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Sample records for agar antifungal susceptibility

  1. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strains using agar diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna B

    2011-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis is a common soil saprotroph and has been isolated from air, organic waste and also from plant, animal and human tissues. Scopulariopsis has mainly been associated in humans with superficial mycoses, but it has also been described as the cause of subcutaneous and invasive infections. The most common aetiological agent of infections in humans is Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. This species has been reported to be resistant in vitro to broad-spectrum antifungal agents available today. The aim of the study was to establish in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 35 S. brevicaulis strains against amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (FC), caspofungin (CAS), terbinafine (TER), ciclopirox (CIC), voriconazole (VOR), clotrimazole (CTR), miconazole (MCZ), econazole (ECO), ketoconazole (KET), itraconazole (ITR), and fluconazole (FLU). Antifungal susceptibility tests were evaluated by an agar diffusion method (Neo-Sensitabs, Rosco, Denmark). AMB, FC, CAS, ITR and FLU showed no antifungal activity against S. brevicaulis. TER, CIC, CTR, KET, VOR, ECO, and MCZ revealed inhibitory activity for S. brevicaulis, but it varied for each of the drugs. The best antifungal effect was observed for TER and CIC. All isolates had large inhibition zones for TER and CIC. CTR was also inhibitory for all tested S. brevicaulis isolates, but the diameters of inhibition zones were smaller than for TER and CIC. Nearly 89% isolates showed inhibition zones for KET and the mean diameter of the inhibition zone was comparable to CTR. The least antifungal activity exhibited VQR, ECO and MCZ. Because of the multiresistance of S. brevicaulis, infections due to this species may not respond to particular antifungal treatment and other therapeutic approaches should be considered, e.g., combined therapy and/or surgery.

  2. Antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Rex, J H; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M G; Polak, A; Galgiani, J N

    1993-01-01

    Unlike antibacterial susceptibility testing, reliable antifungal susceptibility testing is still largely in its infancy. Many methods have been described, but they produce widely discrepant results unless such factors as pH, inoculum size, medium formulation, incubation time, and incubation temperature are carefully controlled. Even when laboratories agree upon a common method, interlaboratory agreement may be poor. As a result of numerous collaborative projects carried out both independently and under the aegis of the Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, the effects of varying these factors have been extensively studied and a standard method which minimizes interlaboratory variability during the testing of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans has been proposed. This review summarizes this work, reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed susceptibility testing standard, and identifies directions for future work. PMID:8269392

  3. [Yeasts in domestic animals: species identification and susceptibility to antifungals].

    PubMed

    Hamal, Petr; Koukalová, Dagmar

    2010-02-01

    Yeasts frequently colonize various kinds of domestic animals, but may also cause serious diseases. The aim of this study was to identify yeast isolates collected from dogs, cows and pigs, and to determine their in vitro antifungal susceptibility. Fifty-six yeast isolates from dogs (n = 24), cows (n = 20), and pigs (n = 12) were investigated. Appearance of colonies grown on Sabouraud agar, micromorphology on rice agar, as well as assimilation and fermentation of various carbon and nitrogen sources were evaluated. Susceptibility to six antifungals (flucytosine, amphotericin B, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole) was determined semiquantitatively using the commercially available Fungitest kit (Bio-Rad Laboratories). Ten yeast species were identified in dogs with relatively even distribution. On the other hand, cow and pig were clearly dominated by Candida krusei (from 7 species) and Candida rugosa (from 5 species), respectively. Further, most of yeast isolates exhibited good susceptibility to the antifungals tested particularly to amphotericin B, ketoconazole and itraconazole. Based on results, it can be concluded that significant differences in the species spectrum and distribution were documented between groups of yeasts from dogs, cows and pigs. This is probably due to different environmental conditions and the endogenous origin of the yeast isolates. Mostly good susceptibility to systemic antifungals should positively influence the therapy of diseases caused by yeasts in veterinary medicine.

  4. Antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Luciana A; Cafarchia, Claudia; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-11-01

    Antifungal resistance has been associated with biofilm formation in many microorganisms, but not yet in Malassezia pachydermatis. This saprophytic yeast can cause otitis and dermatitis in dogs and has emerged as an important human pathogen, responsible for systemic infections in neonates in intensive care units. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of M. pachydermatis strains, in both their planktonic and sessile forms, to fluconazole, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, terbinafine and voriconazole using the XTT assay and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values recorded for each drug were significantly higher for sessile cells relative to planktonic cells to the extent that ≥ 90% of M. pachydermatis strains in their sessile form were classified as resistant to all antifungal agents tested. Data suggest that M. pachydermatis biofilm formation is associated with antifungal resistance, paving the way towards investigating drug resistance mechanisms in Malassezia spp.

  5. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Trilles, Luciana; Fernández-Torres, Belkys; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos; Wanke, Bodo; Guarro, Josep

    2004-10-01

    We have determined the in vitro susceptibilities of 57 strains of Cryptococcus gattii to nine antifungal agents and have compared the MICs for these strains with those for C. neoformans. MICs were determined by a microdilution reference method. Albaconazole and ravuconazole (MICs of 0.04 and 0.05 microg/ml, respectively) showed the best activities. Micafungin showed no activity (MIC of >128 microg/ml). In general, C. gattii was less susceptible than C. neoformans to all drugs tested, with the exception of amphotericin B and flucytosine.

  6. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Cryptococcus gattii

    PubMed Central

    Trilles, Luciana; Fernández-Torres, Belkys; dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Wanke, Bodo; Guarro, Josep

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the in vitro susceptibilities of 57 strains of Cryptococcus gattii to nine antifungal agents and have compared the MICs for these strains with those for C. neoformans. MICs were determined by a microdilution reference method. Albaconazole and ravuconazole (MICs of 0.04 and 0.05 μg/ml, respectively) showed the best activities. Micafungin showed no activity (MIC of >128 μg/ml). In general, C. gattii was less susceptible than C. neoformans to all drugs tested, with the exception of amphotericin B and flucytosine. PMID:15472349

  7. [Methods for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Dannaoui, Eric

    2006-01-01

    During the last years, a large amount of work has been completed to improve the methods used for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing. Reference techniques are currently available both for yeasts and filamentous fungi, but in some instances, technical improvement are needed. Etest is another well standardized method that can be used as an alternative on a routine basis in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Studies of in vitro-in vivo correlations have led to the definition of susceptibility breakpoints for yeasts for fluconazole, itraconazole, and flucytosine.

  8. The isolation, characterization and antifungal susceptibilities of Cryptococcus neoformans from bird excreta in Klang Valley, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tay, S T; Chai, H C; Na, S L; Hamimah, H; Rohani, M Y; Soo-Hoo, T S

    2005-06-01

    The occurrence of Cryptococcus neoformans in bird excreta in Klang valley, Malaysia was determined in this study. Of 544 samples of bird excreta collected from a local zoo, pet shops and public areas, 20 strains of C. neoformans were isolated. All C. neoformans strains were serotype A and thus identified as C. neoformans variety grubii. All did not produce color changes on canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue agar. All were of alpha-mating types, as determined by a pheromone-specific PCR assay. The antifungal susceptibility testing using agar diffusion method Neo-sensitabs showed that all were susceptible to amphotericin B, fluconazole and itraconazole.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility testing of Malassezia yeast: comparison of two different methodologies.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Florencia D; Córdoba, Susana B; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Zalazar, Laura C; Fernández, Mariana S; Cattana, María E; Alegre, Liliana R; Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso J; Giusiano, Gustavo E

    2017-02-01

    All Malassezia species are lipophilic; thus, modifications are required in susceptibility testing methods to ensure their growth. Antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia species using agar and broth dilution methods has been studied. Currently, few tests using disc diffusion methods are being performed. The aim was to evaluate the in vitro susceptibility of Malassezia yeast against antifungal agents using broth microdilution and disc diffusion methods, then to compare both methodologies. Fifty Malassezia isolates were studied. Microdilution method was performed as described in reference document and agar diffusion test was performed using antifungal tablets and discs. To support growth, culture media were supplemented. To correlate methods, linear regression analysis and categorical agreement was determined. The strongest linear association was observed for fluconazole and miconazole. The highest agreement between both methods was observed for itraconazole and voriconazole and the lowest for amphotericin B and fluconazole. Although modifications made to disc diffusion method allowed to obtain susceptibility data for Malassezia yeast, variables cannot be associated through a linear correlation model, indicating that inhibition zone values cannot predict MIC value. According to the results, disc diffusion assay may not represent an alternative to determine antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia yeast.

  10. Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Ascomycetous Yeasts Isolated from Animals

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E.; Peláez, Teresa; Martínez-Nevado, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that antifungal resistance in yeast isolates of veterinary origin may be an underdiagnosed threat. We tested a collection of 92 ascomycetous yeast isolates that were obtained in Spain from birds, mammals and insects for antifungal susceptibility. MICs to amphotericin B and azoles were low, and no resistant isolates were detected. Despite these results, and given the potential role of animals as reservoirs of resistant strains, continuous monitoring of antifungal susceptibility in the veterinary setting is recommended. PMID:27216048

  11. Comparison of spiral gradient and conventional agar dilution for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M; Molitoris, E; Jashnian, F; Finegold, S M

    1991-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed on brucella laked blood agar with 340 isolates and 14 antimicrobial agents by the standard agar dilution technique and the spiral gradient technique in which antibiotic concentrations were established by diffusion from the agar surface. For comparison, spiral gradient MICs were determined by calculating antimicrobial concentrations at growth endpoints and rounding up to the next twofold incremental concentration. The cumulative percentage of strains susceptible at the breakpoint determined from spiral gradient data was within 10%, generally, of the percentage of strains susceptible at the breakpoint determined from agar dilution data. The overall agreement between the two techniques (within one doubling dilution) was 90.6%. The spiral gradient agar dilution technique is a reasonable alternative to the conventional agar dilution technique for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Images PMID:1929262

  12. [Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. causing superficial mycosis. Coro, Falcon state, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Saúl-García, Yotsabeth; Humbría-García, Leyla; Hernández-Valles, Rosaura

    2015-09-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans are often described as causative agents of superficial mycosis and are more resistant to treatment with azoles. In order to determine the distribution of species and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp., one ambispective study, which analyzed 18 yeast isolates obtained from samples from patients diagnosed with superficial mycosis, was performed. Taxonomic identification was performed by macroscopic visualization of the growth characteristics in chromogenic agar and by conventional methods. The susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole was evaluated by the disc diffusion method. Most of the isolates (88.8%), came from nail samples. C. parapsilosis was the most common species, followed by C. tropicalis, C. albicans and C. krusei, which confirmed the prevalence of non-albicans species as a cause of superficial mycoses. The pattern of susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole was similar: all isolates of C. parapsilosis and C. albicans were susceptible, while 83.3% of C. tropicalis showed sensitivity to both antifungals. C. krusei, fluconazole-resistant species showed intermediate susceptibility io voriconazole. The use of chromogenic agar allowed to detect mixed infections in nail samples, involving Candida spp. and C. tropicalis in one case, the latter with resistance to both fluconazole and voriconazole. The results demonstrate the importance of species identification and susceptibility testing to avoid therapeutic failures in superficial mycoses.

  13. Antifungal susceptibility against yeasts isolated from pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Kersun, L S; Reilly, A F; Ingram, M E; Nicholaou, M J; McGowan, K L

    2008-06-01

    Yeast infections cause morbidity in children with cancer and we evaluated species distribution and antifungal susceptibilities of the etiologic agents in this group. Specimens from 58 children yielded 64 cultures positive for yeasts. Central venous catheters were present in 56 (97%) of the children and neutrophil counts were <500 cells/ml3 in 34% of the patients. Twenty-two (38%) had received recent antifungal treatment, with 15 (25%) receiving fluconazole (FLU) prophylaxis. The Candida isolates recovered from four (27%) of the children on FLU prophylaxis, were resistant to this drug. Candida albicans isolates were susceptible to 100% of antifungals tested, whereas non-C. albicans Candida spp. were variable in their susceptibility patterns. FLU prophylaxis minimally affected susceptibility.

  14. [In vitro susceptibility of isolates of Paracoccidioides spp complex to systemic antifungals using the microdilution method].

    PubMed

    Cermehol, Julman R; Alvarado, Primavera; Mendoza, Mireya; Herndndez, Isabel; Cuestal, De

    2015-09-01

    Broth microdilution, the reference method recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), is not available for use with dimorphic fungi, such as those of the Paracoccidioides genus. In this work, in vitro susceptibility of the Paracoccidioides complex (n=19) to systemic antifungals: amphotericin B, 5-flucytosine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin, was evaluated using the microdilution method (Document M27-A3, M27-S3), with some modifications such as: culture time in Sabouraud dextrose agar (7-10 days), RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 2% glucose and the incubation time (7, 8 and 18 days). The sensitivity in vitro was variable; the majority of Paracoccidioides isolates was susceptible to ketoconazol (73.7%), followed by voriconazole (68.4%), itraconazole (63.1%), amphotericin B (52.6%), fluconazole (47.4%), 5-flucytosine (42.1%) and caspofungin (5%). The overall resistance was mainly to caspofungin (94.7%), followed by 5-flucytosine (52.6%) and amphotericin B (47.4%). Fifty-three percent of the isolates were susceptible-dose dependent to fluconazole followed by itraconazole (15.7%) and 5-fluorocytosine (5.3%). Amphotericin B, itraconazole and voriconazole were the most potent antifungal drugs against Paracoccidioides spp (CMI: 0.03-1 microg/mL). Based on these results, we tentatively propose a microdilution assay protocol for susceptibility testing of Paracoccidioides spp to antifungal drugs. This method may be clinically useful to predict resistance, even though further studies are needed.

