthropozoonosis within a broad range of hosts from aquatic animals to mammals, including human beings. Here, we describe the draft genome of S. agalactiae HZAUSC001, a low-virulent strain isolated from the gut of a moribund tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in China. PMID:28183773

  10. Phosphoglycerate kinase enhanced immunity of the whole cell of Streptococcus agalactiae in tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ting; Huang, Hsing-Yen; Tsai, Ming-An; Wang, Pei-Chi; Jiang, Bo-Huang; Chen, Shih-Chu

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a Gram-positive bacterium and a severe aquaculture pathogen that can infect a wide range of warmwater fish species. The outer-surface proteins in bacterial pathogens play an important role in pathogenesis. We evaluated the immunogenicity of two of the identified surface proteins namely phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and ornithine carbamoyl-transferase (OCT). PGK and OCT were over-expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and used as the subunit vaccines in tilapia. Tilapia immunized with the S. agalactiae modified bacteria vaccine (whole cell preparations with recombinant PGK and OCT proteins) individually were tested for the efficacy. OCT and PGK combined with WC had a higher survival rate. A high-level protection and significant specific antibody responses against S. agalactiae challenge was observed upon the vaccinated tilapia with the purified PGK protein and S. agalactiae whole cells. The specific antibody titer against S. agalactiae antigen suggested that increased antibody titers were correlated with post-challenge survival rate. Il-1β expression profile was higher in PGK + WC-treated group. Tnf-α expression in the PGK + WC group was significantly increased. Taken together, our results suggested the combinations of recombinant protein and whole cell may elicit immune responses that reach greater protection than that of individual S. agalactiae components.

  11. Novel substrate specificity of glutathione synthesis enzymes from Streptococcus agalactiae and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Kuniki . E-mail: kkino@waseda.jp; Kuratsu, Shoko; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kokubo, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Yuji; Arai, Toshinobu; Yagasaki, Makoto; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2007-01-12

    Glutathione (GSH) is synthesized by {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) and glutathione synthetase (GS) in living organisms. Recently, bifunctional fusion protein, termed {gamma}-GCS-GS catalyzing both {gamma}-GCS and GS reactions from gram-positive firmicutes Streptococcus agalactiae, has been reported. We revealed that in the {gamma}-GCS activity, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS had different substrate specificities from those of Escherichia coli {gamma}-GCS. Furthermore, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-X{sub aa}-Gly, from free three amino acids. In Clostridium acetobutylicum, the genes encoding {gamma}-GCS and putative GS were found to be immediately adjacent by BLAST search, and had amino acid sequence homology with S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS, respectively. We confirmed that the proteins expressed from each gene showed {gamma}-GCS and GS activity, respectively. C. acetobutylicum GS had broad substrate specificities and synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-Cys-X{sub aa}. Whereas the substrate specificities of {gamma}-GCS domain protein and GS domain protein of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS were the same as those of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS.

  12. Fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae isolates from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Faccone, D; Guerriero, L; Méndez, E; Errecalde, L; Cano, H; Yoyas, N; Togneri, A; Romanowski, V; Galas, M; Whonet, Red; Corso, A

    2010-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance is a growing problem that has only recently emerged in S. agalactiae. Between 2005-2007, WHONET--Argentina network evaluated levofloxacin susceptibility in 1128 clinical S. agalactiae isolates, 10 (0.9%) of which proved to be resistant. Nine of them had come from 5 hospitals (in Buenos Aires City and 4 Argentinean provinces) and recovered from urine (n=7) and vaginal screening cultures (n=2). Three strains were also resistant to macrolides, lincosamides and B streptogramins due to the ermA gene. All nine fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates bore the same two mutations, Ser79Phe in ParC and Ser81Leu in GyrA proteins. Genetic relationships were analyzed by Apal-PFGE and two clones were determined, A (n=6) and B (n=3). To our knowledge, these are the first fluoroquinolone-resistant S. agalactiae isolates detected in Latin America.

  13. Development of an indirect ELISA for bovine mastitis using Sip protein of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Bu, R E; Wang, J L; DebRoy, C; Wu, J H; Xi, L G W; Liu, Y; Shen, Z Q

    2015-01-01

    The sip gene encoding for a conserved highly immunogenic surface protein of Streptococcus agalactiae was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET32a (+) and expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli BL21 (DE3). An indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using the purified Sip protein as a coating antigen, which could identify S. agalactiae specific antibody in sera. The coating antigen at a concentration of 3.125 μg/ml, serum diluted to 1:160, and HRP-conjugated secondary antibody concentration at 1:4000 was found to be most effective in exhibiting positive result. The ELISA was found to be highly specific for S. agalactiae that may be used for the detection of the pathogen in mastitis cases, for epidemiological studies and for surveillance.

  14. Experimental early pathogenesis of Streptococcus agalactiae infection in red tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    PubMed

    Iregui, C A; Comas, J; Vásquez, G M; Verján, N

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes a severe systemic disease in fish, and the routes of entry are still ill-defined. To address this issue, two groups of 33 red tilapia Oreochromis spp. each of 10 g were orally infected with S. agalactiae (n = 30), and by immersion (n = 30), six individuals were control-uninfected fish. Three tilapias were killed at each time point from 30 min to 96 h post-inoculation (pi); controls were killed at 96 h. Samples from most tissues were examined by haematoxylin-eosin (H&E), indirect immunoperoxidase (IPI) and periodic acid-Schiff; only intestine from fish infected by gavage was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. The results of both experiments suggest that the main entry site of S. agalactiae in tilapia is the gastrointestinal epithelium; mucus seems to play an important defensive role, and environmental conditions may be an important predisposing factor for the infection.

  15. Multilocus sequence analysis of Streptococcus canis confirms the zoonotic origin of human infections and reveals genetic exchange with Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis.

    PubMed

    Pinho, M D; Matos, S C; Pomba, C; Lübke-Becker, A; Wieler, L H; Preziuso, S; Melo-Cristino, J; Ramirez, M

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus canis is an animal pathogen that occasionally causes human infections. Isolates recovered from infections of animals (n = 78, recovered from 2000 to 2010 in three European countries, mainly from house pets) and humans (n = 7, recovered from 2006 to 2010 in Portugal) were identified by phenotypic and genotypic methods and characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and emm typing. S. canis isolates presented considerable variability in biochemical profiles and 16S rRNA. Resistance to antimicrobial agents was low, with the most significant being tet(M)- and tet(O)-mediated tetracycline resistance. MLST analysis revealed a polyclonal structure of the S. canis population causing infections, where the same genetic lineages were found infecting house pets and humans and were disseminated in distinct geographic locations. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. canis was a divergent taxon of the sister species Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and found evidence of acquisition of genetic material by S. canis from S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. PFGE confirmed the MLST findings, further strengthening the similarity between animal and human isolates. The presence of emm-like genes was restricted to a few isolates and correlated with some MLST-based genetic lineages, but none of the human isolates could be emm typed. Our data show that S. canis isolates recovered from house pets and humans constitute a single population and demonstrate that isolates belonging to the main genetic lineages identified have the ability to infect the human host, providing strong evidence for the zoonotic nature of S. canis infection.

  16. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Streptococcus canis Confirms the Zoonotic Origin of Human Infections and Reveals Genetic Exchange with Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, M. D.; Matos, S. C.; Pomba, C.; Lübke-Becker, A.; Wieler, L. H.; Preziuso, S.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus canis is an animal pathogen that occasionally causes human infections. Isolates recovered from infections of animals (n = 78, recovered from 2000 to 2010 in three European countries, mainly from house pets) and humans (n = 7, recovered from 2006 to 2010 in Portugal) were identified by phenotypic and genotypic methods and characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and emm typing. S. canis isolates presented considerable variability in biochemical profiles and 16S rRNA. Resistance to antimicrobial agents was low, with the most significant being tet(M)- and tet(O)-mediated tetracycline resistance. MLST analysis revealed a polyclonal structure of the S. canis population causing infections, where the same genetic lineages were found infecting house pets and humans and were disseminated in distinct geographic locations. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. canis was a divergent taxon of the sister species Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and found evidence of acquisition of genetic material by S. canis from S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. PFGE confirmed the MLST findings, further strengthening the similarity between animal and human isolates. The presence of emm-like genes was restricted to a few isolates and correlated with some MLST-based genetic lineages, but none of the human isolates could be emm typed. Our data show that S. canis isolates recovered from house pets and humans constitute a single population and demonstrate that isolates belonging to the main genetic lineages identified have the ability to infect the human host, providing strong evidence for the zoonotic nature of S. canis infection. PMID:23345291

  17. Prophylactic effect of Andrographis paniculata extracts against Streptococcus agalactiae infection in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2009-05-01

    Six herbs were assessed for their antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus agalactiae, a major fish pathogen causing streptococcosis. Each herb was extracted with 3 solvents: water, 95% ethanol, and methanol. Using swab paper disc assays, aqueous extracts of Andrographis paniculata and Allium sativum produced the largest (27.5 mm) and smallest (10.3 mm) inhibition zones, respectively. Determination of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of herb extracts against S. agalactiae showed that the aqueous extract of A. paniculata had the lowest MIC value (31.25 microg/mL). Aqueous extract of A. sativum was the only herb extract with a MIC > 500 microg/mL. Based on mortalities in 2 weeks after intraperitoneal S. agalactiae injection, the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of S. agalactiae for Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was 3.79 x 10(5) CFU/mL. In vivo experiments showed that fish feed supplemented with either A. paniculata leaf powder or dried matter of A. paniculata aqueous extract reduced mortality of S. agalactiae infected Nile tilapia. In addition, no mortality was found in fish receiving dried matter of A. paniculata aqueous extract supplemented feeds at ratios (w/w) of 4:36 and 5:35. During 2 weeks of feeding with A. paniculata supplemented feeds, no adverse effects on appearance, behavior, or feeding responses were observed.

  18. Transcriptome profiling and digital gene expression analysis of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) infected by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Li-li; Ye, Xing; Tian, Yuan-yuan; Sun, Cheng-fei; Lu, Mai-xin; Bai, Jun-jie

    2013-10-01

    Tilapia is an important freshwater aquaculture species worldwide. In recent years, streptococcal diseases have severely threatened development of tilapia aquaculture, while effective prevention and control methods have not yet been established. In order to understand the immunological response of tilapia to infection by Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae), this study employed Solexa/Illumina RNA-seq and digital gene expression (DGE) technology to investigate changes in the tilapia transcriptome before and after S. agalactiae infection. We obtained 82,799 unigenes (mean size: 618 bp) using de novo assembly. Unigenes were annotated by comparing against databases including Nr, Swissprot, cluster of orthologous groups of proteins, Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes, and gene ontology. Combined with DGE technology, transcriptomic changes in tilapia before and after bacteria challenging were examined. A total of 774 significantly up-regulated and 625 significantly down-regulated unigenes were identified, among which 293 were mapped to 181 signaling pathways including 17 immune-related pathways involving 65 differentially expressed genes. We observed a change in the expression of six genes in the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, and this was subsequently confirmed via quantitative real-time PCR. This comparative study of the tilapia transcriptome before and after S. agalactiae infection identified important differentially-expressed immune-related genes and signaling pathways that will provide useful insights for further analysis of the mechanisms of tilapia defense against S. agalactiae infection.

  19. Discovery and Characterization of Human-Urine Utilization by Asymptomatic-Bacteriuria-Causing Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Ipe, Deepak S.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Beatson, Scott A.; Ulett, Kimberly B.; Benjamin, William H.; Davies, Mark R.; Dando, Samantha J.; King, Nathan P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes both symptomatic cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU); however, growth characteristics of S. agalactiae in human urine have not previously been reported. Here, we describe a phenotype of robust growth in human urine observed in ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) that was not seen among uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) strains isolated from patients with acute cystitis. In direct competition assays using pooled human urine inoculated with equal numbers of a prototype ABSA strain, designated ABSA 1014, and any one of several UPSA strains, measurement of the percentage of each strain recovered over time showed a markedly superior fitness of ABSA 1014 for urine growth. Comparative phenotype profiling of ABSA 1014 and UPSA strain 807, isolated from a patient with acute cystitis, using metabolic arrays of >2,500 substrates and conditions revealed unique and specific l-malic acid catabolism in ABSA 1014 that was absent in UPSA 807. Whole-genome sequencing also revealed divergence in malic enzyme-encoding genes between the strains predicted to impact the activity of the malate metabolic pathway. Comparative growth assays in urine comparing wild-type ABSA and gene-deficient mutants that were functionally inactivated for the malic enzyme metabolic pathway by targeted disruption of the maeE or maeK gene in ABSA demonstrated attenuated growth of the mutants in normal human urine as well as synthetic human urine containing malic acid. We conclude that some S. agalactiae strains can grow in human urine, and this relates in part to malic acid metabolism, which may affect the persistence or progression of S. agalactiae ABU. PMID:26553467

  20. Streptococcus agalactiae in the environment of bovine dairy herds--rewriting the textbooks?

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, H J; Nordstoga, A B; Sviland, S; Zadoks, R N; Sølverød, L; Kvitle, B; Mørk, T

    2016-02-29

    Many free-stall bovine dairy herds in Norway fail to eradicate Streptococcus agalactiae despite long-term control measures. In a longitudinal study of 4 free-stall herds with automatic milking systems (AMS), milk and extramammary sites were sampled 4 times with 1-2 month intervals. Composite milk, rectal- and vaginal swabs were collected from dairy cows; rectal swabs from heifers and young stock; rectal- and tonsillar swabs from calves; and environmental swabs from the AMS, the floors, cow beds, watering and feeding equipment. A cross sectional study of 37 herds was also conducted, with 1 visit for environmental sampling. Fifteen of the herds were known to be infected with S. agalactiae while the remaining 22 had not had evidence of S. agalactiae mastitis in the preceding 2 years. All samples were cultured for S. agalactiae, and selected isolates (n=54) from positive herds were genotyped by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). Results show that the bovine gastrointestinal tract and the dairy cow environment are reservoirs of S. agalactiae, and point to the existence of 2 transmission cycles; a contagious transmission cycle via the milking machine and an oro-fecal transmission cycle, with drinking water as the most likely vehicle for transmission. Ten sequence types were identified, and results suggest that strains differ in their ability to survive in the environment and transmit within dairy herds. Measures to eradicate S. agalactiae from bovine dairy herds should take into account the extra-mammary reservoirs and the potential for environmental transmission of this supposedly exclusively contagious pathogen.

  1. Two Coregulated Efflux Transporters Modulate Intracellular Heme and Protoporphyrin IX Availability in Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Annabelle; Lechardeur, Delphine; Derré-Bobillot, Aurélie; Couvé, Elisabeth; Gaudu, Philippe; Gruss, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major neonatal pathogen whose infectious route involves septicemia. This pathogen does not synthesize heme, but scavenges it from blood to activate a respiration metabolism, which increases bacterial cell density and is required for full virulence. Factors that regulate heme pools in S. agalactiae are unknown. Here we report that one main strategy of heme and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) homeostasis in S. agalactiae is based on a regulated system of efflux using two newly characterized operons, gbs1753 gbs1752 (called pefA pefB), and gbs1402 gbs1401 gbs1400 (called pefR pefC pefD), where pef stands for ‘porphyrin-regulated efflux’. In vitro and in vivo data show that PefR, a MarR-superfamily protein, is a repressor of both operons. Heme or PPIX both alleviate PefR-mediated repression. We show that bacteria inactivated for both Pef efflux systems display accrued sensitivity to these porphyrins, and give evidence that they accumulate intracellularly. The ΔpefR mutant, in which both pef operons are up-regulated, is defective for heme-dependent respiration, and attenuated for virulence. We conclude that this new efflux regulon controls intracellular heme and PPIX availability in S. agalactiae, and is needed for its capacity to undergo respiration metabolism, and to infect the host. PMID:20421944

  2. Amperometric biosensor based on a single antibody of dual function for rapid detection of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Gersson; Rey, Alba; Rivera, Camilo; Iregui, Carlos; Orozco, Jahir

    2017-01-15

    Pathogenic bacteria are responsible for several diseases in humans and in a variety of hosts. Detection of pathogenic bacteria is imperative to avoid and/or fight their potential harmful effects. This work reports on the first amperometric biosensor for the rapid detection of Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae). The biosensor relies on a single biotinylated antibody that immobilizes the bacteria on a screen-printed carbon electrode while is further linked to a streptavidin-conjugated HRP reporter. The biotinylated antibody provides selectivity to the biosensor whereas serves as an anchoring point to the reporter for further amplification of the electrochemical signal. The resultant immunosensor is simple, responds rapidly, and allows for the selective and highly sensitive quantification of S. agalactiae cells in a concentration range of 10(1)-10(7)CFUml(-1), with a detection limit of 10CFUml(-1). The approach not only enables a rapid detection and quantification of S. agalactiae in environmental samples but also opens up new opportunities for the simple fabrication of electrochemical immunosensors for different target pathogens.

  3. Two coregulated efflux transporters modulate intracellular heme and protoporphyrin IX availability in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Annabelle; Lechardeur, Delphine; Derré-Bobillot, Aurélie; Couvé, Elisabeth; Gaudu, Philippe; Gruss, Alexandra

    2010-04-22

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major neonatal pathogen whose infectious route involves septicemia. This pathogen does not synthesize heme, but scavenges it from blood to activate a respiration metabolism, which increases bacterial cell density and is required for full virulence. Factors that regulate heme pools in S. agalactiae are unknown. Here we report that one main strategy of heme and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) homeostasis in S. agalactiae is based on a regulated system of efflux using two newly characterized operons, gbs1753 gbs1752 (called pefA pefB), and gbs1402 gbs1401 gbs1400 (called pefR pefC pefD), where pef stands for 'porphyrin-regulated efflux'. In vitro and in vivo data show that PefR, a MarR-superfamily protein, is a repressor of both operons. Heme or PPIX both alleviate PefR-mediated repression. We show that bacteria inactivated for both Pef efflux systems display accrued sensitivity to these porphyrins, and give evidence that they accumulate intracellularly. The DeltapefR mutant, in which both pef operons are up-regulated, is defective for heme-dependent respiration, and attenuated for virulence. We conclude that this new efflux regulon controls intracellular heme and PPIX availability in S. agalactiae, and is needed for its capacity to undergo respiration metabolism, and to infect the host.

  4. Leukocyte populations and cytokine expression in the mammary gland in a mouse model of Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Gabriela; Dinis, Márcia; França, Angela; Bonifácio Andrade, Elva; Gil da Costa, Rui M; Ferreira, Paula; Tavares, Delfina

    2009-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a contagious, mastitis-causing pathogen that is highly adapted to survive in the bovine mammary gland. This study used a BALB/c mouse model of Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis to evaluate leukocyte populations in regional lymph nodes and cytokine expression in the mammary gland involved in the immune response against Streptococcus agalactiae. It was found that the bacteria replicated efficiently in the mammary gland, peaking after 24 h and increasing by 100-fold. Dissemination of bacteria to systemic organs was observed 6 h after infection. At the same time, a massive infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and an increase in the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha were detected in mammary glands, indicating an early inflammatory response. A decrease in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in mammary glands was observed 72 h after infection, accompanied by an increase in the levels of IL-12 and IL-10, which were related to a gradual decrease in bacterial load. An increase in the number of macrophages and B220(+) lymphocytes and similar increases in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in regional lymph nodes were observed, being most pronounced 5 days after infection. Moreover, increased levels of anti-Streptococcus agalactiae antibodies in the mammary gland were observed 10 days after infection. Overall, these data suggest that the host exhibits both innate and acquired immune responses in response to Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequences and Classification of Streptococcus agalactiae Strains Isolated from Laboratory-Reared Long-Evans Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Dzink-Fox, J.; Feng, Y.; Shen, Z.; Bakthavatchalu, V.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In collaboration with the CDC’s Streptococcus Laboratory, we report here the whole-genome sequences of seven Streptococcus agalactiae bacteria isolated from laboratory-reared Long-Evans rats. Four of the S. agalactiae isolates were associated with morbidity accompanied by endocarditis, metritis, and fatal septicemia, providing an opportunity for comparative genomic analysis of this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:28057750

  6. Efficacy of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B) vaccine in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) by intraperitoneal and bath immersion administration.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joyce J; Klesius, Phillip H; Shoemaker, Craig A

    2004-09-09

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) for prevention of streptococcal disease. The vaccine was prepared from formalin-killed cells and concentrated extracellular products (greater than 3 kDa) of a single isolate of S. agalactiae (ARS-KU-MU-11B). Intraperitoneal (IP) and bath immersion (BI) vaccine trials were conducted at two temperatures, 32 and 26 degrees C, and mean fish weights, 5 and 30 g. Control tilapia were injected with tryptic soy broth. Thirty gram tilapia vaccinated and challenged by IP injection with 1.5 x 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/fish of Streptococcus agalactiae at 30 days post-immunization had a relative percent survival (RPS) of 80. Smaller tilapia vaccinated and challenged under similar conditions had an RPS of 25. An RPS of zero was noted in 30 g fish IP vaccinated with Streptococcus iniae and IP challenged with S. agalactiae. The 5 and 30 g tilapia bath immunized with S. agalactiae and IP challenged with 3.6 x 10(5) and 1.7 x 10(6) CFU/fish of S. agalactiae had RPS values of 34. Intraperitoneal administration of the vaccine provided efficacious protection only in the 30 g tilapia regardless of whether the fish were immunized and challenged at 26 or 32 degrees C. Bath immunization of both 5 and 30 g tilapia resulted in RPS values that were two times lower than those achieved with IP vaccination. The results of this study suggest that there is a lack of cross-protection of S. iniae bacterins against S. agalactiae challenge. Protection against S. agalactiae infection is, however, provided through vaccination with a S. agalactiae modified bacterin vaccine.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Type-Specific Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Streptococcus agalactiae Type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shin; Miyake, Katsuhide; Koike, Yoichi; Watanabe, Masaki; Machida, Yuichi; Ohta, Michio; Iijima, Shinji

    1999-01-01

    The type-specific capsular polysaccharide (CP) of a group B streptococcus, Streptococcus agalactiae type Ia, is a high-molecular-weight polymer consisting of the pentasaccharide repeating unit 4)-[α-d-NeupNAc-(2→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1→3)]-β-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-d-Glcp-(1. Here, cloning, sequencing, and transcription of the type Ia-specific capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) genes and functional analysis of these gene products are described. A 26-kb DNA fragment containing 18 complete open reading frames (ORFs) was cloned. These ORFs were designated cpsIaA to cpsIaL, neu (neuraminic acid synthesis gene) A to D, orf1 and ung (uracil DNA glycosylase). The cps gene products of S. agalactiae type Ia were homologous to proteins involved in CP synthesis of S. agalactiae type III and S. pneumoniae serotype 14. Unlike the cps gene cluster of S. pneumoniae serotype 14, transcription of this operon may start from cpsIaA, cpsIaE, and orf1 because putative promoter sequences were found in front of these genes. Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension analyses supported this hypothesis. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were two transcriptional terminators in the 3′ end of this operon (downstream of orf1 and ung). The functions of CpsIaE, CpsIaG, CpsIaI, and CpsIaJ were examined by glycosyltransferase assay by using the gene products expressed in Escherichia coli JM109 harboring plasmids containing various S. agalactiae type Ia cps gene fragments. Enzyme assays suggested that the gene products of cpsIaE, cpsIaG, cpsIaI, and cpsIaJ are putative glucosyltransferase, β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, and β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, respectively. PMID:10464185

  8. Transcriptomic and genomic evidence for Streptococcus agalactiae adaptation to the bovine environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Streptococcus agalactiae is a major cause of bovine mastitis, which is the dominant health disorder affecting milk production within the dairy industry and is responsible for substantial financial losses to the industry worldwide. However, there is considerable evidence for host adaptation (ecotypes) within S. agalactiae, with both bovine and human sourced isolates showing a high degree of distinctiveness, suggesting differing ability to cause mastitis. Here, we (i) generate RNAseq data from three S. agalactiae isolates (two putative bovine adapted and one human) and (ii) compare publicly available whole genome shotgun sequence data from an additional 202 isolates, obtained from six host species, to elucidate possible genetic factors/adaptations likely important for S. agalactiae growth and survival in the bovine mammary gland. Results Tests for differential expression showed distinct expression profiles for the three isolates when grown in bovine milk. A key finding for the two putatively bovine adapted isolates was the up regulation of a lactose metabolism operon (Lac.2) that was strongly correlated with the bovine environment (all 36 bovine sourced isolates on GenBank possessed the operon, in contrast to only 8/151 human sourced isolates). Multi locus sequence typing of all genome sequences and phylogenetic analysis using conserved operon genes from 44 S. agalactiae isolates and 16 additional Streptococcus species provided strong evidence for acquisition of the operon via multiple lateral gene transfer events, with all Streptococcus species known to be major causes of mastitis, identified as possible donors. Furthermore, lactose fermentation tests were only positive for isolates possessing Lac.2. Combined, these findings suggest that lactose metabolism is likely an important adaptation to the bovine environment. Additional up regulation in the bovine adapted isolates included genes involved in copper homeostasis, metabolism of purine, pyrimidine

  9. Necrotizing soft tissue infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis of groups C and G in western Norway.

    PubMed

    Bruun, T; Kittang, B R; de Hoog, B J; Aardal, S; Flaatten, H K; Langeland, N; Mylvaganam, H; Vindenes, H A; Skrede, S

    2013-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is a major cause of necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI). On rare occasions, other β-haemolytic streptococci may also cause NSTI, but the significance and nature of these infections has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, clinical and molecular characteristics of NSTI caused by GAS and β-haemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis of groups C and G (GCS/GGS) in western Norway during 2000-09 are presented. Clinical data were included retrospectively. The bacterial isolates were subsequently emm typed and screened for the presence of genes encoding streptococcal superantigens. Seventy cases were identified, corresponding to a mean annual incidence rate of 1.4 per 100 000. Sixty-one of the cases were associated with GAS, whereas GCS/GGS accounted for the remaining nine cases. The in-hospital case fatality rates of GAS and GCS/GGS disease were 11% and 33%, respectively. The GCS/GGS patients were older, had comorbidities more often and had anatomically more superficial disease than the GAS patients. High age and toxic shock syndrome were associated with mortality. The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis laboratory score showed high values (≥6) in only 31 of 67 cases. Among the available 42 GAS isolates, the most predominant emm types were emm1, emm3 and emm4. The virulence gene profiles were strongly correlated to emm type. The number of superantigen genes was low in the four available GCS/GGS isolates. Our findings indicate a high frequency of streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis in our community. GCS/GGS infections contribute to the disease burden, but differ from GAS cases in frequency and predisposing factors.

  10. The MCP-8 gene and its possible association with resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Gui Hong; Wan, Zi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Liu, Feng; Liu, Xiao Jun; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-09-01

    Mast cell proteases play an important role in the regulation of the immune response. We identified the cDNA of the mast cell protease 8 (MCP-8) gene and analyzed its genomic structure in tilapia. The ORF of the MCP-8 was 768 bp, encoding 255 amino acids. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the MCP-8 gene was expressed predominantly in spleen, moderately in liver, blood, brain, gill, intestine, skin, and weakly expressed in kidney, muscle and eye. After a challenge with Streptococcus agalactiae, the gene was induced significantly (p < 0.05) in intestine, kidney, spleen and liver. Furthermore, we identified five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MCP-8 gene and found that three SNPs were significantly associated (p < 0.05) with resistance against S. agalactiae. However, we found no association between four SNPs and growth traits (p > 0.05). These results suggest that the MCP-8 gene play an important role in the resistance to S. agalactiae in tilapia. The SNP markers in the MCP-8 gene associated with the resistance to the bacterial pathogen may facilitate selection of tilapia resistant to the bacterial disease.

  11. Identification of Genes Preferentially Expressed by Highly Virulent Piscine Streptococcus agalactiae upon Interaction with Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-Ming; Chen, Rong-Rong; Kalhoro, Dildar Hussain; Wang, Zhao-Fei; Liu, Guang-Jin; Lu, Cheng-Ping; Liu, Yong-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging concern with regard to fish. In this study, we used a mouse model and in vitro cell infection to evaluate the pathogenetic characteristics of S. agalactiae GD201008-001, isolated from tilapia in China. This bacterium was found to be highly virulent and capable of inducing brain damage by migrating into the brain by crossing the blood–brain barrier (BBB). The phagocytosis assays indicated that this bacterium could be internalized by murine macrophages and survive intracellularly for more than 24 h, inducing injury to macrophages. Further, selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) was used to investigate microbial gene expression associated with intracellular survival. This positive cDNA selection technique identified 60 distinct genes that could be characterized into 6 functional categories. More than 50% of the differentially expressed genes were involved in metabolic adaptation. Some genes have previously been described as associated with virulence in other bacteria, and four showed no significant similarities to any other previously described genes. This study constitutes the first step in further gene expression analyses that will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by S. agalactiae to survive in macrophages and to cross the BBB. PMID:24498419

  12. The impact of pH and nutrient stress on the growth and survival of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Porter, Andrew J; Zhang, Meng; Harrington, Dean J; Black, Gary W; Sutcliffe, Iain C

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major neonatal pathogen that is able to colonise various host environments and is associated with both gastrointestinal and vaginal maternal carriage. Maternal vaginal carriage represents the major source for transmission of S. agalactiae to the foetus/neonate and thus is a significant risk factor for neonatal disease. In order to understand factors influencing maternal carriage we have investigated growth and long term survival of S. agalactiae under conditions of low pH and nutrient stress in vitro. Surprisingly, given that vaginal pH is normally <4.5, S. agalactiae was found to survive poorly at low pH and failed to grow at pH 4.3. However, biofilm growth, although also reduced at low pH, was shown to enhance survival of S. agalactiae. Proteomic analysis identified 26 proteins that were more abundant under nutrient stress conditions (extended stationary phase), including a RelE family protein, a universal stress protein family member and four proteins that belong to the Gls24 (PF03780) stress protein family. Cumulatively, these data indicate that novel mechanisms are likely to operate that allow S. agalactiae survival at low pH and under nutrient stress during maternal vaginal colonisation and/or that the bacteria may access a more favourable microenvironment at the vaginal mucosa. As current in vitro models for S. agalactiae growth appear unsatisfactory, novel methods need to be developed to study streptococcal colonisation under physiologically-relevant conditions.

  13. Duration of protective antibodies and correlation with survival in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus following Streptococcus agalactiae vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Evans, Joyce J; Klesius, Phillip H

    2005-09-05

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major piscine pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality among numerous species of freshwater, estuarine and marine fishes. Considering the economic importance of fishes susceptible to S. agalactiae throughout the world, an efficacious S. agalactiae vaccine was developed using an extracellular product (ECP) fraction and formalin-killed whole cells of S. agalactiae. A vaccine study was conducted by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus in order to determine the duration of protection and its correlation to antibodies specific for this pathogen. After 47, 90 or 180 d post-vaccination (DPV), the fish were i.p. challenged with approximately 2.0 x 10(4) S. agalactiae colony-forming units (CFU) fish(-1) to determine the duration of protective immunity. The percent survival in control fish i.p.-injected with sterile TSB was 16,16, and 4% on 47, 90 and 180 DPV, respectively, while the percent survival for the vaccinated fish was 67, 62 and 49%, respectively. The specific mean antibody concentration of the vaccinated fish was significantly higher than that of the control fish, with significant correlation between the ELISA optical density (OD) and protection. These results indicate that the specific antibody has a correlation with protection following immunization with the S. agalactiae vaccine and that the vaccine can confer protection against S. agalactiae up to 180 DPV.

  14. Identification and characterization of CD4⁺ T-cell epitopes on GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Yao, Di; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xintong; Yu, Simiao; Wei, Yuhua; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jiannan; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Zhenghai; Sun, Hunan; Yu, Liquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Song, Baifen; Cui, Yudong

    2016-02-01

    The GapC protein is highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) and is shown to be involved in bacterial virulence. Immunization of GapC protein can induce specific CD4(+) T-cell immune responses and protect against S. dysgalactiae infection. However, there are no studies to identify immunodominant CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. In this study, in silico MHC affinity measurement method was firstly used to predict potential CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. Six predictive 15-mer peptides were synthesized and two novel GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, GapC63-77 and GapC96-110, were for the first time identified using CD4(+) T-cells obtained from GapC-immunized BALB/c (H-2(d)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice spleen based on cell proliferation and cytokines response. The results showed that peptides containing 63-77 and 96-110 induced significant antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells proliferation response in vivo. At the same time, high levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A, as well as moderate levels of IL-10 and IL-4 were detected in CD4(+) T-cells isolated from both GapC and peptide-immunized mice in vivo, suggesting that GapC63-77 and GapC96-110 preferentially elicited polarized Th1/Th17-type responses. The characterization of GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes not only helps us understand its protective immunity, but also contributes to design effective T-cell epitope-based vaccine against S. dysgalactiae infection.

  15. Development of live attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine for tilapia via continuous passage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, L P; Wang, R; Liang, W W; Huang, T; Huang, Y; Luo, F G; Lei, A Y; Chen, M; Gan, X

    2015-08-01

    Fish Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) seriously harms the world's aquaculture industry and causes huge economic losses. This study aimed to develop a potential live attenuated vaccine of S. agalactiae. Pre-screened vaccine candidate strain S. agalactiae HN016 was used as starting material to generate an attenuated strain S. agalactiae YM001 by continuous passage in vitro. The biological characteristics, virulence, and stability of YM001 were detected, and the protective efficacy of YM001 immunization in tilapia was also determined. Our results indicated that the growth, staining, characteristics of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotype, and virulence of YM001 were changed significantly as compared to the parental strain HN016. High doses of YM001 by intraperitoneal (IP) injection (1.0 × 10(9) CFU/fish) and oral gavage (1.0 × 10(10) CFU/fish) respectively did not cause any mortality and morbidity in tilapia. The relative percent survivals (RPSs) of fishes immunized with YM001 (1.0 × 10(8) CFU/fish, one time) via injection, immersion, and oral administration were 96.88, 67.22, and 71.81%, respectively, at 15 days, and 93.61, 60.56, and 53.16%, respectively, at 30 days. In all tests with 1-3 times of immunization in tilapia, the dosages at 1 × 10(8) and 1 × 10(9) CFU/fish displayed the similar best results, whereas the immunoprotection of the dosages at 1 × 10(6) and 1 × 10(7) CFU/fish declined significantly (P < 0.01), and 1 × 10(5) CFU/fish hardly displayed any protective effect. In addition, the efficacy of 2-3 times of immunization was significantly higher than that of single immunization (P < 0.01) while no significant difference in the efficacy between twice and thrice of immunization was seen (P > 0.05). The level of protective antibody elicited by oral immunization was significantly higher compared to that of the control group (P < 0.01), and the antibody reached their maximum levels 14-21 days after the immunization but decreased

  16. Macrolide resistance gene mreA of Streptococcus agalactiae encodes a flavokinase.

    PubMed

    Clarebout, G; Villers, C; Leclercq, R

    2001-08-01

    The mreA gene from Streptococcus agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta, resistant to macrolides and clindamycin by active efflux, has recently been cloned in Escherichia coli, where it was reported to confer macrolide resistance (J. Clancy, F. Dib-Hajj, J. W. Petitpas, and W. Yuan, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:2719--2723, 1997). Cumulative data suggested that the mreA gene was located on the chromosome of S. agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of mreA revealed significant homology with several bifunctional flavokinases/(flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) synthetases, which convert riboflavin to flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and FMN to FAD, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography experiments showed that the mreA gene product had a monofunctional flavokinase activity, similar to that of RibR from Bacillus subtilis. Sequences identical to those of the mreA gene and of a 121-bp upstream region containing a putative promoter were detected in strains of S. agalactiae UCN4, UCN5, and UCN6 susceptible to macrolides. mreA and its allele from S. agalactiae UCN4 were cloned on the shuttle vector pAT28. Both constructs were introduced into E. coli, where they conferred a similar two- to fourfold increase in the MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, and clindamycin. The MICs of a variety of other molecules, including crystal violet, acriflavin, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and antibiotics, such as certain cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, doxycycline, nalidixic acid, novobiocin, and rifampin, were also increased. In contrast, resistance to these compounds was not detected when the constructs were introduced into E. faecalis JH2-2. In conclusion, the mreA gene was probably resident in S. agalactiae and may encode a metabolic function. We could not provide any evidence that it was responsible for macrolide resistance in S. agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta; broad-spectrum resistance conferred by the gene in E. coli could involve multidrug efflux pumps

  17. Molecular identification and histopathological study of natural Streptococcus agalactiae infection in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Laith, AA; Ambak, Mohd Azmi; Hassan, Marina; Sheriff, Shahreza Md.; Nadirah, Musa; Draman, Ahmad Shuhaimi; Wahab, Wahidah; Ibrahim, Wan Nurhafizah Wan; Aznan, Alia Syafiqah; Jabar, Amina; Najiah, Musa

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The main objective of this study was to emphasize on histopathological examinations and molecular identification of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from natural infections in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in Temerloh Pahang, Malaysia, as well as to determine the susceptibility of the pathogen strains to various currently available antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods: The diseased fishes were observed for variable clinical signs including fin hemorrhages, alterations in behavior associated with erratic swimming, exophthalmia, and mortality. Tissue samples from the eyes, brain, kidney, liver, and spleen were taken for bacterial isolation. Identification of S. agalactiae was screened by biochemical methods and confirmed by VITEK 2 and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The antibiogram profiling of the isolate was tested against 18 standard antibiotics included nitrofurantoin, flumequine, florfenicol, amoxylin, doxycycline, oleandomycin, tetracycline, ampicillin, lincomycin, colistin sulfate, oxolinic acid, novobiocin, spiramycin, erythromycin, fosfomycin, neomycin, gentamycin, and polymyxin B. The histopathological analysis of eyes, brain, liver, kidney, and spleen was observed for abnormalities related to S. agalactiae infection. Results: The suspected colonies of S. agalactiae identified by biochemical methods was observed as Gram-positive chained cocci, β-hemolytic, and non-motile. The isolate was confirmed as S. agalactiae by VITEK 2 (99% similarity), reconfirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (99% similarity) and deposited in GenBank with accession no. KT869025. The isolate was observed to be resistance to neomycin and gentamicin. The most consistent gross findings were marked hemorrhages, erosions of caudal fin, and exophthalmos. Microscopic examination confirmed the presence of marked congestion and infiltration of inflammatory cell in the eye, brain, kidney, liver, and spleen. Eye samples showed damage of the lens capsule, hyperemic and

  18. [Antimicrobial susceptibilities and serotype distribution of Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated from pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Bulut, Yunus; Demirtürk, Fazli; Calişkan, A Cantuğ

    2006-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of GBS isolated from pregnant women. A total of 671 pregnant women were screened for vaginal carriage of GBS, and vaginal colonization rate was found to be 14.6%. All GBS isolates were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol and ofloxacin. The rates of GBS resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin were 81.6%, 24.5% and 19.4%, respectively. The serotype distribution of GBS isolates was as follows in order of frequency; serotype III (33.7%), serotype Ib (24.5%), serotype V (18.4%), serotype Ia (7.1%), serotype IV (3.1%) and serotype II (2%). Eleven GBS isolates could not be serotyped by the antisera set used in the study.

  19. Loss of catabolic function in Streptococcus agalactiae strains and its association with neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Domelier, Anne-Sophie; van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie; Grandet, Adeline; Mereghetti, Laurent; Rosenau, Agnès; Quentin, Roland

    2006-09-01

    The abilities of 151 Streptococcus agalactiae strains to oxidize 95 carbon sources were studied using the Biolog system. Two populations were constituted: one with a high risk of causing meningitis (HR group; 63 strains), and the other with a lower risk of causing meningitis (LR group; 46 strains). Strains belonging to the HR group were significantly less able to use four carbon sources, i.e., alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate, D-ribose, beta-methyl-D-glucoside, and D,L-alpha-glycerol phosphate, than strains from the LR group (P agalactiae. Fifteen biotypes (B1 to B15) were identified from the results of oxidation of the four carbon sources, of which six (B1 to B6) included 92% of the isolates belonging to the HR group. Strains of biotypes B1 to B6 are thus 13 times more likely to be able to invade the central nervous system of neonates than strains of biotypes B7 to B15. In addition, 86% of strains recently associated with neonatal meningitis (42 strains studied) were identified as being of biotypes B1 to B6. Identification of particular S. agalactiae biotypes may therefore be one of the criteria to assist clinicians in assessing the level of risk of neonatal meningitis when a mother and/or her neonate is colonized with S. agalactiae.

  20. Molecular cloning and bioinformatic analysis of the Streptococcus agalactiae neuA gene isolated from tilapia.

    PubMed

    Wang, E L; Wang, K Y; Chen, D F; Geng, Y; Huang, L Y; Wang, J; He, Y

    2015-06-01

    Cytidine monophosphate (CMP) N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc) synthetase, which is encoded by the neuA gene, can catalyze the activation of sialic acid with CMP, and plays an important role in Streptococcus agalactiae infection pathogenesis. To study the structure and function of the S. agalactiae neuA gene, we isolated it from diseased tilapia, amplified it using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers, and cloned it into a pMD19-T vector. The recombinant plasmid was confirmed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion, and identified by sequencing. Molecular characterization analyses of the neuA nucleotide amino acid sequence were performed using bioinformatic tools and an online server. The results showed that the neuA nucleotide sequence contained a complete coding region, which comprised 1242 bp, encoding 413 amino acids (aa). The aa sequence was highly conserved and contained a Glyco_tranf_GTA_type superfamily and an SGNH_hydrolase superfamily conserved domain, which are related to sialic acid activation catalysis. The NeuA protein possessed many important sites related to post-translational modification, including 28 potential phosphorylation sites and 2 potential N-glycosylation sites, had no signal peptides or transmembrane regions, and was predicted to reside in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the protein had some B-cell epitopes, which suggests its potential in development of a vaccine against S. agalactiae infection. The codon usage frequency of neuA differed greatly in Escherichia coli and Homo sapiens genes, and neuA may be more efficiently expressed in eukaryotes (yeast). S. agalactiae neuA from tilapia maintains high structural homology and sequence identity with CMP-NeuNAc synthetases from other bacteria.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae GD201008-001, isolated in China from tilapia with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangjin; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chengping

    2012-12-01

    This work describes a whole-genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae strain GD201008-001, a pathogen causing meningoencephalitis in cultural tilapia in China. The genome sequence provides opportunities to understand the piscine GBS pathogenicity and its genetic basis associated with host tropism.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae GD201008-001, Isolated in China from Tilapia with Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangjin; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a whole-genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae strain GD201008-001, a pathogen causing meningoencephalitis in cultural tilapia in China. The genome sequence provides opportunities to understand the piscine GBS pathogenicity and its genetic basis associated with host tropism. PMID:23144401

  3. Additive genetic variation in resistance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae capsular type Ib: is genetic resistance correlated?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus (S.) iniae and S. agalactiae are both economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens affecting the globally farmed tilapia (Oreochromis spp.). Historically control of these bacteria in tilapia culture has included biosecurity, therapeutants and vaccination strategies. Genet...

  4. Major surfome and secretome profile of Streptococcus agalactiae from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus): Insight into vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hai-Qing; He, Run-Zhen; Li, Yan-Wei; Su, You-Lu; Li, An-Xing

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major piscine pathogen that is responsible for huge economic losses to the aquaculture industry. Safe recombinant vaccines, based on a small number of antigenic proteins, are emerging as the most attractive, cost-effective solution against S. agalactiae. The proteins of S. agalactiae exposed to the environment, including surface proteins and secretory proteins, are important targets for the immune system and they are likely to be good vaccine candidates. To obtain a precise profile of its surface proteins, S. agalactiae strain THN0901, which was isolated from tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), was treated with proteinase K to cleave surface-exposed proteins, which were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Forty surface-associated proteins were identified, including ten proteins containing cell wall-anchoring motifs, eight lipoproteins, eleven membrane proteins, seven secretory proteins, three cytoplasmic proteins, and one unknown protein. In addition, culture supernatant proteins of S. agalactiae were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and all of the Coomassie-stained bands were subsequently identified by LC-MS/MS. A total of twenty-six extracellular proteins were identified, including eleven secretory proteins, seven cell wall proteins, three membrane proteins, two cytoplasmic proteins and three unknown proteins. Of these, six highly expressed surface-associated and secretory proteins are putative to be vaccine candidate of piscine S. agalactiae. Moreover, immunogenic secreted protein, a highly expressed protein screened from the secretome in the present study, was demonstrated to induce high antibody titer in tilapia, and it conferred protection against S. agalactiae, as evidenced by the relative percent survival (RPS) 48.61± 8.45%. The data reported here narrow the scope of screening protective antigens, and provide guidance in the development of a novel

  5. An Evaluation of a Teat Dip with Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonic Acid in Preventing Bovine Mammary Gland Infection from Experimental Exposure to Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, D. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Brooks, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teat dip with dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (1.94%) for the prevention of intramammary infections was determined in cows experimentally challenged with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus. The infection rates with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus were 62.5% and 75% in undipped quarters, 12.5% and 21.5% in dipped quarters with a reduction rate of 80% and 71% respectively. The significance of some findings in relation to mastitis control are discussed. PMID:17422110

  6. Genetic diversity of Streptococcus agalactiae strains colonizing the same pregnant woman.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruiz, M.; Rodríguez-Granger, J. M.; Bautista-Marín, M. F.; Romero-Noguera, J.; Rosa-Fraile, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of SmaI-DNA digests and serotyping was performed on 15 colonies of Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) from each of 30 vaginal rectal colonized women. Five distinct GBS serotypes were observed among the 30 specimens (Ia, Ib, II, III and V). In 29 of the 30 samples, the same serotype was observed among all 15 colonies; in the remaining specimen, the 15 colonies yielded two serotypes (II and V). The PFGE profiles of all colonies in 27 of the 30 subjects were indistinguishable within each subject. In the remaining women, different DNA profiles were identified among the colonies in each specimen, one of whom carried two different serotypes. Furthermore, strains of the same serotype belonging to different women were genetically heterogeneous. PMID:15061514

  7. Streptococcus agalactiae Endophthalmitis in Boston Keratoprosthesis in a Patient with Steven-Johnson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Humoud M; Talea, Mohammed; Kirat, Omar; Stone, Donald U; May, William N; Kozak, Igor

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old Syrian male with a previous episode of Stevens-Johnson syndrome with bilateral corneal cicatrization previously underwent surgery for Type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (K-Pro). Sixteen months after the K-Pro surgery, the patient presented with decreased vision to hand motion and microbial keratitis of the graft around the K-Pro with purulent discharge. Corneal scrapings were nonrevealing. B-scan in 3 days showed increased debris in the vitreous cavity and thickened retinochoroidal layer. Intravitreal tap and injections of vancomycin and ceftazidime were performed. The vitreous culture revealed β-hemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae; fungal cultures were negative. Repeat B-scan 3 days later demonstrated decreased vitreous opacity, and the patient felt more comfortable and was without pain. His visual acuity improved to 20/70, ocular findings have been stable for 9 months, and the patient continues to be monitored.

  8. Streptococcus agalactiae Endophthalmitis in Boston Keratoprosthesis in a Patient with Steven–Johnson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Humoud M.; Talea, Mohammed; Kirat, Omar; Stone, Donald U.; May, William N.; Kozak, Igor

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old Syrian male with a previous episode of Stevens-Johnson syndrome with bilateral corneal cicatrization previously underwent surgery for Type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (K-Pro). Sixteen months after the K-Pro surgery, the patient presented with decreased vision to hand motion and microbial keratitis of the graft around the K-Pro with purulent discharge. Corneal scrapings were nonrevealing. B-scan in 3 days showed increased debris in the vitreous cavity and thickened retinochoroidal layer. Intravitreal tap and injections of vancomycin and ceftazidime were performed. The vitreous culture revealed β-hemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae; fungal cultures were negative. Repeat B-scan 3 days later demonstrated decreased vitreous opacity, and the patient felt more comfortable and was without pain. His visual acuity improved to 20/70, ocular findings have been stable for 9 months, and the patient continues to be monitored. PMID:27994401

  9. Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype IV in Humans and Cattle, Northern Europe1

    PubMed Central

    Lyhs, Ulrike; Kulkas, Laura; Katholm, Jørgen; Waller, Karin Persson; Saha, Kerttu; Tomusk, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging pathogen of nonpregnant human adults worldwide and a reemerging pathogen of dairy cattle in parts of Europe. To learn more about interspecies transmission of this bacterium, we compared contemporaneously collected isolates from humans and cattle in Finland and Sweden. Multilocus sequence typing identified 5 sequence types (STs) (ST1, 8, 12, 23, and 196) shared across the 2 host species, suggesting possible interspecies transmission. More than 54% of the isolates belonged to those STs. Molecular serotyping and pilus island typing of those isolates did not differentiate between populations isolated from different host species. Isolates from humans and cattle differed in lactose fermentation, which is encoded on the accessory genome and represents an adaptation to the bovine mammary gland. Serotype IV-ST196 isolates were obtained from multiple dairy herds in both countries. Cattle may constitute a previously unknown reservoir of this strain. PMID:27869599

  10. Molecular characterization of temporally and geographically matched Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated from food products and bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie; Domelier, Anne-Sophie; Salloum, Mazen; Violette, Jérémie; Arnault, Laurence; Gaillard, Nicolas; Bind, Jean-Louis; Lartigue, Marie-Frédérique; Quentin, Roland

    2009-12-01

    In a defined geographic area, during a 3-month period, 914 food products were screened for Streptococcus agalactiae, and S. agalactiae strains isolated from bloodstream infections (BSI) in nonpregnant adults were collected. Eleven S. agalactiae strains were isolated from 1.2% of food products, with high rates in pastries (7.0%) and seafood products (11.8%). These findings indicate that S. agalactiae is a food product contaminant. Seven S. agalactiae BSI were observed in nonpregnant adults representing an incidence of 0.015/100 admissions. The distribution of strains in serotypes did not differ according to origin of the strains; food products and clinical strains were of serotypes Ia (22%), Ib (11%), II (5%), III (22%), IV (5%), and V (33%). The strains isolated from seafoods were of serotypes Ia and Ib. The distribution of strains in Sequence Types differed according to their origin; food strains were equally distributed between the major clonal complex (CC), CC1 (27%), CC9 (18%), CC17 (18%), and CC23 (27%), whereas a high proportion of BSI strains belonged to CC1 (57%). DNA macrorestriction using SmaI revealed diversity; nine different patterns were found for the 11 food strains and seven for the 7 BSI strains. One pattern was similar for two food strains and one BSI strain. On account of the molecular characteristics previously described for S. agalactiae strains of human carriage and fish and mice infections, the serotype characteristics of seafood strains suggest contamination by aquatic S. agalactiae, whereas the molecular characteristics of strains from pastries suggest human contamination, but may also originate from rodents. Indeed, serotype V CC1 strains, found in food and responsible for a high percentage of BSI in nonpregnant adults, belong to a known clone spreading worldwide, and have also been described in mice.

  11. Development of a quantitative PCR assay for monitoring Streptococcus agalactiae colonization and tissue tropism in experimentally infected tilapia.

    PubMed

    Su, Y-L; Feng, J; Li, Y-W; Bai, J-S; Li, A-X

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae has become one of the most important emerging pathogens in the aquaculture industry and has resulted in large economic losses for tilapia farms in China. In this study, three pairs of specific primers were designed and tested for their specificities and sensitivities in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs) after optimization of the annealing temperature. The primer pair IGS-s/IGS-a, which targets the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region, was finally chosen, having a detection limit of 8.6 copies of S. agalactiae DNA in a 20 μL reaction mixture. Bacterial tissue tropism was demonstrated by qPCR in Oreochromis niloticus 5 days post-injection with a virulent S. agalactiae strain. Bacterial loads were detected at the highest level in brain, followed by moderately high levels in kidney, heart, spleen, intestines, and eye. Significantly lower bacterial loads were observed in muscle, gill and liver. In addition, significantly lower bacterial loads were observed in the brain of convalescent O. niloticus 14 days post-injection with several different S. agalactiae strains. The qPCR for the detection of S. agalactiae developed in this study provides a quantitative tool for investigating bacterial tissue tropism in infected fish, as well as for monitoring bacterial colonization in convalescent fish.

  12. Molecular mapping of the cell wall polysaccharides of the human pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Péchoux, Christine; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Hols, Pascal; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-11-01

    The surface of many bacterial pathogens is covered with polysaccharides that play important roles in mediating pathogen-host interactions. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is recognized as a major virulence factor while the group B carbohydrate (GBC) is crucial for peptidoglycan biosynthesis and cell division. Despite the important roles of CPS and GBC, there is little information available on the molecular organization of these glycopolymers on the cell surface. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze the nanoscale distribution of CPS and GBC in wild-type (WT) and mutant strains of S. agalactiae. TEM analyses reveal that in WT bacteria, peptidoglycan is covered with a very thin (few nm) layer of GBC (the ``pellicle'') overlaid by a 15-45 nm thick layer of CPS (the ``capsule''). AFM-based single-molecule mapping with specific antibody probes shows that CPS is exposed on WT cells, while it is hardly detected on mutant cells impaired in CPS production (ΔcpsE mutant). By contrast, both TEM and AFM show that CPS is over-expressed in mutant cells altered in GBC expression (ΔgbcO mutant), indicating that the production of the two surface glycopolymers is coordinated in WT cells. In addition, AFM topographic imaging and molecular mapping with specific lectin probes demonstrate that removal of CPS (ΔcpsE), but not of GBC (ΔgbcO), leads to the exposure of peptidoglycan, organized into 25 nm wide bands running parallel to the septum. These results indicate that CPS forms a homogeneous barrier protecting the underlying peptidoglycan from environmental exposure, while the presence of GBC does not prevent peptidoglycan detection. This work shows that single-molecule AFM, combined with high-resolution TEM, represents a powerful platform for analysing the molecular arrangement of the cell wall polymers of bacterial pathogens.

  13. L-proline increases survival of tilapias infected by Streptococcus agalactiae in higher water temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xian-Liang; Han, Yi; Ren, Shi-Tong; Ma, Yan-Mei; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcosis causes massive tilapia kills, which results in heavy economic losses of tilapia farming industry. Out of the Streptococcosis, Streptococcus agalactiae is the major pathogen. The bacterium causes higher mortality of tilapias in higher than lower temperatures. However, effect of temperature on metabolic regulation which is related to the mortality is largely unknown. The present study showed 50% and 70% mortality of tilapias cultured in 25 °C and 30 °C, respectively, in comparison with no death in 20 °C following infection caused by S. agalactiae. Then, GC/MS based metabolomics was used to investigate a global metabolic response of tilapia liver to the two higher water temperatures compared to 20 °C. Thirty-six and forty-five varied abundance of metabolites were identified in livers of tilapias cultured at 25 °C and 30 °C, respectively. More decreasing abundance of amino acids and increasing abundance of carbohydrates were detected in 30 °C than 25 °C groups. On the other hand, out of the pathways enriched, the first five biggest impact pathways belong to amino acid metabolism. Decreasing abundance of l-proline was identified as a crucial biomarker for indexing higher water temperature and a potential modulator to reduce the high death. This was validated by engineering injection or oral addition of l-proline. Exogenous l-proline led to elevated amino acid metabolism, which contributes to the elevated survivals. Our findings provide a potential metabolic modulator for controlling the disease, and shed some light on host metabolic prevention to infectious diseases.

  14. Efficacy of spray administration of formalin-killed Streptococcus agalactiae in hybrid Red Tilapia.

    PubMed

    Noraini, O; Sabri, M Y; Siti-Zahrah, A

    2013-06-01

    An initial evaluation of spray vaccination was carried out with 60 hybrid Red Tilapia Oreochromis spp., divided into three groups that consisted of 10 fish per group with duplicates. The formalin-killed cells (FKCs) of Streptococcus agalactiae were administered once to group 1 by spray and once daily for five consecutive days to group 2. Group 3 remained as the untreated control group and was sprayed with normal saline. A booster was given twice to all the groups, once at the second week and again at the fourth week after the first vaccination. After this initial evaluation, a challenge study was conducted with 40 tilapia divided into two groups that consisted of 10 fish per group with duplicates. Group 1 was vaccinated with FKCs of S. agalactiae by a single spray administration while group 2 remained as the untreated control group. A booster was given twice using the same protocol as in the initial evaluation. After 6 weeks, fish from one of the duplicate tanks from each of groups 1 and 2 were challenged with pathogenic S. agalactiae by intraperitoneal (IP) injection, while fish in another tank were challenged through immersion. Based on the observations, serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the challenged fish than in the either the preexposed fish or the control group 1 week after the initial exposure. However, no significant differences (P > 0.05) were noted between challenged groups 1 and 2. In addition, no significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the frequencies of exposure. The mucus IgM level, however, remained high after each booster until the end of the 8-week study period. Meanwhile, serum IgM levels decreased after the challenge. A higher percentage of survival was noted for fish challenged through immersion (80%) compared with IP injection (70%). These results suggested that single spray exposure was able to induce IgM, which gave moderate to high protection during the challenge study.

  15. Regulation of PI-2b Pilus Expression in Hypervirulent Streptococcus agalactiae ST-17 BM110

    PubMed Central

    du Merle, Laurence; Rosinski-Chupin, Isabelle; Gominet, Myriam; Bellais, Samuel; Poyart, Claire; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The widely spread Streptococcus agalactiae (also known as Group B Streptococcus, GBS) “hypervirulent” ST17 clone is strongly associated with neonatal meningitis. The PI-2b locus is mainly found in ST17 strains but is also present in a few non ST17 human isolates such as the ST-7 prototype strain A909. Here, we analysed the expression of the PI-2b pilus in the ST17 strain BM110 as compared to the non ST17 A909. Comparative genome analyses revealed the presence of a 43-base pair (bp) hairpin-like structure in the upstream region of PI-2b operon in all 26 ST17 genomes, which was absent in the 8 non-ST17 strains carrying the PI-2b locus. Deletion of this 43-bp sequence in strain BM110 resulted in a 3- to 5-fold increased transcription of PI-2b. Characterization of PI-2b promoter region in A909 and BM110 strains was carried out by RNAseq, primer extension, qRT-PCR and transcriptional fusions with gfp as reporter gene. Our results indicate the presence of a single promoter (Ppi2b) with a transcriptional start site (TSS) mapped 37 bases upstream of the start codon of the first PI-2b gene. The large operon of 16 genes located upstream of PI-2b codes for the group B carbohydrate (also known as antigen B), a major constituent of the bacterial cell wall. We showed that the hairpin sequence located between antigen B and PI-2b operons is a transcriptional terminator. In A909, increased expression of PI-2b probably results from read-through transcription from antigen B operon. In addition, we showed that an extended 5’ promoter region is required for maximal transcription of gfp as a reporter gene in S. agalactiae from Ppi2b promoter. Gene reporter assays performed in Lactococcus lactis strain NZ9000, a related non-pathogenic Gram-positive species, revealed that GBS-specific regulatory factors are required to drive PI-2b transcription. PI-2b expression is up-regulated in the BM110ΔcovR mutant as compared to the parental BM110 strain, but this effect is probably indirect

  16. Regulation of PI-2b Pilus Expression in Hypervirulent Streptococcus agalactiae ST-17 BM110.

    PubMed

    Périchon, Bruno; Szili, Noémi; du Merle, Laurence; Rosinski-Chupin, Isabelle; Gominet, Myriam; Bellais, Samuel; Poyart, Claire; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Dramsi, Shaynoor

    2017-01-01

    The widely spread Streptococcus agalactiae (also known as Group B Streptococcus, GBS) "hypervirulent" ST17 clone is strongly associated with neonatal meningitis. The PI-2b locus is mainly found in ST17 strains but is also present in a few non ST17 human isolates such as the ST-7 prototype strain A909. Here, we analysed the expression of the PI-2b pilus in the ST17 strain BM110 as compared to the non ST17 A909. Comparative genome analyses revealed the presence of a 43-base pair (bp) hairpin-like structure in the upstream region of PI-2b operon in all 26 ST17 genomes, which was absent in the 8 non-ST17 strains carrying the PI-2b locus. Deletion of this 43-bp sequence in strain BM110 resulted in a 3- to 5-fold increased transcription of PI-2b. Characterization of PI-2b promoter region in A909 and BM110 strains was carried out by RNAseq, primer extension, qRT-PCR and transcriptional fusions with gfp as reporter gene. Our results indicate the presence of a single promoter (Ppi2b) with a transcriptional start site (TSS) mapped 37 bases upstream of the start codon of the first PI-2b gene. The large operon of 16 genes located upstream of PI-2b codes for the group B carbohydrate (also known as antigen B), a major constituent of the bacterial cell wall. We showed that the hairpin sequence located between antigen B and PI-2b operons is a transcriptional terminator. In A909, increased expression of PI-2b probably results from read-through transcription from antigen B operon. In addition, we showed that an extended 5' promoter region is required for maximal transcription of gfp as a reporter gene in S. agalactiae from Ppi2b promoter. Gene reporter assays performed in Lactococcus lactis strain NZ9000, a related non-pathogenic Gram-positive species, revealed that GBS-specific regulatory factors are required to drive PI-2b transcription. PI-2b expression is up-regulated in the BM110ΔcovR mutant as compared to the parental BM110 strain, but this effect is probably indirect

  17. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the detection of Streptococcus agalactiae in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Bosward, Katrina L; House, John K; Deveridge, Amber; Mathews, Karen; Sheehy, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a well-characterized bovine mastitis pathogen that is known to be highly contagious and capable of spreading rapidly in affected dairy herds. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel molecular diagnostic method that has the capability to provide rapid, cost-effective screening for pathogens to support on-farm disease control and eradication programs. In the current study, a LAMP test was developed to detect S. agalactiae in milk. The assay was validated on a bank of existing clinical mastitis milk samples that had previously been identified as S. agalactiae positive via traditional microbiological culture techniques and PCR. The LAMP assay was conducted on bacterial colonies and DNA extracted from milk in tube- and plate-based formats using multiple detection platforms. The 1-h assay conducted at 64 °C exhibited repeatability (coefficient of variation) of 2.07% (tube) and 8.3% (plate), sensitivity to ~20 pg of extracted DNA/reaction, and specificity against a panel of known bacterial mastitis pathogens. Of the 109 known S. agalactiae isolates assessed by LAMP directly from bacterial cells in culture, 108 were identified as positive, in accordance with PCR analysis. The LAMP analysis from the corresponding milk samples indicated that 104 of these milks exhibited a positive amplification curve. Although exhibiting some limitations, this assay provides an opportunity for rapid screening of milk samples to facilitate on-farm management of this pathogen.

  18. Streptococcus agalactiae CspA is a serine protease that inactivates chemokines.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Joshua D; Shelver, Daniel W

    2009-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) remains a leading cause of invasive infections in neonates and has emerged as a pathogen of the immunocompromised and elderly populations. The virulence mechanisms of GBS are relatively understudied and are still poorly understood. Previous evidence indicated that the GBS cspA gene is necessary for full virulence and the cleavage of fibrinogen. The predicted cspA product displays homology to members of the extracellular cell envelope protease family. CXC chemokines, many of which can recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, are important signaling peptides of the immune system. In this study, we purified CspA and demonstrated that it readily cleaved the CXC chemokines GRO-alpha, GRO-beta, GRO-gamma, neutrophil-activating peptide 2 (NAP-2), and granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2) but did not cleave interleukin-8. CspA did not cleave a panel of other test substrates, suggesting that it possesses a certain degree of specificity. CXC chemokines also underwent cleavage by whole GBS cells in a cspA-dependent manner. CspA abolished the abilities of three representative CXC chemokines, GRO-gamma, NAP-2, and GCP-2, to attract and activate neutrophils. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicated that CspA is a serine protease with S575 at its active site. D180 was also implicated as part of the signature serine protease catalytic triad, and both S575 and D180 were required for both N-terminal and C-terminal autocatalytic processing of CspA.

  19. Streptococcus agalactiae Capsule Polymer Length and Attachment Is Determined by the Proteins CpsABCD

    PubMed Central

    Toniolo, Chiara; Balducci, Evita; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Proietti, Daniela; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Grandi, Guido; Berti, Francesco; Ros, Immaculada Margarit Y; Janulczyk, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The production of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) or secreted exopolysaccharides is ubiquitous in bacteria, and the Wzy pathway constitutes a prototypical mechanism to produce these structures. Despite the differences in polysaccharide composition among species, a group of proteins involved in this pathway is well conserved. Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus; GBS) produces a CPS that represents the main virulence factor of the bacterium and is a prime target in current vaccine development. We used this human pathogen to investigate the roles and potential interdependencies of the conserved proteins CpsABCD encoded in the cps operon, by developing knock-out and functional mutant strains. The mutant strains were examined for CPS quantity, size, and attachment to the cell surface as well as CpsD phosphorylation. We observed that CpsB, -C, and -D compose a phosphoregulatory system where the CpsD autokinase phosphorylates its C-terminal tyrosines in a CpsC-dependent manner. These Tyr residues are also the target of the cognate CpsB phosphatase. An interaction between CpsD and CpsC was observed, and the phosphorylation state of CpsD influenced the subsequent action of CpsC. The CpsC extracellular domain appeared necessary for the production of high molecular weight polysaccharides by influencing CpsA-mediated attachment of the CPS to the bacterial cell surface. In conclusion, although having no impact on cps transcription or the synthesis of the basal repeating unit, we suggest that these proteins are fine-tuning the last steps of CPS biosynthesis (i.e. the balance between polymerization and attachment to the cell wall). PMID:25666613

  20. Streptococcus agalactiae from pregnant women: antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance mechanisms and molecular typing.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Bezares, B; Azcona-Gutiérrez, J M; Martin, C; Jareño, M S; Torres, C; Sáenz, Y

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance mechanisms, virulence genes and clonal relationships of macrolide- and/or lincosamide-resistant (M+/-LR) Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) isolates from pregnant women in La Rioja in Northern Spain, a region with a significant immigrant population. In total 375 GBS isolates were recovered during 2011. About three-quarters of isolates were from European nationals and the remainder distributed among 23 other nationalities. Seventy-five (20%) were classified as M+/-LR strains and 28 (37%) of these were resistant to ⩾3 classes of antibiotics. Capsular serotypes III (29·3%), V (21·3%) and II (12%) were the most frequent. A wide variety of antibiotic resistance genes were detected in M+/-LR strains; notably, 5·3% harboured the lsa(C) gene associated with cross-resistance, and tet(W) was identified in a single strain. We report, for the first time, the detection of cadmium and copper resistance encoded by tcrB + cadA + cadC genes in 20 M+/-LR strains, which raises the possibility of co-selection of antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance disseminated through mobile genetic elements. The M+/-LR strains were highly diverse by DNA macrorestriction profiles (65 patterns) and 16 multilocus sequence types (STs) distributed among six clonal complexes; the most frequent were ST1, ST19, and ST12, and two strains were novel (ST586 and ST601). In conclusion, a wide diversity of genetic lineages of macrolide, lincosamide and heavy-metal- resistant GBS strains was observed in an ethnically diverse maternal population.

  1. Maternal colonisation with Streptococcus agalactiae, and associated stillbirth and neonatal disease in coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Anna C; Koech, Angela C; Sheppard, Anna E; Barsosio, Hellen C; Langat, Joyce; Anyango, Emily; Mwakio, Stella; Mwarumba, Salim; Morpeth, Susan C; Anampiu, Kirimi; Vaughan, Alison; Giess, Adam; Mogeni, Polycarp; Walusuna, Leahbell; Mwangudzah, Hope; Mwanzui, Doris; Salim, Mariam; Kemp, Bryn; Jones, Caroline; Mturi, Neema; Tsofa, Benjamin; Mumbo, Edward; Mulewa, David; Bandika, Victor; Soita, Musimbi; Owiti, Maureen; Onzere, Norris; Walker, A Sarah; Schrag, Stephanie J; Kennedy, Stephen H; Fegan, Greg; Crook, Derrick W; Berkley, James A

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) causes neonatal disease and stillbirth, but its burden in sub-Saharan Africa is uncertain. We assessed maternal recto-vaginal GBS colonisation (7967 women), stillbirth and neonatal disease. Whole genome sequencing was used to determine serotypes, sequence types (ST), and phylogeny. We found low maternal GBS colonisation prevalence (934/7967, 12%), but comparatively high incidence of GBS-associated stillbirth and early onset neonatal disease (EOD) in hospital (0.91(0.25-2.3)/1000 births; 0.76(0.25-1.77)/1000 live-births respectively). However, using a population denominator, EOD incidence was considerably reduced (0.13(0.07-0.21)/1000 live-births). Treated cases of EOD had very high case fatality (17/36, 47%), especially within 24 hours of birth, making under-ascertainment of community-born cases highly likely, both here and in similar facility-based studies. Maternal GBS colonisation was less common in women with low socio-economic status, HIV infection and undernutrition, but when GBS-colonised, they were more likely colonised by the most virulent clone, CC17. CC17 accounted for 267/915(29%) of maternal colonising (265/267(99%) serotype III, 2/267(0.7%) serotype IV), and 51/73(70%) of neonatal disease cases (all serotype III). Trivalent (Ia/II/III) and pentavalent (Ia/Ib/II/III/V) vaccines would cover 71/73(97%) and 72/73(99%) of disease-causing serotypes respectively. Serotype IV should be considered for inclusion, with evidence of capsular switching in CC17 strains. PMID:27572968

  2. Rare serotype occurrence and PFGE genotypic diversity of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from tilapia in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Wang, Rui; Liang, Wanwen; Gan, Xi; Huang, Ting; Huang, Yan; Li, Jian; Shi, Yunliang; Chen, Ming; Luo, Honglin

    2013-12-27

    Previously, we reported 10 PEGE types of 85 tilapia Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS), which shifted from Streptococcus iniae in China, by using PEGE method. Presently, larger and more representative tilapia GBS were isolated, for the first time in China, to characterize their serotypes and genetic diversities more precisely than had done before. 168 GBS strains were distributed in five provinces of China, in which Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan were the major ones, holding 36.9% (62/168), 37.5% (63/168) and 19.6% (33/168), respectively. Serotypes, Ia, Ib and III, were observed in these strains and the most predominant one was Ia (95.2%), which mainly distributed in Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan. Ia initially occurred in 2009, it shoot up to 32.1% in 2010, but decreased to 16.1% in 2011 before went up to 45.2% in 2012. Ib sporadically occurred during 2007-2011, III only occurred in 2012. 14 different PFGE types, including 4 new types (N, O, P and Q), were observed, in which B, D, F and G were the predominant types, holding 83.9% (141/168) of the total GBS strains. Ia corresponded to 11 PFGE types (A-H, N-P), in which type D predominated (51%). Ib represented 3 genotypes (I, J and Q) and III harbored only 2 genotypes (N and F). Type N and F synchronously presented in Ia and III. In summary, the genetic diversity of tilapia GBS varied by serotypes and changed with geographical locations and years. Although Ia still predominated, new rare serotype III already occurred in China.

  3. Virulence factors, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Beigverdi, Reza; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Hantoushzadeh, Sedigheh; Boroumandi, Shahram; Taherikalani, Morovat; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Forty-one Streptococcus agalactiae isolates collected from pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation were analysed for their capsular types, antimicrobial resistance determinants, distribution of virulence factors and genetic relatedness using PCR and multiplex PCR. Capsular type III was predominant (65.8%), followed by capsular type II (14.6%), Ib (7.3%), and V(4.9%). All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, linezolid and quinupristin-dalfopristin. Resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin were found in 97.6%, 24.4%, and 14.6% of isolates, respectively. The most common antimicrobial resistance gene was tetM found in 97.6% of the isolates followed by ermTR and ermB found in 12% and 7.3% of isolates, respectively. The most common virulence gene was hly (100%), followed by scpB (97.6%), bca (97.6%), rib (53.65%) and bac (4.9%). The insertion sequence IS1548 was found in 63.4% of isolates. By multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) typing, 30 different allelic profiles or MLVA types (MTs) were identified. The most frequent was the MT1 (5/41, 12.2%) and followed by MT2 (4/41, 9.75%). Our data revealed that population structure of these isolates is highly diverse and indicates different MLVA types.

  4. Effect of Eugenol against Streptococcus agalactiae and Synergistic Interaction with Biologically Produced Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Perugini Biasi-Garbin, Renata; Saori Otaguiri, Eliane; Morey, Alexandre Tadachi; Fernandes da Silva, Mayara; Belotto Morguette, Ana Elisa; Armando Contreras Lancheros, César; Kian, Danielle; Perugini, Márcia Regina Eches; Nakazato, Gerson; Durán, Nelson; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci (GBS)) is an important infections agent in newborns associated with maternal vaginal colonization. Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis in GBS-colonized pregnant women has led to a significant reduction in the incidence of early neonatal infection in various geographic regions. However, this strategy may lead to resistance selecting among GBS, indicating the need for new alternatives to prevent bacterial transmission and even to treat GBS infections. This study reported for the first time the effect of eugenol on GBS isolated from colonized women, alone and in combination with silver nanoparticles produced by Fusarium oxysporum (AgNPbio). Eugenol showed a bactericidal effect against planktonic cells of all GBS strains, and this effect appeared to be time-dependent as judged by the time-kill curves and viability analysis. Combination of eugenol with AgNPbio resulted in a strong synergistic activity, significantly reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration values of both compounds. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed fragmented cells and changes in bacterial morphology after incubation with eugenol. In addition, eugenol inhibited the viability of sessile cells during biofilm formation and in mature biofilms. These results indicate the potential of eugenol as an alternative for controlling GBS infections.

  5. The susceptibility of bovine udder quarters colonized with Corynebacterium bovis to experimental infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, B W; Barnum, D A

    1984-01-01

    Twenty bovine udder quarters colonized with Corynebacterium bovis SR6 and 20 uncolonized quarters were challenged by inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus Newbould 305 (ATCC 29740) into the teat cistern. The percentage of infection in quarters colonized with C. bovis (50%) was significantly lower than that in controls (100%). By similar challenge no significant difference was observed between the percentage of infection with Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 27956 in 33 quarters colonized with C. bovis (70%) compared to 33 controls (87.9%). A total of 37 quarters colonized with C. bovis and 37 control quarters were challenged with Staph. aureus Newbould 305 (ATCC 29740) and Maxi (ATCC 27543) and Strep. agalactiae (ATCC 27956) by exposure of the teat orifice. The percentage of teat ducts colonized with C. bovis which became infected with either pathogen was not different from that for controls. PMID:6372969

  6. Screening vaccine candidate strains against Streptococcus agalactiae of tilapia based on PFGE genotype.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Rui; Li, Li-Ping; Liang, Wan-Wen; Li, Jian; Huang, Yan; Lei, Ai-Ying; Huang, Wei-Yi; Gan, Xi

    2012-09-14

    The immunogenicity identification of epidemic strain is important for the development and application of vaccine. In this study, 85 Streptococcus agalactiae prevalent strains from the tilapia main cultured areas of China were distributed among 10 distinct PFGE genotypes (A-J). For each genotype, one representative strain (S.a(A)-S.a(J)) was selected to develop an inactivated whole-cell bacterial vaccine (V(A)-V(J)), which then underwent a protective immunity test. V(A)-V(J) showed similar relative percent survival (RPS) to the homologous or heterologous strains with the identical genotype, while the average RPS among V(A)-V(J) protecting against itself genotype strains showed large differences (44.71-98.81%). The RPS of V(A)-V(J) vaccinated fish against infections by the mixture of S.a(A)-S.a(J) at 15 days post vaccination (dpv) was ranged from 13.33% to 60.00%, and V(B), V(D), V(F), and V(G) showed the highest RPS of 60.00%, 46.67%, 53.33% and 60.00% respectively. V(B), V(D) and V(G) have their own specific protection scope, V(B) showed strong protective immunity to infections caused by A-D, F, G and J (53.57-100%), and V(G) showed strong protective immunity to C-H and J (50.00-100%), whereas V(D) showed weak protective immunity to all non-self genotype strains (14.81-36.67%). The results of the combined vaccination showed that V(G)+V(B) group had wider protection scope and higher RPS value than V(G)+V(D) group. Our results demonstrated that the protective immunity of S. agalactiae from tilapia was not only associated with their serotypes, but also related to their PFGE genotypes. It is difficult to acquire a single vaccine candidate strain that can protect against all genotype strains from the same serotype.

  7. Characterization of a new CAMP factor carried by an integrative and conjugative element in Streptococcus agalactiae and spreading in Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Chuzeville, Sarah; Puymège, Aurore; Madec, Jean-Yves; Haenni, Marisa; Payot, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Genetic exchanges between Streptococci occur frequently and contribute to their genome diversification. Most of sequenced streptococcal genomes carry multiple mobile genetic elements including Integrative and Conjugative Elements (ICEs) that play a major role in these horizontal gene transfers. In addition to genes involved in their mobility and regulation, ICEs also carry genes that can confer selective advantages to bacteria. Numerous elements have been described in S. agalactiae especially those integrated at the 3' end of a tRNA(Lys) encoding gene. In strain 515 of S. agalactiae, an invasive neonate human pathogen, the ICE (called 515_tRNA(Lys)) is functional and carries different putative virulence genes including one encoding a putative new CAMP factor in addition to the one previously described. This work demonstrated the functionality of this CAMP factor (CAMP factor II) in Lactococcus lactis but also in pathogenic strains of veterinary origin. The search for co-hemolytic factors in a collection of field strains revealed their presence in S. uberis, S. dysgalactiae, but also for the first time in S. equisimilis and S. bovis. Sequencing of these genes revealed the prevalence of a species-specific factor in S. uberis strains (Uberis factor) and the presence of a CAMP factor II encoding gene in S. bovis and S. equisimilis. Furthermore, most of the CAMP factor II positive strains also carried an element integrated in the tRNA(Lys) gene. This work thus describes a CAMP factor that is carried by a mobile genetic element and has spread to different streptococcal species.

  8. Méningo-encéphalite à Streptococcus agalactiae chez l'adulte non immunodéprimé

    PubMed Central

    Rafai, Mostafa; Chouaib, Naoufal; Zidouh, Saad; Bakkali, Hicham; Belyamani, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae est un Streptocoque beta-hémolytique du groupe B (SGB), c'est un germe commensal occasionnel de la peau, du tube digestif et des voies génito-urinaires. Nous rapportons un cas inhabituel d'une méningo-encéphalite due au Streptococcus agalactiae (SGB) multisensible à l'antibiogramme chez un sujet adulte immunocompétent admis au service des urgences pour prise en charge de troubles de conscience fébrile. L’évolution clinique et biologique à J10 était favorable et le patient à été transféré au service de neurologie pour complément de prise en charge secondaire. L'originalité de notre observation réside dans la rareté du type d'infection par ce germe puise qu'elle est la troisième à notre connaissance d'une méningo-encéphalite à Streptococcus agalactiae dans la littérature, c'est ainsi que même s'il est très rarement en cause, il doit être considéré comme une étiologie possible de méningo-encéphalite chez l'adulte en dehors de la grossesse, quelle que soit le statut immunitaire du patient, et sans méconnaitre le rôle du terrain sous-jacent dans l’émergence de cette pathologie infectieuse polymorphe est potentiellement grave. PMID:25995802

  9. Preliminary observations on the use of latex agglutination test for the detection of mastitis due to Streptococcus agalactiae in cows.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, R C; Barnum, D A

    1986-01-01

    A commercial latex agglutination test for the detection of Group B streptococcal antigens was used to detect infection due to Streptococcus agalactiae in whey of bovine milk samples. Fifteen out of 17 known infections were detected, but it was necessary to incubate the wheys at 37 degrees C for 18 hours in nine of the samples. It was found that the latex agglutination test could detect Group streptococcal carbohydrate antigens in whey samples from artificially infected quarters from one to four days after failure to detect the organism on culture or after antibiotic therapy of the affected quarter. PMID:3527389

  10. Presence and resistance of Streptococcus agalactiae in vaginal specimens of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women and association with other aerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Numanović, Fatima; Smajlović, Jasmina; Gegić, Merima; Delibegović, Zineta; Bektaš, Sabaheta; Halilović, Emir; Nurkić, Jasmina

    2017-02-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence rate and resistance profile of Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) in vaginal swabs of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women in the Tuzla region, Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H), as well as its association with other aerobic bacteria. Methods This prospective study included 200 women, 100 pregnant and 100 adult non-pregnant. The research was conducted at the Institute of Microbiology, University Clinical Center Tuzla from October to December 2015. Standard aerobic microbiological techniques were used for isolation and identification of S. agalactiae and other aerobic bacteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion and microdilution method(VITEK 2/AES instrument). Results Among 200 vaginal swabs, 17 (8.50%) were positive for S. agalactiae, e. g., 7% (7/100) of pregnant and 10% (10/100) of adult non-pregnant women. In the pregnant group, 71.4% (5/7) of S. agalactiae isolates were susceptible to clindamycin and 85.7%(6/7) to erythromycin. In the adult non-pregnant group, only resistance to clindamycin was observed in one patient (1/10; 10%). S. agalactiae as single pathogen was isolated in 57.14% (4/7) of pregnant and 60% (6/10) of adult non-pregnant S. agalactiae positive women. In mixed microbial cultures S. agalactiae was most frequently associated with Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. Conclusion The rate of S. agalactiae positive women in the population of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women of Tuzla Canton, B&H is comparable with other European countries. Large studies are needed to develop a common national strategy for the prevention of S. agalactiae infection in B&H, especially during pregnancy.

  11. Characterization of two novel gadd45a genes in hybrid tilapia and their responses to the infection of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yubang; Ma, Keyi; Liu, Feng; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-07-01

    Diseases are one of the major challenges in tilapia aquaculture. Identification of DNA markers associated with disease resistance may facilitate the acceleration of the selection for disease resistance. Gadd45a (growth arrest and DNA damage 45 A), a stress-inducible gene in humans and mice, has not been studied in fish. We characterized the two prologues of Gadd45a genes in hybrid tilapia. Gadd45a1 and Gadd45a2 shared an identical gene structure and showed an amino acid sequence identity of 73.8%. Their expressions were detected in all 10 tissues examined, with the kidney and gill having high transcriptional expressions. The expression levels of Gadd45a1 were significantly lower than those of Gadd45a2 in all examined tissues. After a challenge with a bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae, the expressions of the two genes were up-regulated significantly in the spleen, kidney, liver and intestine. These findings suggest that the two Gadd45a genes play an important role in the resistance to S. agalactiae in tilapia. We identified 10 SNPs in the two genes. The SNP markers in the two Gadd45a genes could be used to examine whether they are associated with resistance to S. agalactiae.

  12. Interaction of Streptococcus agalactiae and Cellular Innate Immunity in Colonization and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Landwehr-Kenzel, Sybille; Henneke, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is highly adapted to humans, where it is a normal constituent of the intestinal and vaginal flora. Yet, GBS has highly invasive potential and causes excessive inflammation, sepsis, and death at the beginning of life, in the elderly and in diabetic patients. Thus, GBS is a model pathobiont that thrives in the healthy host, but has not lost its potential virulence during coevolution with mankind. It remains incompletely understood how the innate immune system contains GBS in the natural niches, the intestinal and genital tracts, and which molecular events underlie breakdown of mucocutaneous resistance. Newborn infants between days 7 and 90 of life are at risk of a particularly striking sepsis manifestation (late-onset disease), where the transition from colonization to invasion and dissemination, and thus from health to severe sepsis is typically fulminant and not predictable. The great majority of late-onset sepsis cases are caused by one clone, GBS ST17, which expresses HvgA as a signature virulence factor and adhesin. In mice, HvgA promotes the crossing of both the mucosal and the blood–brain barrier. Expression levels of HvgA and other GBS virulence factors, such as pili and toxins, are regulated by the upstream two-component control system CovR/S. This in turn is modulated by acidic epithelial pH, high glucose levels, and during the passage through the mouse intestine. After invasion, GBS has the ability to subvert innate immunity by mechanisms like glycerinaldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase-dependent induction of IL-10 and β-protein binding to the inhibitory phagocyte receptors sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 5 and 14. On the host side, sensing of GBS nucleic acids and lipopeptides by both Toll-like receptors and the inflammasome appears to be critical for host resistance against GBS. Yet, comprehensive models on the interplay between GBS and human immune cells at the colonizing site are

  13. [Vaginal colonization of the Streptococcus agalactiae in pregnant woman in Tunisia: risk factors and susceptibility of isolates to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Ferjani, A; Ben Abdallah, H; Ben Saida, N; Gozzi, C; Boukadida, J

    2006-05-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is one of the main bacterial causes of serious infections in newborns. We have evaluated prospectively GBS vaginal colonization in pregnant women and we have tried to determine the risk factors of the colonization by GBS and the particularities of the different isolated strains. We have screened 300 pregnant women with vaginal and anal sample in a same swab. Thirty nine (13%) pregnant women are colonized by SGB, 0% in the first trimester, 10.2% in the second trimester and 17% in the third trimester. Different factors are associated significantly with GBS colonization: past history of infection in newborns, genital infection during pregnancy and parity The highest rates of resistance are found in tetracycline (97.4%), erythromycin (51.3%) and lincomycin (46.2%). All the strains were susceptible to amoxicilin and pristinamycin.

  14. Liposome-encapsulated cinnamaldehyde enhances zebrafish (Danio rerio) immunity and survival when challenged with Vibrio vulnificus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Faikoh, Elok Ning; Hong, Yong-Han; Hu, Shao-Yang

    2014-05-01

    Cinnamaldehyde, which is extracted from cinnamon, is a natural compound with activity against bacteria and a modulatory immune function. However, the antibacterial activity and immunostimulation of cinnamaldehyde in fish has not been well investigated due to the compound's poor water solubility. Thus, liposome-encapsulated cinnamaldehyde (LEC) was used to evaluate the effects of cinnamaldehyde on in vitro antibacterial activity against aquatic pathogens and in vivo immunity and protection parameters against Vibrio vulnificus and Streptococcus agalactiae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) as well as bactericidal agar plate assay results demonstrated the effective bacteriostatic and bactericidal potency of LEC against Aeromonas hydrophila, V. vulnificus, and S. agalactiae, as well as the antibiotic-resistant Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio alginolyticus. Bacteria challenge test results demonstrated that LEC significantly enhances the survival rate and inhibits bacterial growth in zebrafish infected with A. hydrophila, V. vulnificus, and S. agalactiae. A gene expression study using a real-time PCR showed that LEC immersion-treated zebrafish had increased endogenous interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-15, IL-21, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon (INF)-γ expression in vivo. After the zebrafish were infected with V. vulnificus or S. agalactiae, the LEC immersion treatment suppressed the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, NF-κb, and TNF-α and induced IL-10 and C3b expression. These findings demonstrate that cinnamaldehyde exhibits antimicrobial activity against aquatic pathogens, even antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains and immune-stimulating effects to protect the host's defenses against pathogen infection in bacteria-infected zebrafish. These results suggest that LEC could be used as an antimicrobial agent and immunostimulant to protect bacteria-infected fish in aquaculture.

  15. An Overview of Vaccination Strategies and Antigen Delivery Systems for Streptococcus agalactiae Vaccines in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Paul, Joydeb; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-12-13

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging infectious disease adversely affecting Nile tilapia (Niloticus oreochromis) production in aquaculture. Research carried out in the last decade has focused on developing protective vaccines using different strategies, although no review has been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of these strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of vaccination strategies and antigen delivery systems currently used for S. agalactiae vaccines in tilapia. Furthermore, as shown herein, current vaccine designs include the use of replicative antigen delivery systems, such as attenuated virulent strains, heterologous vectors and DNA vaccines, while non-replicative vaccines include the inactivated whole cell (IWC) and subunit vaccines encoding different S. agalactiae immunogenic proteins. Intraperitoneal vaccination is the most widely used immunization strategy, although immersion, spray and oral vaccines have also been tried with variable success. Vaccine efficacy is mostly evaluated by use of the intraperitoneal challenge model aimed at evaluating the relative percent survival (RPS) of vaccinated fish. The major limitation with this approach is that it lacks the ability to elucidate the mechanism of vaccine protection at portals of bacterial entry in mucosal organs and prevention of pathology in target organs. Despite this, indications are that the correlates of vaccine protection can be established based on antibody responses and antigen dose, although these parameters require optimization before they can become an integral part of routine vaccine production. Nevertheless, this review shows that different approaches can be used to produce protective vaccines against S. agalactiae in tilapia although there is a need to optimize the measures of vaccine efficacy.

  16. An Overview of Vaccination Strategies and Antigen Delivery Systems for Streptococcus agalactiae Vaccines in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Paul, Joydeb; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging infectious disease adversely affecting Nile tilapia (Niloticus oreochromis) production in aquaculture. Research carried out in the last decade has focused on developing protective vaccines using different strategies, although no review has been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of these strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of vaccination strategies and antigen delivery systems currently used for S. agalactiae vaccines in tilapia. Furthermore, as shown herein, current vaccine designs include the use of replicative antigen delivery systems, such as attenuated virulent strains, heterologous vectors and DNA vaccines, while non-replicative vaccines include the inactivated whole cell (IWC) and subunit vaccines encoding different S. agalactiae immunogenic proteins. Intraperitoneal vaccination is the most widely used immunization strategy, although immersion, spray and oral vaccines have also been tried with variable success. Vaccine efficacy is mostly evaluated by use of the intraperitoneal challenge model aimed at evaluating the relative percent survival (RPS) of vaccinated fish. The major limitation with this approach is that it lacks the ability to elucidate the mechanism of vaccine protection at portals of bacterial entry in mucosal organs and prevention of pathology in target organs. Despite this, indications are that the correlates of vaccine protection can be established based on antibody responses and antigen dose, although these parameters require optimization before they can become an integral part of routine vaccine production. Nevertheless, this review shows that different approaches can be used to produce protective vaccines against S. agalactiae in tilapia although there is a need to optimize the measures of vaccine efficacy. PMID:27983591

  17. Structure of Streptococcus agalactiae tip pilin GBS104: a model for GBS pili assembly and host interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Vengadesan; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Kim, Brandon J.; Samal, Alexandra; Macon, Kevin; Ma, Xin; Mishra, Arunima; Doran, Kelly S.; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V. L.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structure of a 75 kDa central fragment of GBS104, a tip pilin from the 2063V/R strain of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS), is reported. The crystal structure of a 75 kDa central fragment of GBS104, a tip pilin from the 2063V/R strain of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS), is reported. In addition, a homology model of the remaining two domains of GBS104 was built and a model of full-length GBS104 was generated by combining the homology model (the N1 and N4 domains) and the crystal structure of the 75 kDa fragment (the N2 and N3 domains). This rod-shaped GBS104 model is constructed of three IgG-like domains (the N1, N2 and N4 domains) and one vWFA-like domain (the N3 domain). The N1 and N2 domains of GBS104 are assembled with distinct and remote segments contributed by the N- and C-termini. The metal-binding site in the N3 domain of GBS104 is in the closed/low-affinity conformation. Interestingly, this domain hosts two long arms that project away from the metal-binding site. Using site-directed mutagenesis, two cysteine residues that lock the N3 domain of GBS104 into the open/high-affinity conformation were introduced. Both wild-type and disulfide-locked recombinant proteins were tested for binding to extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, fibrinogen and laminin, and an increase in fibronectin binding affinity was identified for the disulfide-locked N3 domain, suggesting that induced conformational changes may play a possible role in receptor binding.

  18. Conjugative Transfer and cis-Mobilization of a Genomic Island by an Integrative and Conjugative Element of Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Puymège, Aurore; Bertin, Stéphane; Chuzeville, Sarah; Guédon, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Putative integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), i.e., genomic islands which could excise, self-transfer by conjugation, and integrate into the chromosome of the bacterial host strain, were previously identified by in silico analysis in the sequenced genomes of Streptococcus agalactiae (M. Brochet et al., J. Bacteriol. 190:6913–6917, 2008). We investigated here the mobility of the elements integrated into the 3′ end of a tRNALys gene. Three of the four putative ICEs tested were found to excise but only one (ICE_515_tRNALys) was found to transfer by conjugation not only to S. agalactiae strains but also to a Streptococcus pyogenes strain. Transfer was observed even if recipient cell already carries a related resident ICE or a genomic island flanked by attL and attR recombination sites but devoid of conjugation or recombination genes (CIs-Mobilizable Element [CIME]). The incoming ICE preferentially integrates into the 3′ end of the tRNALys gene (i.e., the attR site of the resident element), leading to a CIME-ICE structure. Transfer of the whole composite element CIME-ICE was obtained, showing that the CIME is mobilizable in cis by the ICE. Therefore, genomic islands carrying putative virulence genes but lacking the mobility gene can be mobilized by a related ICE after site-specific accretion. PMID:23275243

  19. Conjugative transfer and cis-mobilization of a genomic island by an integrative and conjugative element of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Puymège, Aurore; Bertin, Stéphane; Chuzeville, Sarah; Guédon, Gérard; Payot, Sophie

    2013-03-01

    Putative integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), i.e., genomic islands which could excise, self-transfer by conjugation, and integrate into the chromosome of the bacterial host strain, were previously identified by in silico analysis in the sequenced genomes of Streptococcus agalactiae (M. Brochet et al., J. Bacteriol. 190:6913-6917, 2008). We investigated here the mobility of the elements integrated into the 3' end of a tRNA(Lys) gene. Three of the four putative ICEs tested were found to excise but only one (ICE_515_tRNA(Lys)) was found to transfer by conjugation not only to S. agalactiae strains but also to a Streptococcus pyogenes strain. Transfer was observed even if recipient cell already carries a related resident ICE or a genomic island flanked by attL and attR recombination sites but devoid of conjugation or recombination genes (CIs-Mobilizable Element [CIME]). The incoming ICE preferentially integrates into the 3' end of the tRNA(Lys) gene (i.e., the attR site of the resident element), leading to a CIME-ICE structure. Transfer of the whole composite element CIME-ICE was obtained, showing that the CIME is mobilizable in cis by the ICE. Therefore, genomic islands carrying putative virulence genes but lacking the mobility gene can be mobilized by a related ICE after site-specific accretion.

  20. Distribution of virulence factors and association with emm polymorphism or isolation site among beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Cheng, Wei-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Distribution of virulence factors and association with emm polymorphism or isolation site among beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE), the dominant human pathogenic species among group G streptococci, is the causative agent of several invasive and non-invasive diseases worldwide. However, limited information is available about the distribution of virulence factors among SDSE isolates, or their association with emm types and the isolation sites. In this study, 246 beta-hemolytic group G SDSE isolates collected in central Taiwan between February 2007 and August 2011 were under investigation. Of these, 66 isolates were obtained from normally sterile sites and 180 from non-sterile sites. emm typing revealed 32 types, with the most prevalent one being stG10.0 (39.8%), followed by stG245.0 (15.4%), stG840.0 (12.2%), stG6.1 (7.7%), and stG652.0 (4.1%). The virulence genes lmb (encoding laminin-binding protein), gapC (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase), sagA (streptolysin S), and hylB (hyaluronidase) existed in all isolates. Also, 99.2% of the isolates possessed slo (streptolysin O) and scpA (C5a peptidase) genes. In addition, 72.8%, 14.6%, 9.4%, and 2.4% of the isolates possessed the genes ska (streptokinase), cbp (putative collagen-binding protein, SDEG_1781), fbp (putative fibronectin-binding protein, SDEG_0161), and sicG (streptococcal inhibitor of complement), respectively. The only superantigen gene detected was spegg (streptococcus pyrogenic exotoxin G(dys) ), which was possessed by 74.4% of the isolates; these isolates correlated with non-sterile sites. Positive correlations were observed between the following emm types and virulence genes: stG10.0 and stG840.0 with spegg, stG6.1 and stG652.0 with ska, and stG840.0 with cbp. On the other hand, negative correlations were observed between the following: stG245.0, stG6.1, and stG652.0 types with spegg, stG10.0 with ska

  1. Structural Differences between the Streptococcus agalactiae Housekeeping and Pilus-Specific Sortases: SrtA and SrtC1

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, B.; Krishnan, V.; Rajashankar, K.R.; I-Hsiu, H.; Xin, M.; Ton-That, H.; Narayana, S.V.

    2011-10-21

    The assembly of pili on the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria requires transpeptidase enzymes called sortases. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the PI-1 pilus island of strain 2603V/R encodes two pilus-specific sortases (SrtC1 and SrtC2) and three pilins (GBS80, GBS52 and GBS104). Although either pilus-specific sortase is sufficient for the polymerization of the major pilin, GBS80, incorporation of the minor pilins GBS52 and GBS104 into the pilus structure requires SrtC1 and SrtC2, respectively. The S. agalactiae housekeeping sortase, SrtA, whose gene is present at a different location and does not catalyze pilus polymerization, was shown to be involved in cell wall anchoring of pilus polymers. To understand the structural basis of sortases involved in such diverse functions, we determined the crystal structures of S. agalactiae SrtC1 and SrtA. Both enzymes are made of an eight-stranded beta-barrel core with variations in their active site architecture. SrtA exhibits a catalytic triad arrangement similar to that in Streptococcus pyogenes SrtA but different from that in Staphylococcus aureus SrtA. In contrast, the SrtC1 enzyme contains an N-terminal helical domain and a 'lid' in its putative active site, which is similar to that seen in Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus-specific sortases, although with subtle differences in positioning and composition. To understand the effect of such differences on substrate recognition, we have also determined the crystal structure of a SrtC1 mutant, in which the conserved DP(W/F/Y) motif was replaced with the sorting signal motif of GBS80, IPNTG. By comparing the structures of WT wild type SrtA and SrtC1 and the 'lid' mutant of SrtC1, we propose that structural elements within the active site and the lid may be important for defining the role of specific sortase in pili biogenesis.

  2. Molecular characterization and expression of Lck in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in response to Streptococcus agalactiae stimulus.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhen; Wang, Bei; Lu, Yishan; Zhu, Weiwei; Huang, Yu; Jian, JiChang; Wu, Zaohe

    2015-03-01

    Lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) plays a critical role in effective signal transductions that are fundamental to T cell differentiation, proliferation, and effector functions. In this paper, the Lck gene of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (designated as On-Lck), was cloned and its expression pattern under the stimulation of Streptococcus agalactiae was investigated. Sequence analysis showed important structural characteristics required for T cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction were detected in the deduced amino acid sequence of On-Lck, and the deduced genomic structure of On-Lck was similar to the known Lck. In healthy Nile tilapia, the On-Lck transcripts were mainly detected in the thymus, spleen, head kidney, and gill. When immunized with inactivated S. agalactiae, the On-Lck mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in the thymus, spleen, and head kidney. Moreover, there was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of On-Lck after immunization, and the expression reached the highest level at 48 h in the spleen and thymus and at 72 h in the head kidney, respectively. This is the first report on the expression of Lck induced by intracellular bacteria vaccination in teleosts. These findings indicated that On-Lck may play an important role in the immune response to intracellular bacteria in Nile tilapia.

  3. Molecular characterization and expression of CD2 in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in response to Streptococcus agalactiae stimulus.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhen; Wang, Bei; Tang, Jufen; Lu, Yishan; Jian, JiChang; Wu, Zaohe; Nie, Pin

    2016-03-01

    The cluster of differentiation 2 (CD2), functioning as a cell adhesion and costimulatory molecule, plays a crucial role in T-cell activation. In this paper, the CD2 gene of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (designated as On-CD2) was cloned and its expression pattern under the stimulation of Streptococcus agalactiae was investigated. Sequence analysis showed On-CD2 protein consists of two extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a long proline-rich cytoplasmic tail, which is a hallmark of CD2, and several important structural characteristics required for T-cell activation were detected in the deduced amino acid sequence of On-CD2. In healthy tilapia, the On-CD2 transcripts were mainly detected in the head kidney, spleen, blood and thymus. Moreover, there was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of On-CD2 after immunized by formalin-inactivated S. agalactiae and the expression reached the highest level at 12 h in the brain and head kidney, 48 h in the spleen, and 72 h in the thymus, respectively. This is the first report on the expression of CD2 induced by bacteria vaccination in teleosts. These findings indicated that On-CD2 may play an important role in the immune response to intracellular bacteria in Nile tilapia.

  4. Milk protein profiles in response to Streptococcus agalactiae subclinical mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Pongthaisong, Pongphol; Katawatin, Suporn; Thamrongyoswittayakul, Chaiyapas; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the milk protein profiles of normal milk and those of milk during the course of subclinical mastitis, caused by natural Streptococcus agalactiae infection. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry were used to assess protein profiles and to identify the proteins. The results showed that S. agalactiae subclinical mastitis altered the protein profiles of milk. Following Mascot database matching, 11 and 12 protein types were identified in the milk collected from healthy and S. agalactiae subclinical mastitic udders, respectively. The distinct presence of the antibacterial protein cathelicidin-1 was detected in infected milk samples, which in turn was highly correlated to the severity of subclinical mastitis as represented by the milk somatic cell count (r = 0.616), but not the bacterial count. The protein profile of milk reveals changes in the host response to S. agalactiae intramammary infection; cathelicidin-1 could therefore serve as a biomarker for the detection of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows.

  5. Development of a single-dose recombinant CAMP factor entrapping poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres-based vaccine against Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Yin, Jinhua; Barkema, Herman W; Chen, Liben; Shahid, Muhammad; Szenci, Otto; De Buck, Jeroen; Kastelic, John P; Han, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an important contagious bovine mastitis pathogen. Although it is well controlled and even eradicated in most Northern European and North American dairy herds, the prevalence of this pathogen remains very high in China. However, research on development of a vaccine against S. agalactiae mastitis is scarce. The aims of the present study were to: (1) develop a single-dose vaccine against S. agalactiae based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (MS) encapsulated CAMP factor, a conserved virulent protein encoded by S. agalactiae's cfb gene; and (2) evaluate its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a mouse model. The cfb gene was cloned and expressed in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain Trans1-T1. The CAMP factor was tested to determine a safe dose range and then encapsulated in MS of PLGA (50:50) to assess its release pattern in vitro and immune reaction in vivo. Furthermore, a mouse model and a histopathological assay were developed to evaluate bacterial burden and vaccine efficacy. In the low dosage range (<100μg), CAMP factor had no obvious toxicity in mice. The release pattern in vitro was characterized by an initial burst release (44%), followed by a sustained and slower release over 7wk. In mice immunized with either pure CAMP factor protein or PLGA-CAMP, increased antibody titers were detected in the first 2wk, whereas only PLGA-CAMP immunization induced a sustained increase of antibody titers. In mice vaccinated with PLGA-CAMP, mortality and bacteria counts were lower (compared to a control group) after S. agalactiae challenge. Additionally, no pathological lesions were detected in the vaccinated group. Therefore, PLGA-CAMP conferred protective efficacy against S. agalactiae in our mouse model, indicating its potential as a vaccine against S. agalactiae mastitis. Furthermore, the slow-release kinetics of PLGA MS warranted optimism for development of a single-dose vaccine.

  6. A streptococcal NRAMP homologue is crucial for the survival of Streptococcus agalactiae under low pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Shabayek, Sarah; Bauer, Richard; Mauerer, Stefanie; Mizaikoff, Boris; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a commensal bacterium of the human gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts as well as a leading cause of neonatal sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis. Maternal vaginal carriage is the main source for GBS transmission and thus the most important risk factor for neonatal disease. Several studies in eukaryotes identified a group of proteins natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) that function as divalent cation transporters for Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) and confer on macrophages the ability to control replication of bacterial pathogens. Genome sequencing predicted potential NRAMP homologues in several prokaryotes. Here we describe for the first time, a pH-regulated NRAMP Mn(2+) /Fe(2+) transporter in GBS, designated MntH, which confers resistance to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is crucial for bacterial growth and survival under low pH conditions. Our investigation implicates MntH as an important colonization determinant for GBS in the maternal vagina as it helps bacteria to adapt to the harsh acidic environment, facilitates bacterial adherence, contributes to the coexistence with the vaginal microbiota and plays a role in GBS intracellular survival inside macrophages.