  15. An in vitro study of antifungal drug susceptibility of Candida species isolated from human immunodeficiency virus seropositive and human immunodeficiency virus seronegative individuals in Lucknow population Uttar Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Mohammad Shafi; Sreedar, Gadiputi; Shukla, Abhilasha; Gupta, Prashant; Rehan, Ahmad Danish; George, Jiji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients, starting from asymptomatic colonization to pathogenic forms and gradual colonization of non-albicans in patients with advanced immunosuppression leads to resistance for azole group of antifungal drugs with high rate of morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To isolate the Candida species and determine of antifungal drug susceptibility against fluconazole, itraconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B, and clotrimazolein HIV seropositive and control individuals, with or without clinical oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). Materials and Methods: Includes samples from faucial region of 70 subjects with and without clinical candidiasis in HIV seropositive and controls were aseptically inoculated onto Sabaraud's Dextrose Agar media and yeasts were identified for the specific species by Corn Meal Agar, sugar fermentation and heat tolerance tests. Antifungal drug susceptibility of the isolated species was done against above-mentioned drugs by E-test and disc diffusion method. Results: The commonly isolated species in HIV seropositive and controls were Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis Candida guilliermondii and Candida dubliniensis isolated only in HIV seropositive patients. Susceptibility against selected antifungal drugs was observed more in HIV-negative individuals whereas susceptible dose-dependent and resistance were predominant in HIV-positive patients. Conclusion: Resistance is the major problem in the therapy of OPC, especially in HIV seropositive patients due to aggressive and prolonged use of antifungal agents, therefore, our study emphasizes the need for antifungal drug susceptibility testing whenever antifungal treatment is desired, especially in HIV-infected subjects. PMID:26604498

  16. Antifungal susceptibility and virulence factors of clinically isolated dermatophytes in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Mohammad Ali; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Dermatophytes possess a wide array of virulence factors and various antifungal susceptibility patterns which influence their pathogenesis in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate antifungal susceptibility and keratinase and proteinase activity of 49 dermatophyte strains from the genera Microsporum, Trichophyton and Epidermophyton which were isolated from human cases of dermatophytosis. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine dermatophyte strains isolated from clinical samples were cultured on general and specific culture media. Keratinase and proteinase activity was screened on solid mineral media and confirmed in liquid cultures. Drug susceptibility toward azoles (fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole), griseofulvin and terbinafine was evaluated using disk diffusion method on Mueller-Hinton agar and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using microbroth dilution assay according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results: Our results indicated that clinically isolated dermatophytes from 7 major species produced keratinase and proteinase at different extents. The mean keratinase and proteinase activity was reported as 6.69 ± 0.31 (U/ml) and 2.10 ± 0.22 (U/ml) respectively. Disk diffusion and microbroth dilution (MIC) results of antifungal susceptibility testing showed that ketoconazole was the most effective drug against Epidermophyton floccosum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes, itraconazole against T. rubrum and E. floccosum, and griseofulvin and terbinafine against Trichophyton verrucosum. Our results showed that all dermatophyte isolates were resistant to fluconazole. Overall, ketoconazole and itraconazole were the most effective drugs for all dermatophyte species tested. Conclusion: Our results showed that antifungal susceptibility testing is an urgent need to select drugs of choice for treatment of different types of dermatophytosis and further indicated the

  17. Isolation, Identification, and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Dermatophytes from Clinical Samples at Sohag University Hospital in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Mona Fattouh Mohamed; El-din, Asmaa Nasr; El-Hamd, Mohammed Abu

    2016-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and explore the in-vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of dermatophytes isolated from clinically suspected cases of dermatophytosis (tinea infections) attending the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic. Methods This study was conducted at Sohag University Hospital from December 2014 to December 2015. Clinical samples (e.g., skin scrapings and hair stumps) were collected under aseptic precautions. The identification of dermatophytes was performed through microscopic examination using 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) with 40% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) mounts and culture on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and on Dermasel agar base media, both supplemented with chloramphenicol and cycloheximide. All dermatophytes isolates were subjected to antifungal susceptibility testing using the agar-based disk diffusion (ABDD) method against Clotrimazole, Miconazole, Fluconazole, and Griseofulvin. Data were analyzed via SPSS 16, using Chi square and a screening test (cross-tabulation method). Results A total of 110 patients of dermatophytosis were studied. The patients were clinically diagnosed and mycologically confirmed as having tinea capitis (49), tinea corporis (30), tinea pedis (16), tinea cruris (9), or tinea barbae (6). The dermatophytes isolates belonged to 4 species: Microsporum canis 58 (52.7%), Microsporum gypseum 23 (20.9%), Trichophyton mentagrophytes 18 (16.4%), and Microsporum audouinii 11 (10%). The most effective antifungal drugs tested were Clotrimazole, followed by Miconazole (95.5% and 84.5% of isolates were susceptible, respectively). Conclusion Every patient with a tinea infection should be properly studied for a mycological examination and should be treated accordingly. Dermasel agar is more useful as an identification medium in the isolation of dermatophytes. The ABDD method appears to be a simple, cost-effective, and promising method for the evaluation of antifungal susceptibility of dermatophytes. PMID

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae vaginitis: microbiology and in vitro antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Echeverría-Irigoyen, María Julia; Eraso, Elena; Cano, Josep; Gomáriz, María; Guarro, Josep; Quindós, Guillermo

    2011-09-01

    Genitourinary infections by Saccharomyces cerevisiae are rare. Here, we describe eight S. cerevisiae vulvovaginitis episodes where molecular (Affirm VPIII) and conventional microbiological methods (culture and carbohydrate assimilation) have proven to be inadequate for diagnostic purposes. DNA sequencing allowed the correct identification of the pathogen. All isolates were susceptible to most antifungal agents, with two of them also found to be susceptible-dose-dependent to itraconazole.

  19. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis isolates.

    PubMed

    Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna B; Bulanda, Małgorzata

    2014-10-01

    In humans, Scopulariopsis is mainly associated with onychomycoses, rarely with cutaneous infections or with invasive mycoses. However, during the last two decades, deep infections caused by members of this genus have been increasing. Scopulariopsis brevicaulis is the most common species described as an etiologic agent of human disease. Previous antifungal susceptibility studies indicate that this species is resistant in vitro to the broad-spectrum antifungal agents that are available today. Here, we describe the antifungal activity of amphotericin B, terbinafine, ciclopirox, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and voriconazole against 40 S. brevicaulis isolates. Antifungal susceptibility tests were performed using a modified Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A2 procedure. The results showed that itraconazole had the highest minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of >16 mg/l; amphotericin B, voriconazole, and ketoconazole MICs were ranging from 4 to >16 mg/l, 8 to >16 mg/l, and 8 to >16 mg/l, respectively; and the best activity was found with terbinafine and ciclopirox with MICs ranging from 0.5 to 16 mg/l and 1 to 8 mg/l, respectively.

  20. Influence of different Mueller-Hinton agars and media age on Etest susceptibility testing of tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thean Yen; Ng, Lily Siew Yong; Chen, Dorene Mei Mei

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of different Mueller-Hinton agars and media age on tigecycline MICs, obtained by Etest. Variations in MIC values on different Mueller-Hinton were noted, which may result in changes in categoric susceptibility. The use of stored Mueller-Hinton media had minimal effect on MIC values.

  1. Phylogenetic Relationships Matter: Antifungal Susceptibility among Clinically Relevant Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Schmalreck, A. F.; Becker, K.; Fegeler, W.; Czaika, V.; Ulmer, H.; Lass-Flörl, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was 2-fold: to evaluate whether phylogenetically closely related yeasts share common antifungal susceptibility profiles (ASPs) and whether these ASPs can be predicted from phylogeny. To address this question, 9,627 yeast strains were collected and tested for their antifungal susceptibility. Isolates were reidentified by considering recent changes in taxonomy and nomenclature. A phylogenetic (PHYLO) code based on the results of multilocus sequence analyses (large-subunit rRNA, small-subunit rRNA, translation elongation factor 1α, RNA polymerase II subunits 1 and 2) and the classification of the cellular neutral sugar composition of coenzyme Q and 18S ribosomal DNA was created to group related yeasts into PHYLO groups. The ASPs were determined for fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole in each PHYLO group. The majority (95%) of the yeast strains were Ascomycetes. After reclassification, a total of 23 genera and 54 species were identified, resulting in an increase of 64% of genera and a decrease of 5% of species compared with the initial identification. These taxa were assigned to 17 distinct PHYLO groups (Ascomycota, n = 13; Basidiomycota, n = 4). ASPs for azoles were similar among members of the same PHYLO group and different between the various PHYLO groups. Yeast phylogeny may be an additional tool to significantly enhance the assessment of MIC values and to predict antifungal susceptibility, thereby more rapidly initiating appropriate patient management. PMID:24366735

  2. Species Distribution and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Vulvovaginal Candida Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Dai; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Wu, Wen-Xiang; Bai, Hui-Hui; Dong, Han-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) was a common infection associated with lifelong harassment of woman's social and sexual life. The purpose of this study was to describe the species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida species (Candida spp.) isolated from patients with VVC over 8 years. Methods: Species which isolated from patients with VVC in Peking University First Hospital were identified using chromogenic culture media. Susceptibility to common antifungal agents was determined using agar diffusion method based on CLSI M44-A2 document. SPSS software (version 14.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used for statistical analysis, involving statistical description and Chi-square test. Results: The most common strains were Candida (C.) albicans, 80.5% (n = 1775) followed by C. glabrata, 18.1% (n = 400). Nystatin exhibited excellent activity against all species (<4% resistant [R]). Resistance to azole drugs varied among different species. C. albicans: clotrimazole (3.1% R) < fluconazole (16.6% R) < itraconazole (51.5% R) < miconazole (54.0% R); C. glabrata: miconazole (25.6% R) < clotrimazole (50.5% R) < itraconazole (61.9% R) < fluconazole (73.3% R); Candida krusei: clotrimazole (0 R) < fluconazole (57.7% R) < miconazole (73.1% R) < itraconazole (83.3% R). The susceptibility of fluconazole was noticeably decreasing among all species in the study period. Conclusions: Nystatin was the optimal choice for the treatment of VVC at present. The species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from patients with VVC had changed over time. PMID:27174323

  3. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia furfur from bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Iatta, Roberta; Figueredo, Luciana A; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Fungaemia caused by Malassezia spp. in hospitalized patients requires prompt and appropriate therapy, but standard methods for the definition of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility have not been established yet. In this study, the in vitro susceptibility of Malassezia furfur from bloodstream infections (BSIs) to amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (POS) and voriconazole (VRC) was assessed using the broth microdilution (BMD) method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) with different media such as modified Sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB), RPMI and Christensen's urea broth (CUB). Optimal broth media that allow sufficient growth of M. furfur, and produce reliable and reproducible MICs using the CLSI BMD protocol were assessed. Thirty-six M. furfur isolates collected from BSIs of patients before and during AMB therapy, and receiving FLC prophylaxis, were tested. A good growth of M. furfur was observed in RPMI, CUB and SDB at 32 °C for 48 and 72 h. No statistically significant differences were detected between the MIC values registered after 48 and 72 h incubation. ITC, POS and VRC displayed lower MICs than FLC and AMB. These last two antifungal drugs showed higher and lower MICs, respectively, when the isolates were tested in SDB. SDB is the only medium in which it is possible to detect isolates with high FLC MICs in patients receiving FLC prophylaxis. A large number of isolates showed high AMB MIC values regardless of the media used. In conclusion, SDB might be suitable to determine triazole susceptibility. However, the media, the drug formulation or the breakpoints herein applied might not be useful for assessing the AMB susceptibility of M. furfur from BSIs.

  4. Rapid Isolation and Susceptibility Testing of Leptospira spp. Using a New Solid Medium, LVW Agar

    PubMed Central

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Paris, Daniel H.; Langla, Sayan; Thaipadunpanit, Janjira; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Smythe, Lee D.; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp., the causative agents of leptospirosis, are slow-growing Gram-negative spirochetes. Isolation of Leptospira from clinical samples and testing of antimicrobial susceptibility are difficult and time-consuming. Here, we describe the development of a new solid medium that facilitates more-rapid growth of Leptospira spp. and the use of this medium to evaluate the Etest's performance in determining antimicrobial MICs to drugs in common use for leptospirosis. The medium was developed by evaluating the effects of numerous factors on the growth rate of Leptospira interrogans strain NR-20157. These included the type of base agar, the concentration of rabbit serum (RS), and the concentration and duration of CO2 incubation during the initial period of culture. The highest growth rate of NR-20157 was achieved using a Noble agar base supplemented with 10% RS (named LVW agar), with an initial incubation at 30°C in 5% CO2 for 2 days prior to continuous culture in air at 30°C. These conditions were used to develop the Etest for three species, L. interrogans (NR-20161), L. kirschnerii (NR-20327), and L. borgpetersenii (NR-20151). The MICs were read on day 7 for all samples. The Etest was then performed on 109 isolates of pathogenic Leptospira spp. The MIC90 values for penicillin G, doxycycline, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and chloramphenicol were 0.64 units/ml and 0.19, 0.047, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively. The use of LVW agar, which enables rapid growth, isolation of single colonies, and simple antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Leptospira spp., provides an opportunity for new areas of fundamental and applied research. PMID:23114772

  5. Colonization and antifungals susceptibility patterns of Candida species isolated from hospitalized patients in ICUs and NICUs

    PubMed Central

    Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Navid, Mojgan; Torabizadeh, Mehdi; Mazdarani, Shahnam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that there are an increasing in invasive candidiasis during 2-3 last decades. Although, Candida albicans is considered as the most common candidiasis agents, other non-albicans such as C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis were raised as infectious agents. Resistance to fluconazole among non-albicans species is an important problem for clinicians during therapy and prophylaxis. Objectives: The aim of current study was to detect the Candida species from hospitalized neonatal and children in intensive care units (ICUs) and neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). In addition, the susceptibility of isolated agents were also evaluated against three antifungals. Materials and Methods: In the present study 298 samples including 98 blood samples, 100 urines and 100 swabs from oral cavity were inoculated on CHROMagar Candida. Initial detection was done according to the coloration colonies on CHROMagar Candida . Morphology on cornmeal agar, germ tube formation and growth at 45°C were confirmed isolates. Amphotericin B, fluconazole and terbinafine (Lamisil) were used for the susceptibility tests using microdilution method. Results: In the present study 21% and 34% of urines and swabs from oral cavity were positive for Candida species, respectively. The most common species was C. albicans (62.5%) followed by C. tropicalis (15.6%), C. glabrata (6.3%) and Candida species (15.6%). Our study indicated that the most tested species of Candida, 70.3% were sensitive to fluconazole at the concentration of ≤8 μg/mL. Whereas 9 (14.1%) of isolates were resistant to amphotericine B at ≥8 μg/mL. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the importance of species identification and antifungals susceptibility testing for hospitalized patients in ICUs and NICUs wards. PMID:26312235

  6. Antifungal susceptibilities of bloodstream isolates of Candida species from nine hospitals in Korea: application of new antifungal breakpoints and relationship to antifungal usage.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun Jeong; Shin, Jong Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Lee, Wee Gyo; Park, Yeon-Joon; Uh, Young; Kim, Shine-Young; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    We applied the new clinical breakpoints (CBPs) of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to a multicenter study to determine the antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream infection (BSI) isolates of Candida species in Korea, and determined the relationship between the frequency of antifungal-resistant Candida BSI isolates and antifungal use at hospitals. Four hundred and fifty BSI isolates of Candida species were collected over a 1-year period in 2011 from nine hospitals. The susceptibilities of the isolates to four antifungal agents were determined using the CLSI M27 broth microdilution method. By applying the species-specific CBPs, non-susceptibility to fluconazole was found in 16.4% (70/428) of isolates, comprising 2.6% resistant and 13.8% susceptible-dose dependent isolates. However, non-susceptibility to voriconazole, caspofungin, or micafungin was found in 0% (0/370), 0% (0/437), or 0.5% (2/437) of the Candida BSI isolates, respectively. Of the 450 isolates, 72 (16.0%) showed decreased susceptibility to fluconazole [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥4 μg/ml]. The total usage of systemic antifungals varied considerably among the hospitals, ranging from 190.0 to 7.7 defined daily dose per 1,000 patient days, and fluconazole was the most commonly prescribed agent (46.3%). By Spearman's correlation analysis, fluconazole usage did not show a significant correlation with the percentage of fluconazole resistant isolates at hospitals. However, fluconazole usage was significantly correlated with the percentage of fluconazole non-susceptible isolates (r = 0.733; P = 0.025) or the percentage of isolates with decreased susceptibility to fluconazole (MIC ≥4 μg/ml) (r = 0.700; P = 0.036) at hospitals. Our work represents the first South Korean multicenter study demonstrating an association between antifungal use and antifungal resistance among BSI isolates of Candida at hospitals using the new CBPs of the CLSI.

  7. Evaluation of virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility patterns of different Candida species isolated from the female camel (Camelus dromedarius) genital tract.