  7. A novel C5a-derived immunobiotic peptide reduces Streptococcus agalactiae colonization through targeted bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Courtney K; Patras, Kathryn A; Zlamal, Jaime E; Thoman, Marilyn L; Morgan, Edward L; Sanderson, Sam D; Doran, Kelly S

    2013-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes the cervicovaginal tract in approximately 25% of healthy women. Although colonization is asymptomatic, GBS can be vertically transmitted to newborns peripartum, causing severe disease such as pneumonia and meningitis. Current prophylaxis, consisting of late gestation screening and intrapartum antibiotics, has failed to completely prevent transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in the United States. Lack of an effective vaccine and emerging antibiotic resistance necessitate exploring novel therapeutic strategies. We have employed a host-directed immunomodulatory therapy using a novel peptide, known as EP67, derived from the C-terminal region of human complement component C5a. Previously, we have demonstrated in vivo that EP67 engagement of the C5a receptor (CD88) effectively limits staphylococcal infection by promoting cytokine release and neutrophil infiltration. Here, using our established mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, we observed that EP67 treatment results in rapid clearance of GBS from the murine vagina. However, this was not dependent on functional neutrophil recruitment or CD88 signaling, as EP67 treatment reduced the vaginal bacterial load in mice lacking CD88 or the major neutrophil receptor CXCr2. Interestingly, we found that EP67 inhibits GBS growth in vitro and in vivo and that antibacterial activity was specific to Streptococcus species. Our work establishes that EP67-mediated clearance of GBS is likely due to direct bacterial killing rather than to enhanced immune stimulation. We conclude that EP67 may have potential as a therapeutic to control GBS vaginal colonization.

  8. Molecular and functional characterization of peptidoglycan-recognition protein SC2 (PGRP-SC2) from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) involved in the immune response to Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhen; Chen, Shannan; Hou, Jing; Huo, Huijun; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ruan, Baiye; Laghari, Zubair Ahmed; Li, Li; Lu, Yishan; Nie, Pin

    2016-07-01

    PGRP-SC2, the member of PGRP family, plays an important role in regulation of innate immune response. In this paper, a PGRP-SC2 gene of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (designated as On-PGRP-SC2) was cloned and its expression pattern under the infection of Streptococcus agalactiae was investigated. Sequence analysis showed main structural features required for amidase activity were detected in the deduced amino acid sequence of On-PGRP-SC2. In healthy tilapia, the On-PGRP-SC2 transcripts could be detected in all the examined tissues, with the most abundant expression in the muscle. When infected with S. agalactiae, there was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of On-PGRP-SC2 in the spleen, head kidney and brain. The assays for the amidase activity suggested that recombinant On-PGRP-SC2 protein had a Zn(2+)-dependent PGN-degrading activity. Moreover, our works showed that recombinant On-PGRP-SC2 protein could significantly reduce bacterial load in target organs attacked by S. agalactiae. These findings indicated that On-PGRP-SC2 may play important roles in the immune response to S. agalactiae in Nile tilapia.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae proteins: the family II inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Rantanen, Mika K.; Lehtiö, Lari; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Rubens, Craig E.; Goldman, Adrian

    2006-09-01

    Two S. agalactiae proteins, the inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase, were crystallized and diffraction data were collected and processed from these crystals. The data from the two protein crystals extended to 2.80 and 2.65 Å, respectively. Streptococcus agalactiae, which infects human neonates and causes sepsis and meningitis, has recently been shown to possess a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein phosphorylation signalling cascade. Through their target proteins, the S. agalactiae Ser/Thr kinase and Ser/Thr phosphatase together control the growth as well as the morphology and virulence of this organism. One of the targets is the S. agalactiae family II inorganic pyrophosphatase. The inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase have therefore been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected from their crystals. The data were processed using XDS. The inorganic pyrosphosphatase crystals diffracted to 2.80 Å and the Ser/Thr phosphatase crystals to 2.65 Å. Initial structure-solution experiments indicate that structure solution will be successful in both cases. Solving the structure of the proteins involved in this cascade is the first step towards understanding this phenomenon in atomic detail.

  10. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus agalactiae NEM316

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Revathi; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an essential enzyme involved in glycolysis. Despite lacking the secretory signal sequence, this cytosolic enzyme has been found localized at the surface of several bacteria and fungi. As a surface protein, GAPDH exhibits various adhesive functions, thereby facilitating colonization and invasion of host tissues. Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as group B streptococcus (GBS), binds onto the host using its surface adhesins and causes sepsis and pneumonia in neonates. GAPDH is one of the surface adhesins of GBS binding to human plasminogen and is a virulent factor associated with host colonization. Although the surface-associated GAPDH has been shown to bind to a variety of host extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in various bacteria, the molecular mechanism underlying their interaction is not fully understood. To investigate this, structural studies on GAPDH of S. agalactiae were initiated. The gapC gene of S. agalactiae NEM316 encoding GAPDH protein was cloned into pET-28a vector, overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The GAPDH crystals obtained in two different crystallization conditions diffracted to 2.8 and 2.6 Å resolution, belonging to two different space groups P21 and P212121, respectively. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and structure refinement is now in progress. PMID:25005093

  11. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of IgD in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in Response to Streptococcus agalactiae Stimulus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Wang, Pei; Wu, Zao-He; Lu, Yi-Shan; Wang, Zhong-Liang; Jian, Ji-Chang

    2016-03-08

    IgD is considered to be a recently-evolved Ig and a puzzling molecule, being previously found in all vertebrate taxa, except for birds. Although IgD likely plays an important role in vertebrate immune responses, the function of IgD in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is virtually unknown. In the present study, a membrane form of IgD (mIgD) heavy chains were cloned from the GIFT strain of Nile tilapia (designated On-mIgD). The On-mIgD heavy chain's cDNA is composed of 3347 bp with a 31 bp of 5'-UTR, 3015 bp open reading frame (ORF) and 301 bp 3'-UTR, encoding a polypeptide of 1004 amino acids (GenBank accession no: KF530821). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that On-mIgD heavy chains showed the highest similarity to Siniperca chuatsi. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that On-mIgD expression occurred predominately in head kidney, thymus, spleen, and kidney. After Streptococcus agalactiae infection, transcripts of On-mIgD increased and reached its peak at 48 h in the head kidney and thymus, and 72 h in the spleen, respectively. Taken together, these results collectively indicated that IgD could possibly have a key role to play in the immune response when bacterial infections in Nile tilapia.

  12. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of IgD in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in Response to Streptococcus agalactiae Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei; Wang, Pei; Wu, Zao-He; Lu, Yi-Shan; Wang, Zhong-Liang; Jian, Ji-Chang

    2016-01-01

    IgD is considered to be a recently-evolved Ig and a puzzling molecule, being previously found in all vertebrate taxa, except for birds. Although IgD likely plays an important role in vertebrate immune responses, the function of IgD in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is virtually unknown. In the present study, a membrane form of IgD (mIgD) heavy chains were cloned from the GIFT strain of Nile tilapia (designated On-mIgD). The On-mIgD heavy chain’s cDNA is composed of 3347 bp with a 31 bp of 5′-UTR, 3015 bp open reading frame (ORF) and 301 bp 3′-UTR, encoding a polypeptide of 1004 amino acids (GenBank accession no: KF530821). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that On-mIgD heavy chains showed the highest similarity to Siniperca chuatsi. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that On-mIgD expression occurred predominately in head kidney, thymus, spleen, and kidney. After Streptococcus agalactiae infection, transcripts of On-mIgD increased and reached its peak at 48 h in the head kidney and thymus, and 72 h in the spleen, respectively. Taken together, these results collectively indicated that IgD could possibly have a key role to play in the immune response when bacterial infections in Nile tilapia. PMID:27005611

  13. Transcriptomic profiling analysis of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) following Streptococcus agalactiae challenge.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiajie; Fu, Qiang; Ao, Qiuwei; Tan, Yun; Luo, Yongju; Jiang, Hesheng; Li, Chao; Gan, Xi

    2017-03-01

    Innate immune system is the primary defense mechanism against pathogen infection in teleost, which are living in pathogen-rich aquatic environment. It has been long hypothesized that the disease resistance in teleost are strongly correlated to the activities of innate immune genes. Tilapia is an important economical fish around the world, especially in China, where the production accounts for nearly half of the global production. Recently, S. agalactiae has become one of the most serious bacterial diseases in southern China, resulted in high cumulative mortality and economic loss to tilapia industry. Therefore, we sought here to characterize the expression profiles of tilapia against S. agalactiae infection at whole transcriptome level by RNA-seq technology. A total of 2822 genes were revealed significantly expressed in tilapia spleen with a general trend of induction. Notably, most of the genes were rapidly the most induced at the early timepoint. The significantly changed genes highlighted the function of pathogen attachment and recognition, antioxidant/apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and immune activation. Collectively, the induced expression patterns suggested the strong ability of tilapia to rapidly recognize the invasive bacteria, and activation of downstream immune signaling pathways to clear the bacteria and prevent the tissue damage and bacteria triggered cell apoptosis. Our results heighted important roles of novel candidate genes which were often missed in previous tilapia studies. Further studies are needed to characterize the molecular relationships between key immune genes and disease resistance, and to identify the candidate genes for molecular-assistant selection of disease-resistant broodstock and evaluation of disease prevention and treatment measures.

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis in captive juvenile Crocodylus porosus caused by Streptococcus agalactiae: an outbreak and review of the animal and human literature.

    PubMed

    Bishop, E J; Shilton, C; Benedict, S; Kong, F; Gilbert, G L; Gal, D; Godoy, D; Spratt, B G; Currie, B J

    2007-11-01

    We observed an outbreak of necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus agalactiae infection in a group of juvenile saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus). We undertook screening of crocodiles and the environment to clarify the source of the outbreak and evaluated the isolates cultured from post-mortem specimens with molecular methods to assess clonality and the presence of known group B streptococcal virulence determinants. The isolates were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. They were a typical serotype Ia strain with the Calpha-like protein gene, epsilon (or alp1), the mobile genetic elements IS381 ISSag1 and ISSag2, and belonged to multi-locus sequence type (ST) 23. All of these characteristics suggest they were probably of human origin. We review the medical and veterinary literature relating to S. agalactiae necrotizing fasciitis, epidemiology and virulence determinants.

  15. Cross-Resistance to Lincosamides, Streptogramins A, and Pleuromutilins Due to the lsa(C) Gene in Streptococcus agalactiae UCN70▿

    PubMed Central

    Malbruny, Brigitte; Werno, Anja M.; Murdoch, David R.; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae UCN70, isolated from a vaginal swab obtained in New Zealand, is resistant to lincosamides and streptogramins A (LSA phenotype) and also to tiamulin (a pleuromutilin). By whole-genome sequencing, we identified a 5,224-bp chromosomal extra-element that comprised a 1,479-bp open reading frame coding for an ABC protein (492 amino acids) 45% identical to Lsa(A), a protein related to intrinsic LSA resistance in Enterococcus faecalis. Expression of this novel gene, named lsa(C), in S. agalactiae BM132 after cloning led to an increase in MICs of lincomycin (0.06 to 4 μg/ml), clindamycin (0.03 to 2 μg/ml), dalfopristin (2 to >32 μg/ml), and tiamulin (0.12 to 32 μg/ml), whereas no change in MICs of erythromycin (0.06 μg/ml), azithromycin (0.03 μg/ml), spiramycin (0.25 μg/ml), telithromycin (0.03 μg/ml), and quinupristin (8 μg/ml) was observed. The phenotype was renamed the LSAP phenotype on the basis of cross-resistance to lincosamides, streptogramins A, and pleuromutilins. This gene was also identified in similar genetic environments in 17 other S. agalactiae clinical isolates from New Zealand exhibiting the same LSAP phenotype, whereas it was absent in susceptible S. agalactiae strains. Interestingly, this extra-element was bracketed by a 7-bp duplication of a target site (ATTAGAA), suggesting that this structure was likely a mobile genetic element. In conclusion, we identified a novel gene, lsa(C), responsible for the acquired LSAP resistance phenotype in S. agalactiae. Dissection of the biochemical basis of resistance, as well as demonstration of in vitro mobilization of lsa(C), remains to be performed. PMID:21245447

  16. Construction of a Streptococcus agalactiae phoB mutant and evaluation of its potential as an attenuated modified live vaccine in golden pompano, Trachinotus ovatus.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaohui; Wang, Bei; Peng, Yinhui; Li, Yuan; Lu, Yishan; Huang, Yucong; Jian, Jichang; Wu, Zaohe

    2016-11-21

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a Gram-positive pathogen that can survive inside professional phagocytes and nonphagocytic cells to cause septicemia and meningoencephalitis in freshwater and marine fish. However, vaccines based on extracellular products (ECP) and formalin-killed whole S. agalactiae cells, as well as subunit vaccine are unable to protect fish from infection by variant serotypes S. agalactiae. The search for live attenuated vaccine with highly conserved and virulent-related genes is essential for producing a vaccine to help understand and control streptococcosis In this study, the phoB gene was cloned from pathogenic S. agalactiae TOS01 strain and the mutant strain SAΔphoB was constructed via allelic exchange mutagenesis. The results showed that the deduced amino acid of S. agalactiae TOS01 shares high similarities with other Streptococcus spp. and has high conserved response regulator receiver domain (REC) and DNA-binding effector domain of two-component system response regulators (Trans_reg_C). Cell adherence and invasion assays, challenge experiments and histopathological changes post-vaccination were performed and observed, the results showed that the mutant strain SAΔphoB has a lower adherence and invasion rate and less virulent than the wild type strain in golden pompano, and it doesn't induce clinical symptoms and obvious pathological changes in golden pompano, thereby indicating that the deletion of phoB affects the virulence and infectious capacity of S. agalactiae. Golden pompano vaccinated via intraperitoneal injection SAΔphoB had the relative percent survival value of 93.1% after challenge with TOS01, demonstrating its high potential as an effective attenuated live vaccine candidate. Real-time PCR assays showed that the SAΔphoB was able to enhance the expression of immune-related genes, including MHC-I, MyD88, IL-22 and IL-10 after vaccination, indicating that the SAΔphoB is able to induce humoral and cell-mediated immune response in

  17. A commercial rapid optical immunoassay detects Streptococcus agalactiae from aquatic cultures and clinical specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BioStar STREPT B Optical ImmunoAssay (OIA) (BioStar® OIA® Strep B Assay Kit; Biostar Incorporation; Louisville, CO, USA) was used to identify 32 known group B streptococcus (GBS) isolates of fish, dolphin, bovine, and human origin. Thirteen non-GBS isolates from fish and other animals were test...

  18. RovS and Its Associated Signaling Peptide Form a Cell-To-Cell Communication System Required for Streptococcus agalactiae Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaudu, Philippe; Fleuchot, Betty; Besset, Colette; Rosinski-Chupin, Isabelle; Guillot, Alain; Monnet, Véronique; Gardan, Rozenn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Bacteria can communicate with each other to coordinate their biological functions at the population level. In a previous study, we described a cell-to-cell communication system in streptococci that involves a transcriptional regulator belonging to the Rgg family and short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs) that act as signaling molecules. Streptococcus agalactiae, an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium responsible for fatal infections in neonates and immunocompromised adults, has one copy of the shp/rgg locus. The SHP-associated Rgg is called RovS in S. agalactiae. In this study, we found that the SHP/RovS cell-to-cell communication system is active in the strain NEM316 of S. agalactiae, and we identified different partners that are involved in this system, such as the Eep peptidase, the PptAB, and the OppA1-F oligopeptide transporters. We also identified a new target gene controlled by this system and reexamined the regulation of a previously proposed target gene, fbsA, in the context of the SHP-associated RovS system. Furthermore, our results are the first to indicate the SHP/RovS system specificity to host liver and spleen using a murine model, which demonstrates its implication in streptococci virulence. Finally, we observed that SHP/RovS regulation influences S. agalactiae’s ability to adhere to and invade HepG2 hepatic cells. Hence, the SHP/RovS cell-to-cell communication system appears to be an essential mechanism that regulates pathogenicity in S. agalactiae and represents an attractive target for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Importance  Rgg regulators and their cognate pheromones, called small hydrophobic peptides (SHPs), are present in nearly all streptococcal species. The general pathways of the cell-to-cell communication system in which Rgg and SHP take part are well understood. However, many other players remain unidentified, and the direct targets of the system, as well as its link to virulence, remain unclear. Here, we

  19. Characterization of Tn5801.Sag, a variant of Staphylococcus aureus Tn916 family transposon Tn5801 that is widespread in clinical isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Mingoia, Marina; Morici, Eleonora; Tili, Emily; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Montanari, Maria Pia; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2013-09-01

    Tn5801, originally detected in Staphylococcus aureus Mu50, is a Tn916 family element in which a unique int gene (int5801) replaces the int and xis genes in Tn916 (int916 and xis916). Among 62 tet(M)-positive tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae isolates, 43 harbored Tn916, whereas 19 harbored a Tn5801-like element (Tn5801.Sag, ∼20.6 kb). Tn5801.Sag was characterized (PCR mapping, partial sequencing, and chromosomal integration) and compared to other Tn5801-like elements. Similar to Tn5801 from S. aureus Mu50, tested in parallel, Tn5801.Sag was unable to undergo circularization and conjugal transfer.

  20. The use of polyethylene intramammary device in protection of the lactating bovine udder against experimental infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, B W; Barnum, D A

    1982-01-01

    The susceptibility of lactating bovine udder quarters fitted with a polyethylene intramammary device to infection was investigated. Following experimental challenge with Streptococcus agalactiae or Staphylococcus aureus, the incidence of infection was significantly (p less than 0.05) lower in intramammary device-fitted quarters compared to control quarters. In general, total foremilk and strippings milk somatic cell counts for intramammary device-fitted and control quarters were not significantly (p less than 0.05) different. Differential foremilk and strippings milk somatic cell counts were significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in samples from intramammary device-fitted quarters compared to control quarters. PMID:7127192

  1. Inductors and regulatory properties of the genomic island-associated fru2 metabolic operon of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Patron, Kévin; Gilot, Philippe; Rong, Vanessa; Hiron, Aurélia; Mereghetti, Laurent; Camiade, Emilie

    2017-02-01

    The fru2 metabolic operon of Streptococcus agalactiae encodes the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) enzyme II complex Fru2 (EIIB(Fru2) , EIIA(Fru2) , and EIIC(Fru2) ); Fru2 R, a transcriptional activator with PTS regulatory domains (PRDs); a d-allulose-6-phosphate 3-epimerase; a transaldolase; and a transketolase. We showed that the transcription of fru2 is induced during the stationary phase of growth in complex media and during incubation in human cerebrospinal or amniotic fluids. d-allose and d-ribose are environmental signals governing this induction. PTS(Fru2) is involved in the activation of the fru2 promoter, and the histidine-67 of EIIA(Fru2) and the cysteine-9 of EIIB(Fru2) are important for this function. The activation of fru2 is also controlled by Fru2 R. The histidine-243 in the PRD1 domain, the histidine-323 in the PRD2 domain, the cysteine-400 in the EIIB-like domain, and the histidine-549 in the EIIA-like domain are important for the function of Fru2 R. Fru2 R binds to a DNA region containing palindromic sequences upstream of the identified transcriptional start site. EIIB(Fru2) interacts physically with the C-terminal part of Fru2 R (expressing the EIIB-like and EIIA-like motifs) and with EIIA(Fru2) . We propose a model of regulation of fru2 depending on the presence of an activatory carbohydrate in the growth medium.

  2. Effect of Sophora flavescens on non-specific immune response of tilapia (GIFT Oreochromis niloticus) and disease resistance against Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-rui; Gong, Qing-fang; Fang, Hong; Liang, Wan-wen; Chen, Ming; He, Rui-jie

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the effect of a diet supplemented with the Chinese traditional herbal medicine Sophora flavescens on the immunity and disease resistance of an Oreochromis niloticus GIFT strain. Experimental diets containing 0.025%, 0.050%, 0.100%, 0.200%, and 0.400% S. flavescens, as well as a control group without S. flavescens were used. We tested the non-specific humoral immune responses (lysozyme, antiprotease, and complement) and cellular immune responses (reactive oxygen species and nitrogen species production and myeloperoxidase), as well as disease resistance against Streptococcus agalactiae. S. flavescens supplementation at all dose significantly enhanced serum lysozyme, antiprotease, and natural hemolytic complement activity. Similarly, all S. flavescens doses enhanced cellular myeloperoxidase activity. The increased production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen intermediates by peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in most of the treatment groups throughout the test period. The fish fed 0.100% S. flavescens had a percent mortality of 21.1% and a relative percent survival of 73.3% compared with the group fed the basal diet during the S. agalactiae challenge. The results suggest that S. flavescens can be recommended as a tilapia feed supplement to enhance fish immunity and disease resistance against S. agalactiae.

  3. Safety and immunogenicity of an oral DNA vaccine encoding Sip of Streptococcus agalactiae from Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus delivered by live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Huang, L Y; Wang, K Y; Xiao, D; Chen, D F; Geng, Y; Wang, J; He, Y; Wang, E L; Huang, J L; Xiao, G Y

    2014-05-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 was used as a carrier for a reconstructed DNA vaccine against Streptococcus agalactiae. A 1.02 kb DNA fragment, encoding for a portion of the surface immunogenic protein (Sip) of S. agalactiae was inserted into pVAX1. The recombinant plasmid pVAX1-sip was transfected in EPC cells to detect the transient expression by an indirect immunofluorescence assay, together with Western blot analysis. The pVAX1-sip was transformed by electroporation into SL7207. The stability of pVAX1-sip into Salmonella was over 90% after 50 generations with antibiotic selection in vitro while remained stable over 80% during 35 generations under antibiotic-free conditions. The LD50 of SL/pVAX1-sip was 1.7 × 10(11) CFU/fish by intragastric administration which indicated a quite low virulence. Tilapias were inoculated orally at 10(8) CFU/fish, the recombinant bacteria were found present in intestinal tract, spleens and livers and eventually eliminated from the tissues 4 weeks after immunization. Fish immunized at 10(7), 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/fish with different immunization times caused various levels of serum antibody and an effective protection against lethal challenge with the wild-type strain S. agalactiae. Integration studies showed that the pVAX1-sip did not integrate with tilapia chromosomes. The DNA vaccine SL/pVAX1-sip was proved to be safe and effective in protecting tilapias against S. agalactiae infection.

  4. Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Streptococcus equi evolution: the role of CRISPRs.

    PubMed

    Waller, Andrew S; Robinson, Carl

    2013-12-01

    The host-restricted bacterium Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of equine strangles, the most frequently diagnosed infectious disease of horses worldwide. The disease is characterized by abscessation of the lymph nodes of the head and neck, leading to significant welfare and economic cost. S. equi is believed to have evolved from an ancestral strain of Streptococcus zooepidemicus, an opportunistic pathogen of horses and other animals. Comparison of the genome of S. equi strain 4047 with those of S. zooepidemicus identified examples of gene loss due to mutation and deletion, and gene gain through the acquisition of mobile genetic elements that have probably shaped the pathogenic specialization of S. equi. In particular, deletion of the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) locus in the ancestor of S. equi may have predisposed the bacterium to acquire and incorporate new genetic material into its genome. These include four prophages and a novel integrative conjugative element. The virulence cargo carried by these mobile genetic elements is believed to have shaped the ability of S. equi to cause strangles. Further sequencing of S. zooepidemicus has highlighted the diversity of this opportunistic pathogen. Again, CRISPRs are postulated to influence evolution, balancing the need for gene gain over genome stability. Analysis of spacer sequences suggest that these pathogens may be susceptible to a limited range of phages and provide further evidence of cross-species exchange of genetic material among Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

  5. Recurrent Streptococcus agalactiae Toxic Shock Syndrome Triggered by a Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Masataka; Takazono, Takahiro; Tashiro, Masato; Saijo, Tomomi; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Nakamura, Shigeki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Sawai, Toyomitsu; Nishino, Tomoya; Izumikawa, Koichi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by group B streptococcus (GBS) is a rare, but lethal disease. We experienced a 45-year-old woman with pustular psoriasis who developed toxic shock-like syndrome during infliximab treatment. Surprisingly, similar episodes recurred three times in one year with restarting of infliximab treatments. In the third episode, GBS were detected in blood, urine, and vaginal secretion cultures. These episodes of shock syndrome were possibly due to GBS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent streptococcal toxic shock syndrome possibly caused by GBS which was induced by anti-TNF-α inhibitor therapy. The restarting of biological agents in patients with a history of toxic shock syndrome should therefore be avoided as much as possible. PMID:27803422

  6. Phylogenetic relationships among Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from piscine, dolphin, bovine and human sources: a dolphin and piscine lineage associated with a fish epidemic in Kuwait is also associated with human...

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Group B Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) causes of infections in multiple animals. This study examined the genetic relatedness of piscine, dolphin, and human GBS isolates and bovine GBS reference strains from different geographical regions using serological and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) techni...

  7. 21 CFR 526.1810 - Pirlimycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dairy cattle associated with Staphylococcus species such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species such as Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis....

  8. 21 CFR 526.1810 - Pirlimycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dairy cattle associated with Staphylococcus species such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species such as Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis....

  9. 21 CFR 526.1810 - Pirlimycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dairy cattle associated with Staphylococcus species such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species such as Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis....

  10. 21 CFR 526.1810 - Pirlimycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... associated with Staphylococcus species such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species such as Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis. (3) Limitations. Milk taken...

  11. 21 CFR 526.1810 - Pirlimycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dairy cattle associated with Staphylococcus species such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species such as Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis....

  12. Molecular characterization and expression of CD2BP2 in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in response to Streptococcus agalactiae stimulus.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhen; Wang, Bei; Lu, Yishan; Cai, Shuanghu; Cai, Jia; Jian, JiChang; Wu, Zaohe

    2014-09-10

    CD2BP2 (CD2 cytoplasmic tail binding protein 2), one of several proteins interacting with the cytoplasmic tail of CD2, plays a crucial role in CD2-triggered T cell activation and nuclear splicing. The studies on CD2BP2 have tended to be confined to a few mammals, and little information is available to date regarding fish CD2BP2. In this paper, a CD2BP2 gene (On-CD2BP2) was cloned from Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. Sequence analysis showed that the full length of On-CD2BP2 cDNA was 1429 bp, containing a 5'untranslated region (UTR) of 111 bp, a 3'-UTR of 193 bp and an open reading frame of 1125 bp which is encoding 374 amino acids. Two important structural features, a GYF domain and a consensus motif GPFXXXXMXXWXXXGYF were detected in the deduced amino acid sequence of On-CD2BP2, and the deduced genomic structure of On-CD2BP2 was similar to the known CD2BP2. The mRNA expression of On-CD2BP2 in various tissues of Nile tilapia was analyzed by fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR. In healthy Nile tilapia, the On-CD2BP2 transcripts were mainly detected in the head kidney and spleen. While vaccinated with inactivated Streptococcus agalactiae, the On-CD2BP2 mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in the head kidney, spleen and brain 48 h post immunization. Moreover, there was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of On-CD2BP2 after immunization and the expression reached the highest level at 24h in the brain and 48 h in the head kidney and spleen. This is the first report of proving the presence of a CD2BP2 ortholog in fish, and investigating its tissue distribution and expression profile in response to bacterial stimulus. These findings indicated that On-CD2BP2 may play an important role in the immune response to bacteria in Nile tilapia.

  13. Group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in south-east Brazil: genetic diversity, resistance profile and the first report of human and equine isolates belonging to the same multilocus sequence typing lineage.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ligia Guedes; Genteluci, Gabrielle Limeira; Corrêa de Mattos, Marcos; Glatthardt, Thaís; Sá Figueiredo, Agnes Marie; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) isolates are the most common group C streptococci in humans and reports of invasive infections associated with SDSE have been increasing. Molecular epidemiology studies are an important strategy to trace the emergence and spread of possible well-fit bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. In this work, we analysed the antimicrobial and clonal profiles of 115 SDSE infection and colonization isolates of human and equine origin. PFGE revealed the spread of two main clusters: clone A (57.4%) and clone A (26.1%). Remarkably, two isolates from clone B obtained from human colonization cases displayed identical PFGE patterns to those of three equine infection isolates. In addition, multilocus sequence typing allocated these isolates to ST129 (CC31). All of the SDSE isolates were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin, levofloxacin and chloramphenicol. Tetracycline and erythromycin resistance rates were 65.2 and 13.9% respectively. Nevertheless, none of the isolates displaying sporadic PFGE patterns showed erythromycin resistance. The majority of erythromycin-resistant isolates from clone A had inducible resistance to macrolides, lincosamines and streptogramins B (iMLSB phenotype), which is associated with the presence of the ermA gene, whereas the resistant isolates from clone B showed the M phenotype, associated with the mefA gene. In conclusion, the data indicated that the analysed collection of SDSE isolates displayed a clonal structure and that the isolates found in human colonization cases could also be involved in equine infections.

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Combretum molle (Combretaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from crossbred dairy cows with clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Regassa, Fekadu; Araya, Mengistu

    2012-08-01

    Following the rapidly expanding dairy enterprise, mastitis has remained the most economically damaging disease. The objective of this study was mainly to investigate the in vitro antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of Combretum molle (R.Br.Ex.G.Don) Engl & Diels (Combretaceae) against antibiotic-resistant and susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from clinical cases of bovine mastitis using agar disc diffusion method. The leaf and bark extracts showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus at concentrations of 3 mg/ml while the stem and seed extract did not show any bioactivity. Although both leaf and bark extracts were handled in the same manner, the antibacterial activity of the bark extract against the bacterial strains had declined gradually to a lower level as time advanced after extraction. The leaf extract had sustained bioactivity for longer duration. The susceptibility of the bacteria to the leaf extract is not obviously different between S. aureus and S. agalactiae. Also, there was no difference in susceptibility to the leaf extract between the antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-sensitive bacteria. Further phytochemical and in vivo efficacy and safety studies are required to evaluate the therapeutic value of the plant against bovine mastitis.

  15. 21 CFR 526.820 - Erythromycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. Treatment of mastitis due to Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis in lactating or dry cows. (3) Limitations. Milk taken...

  16. 21 CFR 526.820 - Erythromycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. Treatment of mastitis due to Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis in lactating or dry cows. (3) Limitations. Milk taken...

  17. Camel Streptococcus agalactiae populations are associated with specific disease complexes and acquired the tetracycline resistance gene tetM via a Tn916-like element

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Camels are the most valuable livestock species in the Horn of Africa and play a pivotal role in the nutritional sustainability for millions of people. Their health status is therefore of utmost importance for the people living in this region. Streptococcus agalactiae, a Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an important camel pathogen. Here we present the first epidemiological study based on genetic and phenotypic data from African camel derived GBS. Ninety-two GBS were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), capsular polysaccharide typing and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We analysed the GBS using Bayesian linkage, phylogenetic and minimum spanning tree analyses and compared them with human GBS from East Africa in order to investigate the level of genetic exchange between GBS populations in the region. Camel GBS sequence types (STs) were distinct from other STs reported so far. We mapped specific STs and capsular types to major disease complexes caused by GBS. Widespread resistance (34%) to tetracycline was associated with acquisition of the tetM gene that is carried on a Tn916-like element, and observed primarily among GBS isolated from mastitis. The presence of tetM within different MLST clades suggests acquisition on multiple occasions. Wound infections and mastitis in camels associated with GBS are widespread and should ideally be treated with antimicrobials other than tetracycline in East Africa. PMID:24083845

  18. Serotype IV Streptococcus agalactiae ST-452 has arisen from large genomic recombination events between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17 lineages

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rinaudo, C. Daniela; Donati, Claudio; Barucco, Mara; Torricelli, Giulia; Edwards, Morven S.; Baker, Carol J.; Margarit, Imma; Rosini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) causes life-threatening infections in newborns and adults with chronic medical conditions. Serotype IV strains are emerging both among carriers and as cause of invasive disease and recent studies revealed two main Sequence Types (STs), ST-452 and ST-459 assigned to Clonal Complexes CC23 and CC1, respectively. Whole genome sequencing of 70 type IV GBS and subsequent phylogenetic analysis elucidated the localization of type IV isolates in a SNP-based phylogenetic tree and suggested that ST-452 could have originated through genetic recombination. SNPs density analysis of the core genome confirmed that the founder strain of this lineage originated from a single large horizontal gene transfer event between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17. Indeed, ST-452 genomes are composed by two parts that are nearly identical to corresponding regions in ST-24 (CC23) and ST-291 (CC17). Chromosome mapping of the major GBS virulence factors showed that ST-452 strains have an intermediate yet unique profile among CC23 and CC17 strains. We described unreported large recombination events, involving the cps IV operon and resulting in the expansion of serotype IV to CC23. This work sheds further light on the evolution of GBS providing new insights on the recent emergence of serotype IV. PMID:27411639

  19. Serotype IV Streptococcus agalactiae ST-452 has arisen from large genomic recombination events between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17 lineages.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rinaudo, C Daniela; Donati, Claudio; Barucco, Mara; Torricelli, Giulia; Edwards, Morven S; Baker, Carol J; Margarit, Imma; Rosini, Roberto

    2016-07-14

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) causes life-threatening infections in newborns and adults with chronic medical conditions. Serotype IV strains are emerging both among carriers and as cause of invasive disease and recent studies revealed two main Sequence Types (STs), ST-452 and ST-459 assigned to Clonal Complexes CC23 and CC1, respectively. Whole genome sequencing of 70 type IV GBS and subsequent phylogenetic analysis elucidated the localization of type IV isolates in a SNP-based phylogenetic tree and suggested that ST-452 could have originated through genetic recombination. SNPs density analysis of the core genome confirmed that the founder strain of this lineage originated from a single large horizontal gene transfer event between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17. Indeed, ST-452 genomes are composed by two parts that are nearly identical to corresponding regions in ST-24 (CC23) and ST-291 (CC17). Chromosome mapping of the major GBS virulence factors showed that ST-452 strains have an intermediate yet unique profile among CC23 and CC17 strains. We described unreported large recombination events, involving the cps IV operon and resulting in the expansion of serotype IV to CC23. This work sheds further light on the evolution of GBS providing new insights on the recent emergence of serotype IV.

  20. Comprehensive identification and profiling of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) microRNAs response to Streptococcus agalactiae infection through high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Gan, Zhen; Cai, Shuanghu; Wang, Zhongliang; Yu, Dapeng; Lin, Ziwei; Lu, Yishan; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs are a kind of small non-coding RNAs that participate in various biological processes. Deregulated microRNA expression is associated with several types of diseases. Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is an important commercial fish species in China. To identify miRNAs and investigate immune-related miRNAs of O. niloticus, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to identify and analyze miRNAs from tilapia infected with Streptococcus agalactiae at a timescale of 72 h divided into six different time points. The results showed that a total of 3009 tilapia miRNAs were identified, including in 1121 miRNAs which have homologues in the currently available databases and 1878 novel miRNAs. The expression levels of 218 tilapia miRNAs were significantly altered at 6 h-72 h post-bacterial infection (pi), and these miRNAs were therefore classified as differentially expressed tilapia miRNAs. For the 1121 differentially expressed tilapia miRNAs target 41961 genes. GO and KEGG enrichment analysis revealed that some target genes of tilapia miRNAs were grouped mainly into the categories of apoptotic process, signal pathway, and immune response. This is the first report of comprehensive identification of O. niloticus miRNAs being differentially regulated in spleen in normal conditions relating to S. agalactiae infection. This work provides an opportunity for further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of miRNA regulation in O. niloticus host-pathogen interactions.

  1. Effects of some dietary crude plant extracts on the growth and gonadal maturity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and their resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae infection.

    PubMed

    Kareem, Zana H; Abdelhadi, Yasser M; Christianus, Annie; Karim, Murni; Romano, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    A 90-day feeding trial was conducted on the growth performance, feeding efficacy, body indices, various hematological and plasma biochemical parameters, and histopathological examination of the gonads from male and female Nile tilapia fingerlings when fed different crude plant extracts from Cinnamomum camphora, Euphorbia hirta, Azadirachta indica, or Carica papaya at 2 g kg(-1) compared to a control diet. This was followed by a 14-day challenge to Streptococcus agalactiae. All treatments were triplicated, and each treatment consisted of 30 fish. Results showed that C. papaya extracts were the most effective at delaying gonadal maturation to both male and female tilapia, as well as significantly increasing (P < 0.05) growth performance compared to the control treatment. Similarly, dietary C. camphora and E. hirta extracts also significantly improved growth, while no significant growth effect was detected between the A. indica and control treatments (P > 0.05). Further, crude body lipid was lower in the C. camphora, E. hirta and C. papaya treatments, but was only significantly lower for the E. hirta treatment compared to the control. Meanwhile, none of the hematological or biochemical parameters were significantly affected, although plasma ALT was significantly lower for tilapia fed A. indica compared to the control. After the 14-day bacterial challenge, tilapia fed C. camphora supplementation had significantly higher survival, compared to the control, but was not significantly higher than the other supplemented diets. Results indicate that dietary C. papaya extract can significantly promote growth and delay gonadal maturation to both male and female tilapia, while C. camphora was the most effective prophylactic to S. agalactiae and may be a cost-effective and eco-friendly alternative to antibiotics.

  2. Serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from infected cultured tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in Thailand: Nine-year perspective.

    PubMed

    Dangwetngam, Machalin; Suanyuk, Naraid; Kong, Fanrong; Phromkunthong, Wutiporn

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) infection remains a major problem associated with high mortality of cultured tilapia worldwide. The present study reports the serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibilities of GBS isolated from infected tilapia cultured in Thailand. One hundred and forty-four GBS isolates were identified by biochemical, serological and molecular analyses. Of these 144 GBS isolates, 126 were serotype Ia and 18 were serotype III. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of the 144 GBS isolates were determined by the disc diffusion method. Most GBS isolates were susceptible to lincomycin, norfloxacin, oxytetracycline, ampicillin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol, but resistant to oxolinic acid, gentamicin, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. However, 17 isolates displayed an oxytetracycline-resistant phenotype and harboured the tet(M) gene. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 17 oxytetracycline-resistant GBS isolates, and then minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of these isolates were evaluated. Oxytetracyline-resistant isolates were found to be susceptible to ampicillin, lincomycin, norfloxacin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol, with the MIC and MBC ranging from ≤ 0.125 to 0.5 μg ml- 1 and ≤ 0.125 to 2 μg ml- 1, respectively. Moreover, all 17 oxytetracycline-resistant isolates demonstrated resistance to trimethoprim, oxolinic acid, gentamicin, sulfamethoxazole and oxytetracycline, with the MIC and MBC ranging from 16 to ≥ 128 μg ml- 1 and ≥ 128 μg ml- 1, respectively. These findings are useful information for antibiotic usage in fish aquaculture.

  3. Increasing of temperature induces pathogenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae and the up-regulation of inflammatory related genes in infected Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Kayansamruaj, Pattanapon; Pirarat, Nopadon; Hirono, Ikuo; Rodkhum, Channarong

    2014-08-06

    Temperature strongly affects the health of aquatic poikilotherms. In Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), elevated water temperatures increase the severity of streptococcosis. Here we investigated the effects of temperature on the vulnerability and inflammatory response of Nile tilapia to Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococci; GBS). At 35 and 28 °C, GBS took 4 and 7h, respectively to reach the log-phase and, when incubated with tilapia whole blood, experienced survival rates of 97% and 2%, respectively. The hemolysis activity of GBS grown at 35 °C was five times higher than that of GBS grown at 28 °C. GBS expressed cylE (β-hemolysin/cytolysin), cfb (CAMP factor) and PI-2b (pili-backbone) much more strongly at 35 °C than at 28 °C. Challenging Nile tilapia reared at 35 and 28 °C with GBS resulted in accumulated mortalities of about 85% and 45%, respectively. At 35 °C, infected tilapia exhibited tremendous inflammatory responses due to a dramatic up-regulation (30-40-fold) of inflammatory-related genes (cyclooxygenase-2, IL-1β and TNF-α) between 6 and 96 h-post infection. These results suggest that the increase of GBS pathogenicity to Nile tilapia induced by elevated temperature is associated with massive inflammatory responses, which may lead to acute mortality.

  4. Evaluation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and memory in adult rats survivors of the neonatal meningitis by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Lemos, Joelson C; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Carradore, Mirelle M; Moreira, Ana Paula; Collodel, Allan; Zanatta, Jessiele R; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in neonates and young infants, causing sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis. The survivors from this meningitis can suffer serious long-term neurological consequences, such as, seizures, hearing loss, learning and memory impairments. Neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) control the neuronal cell death during the brain development and play an important role in neuronal differentiation, survival and growth of neurons. Neonate Wistar rats, received either 10μL of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of GBS suspension at a concentration of 1×10(6)cfu/mL. Sixty days after induction of meningitis, the animals underwent behavioral tests, after were killed and the hippocampus and cortex were retired for analyze of the BDNF and NGF levels. In the open-field demonstrated no difference in motor, exploratory activity and habituation memory between the groups. The step-down inhibitory avoidance, when we evaluated the long-term memory at 24h after training session, we found that the meningitis group had a decrease in aversive memory when compared with the long-term memory test of the sham group. BDNF levels decreased in hippocampus and cortex; however the NGF levels decreased only in hippocampus. These findings suggest that the meningitis model could be a good research tool for the study of the biological mechanisms involved in the behavioral alterations secondary to GBS meningitis.

  5. RNA-Seq revealed the impairment of immune defence of tilapia against the infection of Streptococcus agalactiae with simulated climate warming.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Liu, Peng; Wan, Zi Yi; Huang, Shu Qing; Wen, Yan Fei; Lin, Grace; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-08-01

    Global warming is one of the causes of disease outbreaks in fishes. Understanding its mechanisms is critical in aquaculture and fisheries. We used tilapia to study the effects of a high temperature on the infection of a bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae using RNA-Seq. We found that the dissolved oxygen level in water at 32 °C is lower than at 22 °C, and tilapia infected with the pathogen died more rapidly at 32 °C. The gene expression profiles showed significant differences in fish raised under different conditions. We identified 126 and 576 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at 4 and 24 h post infection at 22 °C, respectively, whereas at 32 °C, the data were 312 and 1670, respectively. Almost all responding pathways at 22 °C were involved in the immune responses, whereas at 32 °C, the enriched pathways were not only involved in immune responses but also involved in oxygen and energy metabolisms. We identified significant signals of immunosuppression of immune responses at 32 °C. In addition, many of the enriched transcription factors and DEGs under positive selection were involved in immune responses, oxygen and/or energy metabolisms. Our results suggest that global warming could reduce the oxygen level in water and impair the defence of tilapia against bacterial infection.

  6. An in silico model for identification of small RNAs in whole bacterial genomes: characterization of antisense RNAs in pathogenic Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae strains

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Christophe; du Merle, Laurence; Caliot, Marie Elise; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Le Bouguénec, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of small non-coding ribonucleic acids (sRNA) among the large volume of data generated by high-throughput RNA-seq or tiling microarray analyses remains a challenge. Thus, there is still a need for accurate in silico prediction methods to identify sRNAs within a given bacterial species. After years of effort, dedicated software were developed based on comparative genomic analyses or mathematical/statistical models. Although these genomic analyses enabled sRNAs in intergenic regions to be efficiently identified, they all failed to predict antisense sRNA genes (asRNA), i.e. RNA genes located on the DNA strand complementary to that which encodes the protein. The statistical models enabled any genomic region to be analyzed theorically but not efficiently. We present a new model for in silico identification of sRNA and asRNA candidates within an entire bacterial genome. This model was successfully used to analyze the Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Streptococcus agalactiae. In both bacteria, numerous asRNAs are transcribed from the complementary strand of genes located in pathogenicity islands, strongly suggesting that these asRNAs are regulators of the virulence expression. In particular, we characterized an asRNA that acted as an enhancer-like regulator of the type 1 fimbriae production involved in the virulence of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. PMID:22139924

  7. Characterization and expression analysis of the transferrin gene in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and its upregulation in response to Streptococcus agalactiae infection.

    PubMed

    Poochai, Watsida; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Srisapoome, Prapansak; Unajak, Sasimanas; Areechon, Nontawith

    2014-10-01

    In this study, full-length tilapia transferrin (OnTF) isolated from liver cDNA of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was found to have an open reading frame of 2,091-bp encoding 696 amino acid residues. Two additional amino acids: Gly(369) and Gly(370) were observed compared with the reported Nile tilapia transferrin protein sequence. Pre-mature protein has a predicted molecular weight of 78.2 kDa, while mature protein is 73.28 kDa in size. Comparative sequence analysis with transferrin from other species revealed two major putative iron-binding domains designated as the N-lobe and the C-lobe in accordance with the transferrin protein characteristics. The predicted tertiary structure of tilapia transferrin confirmed the presence of iron and anion-binding sites on both lobes that are conserved among transferrins from other species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed significantly higher expression of tilapia transferrin gene in liver than in other tissues (p < 0.05). Transferrin expression in tilapia experimentally infected with 10(6) and 10(8) colony-forming units mL(-1) of Streptococcus agalactiae was significantly upregulated at 24 and 12 h post-infection (hpi), respectively, and decreased afterward. Iron-deficiency in serum of bacterially infected fish was detected at 48 and 24 hpi, respectively. The expression pattern of the transferrin gene and the iron levels of infected tilapia in this study were consistent with the function of transferrin in innate immunity.

  8. Evidence for the Sialylation of PilA, the PI-2a Pilus-Associated Adhesin of Streptococcus agalactiae Strain NEM316

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Eric; Mallet, Adeline; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Chaze, Thibault; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Oliva, Giulia; Oliveira, Liliana; Di Guilmi, Anne-Marie; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Dramsi, Shaynoor

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (or Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a commensal bacterium present in the intestinal and urinary tracts of approximately 30% of humans. We and others previously showed that the PI-2a pilus polymers, made of the backbone pilin PilB, the tip adhesin PilA and the cell wall anchor protein PilC, promote adhesion to host epithelia and biofilm formation. Affinity-purified PI-2a pili from GBS strain NEM316 were recognized by N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc, also known as sialic acid) specific lectins such as Elderberry Bark Lectin (EBL) suggesting that pili are sialylated. Glycan profiling with twenty different lectins combined with monosaccharide composition by HPLC suggested that affinity-purified PI-2a pili are modified by N-glycosylation and decorated with sialic acid attached to terminal galactose. Analysis of various relevant mutants in the PI-2a pilus operon by flow-cytometry and electron microscopy analyses pointed to PilA as the pilus subunit modified by glycosylation. Double labeling using PilB antibody and EBL lectin, which specifically recognizes N-acetylneuraminic acid attached to galactose in α-2, 6, revealed a characteristic binding of EBL at the tip of the pilus structures, highly reminiscent of PilA localization. Expression of a secreted form of PilA using an inducible promoter showed that this recombinant PilA binds specifically to EBL lectin when produced in the native GBS context. In silico search for potentially glycosylated asparagine residues in PilA sequence pointed to N427 and N597, which appear conserved and exposed in the close homolog RrgA from S. pneumoniae, as likely candidates. Conversion of these two asparagyl residues to glutamyl resulted in a higher instability of PilA. Our results provide the first evidence that the tip PilA adhesin can be glycosylated, and suggest that this modification is critical for PilA stability and may potentially influence interactions with the host. PMID:26407005

  9. Isolated Streptococcus agalactiae tricuspid endocarditis in elderly patient without known predisposing factors: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Leila; Charfeddine, Salma; Kammoun, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Group B streptococcal (GBS) tricuspid infective endocarditis is a very rare clinical entity. It affects intravenous drug users, pregnant, postpartum women, and the elderly. We report the case of a 68-year-old patient without known predisposing factors who presented a GBS tricuspid endocarditis treated by penicillin and aminoglycosides with no response. The patient was operated with a good evolution. Our case is the 25th reported in the literature. GBS disease is increasing in the elderly and is mainly associated to comorbid conditions. Tricuspid infective endocarditis with Group B streptococcus predominantly presents as a persistent fever with respiratory symptoms due to pulmonary embolism. Therefore, it requires a medicosurgical treatment and close follow-up. PMID:27053903

  10. Nile Tilapia Infectivity by Genomically Diverse Streptoccocus agalactiae Isolates from Multiple Hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), is recognized for causing cattle mastitis, human neonatal meningitis, and fish meningo-encephalitis. We investigated the genomic diversity of GBS isolates from different phylogenetic hosts and geographical regions using serological t...

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae in pregnant women. First study in a province of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, P; Pegels, E; Laczeski, M; Quiroga, M; Vergara, M

    2013-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal infections. Our purpose was to characterize GBS colonization in pregnant women, current serotypes, resistance phenotypes and genes associated with virulence. In Misiones, Argentina, there are no previous data on this topic. Vaginal-rectal swabs from 3125 pregnant women were studied between 2004 and 2010. GBS strains were identified by conventional and serological methods (Phadebact Strep B Test, ETC International, Bactus AB, Sweden). Serotypes were detected using Strep-B Latex (Statens Serum Institut, Denmark). Resistance phenotypes were determined by the double-disk test. Genes were studied by PCR. Maternal colonization was 9.38%. Resistance to erythromycin was 11.6%, and the constitutive phenotype was the predominant one. Serotype Ia was the most frequent, whereas serotypes IV, VI, VII and VIII were not detected. The lmb, bca and hylB genes were detected in more than 79% of the strains. In this study, the colonization rate with GBS and the serotype distribution were compared with studies reported in other areas of the country. The high resistance to erythromycin in Misiones justifies performing antibiotic susceptibility testing. The serotype distribution, the genes encoding putative virulence factors, and the patterns of resistance phenotypes of GBS may vary in different areas. They thus need to be evaluated in each place to devise strategies for prevention.

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae in pregnant women. First study in a province of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Oviedo, P; Pegels, E; Laczeski, M; Quiroga, M; Vergara, M

    2013-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal infections. Our purpose was to characterize GBS colonization in pregnant women, current serotypes, resistance phenotypes and genes associated with virulence. In Misiones, Argentina, there are no previous data on this topic. Vaginal-rectal swabs from 3125 pregnant women were studied between 2004 and 2010. GBS strains were identified by conventional and serological methods (Phadebact Strep B Test, ETC International, Bactus AB, Sweden). Serotypes were detected using Strep-B Latex (Statens Serum Institut, Denmark). Resistance phenotypes were determined by the double-disk test. Genes were studied by PCR. Maternal colonization was 9.38%. Resistance to erythromycin was 11.6%, and the constitutive phenotype was the predominant one. Serotype Ia was the most frequent, whereas serotypes IV, VI, VII and VIII were not detected. The lmb, bca and hylB genes were detected in more than 79% of the strains. In this study, the colonization rate with GBS and the serotype distribution were compared with studies reported in other areas of the country. The high resistance to erythromycin in Misiones justifies performing antibiotic susceptibility testing. The serotype distribution, the genes encoding putative virulence factors, and the patterns of resistance phenotypes of GBS may vary in different areas. They thus need to be evaluated in each place to devise strategies for prevention. PMID:24159312

  13. Modification of the CpsA Protein Reveals a Role in Alteration of the Streptococcus agalactiae Cell Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Hannah M.; Hanson, Brett R.; Runft, Donna L.; Lin, Qian; Firestine, Steve M.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is a crucial first line of defense for a systemic pathogen, with production of capsular polysaccharides and maintenance of the peptidoglycan cell wall serving essential roles in survival in the host environment. The LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins are important for cell envelope maintenance in many Gram-positive species. In this study, we examined the role of the extracellular domain of the CpsA protein of the zoonotic pathogen group B Streptococcus in capsule production and cell wall integrity. CpsA has multiple functional domains, including a DNA-binding/transcriptional activation domain and a large extracellular domain. We demonstrated that episomal expression of extracellularly truncated CpsA causes a dominant-negative effect on capsule production when expressed in the wild-type strain. Regions of the extracellular domain essential to this phenotype were identified. The dominant-negative effect could be recapitulated by addition of purified CpsA protein or a short CpsA peptide to cultures of wild-type bacteria. Changes in cell wall morphology were also observed when the dominant-negative peptide was added to wild-type cultures. Fluorescently labeled CpsA peptide could be visualized bound at the mid-cell region near the division septae, suggesting a novel role for CpsA in cell division. Finally, expression of truncated CpsA also led to attenuation of virulence in zebrafish models of infection, to levels below that of a cpsA deletion strain, demonstrating the key role of the extracellular domain in virulence of GBS. PMID:25644003

  14. Streptococcus agalactiae isolates of serotypes Ia, III and V from human and cow are able to infect tilapia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Rui; Luo, Fu-Guang; Huang, Yan; Liang, Wan-Wen; Huang, Ting; Lei, Ai-Ying; Gan, Xi; Li, Li-Ping

    2015-10-22

    Recent studies have shown that group B streptococcus (GBS) may be infectious across hosts. The purpose of this study is to investigate the pathogenicity of clinical GBS isolates with serotypes Ia, III and V from human and cow to tilapia and the evolutionary relationship among these GBS strains of different sources. A total of 27 clinical GBS isolates from human (n=10), cow (n=2) and tilapia (n=15) were analyzed using serotyping, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among them, 15 isolates were tested for their pathogenicity to tilapia. The results showed that five human GBS strains (2 serotype III, 2 serotype Ia and 1 serotype V) infected tilapia with mortality rate ranging from 56.67% to 100%, while the other five human GBS strains tested were unable to infect tilapia. In addition, two cow GBS strains C001 and C003 of serotype III infected tilapia. However, they had significantly lower pathogenicity than the five human strains. Furthermore, human GBS strains H005 and H008, which had very strong ability to infect tilapia, had the same PFGE pattern. MLST analysis showed that the five human and the two cow GBS strains that were able to infect tilapia belonged to clonal complexes CC19, CC23 and CC103. The study for the first time confirmed that human or cow GBS clonal complexes CC19, CC23 and CC103 containing strains with serotypes Ia, III and V could infect tilapia and induce clinical signs under experimental conditions.

  15. Characterization of Isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae from Diseased Farmed and Wild Marine Fish from the U.S. Gulf Coast, Latin America, and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Wang, Rui; Wiles, Judy; Baumgartner, Wes; Green, Christopher; Plumb, John; Hawke, John

    2015-06-01

    We examined Lancefield serogroup B Streptococcus isolates recovered from diseased, cultured hybrid Striped Bass (Striped Bass Morone saxatilis × White Bass M. chrysops) and wild and cultured Gulf Killifish Fundulus grandis from coastal waters of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (Gulf coast) and compared those isolates to strains from tilapias Oreochromis spp. reared in Mississippi, Thailand, Ecuador, and Honduras and to the original Gulf coast strain identified by Plumb et al. ( 1974 ). The isolates were subjected to phylogenetic, biochemical, and antibiotic susceptibility analyses. Genetic analysis was performed using partial sequence comparison of (1) the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene; (2) the sipA gene, which encodes a surface immunogenic protein; (3) the cspA gene, which encodes a cell surface-associated protein; and (4) the secY gene, which encodes components of a general protein secretion pathway. Phylogenies inferred from sipA, secY, and cspA gene sequence comparisons were more discriminating than that inferred from the 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. The U.S. Gulf coast strains showed a high degree of similarity to strains from South America and Central America and belonged to a unique group that can be distinguished from other group B streptococci. In agreement with the molecular findings, biochemical and antimicrobial resistance analyses demonstrated that the isolates recovered from the U.S. Gulf coast and Latin America were more similar to each other than to isolates from Thailand. Three laboratory challenge methods for inducing streptococcosis in Gulf Killifish were evaluated-intraperitoneal (IP) injection, immersion (IMM), and immersion plus abrasion (IMMA)-using serial dilutions of S. agalactiae isolate LADL 97-151, a representative U.S. Gulf coast strain. The dose that was lethal to 50% of test fish by 14 d postchallenge was approximately 2 CFU/fish via IP injection. In contrast, the fish that were challenged via IMM or IMMA presented cumulative mortality

  16. Genome characterization and population genetic structure of the zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus canis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Streptococcus canis is an important opportunistic pathogen of dogs and cats that can also infect a wide range of additional mammals including cows where it can cause mastitis. It is also an emerging human pathogen. Results Here we provide characterization of the first genome sequence for this species, strain FSL S3-227 (milk isolate from a cow with an intra-mammary infection). A diverse array of putative virulence factors was encoded by the S. canis FSL S3-227 genome. Approximately 75% of these gene sequences were homologous to known Streptococcal virulence factors involved in invasion, evasion, and colonization. Present in the genome are multiple potentially mobile genetic elements (MGEs) [plasmid, phage, integrative conjugative element (ICE)] and comparison to other species provided convincing evidence for lateral gene transfer (LGT) between S. canis and two additional bovine mastitis causing pathogens (Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae), with this transfer possibly contributing to host adaptation. Population structure among isolates obtained from Europe and USA [bovine = 56, canine = 26, and feline = 1] was explored. Ribotyping of all isolates and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) of a subset of the isolates (n = 45) detected significant differentiation between bovine and canine isolates (Fisher exact test: P = 0.0000 [ribotypes], P = 0.0030 [sequence types]), suggesting possible host adaptation of some genotypes. Concurrently, the ancestral clonal complex (54% of isolates) occurred in many tissue types, all hosts, and all geographic locations suggesting the possibility of a wide and diverse niche. Conclusion This study provides evidence highlighting the importance of LGT in the evolution of the bacteria S. canis, specifically, its possible role in host adaptation and acquisition of virulence factors. Furthermore, recent LGT detected between S. canis and human bacteria (Streptococcus

  17. Genomic Diversity of Streptoccocus agalactiae Isolates from Multiple Hosts and Their Infectivity in Nile Tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), has a broad host range and can be pathogenic to numerous animals, including fish. GBS is most recognized for causing cattle mastitis and human neonatal meningitis, it also causes fatal meningo-encephalitis in fish. We investigat...

  18. Immunogenicity of amino acids 1-150 of Streptococcus GapC displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Song, Baifen; Yang, Xijing; Sun, Hunan; Yu, Liquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Wu, Zhijun; Cui, Yudong

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus is one of the main pathogens that cause bovine mastitis. They includes into S.agalactiae, S.dysgalactiae, and S.uberis. The GapC protein is a virulence factor that is expressed on the surface of Streptococcus species. GapC is highly antigenic and immunization with GapC confers cross-protection against all three species. Our previous data showed that amino acids 1-150 of GapC (GapC1-150) of S. dysgalactiae conferred similar immunoprotection compared to full-length GapC. Thus, the present study aimed to construct a recombinant Escherichia coli XL1-Blue strain that displayed GapC1-150 on its surface, and to investigate the immunogenicity of the surface-localized GapC1-150. To do so, the ompA gene of the E. coli XL1-Blue strain was replaced with the lpp'-ompA-gapC11-150 or lpp'-ompA genes by λ Red recombination, the former of which fused GapC1-150 to an Lpp lipoprotein signal peptide and amino acids 1-159 of OmpA; the recombinant strains were named XL1-Blue/LOG76 and XL1-Blue/LO11, respectively. GapC1-150 was confirmed to localize to the surface of the XL1-Blue/LOG76 strain by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Then, ICR mice were immunized intramuscularly with the XL1-Blue/LOG76 or XL1-Blue/LO11 strains, or recombinant GapC1-150. The sera of the immunized mice were collected and the anti-GapC1-150 antibody levels were detected by ELISA. Lymphocytes secreting interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon-γ were detected by an enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot assay, as was the level of IL-17A level in the supernatant of cultured splenic lymphocytes. The mice immunized with the XL1-Blue/LOG76 strain or GapC1-150 exhibited better cellular and humoral immunity. Lastly, the immunized mice were challenged with S. uberis, S. dysgalactiae, and S. agalactiae strains, and mice that were immunized with the XL1-Blue/LOG76 strain were better protected than those that were

  19. Integrative Conjugative Elements and Related Elements Are Major Contributors to the Genome Diversity of Streptococcus agalactiae▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Brochet, Mathieu; Couvé, Elisabeth; Glaser, Philippe; Guédon, Gérard; Payot, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-five putative integrative conjugative elements and related elements were identified at 15 locations in the eight sequenced genomes of Streptococcus agalactiae. Twelve are composite, likely resulting from site-specific accretions. Circular forms were detected for five elements. Macroarray analysis confirmed their high plasticity and wide distribution in S. agalactiae. PMID:18708498

  20. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases for Control of Mastitis Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine mastitis results in annual losses between $1.7 billion and $2 billion in the United States alone. Among the most relevant causative agents of this disease are Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B; GBS) and Streptococcus dysgalactiae (Group C; GCS) streptococci as well as Staphylococcus aureus. ...

  1. The streptococcal phage SA2 and B30 endolysins act synergistically and kill mastitis causing streptococci in milk.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine mastitis results in billion dollar losses annually in the United States alone. Among the most relevant causative agents of this disease are members of the genus Streptococcus, particularly the species S. agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus; GBS), S. dysgalactiae (Group C; GCS), and S. uberis....

  2. Characterization of the duodenase-1 gene and its associations with resistance to Streptococuus agalactiae in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.).

    PubMed

    Shen, Yubang; Fu, Gui Hong; Liu, Feng; Yue, Gen Hua

    2015-08-01

    Tilapia is a group of cultured teleost fishes whose production is threatened by some diseases. Identification of DNA markers associated with disease resistance in candidate genes may facilitate to accelerate the selection of disease resistance. The gene encoding a duodenase, which can trigger immune response, has not been studied in fish. We characterized the cDNA of duodenase-1 gene of hybrid tilapia. Its ORF is 759 bp, encoding a serine protease of 252 amino acids. This gene consisted of five exons and four introns. Its expression was detected in all 10 tissues examined, and it was highly expressed in the intestine and kidney. After a challenge with the bacterial pathogen, Streptococcus agalactiae, its expression was up-regulated significantly in the intestine, liver and spleen. We identified seven SNPs in the gene and found that four of them were significantly associated with the resistance to S. agalactiae (P < 0.05). The CGTCC haplotype, CAGTC/CGGTC and CGTCC/CGTCC diplotype were significantly associated with the resistance to S. agalactiae (P = 0.00, 0.04 and < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, one SNP was associated significantly with growth traits (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that the duodenase-1 gene plays an important role in the resistance to S. agalactiae in tilapia. The SNP markers in the duodenase-1 gene associated with resistance to the bacterial pathogen, may facilitate the selection of tilapia resistant to the bacterial disease.

  3. Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans has antibacterial activity with specificity for species of Streptococcus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans NRRL 50380 was tested for antibacterial activity. Liamocins inhibited growth of Streptococcus agalactiae, S. uberis, S. mitis, S. infantarius, and S. mutans, with minimum inhibitory concentrations from 20 'g/ml to 78 'g/ml. Enterococcus faecalis was less sus...

  4. Mycoplasma agalactiae, an Etiological Agent of Contagious Agalactia in Small Ruminants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Rahal, Anu; Verma, Amit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is one of the causal agents of classical contagious agalactia (CA), a serious, economically important but neglected enzootic disease of small ruminants. It occurs in many parts of the world and most notably in the Mediterranean Basin. Following the infection common complications are septicaemia, mastitis, arthritis, pleurisy, pneumonia, and keratoconjunctivitis. Primary or tentative diagnosis of the organism is based upon clinical signs. Various serological tests, namely, growth precipitation, immunofluorescence, complement fixation test, haemagglutination inhibition, agglutination, immunodiffusion, enzyme immunoassays, immunoelectrophoresis, blotting techniques, and others, are available. Molecular tools seem to be much more sensitive, specific, and faster and help to differentiate various strains. The real-time PCR, multiplex PCR, quantitative PCR, PCR-RFLP, MLST, and gene probes, complementary to segments of chromosomal DNA or 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), have strengthened the diagnosis of M. agalactiae. Both live attenuated and adjuvant (alum precipitated or saponified) inactivated vaccines are available with greater use of inactivated ones due to lack of side effects. The present review discusses the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical signs of contagious agalactia in small ruminants along with trends and advances in its diagnosis, treatment, vaccination, prevention, and control strategies that will help in countering this disease. PMID:25097796

  5. 21 CFR 526.313 - Ceftiofur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... lactating dairy cattle associated with coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and... associated with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis....

  6. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  7. Replacing and Additive Horizontal Gene Transfer in Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang Chul; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Gronau, Ilan; Stanhope, Michael J.; Siepel, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The prominent role of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) in the evolution of bacteria is now well documented, but few studies have differentiated between evolutionary events that predominantly cause genes in one lineage to be replaced by homologs from another lineage (“replacing HGT”) and events that result in the addition of substantial new genomic material (“additive HGT”). Here in, we make use of the distinct phylogenetic signatures of replacing and additive HGTs in a genome-wide study of the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (SPY) and its close relatives S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDE) and S. dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae (SDD). Using recently developed statistical models and computational methods, we find evidence for abundant gene flow of both kinds within each of the SPY and SDE clades and of reduced levels of exchange between SPY and SDD. In addition, our analysis strongly supports a pronounced asymmetry in SPY–SDE gene flow, favoring the SPY-to-SDE direction. This finding is of particular interest in light of the recent increase in virulence of pathogenic SDE. We find much stronger evidence for SPY–SDE gene flow among replacing than among additive transfers, suggesting a primary influence from homologous recombination between co-occurring SPY and SDE cells in human hosts. Putative virulence genes are correlated with transfer events, but this correlation is found to be driven by additive, not replacing, HGTs. The genes affected by additive HGTs are enriched for functions having to do with transposition, recombination, and DNA integration, consistent with previous findings, whereas replacing HGTs seen to influence a more diverse set of genes. Additive transfers are also found to be associated with evidence of positive selection. These findings shed new light on the manner in which HGT has shaped pathogenic bacterial genomes. PMID:22617954

  8. Transduction of the Streptococcus pyogenes bacteriophage Φm46.1, carrying resistance genes mef(A) and tet(O), to other Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Giovanetti, Eleonora; Brenciani, Andrea; Morroni, Gianluca; Tiberi, Erika; Pasquaroli, Sonia; Mingoia, Marina; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-01-01

    Φm46.1 - Streptococcus pyogenes bacteriophage carrying mef(A) and tet(O), respectively, encoding resistance to macrolides (M phenotype) and tetracycline - is widespread in S. pyogenes but has not been reported outside this species. Φm46.1 is transferable in vitro among S. pyogenes isolates, but no information is available about its transferability to other Streptococcus species. We thus investigated Φm46.1 for its ability to be transduced in vitro to recipients of different Streptococcus species. Transductants were obtained from recipients of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus suis. Retransfer was always achieved, and from S. suis to S. pyogenes occurred at a much greater frequency than in the opposite direction. In transductants Φm46.1 retained its functional properties, such as inducibility with mitomycin C, presence both as a prophage and as a free circular form, and transferability. The transductants shared the same Φm46.1 chromosomal integration site as the donor, at the 3' end of a conserved RNA uracil methyltransferase (rum) gene, which is an integration hotspot for a variety of genetic elements. No transfer occurred to recipients of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus salivarius, even though rum-like genes were also detected in the sequenced genomes of these species. A largely overlapping 18-bp critical sequence, where the site-specific recombination process presumably takes place, was identified in the rum genes of all recipients, including those of the species yielding no transductants. Growth assays to evaluate the fitness cost of Φm46.1 acquisition disclosed a negligible impact on S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, and S. gordonii transductants and a noticeable fitness advantage in S. suis. The S. suis transductant also displayed marked overexpression of the autolysin-encoding gene atl.

  9. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy.

  10. Group B Streptococcus surface proteins as major determinants for meningeal tropism.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Asmaa; Bellais, Samuel; Tardieux, Isabelle; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS), a normal constituent of the intestinal microbiota is the major cause of human neonatal infections and a worldwide spread 'hypervirulent' clone, GBS ST-17, is strongly associated with neonatal meningitis. Adhesion to epithelial and endothelial cells constitutes a key step of the infectious process. Therefore GBS surface-anchored proteins are obvious potential adhesion mediators of barrier crossing and determinant of hypervirulence. This review addresses the most recent molecular insights gained from studies on GBS surface proteins proven to be involved in the crossing of the brain-blood barrier and emphasizes on the specificity of a hypervirulent clone that displays meningeal tropism.

  11. Experimentally induced bovine abortion with Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp bovis.

    PubMed

    Stalheim, O H; Proctor, S J

    1976-08-01

    Two pregnant cows aborted 11 and 18 days after Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp bovis was inoculated into the amniotic fluids. The placentas were retained. The fetuses (approx 100 and 150 days of age) were decomposed; M agalactiae subsp bovis was recovered from several tissues of the fetuses, the placentas, and fetal fluids. The same organism was given by intraperitoneal injection to 2 other pregnant (130 and 180 days, respectively) cows. At necropsy of the latter 36 days later, placentitis was severe; M agalactiae subsp bovis was recovered from the placentas of both cows and from the fetus of 1 cow. Control cows given sterile mycoplasma cultural medium by intraamnion or intraperitoneal injection did not abort and were not infected. When first recovered from the bovine placenta and fetus, M agalactiae subsp bovis grew slowly in liquid medium and assumed bizarre colonial morphology on solidified medium. Colonies were small (0.1 to 0.5 mm) and dark and lacked halos, but they reacted specifically in the direct fluorescent antibody test with equine M agalactiae subsp bovis antiserum. After 1 or 2 subcultures, the isolates grew at a normal rate and displayed their usual colonial morphology.

  12. Selective acylation of plasma membrane proteins of Mycoplasma agalactiae: the causal agent of agalactia.

    PubMed

    Le Hénaff, M; Guéguen, M M; Fontenelle, C

    2000-01-01

    Revealed by in vivo labeling with (14)C-palmitic acid, about 15 acylated proteins were identified in the plasma membrane of Mycoplasma agalactiae (type strain PG2), including the major component p40. Triton X-114 phase partitioning and Western blotting demonstrated the amphiphilic properties of the acyl proteins and showed that they were also antigenic components. Chemical analyses of fatty acids bound to proteins revealed the following selectivity order within acylation: stearic acid (18:0) > linoleic acid (18:2c) approximately palmitic acid (16:0) > oleic acid (18:1c) > myristic acid (14:0), with 16:0 and 18:1c preferred for the O-acylation and 18:0 for the N-acylation. The ratio [O-ester- + amide-bound acyl chains]/O-ester-linked chains being close to 1.4 as well as the presence of S-glycerylcysteine suggest that acyl proteins in M. agalactiae are true lipoproteins containing N-acyl diacyl glycerylcysteine, probably processed by a mechanism analogous to that described for Gram-negative eubacteria.

  13. Increased Age, but Not Parity Predisposes to Higher Bacteriuria Burdens Due to Streptococcus Urinary Tract Infection and Influences Bladder Cytokine Responses, Which Develop Independent of Tissue Bacterial Loads

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Matthew J.; Carey, Alison J.; Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Tan, Chee K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnant adults, non-pregnant adults, immune-compromised individuals and the elderly. The pathogenesis of S. agalactiae UTI in distinct patient populations is poorly understood. In this study, we used murine models of UTI incorporating young mice, aged and dam mice to show that uropathogenic S. agalactiae causes bacteriuria at significantly higher levels in aged mice compared to young mice and this occurs coincident with equivalent levels of bladder tissue colonisation at 24 h post-infection (p.i.). In addition, aged mice exhibited significantly higher bacteriuria burdens at 48 h compared to young mice, confirming a divergent pattern of bacterial colonization in the urinary tract of aged and young mice. Multiparous mice, in contrast, exhibited significantly lower urinary titres of S. agalactiae compared to age-matched nulliparous mice suggesting that parity enhances the ability of the host to control S. agalactiae bacteriuria. Additionally, we show that both age and parity alter the expression levels of several key regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important the immune response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12(p40), and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1). Finally, we demonstrate that other cytokines, including IL-17 are induced significantly in the S. agalactiae-infected bladder regardless of age and parity status. Collectively, these findings show that the host environment plays an important role in influencing the severity of S. agalactiae UTI; infection dynamics, particularly in the context of bacteriuria, depend on age and parity, which also affect the nature of innate immune responses to infection. PMID:27936166

  14. Characterization and identification of streptococci from golden pompano in China.

    PubMed

    Cai, X H; Peng, Y H; Wang, Z C; Huang, T; Xiong, X Y; Huang, Y C; Wang, B; Xu, L W; Wu, Z H

    2016-05-26

    Streptococcal infections cause significant mortality and high economic losses in the fish farm industry worldwide, including in the culture of golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus L., a species gaining popularity in China. A total of 9 streptococcal strains were isolated from cage-cultured diseased golden pompano in Beihai, Zhanjing, and Shenzhen, China, between 2012 and 2014. Conventional and rapid identification systems were used to determine that the isolates were Streptococcus agalactiae, S. iniae, and S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae. All isolates were gram-positive cocci cells in pairs or short-chain, non-motile, catalase negative, α or β hemolytic cocci. The results of multiplex PCR assays and 16S rRNA BLAST analysis also showed that the β hemolytic strains were S. agalactiae and S. iniae and the α hemolytic strain was S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae, respectively. Pathogenicity assays revealed that S. agalactiae (lethal dose [LD50]: 6.38 × 10(4) CFU ml(-1)) was more virulent for golden pompano than S. iniae (LD50: 1.47 × 10(7) CFU ml(-1)) and S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (LD50: 2.57 × 10(6) CFU ml(-1)) when they were challenged by intraperiotoneal (i.p.) injection. The results of antibiotic susceptibility showed that all strains were extremely susceptible to cefradine, erythromycin, and cefotaxime but resistant to gentamicin, penicillin G, novobiocin, neomycin, ciprofloxacin, roxithromycin, furazolidone, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, kanamycin, ampicillin, tetracycline, and vancomycin This is the first report of a phenomenon of golden pompano coinfection with S. agalactiae and S. iniae, which will contribute to the diagnosis and prevention of streptococcicosis.

  15. Role of Vpma phase variation in Mycoplasma agalactiae pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Baumgartner, Martina; Gamper, Erika; Innerebner, Carmen; Zimmermann, Martina; Schilcher, Franz; Tichy, Alexander; Winter, Petra; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Compared with other bacterial pathogens, the molecular mechanisms of mycoplasma pathogenicity are largely unknown. Several studies in the past have shown that pathogenic mycoplasmas are equipped with sophisticated genetic systems that allow them to undergo high-frequency surface antigenic variations. Although never clearly proven, these variable mycoplasma surface components are often implicated in host immune evasion and adaptation. Vpma surface lipoproteins of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae are encoded on a genomic pathogenicity island–like locus and are considered as one of the well-characterized model systems of mycoplasma surface antigenic variation. The present study assesses the role of these phase-variable Vpmas in the molecular pathogenesis of M. agalactiae by testing the wild-type strain PG2 in comparison with the xer1-disrupted Vpma ‘phase-locked’ mutants in sheep infection models. The data clearly illustrate that although Xer1 recombinase is not a virulence factor of M. agalactiae and Vpma phase variation is not necessary for establishing an infection, it might critically influence the survival and persistence of the pathogen under natural field conditions, mainly due to a better capacity for dissemination and evoking systemic responses. This is the first study where mycoplasma ‘phase-locked’ mutants are tested in vivo to elucidate the role of phase variation during infection. PMID:22809092

  16. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some ...

  17. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; McShan, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5′ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges. PMID:25161960

  18. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Scott V; McShan, William M

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5' end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges.

  19. Synthesis of Recombinant P48 of Mycoplasma agalactiae by Site Directed Mutagenesis and its Immunological Characterization.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Singh, Satparkash; Kathiresan, S; Kumar, Ramesh; Bhanot, Vandna; Singh, Vijendra Pal

    2017-01-02

    Contagious agalactia caused by Mycoplasma agalactiae is an economically important disease of sheep and goats and has been prevalent worldwide including India. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the membrane protein P48 of M. agalactiae for specific diagnosis of disease. For this, p48 gene of the organism was amplified by PCR and subjected to site directed mutagenesis to convert three TGA codons to TGG's and, subsequently, cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pPRO EX HTb. Purified recombinant P48 protein reacted to anti-P48 serum in western blotting, which confirmed its immunogenic nature. Furthermore, the immune-blotting of the cell lysates from various Indian isolates of M. agalactiae against anti-P48 serum resulted in a single band at ∼ 48 kDa among all isolates, indicating the conserved nature of P48 antigen in M. agalactiae. Also, the cross reactivity of P48 antigen among various Mycoplasma spp. was checked by western blotting which revealed reactivity only with M. agalactiae and M. bovis. Hence, this antigen could be exploited to differentiate M. agalactiae from other pathogenic Mycoplasma species except M. bovis. However, the inability of P48 to distinguish M. agalactiae from M. bovis does not downgrade the significance of P48 as the two species are usually host specific.

  20. Pattern of infection and antibiotic activity among Streptococcus agalactiae isolates from adults in Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Malek-Jafarian, Masoumeh; Hosseini, Fatemeh-Sadat; Ahmadi, Abodol-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the main causes of sexually transmitted diseases is group B β- hemolytic streptococci (GBS) multiplying in the genital tracts. Penicillin is the most common drug for the treatment of infections caused by these bacteria, but in patients suffering from Penicillin allergy, Erythromycin and Clindamycin are used as alternative therapeutic drugs against GBS. Recently, resistance to these drugs has been reported more often. In this study, efforts have been made to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of GBS. Methods: Modified Christie Atkins Munch-Petersen (CAMP) test was conducted on over 2400 samples of urine and discharge taken from vagina, urethra and prostate. The drug sensitivity was performed by double disk sensitivity tests to Bacitracin, Trimethoprim, and Sulfamethoxazole and then the resistant samples were investigated by E-test to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) value. Results: Twenty-three vaginal and 10 urethral discharge, 27urine and 6 prostatic secretion samples were GBS positive. The most symbiotic microorganisms with GBS were strains of Enterococci (90%), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (25%) and Candida albicans (6%). The disk diffusion method showed 18 cases with Penicillin resistance (MIC: 1.5 mg/ml). Conclusion: Taken together, GBS carriers’ rate in this study was found 20.65% (8.24% men and 12.4% women). Furthermore, findings showed high-level resistance to Erythromycin and Clindamycin. PMID:26989743

  1. [Epididymo-orchitis in a newborn: rare illness revealing late-onset Streptococcus agalactiae meningitis].

    PubMed

    Goirand, M; Berthaud, R; Al Ikhtiar, I; Lachtar, M; Montoro, J; Walter-Nicolet, E

    2014-02-01

    Acute scrotum is unusual during the neonatal period. Testicular torsion is a surgical emergency aimed at salvaging the affected testis. Epididymo-orchitis is the main differential diagnosis, but few cases have been described in the newborn. Here, we report the case of a late-preterm infant who presented with late-onset group B streptococcal sepsis revealed by unilateral epididymo-orchitis.

  2. Mycoplasma agalactiae Induces Cytopathic Effects in Infected Cells Cultured In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Hegde, Shivanand Manjunath; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is the etiological agent of the contagious agalactia syndrome in sheep and goats and causes significant economic losses worldwide. Yet the mechanism of pathogenesis is largely unknown. Even whole-genome sequence analysis of its pathogenic type strain did not lead to any conclusions regarding its virulence or pathogenicity factors. Although inflammation and tissue destruction at the local site of M. agalactiae infection are largely considered as effects of the host immune response, the direct effect of the agent on host cells is not completely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of M. agalactiae infection on the quality and viability of host cells in vitro. Changes in cell morphology including cell elongation, cytoplasm shrinkage and membrane blebbing were observed in infected HeLa cells. Chromatin condensation and increased caspase-3 cleavage in infected HeLa cells 48 h after infection suggests an apoptosis-like phenomenon in M. agalactiae-infected cells. In compliance with these results, decreased viability and cell lysis of M. agalactiae-infected HeLa cells was also observed. Measurement of the amount of LDH released after M. agalactiae infection revealed a time- and dose-dependent increase in HeLa cell lysis. A significant decrease in LDH released after gentamicin treatment of infected cells confirmed the major role of cytadherent M. agalactiae in inducing host cell lysis. This is the first study illustrating M. agalactiae’s induction of cytopathic effects in infected HeLa cells. Further detailed investigation of infected host tissue for apoptotic markers might demonstrate the association between M. agalactiae-induced host cell lysis and the tissue destruction observed during M. agalactiae natural infection. PMID:27662492

  3. Structure of a conjugative element in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.N.; Priebe, S.D.; Guild, W.R.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have cloned and mapped a 69-kilobase (kb) region of the chromosome of Streptococcus pneumoniae DP1322, which carries the conjugative Omega(cat-tet) insertion from S. pneumoniae BM6001. This element proved to be 65.5 kb in size. Location of the junctions was facilitated by cloning a preferred target region from the wild-type strain Rx1 recipient genome. This target site was preferred by both the BM6001 element and the cat-erm-tet element from Streptococcus agalactiae B109. Within the BM6001 element cat and tet were separated by 30 kb, and cat was flanked by two copies of a sequence that was also present in the recipient strain Rx1 DNA. Another sequence at least 2.4 kb in size was found inside the BM6001 element and at two places in the Rx1 genome. Its role is unknown. The ends of the BM6001 element appear to be the same as those of the B109 element, both as seen after transfer to S. pneumoniae and as mapped by others in pDP5 after transposition in Streptococcus faecalis. No homology is seen between the ends of the BM6001 element and no evidence found suggesting that it ever circularizes.

  4. Dynamics of fecal microbial communities in children with diarrhea of unknown etiology and genomic analysis of associated Streptococcus lutetiensis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes extracted from fecal samples provide insights into the dynamics of fecal microflora. This potentially gives valuable etiological information for patients whose conditions have been ascribed to unknown pathogens, which cannot be accomplished using routine culture methods. We studied 33 children with diarrhea who were admitted to the Children’s Hospital in Shanxi Province during 2006. Results Nineteen of 33 children with diarrhea could not be etiologically diagnosed by routine culture and polymerase chain reaction methods. Eleven of 19 children with diarrhea of unknown etiology had Streptococcus as the most dominant fecal bacterial genus at admission. Eight of nine children whom three consecutive fecal samples were collected had Streptococcus as the dominant fecal bacterial genus, including three in the Streptococcus bovis group and three Streptococcus sp., which was reduced during and after recovery. We isolated strains that were possibly from the S. bovis group from feces sampled at admission, which were then identified as Streptococcus lutetiensis from one child and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus from two children. We sequenced the genome of S. lutetiensis and identified five antibiotic islands, two pathogenicity islands, and five unique genomic islands. The identified virulence genes included hemolytic toxin cylZ of Streptococcus agalactiae and sortase associated with colonization of pathogenic streptococci. Conclusions We identified S. lutetiensis and S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus from children with diarrhea of unknown etiology, and found pathogenic islands and virulence genes in the genome of S. lutetiensis. PMID:23782707

  5. Streptolysin S of Streptococcus anginosus exhibits broad-range hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Asam, Daniela; Mauerer, Stefanie; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a commensal of mucous membranes and an emerging human pathogen. Some strains, including the type strain, display a prominent β-hemolytic phenotype. A gene cluster (sag), encoding a variant of streptolysin S (SLS) has recently been identified as the genetic background for β-hemolysin production in S. anginosus. In this study, we further characterized the hemolytic and cytolytic activity of the S. anginosus hemolysin in comparison with other streptococcal hemolysins. The results indicate that SLS of S. anginosus is a broad-range hemolysin able to lyse erythrocytes of different species, including horse, bovine, rabbit and even chicken. The hemolytic activity is temperature dependent, and a down-regulation of the hemolysin expression is induced in the presence of high glucose levels. Survival assays indicate that in contrast to other streptococcal species, S. anginosus does not require SLS for survival in the presence of human granulocytes. Cross-complementation studies using the sagB and sagD genes of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis demonstrated functional similarities to the S. anginosus SLS. Nevertheless, distinct differences to other streptolysin S variants were noted and provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms of SLS pathogen host interactions.

  6. Prevalence of Bovine Mastitis Pathogens in Bulk Tank Milk in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya Jing; Qin, Yun; Guix Vallverdú, Roger; Maldonado García, Jaime; Sun, Wei; Li, Shengli; Cao, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the herd prevalence of major mastitis pathogens in bulk tank milk (BTM) in China dairy herds, to determine the relationship between the presence of mastitis pathogens and bulk tank milk somatic cell counts (BTSCC), and to investigate the impact of different dairy cattle farming modes and region on bacterial species. BTM samples collected from 894 dairy herds in China were examined for the presence of mastitis pathogens. The Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) cards were used for BTM sample collection, storage, and transportation and bacterial DNA amplification by real-time PCR. Among contagious pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae were detected in 50.1, 92.2, and 72.3% of the 894 BTM samples, respectively. Among environmental pathogens, E. coli, Streptococcus uberis, Enterococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Serratia marcescens, Corynebacterium bovis, and Arcanobacterium pyogenes were detected in 28.6, 8.9, 35.7, 20.0, 1.3, 17.0, and 67.2% of the BTM samples, respectively. Staphylococcal β-lactamase gene was detected in 61.7% of the BTM samples. The presence of Staphylococcus aureus and Arcanobacterium pyogenes were significantly associated with high BTSCC, respectively. Significant differences were found in presence of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae in BTM sampled from the small household farms, dairy-farming communities, and large-scaled dairy farms. There were significant differences in the presence of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, staphylococcal β-lactamase gene, Staphylococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus uberis in BTM among Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang, and Hebei province. In conclusion, contagious mammary pathogens are predominated among pathogens in BTM samples in China. PMID:27187065

  7. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Ipe, Deepak S.; Smith, Joshua P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  8. Construction of the first shuttle vectors for gene cloning and homologous recombination in Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Marenda, Marc; Rosengarten, Renate; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Citti, Christine

    2005-12-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is a worldwide ruminant pathogen that causes significant economic losses by inflicting contagious agalactia in sheep and goats. The development of efficient control strategies requires a better understanding of the mycoplasma factors that promote successful infection. However, lack of genetic tools has been a major impediment in studying the pathogenic mechanisms of M. agalactiae. This study describes the identification and cloning of the M. agalactiae origin of replication (oriC) in order to construct the first shuttle vectors for targeted gene disruption, gene complementation and expression studies. Additionally, this report provides the first evidence of the occurrence of homologous recombination and the functionality of heterologous tetM determinant in this pathogen.

  9. Short communication: In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma agalactiae strains isolated from dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Paterna, A; Sánchez, A; Gómez-Martín, A; Corrales, J C; De la Fe, C; Contreras, A; Amores, J

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the susceptibility to several antimicrobials of 28 isolates of Mycoplasma agalactiae obtained from goats in a region (southeastern Spain) where contagious agalactia is endemic. For each isolate, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against 12 antimicrobials of the quinolone, macrolide, aminoglycoside, and tetracycline families was determined. The antimicrobials with the lowest MIC were enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tylosin, and doxycycline, all with MIC90 (concentration at which growth of 90% of the isolates is inhibited) <1 µg/mL. Norfloxacin (a quinolone) showed a wide MIC range (0.1-12.8 µg/mL), suggesting a resistance mechanism toward this antimicrobial that was not elicited by enrofloxacin or ciprofloxacin (the other quinolones tested). Erythromycin showed the highest MIC90 such that its use against Mycoplasma agalactiae is not recommended. Finally, Mycoplasma agalactiae isolates obtained from goat herds with clinical symptoms of contagious agalactia featured higher MIC90 and MIC50 (concentration at which growth of 50% of the isolates is inhibited) values for many of the antimicrobials compared with isolates from asymptomatic animals. The relationship between the extensive use of antimicrobials in herds with clinical contagious agalactia and variations in MIC requires further study.

  10. Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri"): the unrecognized pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L

    1988-01-01

    "Streptococcus milleri" is an unofficial name that has been applied to a group of streptococci which, although basically similar, show various hemolytic, serological, and physiological characteristics. The species name Streptococcus anginosus has recently been recognized as the approved name for these organisms. Streptococci known as "S. milleri" have been implicated as etiologic agents in a variety of serious purulent infections, but because of their heterogeneous characteristics, these organisms may be unrecognized or misidentified by clinical laboratorians. This review describes the bacteriological aspects of organisms known as "S. milleri," their clinical significance, and the problems encountered with their identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:3060239

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic identification of streptococci and related bacteria isolated from bovine intramammary infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Streptococcus spp. and other Gram-positive, catalase-negative cocci (PNC) form a large group of microorganisms which can be found in the milk of cows with intramammary infection. The most frequently observed PNC mastitis pathogens (major pathogens) are Streptococcus uberis, Strep. dysgalactiae, and Strep. agalactiae. The remaining PNC include a few minor pathogens and a large nonpathogenic group. Improved methods are needed for the accurate identification and differentiation of PNC. A total of 151 PNC were collected from cows with intramammary infection and conclusively identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as reference method. Nine phenotypic microbiological tests (alpha-hemolysis, CAMP reaction, esculin hydrolysis, growth on kanamycin esculin azide agar and on sodium chloride agar, inulin fermentation, hippurate hydrolysis, leucine aminopeptidase and pyrrolidonyl peptidase activity), multiplex PCR for the three major pathogens (target genes for Strep. uberis, Strep. dysgalactiae and Strep. agalactiae: pauA, 16S rRNA, and sklA3, respectively), and mass spectroscopy using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS) were evaluated for the diagnosis and discrimination of the three clinically most relevant PNC. Results The probability that a strain of Strep. uberis, Strep. dysgalactiae and Strep. agalactiae was correctly identified by combining the results of the 9 phenotypic tests was 92%, 90%, and 100%, respectively. Applying the multiplex PCR, all strains of the three major pathogens were correctly identified and no false positive results occurred. Correct identification was observed for all strains of Strep. uberis and Strep. agalactiae using MALDI-TOF MS. In the case of Strep. dysgalactiae, some variability was observed at the subspecies level, but all strains were allocated to one single cluster. Conclusions The results of the present study show that reliable identification of the clinically most relevant PNC (Strep

  12. Characterization of Streptococcus gordonii prophage PH15: complete genome sequence and functional analysis of phage-encoded integrase and endolysin.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Jan R

    2008-10-01

    Streptococcus gordonii OMZ1039, isolated from supragingival dental plaque, was found to harbour a prophage, PH15, whose excision could be induced by mitomycin treatment. Phage PH15 belongs to the Siphoviridae. The complete genome sequence of PH15 was determined. The genome was 39 136 bp in size and contained 61 ORFs. The genome of PH15 was most similar in the structural module to the temperate bacteriophages MM1 and phiNIH1.1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes, respectively. In strain OMZ1039, PH15 was found to reside as a prophage in the cysteinyl-tRNA gene. A plasmid, harbouring the attP site and the integrase gene downstream of a constitutive promoter, was capable of site-specific integration into the genomes of different oral streptococcal species. The phage endolysin was purified after expression in Escherichia coli and found to inhibit growth of all S. gordonii strains tested and several different streptococcal species, including the pathogens Streptococcus mutans, S. pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae.

  13. 21 CFR 526.313 - Ceftiofur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... clinical mastitis in lactating dairy cattle associated with coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus... Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis. (iii) Limitations. Milk taken...

  14. 21 CFR 526.313 - Ceftiofur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... clinical mastitis in lactating dairy cattle associated with coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus... Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis. (iii) Limitations. Milk taken...

  15. SCM, the M Protein of Streptococcus canis Binds Immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Simone; Eichhorn, Inga; Kohler, Thomas P.; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus canis (SCM) is a virulence factor and serves as a surface-associated receptor with a particular affinity for mini-plasminogen, a cleavage product of the broad-spectrum serine protease plasmin. Here, we report that SCM has an additional high-affinity immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding activity. The ability of a particular S. canis isolate to bind to IgG significantly correlates with a scm-positive phenotype, suggesting a dominant role of SCM as an IgG receptor. Subsequent heterologous expression of SCM in non-IgG binding S. gordonii and Western Blot analysis with purified recombinant SCM proteins confirmed its IgG receptor function. As expected for a zoonotic agent, the SCM-IgG interaction is species-unspecific, with a particular affinity of SCM for IgGs derived from human, cats, dogs, horses, mice, and rabbits, but not from cows and goats. Similar to other streptococcal IgG-binding proteins, the interaction between SCM and IgG occurs via the conserved Fc domain and is, therefore, non-opsonic. Interestingly, the interaction between SCM and IgG-Fc on the bacterial surface specifically prevents opsonization by C1q, which might constitute another anti-phagocytic mechanism of SCM. Extensive binding analyses with a variety of different truncated SCM fragments defined a region of 52 amino acids located in the central part of the mature SCM protein which is important for IgG binding. This binding region is highly conserved among SCM proteins derived from different S. canis isolates but differs significantly from IgG-Fc receptors of S. pyogenes and S. dysgalactiae sub. equisimilis, respectively. In summary, we present an additional role of SCM in the pathogen-host interaction of S. canis. The detailed analysis of the SCM-IgG interaction should contribute to a better understanding of the complex roles of M proteins in streptococcal pathogenesis.

  16. Development of real-time PCR for detection and quantitation of Streptococcus parauberis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T L; Lim, Y J; Kim, D-H; Austin, B

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus parauberis is an increasing threat to aquaculture of olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus Temminck & Schlegel, in South Korea. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using the TaqMan probe assay to detect and quantify S. parauberis by targeting the gyrB gene sequences, which are effective for molecular analysis of the genus Streptococcus. Our real-time PCR assay is capable of detecting 10 fg of genomic DNA per reaction. The intra- and interassay coefficient of variation (CV) values ranged from 0.42-1.95%, demonstrating that the assay has good reproducibility. There was not any cross-reactivity to Streptococcus iniae or to other streptococcal/lactococcal fish pathogens, such as S. agalactiae and Lactococcus garvieae, indicating that the assay is highly specific to S. parauberis. The results of the real-time PCR assay corresponded well to those of conventional culture assays for S. parauberis from inoculated tissue homogenates (r = 0.957; P < 0.05). Hence, this sensitive and specific real-time PCR is a valuable tool for diagnostic quantitation of S. parauberis in clinical samples.

  17. Evidence for niche adaptation in the genome of the bovine pathogen Streptococcus uberis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Philip N; Holden, Matthew TG; Leigh, James A; Lennard, Nicola; Bignell, Alexandra; Barron, Andy; Clark, Louise; Quail, Michael A; Woodward, John; Barrell, Bart G; Egan, Sharon A; Field, Terence R; Maskell, Duncan; Kehoe, Michael; Dowson, Christopher G; Chanter, Neil; Whatmore, Adrian M; Bentley, Stephen D; Parkhill, Julian

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus uberis, a Gram positive bacterial pathogen responsible for a significant proportion of bovine mastitis in commercial dairy herds, colonises multiple body sites of the cow including the gut, genital tract and mammary gland. Comparative analysis of the complete genome sequence of S. uberis strain 0140J was undertaken to help elucidate the biology of this effective bovine pathogen. Results The genome revealed 1,825 predicted coding sequences (CDSs) of which 62 were identified as pseudogenes or gene fragments. Comparisons with related pyogenic streptococci identified a conserved core (40%) of orthologous CDSs. Intriguingly, S. uberis 0140J displayed a lower number of mobile genetic elements when compared with other pyogenic streptococci, however bacteriophage-derived islands and a putative genomic island were identified. Comparative genomics analysis revealed most similarity to the genomes of Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In contrast, streptococcal orthologs were not identified for 11% of the CDSs, indicating either unique retention of ancestral sequence, or acquisition of sequence from alternative sources. Functions including transport, catabolism, regulation and CDSs encoding cell envelope proteins were over-represented in this unique gene set; a limited array of putative virulence CDSs were identified. Conclusion S. uberis utilises nutritional flexibility derived from a diversity of metabolic options to successfully occupy a discrete ecological niche. The features observed in S. uberis are strongly suggestive of an opportunistic pathogen adapted to challenging and changing environmental parameters. PMID:19175920

  18. Microbiological survey for Mycoplasma spp. in a contagious agalactia endemic area.

    PubMed

    De la Fe, C; Assunção, P; Antunes, T; Rosales, R S; Poveda, J B

    2005-09-01

    In this work, we report a microbiological survey for Mycoplasma spp. undertaken between 2001 and 2002 in 28 goat herds in Gran Canaria, Spain, an area where contagious agalactia is endemic. All herds were randomly selected and represented approximately 15.5% of the total goat population of the island. A variable number of milk, articular and auricular swab samples were collected from each flock and cultured in specific mycoplasma culture media. There was a total of 38.5% positive flocks from which 37 mycoplasma isolates were obtained. In contrast with previous data obtained in Spain, our results showed that the large colony variant of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm LC) was the most commonly isolated agent associated with contagious agalactia. This species was isolated from 90% of the positive herds and accounted for 54.1% of all isolations. M. agalactiae was isolated from 40% of the positive herds (27% of all isolations) and in six herds M. arginini was isolated (18.7% of all isolations). No M. capricolum or M. putrefaciens strains were isolated. Mycoplasmas were isolated from 21 milk samples, 15 ear canals swabs and one articular sample. The association of several species was reported in several herds. These results are at variance with previous serological studies, which indicated a higher disease prevalence, and suggest that it could be necessary to use detection techniques such PCR to confirm the existence of contagious agalactia in goats.

  19. Characterization of a Streptococcus suis tet(O/W/32/O)-Carrying Element Transferable to Major Streptococcal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Claudio; Magi, Gloria; Mingoia, Marina; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Ripa, Sandro; Varaldo, Pietro E.

    2012-01-01

    Mosaic tetracycline resistance determinants are a recently discovered class of hybrids of ribosomal protection tet genes. They may show different patterns of mosaicism, but their final size has remained unaltered. Initially thought to be confined to a small group of anaerobic bacteria, mosaic tet genes were then found to be widespread. In the genus Streptococcus, a mosaic tet gene [tet(O/W/32/O)] was first discovered in Streptococcus suis, an emerging drug-resistant pig and human pathogen. In this study, we report the molecular characterization of a tet(O/W/32/O) gene-carrying mobile element from an S. suis isolate. tet(O/W/32/O) was detected, in tandem with tet(40), in a circular 14,741-bp genetic element (39.1% G+C; 17 open reading frames [ORFs] identified). The novel element, which we designated 15K, also carried the macrolide resistance determinant erm(B) and an aminoglycoside resistance four-gene cluster including aadE (streptomycin) and aphA (kanamycin). 15K appeared to be an unstable genetic element that, in the absence of recombinases, is capable of undergoing spontaneous excision under standard growth conditions. In the integrated form, 15K was found inside a 54,879-bp integrative and conjugative element (ICE) (50.5% G+C; 55 ORFs), which we designated ICESsu32457. An ∼1.3-kb segment that apparently served as the att site for excision of the unstable 15K element was identified. The novel ICE was transferable at high frequency to recipients from pathogenic Streptococcus species (S. suis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus agalactiae), suggesting that the multiresistance 15K element can successfully spread within streptococcal populations. PMID:22710115

  20. Survey of strain distribution and antibiotic resistance pattern of group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) isolated from clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Nasaj, Mona; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the present study were to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profils with particular emphasis on susceptible or resistant strains to macrolides and lincosamids antibiotics and to determine possible antibiotic resistance mechanisms occurring in group B streptococci (GBS) strains using PCR assay and disk diffusion method. Methods: A total of 62 clinical GBS strains were investigated. Antibacterial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method and inducible resistance test for clindamycin by standard double disk diffusion or D-zone test for all isolates to differentiate macrolide resistance phenotype (M), constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (cMLSB) and induced macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (iMLSB). In addition, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of penicillin were determined for all isolates. Finally, possible existence of antibiotic resistance genes for erythromycin (ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) and for clindamycin (linB) were examined among isolates using PCR assay. Results: All 62 isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, cefazoline and vancomycin. However, 93.5% (n=58) of isolates showed an increased MIC to penicillin. The overall rate of erythromycin resistance was 35.5% (n=22). All erythromycin-resistant isolates displayed the M phenotype (100%, n=22). All three erythromycin resistance genes (i.e. ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) were found in erythromycin-resistant isolates. Conclusion: It was concluded that prescribing antibiotic without antibacterial susceptibility tests should be prevented because of the high prevalence of erythromycin-resistant GBS strains and the fact that erythromycin-resistant GBS strains has shown an increased MIC to penicillin, as the drug of choice for treating GBS infections. PMID:27648402

  1. A microwave-irradiated Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine provides partial protection against experimental challenge in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave irradiation, as opposed to formalin exposure, has not routinely been used in the preparation of killed vaccines despite the advantages of decreased chemical toxicity, ability to kill cells quickly, ease of completion requiring only a standard microwave, and potential increased protein cons...

  2. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    PubMed

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  3. Recent trends in pediatric bacterial meningitis in Japan--a country where Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae conjugated vaccines have just been introduced.

    PubMed

    Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Yagihashi, Tatsuhiko; Sato, Yoshitake; Akita, Hironobu; Takahashi, Takao; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the trends in incidence and the characteristics of bacterial meningitis in Japan where Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine and 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) were introduced in 2008 and 2010, respectively, which was 5-20 years after their introduction in western countries. The nationwide Japanese survey of pediatric and neonatal bacterial meningitis was performed in 2011 and 2012. We analyzed the epidemiological and clinical data, and compared the information obtained in the previous nationwide survey database. We also investigated the risk factors for disease outcome. In the 2011-2012 surveys, 357 patients were evaluated. H. influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli were the main organisms. The number of patients hospitalized with bacterial meningitis per 1000 admissions decreased from 1.31 in 2009 to 0.43 in 2012 (p < 0.001). The incidence of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae meningitis also decreased from 0.66 to 0.08 (p < 0.001), and 0.30 to 0.06 (p < 0.001), respectively. Only 0-2 cases with Neisseria meningitidis were reported each year throughout 2001-2012. The median patient age was 10-12 months in 2001-2011, and became lower in 2012 (2 month old) (p < 0.001). The fatality rate for S. agalactiae is the highest (5.9% (11/187)) throughout 2001-2012 among the four organisms. Risk factors for death and sequelae were convulsions at onset, low CSF glucose, S. agalactiae etiology, and persistent positive CSF culture. Hib vaccine and PCV7 decreased the rate of bacterial meningitis. Earlier introduction of these vaccines may have prevented bacterial meningitis among Japanese children.

  4. Killing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), Haemophilus ducreyi, and vaginal Lactobacillus by 3-O-octyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Moncla, B J; Pryke, K; Isaacs, Charles E

    2008-04-01

    The microbicide candidate octylglycerol inactivates sexually transmitted bacterial pathogens at concentrations which spare normal vaginal flora (lactobacillus). Standard minimum microbicidal concentration assays and time-kill assays revealed the drug concentrations and times required for inactivation. Octylglycerol concentrations must exceed the binding capacity of any human serum albumin to be effective.

  5. Sheep primary cells as in vitro models to investigate Mycoplasma agalactiae host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Gabriel, Cordula; Kragl, Martin; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate infection models are imperative for the understanding of pathogens like mycoplasmas that are known for their strict host and tissue specificity, and lack of suitable cell and small animal models has hindered pathogenicity studies. This is particularly true for the economically important group of ruminant mycoplasmas whose virulence factors need to be elucidated for designing effective intervention strategies. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful role model especially because it is phylogenetically very close to M. bovis and causes similar symptoms by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we successfully prepared and characterized four different primary sheep cell lines, namely the epithelial and stromal cells from the mammary gland and uterus, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified vimentin and cytokeratin as specific markers to confirm the typical cell phenotypes of these primary cells. Furthermore, M. agalactiae's consistent adhesion and invasion into these primary cells proves the reliability of these cell models. Mimicking natural infections, mammary epithelial and stromal cells showed higher invasion and adhesion rates compared to the uterine cells as also seen via double immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, we have generated promising in vitro cell models to study host-pathogen interactions of M. agalactiae and related ruminant pathogens in a more authentic manner.

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae, le transformiste.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Campo, Nathalie; Bergé, Matthieu J; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Natural genetic transformation, which was discovered in this species, involves internalization of exogenous single-stranded DNA and its incorporation into the chromosome. It allows acquisition of pathogenicity islands and antibiotic resistance and promotes vaccine escape via capsule switching. This opinion article discusses how recent advances regarding several facets of pneumococcal transformation support the view that the process has evolved to maximize plasticity potential in this species, making the pneumococcus le transformiste of the bacterial kingdom and providing an advantage in the constant struggle between this pathogen and its host.

  7. Comparative erythromycin and tylosin susceptibility testing of streptococci from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Entorf, Monika; Feßler, Andrea T; Kaspar, Heike; Kadlec, Kristina; Peters, Thomas; Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    Tylosin, a 16-membered macrolide, is - besides other indications - used for the treatment of bovine mastitis. So far, there is only limited information available on the tylosin susceptibility of streptococci isolated from mastitis. The aim of the present study was to comparatively investigate 303 streptococci from bovine mastitis, including 101 Streptococcus agalactiae, 100 Streptococcus dysgalactiae and 102 Streptococcus uberis, for their tylosin and erythromycin susceptibility by broth microdilution and agar disk diffusion. Both tests followed the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). For erythromycin, the results were interpreted using the CLSI-approved clinical breakpoints. Moreover, erythromycin-resistant isolates were tested for the presence of macrolide resistance genes and for inducible macrolide resistance. In general, both testing methods showed a good correlation for the three streptococcal species, although for the erythromycin susceptibility testing 11 S. uberis isolates fell into the very major error category. All but one of the erythromycin-resistant isolates harbored at least one macrolide resistance gene, with the erm(B) gene being most common. Moreover, single isolates of S. agalactiae and S. dysgalactiae proved to be inducibly macrolide-resistant. Since inducible macrolide resistance can easily switch to constitutive resistance, tylosin should not be used for the treatment of infections caused by inducibly resistant streptococci.