    PubMed

    Sharifzadeh, Aghil; Soltani, Minoo; Shokri, Hojjatollah

    2015-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the enzymatic activity of different Candida species and their antifungal susceptibility patterns. The study involved a total of 83 isolates of Candida from the genital tract of the female Camelus dromedarius. After species identification, the isolates were analysed for the production/activity of phospholipase, proteinase and haemolysin. In addition, the agar disc diffusion method was performed on the basis of CLSI guidelines M44-A2 protocol for antifungal susceptibility testing. All the isolates were able to produce phospholipase, proteinase and haemolysin. A total of 35.48%, 87.09% and 64.51% of C. albicans isolates exhibited very high phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities, respectively, whereas very high phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities were determined in 5.76%, 23.07% and 45.16% of non-C. albicans isolates respectively. Overall, 61 (73.5%) of Candida isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, 70 (84.3%) susceptible to clotrimazole, 82 (98.8%) susceptible to voriconazole, 76 (91.6%) susceptible to itraconazole, 75 (90.4%) susceptible to ketoconazole, 83 (100%) susceptible to amphotericin B, 81 (97.6%) susceptible to nystatin and 36 (43.4%) susceptible to flucytosine. Candida isolates showed higher haemolytic activity than that of other secreted hydrolases among vaginal Candida species. In addition, amphotericin B was the most in vitro effective antifungal drug and flucytosine had the poorest activity under such conditions.

  8. Diversity and Antifungal Drug Susceptibility of Cryptococcus Isolates in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Worasilchai, Navaporn; Tangwattanachuleeporn, Marut; Meesilpavikkai, Kornvalee; Folba, Claudia; Kangogo, Mourine; Groß, Uwe; Weig, Michael; Bader, Oliver; Chindamporn, Ariya

    2016-12-03

    Yeasts of the Cryptococcus species complex are the causative agent of cryptococcosis, especially in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive individuals. Cerebral or disseminated cryptococcosis has a very high mortality rate worldwide, including in Thailand. Additionally, an increasing rate of antifungal drug resistant cryptococcal isolates has been reported in several neighboring countries, complicating therapeutic approaches. To understand the situation of this infection in Thailand, we retrospectively investigated the molecular epidemiology and antifungal drug resistance in a collection of 74 clinical, 52 environmental and two veterinary isolates using the URA5-RFLP for typing and the EUCAST guideline for susceptibility testing. Where no EUCAST breakpoints (AMB and 5FC) were available, CLSI epidemiologic cutoff values were used for interpretation. Cryptococcal molecular type diversity showed most isolates were C. grubii, molecular type VNI. One clinical isolate was C. deuterogattii (mol. type VGII) and another C. grubii (mol. type VNII). One strain from environment was classified as C. grubii (mol. type VNII). No resistant strains were detected in this retrospective study for either of the antimycotics tested; however, monitoring of the epidemiology of Cryptococcus species in infected patients in Thailand needs to be continued to detect emergence of resistance.

  9. Collaborative Evaluation of Optimal Antifungal Susceptibility Testing Conditions for Dermatophytes

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Torres, Belkys; Cabañes, Francisco J.; Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso J.; Esteban, Alexandre; Inza, Isabel; Abarca, Lourdes; Guarro, Josep

    2002-01-01

    A multicenter study was conducted to define the most suitable testing conditions for antifungal susceptibility of dermatophytes. Broth microdilution MICs of clotrimazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine were determined in three centers against 60 strains of dermatophytes. The effects of inoculum density (ca. 103 and 104 CFU/ml), incubation time (3, 7, and 14 days), endpoint criteria for MIC determination (complete [MIC-0] and prominent [MIC-2] growth inhibition), and incubation temperature (28 and 37°C) on intra- and interlaboratory agreement were analyzed. The optimal testing conditions identified were an inoculum of 104 CFU/ml, a temperature of incubation of 28°C, an incubation period of 7 days, and MIC-0. PMID:12409365

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brazilian Clostridium difficile strains determined by agar dilution and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Edmir Geraldo; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients worldwide. While metronidazole and vancomycin are the most prescribed antibiotics for the treatment of this infection, teicoplanin, tigecycline and nitazoxanide are alternatives drugs. Knowledge on the antibiotic susceptibility profiles is a basic step to differentiate recurrence from treatment failure due to antimicrobial resistance. Because C. difficile antimicrobial susceptibility is largely unknown in Brazil, we aimed to determine the profile of C. difficile strains cultivated from stool samples of inpatients with diarrhea and a positive toxin A/B test using both agar dilution and disk diffusion methods. All 50 strains tested were sensitive to metronidazole according to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints with an MIC90 value of 2μg/mL. Nitazoxanide and tigecycline were highly active in vitro against these strains with an MIC90 value of 0.125μg/mL for both antimicrobials. The MIC90 were 4μg/mL and 2μg/mL for vancomycin and teicoplanin, respectively. A resistance rate of 8% was observed for moxifloxacin. Disk diffusion can be used as an alternative to screen for moxifloxacin resistance, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and metronidazole susceptibility, but it cannot be used for testing glycopeptides. Our results suggest that C. difficile strains from São Paulo city, Brazil, are susceptible to metronidazole and have low MIC90 values for most of the current therapeutic options available in Brazil.

  11. Antifungal susceptibility of 175 Aspergillus isolates from various clinical and environmental sources.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Raquel; Carolino, Elisabete; Veríssimo, Cristina; Martinez, Marife; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2016-10-01

    Some environmental Aspergillus spp. isolates have been described as resistant to antifungals, potentially causing an emerging medical problem. In the present work, the antifungal susceptibility profile of 41 clinical and 134 environmental isolates of Aspergillus was determined using the CLSI microdilution method. The aim of this study was to compare environmental and clinical isolates with respect to their susceptibility, and assess the potential implications for therapy of isolates encountered in different environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report comparing antifungal susceptibility profiles of Aspergillus collected from different environmental sources (poultries, swineries, beach sand, and hospital environment). Significant differences were found in the distribution of the different species sections for the different sources. Significant differences were also found in the susceptibility profile of the different Aspergillus sections recovered from the various sources. Clear differences were found between the susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates for caspofungin, amphotericin B and posaconazole, with clinical isolates showing overall greater susceptibility, except for caspofungin. In comparison to clinical isolates, hospital environmental isolates showed significantly less susceptibility to amphotericin B and posaconazole. These data indicate that species section identity and the site from which the isolate was recovered influence the antifungal susceptibility profile, which may affect initial antifungal choices.

  12. Multilaboratory Comparison of Proficiencies in Susceptibility Testing of Helicobacter pylori and Correlation between Agar Dilution and E Test Methods

    PubMed Central

    Best, L. M.; Haldane, D. J. M.; Keelan, M.; Taylor, D. E.; Thomson, A. B. R.; Loo, V.; Fallone, C. A.; Lyn, P.; Smaill, F. M.; Hunt, R.; Gaudreau, C.; Kennedy, J.; Alfa, M.; Pelletier, R.; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S. J. O.

    2003-01-01

    Susceptibility testing was performed at seven Canadian microbiology laboratories and the Helicobacter Reference Laboratory, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, to assess susceptibility testing proficiency and the reproducibility of the results for clarithromycin and metronidazole and to compare the Epsilometer test (E test) method to the agar dilution reference method. Control strain Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43504 (American Type Culture Collection) and 13 clinical isolates (plus duplicates of four of these strains including ATCC 43504) were tested blindly. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines for agar dilution testing were followed, and the same suspension of organisms was used for agar dilution and E test. Antimicrobials and E test strips were provided to the investigators. Methods were provided on a website (www.Helicobactercanada.org). Each center reported MICs within the stated range for strain ATCC 43504. Compared to the average MICs, interlaboratory agreements within 2 log2 dilutions were 90% (range, 69 to 100%) for clarithromycin by agar dilution, with seven very major errors [VMEs], and 85% (range, 65 to 100%) by E test, with three VMEs. Interlaboratory agreements within 2 log2 dilutions were 83% (range, 50 to 100%) for metronidazole by agar dilution, with six VMEs and eight major errors (MEs), and 75% (range, 50 to 94%) by E test, with four VMEs and four MEs. At lower and higher concentrations of antibiotic, E test MICs were slightly different from agar dilution MICs, but these differences did not result in errors. When a standardized protocol based on NCCLS guidelines was used, most participants in this study correctly identified clarithromycin- and metronidazole-susceptible and -resistant strains of H. pylori 93% of the time by either the agar dilution or E test method, and the numbers of errors were relatively equivalent by both methods. PMID:14506021

  13. Multilaboratory comparison of proficiencies in susceptibility testing of Helicobacter pylori and correlation between agar dilution and E test methods.

    PubMed

    Best, L M; Haldane, D J M; Keelan, M; Taylor, D E; Thomson, A B R; Loo, V; Fallone, C A; Lyn, P; Smaill, F M; Hunt, R; Gaudreau, C; Kennedy, J; Alfa, M; Pelletier, R; Veldhuyzen Van Zanten, S J O

    2003-10-01

    Susceptibility testing was performed at seven Canadian microbiology laboratories and the Helicobacter Reference Laboratory, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, to assess susceptibility testing proficiency and the reproducibility of the results for clarithromycin and metronidazole and to compare the Epsilometer test (E test) method to the agar dilution reference method. Control strain Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43504 (American Type Culture Collection) and 13 clinical isolates (plus duplicates of four of these strains including ATCC 43504) were tested blindly. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines for agar dilution testing were followed, and the same suspension of organisms was used for agar dilution and E test. Antimicrobials and E test strips were provided to the investigators. Methods were provided on a website (www.Helicobactercanada.org). Each center reported MICs within the stated range for strain ATCC 43504. Compared to the average MICs, interlaboratory agreements within 2 log(2) dilutions were 90% (range, 69 to 100%) for clarithromycin by agar dilution, with seven very major errors [VMEs], and 85% (range, 65 to 100%) by E test, with three VMEs. Interlaboratory agreements within 2 log(2) dilutions were 83% (range, 50 to 100%) for metronidazole by agar dilution, with six VMEs and eight major errors (MEs), and 75% (range, 50 to 94%) by E test, with four VMEs and four MEs. At lower and higher concentrations of antibiotic, E test MICs were slightly different from agar dilution MICs, but these differences did not result in errors. When a standardized protocol based on NCCLS guidelines was used, most participants in this study correctly identified clarithromycin- and metronidazole-susceptible and -resistant strains of H. pylori 93% of the time by either the agar dilution or E test method, and the numbers of errors were relatively equivalent by both methods.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolated from pigs in Southern Japan with a modified agar dilution method.

    PubMed

    Chuma, Takehisa; Kawamoto, Toshio; Shahada, Francis; Fujimoto, Hideki; Okamoto, Karoku

    2010-05-01

    The determination of antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae by using the agar dilution method has not been covered by the Clinical and Laboratory Institute (CLSI). Only the broth microdilution method has been outlined. This report describes a modification of the agar dilution procedure for E. rhusiopathiae using Trypto-soy agar supplemented with 0.1% Tween 80 and incubation in ambient air at 37 degrees C for 24 hr. The MICs of the assay were in agreement with those of the broth microdilution method recommended by the CLSI. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed using this method for 149 E. rhusiopathiae isolates from 2 meat processing plants in Kagoshima Prefecture during the period of April 2004 to March 2005. The number of strains resistant to oxytetracycline, erythromycin, lincomycin, ofloxacin and enrofloxacin were 56 (37.6%), 4 (2.7%), 18 (12.1%), 21 (14.1%) and 19 (12.8%), respectively. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin.

  15. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibilities of Five Species of Sporothrix▿

    PubMed Central

    Marimon, Rita; Serena, Carolina; Gené, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Guarro, Josep

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-two isolates belonging to five species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex were tested in vitro against 12 antifungal agents, using a reference microdilution method. There were significant differences among the species; Sporothrix brasiliensis was the species that showed the best response to antifungals, and S. mexicana had the worst response. In general, terbinafine was the most active drug, followed by ketoconazole and posaconazole. PMID:18039919

  16. Antibiotic susceptibility of Stenotrophomonas (Xanthomonas) maltophilia: comparative (NCCLS criteria) evaluation of antimicrobial drugs with the agar dilution and the agar disk diffusion (Bauer-Kirby) tests.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H; Leonhard, B; Bauer, D

    1998-01-01

    Ninety-six clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were examined with the agar dilution method for susceptibility to 19 antimicrobial drugs. Doxycycline, cotrimoxazole, timentin, ofloxacin, fosfomycin, and piperacillin + tazobactam, in that order, inhibited the majority of strains. All isolates were resistant to nitrofurantoin. Concurrent disk susceptibility (Bauer-Kirby method) testing, using currently valid NCCLS interpretative criteria for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uncovered a significant incidence of very major (category I), major (category II), and minor (categories III and IV) discrepancies for aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, and piperacillin + tazobactam and ticarcillin + clavulanic acid. Therefore, new interpretative criteria indicative of intermediate (I) susceptibility of S. maltophilia to these various antibiotics were proposed. In addition, new intermediate susceptibility criteria were proposed for the two beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. It was recommended to exclude ciprofloxacin from test batteries against this microorganism due to the wide scatter of minimal inhibitory concentration values and diameters of inhibition zones; the same was true for polymyxin B. It is hoped that the proposed modified, species-specific criteria will improve the clinical utility of laboratory-generated disk antibiograms with respect to the inherently multiple antibiotic-resistant, opportunistic pathogen S. maltophilia.