  8. Short communication: Streptococcus canis is able to establish a persistent udder infection in a dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Król, Jarosław; Twardoń, Jan; Mrowiec, Jacek; Podkowik, Magdalena; Dejneka, Grzegorz; Dębski, Bogdan; Nowicki, Tadeusz; Zalewski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    Bovine mastitis caused by Streptococcus canis is relatively rare. Consequently, many epidemiologic aspects of the infection, including factors that mediate crossing of host species barriers by the pathogen, infectiousness of the microorganism to the mammary gland, and the course of the disease within a herd, are still not elucidated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe results of a 15-mo observation of subclinical Strep. canis mastitis on a dairy farm housing 76 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. Upon 3 visits to the farm during a period between April 2013 and June 2014, Strep. canis was cultured from milk samples of 17 (22.4% of the herd), 7 (9.6%), and 8 (11.3%) cows, respectively. The isolates obtained were characterized phenotypically by means of the API Strep identification kit (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), as well as genetically by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains displayed the same biochemical features, and the molecular methods revealed that the isolates belonged to a single clone or were very closely related. Results of the study indicate that Strep. canis is capable of causing intramammary infections of long duration, behaving in a contagious manner. Because a persistently infected cow may serve as the source of Strep. canis infection for other animals, effective control of this type of udder infection within a herd may require similar measures to those adopted in Streptococcus agalactiae eradication programs.

  9. Emergence of Atypical Mycoplasma agalactiae Strains Harboring a New Prophage and Associated with an Alpine Wild Ungulate Mortality Episode

    PubMed Central

    Tardy, Florence; Baranowski, Eric; Nouvel, Laurent-Xavier; Mick, Virginie; Manso-Silvàn, Lucía; Thiaucourt, François; Thébault, Patricia; Breton, Marc; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Blanchard, Alain; Garnier, Alexandre; Gibert, Philippe; Game, Yvette; Poumarat, François

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Mycoplasma agalactiae is responsible for contagious agalactia (CA) in small domestic ruminants, a syndrome listed by the World Organization for Animal Health and responsible for severe damage to the dairy industry. Recently, we frequently isolated this pathogen from lung lesions of ibexes during a mortality episode in the French Alps. This situation was unusual in terms of host specificity and tissue tropism, raising the question of M. agalactiae emergence in wildlife. To address this issue, the ibex isolates were characterized using a combination of approaches that included antigenic profiles, molecular typing, optical mapping, and whole-genome sequencing. Genome analyses showed the presence of a new, large prophage containing 35 coding sequences (CDS) that was detected in most but not all ibex strains and has a homolog in Mycoplasma conjunctivae, a species causing keratoconjunctivitis in wild ungulates. This and the presence in all strains of large integrated conjugative elements suggested highly dynamic genomes. Nevertheless, M. agalactiae strains circulating in the ibex population were shown to be highly related, most likely originating from a single parental clone that has also spread to another wild ungulate species of the same geographical area, the chamois. These strains clearly differ from strains described in Europe so far, including those found nearby, before CA eradication a few years ago. While M. agalactiae pathogenicity in ibexes remains unclear, our data showed the emergence of atypical strains in Alpine wild ungulates, raising the question of a role for the wild fauna as a potential reservoir of pathogenic mycoplasmas. PMID:22522685

  10. Genetic Manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (The Group A Streptococcus, GAS)

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation. PMID:24510894

  11. Genetic manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS).

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-10-02

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe, often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation.

  12. Diversity and Evolution of the Tn5801-tet(M)-Like Integrative and Conjugative Elements among Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus.

    PubMed

    León-Sampedro, Ricardo; Novais, Carla; Peixe, Luísa; Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M

    2016-01-04

    This work describes the diversity and evolution of Tn5801 among enterococci, staphylococci, and streptococci based on analysis of the 5,073 genomes of these bacterial groups available in gene databases. We also examined 610 isolates of Enterococcus (from 10 countries, 1987 to 2010) for the presence of this and other known CTn-tet(M) elements due to the scarcity of data about Tn5801 among enterococci. Genome location (by ICeu-I-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] hybridization/integration site identification), conjugation and fitness (by standard methods), Tn5801 characterization (by long-PCR mapping/sequencing), and clonality (by PFGE/multilocus sequence typing [MLST]) were studied. Twenty-three Tn5801 variants (17 unpublished) clustered in two groups, designated "A" (25 kb; n = 14; predominant in Staphylococcus aureus) and "B" (20 kb; n = 9; predominant in Streptococcus agalactiae). The percent GC content of the common backbone suggests a streptococcal origin of Tn5801 group B, with further acquisition of a 5-kb fragment that resulted in group A. Deep sequence analysis allowed identification of variants associated with clonal lineages of S. aureus (clonal complex 8 [CC8], sequence type 239 [ST239]), S. agalactiae (CC17), Enterococcus faecium (ST17/ST18), or Enterococcus faecalis (ST8), local variants, or variants located in different species and geographical areas. All Tn5801 elements were chromosomally located upstream of the guaA gene, which serves as an integration hot spot. Transferability was demonstrated only for Tn5801 type B among E. faecalis clonal backgrounds, which eventually harbored another Tn5801 copy. The study documents early acquisition of Tn5801 by Enterococcus, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus. Clonal waves of these pathogens seem to have contributed to the geographical spread and local evolution of the transposon. Horizontal transfer, also demonstrated, could explain the variability observed, with the isolates often containing sequences of

  13. Diversity and Evolution of the Tn5801-tet(M)-Like Integrative and Conjugative Elements among Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus

    PubMed Central

    León-Sampedro, Ricardo; Novais, Carla; Peixe, Luísa; Baquero, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the diversity and evolution of Tn5801 among enterococci, staphylococci, and streptococci based on analysis of the 5,073 genomes of these bacterial groups available in gene databases. We also examined 610 isolates of Enterococcus (from 10 countries, 1987 to 2010) for the presence of this and other known CTn-tet(M) elements due to the scarcity of data about Tn5801 among enterococci. Genome location (by ICeu-I–pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] hybridization/integration site identification), conjugation and fitness (by standard methods), Tn5801 characterization (by long-PCR mapping/sequencing), and clonality (by PFGE/multilocus sequence typing [MLST]) were studied. Twenty-three Tn5801 variants (17 unpublished) clustered in two groups, designated “A” (25 kb; n = 14; predominant in Staphylococcus aureus) and “B” (20 kb; n = 9; predominant in Streptococcus agalactiae). The percent GC content of the common backbone suggests a streptococcal origin of Tn5801 group B, with further acquisition of a 5-kb fragment that resulted in group A. Deep sequence analysis allowed identification of variants associated with clonal lineages of S. aureus (clonal complex 8 [CC8], sequence type 239 [ST239]), S. agalactiae (CC17), Enterococcus faecium (ST17/ST18), or Enterococcus faecalis (ST8), local variants, or variants located in different species and geographical areas. All Tn5801 elements were chromosomally located upstream of the guaA gene, which serves as an integration hot spot. Transferability was demonstrated only for Tn5801 type B among E. faecalis clonal backgrounds, which eventually harbored another Tn5801 copy. The study documents early acquisition of Tn5801 by Enterococcus, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus. Clonal waves of these pathogens seem to have contributed to the geographical spread and local evolution of the transposon. Horizontal transfer, also demonstrated, could explain the variability observed, with the isolates often containing

  14. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Taiete, Tiago; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing), classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis. PMID:24031748

  15. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection.

  16. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  17. In vitro and in vivo cell invasion and systemic spreading of Mycoplasma agalactiae in the sheep infection model.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Spergser, Joachim; Brunthaler, René; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2014-11-01

    Generally regarded as extracellular pathogens, molecular mechanisms of mycoplasma persistence, chronicity and disease spread are largely unknown. Mycoplasma agalactiae, an economically important pathogen of small ruminants, causes chronic infections that are difficult to eradicate. Animals continue to shed the agent for several months and even years after the initial infection, in spite of long antibiotic treatment. However, little is known about the strategies that M. agalactiae employs to survive and spread within an immunocompetent host to cause chronic disease. Here, we demonstrate for the first time its ability to invade cultured human (HeLa) and ruminant (BEND and BLF) host cells. Presence of intracellular mycoplasmas is clearly substantiated using differential immunofluorescence technique and quantitative gentamicin invasion assays. Internalized M. agalactiae could survive and exit the cells in a viable state to repopulate the extracellular environment after complete removal of extracellular bacteria with gentamicin. Furthermore, an experimental sheep intramammary infection was carried out to evaluate its systemic spread to organs and host niches distant from the site of initial infection. Positive results obtained via PCR, culture and immunohistochemistry, especially the latter depicting the presence of M. agalactiae in the cytoplasm of mammary duct epithelium and macrophages, clearly provide the first formal proof of M. agalactiae's capability to translocate across the mammary epithelium and systemically disseminate to distant inner organs. Altogether, the findings of these in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that M. agalactiae is capable of entering host cells and this might be the strategy that it employs at a population level to ward off the host immune response and antibiotic action, and to disseminate to new and safer niches to later egress and once again proliferate upon the return of favorable conditions to cause persistent chronic infections.

  18. Flow cytometric method for the assessment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of antibacterial agents to Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Patrícia; Antunes, Nuno T; Rosales, Ruben S; de la Fe, Christian; Poveda, Carlos; Poveda, José B; Davey, Hazel M

    2006-10-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was evaluated for the determination of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of seven antibacterial agents (enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, oxytetracycline, and tylosin) on Mycoplasma (M.) agalactiae. Flow cytometry was able to detect M. agalactiae inhibition from 6 h postincubation, although it seems that definitive MIC values determined by flow cytometry were only possible at 12-h postincubation. However, the results obtained by the traditional method were only obtained at 24 h, when a visible change in the medium had occurred. At 24 h, both methods gave the same result for six antibacterial agents (enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and oxytetracycline); whereas flow cytometry gave slightly higher MIC for tylosin. This was attributed to the fact that the M. agalactiae growth that had occurred in the tubes containing tylosin was not enough to visibly change the color of the medium. Futhermore, flow cytometry detected that inhibitory concentrations of oxytetracycline, chloramphenicol, and tylosin as judged at 24 h were not able to inhibit the M. agalactiae growth after 48 h. MIC values of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were sufficient only to maintain the total counts per milliliter throughout the time matched samples, whereas higher concentrations of theses antibacterial agents reduced the total counts per milliliter over the course of the experiment. The main advantage of the flow cytometric method is that MIC results for M. agalactiae can be obtained in a shorter time than is possible with the traditional method. The method presented makes identification of resistant populations of M. agalactiae possible and, unlike the traditional method, allows the effect of each antibacterial agent to be determined in real-time at the single-cell level.

  19. High-level fluorescence labeling of gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aymanns, Simone; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Wolz, Christiane; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence labeling of bacterial pathogens has a broad range of interesting applications including the observation of living bacteria within host cells. We constructed a novel vector based on the E. coli streptococcal shuttle plasmid pAT28 that can propagate in numerous bacterial species from different genera. The plasmid harbors a promoterless copy of the green fluorescent variant gene egfp under the control of the CAMP-factor gene (cfb) promoter of Streptococcus agalactiae and was designated pBSU101. Upon transfer of the plasmid into streptococci, the bacteria show a distinct and easily detectable fluorescence using a standard fluorescence microscope and quantification by FACS-analysis demonstrated values that were 10-50 times increased over the respective controls. To assess the suitability of the construct for high efficiency fluorescence labeling in different gram-positive pathogens, numerous species were transformed. We successfully labeled Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus aureus strains utilizing the EGFP reporter plasmid pBSU101. In all of these species the presence of the cfb promoter construct resulted in high-level EGFP expression that could be further increased by growing the streptococcal and enterococcal cultures under high oxygen conditions through continuous aeration.

  20. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P; Williams, Matthew L; Nascimento, Marcelle M; Burne, Robert A

    2016-01-29

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens.

  1. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R.; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P.; Williams, Matthew L.; Nascimento, Marcelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)–ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  2. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma agalactiae infection in free-ranging Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica) in Andalusia, southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Verbisck-Bucker, G; González-Candela, M; Galián, J; Cubero-Pablo, M J; Martín-Atance, P; León-Vizcaíno, L

    2008-04-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is the main causal agent of contagious agalactia syndrome in Spain. It is a severe disease of small ruminants, endemic in Mediterranean countries, that is characterized by mastitis, arthritis, and keratoconjunctivitis. This paper investigates the temporal, spatial, and host-related factors in the distribution of M. agalactiae infection from October 1996 to November 1998 and March 2002 to May 2003 in Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica) populations from Andalusia, in southern Spain. The predisposing factors to infection among previously selected factors (year of sampling, climatic season, geographic origin according to province, mountain range and metapopulation, sex, year of life, presence of scabies, and phase of the reproductive cycle) were established. We collected conjunctival and ear-canal swabs from 411 free-ranging ibexes. The frequency of infected ibexes was 11.2%. The peak frequency of infection occurred in 1998 and in summer. Granada was the province with greatest risk (odds ratio = 2.6) of carriers (18.8% infected). The predisposing factors were sex (females), age (young animals), and metapopulation (Sierra Nevada). We identified a higher number of infected ibexes in the metapopulation "Sierra Nevada" (34/ 256) and significant differences among the three established metapopulations (P<0.01). Mycoplasma agalactiae infection represents a risk for population density and maintenance of these wild populations; infections can result in blindness, malnutrition, and polyarthritis leading to numerous deaths.

  3. Genetic loci of Mycoplasma agalactiae involved in systemic spreading during experimental intramammary infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Zimmermann, Martina; Flöck, Martina; Brunthaler, Rene; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2016-10-20

    Mycoplasmas are amongst the most successful pathogens of both humans and animals yet the molecular basis of mycoplasma pathogenesis is poorly understood. This is partly due to the lack of classical virulence factors and little similarity to common bacterial pathogenic determinants. Using Mycoplasma agalactiae as a model we initiated research in this direction by screening a transposon mutant library in the natural sheep host using a negative selection method. Having successfully identified putative factors involved in the colonization of local infection and lymphogenic sites, the current study assessed mutants unable to spread systemically in sheep after experimental intramammary infection. Analysis of distant body sites for complete absence of mutants via SSM PCR revealed that additional set of genes, such as pdhB, oppC, oppB, gtsB, MAG1890, MAG5520 and MAG3650 are required for systemic spreading apart from those that were necessary for initial colonization. Additional in vitro studies with the mutants absent at these systemic sites confirmed the potential role of some of the respective gene products concerning their interaction with host cells. Mutants of pdhB, oppC and MAG4460 exhibited significantly slower growth in the presence of HeLa cells in MEM medium. This first attempt to identify genes exclusively required for systemic spreading provides a basis for further in-depth research to understand the exact mechanism of chronicity and persistence of M. agalactiae.

  4. Molecular pathogenicity of Streptococcus anginosus.

    PubMed

    Asam, D; Spellerberg, B

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus anginosus and the closely related species Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius, are primarily commensals of the mucosa. The true pathogenic potential of this group has been under-recognized for a long time because of difficulties in correct species identification as well as the commensal nature of these species. In recent years, streptococci of the S. anginosus group have been increasingly found as relevant microbial pathogens in abscesses and blood cultures and they play a pathogenic role in cystic fibrosis. Several international studies have shown a surprisingly high frequency of infections caused by the S. anginosus group. Recent studies and a genome-wide comparative analysis suggested the presence of multiple putative virulence factors that are well-known from other streptococcal species. However, very little is known about the molecular basis of pathogenicity in these bacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge of pathogenicity factors and their regulation in S. anginosus.

  5. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  6. Anatomic location of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri and Mycoplasma agalactiae in naturally infected goat male auricular carriers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Martín, Angel; De la Fe, Christian; Amores, Joaquín; Sánchez, Antonio; Contreras, Antonio; Paterna, Ana; Buendía, Antonio J; Corrales, Juan C

    2012-06-15

    This study sought to determine whether male goat auricular carriers of mycoplasmas known to cause contagious agalactia could harbour these microorganisms at anatomical sites other than the ears. A microbiological study was conducted in 6 naturally infected bucks that had been diagnosed as chronic auricular asymptomatic carriers of Mycoplasma (M.) mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) more than one year previously. To detect mycoplasmas, cultures and PCR were performed on 46 samples taken from each goat from the cardio-respiratory, digestive, nervous, lymph and genitourinary systems and several joints. Of a total of 274 samples analyzed, 28 were positive for mycoplasmas (10.1%): Mmc was detected in 17 (6.1%), Mycoplasma (M.) agalactiae in 12 (4.3%) and both microorganisms were identified in one of the samples. In all 6 goats, mixed infection was observed despite none being auricular carriers of M. agalactiae. Mycoplasma spp. were identified at 15 different sites; the most frequent sites being the joints (31.2%, 5 positive samples), lymph nodes (25%, 4 positive samples) and respiratory tract (25%, 4 positive samples). Positive results were also obtained in three brain tissue (18.7%), two cardiac tissue (12.5%) and one ileum, urethra, testicle and bulbourethral gland (6.25%) samples. The histopathological findings may suggest the presence of mild chronic conditions in some of the organs where the bacteria were found. Our findings reveal for the first time the capacity of Mmc and M. agalactiae to colonize several other organ systems in chronically naturally infected auricular carriers, possibly representing an added risk factor for the spread of these microorganisms. In the case of M. agalactiae, colonization seemed to be independent of the animal's auricular carrier state.

  7. Synergistic streptococcal phage λSA2 and B30 endolysins kill streptococci in cow milk and in a mouse model of mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Powell, Anne M.; Camp, Mary J.; Pohl, Calvin S.; Donovan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis results in billion dollar losses annually in the United States alone. Streptococci are among the most relevant causative agents of this disease. Conventional antibiotic therapy is often unsuccessful and contributes to development of antibiotic resistance. Bacteriophage endolysins represent a new class of antimicrobials against these bacteria. In this work, we characterized the endolysins (lysins) of the streptococcal phages λSA2 and B30 and evaluated their potential as anti-mastitis agents. When tested in vitro against live streptococci, both enzymes exhibited near-optimum lytic activities at ionic strengths, pH, and Ca2+ concentrations consistent with cow milk. When tested in combination in a checkerboard assay, the lysins were found to exhibit strong synergy. The λSA2 lysin displayed high activity in milk against Streptococcus dysgalactiae (reduction of CFU/ml by 3.5 log units at 100 μg/ml), Streptococcus agalactiae (2 log), and Streptococcus uberis (4 log), whereas the B30 lysin was less effective. In a mouse model of bovine mastitis, both enzymes significantly reduced intramammary concentrations of all three streptococcal species (except for B30 vs. S. dysgalactiae), and the effects on mammary gland wet weights and TNFα concentrations were consistent with these findings. Unexpectedly, the synergistic effect determined for the two enzymes in vitro was not observed in the mouse model. Overall, our results illustrate the potential of endolysins for treatment of Streptococcus-induced bovine mastitis. PMID:25895090

  8. Synergistic streptococcal phage λSA2 and B30 endolysins kill streptococci in cow milk and in a mouse model of mastitis.

    PubMed

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Powell, Anne M; Camp, Mary J; Pohl, Calvin S; Donovan, David M

    2015-10-01

    Bovine mastitis results in billion dollar losses annually in the USA alone. Streptococci are among the most relevant causative agents of this disease. Conventional antibiotic therapy is often unsuccessful and contributes to development of antibiotic resistance. Bacteriophage endolysins represent a new class of antimicrobials against these bacteria. In this work, we characterized the endolysins (lysins) of the streptococcal phages λSA2 and B30 and evaluated their potential as anti-mastitis agents. When tested in vitro against live streptococci, both enzymes exhibited near-optimum lytic activities at ionic strengths, pH, and Ca(2+) concentrations consistent with cow milk. When tested in combination in a checkerboard assay, the lysins were found to exhibit strong synergy. The λSA2 lysin displayed high activity in milk against Streptococcus dysgalactiae (reduction of CFU/ml by 3.5 log units at 100 μg/ml), Streptococcus agalactiae (2 log), and Streptococcus uberis (4 log), whereas the B30 lysin was less effective. In a mouse model of bovine mastitis, both enzymes significantly reduced intramammary concentrations of all three streptococcal species (except for B30 vs. S. dysgalactiae), and the effects on mammary gland wet weights and TNFα concentrations were consistent with these findings. Unexpectedly, the synergistic effect determined for the two enzymes in vitro was not observed in the mouse model. Overall, our results illustrate the potential of endolysins for treatment of Streptococcus-induced bovine mastitis.

  9. Recombination-deficient Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Daneo-Moore, L.; Volpe, A.

    1985-05-01

    A UV-sensitive derivative was obtained from Streptococcus sanguis Challis. The organism could be transformed with a number of small streptococcal plasmids at frequencies equal to, or 1 logarithm below, the transformation frequencies for the parent organism. However, transformation with chromosomal DNA was greatly impaired in the UV-sensitive derivative.

  10. Population structure of Streptococcus oralis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thuy; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Gilbert, Steven C.; Clark, Douglas; Wade, William G.; Beighton, David

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus oralis is a member of the normal human oral microbiota, capable of opportunistic pathogenicity; like related oral streptococci, it exhibits appreciable phenotypic and genetic variation. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for S. oralis was developed and the resultant data analysed to examine the population structure of the species. Analysis of 113 isolates, confirmed as belonging to the S. oralis/mitis group by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, characterized the population as highly diverse and undergoing inter- and intra-species recombination with a probable clonal complex structure. ClonalFrame analysis of these S. oralis isolates along with examples of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae grouped the named species into distinct, coherent populations and did not support the clustering of S. pseudopneumoniae with S. mitis as reported previously using distance-based methods. Analysis of the individual loci suggested that this discrepancy was due to the possible hybrid nature of S. pseudopneumoniae. The data are available on the public MLST website (http://pubmlst.org/soralis/). PMID:19423627

  11. First Isolation of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae from a Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kichan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Hee-Soo; Her, Moon; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus species are emerging potential pathogens in marine mammals. We report the isolation and identification of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae in a Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

  12. [Evaluation of Prolex for the rapid identification of streptococci isolated in medical microbiology].

    PubMed

    Loubinoux, J; Mihaila-Amrouche, L; Bouvet, A

    2004-10-01

    The need to rapidly identify streptococci responsible for acute infectious diseases has led to the development of agglutination techniques that are able to identify streptococcal group antigens (A, B, C, D, F, and G) directly from primoculture colonies on blood agar. The Prolex agglutination tests (Pro-Lab Diagnostics, Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada), distributed in France by i2a, have been used for the determination of group antigens of 166 isolates of streptococci and enterococci previously identified in the National Reference Center for Streptococci. The results obtained with the Prolex reagents have permitted to correctly identify all pyogenic beta-hemolytic streptococci (23 Streptococcus pyogenes, 21 Streptococcus agalactiae, 33 Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis including 6 group C and 27 group G, and 5 Streptococcus porcinus including 4 group B). Four differences between unexpected agglutinations (A or F) and species identifications have been obtained. These differences were observed for four non-hemolytic isolates of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus infantarius, and Streptococcus suis. The anti-D reagent has been of value as a marker for isolates of enterococci. Thus, these results confirm the abilities of these agglutination tests for the grouping of beta-hemolytic streptococci. Moreover, the use of Prolex has the advantage to be rapid because of the non-enzymatic but chemical extraction of streptococcal antigens.

  13. GLYOXYLATE FERMENTATION BY STREPTOCOCCUS ALLANTOICUS

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, R. C.; Drucker, H.; Wolfe, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    Valentine, R. C. (University of Illinois, Urbana), H. Drucker, and R. S. Wolfe. Glyoxylate fermentation by Streptococcus allantoicus. J. Bacteriol. 87:241–246. 1964.—Extracts of Streptococcus allantoicus were found to degrade glyoxylate, yielding tartronic semialdehyde and CO2. Tartronic semialdehyde was prepared chemically, and its properties were compared with the enzymatic product: reduction by sodium borohydride yielded glycerate; heating at 100 C yielded glycolaldehyde and CO2; autoxidation yielded mesoxalic semialdehyde; periodate oxidation yielded glyoxylate and a compound presumed to be formate. Tartronic semialdehyde reductase was present in extracts of S. allantoicus and in a species of Pseudomonas grown on allantoin. A scheme for the synthesis of acetate from glyoxylate by S. allantoicus is discussed. PMID:14151040

  14. Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri group") are of different clinical importance and are not equally associated with abscess.

    PubMed

    Claridge, J E; Attorri, S; Musher, D M; Hebert, J; Dunbar, S

    2001-05-15

    Difficulties in distinguishing organisms of the "Streptococcus milleri group" (SMG; Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus), have caused ambiguity in determining their pathogenic potential. We reviewed 118 cases in which SMG isolates had been identified using 16S rDNA sequence. S. constellatus and S. anginosus were isolated far more frequently than was S. intermedius. Nearly all isolates of S. intermedius and most isolates of S. constellatus, but only 19% of those of S. anginosus, were associated with abscess. Our findings suggest that speciation of the SMG may guide diagnostic evaluation, give insight into the possible role of coinfecting organisms, and help assess the need to search for occult abscess.

  15. In vitro susceptibilities of field isolates of Mycoplasma agalactiae to oxytetracycline, tylosin, enrofloxacin, spiramycin and lincomycin-spectinomycin.

    PubMed

    Loria, G R; Sammartino, C; Nicholas, R A J; Ayling, R D

    2003-08-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of tetracycline, enrofloxacin, tylosin, spiramycin and a lincomycin:spectinomycin 1:2 combination, against 24 Sicilian isolates of Mycoplasma agalactiae, the causative organism of contagious agalactia were determined in vitro by a broth dilution method. Enrofloxacin was the most effective antimicrobial in vitro with a range of MIC values from 0.125 to 0.500 microg/ml and an MIC(50) of 0.203 and MIC(90) of 0.365 microg/ml. Using the MIC(50) and MIC(90) values the remaining four antimicrobials are ranked in order of in vitro effectiveness as follows: tylosin (MIC(50)0.292; MIC(90)0.525 microg/ml) was slightly more effective than tetracycline (MIC(50)0.296; MIC(90)0.533 microg/ml), followed by lincomycin:spectinomycin (MIC(50)0.521; MIC(90)0.938 microg/ml) and spiramycin (MIC(50)1.583; MIC(90)2.850 microg/ml). MIC values above 1.000 microg/ml were obtained using tetracycline, tylosin and spiramycin for some M. agalactiae isolates.

  16. Comprehensive RNA-Seq Profiling to Evaluate the Sheep Mammary Gland Transcriptome in Response to Experimental Mycoplasma agalactiae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Korb, Melanie; Brunthaler, René; Ertl, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is a worldwide serious pathogen of small ruminants that usually spreads through the mammary route causing acute to subacute mastitis progressing to chronic persistent disease that is hard to eradicate. Knowledge of mechanisms of its pathogenesis and persistence in the mammary gland are still insufficient, especially the host-pathogen interplay that enables it to reside in a chronic subclinical state. This study reports transcriptome profiling of mammary tissue from udders of sheep experimentally infected with M. agalactiae type strain PG2 in comparison with uninfected control animals using Illumina RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq). Several differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were observed in the infected udders and RT-qPCR analyses of selected DEGs showed their expression profiles to be in agreement with results from RNA-Seq. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed majority of the DEGs to be associated with mycoplasma defense responses that are directly or indirectly involved in host innate and adaptive immune responses. Similar RNA-Seq analyses were also performed with spleen cells of the same sheep to know the specific systemic transcriptome responses. Spleen cells exhibited a comparatively lower number of DEGs suggesting a less prominent host response in this organ. To our knowledge this is the first study that describes host transcriptomics of M. agalactiae infection and the related immune-inflammatory responses. The data provides useful information to further dissect the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying mycoplasma mastitis, which is a prerequisite for designing effective intervention strategies. PMID:28081235

  17. Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., two novel Streptococcus species isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Vandamme, Peter; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; Elfahime, El Mostafa; Farricha, Omar El; Swings, Jean; Amar, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on two unidentified Gram-stain positive, catalase and oxidase negative, non-hemolytic Streptococcus-like organisms recovered from raw camel milk in Morocco. Phenotypic characterization and comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated that the two strains were highly different from each other and that they did not correspond to any recognized species of the genus Streptococcus. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the unidentified organisms each formed a hitherto unknown sub-line within the genus Streptococcus, displaying a close affinity with Streptococcus moroccensis, Streptococcus minor and Streptococcus ovis. DNA G+C content determination, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and biochemical tests demonstrated the bacterial isolates represent two novel species. Based on the phenotypic distinctiveness of the new bacteria and molecular genetic evidence, it is proposed to classify the two strains as Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov., with CCMM B832(T) (=LMG 27683(T)) as the type strain, and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., with CCMM B834(T) (=LMG 27685(T)) as the type strain.

  18. Mode of action and In Vitro susceptibility of mastitis pathogens to macedocin ST91KM and preparation of a teat seal containing the bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Pieterse, Renee; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Leon M.T., Dicks

    2010-01-01

    Mastitis is considered to be the most economically costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Regular dosage of animals with antibiotics, including use of prophylactic concentrations, may select for resistant strains. The purpose of this study was to determine the mode of action of a new bacteriocin (macedocin ST91KM), to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance of mastitis pathogens to antibiotics commonly used in treatment remedies, and to introduce the possible use of an alternative antimicrobial agent. The bacteriocin macedocin ST91KM, produced by Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus ST91KM, is bactericidal to Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Staphylococcus aureus associated with mastitis infections, including strains resistant to methicillin and oxacillin. Sensitive cells were deformed and secreted nucleotides, K+ and β-galactosidase when exposed to macedocin ST91KM. Adsorption of the peptide to target cells decreased in the presence of solvents, suggesting that receptors on the cell surfaces have lipid moieties. No adsorption was recorded in the presence of MgCl2, KI and Na2CO3, suggesting that ionic strength plays an important role. A teat seal preparation containing macedocin ST91KM effectively released the peptide and inhibited the growth of S. agalactiae. Macedocin ST91KM could form the basis for alternative dry cow therapy to prevent mastitis infections in dairy cows as it is effective against pathogens that display resistance to conventional antibiotic therapy. PMID:24031473

  19. A retrospective study of the aetiology and temporal distribution of bovine clinical mastitis in smallholder dairy herds in the Dar es Salaam region of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kivaria, F M; Noordhuizen, J P T M

    2007-05-01

    A 31-year record-based retrospective study was carried out to determine the aetiology and temporal distribution of bovine clinical mastitis in smallholder dairy herds in the Dar es Salaam region of Tanzania over the period November 1971-December 2002. Laboratory information on 1964 quarter samples from 1365 cows in 281 smallholder dairy herds were retrieved, compiled and studied. Eighty-eight percent of the quarter samples were culture-positive and the predominant mastitis pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (25.7%), Streptococcus agalactiae (15.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3%) and Escherichia coli (14.1%). Other isolates included Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7.5%), Streptococcus dysgalactiae (5.2%) and Streptococcus uberis (4.2%). Contagious mastitis pathogens were isolated from 45.6% of the culture-positive samples, whereas environmental and miscellaneous pathogens were isolated from 48.2% and 5.7%, respectively. Thirty percent of the miscellaneous mastitis pathogens were Candida species. The results demonstrate a steady increase in clinical Candida albicans mastitis. The prevalence of Candida albicans has increased from 1% in 1971 to 17.0% in November 2002. Conversely, despite some fluctuations, the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, E. coli and K. pneumoniae remain above 10%. The possible risk factors for these observations are discussed.

  20. Group A Streptococcus vulvovaginitis in breastfeeding women.

    PubMed

    Rahangdale, Lisa; Lacy, Judith; Hillard, Paula A

    2008-08-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus-associated vulvovaginitis is uncommon in adult women. Clinicians should include group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus as a possible cause of vulvovaginal symptoms in breastfeeding women. Along with appropriate antibiotic therapy, vaginal estrogen therapy may be considered to diminish susceptibility to recurrent infection in women with vaginal atrophy.

  1. Group G Streptococcus bacteremia in recurrent cellulitis.

    PubMed

    di Meo, Nicola; Stinco, Giuseppe; Gubertini, Nicoletta; Patriarca, Maria Martina; Trevisan, Giusto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, group G Streptococcus has been reported with increasing frequency as the cause of a variety of human infections. Underlying host factors such as immunosuppression, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis may be predisposing conditions leading to infection. Toxic involvement and post-streptococcal sequalae, once believed to be exclusive to infections caused by group A Streptococcus, are now known to occur following acute group G Streptococcus and group C Streptococcus infections. We report on a case of group G Streptococcus bacteremia and recurrent cellulitis with toxic involvement. Patient blood cultures were always negative for β-hemolytic Streptococci in all the recurrences, except during the last one. Antibiotic therapy based on antibiogram quickly resolved the infection. A regimen of intramuscular injection of 1.2 million units of benzathine penicillin every 15 days for one year prevented recurrences of cellulitis.

  2. Polyarteritis nodosa associated with streptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    David, J; Ansell, B M; Woo, P

    1993-01-01

    Twelve children are described with an essentially benign vasculitic illness in association with streptococcal infection. They demonstrated characteristic clinical features of nodular cutaneous polyarteritis with fever. Laboratory findings showed an acute phase response associated with raised antistreptolysin and antihyaluronidase titres in all patients and a positive throat culture for beta haemolytic streptococcus in three patients. Ten required corticosteroids. Two patients had systemic involvement with abnormal arteriography; both had appreciably raised white cell counts (> 40 x 10(9)/l). They may represent a subset of poststreptococcal vasculitis, requiring cytotoxic treatment for effective disease control. Images PMID:7904442

  3. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-10-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine.

  4. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-01-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine. PMID:591633

  5. Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae as leading causes of pediatric bacterial meningitis in nine Mexican hospitals following 3 years of active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Cruz, Enrique; Martinez-Longoria, Cesar Adrian; Llausas-Magana, Eduardo; Luevanos-Velazquez, Antonio; Vazquez-Narvaez, Jorge Alejandro; Beltran, Sandra; Limon-Rojas, Ana Elena; Urtiz-Jeronimo, Fernando; Castaneda-Narvaez, Jose Luis; Otero-Mendoza, Francisco; Aguilar-Del Real, Fernando; Rodriguez-Chagoyan, Jesus; Rivas-Landeros, Rosa Maria; Volker-Soberanes, Maria Luisa; Hinojosa-Robles, Rosa Maria; Arzate-Barbosa, Patricia; Aviles-Benitez, Laura Karina; Elenes-Zamora, Fernando Ivan; Becka, Chandra M.; Ruttimann, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Meningococcal meningitis is reported as a rare condition in Mexico. There are no internationally published studies on bacterial causes of meningitis in the country based on active surveillance. This study focuses on finding the etiology of bacterial meningitis in children from nine Mexican Hospitals. Methods: From January 2010 to February 2013, we conducted a three years of active surveillance for meningitis in nine hospitals throughout Mexico. Active surveillance started at the emergency department for every suspected case, and microbiological studies confirmed/ruled out all potentially bacterial pathogens. We diagnosed based on routine cultures from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (not polymerase chain reaction or other molecular diagnostic tests), and both pneumococcal serotyping and meningococcal serogrouping by using standard methods. Results: Neisseria meningitidis was the leading cause, although 75% of cases occurred in the northwest of the country in Tijuana on the US border. Serogroup C was predominant. Streptococcus pneumoniae followed Neisseria meningitides, but was uniformly distributed throughout the country. Serotype 19A was the most incident but before universal implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Other bacteria were much less common, including Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus agalactiae (these two affecting mostly young infants). Conclusions: Meningococcal meningitis is endemic in Tijuana, Mexico, and vaccination should be seriously considered in that region. Continuous universal vaccination with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine should be nationally performed, and polymerase chain reaction should be included for bacterial detection in all cultures – negative but presumably bacterial meningitis cases. PMID:27551428

  6. Investigation on the efficacy of meloxicam in sows with mastitis-metritis-agalactia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, A C; Philipp, H; Kleemann, R

    2003-10-01

    The efficacy of meloxicam in the treatment of sows with mastitis-metritis-agalactia syndrome was investigated in comparison with flunixin. Basic therapy comprised administration of an antibiotic and oxytocin. A total of 200 sows and litters were examined in a double-blind clinical study with observations up to 8 days after the first treatment. The primary parameter, the clinical index score on day 2, consisting of rectal temperature, feed intake, general demeanour, respiratory rate, vaginal discharge, degree of inflammation of mammary glands, milk flow and nursing behaviour, revealed a significant (P < or = 0.05) non-inferiority of meloxicam in comparison with flunixin implying equal efficacy of both drugs. No significant differences were noted in the distribution of clinical efficacy scores within both groups at each day of examination. The differences in litter weight and daily weight gain per piglet were not significant between the two test groups. The mortality rates until day 8 of the study were without significant difference between groups. In piglets of diseased litters, however, the mortality rate was 50% lower in the meloxicam group in comparison with the reference group, this difference reaching statistical significance (P < or = 0.05).

  7. Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Neonatal Infections in Portugal (2005–2015): Diversification and Emergence of a CC17/PI-2b Multidrug Resistant Sublineage

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Elisabete R.; Pedroso-Roussado, Cristiano; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário; Oliveira, Henrique

    2017-01-01

    The molecular characterization of 218 GBS isolates recovered from neonatal invasive infections in Portugal in 2005–2015 revealed the existence of a small number of genetically distinct lineages that were present over a significant time-span. Serotypes III and Ia were dominant in the population, together accounting for >80% of the isolates. Clonal complex 17 included 50% of all isolates, highlighting the importance of the hypervirulent genetic lineage represented by serotype III ST17/rib/PI-1+PI-2b. Serotype Ia was represented mainly by ST23, previously reported as dominant among invasive disease in non-pregnant adults in Portugal, but also by ST24, showing an increased frequency among late-onset disease. Overall erythromycin resistance was 16%, increasing during the study period (p < 0.001). Macrolide resistance was overrepresented among CC1 and CC19 isolates (p < 0.001 and p = 0.008, respectively). While representatives of the hypervirulent CC17 lineage were mostly susceptible to macrolides, we identified for the first time in Europe a recently emerging sublineage characterized by the loss of PI-1 (CC17/PI-2b), simultaneously resistant to macrolides, lincosamides, and tetracycline, also exhibiting high-level resistance to streptomycin and kanamycin. The stability and dominance of CC17 among neonatal invasive infections in the past decades indicates that it is extremely well adapted to its niche; however emerging resistance in this genetic background may have significant implications for the prevention and management of GBS disease.

  8. Group B Streptococcus Induces Neutrophil Recruitment to Gestational Tissues and Elaboration of Extracellular Traps and Nutritional Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kothary, Vishesh; Doster, Ryan S.; Rogers, Lisa M.; Kirk, Leslie A.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Haley, Kathryn P.; Manning, Shannon D.; Aronoff, David M.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, or Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen associated with infection during pregnancy and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Infection of the extraplacental membranes surrounding the developing fetus, a condition known as chorioamnionitis, is characterized histopathologically by profound infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs, neutrophils) and greatly increases the risk for preterm labor, stillbirth, or neonatal GBS infection. The advent of animal models of chorioamnionitis provides a powerful tool to study host-pathogen relationships in vivo and ex vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the innate immune response elicited by GBS and evaluate how antimicrobial strategies elaborated by these innate immune cells affect bacteria. Our work using a mouse model of GBS ascending vaginal infection during pregnancy reveals that clinically isolated GBS has the capacity to invade reproductive tissues and elicit host immune responses including infiltration of PMNs within the choriodecidua and placenta during infection, mirroring the human condition. Upon interacting with GBS, murine neutrophils elaborate DNA-containing extracellular traps, which immobilize GBS and are studded with antimicrobial molecules including lactoferrin. Exposure of GBS to holo- or apo-forms of lactoferrin reveals that the iron-sequestration activity of lactoferrin represses GBS growth and viability in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data indicate that the mouse model of ascending infection is a useful tool to recapitulate human models of GBS infection during pregnancy. Furthermore, this work reveals that neutrophil extracellular traps ensnare GBS and repress bacterial growth via deposition of antimicrobial molecules, which drive nutritional immunity via metal sequestration strategies. PMID:28217556

  9. Contribution of the RgfD Quorum Sensing Peptide to rgf Regulation and Host Cell Association in Group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert E.; Knupp, David; Al Safadi, Rim; Rosenau, Agnѐs; Manning, Shannon D.

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus; GBS) is a common inhabitant of the genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal tract in up to 40% of healthy adults; however, this opportunistic pathogen is able to breach restrictive host barriers to cause disease and persist in harsh and changing conditions. This study sought to identify a role for quorum sensing, a form of cell to cell communication, in the regulation of the fibrinogen-binding (rgfBDAC) two-component system and the ability to associate with decidualized endometrial cells in vitro. To do this, we created a deletion in rgfD, which encodes the putative autoinducing peptide, in a GBS strain belonging to multilocus sequence type (ST)-17 and made comparisons to the wild type. Sequence variation in the rgf operon was detected in 40 clinical strains and a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism was detected in rgfD in all of the ST-17 genomes that resulted in a truncation. Using qPCR, expression of rgf operon genes was significantly decreased in the ST-17 ΔrgfD mutant during exponential growth with the biggest difference (3.3-fold) occurring at higher cell densities. Association with decidualized endometrial cells was decreased 1.3-fold in the mutant relative to the wild type and rgfC expression was reduced 22-fold in ΔrgfD following exposure to the endometrial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that this putative quorum sensing molecule is important for attachment to human tissues and demonstrate a role for RgfD in GBS pathogenesis through regulation of rgfC. PMID:28067833

  10. Towards Control of Streptococcus iniae

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is an emerging zoonotic pathogen; such infections generally occur through injuries associated with preparing whole fresh fish for cooking. Those infected to date have been of Asian descent, are usually elderly (average age 68 years), and have had >1 underlying conditions that may predispose them to infection. Studies of the foundations of growth characteristics of S. iniae and its interactions with piscine host cells have recently been complemented by molecular studies. Advances in molecular biology have allowed research groups to identify numerous virulence factors and to explore their roles in the progression of S. iniae infection. Many of these virulence factors are homologous to those found in the major human pathogen S. pyogenes. An increased understanding of the properties of these factors and their effect on the success of infection is leading to novel approaches to control S. iniae infection; in particular, vaccination programs at fish farms have reduced the reservoir of infection for additional clinical cases. PMID:19961667

  11. Infections Associated with Streptococcus intermedius in Children.

    PubMed

    Faden, Howard S

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a viridans Streptococcus belonging to the Anginosus group. In the past 7 years, it has been associated with abscesses in 48 children, 40% of whom had complicated and/or life-threatening illness. It was the sole pathogen in 35 cases. Seventy-five percent of the infections occurred in winter and spring. None occurred in infants younger than 1 year.

  12. The Crystal Structure Analysis of Group B Streptococcus Sortase C1: A Model for the ;Lid; Movement upon Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Baldeep; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Huang, I-Hsiu; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V.L.

    2012-02-07

    A unique feature of the class-C-type sortases, enzymes essential for Gram-positive pilus biogenesis, is the presence of a flexible 'lid' anchored in the active site. However, the mechanistic details of the 'lid' displacement, suggested to be a critical prelude for enzyme catalysis, are not yet known. This is partly due to the absence of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor complex crystal structures. We have recently described the crystal structures of the Streptococcus agalactiae SAG2603 V/R sortase SrtC1 in two space groups (type II and type III) and that of its 'lid' mutant and proposed a role of the 'lid' as a protector of the active-site hydrophobic environment. Here, we report the crystal structures of SAG2603 V/R sortase C1 in a different space group (type I) and that of its complex with a small-molecule cysteine protease inhibitor. We observe that the catalytic Cys residue is covalently linked to the small-molecule inhibitor without lid displacement. However, the type I structure provides a view of the sortase SrtC1 lid displacement while having structural elements similar to a substrate sorting motif suitably positioned in the active site. We propose that these major conformational changes seen in the presence of a substrate mimic in the active site may represent universal features of class C sortase substrate recognition and enzyme activation.

  13. The crystal structure analysis of group B Streptococcus sortase C1: a model for the "lid" movement upon substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Khare, Baldeep; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Huang, I-Hsiu; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V L

    2011-12-09

    A unique feature of the class-C-type sortases, enzymes essential for Gram-positive pilus biogenesis, is the presence of a flexible "lid" anchored in the active site. However, the mechanistic details of the "lid" displacement, suggested to be a critical prelude for enzyme catalysis, are not yet known. This is partly due to the absence of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor complex crystal structures. We have recently described the crystal structures of the Streptococcus agalactiae SAG2603 V/R sortase SrtC1 in two space groups (type II and type III) and that of its "lid" mutant and proposed a role of the "lid" as a protector of the active-site hydrophobic environment. Here, we report the crystal structures of SAG2603 V/R sortase C1 in a different space group (type I) and that of its complex with a small-molecule cysteine protease inhibitor. We observe that the catalytic Cys residue is covalently linked to the small-molecule inhibitor without lid displacement. However, the type I structure provides a view of the sortase SrtC1 lid displacement while having structural elements similar to a substrate sorting motif suitably positioned in the active site. We propose that these major conformational changes seen in the presence of a substrate mimic in the active site may represent universal features of class C sortase substrate recognition and enzyme activation.

  14. Isolation of Streptococcus tigurinus - a novel member of Streptococcus mitis group from a case of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Dhotre, Shree V; Mehetre, Gajanan T; Dharne, Mahesh S; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a new member of the Streptococcus viridians group and is closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated only by newer molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene analysis. During the course of study on bacteraemia and infective endocarditis with reference to periodontitis and viridians group of streptococci, a strain of S. tigurinus isolated from subgingival plaque of a patient with periodontitis identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis, which was originally identified as Streptococcus pluranimalium by Vitek 2. Confirmation by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed 99.39% similarity (1476/1485 bp) with S. tigurinus AZ_3a(T) (AORU01000002). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of S. tigurinus from the oral cavity of a periodontitis patient.

  15. Evaluation of procedures for typing of group B Streptococcus: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Steen

    2017-01-01

    Background This study evaluates two procedures for typing of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci; GBS) isolates, using retrospective typing data from the period 2010 to 2014 with a commercial latex agglutination test (latex test) and the Lancefield precipitation test (LP test). Furthermore, the genotype distribution of phenotypically non-typable (NT) GBS isolates is presented. We also raise the awareness, that the difference in typing results obtained by phenotypical methods and genotype based methods may have implications on vaccine surveillance in case a GBS vaccine is introduced. Methods A total of 616 clinical GBS isolates from 2010 to 2014 were tested with both a latex test and the LP test. Among these, 66 isolates were genotyped by PCR, including 41 isolates that were phenotypically NT. Results The latex test provided a serotype for 83.8% of the isolates (95% CI [80.7–86.6]) compared to 87.5% (95% CI [84.6–90.0]) obtained by the LP method. The two assays provided identical capsular identification for all sero-typeable isolates (excluding NT isolates). The PCR assay provided a genotype designation to the 41 isolates defined as phenotypically NT isolates. Discussion We found that the latex test showed a slightly lower identification percentage than the LP test. Our recommendation is to use the latex agglutination as the routine primary assay for GBS surveillance, and then use the more labour intensive precipitation test on the NT isolates to increase the serotyping rate. A genotype could be assigned to all the phenotypically NT isolates, however, as a consequence genotyping will overestimate the coverage from possible future capsular polysaccharide based GBS vaccines. PMID:28321367

  16. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 μm). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 μm. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 μm below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 μm. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis.

  17. Mycoplasma agalactiae MAG_5040 is a Mg2+-dependent, sugar-nonspecific SNase recognised by the host humoral response during natural infection.

    PubMed

    Cacciotto, Carla; Addis, Maria Filippa; Coradduzza, Elisabetta; Carcangiu, Laura; Nuvoli, Anna Maria; Tore, Gessica; Dore, Gian Mario; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Uzzau, Sergio; Chessa, Bernardo; Pittau, Marco; Alberti, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this study the enzymatic activity of Mycoplasma agalactiae MAG_5040, a magnesium-dependent nuclease homologue to the staphylococcal SNase was characterized and its antigenicity during natural infections was established. A UGA corrected version of MAG_5040, lacking the region encoding the signal peptide, was expressed in Escherichia coli as a GST fusion protein. Recombinant GST-MAG_5040 exhibits nuclease activity similar to typical sugar-nonspecific endo- and exonucleases, with DNA as the preferred substrate and optimal activity in the presence of 20 mM MgCl2 at temperatures ranging from 37 to 45°C. According to in silico analyses, the position of the gene encoding MAG_5040 is consistently located upstream an ABC transporter, in most sequenced mycoplasmas belonging to the Mycoplasma hominis group. In M. agalactiae, MAG_5040 is transcribed in a polycistronic RNA together with the ABC transporter components and with MAG_5030, which is predicted to be a sugar solute binding protein by 3D modeling and homology search. In a natural model of sheep and goats infection, anti-MAG_5040 antibodies were detected up to 9 months post infection. Taking into account its enzymatic activity, MAG_5040 could play a key role in Mycoplasma agalactiae survival into the host, contributing to host pathogenicity. The identification of MAG_5040 opens new perspectives for the development of suitable tools for the control of contagious agalactia in small ruminants.

  18. Contagious agalactia due to Mycoplasma spp. in small dairy ruminants: epidemiology and prospects for diagnosis and control.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Martín, Angel; Amores, Joaquín; Paterna, Ana; De la Fe, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Contagious agalactia (CA) is a serious disease of small dairy ruminants that has a substantial economic impact on the goat and sheep milk industries. The main aetiological agent of the disease is Mycoplasma agalactiae, although other species, such as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum and Mycoplasma putrefaciens, are pathogenic in goats. There are two clinical-epidemiological states of CA in sheep and goats; herds and flocks may exhibit outbreaks of CA or may be chronically infected, the latter with a high incidence of subclinical mastitis and only occasional clinical cases. The complex epidemiology of CA is related to the genetic characteristics and mechanisms of molecular variation of the Mycoplasma spp. involved, along with presence of CA-mycoplasmas in wild ruminant species. In goats, the situation is particularly complex and asymptomatic carriers have been detected in chronically infected herds. The coexistence of other non-pathogenic mycoplasmas in the herd further complicates the diagnosis of CA and the design of efficient strategies to control the disease. Routes of infection, such as the venereal route, may be involved in the establishment of chronic infection in herds. Current challenges include the need for improved diagnostic methods for detection of chronic and subclinical infections and for the design of more efficient vaccines.

  19. Effects on goat milk quality of the presence of Mycoplasma spp. in herds without symptoms of contagious agalactia.

    PubMed

    de la Fe, Christian; Sánchez, Antonio; Gutierrez, Aldo; Contreras, Antonio; Carlos Corrales, Juan; Assunçao, Patricia; Poveda, Carlos; Poveda, José B

    2009-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the possible effects of mycoplasmas on the quality of milk produced by goat herds in a contagious agalactia (CA) endemic area with absence of classical symptoms. Several factors related to milk quality (percentages of fat, total protein, lactose and total solids, standard plate counts (SPC) and presence of Staphylococcus aureus) were compared in mycoplasma-infected and non-infected herds. To define the CA status of 26 herds on the island of Lanzarote (Spain), where CA is endemic, 570 individual milk samples and 266 bulk tank milk (BTM) samples were microbiologically analysed for the presence of Mycoplasma spp. A herd was considered infected by mycoplasmas when at least a sample (individual or BTM) was positive. BTM samples were also used to determine milk quality parameters. Mycoplasma infection was confirmed in 13 herds. A total of 31, 10 and 11 strains of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC (MmmLC), Mp. agalactiae and Mp. capricolum subsp. capricolum were isolated. No significant differences were observed between the least square means of the variables fat, total protein, lactose and total solids or SPC recorded for the infected v. non-infected herds. The Staph. aureus status of a herd was also found to be independent of the presence of Mycoplasma spp. Our findings indicate that neither the presence of mycoplasmas in a goat herd with absence of classical symptoms seem to compromise the quality of the BTM.