  17. Metronidazole susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori: comparison of disk, broth, and agar dilution methods and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    DeCross, A J; Marshall, B J; McCallum, R W; Hoffman, S R; Barrett, L J; Guerrant, R L

    1993-01-01

    Since the methods for metronidazole susceptibility testing of Helicobacter pylori have not been standardized or validated, we compared three methods that are used to test the metronidazole susceptibilities of 25 isolates of H. pylori. Specifically, we examined the methods of Steer's replicator agar dilution, tube broth microdilution, and modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion. The metronidazole disk zone sizes obtained by the disk diffusion method correlated well (r = 0.74) with the MICs obtained by the agar dilution method. Afterward, the disk diffusion method was used to characterize the metronidazole susceptibilities of 44 isolates of H. pylori. Dual therapy (bismuth and metronidazole) proved to be highly effective against metronidazole-susceptible strains (81.6% eradication rate) but fared poorly against resistant strains (16.7% eradication rate; P < 0.01). Using agar dilution testing, we validated the modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method for metronidazole susceptibility testing of H. pylori and conclude that it is practical, accurate, and clinically applicable. PMID:8370723

  18. Antifungal Susceptibility and Risk Factors in Patients with Candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Mermutluoglu, Cigdem; Deveci, Ozcan; Dayan, Saim; Aslan, Emel; Bozkurt, Fatma; Tekin, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the antifungal susceptibility, typology, and risk factors of candidemia among adult and pediatric inpatients at a university hospital. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was designed, and data collected between December 2013 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. The case group consisted of patients with candidemia. The control group was selected from the inpatients that did not develop candidemia but were admitted in the same clinic and during the same period as the candidemia group. The diagnosis of candidemia was based on a compatible clinical picture and positive blood culture of Candida spp. The demographic characteristics, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores, comorbidities, use of invasive devices, antibiotics administered, and duration of antibiotic uses were compared between both the groups. Results: Out of the 84 patients, 42 (50%) were included in the case group, and the remaining 42 (50%) were included in the control group. Out of all the patients, 31 (36.9%) were female, and 53 (63.1%) were male. When the clinical findings of the case and control groups were compared, the prevalence of nosocomial infections, sepsis, candiduria, and fever was statistically significantly higher in the case group. Among the isolated group in the study, 22 (52.4%) were identified as C. albicans, while the others were non-albicans Candida strains. The C. albicans strain (4.5%) was resistant to fluconazole, while 7 among the non-albicans Candida strains (35%) were resistant to fluconazole. In the case group, abdominal surgery, CVP catheter presence, TPN, endotracheal intubation, frequency of blood transfusion, and SOFA scores were significantly higher than the control groups. The logistic regression test demonstrated that TPN and blood transfusion are the most important risk factors for candidemia (OR=8.14 and OR=5.96, respectively). Conclusion: The invasive Candida infections continue to be a major

  19. Quantitative Microplate-Based Growth Assay for Determination of Antifungal Susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Goughenour, Kristie D.; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Standardized methodologies for determining the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens is central to the clinical management of invasive fungal disease. Yeast-form fungi can be tested using broth macrodilution and microdilution assays. Reference procedures exist for Candida species and Cryptococcus yeasts; however, no standardized methods have been developed for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast forms of the dimorphic systemic fungal pathogens. For the dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum, susceptibility to echinocandins differs for the yeast and the filamentous forms, which highlights the need to employ Histoplasma yeasts, not hyphae, in antifungal susceptibility tests. To address this, we developed and optimized methodology for the 96-well microtiter plate-based measurement of Histoplasma yeast growth in vitro. Using optical density, the assay is quantitative for fungal growth with a dynamic range greater than 30-fold. Concentration and assay reaction time parameters were also optimized for colorimetric (MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] reduction) and fluorescent (resazurin reduction) indicators of fungal vitality. We employed this microtiter-based assay to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of multiple clinical isolates of Histoplasma representing different phylogenetic groups. This methodology fulfills a critical need for the ability to monitor the effectiveness of antifungals on Histoplasma yeasts, the morphological form present in mammalian hosts and, thus, the form most relevant to disease. PMID:26246483

  20. Epidemiology and antifungal susceptibilities of yeasts causing vulvovaginitis in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Gamarra, Soledad; Morano, Susana; Dudiuk, Catiana; Mancilla, Estefanía; Nardin, María Elena; de Los Angeles Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2014-10-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is one of the most common mycosis. However, the information about antifungal susceptibilities of the yeasts causing this infection is scant. We studied 121 yeasts isolated from 118 patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis. The isolates were identified by phenotypic and molecular methods, including four phenotypic methods described to differentiate Candida albicans from C. dubliniensis. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed according to CLSI documents M27A3 and M27S4 using the drugs available as treatment option in the hospital. Diabetes, any antibacterial and amoxicillin treatment were statistically linked with vulvovaginal candidiasis, while oral contraceptives were not considered a risk factor. Previous azole-based over-the-counter antifungal treatment was statistically associated with non-C.albicans yeasts infections. The most common isolated yeast species was C. albicans (85.2 %) followed by C. glabrata (5 %), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (3.3 %), and C. dubliniensis (2.5 %). Fluconazole- and itraconazole-reduced susceptibility was observed in ten and in only one C. albicans strains, respectively. All the C. glabrata isolates showed low fluconazole MICs. Clotrimazole showed excellent potency against all but seven isolates (three C. glabrata, two S. cerevisiae, one C. albicans and one Picchia anomala). Any of the strains showed nystatin reduced susceptibility. On the other hand, terbinafine was the less potent drug. Antifungal resistance is still a rare phenomenon supporting the use of azole antifungals as empirical treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  1. A defect in iron uptake enhances the susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans to azole antifungal drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmi; Cho, Yong-Joon; Do, Eunsoo; Choi, Jaehyuk; Hu, Guanggan; Cadieux, Brigitte; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Younghoon; Kronstad, James W.; Jung, Won Hee

    2015-01-01

    The high-affinity reductive iron uptake system that includes a ferroxidase (Cfo1) and an iron permease (Cft1) is critical for the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans. In addition, a mutant lacking CFO1 or CFT1 not only has reduced iron uptake but also displays a markedly increased susceptibility to azole antifungal drugs. Altered antifungal susceptibility of the mutants was of particular interest because the iron uptake system has been proposed as an alternative target for antifungal treatment. In this study, we used transcriptome analysis to begin exploring the molecular mechanisms of altered antifungal susceptibility in a cfo1 mutant. The wild-type strain and the cfo1 mutant were cultured with or without the azole antifungal drug fluconazole and their transcriptomes were compared following sequencing with Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx (GAIIx) technology. As expected, treatment of both strains with fluconazole caused elevated expression of genes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway that includes the target enzyme Erg11. Additionally, genes differentially expressed in the cfo1 mutant were involved in iron uptake and homeostasis, mitochondrial functions and respiration. The cfo1 mutant also displayed phenotypes consistent with these changes including a reduced ratio of NAD+/NADH and down-regulation of Fe-S cluster synthesis. Moreover, combination treatment of the wild-type strain with fluconazole and the respiration inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium dramatically increased susceptibility to fluconazole. This result supports the hypothesis that down-regulation of genes required for respiration contributed to the altered fluconazole susceptibility of the cfo1 mutant. Overall, our data suggest that iron uptake and homeostasis play a key role in antifungal susceptibility and could be used as novel targets for combination treatment of cryptococcosis. Indeed, we found that iron chelation in combination with fluconazole treatment synergistically inhibited the growth of C

  2. Epidemiology, Antifungal Susceptibility, and Pathogenicity of Candida africana Isolates from the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Adrien; Linton, Chistopher J.; Palmer, Michael D.; Brown, Phillipa; Johnson, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Candida africana was previously proposed as a new species within the Candida albicans species complex, together with C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, although further phylogenetic analyses better support its status as an unusual variant within C. albicans. Here we show that C. africana can be distinguished from C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by pyrosequencing of a short region of ITS2, and we have evaluated its occurrence in clinical samples by pyrosequencing all presumptive isolates of C. albicans submitted to the Mycology Reference Laboratory over a 9-month period. The C. albicans complex constituted 826/1,839 (44.9%) of yeast isolates received over the study period and included 783 isolates of C. albicans, 28 isolates of C. dubliniensis, and 15 isolates of C. africana. In agreement with previous reports, C. africana was isolated exclusively from genital specimens, in women in the 18-to-35-year age group. Indeed, C. africana constituted 15/251 (6%) of “C. albicans” isolates from female genital specimens during the study period. C. africana isolates were germ tube positive, grew significantly more slowly than C. albicans and C. dubliniensis on conventional mycological media, could be distinguished from the other members of the C. albicans complex by appearance on chromogenic agar, and were incapable of forming chlamydospores. Here we present the detailed evaluation of epidemiological, phenotypic, and clinical features and antifungal susceptibility profiles of United Kingdom isolates of C. africana. Furthermore, we demonstrate that C. africana is significantly less pathogenic than C. albicans and C. dubliniensis in the Galleria mellonella insect systemic infection model. PMID:23303503

  3. Multicenter surveillance of species distribution and antifungal susceptibilities of Candida bloodstream isolates in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sook-In; Shin, Jong Hee; Song, Jae-Hoon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, Mi-Na; Chang, Hyun Ha; Moon, Chi Sook

    2010-06-01

    Multicenter data on in vitro susceptibility of Candida bloodstream isolates to echinocandin antifungal agents is still lacking in South Korea. We performed a prospective multicenter study to determine the species distribution of Candida bloodstream isolates and their susceptibility to five antifungal agents, including caspofungin and micafungin. A total of 639 isolates were collected from 20 tertiary hospitals between September 2006 and August 2007. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined through the use of the CLSI broth microdilution method M27-A3. The overall species distribution was as follows; Candida albicans (38%), Candida parapsilosis (26%), Candia tropicalis (20%), Candida glabrata (11%), and miscellaneous Candida species (5%). Although C. parapsilosis and miscellaneous Candida species were less susceptible to both echinocandins, all 639 isolates were susceptible to both caspofungin and micafungin (MIC, antifungals, including two echinocandins, are still low among bloodstream isolates in South Korea.

  4. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans multidrug transporter mutants to various antifungal agents and other metabolic inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, D; Ischer, F; Monod, M; Bille, J

    1996-01-01

    Some Candida albicans isolates from AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis are becoming resistant to the azole antifungal agent fluconazole after prolonged treatment with this compound. Most of the C. albicans isolates resistant to fluconazole fail to accumulate this antifungal agent, and this has been considered a cause of resistance. This phenomenon was shown to be linked to an increase in the amounts of mRNA of a C. albicans ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter gene called CDR1 and of a gene conferring benomyl resistance (BENr), the product of which belongs to the class of major facilitator multidrug efflux transporters (D. Sanglard, K. Kuchler, F. Ischer, J. L. Pagani, M. Monod, and J. Bille, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 39:2378-2386, 1995). To analyze the roles of these multidrug transporters in the efflux of azole antifungal agents, we constructed C. albicans mutants with single and double deletion mutations of the corresponding genes. The mutants were tested for their susceptibilities to these antifungal agents. Our results indicated that the delta cdr1 C. albicans mutant was hypersusceptible to the azole derivatives fluconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole, thus showing that the ABC transporter Cdr1 can use these compounds as substrates. The delta cdr1 mutant was also hypersusceptible to other antifungal agents (terbinafine and amorolfine) and to different metabolic inhibitors (cycloheximide, brefeldin A, and fluphenazine). The same mutant was slightly more susceptible than the wild type to nocodazole, cerulenin, and crystal violet but not to amphotericin B, nikkomycin Z, flucytosine, or pradimicin. In contrast, the delta ben mutant was rendered more susceptible only to the mutagen 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide. However, this mutation increased the susceptibilities of the cells to cycloheximide and cerulenin when the mutation was constructed in a delta cdr1 background. The assay used in the present study could be implemented with new antifungal

  5. In vitro antifungal susceptibilities of Sporothrix schenckii in two growth phases.

    PubMed

    Trilles, Luciana; Fernández-Torres, Belkys; Dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Wanke, Bodo; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; de Almeida Paes, Rodrigo; Inza, Isabel; Guarro, Josep

    2005-09-01

    We have determined the antifungal susceptibilities of 34 clinical isolates of the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii to 11 drugs using a microdilution method. In general, the type of growth phase (mycelial or yeast) and the temperature of incubation (30 or 35 degrees C) exerted a significant influence on the MICs.

  6. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibilities of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Growth Phases

    PubMed Central

    Trilles, Luciana; Fernández-Torres, Belkys; dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Wanke, Bodo; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; de Almeida Paes, Rodrigo; Inza, Isabel; Guarro, Josep

    2005-01-01

    We have determined the antifungal susceptibilities of 34 clinical isolates of the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii to 11 drugs using a microdilution method. In general, the type of growth phase (mycelial or yeast) and the temperature of incubation (30 or 35°C) exerted a significant influence on the MICs. PMID:16127080

  7. Susceptibility variation of Malassezia pachydermatis to antifungal agents according to isolate source

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Caroline Borges; de Jesus, Francielli Pantella Kunz; Nardi, Graziela Habib; Loreto, Érico Silva; Santurio, Janio Morais; Coutinho, Selene Dall’Acqua; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2013-01-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is associated with dermatomycoses and otomycosis in dogs and cats. This study compared the susceptibility of M. pachydermatis isolates from sick (G1) and healthy (G2) animals to azole and polyene antifungals using the M27-A3 protocol. Isolates from G1 animals were less sensitive to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, clotrimazole and miconazole. PMID:24159302

  8. Inaccuracy of the disk diffusion method compared with the agar dilution method for susceptibility testing of Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Lehtopolku, Mirva; Kotilainen, Pirkko; Puukka, Pauli; Nakari, Ulla-Maija; Siitonen, Anja; Eerola, Erkki; Huovinen, Pentti; Hakanen, Antti J

    2012-01-01

    The agar dilution method has been standardized by the CLSI for the susceptibility testing of Campylobacter species, and according to these standards, the disk diffusion method should be used only in screening for macrolide and ciprofloxacin resistance. Nevertheless, the disk diffusion test is currently widely used, since it is easy to perform in clinical microbiology laboratories. In this study, the disk diffusion method was compared to the agar dilution method by analyzing the in vitro activities of seven antimicrobial agents against 174 Campylobacter strains collected in Finland between 2003 and 2008. Recommendations of the CLSI were followed using Mueller-Hinton agar plates with 5% of sheep blood. For each strain, the disk diffusion tests were performed two to four times. Of the 33 erythromycin-resistant strains (MIC, ≥16 μg/ml), 24 (73%) constantly showed a 6-mm erythromycin inhibition zone (i.e., no inhibition), while for seven strains the inhibition zone varied from 6 to 44 mm in repeated measurements. Among the 141 erythromycin-susceptible strains (MIC, <16 μg/ml), erythromycin inhibition zones varied between 6 and 61 mm. Of the 87 ciprofloxacin-resistant strains, 47 (54%) showed 6-mm inhibition zones, while 40 strains showed inhibition zones between 6 and 60 mm. Significant differences between the repetitions were observed in the disk diffusion for all antimicrobial agents and all strains except for the macrolide-resistant strains regarding the macrolides. For 17 (10%) strains, the variation in repeated measurements was substantial. These results show that the disk diffusion method may not be a reliable tool for the susceptibility testing of Campylobacter spp. Further studies are needed to assess whether the disk diffusion test could be improved or whether all susceptibilities of campylobacters should be tested using an MIC-based method.

  9. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from the patients with vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Masahito; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-02-01

    There have been the current Japanese data on susceptibility testing for Candida isolates from vaginal candidiasis. The in vitro activities of therapeutic antifungal drugs for vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC); miconazole (MCZ), itraconazole (ITCZ), fluconazole (FLCZ), clotrimazole (CTZ), oxiconazole (OCZ), isoconazole (ICZ) and bifonazole (BFZ) against vaginal isolates. Fifty-four strains Candida albicans and 19 strains of Candida glabrata were evaluated using a broth microdilution method specified by Clinical Laboratories Standard Institute (CLSI) document M27-A3. The MIC90 of each drug, MCZ, ITCZ, FLCZ, CTZ, OCZ, ICZ and BFZ, against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates were 0.25, 0.12, 1, 0.06, 0.12, 0.12 and 1 μg/ml and 1, 1, 8, 0.5, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml respectively. The activities of these drugs, except for BFZ, against C. glabrata were lower than that of C. albicans. There was one azole-resistant isolate in C. glabrata of which MIC of FLCZ is > 64 μg/ml and this isolate had cross resistance to other antifungal drugs tested. These results suggest that antifungal drugs for treatment of VVC continues to have potent antifungal activities against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates from vaginitis. CTZ, OCZ and ICZ susceptibility of FLCZ low susceptibility C. glabrata are relatively higher than MCZ, ITCZ and FLCZ.

  10. Species assignment and antifungal susceptibilities of black aspergilli recovered from otomycosis cases in Iran.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Sedaghati, Ebrahim; Mahmoudabadi, Ali Zarei; Naseri, Ali; Kocsubé, Sándor; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Varga, János

    2012-07-01

    Black aspergilli are among the main causative agents of otomycosis worldwide. In this study, the species assignment of black aspergilli isolated from otomycosis cases in Iran was carried out using sequence analysis of part of the calmodulin gene. The results indicate that Aspergillus niger is not the only black Aspergillus species involved in otomycosis cases in Iran: Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus tubingensis are also able to cause ear infections. Antifungal susceptibility tests were carried out against five antifungal drugs including amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole and terbinafine. All isolates were highly susceptible to terbinafine, while they exhibited moderate susceptibilities against amphotericin B, fluconazole and ketoconazole. Aspergillus niger and A. awamori were found to have higher minimal inhibitory concentrations for azoles than A. tubingensis, in accordance with previous findings.