  20. Mycoplasma agalactiae Secretion of β-(1→6)-Glucan, a Rare Polysaccharide in Prokaryotes, Is Governed by High-Frequency Phase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, E.; Pau-Roblot, C.; Sagné, E.; Citti, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasmas are minimal, wall-less bacteria but have retained the ability to secrete complex carbohydrate polymers that constitute a glycocalyx. In members of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster, which are important ruminant pathogens, the glycocalyx includes both cell-attached and cell-free polysaccharides. This report explores the potential secretion of polysaccharides by M. agalactiae, another ruminant pathogen that belongs to a distant phylogenetic group. Comparative genomic analyses showed that M. agalactiae possesses all the genes required for polysaccharide secretion. Notably, a putative synthase gene (gsmA) was identified, by in silico reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathway, that could be involved in both polymerization and export of the carbohydrate polymers. M. agalactiae polysaccharides were then purified in vitro and found to be mainly cell attached, with a linear β-(1→6)-glucopyranose structure [β-(1→6)-glucan]. Secretion of β-(1→6)-glucan was further shown to rely on the presence of a functional gsmA gene, whose expression is subjected to high-frequency phase variation. This event is governed by the spontaneous intraclonal variation in length of a poly(G) tract located in the gsmA coding sequence and was shown to occur in most of the M. agalactiae clinical isolates tested in this study. M. agalactiae susceptibility to serum-killing activity appeared to be dictated by ON/OFF switching of β-(1→6)-glucan secretion, suggesting a role of this phenomenon in survival of the pathogen when it invades the host bloodstream. Finally, β-(1→6)-glucan secretion was not restricted to M. agalactiae but was detected also in M. mycoides subsp. capri PG3T, another pathogen of small ruminants. IMPORTANCE Many if not all bacteria are able to secrete polysaccharides, either attached to the cell surface or exported unbound into the extracellular environment. Both types of polysaccharides can play a role in bacterium-host interactions. Mycoplasmas are

  1. Group B Streptococcus Interactions with Human Meningeal Cells and Astrocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Alkuwaity, Khalil; Taylor, Alexander; Heckels, John E.; Doran, Kelly S.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2012-01-01

    Background Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a leading cause of life-threatening neonatal meningitis and survivors often suffer permanent neurological damage. How this organism interacts with the meninges and subsequently with astrocytes that constitute the underlying cortical glia limitans superficialis is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, we demonstrate dose-dependent adherence of GBS over time to human meningioma cells and fetal astrocytes in vitro, which was not influenced by expression of either β-haemolysin/cytolysin (β-h/c) toxin, different capsule serotypes or by absence of capsule (p>0.05). Internalization of GBS by both cell types was, however, a slow and an infrequent event (only 0.02–0.4% of associated bacteria were internalised by 9 h). Expression of β-h/c toxin did not play a role in invasion (p>0.05), whereas capsule expression lead to a reduction (p<0.05) in the numbers of intracellular bacteria recovered. GBS strains induced cytotoxicity as demonstrated by the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme release by 9 h and by viable staining. Increasing levels of meningioma cell death correlated with bacterial growth and the phenotype of β-h/c toxin production, i.e. from weakly, to normo- to hyper-haemolytic. However, cytotoxicity was significantly greater (p<0.05) towards astrocytes, and infection with initial MOI≥0.003 induced 70–100% LDH release. By comparing wild-type (β-h/c+) and mutant (ΔcylE β-h/c−) strains and β-h/c toxin extracts and by using the surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine in cytotoxicity inhibition experiments, β-h/c toxin was demonstrated as principally responsible for cell death. Conclusions/Significance This study has described key events in the interactions of GBS with meningeal cells and astrocytes in vitro and a major virulence role for β-h/c toxin. Understanding the mechanisms involved will help to identify potential therapies for improving patient

  2. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  3. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  4. Galactokinase activity in Streptococcus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.; Morris, H.A.; McKay, L.L.

    1985-10-01

    ATP-dependent phosphorylation of (/sup 14/C)galactose by 11 strains of streptococcus thermophilus indicated that these organisms possessed the Leloir enzyme, galactokinase (galK). Activities were 10 times higher in fully induced, galactose-fermenting (Gal/sup +/) strains than in galactose-nonfermenting (Gal/sup -/) strains. Lactose-grown, Gal/sup -/ cells released free galactose into the medium and were unable to utilize residual galactose or to induce galK above basal levels. Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus 19258 also released galactose into the medium, but when lactose was depleted, growth on galactose commenced, and galK increased from 0.025 to 0.22 ..mu..mol of galactose phosphorylated per min per mg of protein. When lactose was added to galactose-grown cells of S. thermophilus 19258, galK activity rapidly decreased. These results suggest that galK in Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus is subject to an induction-repression mechanism, but that galK cannot be induced in Gal/sup -/ strains.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular epidemiology of streptococci from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Rato, Márcia G; Bexiga, Ricardo; Florindo, Carlos; Cavaco, Lina M; Vilela, Cristina L; Santos-Sanches, Ilda

    2013-01-25

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS), Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (Group C Streptococcus, GCS) and Streptococcus uberis are relevant mastitis pathogens, a highly prevalent and costly disease in dairy industry due to antibiotherapy and loss in milk production. The aims of this study were the evaluation of antimicrobial drug resistance patterns, particularly important for streptococcal mastitis control and the identification of strain molecular features. Antimicrobial resistance was assessed by disk diffusion against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefazolin, cefoperazone, pirlimycin-PRL, rifaximin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin-ERY, gentamicin, tetracycline-TET and vancomycin. Genotypic relationships were identified using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), macrolide and/or tetracycline resistance gene profiling, GBS capsular typing, GBS virulence gene profiling and GBS and S. uberis multi locus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of the isolates were susceptible to all drugs except to aminoglycoside, macrolide, lincosamide and tetracycline. Close to half of the TET resistant isolates have tetO and tetK and almost all ERY-PRL resistant isolates have ermB. A high degree of intra-species polymorphism was found for GCS. The GBS belonged to ST-2, -554, -61, -23 lineages and five new molecular serotypes and human GBS insertion sequences in the cpsE gene were found. Also, GBS of serotype V with scpB and lmb seem to be related with GBS isolates of human origin (same ST-2 and similar PFGE). Overall our results suggested that different therapeutic programs may have been implemented in the different farms and that in most cases clones were herd-specific.

  6. Distribution of Streptococcus troglodytae and Streptococcus dentirousetti in chimpanzee oral cavities.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Mayu; Imai, Susumu; Okamoto, Masaaki; Saito, Wataru; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Momoi, Yasuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution and phenotypic properties of the indigenous streptococci in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) oral cavities. Eleven chimpanzees (aged from 9 to 44 years, mean ± SD, 26.9 ± 12.6 years) in the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University were enrolled in this research and brushing bacterial samples collected from them. Streptococci were isolated from the oral cavities of all chimpanzees. The isolates (n = 46) were identified as thirteen species by 16S rRNA genes analysis. The predominant species was Streptococcus sanguinis of mitis streptococci from five chimpanzees (45%). Mutans streptococci were isolated from six chimpanzees (55%). The predominant species in the mutans streptococci were Streptococcus troglodytae from four chimpanzees (36%), this species having been proposed as a novel species by us, and Streptococcus dentirousetti from three chimpanzees (27%). Streptococcus mutans was isolated from one chimpanzee (9%). However, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus macacae and Streptococcus downei, which are indigenous to human and monkey (Macaca fasciclaris) oral habitats, were not isolated. Of the mutans streptococci, S. troglodytae, S. dentirousetti, and S. mutans possessed strong adherence activity to glass surface.

  7. Streptococcus orisasini sp. nov. and Streptococcus dentasini sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of donkeys.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazuko; Saito, Masanori; Tsudukibashi, Osamu; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo

    2013-08-01

    Four Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid isolates that were obtained from donkey oral cavities formed two distinct clonal groups when characterized by phenotypic and phylogenetic studies. From the results of biochemical tests, the organisms were tentatively identified as a streptococcal species. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two of the isolates were related most closely to Streptococcus ursoris with 95.6 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and to Streptococcus ratti with 92.0 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates, however, were related to Streptococcus criceti with 95.0 and 89.0 % similarities based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively. From both phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, the four isolates formed two distinct clonal groups and are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus. The names proposed for these organisms are Streptococcus orisasini sp. nov. (type strain NUM 1801(T) = JCM 17942(T) = DSM 25193(T)) and Streptococcus dentasini sp. nov. (type strain NUM 1808(T) = JCM 17943(T) = DSM 25137(T)).

  8. Rapid identification of pathogenic streptococci isolated from moribund red tilapia (Oreochromis spp.).

    PubMed

    Abdelsalam, Mohamed; Elgendy, Mamdouh Y; Shaalan, Mohamed; Moustafa, Mohamed; Fujino, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Accurate and rapid identification of bacterial pathogens of fish is essential for the effective treatment and speedy control of infections. Massive mortalities in market-sized red tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) were noticed in mariculture concrete ponds in northern Egypt. Histopathological examination revealed marked congestion in the central vein of the liver with the presence of bacterial aggregates inside the lumen and in the vicinity of the central vein. A total of 12 isolates of streptococci were obtained from the moribund fish. This study documented the ability of the MicroSeq 500 16S bacterial sequencing method to accurately identify Streptococcus agalactiae and S. dysgalactiae mixed infections from moribund red tilapia that were difficult to be recognised by the commercial biochemical systems. The continuously decreasing cost of the sequencing technique should encourage its application in routine diagnostic procedures.

  9. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  10. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for differentiation between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    van Prehn, Joffrey; van Veen, Suzanne Q; Schelfaut, Jacqueline J G; Wessels, Els

    2016-05-01

    We compared the Vitek MS and Microflex MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry platform for species differentiation within the Streptococcus mitis group with PCR assays targeted at lytA, Spn9802, and recA as reference standard. The Vitek MS correctly identified 10/11 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 13/13 Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and 12/13 S. mitis/oralis. The Microflex correctly identified 9/11 S. pneumoniae, 0/13 S. pseudopneumoniae, and 13/13 S. mitis/oralis. MALDI-TOF is a powerful tool for species determination within the mitis group. Diagnostic accuracy varies depending on platform and database used.

  11. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  12. Iron acquisition and regulation systems in Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ruiguang; Sun, Xuesong

    2014-05-01

    Gram-positive Streptococcus species are responsible for millions of cases of meningitis, bacterial pneumonia, endocarditis, erysipelas and necrotizing fasciitis. Iron is essential for the growth and survival of Streptococcus in the host environment. Streptococcus species have developed various mechanisms to uptake iron from an environment with limited available iron. Streptococcus can directly extract iron from host iron-containing proteins such as ferritin, transferrin, lactoferrin and hemoproteins, or indirectly by relying on the employment of specialized secreted hemophores (heme chelators) and small siderophore molecules (high affinity ferric chelators). This review presents the most recent discoveries in the iron acquisition system of Streptococcus species - the transporters as well as the regulators.

  13. Antibody-mediated complement C3b/iC3b binding to group B Streptococcus in paired mother and baby serum samples in a refugee population on the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations.

  14. Antibody-Mediated Complement C3b/iC3b Binding to Group B Streptococcus in Paired Mother and Baby Serum Samples in a Refugee Population on the Thailand-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T.; Gorringe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations. PMID:25589553

  15. Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from oral cavities of elephants.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-09-01

    Four Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped organisms were isolated from elephant oral cavities. The isolates were tentatively identified as streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two isolates (NUM 6304(T) and NUM 6312) were related most closely to Streptococcus salivarius with 96.8 % and 93.1 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and the RNA polymerase β subunit encoding gene (rpoB), respectively, and to Streptococcus vestibularis with 83.7 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates (NUM 6306(T) and NUM 6318) were related most closely to S. vestibularis with 97.0 % and 82.9 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively, and to S. salivarius with 93.5 % similarity based on the rpoB gene. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, these isolates are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6304(T) = JCM 19287(T) = DSM 27382(T)) and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6306(T) = JCM 19288(T) = DSM 27513(T)) are proposed.

  16. Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov., isolated from raw camel milk.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Amar, Mohamed; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; El Farricha, Omar; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Two catalase- and oxidase-negative Streptococcus-like strains, LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T), were isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing assigned these bacteria to the genus Streptococcus with Streptococcus rupicaprae 2777-2-07(T) as their closest phylogenetic neighbour (95.9% and 95.7% similarity, respectively). 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the two strains was 96.7%. Although strains LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T) shared a DNA-DNA hybridization value that corresponded to the threshold level for species delineation (68%), the two strains could be distinguished by multiple biochemical tests, sequence analysis of the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS), RNA polymerase (rpoA) and ATP synthase (atpA) genes and by their MALDI-TOF MS profiles. On the basis of these considerable phenotypic and genotypic differences, we propose to classify both strains as novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27682(T)  = CCMM B831(T)) and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27684(T)  = CCMM B833(T)) are proposed.

  17. Streptococcus-Zebrafish Model of Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Melody N.; Pfeifer, John D.; Caparon, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Due to its small size, rapid generation time, powerful genetic systems, and genomic resources, the zebrafish has emerged as an important model of vertebrate development and human disease. Its well-developed adaptive and innate cellular immune systems make the zebrafish an ideal model for the study of infectious diseases. With a natural and important pathogen of fish, Streptococcus iniae, we have established a streptococcus- zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis. Following injection into the dorsal muscle, zebrafish developed a lethal infection, with a 50% lethal dose of 103 CFU, and died within 2 to 3 days. The pathogenesis of infection resembled that of S. iniae in farmed fish populations and that of several important human streptococcal diseases and was characterized by an initial focal necrotic lesion that rapidly progressed to invasion of the pathogen into all major organ systems, including the brain. Zebrafish were also susceptible to infection by the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, disease was characterized by a marked absence of inflammation, large numbers of extracellular streptococci in the dorsal muscle, and extensive myonecrosis that occurred far in advance of any systemic invasion. The genetic systems available for streptococci, including a novel method of mutagenesis which targets genes whose products are exported, were used to identify several mutants attenuated for virulence in zebrafish. This combination of a genetically amenable pathogen with a well-defined vertebrate host makes the streptococcus-zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis a powerful model for analysis of infectious disease. PMID:12065534

  18. 9230 FECAL ENTEROCOCCUS/STREPTOCOCCUS GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1903 the genus name Enterococcus was proposed for gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped bacterial of intestinal origin. Several years later, it was suggested that the genus name be changed to Streptococcus because of the organisms' ability to form chains of coccoid...

  19. Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae as an Otopathogen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Kaur, Ravinder; Casey, Janet R.; Sabharwal, Vishakha; Pelton, Stephen; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Among 34 Spn sequential isolates from middle ear fluid we found a case of a nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae (NT-Spn) in a child with AOM. The strain was pneumolysin PCR positive and capsule gene PCR negative. Virulence of the NT-Spn was confirmed in a chinchilla model of AOM. PMID:21251566

  20. A lingual abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Hsia, Jennifer C; Mendez, Eduardo; Clarridge, Jill E

    2012-04-01

    Lingual abscesses are rare. We describe a case in a healthy female with no recent history of trauma. The organism recovered by culture of drainage material collected prior to antibiotic treatment was Streptococcus intermedius, an organism recognized as flora of the oropharynx and associated with abscess formation. The isolate was resistant to clindamycin, which was the antibiotic therapy that the patient received.

  1. Revisitingmolecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ninety-two Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes have been described so far, but the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduced in the Brazilian basic vaccination schedule in 2010 covers only the ten most prevalent in the country. Pneumococcal serotype-shifting after massive immunization is a major concern and monitoring this phenomenon requires efficient and accessible serotyping methods. Pneumococcal serotyping based on antisera produced in animals is laborious and restricted to a few reference laboratories. Alternatively, molecular serotyping methods assess polymorphisms in the cps gene cluster, which encodes key enzymes for capsular polysaccharides synthesis in pneumococci. In one such approach, cps-RFLP, the PCR amplified cps loci are digested with an endonuclease, generating serotype-specific fingerprints on agarose gel electrophoresis. Methods In this work, in silico and in vitro approaches were combined to demonstrate that XhoII is the most discriminating endonuclease for cps-RFLP, and to build a database of serotype-specific fingerprints that accommodates the genetic diversity within the cps locus of 92 known pneumococci serotypes. Results The expected specificity of cps-RFLP using XhoII was 76% for serotyping and 100% for serogrouping. The database of cps-RFLP fingerprints was integrated to Molecular Serotyping Tool (MST), a previously published web-based software for molecular serotyping. In addition, 43 isolates representing 29 serotypes prevalent in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013, were examined in vitro; 11 serotypes (nine serogroups) matched the respective in silico patterns calculated for reference strains. The remaining experimental patterns, despite their resemblance to their expected in silico patterns, did not reach the threshold of similarity score to be considered a match and were then added to the database. Conclusion The cps-RFLP method with XhoII outperformed the antisera-based and other molecular serotyping

  2. Disruption of the pdhB pyruvate dehydrogenase [corrected] gene affects colony morphology, in vitro growth and cell invasiveness of Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of available substrates, the metabolic potential and the growth rates of bacteria can play significant roles in their pathogenicity. This study concentrates on Mycoplasma agalactiae, which causes significant economic losses through its contribution to contagious agalactia in small ruminants by as yet unknown mechanisms. This lack of knowledge is primarily due to its fastidious growth requirements and the scarcity of genetic tools available for its manipulation and analysis. Transposon mutagenesis of M. agalactiae type strain PG2 resulted in several disruptions throughout the genome. A mutant defective in growth in vitro was found to have a transposon insertion in the pdhB gene, which encodes a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This growth difference was quite significant during the actively dividing logarithmic phase but a gradual recovery was observed as the cells approached stationary phase. The mutant also exhibited a different and smaller colony morphology compared to the wild type strain PG2. For complementation, pdhAB was cloned downstream of a strong vpma promoter and upstream of a lacZ reporter gene in a newly constructed complementation vector. When transformed with this vector the pdhB mutant recovered its normal growth and colony morphology. Interestingly, the pdhB mutant also had significantly reduced invasiveness in HeLa cells, as revealed by double immunofluorescence staining. This deficiency was recovered in the complemented strain, which had invasiveness comparable to that of PG2. Taken together, these data indicate that pyruvate dehydrogenase might be an important player in infection with and colonization by M. agalactiae.

  3. Description of Streptococcus pneumoniae Infections in Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Description of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in burn patients§ Jessie S. Glasser a, Michael L. Landruma,b,c, Kevin K. Chung a,d, Duane R...history: Accepted 10 July 2009 Keywords: Burn Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumococcus Pneumococcal a b s t r a c t Background: Longer survival in burn...Staphylococcus aureus. Although Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are common in the community and can cause nosocomial infections, the incidence and

  4. Phim46.1, the main Streptococcus pyogenes element carrying mef(A) and tet(O) genes.

    PubMed

    Brenciani, Andrea; Bacciaglia, Alessandro; Vignaroli, Carla; Pugnaloni, Armanda; Varaldo, Pietro E; Giovanetti, Eleonora

    2010-01-01

    Phim46.1, the recognized representative of the most common variant of mobile, prophage-associated genetic elements carrying resistance genes mef(A) (which confers efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance) and tet(O) (which confers tetracycline resistance) in Streptococcus pyogenes, was fully characterized. Sequencing of the Phim46.1 genome (55,172 bp) demonstrated a modular organization typical of tailed bacteriophages. Electron microscopic analysis of mitomycin-induced Phim46.1 revealed phage particles with the distinctive icosahedral head and tail morphology of the Siphoviridae family. The chromosome integration site was within a 23S rRNA uracil methyltransferase gene. BLASTP analysis revealed that the proteins of Phim46.1 had high levels of amino acid sequence similarity to the amino acid sequences of proteins from other prophages, especially Phi10394.4 of S. pyogenes and lambdaSa04 of S. agalactiae. Phage DNA was present in the host cell both as a prophage and as free circular DNA. The lysogeny module appears to have been split due to the insertion of a segment containing tet(O) (from integrated conjugative element 2096-RD.2) and mef(A) (from a Tn1207.1-like transposon) into the unintegrated phage DNA. The phage attachment sequence lies in the region between tet(O) and mef(A) in the unintegrated form. Thus, whereas in this form tet(O) is approximately 5.5 kb upstream of mef(A), in the integrated form, tet(O), which lies close to the right end of the prophage, is approximately 46.3 kb downstream of mef(A), which lies close to the left end of the prophage.

  5. [Thousand faces of Streptococcus pneumonia (pneumococcus) infections].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Bálint Gergely; Lénárt, Katalin Szidónia; Kádár, Béla; Gombos, Andrea; Dezsényi, Balázs; Szanka, Judit; Bobek, Ilona; Prinz, Gyula

    2015-11-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are high worldwide and in Hungary among paediatric as well as adult populations. Pneumococci account for 35-40% of community acquired adult pneumonias requiring hospitalization, while 25-30% of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonias are accompanied by bacteraemia. 5-7% of all infections are fatal but this rate is exponentially higher in high risk patients and elderly people. Mortality could reach 20% among patients with severe invasive pneumococcal infections. Complications may develop despite administration of adequate antibiotics. The authors summarize the epidemiology of pneumococcal infections, pathogenesis of non-invasive and invasive disease and present basic clinical aspects through demonstration of four cases. Early risk stratification, sampling of hemocultures, administration of antibiotics and wider application of active immunization could reduce the mortality of invasive disease. Anti-pneumococcal vaccination is advisable for adults of ≥50 years and high risk patients of ≥18 years who are susceptible to pneumococcal disease.

  6. Rapid identification of bovine mastitis pathogens by high-resolution melt analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; De Buck, Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Accurate identification of mastitis pathogens is often compromised when using conventional culture-based methods. Here, we report a novel, rapid assay tested for speciation of bacterial mastitis pathogens using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V5 and V6 was performed with a resulting amplicon of 290bp. First, a library was generated of melt curves of 9 common pathogens that are implicated in bovine mastitis. Six of the isolates, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycoplasma bovis, were type strains while the other 3, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Corynebacterium bovis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae, were bovine mastitis field isolates. Four of the type strains, E. coli, S. agalactiae, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, were found to be of human origin, while the other 3 type strains were isolated from bovine infections. Secondly, the melt curves and corresponding amplicon sequences of A. pyogenes, E. coli, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, K. pneumoniae, S. uberis and S. aureus were compared with 10 bovine mastitis field isolates of each pathogen. Based on the distinct differences in melt curves and sequences between human and bovine isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, it was deemed necessary to select a set of bovine strains for these pathogens to be used as reference strains in the HRMA. Next, the HRMA was validated by three interpreters analyzing the differential clustering pattern of melt curves of 60 bacterial cultures obtained from mastitis milk samples. The three test interpreters were blinded to the culture and sequencing results of the isolates. Overall accuracy of the validation assay was 95% as there was difficulty in identifying the streptococci due to heterogeneity observed in the PCR amplicons of S. uberis. The present study revealed that broad-range real-time PCR with

  7. Genomics, evolution, and molecular epidemiology of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC).

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Meile, Leo; Lacroix, Christophe; Stevens, Marc J A

    2015-07-01

    The Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) is a group of human and animal derived streptococci that are commensals (rumen and gastrointestinal tract), opportunistic pathogens or food fermentation associates. The classification of SBSEC has undergone massive changes and currently comprises 7 (sub)species grouped into four branches based on sequences identities: the Streptococcus gallolyticus, the Streptococcus equinus, the Streptococcus infantarius and the Streptococcus alactolyticus branch. In animals, SBSEC are causative agents for ruminal acidosis, potentially laminitis and infective endocarditis (IE). In humans, a strong association was established between bacteraemia, IE and colorectal cancer. Especially the SBSEC-species S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus is an emerging pathogen for IE and prosthetic joint infections. S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus and the S. infantarius branch are further associated with biliary and urinary tract infections. Knowledge on pathogenic mechanisms is so far limited to colonization factors such as pili and biofilm formation. Certain strain variants of S. gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus and S. infantarius subsp. infantarius are associated with traditional dairy and plant-based food fermentations and display traits suggesting safety. However, due to their close relationship to virulent strains, their use in food fermentation has to be critically assessed. Additionally, implementing accurate and up-to-date taxonomy is critical to enable appropriate treatment of patients and risk assessment of species and strains via recently developed multilocus sequence typing schemes to enable comparative global epidemiology. Comparative genomics revealed that SBSEC strains harbour genomics islands (GI) that seem acquired from other streptococci by horizontal gene transfer. In case of virulent strains these GI frequently encode putative virulence factors, in strains from food fermentation the GI encode functions that are

  8. Cloning and expression of hyaluronate lyase genes of Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus constellatus subsp. constellatus(1).

    PubMed

    Takao, Ayuko

    2003-02-14

    Hyaluronate lyase (HAase) genes of Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus constellatus subsp. constellatus were isolated. In S. constellatus subsp. constellatus, the deduced amino acid sequence of HAase was most similar to that of S. intermedius (68%), whereas the enzyme of S. intermedius was most similar to that of S. pneumoniae (72%). Upstream of the HAase gene on the opposite strands, an open reading frame of a putative glutathione peroxidase started in S. intermedius, and this arrangement was similar to that in S. pneumoniae but unlike that in S. constellatus subsp. constellatus. Cell lysates of Escherichia coli carrying each streptococcal gene showed HAase activity, demonstrating that each cloned gene actually coded for HAase.

  9. In vitro susceptibilities of caprine Mycoplasma agalactiae field isolates to six antimicrobial agents using the E test methodology.

    PubMed

    Filioussis, George; Petridou, Evanthia; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Kritas, Spyridon K

    2014-12-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, spectinomycin, tetracycline, spiramycin and erythromycin against 30 caprine Greek isolates of Mycoplasma agalactiae were determined using E test methodology. The E test strips were placed on Eaton's agar medium without antimicrobials and phenol red. MICs were then read by determining where the growth inhibition zone intersected with the MIC scale on the strip. An MIC value of 8 µg/mL was considered as a guide to mycoplasma resistance. All isolates were sensitive to fluoroquinolones (MIC50, 0.19 g/mL; MIC90, 0.38 µg/mL; highest MIC, 0.5 µg/mL), spectinomycin (MIC50, 0.5 µg/mL; MIC90, 1 µg/mL; highest MIC, 1 µg/mL), and spiramycin (MIC50, 1 µg/mL; MIC90, 1.5 µg/mL; highest MIC, 2 µg/mL). Two strains exhibited resistance to tetracycline (MIC 32 µg/mL) but these were not found to carry any of the tet(M), tet(O), and tet(S) resistance genes. Finally all isolates expressed resistance to erythromycin (MIC50, 128 µg/mL; MIC90, >256 µg/mL).

  10. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points.

  11. Endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis: an emerging zoonosis?

    PubMed

    Lacave, Guillaume; Coutard, Aymeric; Troché, Gilles; Augusto, Sandrine; Pons, Stéphanie; Zuber, Benjamin; Laurent, Virginie; Amara, Marlène; Couzon, Brigitte; Bédos, Jean-Pierre; Pangon, Béatrice; Grimaldi, David

    2016-02-01

    We report a human case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis. Identification was carried out from positive blood culture using mass spectrometry and SodA gene sequencing. S. canis related zoonotic invasive infections may have been previously underdiagnosed due to inadequate identification of group G Streptococcus species.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus thermophilus strain ND03.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihong; Chen, Xia; Wang, Jicheng; Zhao, Wenjing; Shao, Yuyu; Wu, Lan; Zhou, Zhemin; Sun, Tiansong; Wang, Lei; Meng, He; Zhang, Heping; Chen, Wei

    2011-02-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus strain ND03 is a Chinese commercial dairy starter used for the manufacture of yogurt. It was isolated from naturally fermented yak milk in Qinghai, China. We present here the complete genome sequence of ND03 and compare it to three other published genomes of Streptococcus thermophilus strains.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus sp. Strain NPS 308

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Sato, Keiko; Imamura, Keigo; Hoshino, Tomonori; Nishiguchi, Miyuki; Hasuwa, Tomoyuki; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus sp. strain NPS 308, isolated from an 8-year-old girl diagnosed with infective endocarditis, likely presents a novel species of Streptococcus. Here, we present a complete genome sequence of this species, which will contribute to better understanding of the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. PMID:28007849

  14. Influence of pH on inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by Streptococcus oligofermentans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chu, Lei; Wu, Fei; Guo, Lili; Li, Mengci; Wang, Yinghui; Wu, Ligeng

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus oligofermentans is a novel strain of oral streptococcus that can specifically inhibit the growth of Streptococcus mutans. The aims of this study were to assess the growth of S. oligofermentans and the ability of S. oligofermentans to inhibit growth of Streptococcus mutans at different pH values. Growth inhibition was investigated in vitro using an interspecies competition assay. The 4-aminoantipyine method was used to measure the initial production rate and the total yield of hydrogen peroxide in S. oligofermentans. S. oligofermentans grew best at pH 7.0 and showed the most pronounced inhibitory effect when it was inoculated earlier than S. mutans. In terms of the total yield and the initial production rate of hydrogen peroxide by S. oligofermentans, the effects of the different culture pH values were as follows: pH 7.0 > 6.5 > 6.0 > 7.5 > 5.5 = 8.0 (i.e. there was no significant difference between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0). Environmental pH and the sequence of inoculation significantly affected the ability of S. oligofermentans to inhibit the growth of S. mutans. The degree of inhibition may be attributed to the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced.

  15. Streptococcus mutans, Caries and Simulation Models

    PubMed Central

    Forssten, Sofia D.; Björklund, Marika; Ouwehand, Arthur C.

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries and dental plaque are among the most common diseases worldwide, and are caused by a mixture of microorganisms and food debris. Specific types of acid-producing bacteria, especially Streptococcus mutans, colonize the dental surface and cause damage to the hard tooth structure in the presence of fermentable carbohydrates e.g., sucrose and fructose. This paper reviews the link between S. mutans and caries, as well as different simulation models that are available for studying caries. These models offer a valuable approach to study cariogenicity of different substrates as well as colonization of S. mutans. PMID:22254021

  16. Update on Streptococcus equi subsp equi infections.

    PubMed

    Mallicote, Martha

    2015-04-01

    There are few diseases that ignite as much fervor among horse owners as strangles. Streptococcus equi subsp equi (strangles) infections frequently require the treating veterinarian to manage not only the clinical cases but also the biosecurity and provision of information to all involved parties. Although the disease is typically characterized by low mortality and high morbidity, restrictions of horse movement that result from appropriate quarantine procedures often frustrate the involved parties. The aims of this article are to provide clinically relevant information for diagnosis, treatment, and biosecurity management of strangles infection.

  17. Primary ventriculitis caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Vajramani, G V; Akrawi, H; Jones, G; Sparrow, O C E

    2007-06-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is increasingly being recognised as an aetiological agent in central nervous system infections. Primary ventriculitis caused by this organism has not been reported so far. We present a case of primary ventriculitis, which resulted in adhesions and multiloculated hydrocephalus, necessitating numerous surgical procedures to control it. No predisposing factor(s) could be identified. Although the organism could not be cultured from CSF, as he was already on antibiotic treatment, it could, however, be identified by 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction on the CSF sample. It appears important to recognise this condition and to treat it aggressively to prevent complications such as adhesions and multiloculated hydrocephalus.

  18. Lactational mastitis caused by Streptococcus lactarius.

    PubMed

    Tena, Daniel; Fernández, Cristina; López-Garrido, Beatriz; Pérez-Balsalobre, Mercedes; Losa, Cristina; Medina-Pascual, María José; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Human infections caused by Streptococcus lactarius have not been previously reported. In the present report, we describe a lactational mastitis caused by this organism. The infection occurred in a 28-year-old breast-feeding female, with a 10-days history of moderate pain on the right breast. The patient was cured after antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin for 21 days. Our case shows that S. lactarius should be considered as a cause of lactational mastitis. The introduction of molecular microbiology techniques can be extremely useful for knowing the implication of streptococci in lactational mastitis.

  19. Streptococcus mutans-induced nephritis in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Albini, B.; Nisengard, R. J.; Glurich, I.; Neiders, M. E.; Stinson, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous administration of disrupted Streptococcus mutans into rabbits over 23-76 weeks led to severe nephritis involving glomeruli, tubules, and interstitium. Light-microscopic observation of glomeruli documented diffuse endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis accompanied often (65%) by epithelial crescents. Electron-microscopic observation revealed humps in glomeruli of 70% of kidney specimens. In the glomeruli of some rabbits, extensive fibrin deposits and sclerosis were evident. Immunofluorescence showed linear, granular, often ribbonlike or patchy immune deposits encompassing, in order of decreasing frequency, C3, IgG, streptococcal antigen, IgA, and IgM. The histopathologic and immunohistologic features of the nephritis seen in rabbits given S mutans thus shows many features of Streptococcus-associated nephritides in man, in particular, the diffuse glomerular nephritis encountered in subacute bacterial endocarditis. Further, analysis of nephritis induced by administration of S mutans may have implications for the evaluation and purification of dental caries vaccines. Images Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:3976844

  20. [Occurrence and etiology for subclinical mastitis in cows].

    PubMed

    Filev, F

    1977-01-01

    Studied were a total of 16,571 cows on 89 farms by means of the Bernburg test. Milk was sampled from the positively reacting quarters of the udder by taking 18,047 samples intended for bacteriologic investigation. The demonstration of mastitis streptococci was carried out on "TKT" agar Merk, of pathogenic staphylococci, hemolytic streptococci, and Corinebacteria--on dextrose agar Oxoid containing 7.5% citrated calf blood. The isolated hemolytic streptococcus bacteria from the two nutrient media were differentiated through the CAMP test as well as serologically by the precipitation agar gel and Difco sera. The pathogenicity of Staphylococcus bacteria, in addition through hemolysis, was tested by the use of plasma coagulase with citrated rabbit plasma. In 53.95% of the cases there were secretory lesions due to Sc. agalactiae (6.23%) to Sc. dysgalactiae (5.69%) to Sc. uberis (8.47%), to Staph. aureus (2.44%), to hemolytic streptococci of the C, G and L groups (0.28%), to Sc. viridans (0.03%), to Corynebacterium pyogenes (0.41%), and catarrhal mastitis (30.4%). Some of the causative agents, such as Sc. agalactiae, Staph. aureus, and others have proved of epidemiologic importance to humans.

  1. Changing trends in mastitis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The global dairy industry, the predominant pathogens causing mastitis, our understanding of mastitis pathogens and the host response to intramammary infection are changing rapidly. This paper aims to discuss changes in each of these aspects. Globalisation, energy demands, human population growth and climate change all affect the dairy industry. In many western countries, control programs for contagious mastitis have been in place for decades, resulting in a decrease in occurrence of Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus mastitis and an increase in the relative impact of Streptococcus uberis and Escherichia coli mastitis. In some countries, Klebsiella spp. or Streptococcus dysgalactiae are appearing as important causes of mastitis. Differences between countries in legislation, veterinary and laboratory services and farmers' management practices affect the distribution and impact of mastitis pathogens. For pathogens that have traditionally been categorised as contagious, strain adaptation to human and bovine hosts has been recognised. For pathogens that are often categorised as environmental, strains causing transient and chronic infections are distinguished. The genetic basis underlying host adaptation and mechanisms of infection is being unravelled. Genomic information on pathogens and their hosts and improved knowledge of the host's innate and acquired immune responses to intramammary infections provide opportunities to expand our understanding of bovine mastitis. These developments will undoubtedly contribute to novel approaches to mastitis diagnostics and control. PMID:22082032

  2. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents among bovine mastitis pathogens isolated from North American dairy cattle, 2002-2010.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Cynthia J; Portis, Ellen; Johansen, Lacie; Mullins, Lisa M; Stoltman, Gillian A

    2013-09-01

    Approximately 8,000 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli, isolated by 25 veterinary laboratories across North America between 2002 and 2010, were tested for in vitro susceptibility to beta-lactam, macrolide, and lincosamide drugs. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the beta-lactam drugs remained low against most of the Gram-positive strains tested, and no substantial changes in the MIC distributions were seen over time. Of the beta-lactam antimicrobial agents tested, only ceftiofur showed good in vitro activity against E. coli. The MICs of the macrolides and lincosamides also remained low against Gram-positive mastitis pathogens. While the MIC values given by 50% of isolates (MIC50) for erythromycin and pirlimycin and the streptococci were all low (≤0.5 µg/ml), the MIC values given by 90% of isolates (MIC90) were higher and more variable, but with no apparent increase over time. Staphylococcus aureus showed little change in erythromycin susceptibility over time, but there may be a small, numerical increase in pirlimycin MIC50 and MIC90 values. Overall, the results suggest that mastitis pathogens in the United States and Canada have not shown any substantial changes in the in vitro susceptibility to beta-lactam, macrolide, and lincosamide drugs tested over the 9 years of the study.

  3. 21 CFR 526.464a - Cloxacillin benzathine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... bovine mastitis in nonlactating cows due to S. agalactiae and S. aureus. (3) Limitations. For use in dry... Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae including penicillin resistant strains in dairy cows...

  4. 21 CFR 526.464a - Cloxacillin benzathine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... bovine mastitis in nonlactating cows due to S. agalactiae and S. aureus. (3) Limitations. For use in dry... Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae including penicillin resistant strains in dairy cows...

  5. 21 CFR 526.464a - Cloxacillin benzathine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... bovine mastitis in nonlactating cows due to S. agalactiae and S. aureus. (3) Limitations. For use in dry... Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae including penicillin resistant strains in dairy cows...

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, A; Robaina, R; Pérez, G; Cairoli, E

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive destructive soft tissue infection with high mortality. Streptococcus pneumoniae as etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. The increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is probably a multifactorial phenomenon. We report a case of a patient, a 36-year-old Caucasian female with 8-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus who presented a fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis. The role of computed tomography and the high performance of blood cultures for isolation of the causative microorganism are emphasized. Once diagnosis is suspected, empiric antibiotic treatment must be prescribed and prompt surgical exploration is mandatory.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 1042 strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus: comparison from 1985 to 1989.

    PubMed

    Liebana, J; Castillo, A; Peis, J; Baca, P; Piedrola, G

    1991-06-01

    A total of 1042 strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus isolated between 1985 and 1989 were tested to study the evolution of their sensitivity to penicillin, amoxycillin, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid, cefuroxime, tetracycline, erythromycin, spiramycin, acetyl spiramycin, lincomycin and clindamycin. The strains were taken from stock cultures and isolated from human saliva and dental plaque. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by an agar dilution method. Except for spiramycin and acetyl spiramycin, all the antibiotics inhibited 100% of the strains with concentrations less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml. Microorganisms from both species underwent a slow progressive loss of sensitivity to all the antibiotics over a 5-year period of study, showing statistically significant results in most cases.

  8. Laboratory Growth and Maintenance of Streptococcus pyogenes (The Group A Streptococcus, GAS)

    PubMed Central

    Gera, Kanika; McIver, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that strictly infects humans. It is the causative agent of a broad spectrum of diseases accounting for millions of infections and at least 517, 000 deaths each year worldwide (Carapetis et al., 2005). It is a nutritionally fastidious organism that ferments sugars to produce lactic acid and has strict requirements for growth. To aid in the study of this organism, this unit describes the growth and maintenance of S. pyogenes. PMID:24510893

  9. Reappraisal of the taxonomy of Streptococcus suis serotypes 20, 22 and 26: Streptococcus parasuis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, R; Maruyama, F; Ishida, S; Tohya, M; Sekizaki, T; Osawa, Ro

    2015-02-01

    In order to clarify the taxonomic position of serotypes 20, 22 and 26 of Streptococcus suis, biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on isolates (SUT-7, SUT-286(T), SUT-319, SUT-328 and SUT-380) reacted with specific antisera of serotypes 20, 22 or 26 from the saliva of healthy pigs as well as reference strains of serotypes 20, 22 and 26. Comparative recN gene sequencing showed high genetic relatedness among our isolates, but marked differences from the type strain S. suis NCTC 10234(T), i.e. 74.8-75.7 % sequence similarity. The genomic relatedness between the isolates and other strains of species of the genus Streptococcus, including S. suis, was calculated using the average nucleotide identity values of whole genome sequences, which indicated that serotypes 20, 22 and 26 should be removed taxonomically from S. suis and treated as a novel genomic species. Comparative sequence analysis revealed 99.0-100 % sequence similarities for the 16S rRNA genes between the reference strains of serotypes 20, 22 and 26, and our isolates. Isolate STU-286(T) had relatively high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with S. suis NCTC 10234(T) (98.8 %). SUT-286(T) could be distinguished from S. suis and other closely related species of the genus Streptococcus using biochemical tests. Due to its phylogenetic and phenotypic similarities to S. suis we propose naming the novel species Streptococcus parasuis sp. nov., with SUT-286(T) ( = JCM 30273(T) = DSM 29126(T)) as the type strain.

  10. Quantification of bovine oxylipids during intramammary Streptococcus uberis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus uberis mastitis results in severe mammary tissue damage in dairy cows due to uncontrolled inflammation. Oxylipids are potent lipid mediators that orchestrate pathogen-induced inflammatory responses, however, changes in oxylipid biosynthesis during S. uberis mastitis are unknown. Thus, ...

  11. Are Tilapia Infected with Gyrodactylus More Susceptible to Streptococcus?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and Gyrodactylus niloticus are two common pathogens of cultured Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. We studied concurrent infection of tilapia by G. niloticus and S. iniae and evaluated whether parasitism in tilapia with Gyrodactylus increased susceptibility and mortality follo...

  12. Comparative genomics of the dairy isolate Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against related members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the genus Streptococcus, only Streptococcus thermophilus is used as a starter culture in food fermentations. Streptococcus macedonicus though, which belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC), is also frequently isolated from fermented foods mainly of dairy origin. Members of the SBSEC have been implicated in human endocarditis and colon cancer. Here we compare the genome sequence of the dairy isolate S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 to the other SBSEC genomes in order to assess in silico its potential adaptation to milk and its pathogenicity status. Results Despite the fact that the SBSEC species were found tightly related based on whole genome phylogeny of streptococci, two distinct patterns of evolution were identified among them. Streptococcus macedonicus, Streptococcus infantarius CJ18 and Streptococcus pasteurianus ATCC 43144 seem to have undergone reductive evolution resulting in significantly diminished genome sizes and increased percentages of potential pseudogenes when compared to Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. In addition, the three species seem to have lost genes for catabolizing complex plant carbohydrates and for detoxifying toxic substances previously linked to the ability of S. gallolyticus to survive in the rumen. Analysis of the S. macedonicus genome revealed features that could support adaptation to milk, including an extra gene cluster for lactose and galactose metabolism, a proteolytic system for casein hydrolysis, auxotrophy for several vitamins, an increased ability to resist bacteriophages and horizontal gene transfer events with the dairy Lactococcus lactis and S. thermophilus as potential donors. In addition, S. macedonicus lacks several pathogenicity-related genes found in S. gallolyticus. For example, S. macedonicus has retained only one (i.e. the pil3) of the three pilus gene clusters which may mediate the binding of S. gallolyticus to the extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly

  13. Acriflavine-Resistant Mutant of Streptococcus cremoris†

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Selection for resistance to acriflavine in Streptococcus cremoris resulted in cross-resistance to the drugs neomycin, streptomycin, ethidium bromide, mitomycin C, and proflavine. Furthermore, the mutants showed resistance to lytic bacteriophages to which the parental strain was sensitive, and, unlike the parent, the mutants grew well at higher temperatures (40°C). Revertants selected independently either for temperature sensitivity or for acriflavine sensitivity lost resistance to all the drugs and dyes but retained the bacteriophage resistance phenotype. The acriflavine-resistant mutation resulted in an increase in resistance by the bacterial cells to sodium dodecyl sulfate, a potent solvent of lipopolysaccharide and lipoprotein. It is suggested that the acriflavine resistance mutation determines the synthesis of a membrane substance resistant to higher temperatures. PMID:907329

  14. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Andam, Cheryl P; Hanage, William P

    2015-07-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci.

  15. Contralateral compartment syndrome inoculated by invasive group A streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huiwen; Mcphillips, Sean Thomas; Chundi, Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare but a well-documented complication in patients with trauma-induced group A streptococcus infection. Here, we present a case of a male who developed compartment syndrome on the left lower extremity after an injury inoculated by group A streptococcus on the right lower extremity. The patient was resuscitated with antibiotics, urgent fasciotomy, and immunoglobulin. The patient was eventually transferred to a burn center for further care. PMID:27802865

  16. Streptococcus rubneri sp. nov., isolated from the human throat.

    PubMed

    Huch, Melanie; De Bruyne, Katrien; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Bub, Achim; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Watzl, Bernhard; Snauwaert, Isabel; Franz, Charles M A P; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The novel, Gram-stain-positive, ovoid, lactic acid bacterial isolates LMG 27205, LMG 27206, LMG 27207(T) and MRI-F 18 were obtained from throat samples of healthy humans. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicated that these isolates belong to the genus Streptococcus, specifically the Streptococcus mitis group, with Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus mitis as the nearest neighbours (99.45 and 98.56 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the respective type strains). Genotypic fingerprinting by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), DNA-DNA hybridizations, comparative sequence analysis of pheS, rpoA and atpA and physiological and biochemical tests revealed that these bacteria formed a taxon well separated from its nearest neighbours and other species of the genus Streptococcus with validly published names and, therefore, represent a novel species, for which the name Streptococcus rubneri sp. nov. is proposed, with LMG 27207(T) ( = DSM 26920(T)) as the type strain.

  17. Anti-Group B Streptococcus Glycan-Conjugate Vaccines Using Pilus Protein GBS80 As Carrier and Antigen: Comparing Lysine and Tyrosine-directed Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Nilo, Alberto; Morelli, Laura; Passalacqua, Irene; Brogioni, Barbara; Allan, Martin; Carboni, Filippo; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Zerbini, Francesca; Maione, Domenico; Fabbrini, Monica; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Hu, Qi-Ying; Margarit, Immaculada; Berti, Francesco; Adamo, Roberto

    2015-07-17

    Gram-positive Streptococcus agalactiae or group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of invasive infections in pregnant women, newborns, and elderly people. Vaccination of pregnant women represents the best strategy for prevention of neonatal disease, and GBS polysaccharide-based conjugate vaccines are currently under clinical testing. The potential of GBS pilus proteins selected by genome-based reverse vaccinology as protective antigens for anti-streptococcal vaccines has also been demonstrated. Dressing pilus proteins with surface glycan antigens could be an attractive approach to extend vaccine coverage. We have recently developed an efficient method for tyrosine-directed ligation of large glycans to proteins via copper-free azide-alkyne [3 + 2] cycloaddition. This method enables targeting of predetermined sites of the protein, ensuring that protein epitopes are preserved prior to glycan coupling and a higher consistency in glycoconjugate batches. Herein, we compared conjugates of the GBS type II polysaccharide (PSII) and the GBS80 pilus protein obtained by classic lysine random conjugation and by the recently developed tyrosine-directed ligation. PSII conjugated to CRM197, a carrier protein used for vaccines in the market, was used as a control. We found that the constructs made from PSII and GBS80 were able to elicit murine antibodies recognizing individually the glycan and protein epitopes on the bacterial surface. The generated antibodies were efficacious in mediating opsonophagocytic killing of strains expressing exclusively PSII or GBS80 proteins. The two glycoconjugates were also effective in protecting newborn mice against GBS infection following vaccination of the dams. Altogether, these results demonstrated that polysaccharide-conjugated GBS80 pilus protein functions as a carrier comparably to CRM197, while maintaining its properties of protective protein antigen. Glycoconjugation and reverse vaccinology can, therefore, be combined to design

  18. Horizontal transmission of streptococcus mutans in schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Ana M.; Liébana, Maria J.; Castillo, Francisca; Martín-Platero, Antonio; Liébana, José

    2012-01-01

    Objetive: The aim of this study was to analyze possible horizontal transmission patterns of S. mutans among 6-7-yr-old schoolchildren from the same class, identifying genotypes and their diversity and relationship with caries disease status. Study Design: Caries indexes and saliva mutans streptococci and lactobacilli counts were recorded in 42 schoolchildren. Mutans streptococci colonies were identified by means of biochemical tests and all S. mutans strains were genotyped by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction. A child was considered free of S. mutans when it could not be isolated in 3 samples at 1-week intervals. Results: S. mutans was isolated in 30 schoolchildren: 20 having one genotype and 10 two genotypes. Higher mutans streptococci and caries index values were found in those with two genotypes. Five genotypes were isolated in more than 1 schoolchild and one of these was isolated in 3 schoolchildren. Our results suggest that horizontal transmission may take place. Conclusion: Schoolchildren aged 6-7 yrs may be the source of mutual transmission of S. mutans. Key words:Streptococcus mutans, Horizontal transmission, AP-PCR, genotyping PMID:22143733

  19. Thermal Injury and Recovery of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Carol W.; Witter, Lloyd D.; Ordal, Z. John

    1968-01-01

    Exposure of Streptococcus faecalis R57 to sublethal heating produced a temporary change in the salt tolerance and growth of the organism. After sublethal heat treatment at 60 C for 15 min, greater than 99.0% of the viable population was unable to reproduce on media containing 6% NaCl. In addition, the heated cells displayed a sensitivity to incubation temperature, pH, and 0.01% methylene blue. When the injured cells were placed in a synthetic medium, recovery occurred at a much slower rate than in a complex medium. However, both media supported comparable growth of the uninjured organism. Various media used for the enrichment of streptococci also provided a suitable environment for the recovery of the injured cells. Generally, as more selective agents were present in the medium, the rates of recovery decreased. Metabolic inhibitor studies with chloramphenicol, penicillin, and actinomycin D substantiated the fact that the process involved was recovery and not growth, and that this recovery was linked to ribonucleic acid synthesis. PMID:4973066

  20. Fumarate Reductase Activity of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Aue, B. J.; Diebel, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Some characteristics of a fumarate reductase from Streptococcus faecalis are described. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.4; optimal activity was observed when the ionic strength of the phosphate buffer was adjusted to 0.088. The Km value of the enzyme for reduced flavin mononucleotide was 2 × 10−4 m as determined with a 26-fold preparation. In addition to fumarate, the enzyme reduced maleate and mesaconate. No succinate dehydrogenase activity was detected, but succinate did act as an inhibitor of the fumarate reductase activity. Other inhibitors were malonate, citraconate, and trans-, trans-muconate. Metal-chelating agents did not inhibit the enzyme. A limited inhibition by sulfhydryl-binding agents was observed, and the preparations were sensitive to air oxidation and storage. Glycine, alanine, histidine, and possibly lysine stimulated fumarate reductase activity in the cell-free extracts. However, growth in media supplemented with glycine did not enhance fumarate reductase activity. The enzymatic activity appears to be constitutive. PMID:4960892

  1. Quorum sensing in group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread phenomenon in the microbial world that has important implications in the coordination of population-wide responses in several bacterial pathogens. In Group A Streptococcus (GAS), many questions surrounding QS systems remain to be solved pertaining to their function and their contribution to the GAS lifestyle in the host. The QS systems of GAS described to date can be categorized into four groups: regulator gene of glucosyltransferase (Rgg), Sil, lantibiotic systems, and LuxS/AI-2. The Rgg family of proteins, a conserved group of transcription factors that modify their activity in response to signaling peptides, has been shown to regulate genes involved in virulence, biofilm formation and competence. The sil locus, whose expression is regulated by the activity of signaling peptides and a putative two-component system (TCS), has been implicated on regulating genes involved with invasive disease in GAS isolates. Lantibiotic regulatory systems are involved in the production of bacteriocins and their autoregulation, and some of these genes have been shown to target both bacterial organisms as well as processes of survival inside the infected host. Finally AI-2 (dihydroxy pentanedione, DPD), synthesized by the LuxS enzyme in several bacteria including GAS, has been proposed to be a universal bacterial communication molecule. In this review we discuss the mechanisms of these four systems, the putative functions of their targets, and pose critical questions for future studies. PMID:25309879

  2. Export Requirements of Pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Price, Katherine E.; Greene, Neil G.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major causative agent of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Pneumolysin (Ply), a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), is produced by virtually all clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae, and ply mutant strains are severely attenuated in mouse models of colonization and infection. In contrast to all other known members of the CDC family, Ply lacks a signal peptide for export outside the cell. Instead, Ply has been hypothesized to be released upon autolysis or, alternatively, via a nonautolytic mechanism that remains undefined. We show that an exogenously added signal sequence is not sufficient for Sec-dependent Ply secretion in S. pneumoniae but is sufficient in the surrogate host Bacillus subtilis. Previously, we showed that Ply is localized primarily to the cell wall compartment in the absence of detectable cell lysis. Here we show that Ply released by autolysis cannot reassociate with intact cells, suggesting that there is a Ply export mechanism that is coupled to cell wall localization of the protein. This putative export mechanism is capable of secreting a related CDC without its signal sequence. We show that B. subtilis can export Ply, suggesting that the export pathway is conserved. Finally, through truncation and domain swapping analyses, we show that export is dependent on domain 2 of Ply. PMID:22563048

  3. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Churton, Nicholas W. V.; Misra, Raju V.; Howlin, Robert P.; Allan, Raymond N.; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N.; Gharbia, Saheer E.; Edwards, Richard J.; Clarke, Stuart C.; Webb, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. PMID:27190203

  4. Sodium-stimulated ATPase in Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, N; Unemoto, T; Kobayashi, H

    1984-01-01

    We measured Na+-stimulated ATPase activity in a mutant of Streptococcus faecalis defective in the generation of proton motive force. The activity in membrane vesicles was 62.1 +/- 5.9 nmol of phosphate produced per min per mg of protein when cells were grown on medium containing 0.12 M Na+. Activity decreased as the concentration of Na+ in the growth medium decreased. The decrease in enzyme activity corresponded to the decrease in transport activity for Na+ in both whole cells and membrane vesicles. The effects of pH on both activities were identical. Thus, it is suggested that Na+ movement is mediated by this enzyme. Sodium extrusion and ATPase activity in the wild-type strain were markedly lower than those observed in the mutant strain. Elevated activities of both Na+ extrusion and Na+-stimulated ATPase could be detected in the wild-type strain when cells were grown in the absence of proton motive force. Thus, we propose that the level of ATPase is increased by dissipation of the proton motive force. PMID:6144668

  5. Exogenous Streptococcus pneumoniae Endophthalmitis in Diabetic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Angela H.; Fulton, Linda K.; Marquart, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetics are at increased risk for eye infections including bacterial endophthalmitis. It is unclear whether the severity of endophthalmitis is greater in these patients due to confounding factors such as pre-existing ocular diseases in some but not others. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that disease severity and/or bacterial loads would be significantly higher in a Type I diabetic rabbit model of Streptococcus pneumoniae endophthalmitis. Rabbits were treated with alloxan to destroy pancreatic islet cells, or mock-treated with vehicle, and maintained for 10 days before intravitreal infection with S. pneumoniae E353. Clinical scoring of the eyes was performed 24 and 48 hours after infection, followed by euthanasia and vitreous harvest to quantitate bacterial loads. There were no significant differences in clinical scores (P ≥ 0.440) or bacterial loads (P = 0.736), however, 4/12 (33%) of the diabetic rabbits became bacteremic. This finding not only indicates a breakdown in the blood-ocular barrier, but also prompts further investigation into the exploitation of the diabetic eye by the streptococci. PMID:28387365

  6. Role of hyaluronidase in Streptococcus intermedius biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pecharki, D; Petersen, F C; Scheie, A Aa

    2008-03-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is found in biofilms on teeth and as a commensal member of the gastrointestinal and urinary floras, but may also be associated with deep-seated purulent infections and infective endocarditis. S. intermedius produces hyaluronidase, an enzyme that breaks down hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue. We investigated the involvement of hyaluronidase in S. intermedius biofilm formation and dispersal as well as adhesion to human cells. The hyaluronidase activity and expression of the hyl gene were higher in growth media supplemented with HA. Inactivation of the S. intermedius hyaluronidase resulted in a mutant that formed up to 31 % more biofilm in media supplemented with HA. Hyaluronidase added to the medium caused dispersal of S. intermedius biofilm. Adhesion to epithelial cells was similar in the wild-type and the hyaluronidase mutant. We concluded that hyaluronidase may be important for S. intermedius detachment from biofilms but not for adhesion to epithelial cells. The ability of S. intermedius to detach from the surface and to spread may be crucial in the pathogenicity of this micro-organism.