  11. ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING AND GENOTYPING CHARACTERIZATION OF Cryptococcus neoformans AND gattii ISOLATES FROM HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS OF RIBEIRÃO PRETO, SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    FIGUEIREDO, Thais Pandini; de LUCAS, Rosymar Coutinho; CAZZANIGA, Rodrigo Anselmo; FRANÇA, Carolina Nunes; SEGATO, Fernando; TAGLIALEGNA, Rafael; MAFFEI, Claudia Maria Leite

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryptococcosis is a leading invasive fungal infection in immunocompromised patients. Considering the high prevalence and severity of these infections in immunocompromised patients attended at HC-FMRP-USP, the present research aimed to characterize the clinical isolates of Cryptococcus strains by biochemical and molecular methods and evaluate antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates. Fifty isolates from 32 HIV-positive patients were obtained at HC-FMRP-USP. Most of the isolates (78.1%) were identified as C. neoformans, and 100% of C. neoformans and C. gattii strains were susceptible to amphotericin B, ketoconazole and fluconazole. All isolates were classified as serotype A (grubbii variety) by PCR and most of them were characterized in mating type MATa. PCR analysis of specific M13 microsatellite sequence revealed that VNI type was predominant among C. neoformans, while VGII was predominant among C. gattii. The strains did not show a significant resistance to the antifungals tested, and Canavanine-Glycine-Bromthymol Blue Agar (CGB) proved to be a reliable test presenting a good correlation with the molecular characterization. C. neoformans isolated from disseminated infections in the same patient showed molecular identity when different anatomical sites were compared; besides, the studied strains did not present a significant increase in resistance to antifungal agents. In addition, the homogeneity of the molecular types and detection of the mating types suggested a low possibility of crossing among the strains. PMID:27680174

  12. Antifungal Susceptibility Analysis of Clinical Isolates of Candida parapsilosis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    LOTFALI, Ensieh; KORDBACHEH, Parivash; MIRHENDI, Hossein; ZAINI, Farideh; GHAJARI, Ali; MOHAMMADI, Rasoul; NOORBAKHSH, Fatemeh; MOAZENI, Maryam; FALLAHI, Aliakbar; REZAIE, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida parapsilosis is an emergent agent of invasive fungal infections. This yeast is one of the five most widespread yeasts concerned in invasive candidiasis. C. parapsilosis stands out as the second most common yeast species isolated from patients with bloodstream infections especially in neonates with catheter. Recently several reports suggested that its reduced susceptibility to azoles and polyene might become a cause for clinical concern, although C. parapsilosis is not believed to be intensely prone to the development of antifungal resistance. Methods: In the present report, One hundred and twenty clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis complex were identified and differentiated by using PCR-RFLP analysis. The isolates were then analyzed to determine their susceptibility profile to fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITC) and amphotericin B. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results were analyzed according to the standard CLSI guide. Results: All of isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis. No C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis strains were found. Evaluation of the antifungal susceptibility profile showed that only three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to fluconazole, three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to itraconazole and two (1.7%) C. parapsilosis were amphotericin B resistant. Conclusion: Profiles in clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis can provide important information for the control of antifungal resistance as well as distribution and susceptibility profiles in populations. PMID:27141494

  13. Microdilution in vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Candida Species, From Mild Cutaneous to Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Elham; Sabokbar, Azar; Moazeni, Maryam; Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Badali, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida species, as opportunistic organisms, can cause various clinical manifestations, ranging from mild cutaneous infections to systemic candidiasis in otherwise healthy individuals. Remarkably, the incidence and mortality rates of candidemia have significantly increased worldwide, even after advances in medical interventions and the development of novel antifungal drugs. Objectives Given the possible resistance to antifungal agents, susceptibility testing can be useful in defining the activity spectrum of antifungals and determining the appropriate treatment regime. Materials and Methods The in vitro susceptibilities of molecularly identified Candida strains (n = 150) belonging to seven species recovered from clinical specimens, including vaginal, cutaneous, sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and blood samples, were determined for six antifungal drugs (amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin), based on the clinical and laboratory standards institute’s M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Results Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species (44.66%), followed by non-albicans Candida, including C. glabrata (20%), C. parapsilosis (13.33%), C. krusei (8%), C. tropicalis (7.3%), C. dubliniensis (4%), and C. africana (3.33%). Posaconazole had the lowest geometric mean minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (0.0122 µg/ml), followed by amphotericin B (0.0217 µg/mL), voriconazole (0.1022 µg/mL), itraconazole (0.1612 µg/mL), caspofungin (0.2525 µg/mL), and fluconazole (0.4874 µg/mL) against all isolated Candida species. Candida africana and C. parapsilosis were significantly more susceptible to fluconazole, compared to C. albicans and other Candida species (P < 0.001). However, their clinical effectiveness in the treatment of Candida infections remains to be determined. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of precise and correct species identification of clinical yeast isolates via

  14. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of 12 Antifungal Drugs against 55 Trichophyton schoenleinii Isolates from Tinea Capitis Favosa Patients in Iran, Turkey, and China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shuwen; Ansari, Saham; Ilkit, Macit; Rafati, Haleh; Hedayati, Mohammad T; Taghizadeh-Armaki, Mojtaba; Nasrollahi-Omran, Ayatollah; Tolooe, Ali; Zhan, Ping; Liao, Wanqing; van der Lee, Henrich A; Verweij, Paul E; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2017-02-01

    Trichophyton schoenleinii is an anthropophilic dermatophyte mainly causing tinea favosa of the scalp in certain regions of the world, especially Africa and Asia. We investigated the in vitro susceptibilities of 55 T. schoenleinii isolates collected over the last 30 years from Iran, Turkey, and China to 12 antifungals using the CLSI broth microdilution method. Our results revealed that terbinafine and ketoconazole were the most potent antifungal agents among those tested, independently of the geographic regions where strains were isolated.

  15. Multilocus phylogeny and antifungal susceptibility of Aspergillus section Circumdati from clinical samples and description of A. pseudosclerotiorum sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multilocus phylogenetic study was carried out to assess the species distribution in a set of 34 clinical isolates of Aspergillus section Circumdati from the USA and their in vitro antifungal susceptibility were determined against eight antifungal drugs. The genetic markers used were ITS, BenA, CaM...

  16. Comparison of agar dilution and antibiotic gradient strip test with broth microdilution for susceptibility testing of swine Brachyspira species.

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-03-01

    Production-limiting diseases in swine caused by Brachyspira are characterized by mucohemorrhagic diarrhea (B. hyodysenteriae and "B. hampsonii") or mild colitis (B. pilosicoli), while B. murdochii is often isolated from healthy pigs. Emergence of novel pathogenic Brachyspira species and strains with reduced susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials has reinforced the need for standardized susceptibility testing. Two methods are currently used for Brachyspira susceptibility testing: agar dilution (AD) and broth microdilution (BMD). However, these tests have primarily been used for B. hyodysenteriae and rarely for B. pilosicoli. Information on the use of commercial susceptibility testing products such as antibiotic gradient strips is lacking. Our main objective was to validate and compare the susceptibility results, measured as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of 6 antimicrobials for 4 Brachyspira species (B. hyodysenteriae, "B. hampsonii", B. pilosicoli, and B. murdochii) by BMD and AD (tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, tylosin, and carbadox) or antibiotic gradient strip (doxycycline) methods. In general, the results of a high percentage of all 4 Brachyspira species differed by ±1 log2 dilution or less by BMD and AD for tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, and tylosin, and by BMD and antibiotic gradient strip for doxycycline. The carbadox MICs obtained by BMD were 1-5 doubling dilutions different than those obtained by AD. BMD for Brachyspira was quicker to perform with less ambiguous interpretation of results when compared with AD and antibiotic gradient strip methods, and the results confirm the utility of BMD in routine diagnostics.

  17. In Vitro Susceptibility Profiles of Eight Antifungal Drugs against Clinical and Environmental Strains of Phaeoacremonium

    PubMed Central

    Badali, Hamid; Khodavaisy, Sadegh; Fakhim, Hamed; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2015-01-01

    In vitro susceptibilities of a worldwide collection of molecularly identified Phaeoacremonium strains (n = 43) belonging to seven species and originating from human and environmental sources were determined for eight antifungal drugs. Voriconazole had the lowest geometric mean MIC (0.35 μg/ml), followed by posaconazole (0.37 μg/ml), amphotericin B (0.4 μg/ml), and isavuconazole (1.16 μg/ml). Caspofungin, anidulafungin, fluconazole, and itraconazole had no activity. PMID:26369976

  18. Antifungal susceptibility of Candida biofilms: unique efficacy of amphotericin B lipid formulations and echinocandins.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, D M; George, T; Chandra, J; Mukherjee, P K; Ghannoum, M A

    2002-06-01

    Biofilms, likely the predominant mode of device-related microbial infection, exhibit resistance to antimicrobial agents. Evidence suggests that Candida biofilms have dramatically reduced susceptibility to antifungal drugs. We examined antifungal susceptibilities of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms grown on a bioprosthetic model. In addition to conventional agents, we determined if new antifungal agents (triazoles, amphotericin B lipid formulations, and echinocandins) have activities against Candida biofilms. We also explored effects of preincubation of C. albicans cells with subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of drugs to see if they could modify subsequent biofilm formation. Finally, we used confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) to image planktonic- and biofilm-exposed blastospores to examine drug effects on cell structure. Candida biofilms were formed on silicone elastomer and quantified by tetrazolium and dry weight (DW) assays. Susceptibility testing of fluconazole, nystatin, chlorhexidine, terbenafine, amphotericin B (AMB), and the triazoles voriconazole (VRC) and ravuconazole revealed resistance in all Candida isolates examined when grown as biofilms, compared to planktonic forms. In contrast, lipid formulations of AMB (liposomal AMB and AMB lipid complex [ABLC]) and echinocandins (caspofungin [Casp] and micafungin) showed activity against Candida biofilms. Preincubation of C. albicans cells with sub-MIC levels of antifungals decreased the ability of cells to subsequently form biofilm (measured by DW; P < 0.0005). CSLM analysis of planktonic and biofilm-associated blastospores showed treatment with VRC, Casp, and ABLC resulted in morphological alterations, which differed with each agent. In conclusion, our data show that Candida biofilms show unique susceptibilities to echinocandins and AMB lipid formulations.

  19. Determination of antifungal susceptibility patterns among the environmental isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Faezeh; Dehghan, Parvin; Nekoeian, Shahram; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, triazole-resistant environmental isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus have emerged in Europe and Asia. Azole resistance has been reported in patients who are treated with long-term azole therapy or exposure of the fungus spores to the azole fungicides used in agriculture. To date, a wide range of mutations in A. fumigatus have been described conferring azole-resistance, which commonly involves modifications in the cyp51A gene. We investigated antifungal susceptibility pattern of environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Materials and Methods: In this study, 170 environmental samples collected from indoors surfaces of three hospitals in Iran. It was used β-tubulin gene to confirm the all of A. fumigatus isolates, which was identified by conventional methods. Furthermore, the antifungal susceptibility of itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole was investigated using broth microdilution test, according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility testing reference method. Results: From a total of 158 environmental molds fungi obtained from the hospitals, 58 isolates were identified as A. fumigatus by amplification of expected size of β-tubulin gene (~500 bp). In this study, in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing has shown that there were not high minimum inhibitory concentration values of triazole antifungals in all of the 58 environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that there was not azole-resistant among environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Medical triazoles compounds have structural similarity with triazole fungicide compounds in agriculture, therefore, resistance development through exposure to triazole fungicide compounds in the environment is important but it sounds there is not a serious health problem in drug resistance in environmental isolates in Iran. PMID:27656605

  20. Process Analysis of Variables for Standardization of Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Nonfermentative Yeasts ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Mesa-Arango, Ana C.; Gómez-López, Alicia; Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Nonfermentative yeasts, such as Cryptococcus spp., have emerged as fungal pathogens during the last few years. However, standard methods to measure their antifungal susceptibility (antifungal susceptibility testing [AST]) are not completely reliable due to the impaired growth of these yeasts in standard media. In this work, we have compared the growth kinetics and the antifungal susceptibilities of representative species of nonfermentative yeasts such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii, Cryptococcus albidus, Rhodotorula spp., Yarrowia lipolytica, Geotrichum spp., and Trichosporon spp. The effect of the growth medium (RPMI medium versus yeast nitrogen base [YNB]), glucose concentration (0.2% versus 2%), nitrogen source (ammonium sulfate), temperature (30°C versus 35°C), shaking, and inoculum size (103, 104, and 105 cells) were analyzed. The growth rate, lag phase, and maximum optical density were obtained from each growth experiment, and after multivariate analysis, YNB-based media demonstrated a significant improvement in the growth of yeasts. Shaking, an inoculum size of 105 CFU/ml, and incubation at 30°C also improved the growth kinetics of organisms. Supplementation with ammonium sulfate and with 2% glucose did not have any effect on growth. We also tested the antifungal susceptibilities of all the isolates by the reference methods of the CLSI and EUCAST, the EUCAST method with shaking, YNB under static conditions, and YNB with shaking. MIC values obtained under different conditions showed high percentages of agreement and significant correlation coefficient values between them. MIC value determinations according to CLSI and EUCAST standards were rather complicated, since more than half of isolates tested showed a limited growth index, hampering endpoint determinations. We conclude that AST conditions including YNB as an assay medium, agitation of the plates, reading after 48 h of incubation, an inoculum size of 105 CFU/ml, and incubation at 30

  1. Process analysis of variables for standardization of antifungal susceptibility testing of nonfermentative yeasts.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Mesa-Arango, Ana C; Gómez-López, Alicia; Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-04-01

    Nonfermentative yeasts, such as Cryptococcus spp., have emerged as fungal pathogens during the last few years. However, standard methods to measure their antifungal susceptibility (antifungal susceptibility testing [AST]) are not completely reliable due to the impaired growth of these yeasts in standard media. In this work, we have compared the growth kinetics and the antifungal susceptibilities of representative species of nonfermentative yeasts such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii, Cryptococcus albidus, Rhodotorula spp., Yarrowia lipolytica, Geotrichum spp., and Trichosporon spp. The effect of the growth medium (RPMI medium versus yeast nitrogen base [YNB]), glucose concentration (0.2% versus 2%), nitrogen source (ammonium sulfate), temperature (30°C versus 35°C), shaking, and inoculum size (10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) cells) were analyzed. The growth rate, lag phase, and maximum optical density were obtained from each growth experiment, and after multivariate analysis, YNB-based media demonstrated a significant improvement in the growth of yeasts. Shaking, an inoculum size of 10(5) CFU/ml, and incubation at 30°C also improved the growth kinetics of organisms. Supplementation with ammonium sulfate and with 2% glucose did not have any effect on growth. We also tested the antifungal susceptibilities of all the isolates by the reference methods of the CLSI and EUCAST, the EUCAST method with shaking, YNB under static conditions, and YNB with shaking. MIC values obtained under different conditions showed high percentages of agreement and significant correlation coefficient values between them. MIC value determinations according to CLSI and EUCAST standards were rather complicated, since more than half of isolates tested showed a limited growth index, hampering endpoint determinations. We conclude that AST conditions including YNB as an assay medium, agitation of the plates, reading after 48 h of incubation, an inoculum size of 10(5) CFU/ml, and

  2. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Carvalhinho, Sara; Costa, Ana Margarida; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Martins, Eugénio; Sampaio, Ana

    2012-07-01

    Forty Candida albicans strains isolated from patient's mouth with fixed orthodontic appliances were analyzed to their susceptibilities to antifungal agents, mouth rinses and essential oils. Susceptibility to fluconazole, econazole, miconazole and ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed by the disk diffusion (DD) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M44-A protocol, and by Etest (fluconazole and amphotericin B). The susceptibilities to mouth rinses and essential oils were also determined by the DD technique. All isolates tested were susceptible (S) to amphotericin B, nystatin and fluconazole. The overall concordance between the DD and the Etest was 100% for amphotericin and fluconazole. One isolate was resistant to econazole (2.5%) and the other to ketoconazole (2.5%). Econazole and ketoconazole had the highest percentages of susceptible dose dependent (SDD), 55 and 95%, respectively. Regarding to the susceptibility isolates profile, seven phenotypes were detected, and the 3 more represented (90% of the isolates) of them were SDD to one, two or three azoles. The study of mouth rinses showed a high variability of efficacy against C. albicans. The results showed that the isolates susceptibility to essential oils differed (P < 0.05). The profile activity was: cinnamon > laurel > mint > eucalyptus > rosemary > lemon > myrrh > tangerine. The main finding was that the susceptibility to cinnamon and laurel varied among the three more representative antifungal phenotypes (P < 0.05). The susceptibility of econazole-SDD isolates to cinnamon and lemon was higher than those of the econazole-S yeasts (P < 0.05). In contrast, econazole-SDD isolates were less affected by laurel than econazole-S counterparts (P < 0.05).

  3. Evaluation of agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to determine the disinfectant susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyan; Yang, Qianru; Long, Mei; Guo, Lijuan; Li, Bei; Meng, Yue; Zhang, Anyun; Wang, Hongning; Liu, Shuliang; Zou, Likou

    2015-11-01

    A variety of disinfectants have been widely used in veterinary hygiene, food industries and environments, which could induce the development of bacterial resistance to disinfectants. The methods used to investigate antimicrobial effects of disinfectant vary considerably among studies, making comparisons difficult. In this study, agar dilution and broth microdilution methods were used to compare the antimicrobial activities of four quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) against foodborne and zoonotic pathogens. The potential relationship between the presence of QACs resistance genes and phenotypic resistance to QACs was also investigated. Our results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by two methods might be different depended upon different QACs and bacteria applied. Regardless of the testing methods, Klebsiella pneumoniae was more tolerant among Gram-negative strains to four QACs, followed by Salmonella and Escherichia coli. The agreement between MICs obtained by the two methods was good, for benzalkonium chloride (78.15%), didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) (82.35%), cetylpyridinium chloride (CTPC) (97.48%) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) (99.16%), respectively. Among all Gram-negative bacteria, 94.55% (n=52) of qacEΔ1-positive strains showed higher MICs (512 mg l(-1)) to CTAB. The qacEΔ1 gene was highly associated (P<0.05) with the high MICs of QACs (⩾512 mg l(-1)). In addition, DDAC remained as the most effective disinfectant against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This is the first study that compared the agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to assess the antimicrobial activity of QACs. The study demonstrated the need to standardize method that would be used in evaluating QACs antimicrobial properties in the future.

  4. Virulence Attributes and Antifungal Susceptibility Profile of Opportunistic Fungi Isolated from Ophthalmic Infections.

    PubMed

    Sav, Hafize; Ozdemir, Havva Gül; Altınbas, Rabiye; Kiraz, Nuri; Ilkit, Macit; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2016-10-01

    Investigations of both virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility profiles are crucial for understanding the pathogenesis and prognosis of ophthalmic mycoses. In this study, we investigated the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of amphotericin B (AMB), voriconazole (VRC), and natamycin (NAT) against a set of 50 fungal isolates obtained from patients with ocular mycoses using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution method. In addition, putative virulence factor, such as secretory phospholipases and proteinases, and biofilm formation activity were analyzed. The geometric means (GMs) of the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the antifungals across all isolates were the following (in increasing order): VRC (0.70 μg/mL), AMB (0.81 μg/mL), and NAT (1.05 μg/mL). The highest activity against 14 Aspergillus strains was exhibited by VRC (GM MIC: 0.10 μg/mL), followed by AMB and NAT (GM MICs: 0.21 and 0.27 μg/mL), respectively. However, for 12 Fusarium spp., the GM MIC of VRC (2.66) was higher than those of NAT and AMB (GM MICs 1.3 and 0.8 μg/mL, respectively). Proteinase and phospholipase activity were observed in 30 % and 42 % of the isolates, respectively, whereas only 8 % of the isolates were able to produce biofilms. Phospholipase activity was observed in all Fusarium isolates, but not in any of the Aspergillus isolates. In contrast, biofilm-forming capability was detected in 25 % of the Fusarium isolates, but none of the Aspergillus isolates. The differences in the MICs of AMB, VRC, and NAT, biofilm-forming ability and proteinase and phospholipase activities among the isolates were not significant (p > 0.05). Overall, our study suggests no significant correlation between the antifungal susceptibility profiles and virulence attributes of ocular fungal isolates.

  5. Antifungal susceptibility patterns of opportunistic fungi in the genera Verruconis and Ochroconis.

    PubMed

    Seyedmousavi, S; Samerpitak, K; Rijs, A J M M; Melchers, W J G; Mouton, J W; Verweij, P E; de Hoog, G S

    2014-06-01

    Species of Verruconis and species of Ochroconis are dematiaceous fungi generally found in the environment but having the ability to infect humans, dogs, cats, poultry, and fish. This study presents the antifungal susceptibility patterns of these fungi at the species level. Forty strains originating from clinical and environmental sources were phylogenetically identified at the species level by using sequences of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (rDNA ITS). In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing was performed against eight antifungals, using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution method. The geometric mean MICs for amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC), and posaconazole (POS) and minimum effective concentrations (MECs) for caspofungin (CAS) and anidulafungin (AFG) across the Ochroconis and Verruconis species were as follows, in increasing order. For Verruconis species, the values (μg/ml) were as follows: AFG, 0.04; POS, 0.25; ITC, 0.37; AMB, 0.50; CAS, 0.65; VRC, 0.96; 5FC, 10.45; and FLC, 47.25. For Ochroconis species, the values (μg/ml) were as follows: AFG, 0.06; POS, 0.11; CAS, 0.67; VRC, 2.76; ITC, 3.94; AMB, 5.68; 5FC, 34.48; and FLC, 61.33. Antifungal susceptibility of Ochroconis and Verruconis was linked with phylogenetic distance and thermotolerance. Echinocandins and POS showed the greatest in vitro activity, providing possible treatment options for Ochroconis and Verruconis infections.

  6. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Oral Candida Isolates from Patients Suffering from Caries and Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    De-la-Torre, Janire; Ortiz-Samperio, María Esther; Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Eraso, Elena; Echebarria-Goicouria, María Ángeles; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Quindós, Guillermo

    2017-01-25

    Caries and chronic periodontitis are common oral diseases where a higher Candida colonization is reported. Antifungal agents could be adjuvant drugs for the therapy of both clinical conditions. The aim of the current study has been to evaluate the in vitro activities of conventional and new antifungal drugs against oral Candida isolates from patients suffering from caries and/or chronic periodontitis. In vitro activities of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, nystatin, posaconazole and voriconazole against 126 oral Candida isolates (75 Candida albicans, 18 Candida parapsilosis, 11 Candida dubliniensis, six Candida guilliermondii, five Candida lipolytica, five Candida glabrata, four Candida tropicalis and two Candida krusei) from 61 patients were tested by the CLSI M27-A3 method. Most antifungal drugs were highly active, and resistance was observed in less than 5% of tested isolates. Miconazole was the most active antifungal drug, being more than 98% of isolates susceptible. Fluconazole, itraconazole, and the new triazoles, posaconazole and voriconazole, were also very active. Miconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole have excellent in vitro activities against all Candida isolates and could represent suitable treatment for a hypothetically adjunctive therapy of caries and chronic periodontitis.

  7. Microscopic Evaluation, Molecular Identification, Antifungal Susceptibility, and Clinical Outcomes in Fusarium, Aspergillus and, Dematiaceous Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Gajjar, Devarshi U.; Pal, Anuradha K.; Ghodadra, Bharat K.; Vasavada, Abhay R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Dematiaceous are the most common fungal species causing keratitis in tropical countries. Herein we report a prospective study on fungal keratitis caused by these three fungal species. Methodology. A prospective investigation was undertaken to evaluate eyes with presumed fungal keratitis. All the fungal isolates (n = 73) obtained from keratitis infections were identified using morphological and microscopic characters. Molecular identification using sequencing of the ITS region and antifungal susceptibility tests using microdilution method were done. The final clinical outcome was evaluated in terms of the time taken for resolution of keratitis and the final visual outcome. The results were analyzed after segregating the cases into three groups, namely, Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Dematiaceous keratitis. Results. Diagnosis of fungal keratitis was established in 73 (35.9%) cases out of 208 cases. The spectra of fungi isolated were Fusarium spp. (26.6%), Aspergillus spp. (21.6%), and Dematiaceous fungi (11.6%). The sequence of the ITS region could identify the Fusarium and Aspergillus species at the species complex level, and the Dematiaceous isolates were accurately identified. Using antifungal agents such as fluconazole, natamycin, amphotericin B, and itraconazole, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for Fusarium spp. were >32 μg/mL, 4–8 μg/mL, 0.5–1 μg/mL, and >32 μg/mL, respectively. Antifungal susceptibility data showed that Curvularia spp. was highly resistant to all the antifungal agents. Overall, natamycin and amphotericin B were found to be the most effective antifungal agents. The comparative clinical outcomes in all cases showed that the healing response in terms of visual acuity of the Dematiaceous group was significantly good when compared with the Fusarium and Aspergillus groups (P < 0.05). The time required for healing in the Fusarium group was statistically significantly less when compared with

  8. [Regional laboratory network for surveillance of invasive fungal infections and antifungal susceptibility in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Córdoba, Susana; Melhem, Marcia C; Szeszs, María W; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Martínez, Gerardo; Gabastou, Jean-Marc

    2008-02-01

    This article describes the general objectives of the Regional Laboratory Network for Surveillance of Invasive Fungal Infections and Antifungal Susceptibility in Latin America. Formation of the Network was coordinated by the Essential Medicines, Vaccines, and Health Technologies Unit of the Pan American Health Organization, with the technical and financial support of the National Center for Microbiology of the Carlos III Health Institute (Spain), and the technical support of the Microbiology Department of the Dr. C. Malbrán National Institute on Infectious Diseases (Argentina) and the Microbiology Unit of the Parasitology Service of the Adolfo Lutz Institute (Brazil). The Network's principle objectives are epidemiological surveillance of invasive fungal infections through detection of antifungal resistance and identification of emergent, invasive fungal infections; establishment of norms and common protocols for early diagnosis of mycoses; and strengthening coordination, communications, and transference mechanisms among countries. The Network must be gradually implemented and must include staff training, a systematic process for sharing technology, evaluation of diagnostic techniques, identification of fungal species, and standardized tests for antifungal susceptibility.

  9. Virulence Factors Contributing to Pathogenicity of Candida tropicalis and Its Antifungal Susceptibility Profile

    PubMed Central

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Saini, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of invasive candidiasis has increased over the past few decades. Although Candida albicans remains by far the most common species encountered, in recent years shift towards non-albicans Candida species like Candida tropicalis is noted. Here in this study we determined the virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility profile of 125 C. tropicalis isolated from various clinical specimens. Biofilm formation was seen in 53 (42.4%) isolates. Coagulase production was noted in 18 (14.4%) isolates. Phospholipase enzyme was the major virulent factor produced by C. tropicalis isolates. A total of 39 biofilm forming isolates showed phospholipase activity. Proteinase activity was demonstrated by 65 (52%) isolates. A total of 38 (30.4%) isolates showed haemolytic activity. Maximum isolates demonstrated resistance to fluconazole. Fluconazole resistance was more common in C. tropicalis isolated from blood cultures. Antifungal resistance was more in isolates possessing the ability to produce phospholipase and biofilm. C. tropicalis exhibit a great degree of variation not only in their pathogenicity but also in their antifungal susceptibility profile. The identification of virulence attributes specific for each species and their correlation with each other will aid in the understanding of the pathogenesis of infection. PMID:24803934

  10. Exogenous tyrosol inhibits planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida species and enhances their susceptibility to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de A; Teixeira, Carlos E C; Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Alencar, Lucas P; de Oliveira, Jonathas S; Monteiro, André J; Bandeira, Tereza J P G; Sidrim, José J C; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2015-06-01

    Tyrosol is a quorum-sensing molecule of Candida albicans able to induce hyphal development in the early and intermediate stages of biofilm growth. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of high concentrations of exogenous tyrosol on planktonic cells and biofilms of C. albicans (n = 10) and C. tropicalis (n = 10), and investigated whether tyrosol could be synergic to antifungals that target cellular ergosterol. Antifungal susceptibility and drug interaction against planktonic cells were investigated by the broth microdilution method. Tyrosol was able to inhibit planktonic cells, with MIC values ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 mM for both species. Synergism was observed between tyrosol/amphotericin B (11/20 strains), tyrosol/itraconazole (18/20 strains) and tyrosol/fluconazole (18/20 strains). Exogenous tyrosol alone or combined with antifungals at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC were able to reduce biofilm of both Candida species. Mature biofilms were susceptible to tyrosol alone at 50 × MIC or combined with amphotericin at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC. On the other hand, tyrosol plus azoles at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC enhanced biofilm growth.

  11. Comparison of susceptibility and transcription profile of the new antifungal hassallidin A with caspofungin

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhof, Torsten . E-mail: t.neuhof@gmx.de; Seibold, Michael; Thewes, Sascha; Laue, Michael; Han, Chang-Ok; Hube, Bernhard; Doehren, Hans von

    2006-10-20

    This is First report on the antifungal effects of the new glycolipopeptide hassallidin A. Due to related molecular structure moieties between hassallidin A and the established antifungal drug caspofungin we assumed parallels in the effects on cell viability. Therefore we compared hassallidin A with caspofungin by antifungal susceptibility testing and by analysing the genome-wide transcriptional profile of Candida albicans. Furthermore, we examined modifications in ultracellular structure due to hassallidin A treatment by electron microscopy. Hassallidin A was found to be fungicidal against all tested Candida species and Cryptococcus neoformans isolates. MICs ranged from 4 to 8 {mu}g/ml, independently from the species. Electron microscopy revealed noticeable ultrastructural changes in C. albicans cells exposed to hassallidin A. Comparing the transcriptional profile of C. albicans cells treated with hassallidin A to that of cells exposed to caspofungin, only 20 genes were found to be similarly up- or down-regulated in both assays, while 227 genes were up- or down-regulated induced by hassallidin A specifically. Genes up-regulated in cells exposed to hassallidin A included metabolic and mitotic genes, while genes involved in DNA repair, vesicle docking, and membrane fusion were down-regulated. In summary, our data suggest that, although hassallidin A and caspofungin have similar structures, however, the effects on susceptibility and transcriptional response to yeasts seem to be different.

  12. Multilaboratory Evaluation of In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Dermatophytes for ME1111

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, V.; Diekema, D.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Rennie, R.; Walsh, T.; Wengenack, N.; Fothergill, A.; Wiederhold, N.