  7. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Laura C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. PMID:24118108

  8. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms. PMID:26347778

  9. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms.

  10. Conjugal mobilization of the mega element carrying mef(E) from Streptococcus salivarius to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Santagati, Maria; Lupo, Agnese; Scillato, Marina; Di Martino, Andrea; Stefani, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of an unusual strain of Streptococcus salivarius, 3C30, displaying both the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B and the tetracycline resistance phenotypes. It harbours the mef(E), erm(B), and tet(M) genes carried by different genetic elements. The genetic element carrying mef(E), named mega, was investigated by long PCR and sequencing, while the presence of the Tn3872-like element, carrying tet(M) and erm(B), was demonstrated by sequencing of both the int-xis-Tn and the fragment between the two resistance genes. In strain 3C30 the mega element is 5388 bp in size and its nucleotide sequence is identical to that of the element described previously in S. salivarius, with the exception of a 912 bp deletion at the left end. The composite Tn3872-like element appeared to be nonconjugative while the mega element was transferred by conjugation to Streptococcus pneumoniae. It was, however, impossible to transfer it again from these transconjugants to other strains. In addition, only in the 3C30 strain did mega form circular structures, as identified by real-time PCR. In conclusion, we found a clinical strain of S. salivarius carrying both mega and Tn3872-like genetic elements. Mega is transferable by conjugation to S. pneumoniae but it is not transferable again from the transconjugants, suggesting a possible mobilization by recombinases of the coresident Tn3872-like transposon.

  11. Functional variation of the antigen I/II surface protein in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Petersen, F C; Assev, S; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Scheie, A A

    2002-01-01

    Although Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus mutans are regarded as members of the commensal microflora of the body, S. intermedius is often associated with deep-seated purulent infections, whereas S. mutans is frequently associated with dental caries. In this study, we investigated the roles of the S. mutans and S. intermedius antigen I/II proteins in adhesion and modulation of cell surface characteristics. By using isogenic mutants, we show that the antigen I/II in S. mutans, but not in S. intermedius, was involved in adhesion to a salivary film under flowing conditions, as well as in binding to rat collagen type I. Binding to human fibronectin was a common function associated with the S. mutans and S. intermedius antigen I/II. Adhesion of S. mutans or S. intermedius to human collagen types I or IV was negligible. Hydrophobicity, as measured by water contact angles, and zeta potentials were unaltered in the S. intermedius mutant. The S. mutans isogenic mutants, on the other hand, exhibited more positive zeta potentials at physiological pH values than did the wild type. The results indicate common and species-specific roles for the antigen I/II in mediating the attachment of S. mutans and S. intermedius to host components and in determining cell surface properties.

  12. Caries experience and quantification of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus in saliva of Sudanese schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Nurelhuda, Nazik M; Al-Haroni, M; Trovik, T A; Bakken, V

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus are among the most commonly isolated bacterial species implicated as etiological agents of dental caries. Details of the composition of the oral microflora related to dental caries should aid in assessing the prevalence and risk of disease at an individual level. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence and relative amounts of S. mutans and S. sobrinus in the saliva samples obtained from schoolchildren in Khartoum State, the Sudan, and to study the association of the amounts of S. mutans and S. sobrinus with caries experience, socioeconomic status and sugar-sweetened snacks in this population. 140 samples, 30 of which were from individuals with caries experience, were examined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with specific oligonucleotide primers. The mean ratio of fold differences of S. mutans to S. sobrinus was 0.77 (SD 5.4) and 2.29 (SD 6.0) for samples obtained from caries-free and caries-active individuals, respectively. This suggested that the proportion of S. sobrinus was higher than S.mutans in the caries-active group when compared to the caries-free group. An association was found between children with caries-active lesions and the frequent consumption of sticky desserts and higher socioeconomic status. S. sobrinus seems to be associated with caries experience in the studied population. A proposal of caries screening programs designed to test for S. sobrinus in this population may be developed.

  13. Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome Caused by Group G Streptococcus, United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Marina

    2017-01-01

    We describe successful management of 3 patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) attributable to group G Streptococcus infection. This small series supports recognition of group G Streptococcus in the etiology of STSS. We propose intravenous immunoglobulin be used in treatment as it is for STSS caused by group A Streptococcus. PMID:27983491

  14. 77 FR 26014 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: P4 Peptide From Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: P4 Peptide From Streptococcus Pneumoniae AGENCY: Technology Transfer... ``Functional Epitopes of Streptococcus Pneumoniae PsaA Antigen and Uses Thereof,'' filed 7/ 18/2008, claiming... Streptococcus pneumoniae. This technology also includes an antibody that can bind to the epitopes of the...

  15. The Importance of TLR2 and Macrophages in Modulating a Humoral Response after Encountering Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-26

    Response after Encountering Streptococcus Pneumoniae " Brian Schae:5 ,Ph.D. Department of Microbi ogy & Immunology Committee Chairperson Masters...Macrophages in Modulating a Humoral Response after Encountering Streptococcus Pneumoniae " is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond brief excerpts, is...Dissertation: The importance of TLR2 and macrophages in modulating a humoral response after encountering Streptococcus pneumoniae Sam Vasilevsky

  16. A Fishy Tale: a Man with Empyema Caused by Streptococcus halichoeri

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, veterinary laboratories in the United Kingdom reported a novel Lancefield group B streptococcus, Streptococcus halichoeri, in seals. We report a case of Streptococcus halichoeri causing postoperative empyema in a patient. A search of the literature revealed that this is the first case of S. halichoeri ever reported in humans. PMID:24478513

  17. Thalamic abscess caused by a rare pathogen: streptococcus constellatus

    PubMed Central

    Şenol, Özgür; Süslü, Hikmet Turan; Tatarlı, Necati; Tiryaki, Mehmet; Güçlü, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus constellatus is a microorganism that lives commensally in the oropharyngeal region, urogenital region, and intestinal tract. However, it can cause infection in patients with certain predisposing factors. Rarely, this microorganism can cause a brain abscess. Thalamic localization of brain abscesses is much rarer than abscesses in other locations of the brain. Brain abscess caused by streptococcus constellatus are very rarely been reported in the literature. We present a rare case of a left-sided thalamic abscess caused by streptococcus constellatus in a 25-year-old male patient who was injured by shrapnel pieces in the head and who was malnourished. The patient was successfully treated by stereotactic aspiration and antibiotherapy. PMID:27800109

  18. Group B streptococcus endocarditis associated with multiple pulmonary septic emboli.

    PubMed

    Teran, Carlos G; Antezana, Ariel O; Salvani, Jerome; Abaitey, Deborah

    2011-03-29

    Endocarditis is a rare presentation of group B streptococcal infection. Its association with pulmonary septic embolism was only barely studied and limited data is available up to date. Multiple septic emboli is a common complication of bacterial endocarditis, but only a few cases have been documented in relation to group B streptococcus. We present the case of an 87 year old female patient with multiple underlying conditions that predisposed the development of bacterial endocarditis secondary to group B streptococcus and subsequently multiple pulmonary septic emboli. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone and azythromycin with good response and complete recovery without any further complications. In the event of a diagnosed case of group B streptococcus endocarditis, there should be a low threshold for the suspicion of septic pulmonary emboli especially in cases with right valves involvement.

  19. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  20. [Streptococcus intermedius: a rare cause of brain abscess in children].

    PubMed

    Jouhadi, Z; Sadiki, H; Hafid, I; Najib, J

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, also known as the Streptococcus milleri group. Although this is a commensal agent of the mouth and upper airways, it has been recognized as an important pathogen in the formation of abscesses. However, it has rarely been involved in the formation of brain abscess in children. We report 4 pediatric cases of brain abscess caused by S. intermedius. Three boys and 1 girl, all aged over 2 years, were admitted for a febrile meningeal syndrome and seizures, caused by a S. intermedius brain abscess. Diagnosis was obtained by brain imaging combined with culture of cerebrospinal fluid. The outcome was favorable after antibiotic therapy and abscess puncture. S. intermedius should be considered a potential pathogen involved in the development of brain abscess in children.

  1. Construction of a chimeric lysin Ply187N-V12C with extended lytic activity against staphylococci and streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiuhua; Wang, Jing; Yang, Hang; Wei, Cuihua; Yu, Junping; Zhang, Yun; Huang, Yanling; Zhang, Xian-En; Wei, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    Developing chimeric lysins with a wide lytic spectrum would be important for treating some infections caused by multiple pathogenic bacteria. In the present work, a novel chimeric lysin (Ply187N-V12C) was constructed by fusing the catalytic domain (Ply187N) of the bacteriophage lysin Ply187 with the cell binding domain (146-314aa, V12C) of the lysin PlyV12. The results showed that the chimeric lysin Ply187N-V12C had not only lytic activity similar to Ply187N against staphylococcal strains but also extended its lytic activity to streptococci and enterococci, such as Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis, which Ply187N could not lyse. Our work demonstrated that generating novel chimeric lysins with an extended lytic spectrum was feasible through fusing a catalytic domain with a cell-binding domain from lysins with lytic spectra across multiple genera. PMID:25219798

  2. Occurrence of Clinical and Sub-Clinical Mastitis in Dairy Herds in the West Littoral Region in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Gianneechini, R; Concha, C; Rivero, R; Delucci, I; López, J Moreno

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine dairy farms were selected to determine the incidence of clinical mastitis, prevalence of sub-clinical mastitis and bacterial aetiology in the West Littoral Region of Uruguay. In samples taken by the owner and frozen at -20°C during a week the incidence rate of clinical mastitis was determined as 1.2 cases per 100 cow-months at risk. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolated pathogen in 37.5% of 40 milk samples from clinical cases obtained in 1 month. No bacteria grew in the 32.5% of the total samples. A sub-sample including 1077 dairy cows from randomly selected farms was used to determine the prevalence of sub-clinical mastitis. These samples were taken on one visit to each farm. The prevalence was 52.4% on a cow basis and 26.7% on an udder quarter basis. In 55.1% of the quarters of the selected animals with more than 300 000 cells/ml there was no growth. The isolated pathogens from sub-clinical cases and their relative frequencies were: Staphylococcus aureus 62.8%, Streptococcus agalactiae 11.3%, Enterococcus sp. 8%, coagulase-negative staphylococci 7.4%, Streptococus uberis 6.4%, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 1.8%, Escherichia coli 1.5% and Staphylococcus hyicus coagulase-positive 0.6%. PMID:12831175

  3. Molecular Epidemiology and Genomics of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Bessen, Debra E.; McShan, W. Michael; Nguyen, Scott V.; Shetty, Amol; Agrawal, Sonia; Tettelin, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus; GAS) is a strict human pathogen with a very high prevalence worldwide. This review highlights the genetic organization of the species and the important ecological considerations that impact its evolution. Recent advances are presented on the topics of molecular epidemiology, population biology, molecular basis for genetic change, genome structure and genetic flux, phylogenomics and closely related streptococcal species, and the long- and short-term evolution of GAS. The application of whole genome sequence data to addressing key biological questions is discussed. PMID:25460818

  4. Genome sequence of Streptococcus mutans bacteriophage M102.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Jan R

    2007-10-01

    Bacteriophage M102 is a lytic phage specific for serotype c strains of Streptococcus mutans, a causative agent of dental caries. In this study, the complete genome sequence of M102 was determined. The genome is 31,147 bp in size and contains 41 ORFs. Most of the ORFs encoding putative phage structural proteins show similarity to those from bacteriophages from Streptococcus thermophilus. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the M102 genome contains an unusual lysis cassette, which encodes a holin and two lytic enzymes.

  5. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  6. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae: Emergence and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lance E.; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While significant protection from pneumococcal disease has been achieved by the use of polysaccharide and polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines, capsule-independent protection has been limited by serotype replacement along with disease caused by nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp). NESp strains compose approximately 3% to 19% of asymptomatic carriage isolates and harbor multiple antibiotic resistance genes. Surface proteins unique to NESp enhance colonization and virulence despite the lack of a capsule even though the capsule has been thought to be required for pneumococcal pathogenesis. Genes for pneumococcal surface proteins replace the capsular polysaccharide (cps) locus in some NESp isolates, and these proteins aid in pneumococcal colonization and otitis media (OM). NESp strains have been isolated from patients with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal disease, but noninvasive diseases, specifically, conjunctivitis (85%) and OM (8%), are of higher prevalence. Conjunctival strains are commonly of the so-called classical NESp lineages defined by multilocus sequence types (STs) ST344 and ST448, while sporadic NESp lineages such as ST1106 are more commonly isolated from patients with other diseases. Interestingly, sporadic lineages have significantly higher rates of recombination than classical lineages. Higher rates of recombination can lead to increased acquisition of antibiotic resistance and virulence factors, increasing the risk of disease and hindering treatment. NESp strains are a significant proportion of the pneumococcal population, can cause disease, and may be increasing in prevalence in the population due to effects on the pneumococcal niche caused by pneumococcal vaccines. Current vaccines are ineffective against NESp, and further research is necessary to develop vaccines effective against both encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococci. PMID:27006456

  7. Heteroresistance to penicillin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Morand, Brigitte; Mühlemann, Kathrin

    2007-08-28

    Heteroresistance to beta-lactam antibiotics has been mainly described for staphylococci, for which it complicates diagnostic procedures and therapeutic success. This study investigated whether heteroresistance to penicillin exists in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Population analysis profile (PAP) showed the presence of subpopulations with higher penicillin resistance in four of nine clinical pneumococcal strains obtained from a local surveillance program (representing the multiresistant clones ST179, ST276, and ST344) and in seven of 16 reference strains (representing the international clones Spain(23F)-1, Spain(9V)-3, Spain(14)-5, Hungary(19A)-6, South Africa(19A)-13, Taiwan(23F)-15, and Finland(6B)-12). Heteroresistant strains had penicillin minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (for the majority of cells) in the intermediate- to high-level range (0.19-2.0 mug/ml). PAP curves suggested the presence of subpopulations also for the highly penicillin-resistant strains Taiwan(19F)-14, Poland(23F)-16, CSR(19A)-11, and CSR(14)-10. PAP of bacterial subpopulations with higher penicillin resistance showed a shift toward higher penicillin-resistance levels, which reverted upon multiple passages on antibiotic-free media. Convergence to a homotypic resistance phenotype did not occur. Comparison of two strains of clone ST179 showed a correlation between the heteroresistant phenotype and a higher-penicillin MIC and a greater number of altered penicillin-binding proteins (PBP1a, -2b, and -2x), respectively. Therefore, heteroresistance to penicillin occurs in international multiresistant clones of S. pneumoniae. Pneumococci may use heteroresistance to penicillin as a tool during their evolution to high penicillin resistance, because it gives the bacteria an opportunity to explore growth in the presence of antibiotics before acquisition of resistance genes.

  8. Thermoregulation of capsule production by Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Song Ok; Wright, Jordan O; Tesorero, Rafael A; Lee, Hyunwoo; Beall, Bernard; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2012-01-01

    The capsule of Streptococcus pyogenes serves as an adhesin as well as an anti-phagocytic factor by binding to CD44 on keratinocytes of the pharyngeal mucosa and the skin, the main entry sites of the pathogen. We discovered that S. pyogenes HSC5 and MGAS315 strains are further thermoregulated for capsule production at a post-transcriptional level in addition to the transcriptional regulation by the CovRS two-component regulatory system. When the transcription of the hasABC capsular biosynthetic locus was de-repressed through mutation of the covRS system, the two strains, which have been used for pathogenesis studies in the laboratory, exhibited markedly increased capsule production at sub-body temperature. Employing transposon mutagenesis, we found that CvfA, a previously identified membrane-associated endoribonuclease, is required for the thermoregulation of capsule synthesis. The mutation of the cvfA gene conferred increased capsule production regardless of temperature. However, the amount of the capsule transcript was not changed by the mutation, indicating that a post-transcriptional regulator mediates between CvfA and thermoregulated capsule production. When we tested naturally occurring invasive mucoid strains, a high percentage (11/53, 21%) of the strains exhibited thermoregulated capsule production. As expected, the mucoid phenotype of these strains at sub-body temperature was due to mutations within the chromosomal covRS genes. Capsule thermoregulation that exhibits high capsule production at lower temperatures that occur on the skin or mucosal surface potentially confers better capability of adhesion and invasion when S. pyogenes penetrates the epithelial surface.

  9. Thermoregulation of Capsule Production by Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Song Ok; Wright, Jordan O.; Tesorero, Rafael A.; Lee, Hyunwoo; Beall, Bernard; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2012-01-01

    The capsule of Streptococcus pyogenes serves as an adhesin as well as an anti-phagocytic factor by binding to CD44 on keratinocytes of the pharyngeal mucosa and the skin, the main entry sites of the pathogen. We discovered that S. pyogenes HSC5 and MGAS315 strains are further thermoregulated for capsule production at a post-transcriptional level in addition to the transcriptional regulation by the CovRS two-component regulatory system. When the transcription of the hasABC capsular biosynthetic locus was de-repressed through mutation of the covRS system, the two strains, which have been used for pathogenesis studies in the laboratory, exhibited markedly increased capsule production at sub-body temperature. Employing transposon mutagenesis, we found that CvfA, a previously identified membrane-associated endoribonuclease, is required for the thermoregulation of capsule synthesis. The mutation of the cvfA gene conferred increased capsule production regardless of temperature. However, the amount of the capsule transcript was not changed by the mutation, indicating that a post-transcriptional regulator mediates between CvfA and thermoregulated capsule production. When we tested naturally occurring invasive mucoid strains, a high percentage (11/53, 21%) of the strains exhibited thermoregulated capsule production. As expected, the mucoid phenotype of these strains at sub-body temperature was due to mutations within the chromosomal covRS genes. Capsule thermoregulation that exhibits high capsule production at lower temperatures that occur on the skin or mucosal surface potentially confers better capability of adhesion and invasion when S. pyogenes penetrates the epithelial surface. PMID:22615992

  10. The novel species Streptococcus tigurinus and its association with oral infection.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Andrea; Bostanci, Nagihan; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a novel species of viridans streptococci, shown to cause severe invasive infections such as infective endocarditis, spondylodiscitis and meningitis. S. tigurinus belongs to the Streptococcus mitis group and is most closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae and Streptococcus infantis. The presence of S. tigurinus in the human oral cavity has been documented, including in patients with periodontal disease. This review addresses the available scientific knowledge on S. tigurinus and its association with closely related streptococci, and discusses its putative involvement in common oral infections. While there is as yet no strong evidence on the involvement of S. tigurinus with oral infections, its presence in the oral cavity and its association with endocarditis warrants special attention for a link between oral and systemic infection.

  11. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  12. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus salivarius FruA▿

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Ayako; Furukawa, Soichi; Fujita, Shuhei; Mitobe, Jiro; Kawarai, Taketo; Narisawa, Naoki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Kosono, Saori; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Haruo; Morinaga, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2011-01-01

    The oral microbial flora consists of many beneficial species of bacteria that are associated with a healthy condition and control the progression of oral disease. Cooperative interactions between oral streptococci and the pathogens play important roles in the development of dental biofilms in the oral cavity. To determine the roles of oral streptococci in multispecies biofilm development and the effects of the streptococci in biofilm formation, the active substances inhibiting Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation were purified from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 9759 and HT9R culture supernatants using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis was performed, and the results were compared to databases. The S. salivarius HT9R genome sequence was determined and used to indentify candidate proteins for inhibition. The candidates inhibiting biofilms were identified as S. salivarius fructosyltransferase (FTF) and exo-beta-d-fructosidase (FruA). The activity of the inhibitors was elevated in the presence of sucrose, and the inhibitory effects were dependent on the sucrose concentration in the biofilm formation assay medium. Purified and commercial FruA from Aspergillus niger (31.6% identity and 59.6% similarity to the amino acid sequence of FruA from S. salivarius HT9R) completely inhibited S. mutans GS-5 biofilm formation on saliva-coated polystyrene and hydroxyapatite surfaces. Inhibition was induced by decreasing polysaccharide production, which is dependent on sucrose digestion rather than fructan digestion. The data indicate that S. salivarius produces large quantities of FruA and that FruA alone may play an important role in multispecies microbial interactions for sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in the oral cavity. PMID:21239559

  13. Capsular Polysaccharide Expression in Commensal Streptococcus Species: Genetic and Antigenic Similarities to Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Skov Sørensen, Uffe B.; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong; Tettelin, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is considered a hallmark of most invasive species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which the capsule is among the principal virulence factors and is the basis for successful vaccines. Consequently, it was previously assumed that capsule production distinguishes S. pneumoniae from closely related commensals of the mitis group streptococci. Based on antigenic and genetic analyses of 187 mitis group streptococci, including 90 recognized serotypes of S. pneumoniae, we demonstrated capsule production by the Wzy/Wzx pathway in 74% of 66 S. mitis strains and in virtually all tested strains of S. oralis (subspecies oralis, dentisani, and tigurinus) and S. infantis. Additional analyses of genomes of S. cristatus, S. parasanguinis, S. australis, S. sanguinis, S. gordonii, S. anginosus, S. intermedius, and S. constellatus revealed complete capsular biosynthesis (cps) loci in all strains tested. Truncated cps loci were detected in three strains of S. pseudopneumoniae, in 26% of S. mitis strains, and in a single S. oralis strain. The level of sequence identities of cps locus genes confirmed that the structural polymorphism of capsular polysaccharides in S. pneumoniae evolved by import of cps fragments from commensal Streptococcus species, resulting in a mosaic of genes of different origins. The demonstrated antigenic identity of at least eight of the numerous capsular polysaccharide structures expressed by commensal streptococci with recognized serotypes of S. pneumoniae raises concerns about potential misidentifications in addition to important questions concerning the consequences for vaccination and host-parasite relationships both for the commensals and for the pathogen. PMID:27935839

  14. Isolation and characterization of unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Altabe, Silvia; Lopez, Paloma; de Mendoza, Diego

    2007-11-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis is essential for the maintenance of membrane structure and function in many groups of anaerobic bacteria. Like Escherichia coli, the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae produces straight-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids. In E. coli UFA synthesis requires the action of two gene products, the essential isomerase/dehydratase encoded by fabA and an elongation condensing enzyme encoded by fabB. S. pneumoniae lacks both genes and instead employs a single enzyme with only an isomerase function encoded by the fabM gene. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of an S. pneumoniae 708 fabM mutant. This mutant failed to grow in complex medium, and the defect was overcome by addition of UFAs to the growth medium. S. pneumoniae fabM mutants did not produce detectable levels of monounsaturated fatty acids as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography analysis of the radiolabeled phospholipids. We also demonstrate that a fabM null mutant of the cariogenic organism Streptococcus mutants is a UFA auxotroph, indicating that FabM is the only enzyme involved in the control of membrane fluidity in streptococci. Finally we report that the fabN gene of Enterococcus faecalis, coding for a dehydratase/isomerase, complements the growth of S. pneumoniae fabM mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that FabM is a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents against streptococci and that S. pneumoniae UFA auxotrophs could help identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in UFA biosynthesis.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Auxotrophs of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans▿

    PubMed Central

    Altabe, Silvia; Lopez, Paloma; de Mendoza, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis is essential for the maintenance of membrane structure and function in many groups of anaerobic bacteria. Like Escherichia coli, the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae produces straight-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids. In E. coli UFA synthesis requires the action of two gene products, the essential isomerase/dehydratase encoded by fabA and an elongation condensing enzyme encoded by fabB. S. pneumoniae lacks both genes and instead employs a single enzyme with only an isomerase function encoded by the fabM gene. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of an S. pneumoniae 708 fabM mutant. This mutant failed to grow in complex medium, and the defect was overcome by addition of UFAs to the growth medium. S. pneumoniae fabM mutants did not produce detectable levels of monounsaturated fatty acids as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography analysis of the radiolabeled phospholipids. We also demonstrate that a fabM null mutant of the cariogenic organism Streptococcus mutants is a UFA auxotroph, indicating that FabM is the only enzyme involved in the control of membrane fluidity in streptococci. Finally we report that the fabN gene of Enterococcus faecalis, coding for a dehydratase/isomerase, complements the growth of S. pneumoniae fabM mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that FabM is a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents against streptococci and that S. pneumoniae UFA auxotrophs could help identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in UFA biosynthesis. PMID:17827283

  16. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  20. Following the equator: division site selection in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms that spatially regulate cytokinesis are more diverse than initially thought. In two recent publications a positive regulator of FtsZ positioning has been identified in Streptococcus pneumoniae. MapZ (LocZ) connects the division machinery with cell wall elongation, providing a simple mechanism to ensure correct division site selection.

  1. Anticariogenic activity of some tropical medicinal plants against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Shim, Jae-Seok; Chung, Jae-Youn

    2004-09-01

    The methanol extracts of five tropical plants, Baeckea frutescens, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Kaempferia pandurata, Physalis angulata and Quercus infectoria, exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. In particular, G. glabra, K. pandurata and P. angulata conferred fast killing bactericidal effect against S. mutans in 2 min at 50 microg/ml of extract concentration.

  2. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Infections Associated with Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrea; Levine, Seth J.; Garvin, Joseph P.; Brown, Susan; Turner, Lauren; Fritzinger, Angela; Gertz, Robert E.; Murphy, Julia M.; Vogt, Marshall; Beall, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is a known zoonotic pathogen. In this public health investigation conducted in Virginia, USA, in 2013, we identified a probable family cluster of S. zooepidemicus cases linked epidemiologically and genetically to infected guinea pigs. S. zooepidemicus infections should be considered in patients who have severe clinical illness and report guinea pig exposure. PMID:25531424

  3. Streptococcus parasanguinis: new pathogen associated with asymptomatic mastitis in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Garayzábal, J. F.; Fernández, E.; Las Heras, A.; Pascual, C.; Collins, M. D.; Domínguez, L.

    1998-01-01

    We describe two unusual cases in sheep of subclinical mastitis caused by Streptococcus parasanguinis. This bacterium has been associated with the development of experimental endocarditis; its presence at relatively high concentrations in apparently healthy sheep milk may pose a health risk in persons with predisposing heart lesions. PMID:9866743

  4. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Baek, Jin Yang; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens the successful treatment of pneumococcal infections. Here we report a case of bacteremic pneumonia caused by an extremely drug-resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae, nonsusceptible to at least one agent in all classes but vancomycin and linezolid, posing an important new public health threat in our region.

  5. Clinical and microbiological features of bacteremia with Streptococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Trell, Kristina; Nilson, Bo; Petersson, Ann-Cathrine; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus equi (SE) rarely causes human infections. We identified 18 SE isolates from blood cultures. The focus of infection was unknown (n = 5), arthritis (n = 3), catheter-related (n = 2), pneumonia (n = 2), or other (n = 6). There were no fatalities. Several patients had animal contacts but there were no indications of clonal outbreaks.

  6. Streptococcus intermedius liver abscesses and colon cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J J; McKendrick, A I; Drelichman, V S

    2005-10-01

    Certain species of bacteria are known to be associated with colorectal cancer. We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with bacteraemia and liver abscesses due to Streptococcus intermedius. The isolation of this organism should prompt investigation for colorectal neoplasm, which may be present but asymptomatic, without metastases, and therefore at a curative stage.

  7. Next generation protein based Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E; Khan, M Nadeem; Xu, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    All currently available Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) vaccines have limitations due to their capsular serotype composition. Both the 23-valent Spn polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) and 7, 10, or 13-valent Spn conjugate vaccines (PCV-7, 10, -13) are serotype-based vaccines and therefore they elicit only serotype-specific immunity. Emergence of replacement Spn strains expressing other serotypes has consistently occurred following introduction of capsular serotype based Spn vaccines. Furthermore, capsular polysaccharide vaccines are less effective in protection against non-bacteremic pneumonia and acute otitis media (AOM) than against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). These shortcomings of capsular polysaccharide-based Spn vaccines have created high interest in development of non-serotype specific protein-based vaccines that could be effective in preventing both IPD and non-IPD infections. This review discusses the progress to date on development of Spn protein vaccine candidates that are highly conserved by all Spn strains, are highly conserved, exhibit maximal antigenicity and minimal reactogenicity to replace or complement the current capsule-based vaccines. Key to development of a protein based Spn vaccine is an understanding of Spn pathogenesis. Based on pathogenesis, a protein-based Spn vaccine should include one or more ingredients that reduce NP colonization below a pathogenic inoculum. Elimination of all Spn colonization may not be achievable or even advisable. The level of expression of a target protein antigen during pathogenesis is another key to the success of protein based vaccines.. As with virtually all currently licensed vaccines, production of a serum antibody response in response to protein based vaccines is anticipated to provide protection from Spn infections. A significant advantage that protein vaccine formulations can offer over capsule based vaccination is their potential benefits associated with natural priming and boosting to all strains of

  8. Emerging resistant serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Elshafie, Sittana; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution, vaccine serotype coverage, and antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated from patients with invasive diseases, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-7). Methods A total of 134 isolates were collected from blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens at Hamad Hospital during the period from 2005 to 2009. Isolate serotyping was done using the Quellung reaction. The prevaccination period was considered before 2005. Results The most common serotypes for all age groups were 3 (12.70%), 14 (11.90%), 1 (11.90%), 19A (9.00%), 9V (5.20%), 23F (5.20%), and 19F (4.50%). Coverage rates for infant <2 years for PCV-7, the 10-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-10), and the 13-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-13) were 34.78%, 52.17%, and 78.26%, respectively. Coverage rates of these vaccines were 50%, 67.86%, and 75% for the 2–5 years age group; 27.12%, 40.68%, and 64.41% for the age group 6–64 years; and 25%, 33.33%, and 66.67% for the ≥65 years age group, respectively. The percentage of nonsusceptible isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime, and erythromycin were 43.86%, 16.66%, and 22.81%, respectively. Thirty-seven isolates (32.46%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, 1, 9V, 12F, 4, 6B, 3, and 15A. Compared to previous results before the introduction of PCV-7, there was a significant reduction in penicillin-nonsusceptable S. pneumoniae from 66.67% to 43.86%, and a slight insignificant reduction in erythromycin nonsusceptible strains from 27.60% to 22.8%, while there was a significant increase in cefotaxime nonsusceptible strains from 3.55% to 16.66%. Conclusion Invasive pneumococcal strains and the emergence of MDR serotypes is a global burden that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including vaccination, antibiotic stewardship, and continuous

  9. Next generation protein based Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pichichero, Michael E; Khan, M Nadeem; Xu, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    All currently available Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) vaccines have limitations due to their capsular serotype composition. Both the 23-valent Spn polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) and 7, 10, or 13-valent Spn conjugate vaccines (PCV-7, 10, -13) are serotype-based vaccines and therefore they elicit only serotype-specific immunity. Emergence of replacement Spn strains expressing other serotypes has consistently occurred following introduction of capsular serotype based Spn vaccines. Furthermore, capsular polysaccharide vaccines are less effective in protection against non-bacteremic pneumonia and acute otitis media (AOM) than against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). These shortcomings of capsular polysaccharide-based Spn vaccines have created high interest in development of non-serotype specific protein-based vaccines that could be effective in preventing both IPD and non-IPD infections. This review discusses the progress to date on development of Spn protein vaccine candidates that are highly conserved by all Spn strains, are highly conserved, exhibit maximal antigenicity and minimal reactogenicity to replace or complement the current capsule-based vaccines. Key to development of a protein based Spn vaccine is an understanding of Spn pathogenesis. Based on pathogenesis, a protein-based Spn vaccine should include one or more ingredients that reduce NP colonization below a pathogenic inoculum. Elimination of all Spn colonization may not be achievable or even advisable. The level of expression of a target protein antigen during pathogenesis is another key to the success of protein based vaccines.. As with virtually all currently licensed vaccines, production of a serum antibody response in response to protein based vaccines is anticipated to provide protection from Spn infections. A significant advantage that protein vaccine formulations can offer over capsule based vaccination is their potential benefits associated with natural priming and boosting to all strains of

  10. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius adhesion to fibronectin films are oppositely influenced by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-10-07

    Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces is mediated by an interplay of specific and nonspecific interactions. Although nonspecific interactions are ubiquitously present, little is known about the physicochemical mechanisms of specific interactions. The aim of this paper is to determine the influence of ionic strength on the adhesion of two streptococcal strains to fibronectin films. Streptococcus mutans LT11 and Streptococcus intermedius NCTC11324 both possess antigen I/II with the ability to bind fibronectin from solution, but S. intermedius binds approximately 20x less fibronectin than does the S. mutans strain under identical conditions. Both strains as well as fibronectin films are negatively charged in low ionic strength phosphate buffered saline (PBS, 10x diluted), but bacteria appear uncharged in high ionic strength PBS. Physicochemical modeling on the basis of overall cell surface properties (cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potentials) demonstrates that both strains should favor adhesion to fibronectin films in a high ionic strength environment as compared to in a low ionic strength environment, where electrostatic repulsion between equally charged surfaces is dominant. Adhesion of S. intermedius to fibronectin films in a parallel plate flow chamber was completely in line with this modeling, while in addition atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated stronger adhesion forces upon retraction between fibronectin-coated tips and the cell surfaces in high ionic strength PBS than in low ionic strength PBS. Thus, the dependence of the interaction on ionic strength is dominated by the overall negative charge on the interacting surfaces. Adhesion of S. mutans to fibronectin films, however, was completely at odds with theoretical modeling, and the strain adhered best in low ionic strength PBS. Moreover, AFM indicated weaker repulsive forces upon approach between fibronectin-coated tips and the cell surfaces in low ionic strength PBS than in high ionic

  11. The course of acute-phase proteins and serum cortisol in mastitis metritis agalactia (MMA) of the sow and sow performance.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, K N; Bilkei, G

    2005-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in acute-phase proteins (APPs) during mastitis metritis agalactia (MMA) in sows. Sows with MMA (group one, n=15) and healthy sows (group two, n = 15) were evaluated at days 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 postpartum. Number of total born, liveborn, stillborn, and mummified pigs did not differ significantly between the groups. Preweaning mortality was higher (P < 0.001) among MMA sows than among healthy control animals. The offspring of healthy sows had higher (P < 0.05) weaning litter weights than the off-spring of MMA sows. Mean serum alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations were higher in MMA sows on the days 1 (P < 0.05), 5 (P = 0.05), and 10 (P < 0.001) post partum. Mean serum haptoglobin (HPT) was higher in MMA sows on days 1, 5 (P < 0.001), and 10 (P < 0.05) of lactation. Cortisol serum concentrations up to day 10 post partum were higher (P < 0.001) in MMA sows than in healthy sows. AGP was negatively correlated with litter weight, indicating that activation of the cellular immune response in sows negatively affects the growth rate of suckling piglets. Correlations were found between the overall means for weight, acute-phase proteins, and serum cortisol concentration.

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus mitis caused by accidental human bite.

    PubMed

    Bastug, Aliye; Kislak, Sumeyye; Mutlu, Nevzat Mehmet; Akcaboy, Zeynep Nur; Koksal, Asude; Sertcelik, Ahmet; Ünlü, Ramazan Erkin; Akinci, Esragul; Bodur, Hurrem

    2016-01-31

    Human bite wounds are more prone to infection than animal bites, which may cause necrotizing soft tissue infections such as myositis, fasciitis. Both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms may be responsible, including Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Peptostreptococcus spp. Necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by serious tissue destruction and systemic toxicity with high morbidity and mortality. We report a patient with Streptococcus mitis associated necrotizing fasciitis on the upper extremity resulting from an accidental human bite, which caused nearly fatal infection. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment should be given after a human bite to prevent infection. If the infection signs and symptoms develop, rapid diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic and surgical therapy should be administered immediately. Streptococcus mitis is a viridans streptococcus, usually known as a relatively benign oral streptococcus. To our knowledge, this is the first necrotizing fasciitis case due to Streptococcus mitis after human bite.

  13. The Host Immune Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae: Bridging Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-06

    caused by penicillin -resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in rabbits. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46: 1760- 1765. Takeuchi, O., Hoshino, K., and...2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The host immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae ...host immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae : bridging innate and adaptive immunity Katherine Shi-Hui Lee Thesis directed by: Clifford M

  14. Clinical implications and treatment of multiresistant Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    File, T M

    2006-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Prior to the 1970s this pathogen was uniformly susceptible to penicillin and most other antimicrobials. However, since the 1990s there has been a significant increase in drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (DRSP) due, in large part, to increased use of antimicrobials. The clinical significance of this resistance is not definitely established, but appears to be most relevant to specific MICs for specific antimicrobials. Certain beta-lactams (amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone), the respiratory fluoroquinolones, and telithromycin are among several agents that remain effective against DRSP. Continued surveillance studies, appropriate antimicrobial usage campaigns, stratification of patients based on known risk factors for resistance, and vaccination programmes are needed to appropriately manage DRSP and limit its spread.

  15. Streptococcus intermedius: an unusual cause of a primary empyema.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Said B; Al Hasan, Muhanad A; Roy, Thomas M; Byrd, Ryland P

    2006-02-01

    Despite the evolution of modern antibiotics, pleural space infection remains a common illness with significant morbidity and mortality. Every year up to 60 percent of the 1.2 million patients in the United States who present with community-acquired pneumonia develop parapneumonic pleural effusions. Few of these parapneumonic effusions progress to an empyema. Interestingly, in about 10 percent of the cases of empyema, no underlying pulmonary infection can be identified. These pleural space infections are called primary empyemas. We present a patient with a primary empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius. Relatively few studies have investigated primary empyema caused Streptococcus intermedius. This case presentation serves as a reminder to the clinician about primary empyema caused by this micro-organism.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Associated with Streptococcus anginosus Bacteremia and Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Umair; Sharma, Anuj; Lowe, Dhruv; Khan, Rashad; Manocha, Divey

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is part of the normal flora of the human gastrointestinal tract. Their ability to cause abscesses is very unique and sets them apart from the rest of the streptococci groups. While an association of group D streptococcus bacteremia and endocarditis with colorectal carcinoma is well established, S. anginosus infections are rarely implicated with colonic malignancy. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to the hospital with fatigue and generalized abdominal pain. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple liver abscesses and rectal thickening. Blood cultures were found to grow S. anginosus bacteria. Colonoscopy revealed a rectal mass which was later confirmed to be rectal adenocarcinoma. This case presents an association between S. anginosus bacteremia and presence of colorectal cancer which has been highlighted in only a few case reports in literature. This should prompt clinicians to screen for colorectal cancer in patients with S. anginosus bacteremia. PMID:28100999

  17. Splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a young healthy man.

    PubMed

    Maliyil, Jepsin; Caire, William; Nair, Rajasree; Bridges, Debbie

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of splenic abscess with multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a healthy young man without any identifiable risk factors, which resolved with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. Streptococcus intermedius, a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, is a common commensal organism of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, and it is a known cause of deep-seated infections. Suppurative infections caused by Streptococcus anginosus group are sometimes associated with bacteremia, but hematogenous spread of infection from an occult source leading to concurrent splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses has never been previously reported in a healthy young individual.

  18. Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae with a DNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Denys, G A; Carey, R B

    1992-01-01

    The Accuprobe Streptococcus pneumoniae Culture Identification Test (Gen-Probe, Inc.) was evaluated with 172 isolates of S. pneumoniae and 204 nonpneumococcal isolates. The sensitivity and specificity of the Accuprobe test were 100%. Optimum results were obtained when four or more discrete colonies were selected for testing. The Accuprobe test was determined to be an accurate and rapid method for identification of S. pneumoniae. PMID:1400974

  19. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, A. M.; Humrighouse, B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324T, 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496T, and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300T. A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844T = CCUG 67100T = LMG 28801T. PMID:26763962

  20. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi infection (strangles) in horses.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Ashley

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (strangles) is a highly contagious upper respiratory infection in horses. The infection is transmitted by inhalation or direct contact with mucopurulent discharge from an infective animal, resulting in fever, depression, and submandibular and retropharyngeal lymph node enlargement that can lead to respiratory distress. Complications include purpura hemorrhagica and metastatic abscessation. Control of outbreaks requires strict isolation protocols and hygiene measures. Detection of carriers is essential for preventing disease recurrence on a farm.

  1. Disseminated Streptococcus pneumoniae infection involving a ventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, J.S.; Rajagopalan, N.; Huaman, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first reported case, to our knowledge, of disseminated pneumococcal infection involving a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The management of this infection was extremely challenging, requiring multiple surgical debridements, LVAD removal, and prolonged courses of antibiotics. The Streptococcus pneumoniae isolate was found to be serotype 19F, which is included in both the pneumococcal polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. This report highlights the importance of routine screening for up-to-date vaccination in patients who undergo LVAD implantation. PMID:26073334

  2. Disseminated Streptococcus pneumoniae infection involving a ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Reeves, J S; Rajagopalan, N; Huaman, M A

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first reported case, to our knowledge, of disseminated pneumococcal infection involving a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The management of this infection was extremely challenging, requiring multiple surgical debridements, LVAD removal, and prolonged courses of antibiotics. The Streptococcus pneumoniae isolate was found to be serotype 19F, which is included in both the pneumococcal polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. This report highlights the importance of routine screening for up-to-date vaccination in patients who undergo LVAD implantation.

  3. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324(T), 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496(T), and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300(T). A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844(T) = CCUG 67100(T) = LMG 28801(T).

  4. First Report of the Multiresistance Gene cfr in Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Li, Dexi; Song, Li; Liu, Yang; He, Tao; Liu, Hebing; Wu, Congming

    2013-01-01

    The multiresistance gene cfr was identified for the first time in streptococci, namely, in porcine Streptococcus suis isolate S10. The cfr gene was detected on the ∼100-kb plasmid pStrcfr, where it was bracketed by two copies of the novel insertion sequence ISEnfa5, located in the same orientation. The detection of a cfr- and ISEnfa5-containing amplicon by inverse PCR suggests that ISEnfa5 may play a role in the dissemination of cfr. PMID:23733472

  5. First Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Streptococcus suis▿

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; San Millan, Alvaro; Catalan, Ana; de la Campa, Adela G.; Rivero, Estefania; Lopez, Gema; Dominguez, Lucas; Moreno, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    We have identified and sequenced the genes encoding the quinolone-resistance determining region (QRDR) of ParC and GyrA in fluoroquinolone-susceptible and -resistant Streptococcus suis clinical isolates. Resistance is the consequence of single point mutations in the QRDRs of ParC and GyrA and is not due to clonal spread of resistant strains or horizontal gene transfer with other bacteria. PMID:17116660

  6. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E.J.; Reddy, M.S.; Levine, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with {sup 125}I-labeled HSMSL or {sup 125}I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of ({sup 125}I)alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch.

  7. FORMATION OF PROTOPLASTS FROM STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS BY LYSOZYME1

    PubMed Central

    Bibb, William R.; Straughn, W. R.

    1962-01-01

    Bibb, William R. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) and W. R. Straughn. Formation of protoplasts from Streptococcus faecalis by lysozyme. J. Bacteriol. 84:1094–1098. 1962.—Incubation of whole cells of Streptococcus faecalis F24 in the presence of the crystalline egg-white lysozyme and appropriate sucrose concentration resulted in the formation of discrete spherical structures. On dilution, these osmotically fragile structures lysed immediately. Methyl pentose determinations on isolated cell walls and protoplast membranes verified the presence of rhamnose in the cell walls and its essentially complete absence in protoplast membranes. Cell walls were rendered soluble by lysozyme. After lysozyme treatment of cell walls, 96% of the rhamnose present was not sedimented by centrifugation at 12,500 × g for 30 min. No cell-wall structures were recognized by phasecontrast or electron microscopy. After direct lysis of whole cells of S. faecalis F24 by lysozyme, protoplast membranes were isolated. It is concluded that, in the strain of group D streptococcus studied, lysozyme effectively removes the cell wall. Images PMID:13968087

  8. The thioredoxin system in the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans and the food-industry bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Marco, Salvatore; Rullo, Rosario; Albino, Antonella; Masullo, Mariorosario; De Vendittis, Emmanuele; Amato, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    The Streptococcus genus includes the pathogenic species Streptococcus mutans, the main responsible of dental caries, and the safe microorganism Streptococcus thermophilus, used for the manufacture of dairy products. These facultative anaerobes control the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and indeed, both S. mutans and S. thermophilus possess a cambialistic superoxide dismutase, the key enzyme for a preventive action against ROS. To evaluate the properties of a crucial mechanism for repairing ROS damages, the molecular and functional characterization of the thioredoxin system in these streptococci was investigated. The putative genes encoding its protein components in S. mutans and S. thermophilus were analysed and the corresponding recombinant proteins were purified. A single thioredoxin reductase was obtained from either S. mutans (SmTrxB) or S. thermophilus (StTrxB1), whereas two thioredoxins were prepared from either S. mutans (SmTrxA and SmTrxH1) or S. thermophilus (StTrxA1 and StTrxA2). Both SmTrxB and StTrxB1 reduced the synthetic substrate DTNB in the presence of NADPH, whereas only SmTrxA and StTrxA1 accelerated the insulin reduction in the presence of DTT. To reconstitute an in vitro streptococcal thioredoxin system, the combined activity of the thioredoxin components was tested through the insulin precipitation in the absence of DTT. The assay functions with a combination of SmTrxB or StTrxB1 with either SmTrxA or StTrxA1. These results suggest that the streptococcal members of the thioredoxin system display a direct functional interaction between them and that these protein components are interchangeable within the Streptococcus genus. In conclusion, our data prove the existence of a functioning thioredoxin system even in these microaerophiles.

  9. Inference of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Among Diverse Group A Streptococcus Strains Using emm Sequencing and Multilocus Genotyping Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-04

    pneumonia . Less frequently, it can cause severe symptoms such as toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing fasciitis, and sterile rheumatic sequelae [1]. Penicillin ... Pneumonia outbreak associated with group A Streptococcus at a military training facility. Clin Infect Dis 40: 511–518. 17. Lamagni TL, Neal S, Keshishian C...Macrolide resistance and erythromycin resistance determinants among Belgian Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. J Antimicrob

  10. National Department of Defense Surveillance for Invasive Streptococcus Pneumoniae: Antibiotic Resistance, Serotype Distribution, and Arbitrarily Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-15

    penicillin -susceptible and peni- cillin-resistant Streptococcnspneuttmoniae serotypes in Canada. J Infect Dis Streptococcus pneumoniae Surveillance Group...Gray for the Streptococcus pneumonia Surveillance Group Report No. 00-44 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH...Defense Surveillance for Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae : Antibiotic Resistance, Serotype Distribution, and Arbitrarily Primed Polymerase Chain

  11. Controlled laboratory challenge demonstrates substantial additive genetic variation in resistance to Streptococcus iniae in Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is an etiologic agent of streptococcal disease in tilapia and is one of several Streptococcus spp. that negatively impact worldwide tilapia production. Methods for the prevention and control of S. iniae include vaccines, management strategies, and antibiotics. An alternative and ...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Hypervirulent and Vaccine Candidate Streptococcus suis Strain SC19

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lin; Dong, Xingxing; Zhou, Yang; Li, Zhiwei; Deng, Limei; Chen, Huanchun; Wang, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus suis, a zoonotic bacterium found primarily in pigs, has been recognized recently as an emerging pathogen of humans. Herein, we describe the genome of Streptococcus suis strain SC19, a hypervirulent and vaccine candidate strain isolated from a pig amid the 2005 outbreak in China. PMID:28104658

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus iniae 89353, a Virulent Strain Isolated from Diseased Tilapia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Han; Chen, Chun-Yao; Huang, Chang-Wen; Lu, Jenn-Kan; Chou, Hsin-Yiu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus iniae 89353 is a virulent strain isolated from diseased tilapia in Taiwan. The full-genome sequence of S. iniae 89353 is 2,098,647 bp. The revealed genome information will be beneficial for identification and understanding of potential virulence genes of Streptococcus iniae and possible immunogens for vaccine development against streptococcosis. PMID:28126946

  14. Hypopituitarism as consequence of late neonatal infection by Group B streptococcus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Amanda Santana; Fernandes, Ana Lourdes Lima Araújo; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a condition characterized by dysfunction of the pituitary gland hormone production. The insults of the perinatal period, which includes the late infection by Group B Streptococcus, consists in a rare etiology of this condition. We present the case of a 39-days-old infant with meningitis caused by Streptococcus Group B, which showed, among other consequences, hypopituitarism. PMID:26161231

  15. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents are devices...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents are devices...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents are devices...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents are devices...