    2015-01-01

    ME1111 is a novel small molecule antifungal agent under development for the topical treatment of onychomycosis. Standardization of the susceptibility testing method for this candidate antifungal is needed. Toward this end, 8 independent laboratories determined the interlaboratory reproducibility of ME1111 susceptibility testing. In addition, we subsequently identified 2 strains as quality control (QC) isolates for the method. In the reproducibility study, 5 blinded clinical strains each of Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Epidermophyton floccosum were tested, while the QC study tested 6 blinded T. rubrum or T. mentagrophytes ATCC strains. Testing was performed in frozen microtiter panels according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M38-A2 methodology. In the reproducibility study, 9 of 15 clinical strains showed interlaboratory agreement of >90% at the 80% inhibition endpoint, with a range of agreement of 76.2% to 100%. In the QC study, 4 of the 6 ATCC strains showed interlaboratory agreement of >90%. ME1111 demonstrated excellent interlaboratory agreement when tested against dermatophytes. Based on this data, the CLSI Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Tests approved the susceptibility testing of ME1111 against dermatophytes according to M38-A2 methodology, which stipulates RPMI 1640 as the test medium, an inoculum size of 1 to 3 × 103 CFU/ml, and an incubation time and temperature of 96 h at 35°C. The MIC endpoint should be 80% inhibition compared with the growth control. T. rubrum ATCC MYA-4438 and T. mentagrophytes ATCC 28185 were selected as QC isolates, with an acceptable range of 0.12 to 1 μg/ml for the two strains. PMID:26719434

  13. Cotrimoxazole enhances the in vitro susceptibility of Coccidioides posadasii to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Astete-Medrano, Delia Jessica; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; Andrade, Heuziwanne Tavares Leite; Perdigão Neto, Lauro Vieira; Tavares, Juliane Lira; de Lima, Rita Amanda Chaves; Patoilo, Kharla Kharolyni Nobre Rabelo; Monteiro, Andre Jalles; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cotrimoxazole on the in vitro susceptibility of Coccidioides posadasii strains to antifungals. A total of 18 strains of C. posadasii isolated in Brazil were evaluated in this study. The assays were performed in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and the combinations were tested using the checkerboard method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were reduced by 11, 2.4, 4.3 and 3.5 times for amphotericin B, itraconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively. Moreover, it was seen that cotrimoxazole itself inhibited C. posadasii strains in vitro. The impairment of folic acid synthesis may be a potential antifungal target for C. posadasii.

  14. In vitro susceptibility of e.faecalis and c.albicans isolates from apical periodontitis to common antimicrobial agents, antibiotics and antifungal medicaments

    PubMed Central

    Yoldas, Oguz; Yilmaz, Sehnaz; Akcimen, Beril; Seydaoglu, Gulsah; Kipalev, Arzu; Koksal, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antimicrobial activity of 4 antibiotic agents (for E.faecalis) and 4 antifungal agents (for C.albicans) by agar dilution method. Additionally, modified strip diffusion method was used for detection of in vitro antimicrobial activities of 5% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX and agar diffusion method for detection of in vitro susceptibilities of three intracanal medicaments for 18 E.faecalis and 18 C.albicans isolates from primary and secondary root canal infection. Isolates were recovered from 231 endodontic samples of patients, with the need of root canal treatment and retreatment. All tested E.faecalis isolates showed resistance to antibiotics. For irrigation solutions, 2% CHX was more effective in eliminating E.faecalis but 5% NaOCl showed larger inhibition zone than 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX. For intracanal medication, Ca(OH)2-CHX worked efficiently in killing E.faecalis isolates compared to Ca(OH)2-Steril saline solution, Ca(OH)2-Glycerin. For C.albicans, 18 isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, nistatin, fluconazole but showed resistance to ketoconazole. 5% NaOCl was more effective in eliminating and produced larger inhibition zone compared to 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX. Ca(OH)2-Glycerin intracanal medication was better in eliminating C.albicans isolates and produced larger inhibition zone compared to other Ca(OH)2 medicaments. Key words:E.faecalis, C.albicans, antimicrobial, antibiotic, antifungal. PMID:24558517

  15. In vitro susceptibility of antifungal drugs against Sporothrix brasiliensis recovered from cats with sporotrichosis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Pereira, Sandro Antonio; Gremião, Isabella Dib Ferreira; Schubach, Tânia Maria Pacheco; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2016-03-01

    Sporotrichosis is an important subcutaneous mycosis of humans and animals. Classically, the disease is acquired upon traumatic inoculation of Sporothrix propagules from contaminated soil and plant debris. In addition, the direct horizontal transmission of Sporothrix among animals and the resulting zoonotic infection in humans highlight an alternative and efficient rout of transmission through biting and scratching. Sporothrix brasiliensis is the most virulent species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex and is responsible for the long-lasting outbreak of feline sporotrichosis in Brazil. However, antifungal susceptibility data of animal-borne isolates is scarce. Therefore, this study evaluated the in vitro activity of amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole, voriconazole, fluconazole, and ketoconazole against animal-borne isolates of S. brasiliensis. The susceptibility tests were performed through broth microdilution (M38-A2). The results show the relevant activity of itraconazole, amphotericin B, and ketoconazole against S. brasiliensis, with the following MIC ranges: 0.125-2, 0.125-4 and 0.0312-2 μg/ml, respectively. Caspofungin was moderately effective, displaying higher variation in MIC values (0.25-64 μg/ml). Voriconazole (2-64 μg/ml) and fluconazole (62.5-500 μg/ml) showed low activity against S. brasiliensis strains. This study contributed to the characterization of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of strains of S. brasiliensis recovered from cats with sporotrichosis, which have recently been considered the main source of human infections.

  16. Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Candida Species Recovered from Endotracheal Tube in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Elham; Rezaie, Sassan; Abolghasem, Sara; Kiasat, Neda; Salehi, Zahra; Sharifynia, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Biofilms formed by Candida species which associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents. The aim of this study was to identify and determine the antifungal susceptibility pattern of Candida species isolated from endotracheal tubes from ICU patients. Methods. One hundred forty ICU patients with tracheal tubes who were intubated and mechanically ventilated were surveyed for endotracheal tube biofilms. Samples were processed for quantitative microbial culture. Yeast isolates were identified to the species level based on morphological characteristics and their identity was confirmed by PCR-RFLP. Antifungal susceptibility testing was determined according to CLSI document (M27-A3). Results. Ninety-five strains of Candida were obtained from endotracheal tubes of which C. albicans (n = 34; 35.7%) was the most frequently isolated species followed by other species which included C. glabrata (n = 24; 25.2%), C. parapsilosis (n = 16; 16.8%), C. tropicalis (n = 12; 12.6%), and C. krusei (n = 9; 9.4%). The resulting MIC90 for all Candida species were in increasing order as follows: caspofungin (0.5 μg/mL); amphotericin B (2 μg/mL); voriconazole (8.8 μg/mL); itraconazole (16 μg/mL); and fluconazole (64 μg/mL). Conclusion. Candida species recovered from endotracheal tube are the most susceptible to caspofungin. PMID:27642628

  17. Susceptibility to antifungal agents and genotypes of Brazilian clinical and environmental Cryptococcus gattii strains.

    PubMed

    Silva, Dayane C; Martins, Marilena A; Szeszs, Maria Walderez; Bonfietti, Lucas X; Matos, Dulcilena; Melhem, Marcia S C

    2012-04-01

    There are few reports concerning the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus gattii isolates. In this study, we performed polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism to investigate the molecular subtypes of 50 clinical and 4 environmental Brazilian isolates of C. gattii and assessed their antifungal susceptibility for fluconazole (FLU) and amphotericin B (Amb) according to recent recommendations proposed for antifungal susceptibility testing of nonfermentative yeasts. Time-kill curve studies were performed using RPMI 1640 medium to analyze the fungicidal effect of AmB. We found 47 VGII (94%) molecular types and 3 VGI (6%) types among the clinical isolates. The environmental isolates were VGII (75%) subtype and VGI (25%) subtype. The FLU-MIC ranged from 1 to 64 mg L(-1), and MIC(50)/MIC(90) values were, respectively, 8/16 mg L(-1). For AmB, the MICs were low and homogeneous, ranging from 0.12 to 0.5 mg L(-1), for VGI or VGII. The time required to reach the fungicidal end point (99.9% killing) was 6 h for the majority of strains (64%), but viable cells of VGII were still present after 48 h of exposition. We pointed out the occurrence of high FLU-MICs for C. gattii isolates with highest values for VGII. Our data also suggest that the rate of killing of C. gattii by AmB is strain dependent, and viable cells of VGII genotype strains were still observed after an extended incubation time, addressing future studies to determine whether the in vitro fungicidal activity could be clinically relevant.

  18. Antifungal susceptibility of Candida species isolated from patients with candidemia in southern Taiwan, 2007-2012: impact of new antifungal breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Fang; Chen, Fang-Ju; Lee, Chen-Hsiang

    2017-02-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) revised the clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for the azoles and echinocandins against Candida species in 2012. We aimed to report the epidemiology of candidemia and antifungal susceptibility of Candida species and evaluate the impact of new CBPs on antifungal susceptibility in our region. All blood isolates of Candida species were obtained from 2007 to 2012. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole, voriconazole, echinocandins and flucytosine against Candida isolates were determined by Sensititre YeastOne system. Differences in susceptibility rates between the CBPs of previous and revised versions of CLSI were examined. Of 709 Candida isolates, the fluconazole-susceptible rate was 96.5% in Candida albicans, 85.8% in Candida tropicalis and 92.1% in Candida parapsilosis by the revised CBPs. Compared with the susceptibility results by previous CBPs, the marked reductions in susceptibility of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to fluconazole, that of C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to voriconazole, that of C. tropicalis and Candida glabrata to anidulafungin and that of C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and Candida krusei to caspofungin by revised CBPs were found. In conclusion, Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis remain highly susceptible to fluconazole. The non-susceptible rates of Candida species to azoles and echinocandins increase with interpretation by the revised CBPs.

  19. In vitro susceptibility patterns of clinically important Trichophyton and Epidermophyton species against nine antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Badali, Hamid; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Mashedi, Olga; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meis, Jacques F

    2015-05-01

    Despite the common, worldwide, occurrence of dermatophytes, little information is available regarding susceptibility profiles against currently available and novel antifungal agents. A collection of sixty-eight clinical Trichophyton species and Epidermophyton floccosum were previously identified and verified to the species level by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA. MICs of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, isavuconazole, terbinafine and MECs of caspofungin and anidulafungin were performed based on CLSI M38-A2. The resulting MIC90 s of all strains were, in increasing order, as follows: terbinafine (0.063 mg l(-1) ); posaconazole (1 mg l(-1) ); isavuconazole and anidulafungin (2 mg l(-1) ); itraconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin (4 mg l(-1) ) and fluconazole (>64 mg l(-1) ). These results confirm that terbinafine is an excellent agent for treatment of dermatophytosis due to T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, T. verrucosum, T. schoenleinii and E. floccosum. In addition, the new azoles POS and ISA are potentially useful antifungals to treat dermatophytosis. However, the clinical effectiveness of these novel antifungals remains to be determined.

  20. Ultraviolet induction of antifungal activity in plants.

    PubMed

    Schumpp, O; Bruderhofer, N; Monod, M; Wolfender, J-L; Gindro, K

    2012-11-01

    Ultraviolet-C irradiation as a method to induce the production of plant compounds with antifungal properties was investigated in the leaves of 18 plant species. A susceptibility assay to determine the antifungal susceptibility of filamentous fungi was developed based on an agar dilution series in microtiter plates. UV irradiation strongly induced antifungal properties in five species against a clinical Fusarium solani strain that was responsible for an onychomycosis case that was resistant to classic pharmacological treatment. The antifungal properties of three additional plant species were either unaffected or reduced by UV-C irradiation. This study demonstrates that UV-C irradiation is an effective means of modulating the antifungal activity of very diverse plants from a screening perspective.

  1. The Frequency, Antifungal Susceptibility and Enzymatic Profiles of Candida Species Isolated from Neutropenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gharaghani, Maral; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Keikhaei, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutropenia, as a predisposing factor for invasive candidiasis, is defined as a reduction in neutrophil count to less than 1500/mm3. It is a common condition in patients with hematological malignancy and cytostatic chemotherapy. Extensive chemotherapy and prophylaxis with antifungals have increased the resistance of Candida isolates to antifungal drugs. Although, Candida albicans is the most common causative agent among neutropenic patients, there is an increasing rate of non-albicans species. Extracellular enzymes activity pattern and antifungal agent sensitivity profiles are two important factors for spreading resistant strains. Objectives The aim of the present study was to identify the Candida strains isolated from hospitalized neutropenic patients. The patterns of antifungal susceptibility of the causative agents to antifungals and the extracellular enzymes activity of the isolates were also evaluated. Patients and Methods In the present study, 243 urine and 243 oral swab samples were collected from neutropenic patients and inoculated on CHROMagar Candida. In addition, 100 blood samples were also inoculated in biphasic Brain Heart Infusion medium. Several yeast isolates were isolated from samples and identified by classical and molecular techniques. The profiles of extracellular enzymes and the susceptibility of recovered agents to amphotericin B, fluconazole and caspofungin were also evaluated. Results A total of 110 yeast strains isolated from urine and oral cavities were identified as C. albicans (51.8%), C. krusei (25.5%), C. glabrata (6.4%) and other yeasts (16.3%). No yeast species was isolated from blood samples. Our result showed that in 90% of the isolates, the range of secretion of extracellular enzymes was medium (2+) and high (3+), however only a few isolates were negative for this characteristic. All isolates were sensitive to caspofungin and fluconazole, whereas 54.7% of isolates were resistant to amphotericin B. Conclusions We found a

  2. Reproducibility of control organism zone diameters for batches of IsoSensitest agar manufactured from 1996 to 2000 using the BSAC disc susceptibility test method.

    PubMed

    Landrygan, Janine; James, Peter A; Brooks, Dawn; Kubiak, Elizabeth M

    2002-02-01

    The BSAC Working Party on Susceptibility Testing has recently suggested that the performance of IsoSensitest agar has changed since 1991. Twenty batches of IsoSensitest agar that had been manufactured between 1996 and 2000 were tested using the BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method. Antibiotic discs containing amoxicillin 10 microg, ceftazidime 30 microg, gentamicin 10 microg, ciprofloxacin 1 microg and colistin sulphate 25 microg were tested on each batch of media 12 times against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 where appropriate. There was a small reduction in zone sizes for most antibiotics on batches of media that were near their expiration date, but otherwise zone sizes were remarkably consistent. We could find no evidence to suggest that a change in the performance of IsoSensitest agar for the disc diffusion method had occurred since 1996.