  19. Nonhemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates That Lack Large Regions of the sag Operon Mediating Streptolysin S Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Miho; Murayama, Somay Y.; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Wajima, Takeaki; Takahashi, Miki; Masaki, Junko; Kurokawa, Iku; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2010-01-01

    Among nonhemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) strains (n = 9) isolated from patients with pharyngitis or acute otitis media, we identified three deletions in the region from the epf gene, encoding the extracellular matrix binding protein, to the sag operon, mediating streptolysin S production. PMID:20018818

  20. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to identify antibodies to Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Streptococcus and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Pathogenic streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore...

  1. Identification of a pheA gene associated with Streptococcus mitis by using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Kuk; Dang, Hien Thanh; Myung, Soon Chul; Kim, Wonyong

    2012-04-01

    We performed suppression subtractive hybridization to identify genomic differences between Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on the pheA gene, a primer set specific to S. mitis detection was found in 18 out of 103 S. mitis-specific clones. Our findings would be useful for discrimination of S. mitis from other closely related cocci in the oral environment.

  2. Hypopituitarism as consequence of late neonatal infection by Group B streptococcus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Amanda Santana; Fernandes, Ana Lourdes Lima Araújo; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a condition characterized by dysfunction of the pituitary gland hormone production. The insults of the perinatal period, which includes the late infection by Group B Streptococcus, consists in a rare etiology of this condition. We present the case of a 39-days-old infant with meningitis caused by Streptococcus Group B, which showed, among other consequences, hypopituitarism.

  3. Molecular characterization of the presence of Eubacterium spp and Streptococcus spp in endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Fouad, A F; Kum, K-Y; Clawson, M L; Barry, J; Abenoja, C; Zhu, Q; Caimano, M; Radolf, J D

    2003-08-01

    Eubacterium spp. and Streptococcus spp. are virulent, commonly identified microorganisms in endodontic infections. The purpose of this study was to use molecular methods to identify these organisms in 22 infected root canals that include eight cases with preoperative clinical symptoms and five cases with a history of diabetes mellitus. The presence of Streptococcus spp. and Eubacterium spp. was examined using two sets of PCR primers specific with multiple species within the respective genera. Positive specimens had their PCR products sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed to identify the specific species. Sixteen specimens (73%) contained Eubacterium spp. and nine (41%) were positive for Streptococcus spp. Eubacterium infirmum was the most prevalent Eubacterium sp. This organism was significantly associated with a history of diabetes (OR = 9.6; P = 0.04). Streptococcus anginosus was the most common Streptococcus sp., but neither it nor any of the other streptococci were significantly associated with the clinical parameters evaluated.

  4. Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Associated with Fish and the Fish Farm Environment, Established by Amplified rRNA Gene Restriction Analysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Christian; Pelletier, Claire; Boussaha, Mekki; Douet, Diane-Gaëlle; Lautraite, Armand; Tailliez, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have become a major source of concern for aquaculture in recent decades. In addition to true pathogenic species of worldwide significance, such as Streptococcus iniae and Lactococcus garvieae, several species have been reported to produce occasional fish mortalities in limited geographic areas, and many unidentifiable or ill-defined isolates are regularly isolated from fish or fish products. To clarify the nature and prevalence of different fish-associated bacteria belonging to the lactic acid bacterium group, a collection of 57 isolates of different origins was studied and compared with a set of 22 type strains, using amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA). Twelve distinct clusters were delineated on the basis of ARDRA profiles and were confirmed by sequencing of sodA and 16S rRNA genes. These clusters included the following: Lactococcus raffinolactis, L. garvieae, Lactococcus l., S. iniae, S. dysgalactiae, S. parauberis, S. agalactiae, Carnobacterium spp., the Enterococcus “faecium” group, a heterogeneous Enterococcus-like cluster comprising indiscernible representatives of Vagococcus fluvialis or the recently recognized V. carniphilus, V. salmoninarum, and Aerococcus spp. Interestingly, the L. lactis and L. raffinolactis clusters appeared to include many commensals of fish, so opportunistic infections caused by these species cannot be disregarded. The significance for fish populations and fish food processing of three or four genetic clusters of uncertain or complex definition, namely, Aerococcus and Enterococcus clusters, should be established more accurately. PMID:17337536

  5. Prevalence of bovine milk pathogens in Azorean pastures: mobile versus fixed milking machines

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, C.; Pacheco, D.; Soares, L.; Moitoso, M.; Maldonado, J.; Guix, R.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the influence of using mobile (n=47) or fixed (n=45) milking machines in Azorean herds on the apparent prevalence of several milk pathogens in bulk tank milk (BTM) and (2) to determine whether separated subclinical mastitic cows can serve, in real time, as predictors of milk pathogen prevalence for the remaining animals at the herd level. The use of a mobile or fixed milking machine influenced (P≤0.05) the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (72.3 per cent; n=34 v 51.1 per cent; n=23, respectively) and Klebsiella species (46.8 per cent; n=22 v 26.7 per cent; n=12, respectively). S aureus (95 per cent CI OR 1.1 to 6.0) and Klebsiella species (95 per cent CI OR 1.0 to 5.8) were 2.5 times more likely to increase in the BTM of herds using mobile milking machines. The prevalence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (100 per cent; n=92), Escherichia coli (75.0 per cent), Corynebacterium bovis (57.6 per cent), Enterococcus species (55.4 per cent), Streptococcus dysgalactiae (51.1 per cent), Streptococcus uberis (41.3 per cent), Actinomyces pyogenes or Peptostreptococcus indolicus (41.3 per cent) and Streptococcus agalactiae (32.6 per cent) in BTM remained similar among the herds. κ coefficients were always <0.70, indicating intra-herd disagreement of the prevalence of milk pathogens between BTM and separated milking cows. Milking hygiene should be improved in pastures, focusing specifically on herds that use a mobile milking machine. The segregated cows at milking time are not good predictors of milk pathogens in BTM. PMID:27843558

  6. Genomics of Streptococcus salivarius, a major human commensal.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The salivarius group of streptococci is of particular importance for humans. This group consists of three genetically similar species, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus thermophilus. S. salivarius and S. vestibularis are commensal organisms that may occasionally cause opportunistic infections in humans, whereas S. thermophilus is a food bacterium widely used in dairy production. We developed Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and comparative genomic analysis to confirm the clear separation of these three species. These analyses also identified a subgroup of four strains, with a core genome diverging by about 10%, in terms of its nucleotide sequence, from that of S. salivarius sensu stricto. S. thermophilus species displays a low level of nucleotide variability, due to its recent emergence with the development of agriculture. By contrast, nucleotide variability is high in the other two species of the salivarius group, reflecting their long-standing association with humans. The species of the salivarius group have genome sizes ranging from the smallest (∼ 1.7 Mb for S. thermophilus) to the largest (∼ 2.3 Mb for S. salivarius) among streptococci, reflecting genome reduction linked to a narrow, nutritionally rich environment for S. thermophilus, and natural, more competitive niches for the other two species. Analyses of genomic content have indicated that the core genes of S. salivarius account for about two thirds of the genome, indicating considerable variability of gene content and differences in potential adaptive features. Furthermore, we showed that the genome of this species is exceptionally rich in genes encoding surface factors, glycosyltransferases and response regulators. Evidence of widespread genetic exchanges was obtained, probably involving a natural competence system and the presence of diverse mobile elements. However, although the S. salivarius strains studied were isolated from several human body-related sites

  7. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus mutans: Comparison of Serotype Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Little, Wayne A.; Thomson, Lynn A.; Bowen, William H.

    1979-01-01

    A total of 82 strains of Streptococcus mutans representing serotypes a through g were tested for susceptibility to erythromycin, penicillin, methicillin, lincomycin, tetracycline, vancomycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, neomycin, kanamycin, bacitracin, and polymyxin B. Strains included stock cultures and isolates from human and animal dental plaque. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by a broth-microdilution procedure. The major differences in antibiotic susceptibility observed among the serotypes resulted with antibiotics which act on the cell surface. Bacitracin was most active against serotype a strains and polymyxin B against serotype b strains. Serotypes a, d, and g were less susceptible than the other serotypes to methicillin. PMID:464571

  8. First isolation of Streptococcus downei from human dental plaques.

    PubMed

    Yoo, So Young; Kim, Kwan-Joong; Lim, Seong-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Won; Hwang, Ho-Keel; Min, Byung-Moo; Choe, Son-Jin; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2005-08-15

    In this study, we isolated four bacterial strains grown on mitis-salivarius sucrose bacitracin agar. The strains had similar biochemical characteristics to biotypes I or II of mutans streptococci. The four isolates were identified as Streptococcus downei by 16S rDNA and dextranase gene (dex) sequencing as well as polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) targeting dex. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation and identification of S. downei from dental plaque in humans. The results suggest that S. downei can inhabit the human oral cavity.

  9. Development of Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccines Using Live Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifeng; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae still causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children and the elderly. Much effort has been dedicated to developing protein-based universal vaccines to conquer the current shortcomings of capsular vaccines and capsular conjugate vaccines, such as serotype replacement, limited coverage and high costs. A recombinant live vector vaccine delivering protective antigens is a promising way to achieve this goal. In this review, we discuss the researches using live recombinant vaccines, mainly live attenuated Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria, to deliver pneumococcal antigens. We also discuss both the limitations and the future of these vaccines. PMID:25309747

  10. Chromosome and cell wall segregation in Streptococcus faecium ATCC 9790

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.L.; Glaser, D.; Dicker, D.T.; Zito, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Segregation was studied by measuring the positions of autoradiographic grain clusters in chains formed from single cells containing on average less than one radiolabeled chromosome strand. The degree to which chromosomal and cell wall material cosegregated was quantified by using the methods of S. Cooper and M. Weinberger, dividing the number of chains labeled at the middle. This analysis indicated that in contrast to chromosomal segregation in Escherichia coli and, in some studies, to that in gram-positive rods, chromosomal segregation in Streptococcus faecium was slightly nonrandom and did not vary with growth rate. Results were not significantly affected by strand exchange. In contrast, labeled cell wall segregated predominantly nonrandomly.

  11. Isolation and some properties of fimbriae of oral Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Taihei; Matsunoshita, Nobuko

    2004-07-01

    Streptococcus intermedius 1208-1 carried linear fiber-like fimbriae that extended radially from the cell surface. The fimbriae were isolated by pipetting and sonication and were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by a column chromatography series. Heat treatment in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate resulted in the dissociation into smaller molecules. Rabbit antiserum raised against the purified protein reacted with fimbriae on the surface of bacteria under immunogold staining. Serotype g or g-related strains produced the fimbriae and aggregated in human saliva. The aggregation was inhibited by the anti-fimbriae immunoglobulin Fab fragment or the purified fimbriae.

  12. Peritoneal culture alters Streptococcus pneumoniae protein profiles and virulence properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Janssen, R.; Robb, C. W.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the properties of Streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in the murine peritoneal cavity and compared its virulence-associated characteristics to those of cultures grown in vitro. Analysis of mRNA levels for specific virulence factors demonstrated a 2.8-fold increase in ply expression and a 2.2-fold increase in capA3 expression during murine peritoneal culture (MPC). Two-dimensional gels and immunoblots using convalescent-phase patient sera and murine sera revealed distinct differences in protein production in vivo (MPC). MPC-grown pneumococci adhered to A549 epithelial cell lines at levels 10-fold greater than those cultured in vitro.

  13. A Rare Cause of Primary Aortoenteric Fistula: Streptococcus parasanguinis Aortitis

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Kyle; Munguti, Cyrus; Nassif, Imad

    2017-01-01

    Primary aortoenteric fistula is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed but can lead to significant mortality if the diagnosis is delayed. Aortitis, characterized by inflammation of the aortic wall, is a rare cause of aortoenteric fistula. We present a case report of a 72-year-old male patient with infectious aortoenteric fistula secondary to Streptococcus parasanguinis, along with a review of the literature. This case demonstrates the importance of early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment of aortoenteric fistulae and recognizing infectious aortitis as a potential etiology. PMID:28255476

  14. Streptococcus Pneumoniae Intracranial Abscess and Post-Infectious Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Alexandra; Maung, Ko Ko; Ratts, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial abscesses are rare complications of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, and to our knowledge, there have been no case reports of post-infectious vasculitis developing in such patients. Here we describe the case of a 48-year-old post-splenectomy male who developed post-infectious vasculitis following S. pneumoniae otitis media complicated by mastoiditis, osteomyelitis, meningitis, and intracranial abscess. Clinicians ought to be aware of the possible adverse outcomes of invasive S. pneumoniae and the limitations of current treatment options. PMID:28191299

  15. Molecular characterization of virulence genes of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in equines

    PubMed Central

    Javed, R.; Taku, A. K.; Gangil, Rakhi; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the occurrence of streptococci in equines in Jammu (R. S. Pura, Katra), characterization of Streptococci equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus with respect to their virulence traits and to determine antibiotic sensitivity pattern of virulent Streptococcus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 samples were collected from both clinically affected animals (exhibiting signs of respiratory tract disease) and apparently healthy animals and were sent to laboratory. The organisms were isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of Streptococcus was done directly from cultures using sodA and seM gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics such as amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. Results: During this study, a total 40 streptococcal isolates were obtained out of which 2 isolates were of S. equi subsp. equi, 12 isolates were from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In the PCR-based detection, we revealed amplicons of 235 bp and 679 bp for confirmation of sodA and seM gene, respectively. In antibiogram, two isolates of S. equi subsp. equi were found resistant to penicillin G, and all other isolates were found sensitive to amoxicillin and streptomycin. Conclusion: The majority of streptococcal infections was due to S. equi subsp. Zooepidemicus, and thus was recognized as a potential pathogen of diseases of equines besides S. equi subsp. equi. PMID:27651677

  16. Development of a multiplex PCR assay to detect Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus iniae in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Bin; Kwon, Kyoung; Cha, In Seok; Jang, Ho Bin; Nho, Seong Won; Fagutao, Fernand F; Kim, Young Kyu; Yu, Jong Earn; Jung, Tae Sung

    2014-01-01

    A multiplex PCR protocol was established to simultaneously detect major bacterial pathogens in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) including Edwardsiella (E.) tarda, Streptococcus (S.) parauberis, and S. iniae. The PCR assay was able to detect 0.01 ng of E. tarda, 0.1 ng of S. parauberis, and 1 ng of S. iniae genomic DNA. Furthermore, this technique was found to have high specificity when tested with related bacterial species. This method represents a cheaper, faster, and reliable alternative for identifying major bacterial pathogens in olive flounder, the most important farmed fish in Korea.

  17. Streptococcus mitis: walking the line between commensalism and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus mitis is a viridans streptococcus and a normal commensal of the human oropharynx. However, S. mitis can escape from this niche and cause a variety of infectious complications including infective endocarditis, bacteraemia and septicaemia. It uses a variety of strategies to effectively colonize the human oropharynx. These include expression of adhesins, immunoglobulin A proteases and toxins, and modulation of the host immune system. These various colonization factors allow S. mitis to compete for space and nutrients in the face of its more pathogenic oropharyngeal microbial neighbours. However, it is likely that in vulnerable immune-compromised patients S. mitis will use the same colonization and immune modulation factors as virulence factors promoting its opportunistic pathogenesis. The recent publication of a complete genome sequence for S. mitis strain B6 will allow researchers to thoroughly investigate which genes are involved in S. mitis host colonization and pathogenesis. Moreover, it will help to give insight into where S. mitis fits in the complicated oral microbiome. This review will discuss the current knowledge of S. mitis factors involved in host colonization, their potential role in virulence and what needs to be done to fully understand how a an oral commensal successfully transitions to a virulent pathogen.

  18. [Streptococcus pyogenes and the brain: living with the enemy].

    PubMed

    Dale, R C

    Streptococcus pyogenes (or group A beta hemolytic streptococcus) is a pathogenic bacterium that can give rise to a range of invasive and autoimmune diseases, although it is more widely known as the cause of tonsillitis. It is particularly interesting to note that this germ only causes disease in humans. For many years it has been acknowledged that it can cause an autoimmune brain disease (Sydenham s chorea). Yet, the spectrum of post streptococcal brain disorders has recently been extended to include other movement disorders such as tics or dystonia. A number of systematic psychiatric studies have shown that certain emotional disorders generally accompany the movement disorder (particularly, obsessive compulsive disorder). The proposed pathogenetic mechanism is that of a neuronal dysfunction in which antibodies play a mediating role. The antibodies that are produced after the streptococcal infection cross react with neuronal proteins, and more especially so in individuals with a propensity. This represents a possible model of immunological mimicry and its potential importance with respect to certain idiopathic disorders such as Tourette syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder.

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of sil Locus in Clinical Streptococcus pyogenes Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plainvert, Céline; Dinis, Márcia; Ravins, Miriam; Hanski, Emanuel; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Fouet, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) causes a wide variety of diseases, ranging from mild noninvasive to severe invasive infections. Mutations in regulatory components have been implicated in the switch from colonization to invasive phenotypes. The inactivation of the sil locus, composed of six genes encoding a quorum-sensing complex, gives rise to a highly invasive strain. However, studies conducted on limited collections of GAS strains suggested that sil prevalence is around 15%; furthermore, whereas a correlation between the presence of sil and the genetic background was suggested, no link between the presence of a functional sil locus and the invasive status was assessed. We established a collection of 637 nonredundant strains covering all emm genotypes present in France and of known clinical history; 68%, 22%, and 10% were from invasive infections, noninvasive infections, and asymptomatic carriage, respectively. Among the 637 strains, 206 were sil positive. The prevalence of the sil locus varied according to the emm genotype, being present in >85% of the emm4, emm18, emm32, emm60, emm87, and emm90 strains and absent from all emm1, emm28, and emm89 strains. A random selection based on 2009 French epidemiological data indicated that 16% of GAS strains are sil positive. Moreover, due to mutations leading to truncated proteins, only 9% of GAS strains harbor a predicted functional sil system. No correlation was observed between the presence or absence of a functional sil locus and the strain invasiveness status. PMID:24671796

  20. Phylogenomics and the Dynamic Genome Evolution of the Genus Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Vincent P.; Palmer, Sara R.; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D.; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M.; Highlander, Sarah K.; Town, Christopher D.; Burne, Robert A.; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Streptococcus comprises important pathogens that have a severe impact on human health and are responsible for substantial economic losses to agriculture. Here, we utilize 46 Streptococcus genome sequences (44 species), including eight species sequenced here, to provide the first genomic level insight into the evolutionary history and genetic basis underlying the functional diversity of all major groups of this genus. Gene gain/loss analysis revealed a dynamic pattern of genome evolution characterized by an initial period of gene gain followed by a period of loss, as the major groups within the genus diversified. This was followed by a period of genome expansion associated with the origins of the present extant species. The pattern is concordant with an emerging view that genomes evolve through a dynamic process of expansion and streamlining. A large proportion of the pan-genome has experienced lateral gene transfer (LGT) with causative factors, such as relatedness and shared environment, operating over different evolutionary scales. Multiple gene ontology terms were significantly enriched for each group, and mapping terms onto the phylogeny showed that those corresponding to genes born on branches leading to the major groups represented approximately one-fifth of those enriched. Furthermore, despite the extensive LGT, several biochemical characteristics have been retained since group formation, suggesting genomic cohesiveness through time, and that these characteristics may be fundamental to each group. For example, proteolysis: mitis group; urea metabolism: salivarius group; carbohydrate metabolism: pyogenic group; and transcription regulation: bovis group. PMID:24625962

  1. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•−), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  2. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress.

  3. Characterisation of Streptococcus suis isolates from wild boars (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Sánchez del Rey, Verónica; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F; Mentaberre, Gregorio; Briones, Víctor; Lavín, Santiago; Domínguez, Lucas; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Vela, Ana Isabel

    2014-06-01

    Wild boar are widely distributed throughout the Iberian Peninsula and can carry potentially virulent strains of Streptococcus suis. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. suis in wild boars from two large geographical regions of Spain. Serotypes 1, 2, 7 and 9 identified were further genetically characterised by virulence-associated genotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to determine the population structure of S. suis carried by these animals. Streptococcus suis was isolated from 39.1% of the wild boars examined: serotype 9 was the most frequently isolated (12.5%), followed by serotype 1 (2.5%). Serotype 2 was rarely isolated (0.3%). Eighteen additional serotypes were identified indicating wide diversity of this pathogen within the wild boar population. This heterogeneity was confirmed by PFGE and MLST analyses and the majority of isolates exhibited the virulence-associated genotype mrp-/epf-/sly-. The results of this study highlight that the carriage of S. suis by wild boars is commonplace. However, MLST data indicate that these isolates are not related to prevalent clonal complexes ST1, ST16, ST61 and ST87 typically associated with infection of pigs or humans in Europe.

  4. A molecular trigger for intercontinental epidemics of group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Luchang; Olsen, Randall J.; Nasser, Waleed; Beres, Stephen B.; Vuopio, Jaana; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Porter, Adeline R.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular events responsible for strain emergence, enhanced virulence, and epidemicity has been a long-pursued goal in infectious diseases research. A recent analysis of 3,615 genomes of serotype M1 group A Streptococcus strains (the so-called “flesh-eating” bacterium) identified a recombination event that coincides with the global M1 pandemic beginning in the early 1980s. Here, we have shown that the allelic variation that results from this recombination event, which replaces the chromosomal region encoding secreted NADase and streptolysin O, is the key driver of increased toxin production and enhanced infection severity of the M1 pandemic strains. Using isoallelic mutant strains, we found that 3 polymorphisms in this toxin gene region increase resistance to killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, increase bacterial proliferation, and increase virulence in animal models of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis. Genome sequencing of an additional 1,125 streptococcal strains and virulence studies revealed that a highly similar recombinational replacement event underlies an ongoing intercontinental epidemic of serotype M89 group A Streptococcus infections. By identifying the molecular changes that enhance upper respiratory tract fitness, increased resistance to innate immunity, and increased tissue destruction, we describe a mechanism that underpins epidemic streptococcal infections, which have affected many millions of people. PMID:26258415

  5. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Timothy C.; McArthur, Jason D.; Cole, Jason N.; Gillen, Christine M.; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K. S.; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  6. Oxygen dependent pyruvate oxidase expression and production in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-yan; Itzek, Andreas; Chen, Zhi-yun; Kreth, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the oxygen dependent regulation of pyruvate oxidase (SpxB) gene expression and protein production in Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis). SpxB is responsible for the generation of growth-inhibiting amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) able to antagonize cariogenic Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Furthermore, the ecological consequence of H2O2 production was investigated in its self-inhibiting ability towards the producing strain. Expression of spxB was determined with quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and a fluorescent expression reporter strain. Protein abundance was investigated with FLAG epitope engineered in frame on the C-terminal end of SpxB. Self inhibition was tested with an antagonism plate assay. The expression and protein abundance decreased in cells grown under anaerobic conditions. S. sanguinis was resistant against its own produced H2O2, while cariogenic S. mutans was inhibited in its growth. The results suggest that S. sanguinis produces H2O2 as antimicrobial substance to inhibit susceptible niche competing species like S. mutans during initial biofilm formation, when oxygen availability allows for spxB expression and Spx production. PMID:21485312

  7. Responses of innate immune cells to group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Christina; Kovarik, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS), also called Streptococcus pyogenes, is a Gram-positive beta-hemolytic human pathogen which causes a wide range of mostly self-limiting but also several life-threatening diseases. Innate immune responses are fundamental for defense against GAS, yet their activation by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and GAS-derived pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) is incompletely understood. In recent years, the use of animal models together with the powerful tools of human molecular genetics began shedding light onto the molecular mechanisms of innate immune defense against GAS. The signaling adaptor MyD88 was found to play a key role in launching the immune response against GAS in both humans and mice, suggesting that PRRs of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family are involved in sensing this pathogen. The specific TLRs and their ligands have yet to be identified. Following GAS recognition, induction of cytokines such as TNF and type I interferons (IFNs), leukocyte recruitment, phagocytosis, and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been recognized as key events in host defense. A comprehensive knowledge of these mechanisms is needed in order to understand their frequent failure against GAS immune evasion strategies.

  8. Streptococcus caprae sp. nov., isolated from Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica).

    PubMed

    Vela, A I; Mentaberre, G; Lavín, S; Domínguez, L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on a novel Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organism isolated from tonsil samples of two Iberian ibexes. The micro-organism was identified as a streptococcal species based on its cellular, morphological and biochemical characteristics. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison studies confirmed its identification as a member of the genus Streptococcus, but the organism did not correspond to any species of this genus. The nearest phylogenetic relative of the unknown coccus from ibex was Streptococcus porci 2923-03T (96.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Analysis based on rpoB and sodA gene sequences revealed sequence similarity values lower than 86.0 and 83.8 %, respectively, from the type strains of recognized Streptococcus species. The novel bacterial isolate was distinguished from Streptococcus porci and other Streptococcus species using biochemical tests. Based on both phenotypic and phylogenetic findings, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the name Streptococcus caprae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DICM07-02790-1CT ( = CECT 8872T = CCUG 67170T).

  9. Streptococcus oriloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavities of elephants.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Saito, Masanori; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-11-01

    Two strains were isolated from oral cavity samples of healthy elephants. The isolates were Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organisms that were tentatively identified as a streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis suggested classification of these organisms in the genus Streptococcus with Streptococcus criceti ATCC 19642(T) and Streptococcus orisuis NUM 1001(T) as their closest phylogenetic neighbours with 98.2 and 96.9% gene sequence similarity, respectively. When multi-locus sequence analysis using four housekeeping genes, groEL, rpoB, gyrB and sodA, was carried out, similarity of concatenated sequences of the four housekeeping genes from the new isolates and Streptococcus mutans was 89.7%. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments suggested that the new isolates were distinct from S. criceti and other species of the genus Streptococcus. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic differences, it is proposed that the novel isolates are classified in the genus Streptococcus as representatives of Streptococcus oriloxodontae sp. nov. The type strain of S. oriloxodontae is NUM 2101(T) ( =JCM 19285(T) =DSM 27377(T)).

  10. Streptococcus danieliae sp. nov., a novel bacterium isolated from the caecum of a mouse.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Charrier, Cédric; Haller, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We report the characterization of one novel bacterium, strain ERD01G(T), isolated from the cecum of a TNF(deltaARE) mouse. The strain was found to belong to the genus Streptococcus based on phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences. The bacterial species with standing name in nomenclature that was most closely related to our isolate was Streptococcus alactolyticus (97 %). The two bacteria were characterized by a DNA-DNA hybridization similarity value of 35 %, demonstrating that they belong to different species. The new isolate was negative for acetoin production, esculin hydrolysis, urease, α-galactosidase and β-glucosidase, was able to produce acid from starch and trehalose, grew as beta-hemolytic coccobacilli on blood agar, did not grow at >40 °C, did not survive heat treatment at 60 °C for 20 min and showed negative agglutination in Lancefield tests. On the basis of these characteristics, strain ERD01G(T) differed from the most closely related species S. alactolyticus, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus sanguinis. Thus, based on genotypic and phenotypic evidence, we propose that the isolate belongs to a novel bacterial taxon within the genus Streptococcus, for which the name Streptococcus danieliae is proposed. The type strain is ERD01G(T) (= DSM 22233(T) = CCUG 57647(T)).

  11. Bacterial diskospondylitis in juvenile mink from 2 Ontario mink farms.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Jorge; Vidaña, Beatriz; Cruz-Arambulo, Robert; Slavic, Durda; Tapscott, Brian; Brash, Marina L

    2013-09-01

    Nine juvenile mink with hind-limb paresis/paralysis from 2 Ontario farms were submitted for necropsy. Diagnostic tests revealed spinal compression and severe thoracic diskospondylitis with intralesional Gram-positive coccoid bacterial colonies. Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, and hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from vertebral lesions.

  12. Bacterial diskospondylitis in juvenile mink from 2 Ontario mink farms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Jorge; Vidaña, Beatriz; Cruz-Arambulo, Robert; Slavic, Durda; Tapscott, Brian; Brash, Marina L.

    2013-01-01

    Nine juvenile mink with hind-limb paresis/paralysis from 2 Ontario farms were submitted for necropsy. Diagnostic tests revealed spinal compression and severe thoracic diskospondylitis with intralesional Gram-positive coccoid bacterial colonies. Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, and hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from vertebral lesions. PMID:24155490

  13. Versatility of choline metabolism and choline-binding proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae and commensal streptococci.

    PubMed

    Hakenbeck, Regine; Madhour, Abderrahim; Denapaite, Dalia; Brückner, Reinhold

    2009-05-01

    The pneumococcal choline-containing teichoic acids are targeted by cholinebinding proteins (CBPs), major surface components implicated in the interaction with host cells and bacterial cell physiology. CBPs also occur in closely related commensal species, Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis, and many strains of these species contain choline in their cell wall. Physiologically relevant CBPs including cell wall lytic enzymes are highly conserved between Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. mitis. In contrast, the virulence-associated CBPs, CbpA, PspA and PcpA, are S. pneumoniae specific and are thus relevant for the characteristic properties of this species.

  14. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus colonization and caries experience in 3- and 5-year-old Thai children

    PubMed Central

    Saraithong, P.; Pattanaporn, K.; Chen, Z.; Khongkhunthian, S.; Laohapensang, P.; Chhun, N.; Pattanaporn, W.; Gaw, H. Y.; Li, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the colonization of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus in supra-gingival plaque samples and to determine their correlation with the prevalence of early childhood caries (ECC) in Thai children. Materials and methods A total of 344 Thai children, ages 3 and 5 years, were invited to participate in this study. Caries status of the children was examined. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to evaluate DNA levels of S. mutans and S. sobrinus. Results Eighty-five percent of the children were colonized by S. mutans and 50.9 % of them were colonized by S. sobrinus. The prevalence of ECC was 43.8 % and 56.2 % among 3- and 5-year-old children, respectively, and was significantly associated with the presence of S. mutans and S. sobrinus. The severity of ECC was significantly correlated with increased DNA levels of the two bacteria. Children who were positive for S. mutans and S. sobrinus (Sm+/Sb+) were 8 times or 44 times more likely to experience ECC than children who were Sm−/Sb+or were Sm−/Sb−. Conclusions The study evidence further suggest that children colonized by both S. mutans and S. sobrinus are at the higher risk for ECC. Clinical relevance Molecular-based qPCR can be used to detect and quantify S. mutans and S. sobrinus colonization for epidemiological and clinical studies for ECC risk assessment. PMID:25753978

  15. A novel suicide shuttle plasmid for Streptococcus suis serotype 2 and Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Ping; Su, Yiqi; Lin, Huixing; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Lei; Ma, Zhe; Fan, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    The mariner-based Himar1 system has been utilized for creating mutant libraries of many Gram-positive bacteria. Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) and Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (SEZ) are primary pathogens of swine that threaten the swine industry in China. To provide a forward-genetics technology for finding virulent phenotype-related genes in these two pathogens, we constructed a novel temperature-sensitive suicide shuttle plasmid, pMar4s, which contains the Himar1 system transposon, TnYLB-1, and the Himar1 C9 transposase from pMarA and the repTAs temperature-sensitive fragment from pSET4s. The kanamycin (Kan) resistance gene was in the TnYLB-1 transposon. Temperature sensitivity and Kan resistance allowed the selection of mutant strains and construction of the mutant library. The SS2 and SEZ mutant libraries were successfully constructed using the pMar4s plasmid. Inverse-Polymerase Chain Reaction (Inverse-PCR) results revealed large variability in transposon insertion sites and that the library could be used for phenotype alteration screening. The thiamine biosynthesis gene apbE was screened for its influence on SS2 anti-phagocytosis; likewise, the sagF gene was identified to be a hemolytic activity-related gene in SEZ. pMar4s was suitable for mutant library construction, providing more information regarding SS2 and SEZ virulence factors and illustrating the pathogenesis of swine streptococcosis. PMID:27256117

  16. mef(A) is the predominant macrolide resistance determinant in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bley, Christine; van der Linden, Mark; Reinert, Ralf René

    2011-05-01

    In this study, macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Germany were carefully characterised by susceptibility testing, phenotyping, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of macrolides resistance genes, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Of 2045 S. pneumoniae and 352 S. pyogenes isolates, 437 (21.4%) and 29 (8.2%), respectively, were found to be macrolide-resistant. Amongst the S. pneumoniae isolates, the most prevalent resistance marker was mef(A) (57.7%) followed by erm(B) (27.0%) and mef(E) (11.2%). Of note, the dual resistance mechanism mef(E)+erm(B) was found in a relatively high proportion (4.1%) of pneumococcal isolates. Amongst the S. pyogenes isolates, 31.0% carried mef(A), 34.5% erm(B) and 13.8% erm(A). Dissemination of a single clone [mef(A)-positive England(14)-9] has significantly contributed to the emergence of macrolide resistance amongst pneumococci in Germany.

  17. Effect of cigarette smoke exposure on the growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zonuz, Ali Taghavi; Rahmati, Ali; Mortazavi, Hadi; Khashabi, Ehasn; Farahani, Ramin Mostofi Zadeh

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of cigarette smoke on the growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis. The standard strains of S. mutans (ATCC 25175) and S. sanguis (ATCC 10556) were cultured on blood agar and incubated for 48 hr in three main environments: atmospheric air, carbon dioxide, and cigarette smoke. Kent gold 1(nicotine: 0.1 mg, tar: 1 mg), Kent lights (nicotine: 0.8 mg, tar: 9 mg) and Bahman (nicotine: 1 mg, tar: 13 mg) were the brands used in the present study. Afterwards, digital photographs of the colonies were taken and the diameter of colonies was measured. Data were analyzed using Post Hoc and General Linear Model statistical tests. Cigarette smoke and carbon dioxide environments significantly increased the growth of S. mutans. However, high nicotine/tar content cigarette smoke (Bahman) had the greatest impact on S. mutans and S. sanguis. The mutans/sanguis ratio, which was 0.71 in atmospheric air, increased to 1.07 in the presence of carbon dioxide. Kent gold 1, Kent lights, and Bahman demonstrated a mutans/sanguis ratio of 1, 0.84, and 0.98 respectively. In conclusion, it seems that the growth of S. sanguis and S. mutans is accelerated in the vicinity of cigarette smoke.

  18. Solitary Pyomyositis of the Left Rhomboideus Muscle Caused by Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius in an Immunocompetent Person.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Takaya, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Go; Shinzato, Isaku; Takafuta, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Primary pyomyositis is a bacterial infection of the skeletal muscle commonly affecting children with Staphylococcus aureus most often isolated as a pathogen. However, pyomyositis caused by anaerobic bacteria is rare in adults. Here, we report a case of solitary Pyomyositis of the left rhomboideus muscle in an immunocompetent person. A 70-year-old Japanese male presented with high fever and left shoulder pain. His muscle below the lower edge of the left scapula was tender and swollen. His laboratory examinations revealed severe inflammation. Computed tomography showed a solitary low-density area around a contrast enhancement in the left rhomboideus muscle. He was diagnosed as having solitary pyomyositis. Although his symptoms did not improve despite empiric intravenous administration of antibiotics, an incision was performed. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius were isolated from the culture of drainage fluid. His symptoms gradually disappeared after the incisional drainage and continuous administration of antibiotics. Pyomyositis did not recur after his discharge. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on anaerobic pyomyositis of the shoulder muscle.

  19. Effects of Salts and Metal Oxides on Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Nagame, Seigo; Kambara, Masaki; Yoshino, Katsumi

    1994-10-01

    The effects of calcium salts and metal oxide powders on electrochemical, optical and biological properties of Streptococcus mutans have been studied as a novel method to determine the strain. Electrochemical signals of Streptococcus mutans show remarkable decrease in the presence of saturated calcium salts such as CaHPO4, Ca3(PO4)2, and Ca5(PO4)3OH depending on the strains of Streptococcus mutans: Ingbritt, NCTC-10449, or GS-5. The number of viable cells also decreases upon addition of these powders. The effects of metal oxides such as ZnO and BaTiO3 on the electrochemical characteristics and photoluminescence of Streptococcus mutans have also been studied.

  20. Fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae Sepsis in a Patient With Celiac Disease-Associated Hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Ouseph, Madhu M.; Simons, Malorie; Treaba, Diana O.; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with poorly controlled celiac disease (CD) and fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis, describe the morphologic findings, and stress the need for monitoring splenic function and pneumococcal vaccination in these patients. PMID:27761478

  1. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus orisasini SH06, Isolated from a Healthy Thoroughbred Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Misako; Nakano, Akiyo; Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Arakawa, Kensuke; Nakajima, Fumihiko; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kikusui, Tekefumi; Yanagida, Fujitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus orisasini SH06 was isolated from a healthy thoroughbred gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this organism. This paper is the first published report of the genomic sequence of S. orisasini. PMID:26769944

  3. Treatment of Streptococcus mutans bacteria by a plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Huang, Jun; Liu, Xiaodi; Peng, Lei; Guo, Lihong; Lv, Guohua; Chen, Wei; Feng, Kecheng; Yang, Si-ze

    2009-03-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle was realized at atmospheric pressure with a funnel-shaped nozzle. The preliminary characteristics of the plasma plume and its applications in the inactivation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), the most important microorganism causing dental caries, were presented in this paper. The temperature of the plasma plume does not reach higher than 315 K when the power is below 28 W. Oxygen was injected downstream in the plasma afterglow region through the powered steel tube. Its effect was studied via optical-emission spectroscopy, both in air and in agar. Results show that addition of 26 SCCM O2 does not affect the plume length significantly (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP). The inactivation of S. mutans is primarily attributed to ultraviolet light emission, O, OH, and He radicals.

  4. Red drum Sciaenops ocellatus mortalities associated with Streptococcus iniae infection.

    PubMed

    Eldar, A; Perl, S; Frelier, P F; Bercovier, H

    1999-05-12

    We isolated for the first time Streptococcus iniae strains associated with diseased marine fish. Diseased red drum Sciaenops ocellatus were lethargic, and presented external signs (exophthalmia and loss of orientation) resembling those of freshwater fish infected by S. iniae. Skin lesions, extending to a necrotizing myositis, were typical of S. iniae infection of red drum. Histopathological findings indicate that S. iniae infection in red drum produces a chronic disease with systemic involvement characterized by multiple necrotic foci. Molecular epidemiology (RFLP [restriction fragment length polymorphism] ribotyping) revealed that 2 different ribotypes were involved in a single outbreak. The first is the EcoRI 'Israeli' trout and tilapine ribotype (Hind III type a strains), while the second is the EcoRI 'American' ribotype (Hind III type b strains), typical of tilapines farmed in Texas and Idaho.

  5. Interpreting Assays for the Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is both an aggressive pathogen and a normal part of the human respiratory microbiome. Clinicians and microbiologists have struggled to develop tests that can identify pneumococcal respiratory infection and accurately distinguish colonization from invasive disease. Molecular methods hold the promise of an improved ability to rapidly detect microorganisms in respiratory secretions and to make an accurate diagnosis; however, interpretation of diagnostic testing for S. pneumoniae remains problematic. Molecular assays, such as those targeting the pneumolysin gene, may cross-react with other streptococcal species, confounding detection and quantification. Assays that target the autolysin gene appear to be more specific. Even when accurately identified, however, the significance of S. pneumoniae DNA detected in clinical samples is difficult to determine. Here we will discuss the challenges faced in the interpretation of molecular testing for S. pneumoniae, and some strategies that might be used to improve our ability to diagnose pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:21460292

  6. Streptococcus suis Sequence Type 7 Outbreak, Sichuan, China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Changyun; Zhu, Xiaoping; Jing, Huaiqi; Du, Huamao; Segura, Mariela; Zheng, Han; Kan, Biao; Wang, Lili; Bai, Xuemei; Zhou, Yongyun; Cui, Zhigang; Zhang, Shouying; Jin, Dong; Sun, Na; Luo, Xia; Zhang, Ji; Gong, Zhaolong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hui; Li, Zhenjun; Sun, Qiangzheng; Liu, Honglu; Dong, Boqing; Ke, Changwen; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Hua; Tian, Kecheng; Wang, Yu; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2006-01-01

    An outbreak of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 emerged in the summer of 2005 in Sichuan Province, and sporadic infections occurred in 4 additional provinces of China. In total, 99 S. suis strains were isolated and analyzed in this study: 88 isolates from human patients and 11 from diseased pigs. We defined 98 of 99 isolates as pulse type I by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of SmaI-digested chromosomal DNA. Furthermore, multilocus sequence typing classified 97 of 98 members of the pulse type I in the same sequence type (ST), ST-7. Isolates of ST-7 were more toxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells than ST-1 strains. S. suis ST-7, the causative agent, was a single-locus variant of ST-1 with increased virulence. These findings strongly suggest that ST-7 is an emerging, highly virulent S. suis clone that caused the largest S. suis outbreak ever described. PMID:16965698

  7. Single Cell Bottlenecks in the Pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, M. Ammar; Zuniga, Marisol; Roche, Aoife M.; Hamaguchi, Shigeto; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we studied a virulent isolate of the leading bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae in an infant mouse model of colonization, disease and transmission, both with and without influenza A (IAV) co-infection. To identify vulnerable points in the multiple steps involved in pneumococcal pathogenesis, this model was utilized for a comprehensive analysis of population bottlenecks. Our findings reveal that in the setting of IAV co-infection the organism must pass through single cell bottlenecks during bloodstream invasion from the nasopharynx within the host and in transmission between hosts. Passage through these bottlenecks was not associated with genetic adaptation by the pathogen. The bottleneck in transmission occurred between bacterial exit from one host and establishment in another explaining why the number of shed organisms in secretions is critical to overcoming it. These observations demonstrate how viral infection, and TLR-dependent innate immune responses it stimulates and that are required to control it, drive bacterial contagion. PMID:27732665

  8. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiuchun; Shi, Xiaoli; Shi, Limei; Liu, Jinlin; Stone, Victoria; Kong, Fanxiang; Kitten, Todd; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation. PMID:26950587

  9. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Youn; Park, So Young; Moon, Soo-Youn; Son, Jun Seong; Lee, Mi Suk

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is known to be a highly lethal infection of deep-seated subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia. Reports of necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae are exceedingly rare. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a 62-yr-old man with liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. He presented with painful swelling of left leg and right hand. On the day of admission, compartment syndrome was aggravated and the patient underwent surgical exploration. Intra-operative findings revealed necrotizing fasciitis and cultures of two blood samples and wound aspirates showed S. pneumoniae. The patient died despite debridement and proper antimicrobial treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis with meningitis reported in Korea. We also review and discuss the literature on pneumococcal necrotizing fasciitis.

  10. Recognition of Streptococcus pneumoniae by the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Uwe; Suttorp, Norbert; Opitz, Bastian

    2012-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is both a frequent colonizer of the upper respiratory tract and a leading cause of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. The innate immune system is critical for the control of colonization and for defence during invasive disease. Initially, pneumococci are recognized by different sensors of the innate immune system called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which control most subsequent host defence pathways. These PRRs include the transmembrane Toll-like receptors (TLRs) as well as the cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLRs) and DNA sensors. Recognition of S. pneumoniae by members of these PRR families regulates the production of inflammatory mediators that orchestrate the following immune response of infected as well as neighbouring non-infected cells, stimulates the recruitment of immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages, and shapes the adaptive immunity. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the function of different PRRs in S. pneumoniae infection.

  11. Pleural effusion Due to Streptococcus milleri: Case descriptions.

    PubMed

    Madrid-Carbajal, Claudia Janeth; Molinos, Luis; García-Clemente, Marta; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Fleites, Ana; Casan-Clarà, Pere

    2014-09-01

    In this study we analyzed the characteristics of patients with pleural effusion secondary to Streptococcus milleri studied retrospectively between January and March 2013 and found seven patients with a mean age of 60 years, 43% of which were smokers and 57% with a drinking habit. The most common associated factors were alcoholism, previous pneumonia and diabetes. Other bacteria were identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacteroides and Prevotella intermedia capillosus in two patients. The mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 28 days; six patients underwent pleural drainage by chest tube and one patient needed surgery due to poor clinical progress. The mean duration of hospitalization was 30 days with satisfactory outcome in all cases, despite some changes in residual function.

  12. Genetic patterns of Streptococcus uberis isolated from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Elina B; Lasagno, Mirta C; Odierno, Liliana M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotypic relationships among 40 Streptococcus uberis isolated from bovine mastitis by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Additionally, the association between PFGE patterns and virulence profiles was investigated. The isolates exhibited 17 PFGE patterns. Different strains were found within and among herds; however, a low number of isolates within the same herd shared an identical PFGE type. No association between PFGE patterns and virulence profiles was found. However, the detection of specific strains in some herds could indicate that some strains are more virulent than others. Further research needs to be undertaken to elucidate new virulence-associated genes that might contribute to the capability of these strains to produce infection.

  13. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sfeir, Julien; Lefrançois, Corinne; Baudoux, Dominique; Derbré, Séverine; Licznar, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of tonsillitis. The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of 18 essential oils chemotypes from aromatic medicinal plants against S. pyogenes. Antibacterial activity of essential oils was investigated using disc diffusion method. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of essential oils showing an important antibacterial activity was measured using broth dilution method. Out of 18 essential oils tested, 14 showed antibacterial activity against S. pyogenes. Among them Cinnamomum verum, Cymbopogon citratus, Thymus vulgaris CT thymol, Origanum compactum, and Satureja montana essential oils exhibited significant antibacterial activity. The in vitro results reported here suggest that, for patients suffering from bacterial throat infections, if aromatherapy is used, these essential oils, considered as potential antimicrobial agents, should be preferred. PMID:23662123

  14. Treatment of Streptococcus mutans bacteria by a plasma needle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xianhui; Huang Jun; Lv Guohua; Liu Xiaodi; Peng Lei; Guo Lihong; Chen Wei; Feng Kecheng; Yang Size

    2009-03-15

    A dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle was realized at atmospheric pressure with a funnel-shaped nozzle. The preliminary characteristics of the plasma plume and its applications in the inactivation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), the most important microorganism causing dental caries, were presented in this paper. The temperature of the plasma plume does not reach higher than 315 K when the power is below 28 W. Oxygen was injected downstream in the plasma afterglow region through the powered steel tube. Its effect was studied via optical-emission spectroscopy, both in air and in agar. Results show that addition of 26 SCCM O{sub 2} does not affect the plume length significantly (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP). The inactivation of S. mutans is primarily attributed to ultraviolet light emission, O, OH, and He radicals.

  15. Glucosyltransferase from Streptococcus sobrinus Catalyzes Glucosylation of Catechin.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, K; Kontani, M; Ono, H; Kodama, T; Tanaka, T; Ooshima, T; Hamada, S

    1995-07-01

    We previously showed that the polymeric forms of polyphenols present in oolong tea extract exhibited strong inhibitory activities against glucosyltransferases (GTases) of mutans streptococci, while green tea extract, which is rich in catechins, did not show such GTase-inhibitory activities. In this study, (+)-catechin [2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dihydro-2H-1-benzopyran-3,5,7-triol] was found to be glucosylated by the GTase of Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 with sucrose as the substrate, and the product was identified as 4(prm1)-O-(alpha)-d-glucopyranosyl-(+)-catechin, with a molecular weight of 452. The (alpha)-glucosylated (+)-catechin did not exhibit significant inhibition of glucan synthesis from sucrose by the GTase, which is in contrast to the polymeric polyphenols isolated from oolong tea leaves.

  16. Aromatic Esters of Bicyclic Amines as Antimicrobials against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    de Gracia Retamosa, María; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Maestro, Beatriz; García-Fernández, Esther; de Waal, Bas; Meijer, E W; García, Pedro; Sanz, Jesús M

    2015-11-09

    A double approach was followed in the search of novel inhibitors of the surface choline-binding proteins (CBPs) of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) with antimicrobial properties. First, a library of 49 rationally-designed esters of alkyl amines was screened for their specific binding to CBPs. The best binders, being esters of bicyclic amines (EBAs), were then tested for their in vitro effect on pneumococcal growth and morphology. Second, the efficiency of EBA-induced CBP inhibition was enhanced about 45,000-fold by multivalency effects upon synthesizing a poly(propylene imine) dendrimer containing eight copies of an atropine derivative. Both approaches led to compounds that arrest bacterial growth, dramatically decrease cell viability, and exhibit a protection effect in animal disease models, demonstrating that the pneumococcal CBPs are adequate targets for the discovery of novel antimicrobials that overcome the currently increasing antimicrobial resistance issues.

  17. Streptococcus constellatus-associated pyoderma in a dog.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Luisa; Nizza, Sandra; de Martinis, Claudio; Foglia Manzillo, Valentina; Iovane, Valentina; Paciello, Orlando; Pagnini, Ugo

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a case of chronic and deep pyodermitis in a 4-year-old male dog with a 3-month skin problems history that had been treated unsuccessfully with fluoroquinolone therapy, prescribed by a private medical veterinary practice, without an early diagnosis. Microbiological examination and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed in our laboratory (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) and a diagnosis of Streptococcus constellatus-associated pyoderma in the dog was made. A new antimicrobial treatment, with tetracyclines, was designed after the definitive diagnosis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The dog remained free of clinical illness at completion of therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a canine pyoderma caused by S. constellatus, a commensal organism which may also cause pyogenic infections. Furthermore, this study confirms that a fluoroquinolone represents a poor empirical choice for initial therapy of canine pyoderma.

  18. Characteristics of Streptococcus suis isolated from patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bin; Wada, Akihito; Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Mita, Kazuhito; Endo, Miyoko; Matsuo, Hirosuke; Asatuma, Yoshinori; Kuramoto, Sanae; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Motoyosi; Yoshikawa, Hiroko; Watabe, Nobuei; Yamada, Hideko; Kurita, Shohachi; Imai, Yumiko; Watanabe, Haruo

    2006-12-01

    Seven cases of Streptococcus suis infection in Japan during 1994 and 2006 were summarized. All cases had porcine exposure and five of them had hand skin injury during the exposure. Five cases presented symptoms of meningitis, three presented symptoms of sepsis, and one resulted in sudden death. All of the isolated S. suis belonged to Lancefield's group D and to serotype 2. They were susceptible to penicillin G, ampicillin, cefotaxime, and ciprofloxacin. However, six of them were resistant to both erythromycin and clindamycin, and four were also resistant to minocycline. Multilocus sequence typing of six isolates showed that they belonged to sequence type (ST) 1, and their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were similar. The remaining isolate was ST28 and its PFGE pattern was distinct from those of the others.

  19. Streptococcus suis infection in swine. A sixteen month study.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, R; Gottschalk, M; Mittal, K R; Beaudoin, M

    1990-01-01

    A total of 349 isolates of Streptococcus suis retrieved from different tissues from diseased pigs were examined in this study. Only 48% of them could be categorized as one of serotypes 1 to 8 and 1/2. Among typable isolates, serotype 2 was the most prevalent (23%), followed by serotype 3 (10%). The majority of all isolates originated from lungs, meninges/brain, and multiple tissues. Forty-one percent of typable isolates and 33% of untypable isolates were retrieved in pure culture. Other isolates were found in conjunction with Pasteurella multocida, Escherichia coli, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Actinomyces pyogenes, and other streptococci. Typable S. suis isolates were more frequently isolated from pigs between five and ten weeks of age, while untypable isolates were mostly found in animals aged more than 24 weeks. No obvious monthly and/or seasonal variation of the prevalence of isolation of S. suis could be detected. PMID:2306668

  20. Splenic abscess in an infant caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Tadashi; Matsubayashi, Rie; Saito, Isamu; Tobayama, Shigeo; Machida, Hiromichi

    2007-12-01

    We report a 20-month-old girl with splenic abscess. The patient was admitted to our hospital because of persistent high fever and abdominal pain. Laboratory data showed leucocytosis and elevated C-reactive protein levels. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple low-density lesions in the spleen. These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of splenic abscess. She was successfully treated with ultrasonographically guided percutaneous drainage for 11 days and intravenous antibiotic for 17 days. On culture, aspirated fluid from the abscess grew Streptococcus intermedius. This case illustrates that the differential diagnosis of unknown-focus infection in infants should include splenic abscess. We recommend conservative therapy (antibiotics and drainage) as first-line therapy for splenic abscess in pediatric patients, based on the importance of the immunological functions of the spleen.