  3. Molecular characterisation and antifungal susceptibility of clinical Cryptococcus deuterogattii (AFLP6/VGII) isolates from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Herkert, P F; Hagen, F; de Oliveira Salvador, G L; Gomes, R R; Ferreira, M S; Vicente, V A; Muro, M D; Pinheiro, R L; Meis, J F; Queiroz-Telles, F

    2016-11-01

    Cryptococcosis, caused by Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato, is an emerging disease that was initially found in (sub)tropical regions but recently expanded to temperate regions. Cryptococcus gattii s.l. infections are mostly encountered in healthy individuals, frequently affecting both lungs and the central nervous system (CNS). Usually, C. gattii s.l. is less susceptible to antifungal compounds than its counterpart, C. neoformans s.l. We studied 18 clinical C. gattii s.l. isolates with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting, mating-typing, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and antifungal susceptibility testing. All isolates were C. deuterogattii (genotype AFLP6/VGII), 14 were mating-type α and four were type a. Amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole and isavuconazole showed high activity, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges of 0.063-0.25, 0.031-0.25, 0.031-0.25, 0.031-0.25 and <0.016-0.25 μg mL(-1), respectively. Fluconazole and flucytosine had high geometric mean MICs of 2.07 and 3.7 μg mL(-1), respectively. Most cases occurred in immunocompetent patients (n = 10; 55.6 %) and CNS involvement was the most common clinical presentation (n = 14; 77.8 %). Three patients (16.7 %) showed sequelae, hyperreflexia, dysarthria, diadochokinesia, anosmia and upper limb weakness. In conclusion, all infections were caused by C. deuterogattii (AFLP6/VGII) and the majority of patients were immunocompetent, with the CNS as the most affected site. All antifungal drugs had high in vitro activity against C. deuterogattii isolates, except fluconazole and flucytosine.

  4. Candidiasis in Pediatrics; Identification and In vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of the Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, R; Ataei, B

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida species are normal microflora of oral cavity, vagina, and gastrointestinal tract. They are the third most prevalent cause of pediatric health care–associated bloodstream fungal infection. This study aimed to provide an epidemiological feature of candidiasis and also presents an antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical Candida isolates among children. Materials and Methods During July 2013 to February 2015, 105 patients from different hospitals of Isfahan, Iran, were examined for candidiasis by phenotypic tests. Samples were obtained from nail clippings, blood, thrush, BAL, urine, oropharynx, skin, and eye discharge. The age range of patients was between 18 days to 16 years. Genomic DNA of isolates was extracted and ITS1-5.8SrDNA-ITS2 region was amplified by ITS1 and ITS2 primers. The PCR products were digested using the restriction enzyme MspI. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) was determined using microdilution broth method according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Results Forty-three patients (40.9%) had Candida infection.The most clinical strains were isolated from nail infections (39.5%), and candidemia (13.9%). Candida albicans was the most prevalent species (46.5%). MICs ranges for amphotericin B, fluconazole, and itraconazole were (0.025-0.75 µg/ml), (0.125-16 µg/ml), and (0.094-2 µg/ml), respectively. Conclusion Due to high incidence of Candida infections among children, increasing of fatal infection like candidemia, and emersion of antifungal resistance Candida isolates, early and precise identification of the Candida species and determination of antifungal susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates may lead to better management of the infection. PMID:27222702

  5. Molecular identification, antifungal susceptibility profile, and biofilm formation of clinical and environmental Rhodotorula species isolates.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona E; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC(50)/MIC(90), 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula

  6. Molecular Identification, Antifungal Susceptibility Profile, and Biofilm Formation of Clinical and Environmental Rhodotorula Species Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona e

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC50/MIC90, 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula species

  7. First description of Candida nivariensis in Brazil: antifungal susceptibility profile and potential virulence attributes

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Ramos, Livia de Souza; Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Chaves, Alessandra Leal da Silva; Muramoto, Ilda Akemi; dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the antifungal susceptibility profile and the production of potential virulence attributes in a clinical strain of Candida nivariensis for the first time in Brazil, as identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region and D1/D2 domains of the 28S of the rDNA. For comparative purposes, tests were also performed with reference strains. All strains presented low planktonic minimal inhibitory concentrations (PMICs) to amphotericin B (AMB), caspofungin (CAS), and voriconazole. However, our strain showed elevated planktonic MICs to posaconazole (POS) and itraconazole, in addition to fluconazole resistance. Adherence to inert surfaces was conducted onto glass and polystyrene. The biofilm formation and antifungal susceptibility on biofilm-growing cells were evaluated by crystal violet staining and a XTT reduction assay. All fungal strains were able to bind both tested surfaces and form biofilm, with a binding preference to polystyrene (p < 0.001). AMB promoted significant reductions (≈50%) in biofilm production by our C. nivariensis strain using both methodologies. This reduction was also observed for CAS and POS, but only in the XTT assay. All strains were excellent protease producers and moderate phytase producers, but lipases were not detected. This study reinforces the pathogenic potential of C. nivariensis and its possible resistance profile to the azolic drugs generally used for candidiasis management. PMID:26814644

  8. In vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Candida Albicans from HIV and AIDS Patients Attending the Nylon Health District Hospital in Douala, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Nsagha, Dickson S.; Assob, Jules C.N.; Kamga, Henri L.; Teyim, Pride

    2012-01-01

    HIV and AIDS are major public health problems in Cameroon where the HIV prevalence is 5.5%. Candidiasis is the leading opportunistic mycosis in HIV and AIDS patients. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of Candida albicans in HIV and AIDS patients to eight antifungal agents in the Nylon Health District of Douala in Cameroon. Three hundred and four HIV and AIDS patients were recruited between March and August 2007 to participate in a cross-sectional study. All subjects who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects before samples were collected. Three samples comprising oral swabs, vagina/urethra swabs and a mid-stream urine were collected from each subject. Specimens were cultured on sabouraud dextrose agar and C. albicans isolates were identified using the germ tube technique. The disk diffusion method was used for antifungal susceptibility testing using eight antifungal agents. The prevalence of candidiasis in the study population was 67.8% (95% CI: 62.5-73.1%) and that of C. albicans was 42.8% (95% CI: 37.2-48.4%). Oral swabs had the highest prevalence of C. albicans followed by vaginal/urethral samples (52.6% vs. 29.7% respectively). Forty (30.8%) subjects had C. albicans infection at more than one collection site. There was a statistically significant difference in the infectivity of C. albicans with age, sex and site of infection (P<0.05). C. albicans isolates were most sensitive to ketoconazole (80%) followed by econazole (64.6%) while fluconazole and 5-flurocytosin recorded the poorest sensitivities (22.9% vs 24.6%, respectively). There was a statistically significant difference in the sensitivity pattern of antifungal agents with respect to the site of isolation of the organism (P<0.05). Ketoconazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of C. albicans infection in HIV and AIDS patients in the Nylon Health District of Douala, Cameroon.

  9. In vitro resistance of clinical Fusarium species to amphotericin B and voriconazole using the EUCAST antifungal susceptibility method.

    PubMed

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Salah, Husam; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Hamed, Manal; Theelen, Bart; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Boekhout, Teun; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2016-08-01

    Susceptibility testing using the EUCAST-AFST method against 39 clinical Fusarium strains consecutively collected from local and invasive infections during the last 10years assessed the in vitro activities of amphotericin B (AmB) and triazole antifungal agents. In addition, the susceptibility pattern of 12 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre (CBS) was evaluated. In particular Fusarium petroliphilum and F. solani sensu lato were involved in disseminated infections and known for treatment failure. AmB displayed the lowest MICs followed by voriconazole VRC, posaconazole (POC). Itraconazole (ITC) showed high MIC values, displaying in vitro resistance. Clinical isolates were significantly (P <0.05) more resistant to AmB, VRC, and POC, than the CBS reference isolates probably due to previous exposure to antifungal therapy. Resistant profiles to AmB and VRC, which are the currently recommended agents in the guidelines for treatments, and a late diagnosis may be associated with high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. The present antifungal susceptibility profiles showed that species- and strain-specific differences in antifungal susceptibility exist within Fusarium and that susceptibility testing is important and may improve the prognosis of these infections.

  10. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  11. Invasive candidiasis in Pakistan: clinical characteristics, species distribution and antifungal susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, J. Q.; Jabeen, K.; Saeed, N.; Iqbal, N.; Malik, B.; Lockhart, S. R.; Zafar, A.; Brandt, M. E.; Hasan, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports for the first time, to our knowledge, descriptive epidemiological data for 18 invasive Candida isolates from Pakistan, including species identification and antifungal susceptibility against fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin, micafungin, anidulafungin and amphotericin. Risk factors for invasive candidiasis (IC) were determined for 96 patients from Karachi, Pakistan. In adults and neonates, Candida tropicalis (38 and 36 %, respectively) was the most common species, followed in adults by Candida parapsilosis (17.8 %), Candida glabrata (15.9 %) and Candida albicans (12.3 %). C. albicans (21 %) was the second most common in neonates. In children, C. albicans (31.9 %), C. tropicalis (26.4 %) and C. parapsilosis (19.4 %) were the most common. C. albicans IC was significantly associated with paediatric age [crude odds ratio (COR) 3.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.63–7.32]. Rare species made up 17.5% of the total isolates studied. Resistance to fluconazole was seen in C. glabrata (15.0%) and Candida krusei (100.0%). Only one isolate (C. glabrata) was resistant to all three echinocandins. Low MICs of fluconazole for 98% (184/188) of isolates tested support its continued use as an empiric therapy for IC. Non-C. albicans IC was associated with the use of β lactam inhibitor combinations (COR 3.16, 95% CI 1.05–9.57). Use of healthcare devices was documented in 85.4% of IC patients, whilst 75.0% had been admitted to special care units. Surprisingly, 66.7% of patients with IC were not obviously immunosuppressed. The high frequency of modifiable risk factors in this population indicates that candidaemia can be reduced with stringent antibiotic and infection control measures. These data will be useful for empiric selection of antifungals in Karachi, and contribute to global assessments of antifungal resistance. PMID:23105021

  12. Systemic Candida infection in University hospital 1997-1999: the distribution of Candida biotypes and antifungal susceptibility patterns.

    PubMed

    Ng, K P; Saw, T L; Na, S L; Soo-Hoo, T S

    2001-01-01

    A total of 102 Candida species were isolated from blood cultures from January 1997 to October 1999. Using assimilation of carbohydrate test, 52 (51.0%) of the Candida sp. were identified as C. parapsilosis, 25.5% (26) were C. tropicalis. C. albicans made up 11.8% (12), 6.9% (7) were C. rugosa, 3.8% (4) C. glabrata and 1% (1) C. guilliermondii. No C. dubliniensis was found in the study. In vitro antifungal susceptibility tests showed that all Candida species were sensitive to nystatin, amphotericin B and ketoconazole. Although all isolates remained sensitive to fluconazole, intermediate susceptibility was found in 3 C. rugosa isolates. Antifungal agents with high frequency of resistance were econazole, clotrimazole, miconazole and 5-fluorocytosine. Candida species found to have resistance to these antifungal agents were non-C. albicans.

  13. In vitro susceptibility of 137 Candida sp. isolates from HIV positive patients to several antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Magaldi, S; Mata, S; Hartung, C; Verde, G; Deibis, L; Roldán, Y; Marcano, C

    2001-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis caused by various species of Candida is one of the most common infections in HIV seropositive or AIDS patients. Drug resistance among these yeasts is an increasing problem. We studied the frequency of resistance profile to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and terbinafine of 137 isolates of Candida sp. From HIV positive or AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis at Instituto de Inmunología, U.C.V. and the Hospital "Jose Ignacio Baldó", Caracas Venezuela, using the well diffusion susceptibility test (Magaldi et al.). We found that nearly 10% of C. albicans isolates were primarily fluconazole resistant, 45% of C. albicans isolates from patients with previous treatment were resistant to fluconazole, of which 93% showed cross-resistance to itraconazole, and even about 30% of C. tropicalis (n = 13) were resistant to fluconazole and/or itraconazole. To this respect, several recent reports have been described antifungal cross-resistance among azoles. Therefore, we consider that C. tropicalis should be added to the growing list of yeast in which antifungal drug resistance is common. This report could be useful for therapeutic aspect in AIDS patients with oral candidiasis.

  14. Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility of Penicillium-Like Fungi from Clinical Samples in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Suarez, Marcela; Sutton, Deanna A.; García, Dania; Martin-Vicente, Adela; Wiederhold, Nathan; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium species are some of the most common fungi observed worldwide and have an important economic impact as well as being occasional agents of human and animal mycoses. A total of 118 isolates thought to belong to the genus Penicillium based on morphological features were obtained from the Fungus Testing Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio (United States). The isolates were studied phenotypically using standard growth conditions. Molecular identification was made using two genetic markers, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and a fragment of the β-tubulin gene. In order to assess phylogenetic relationships, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference assessments were used. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed according to CLSI document M38-A2 for nine antifungal drugs. The isolates were identified within three genera, i.e., Penicillium, Talaromyces, and Rasamsonia. The most frequent species in our study were Penicillium rubens, P. citrinum, and Talaromyces amestolkiae. The potent in vitro activity of amphotericin B (AMB) and terbinafine (TRB) and of the echinocandins against Penicillium and Talaromyces species might offer a good therapeutic alternative for the treatment of infections caused by these fungi. PMID:27280422

  15. Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility of Penicillium-Like Fungi from Clinical Samples in the United States.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Suarez, Marcela; Sutton, Deanna A; Cano-Lira, José F; García, Dania; Martin-Vicente, Adela; Wiederhold, Nathan; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2016-08-01

    Penicillium species are some of the most common fungi observed worldwide and have an important economic impact as well as being occasional agents of human and animal mycoses. A total of 118 isolates thought to belong to the genus Penicillium based on morphological features were obtained from the Fungus Testing Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio (United States). The isolates were studied phenotypically using standard growth conditions. Molecular identification was made using two genetic markers, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and a fragment of the β-tubulin gene. In order to assess phylogenetic relationships, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference assessments were used. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed according to CLSI document M38-A2 for nine antifungal drugs. The isolates were identified within three genera, i.e., Penicillium, Talaromyces, and Rasamsonia The most frequent species in our study were Penicillium rubens, P. citrinum, and Talaromyces amestolkiae The potent in vitro activity of amphotericin B (AMB) and terbinafine (TRB) and of the echinocandins against Penicillium and Talaromyces species might offer a good therapeutic alternative for the treatment of infections caused by these fungi.

  16. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibilities of black Aspergillus isolates from otomycosis cases in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Kocsubé, Sándor; Dóczi, Ilona; Bereczki, László; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Varga, János

    2012-08-01

    Otomycosis, also known as fungal otitis externa, has been used to describe a fungal infection of the external auditory canal, but sometimes involving the middle ear. Many fungal species have been identified as infectious agents in otomycosis, with Aspergillus and Candida species being the most common. Among aspergilli, Aspergillus niger is the most commonly described species in the literature. In this study, 14 black Aspergillus strains were analyzed, which were isolated from otomycosis cases in Hungary between 2010 and 2011. These strains were identified as A. niger according to conventional morphological methods. Species identification was based on sequencing of part of the calmodulin gene. Our results indicate that instead of A. niger, A. awamori and A. tubingensis are the predominant species that cause ear infections in Southern Hungary. Antifungal susceptibility tests were carried out against four antifungal drugs: amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole and terbinafine. All isolates were found to exhibit low in vitro MIC values to amphotericin B, terbinafine and itraconazole. However, the examined isolates exhibited high in vitro MIC values to ketoconazole.

  17. Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Fluconazole by Flow Cytometry Correlates with Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wenisch, Christoph; Moore, Caroline B.; Krause, Robert; Presterl, Elisabeth; Pichna, Peter; Denning, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility testing of fungi by flow cytometry (also called fluorescence-activated cell sorting [FACS]) using vital staining with FUN-1 showed a good correlation with the standard M27-A procedure for assessing MICs. In this study we determined MICs for blood culture isolates from patients with candidemia by NCCLS M27-A and FACS methods and correlated the clinical outcome of these patients with in vitro antifungal resistance test results. A total of 24 patients with candidemia for whom one or more blood cultures were positive for a Candida sp. were included. Susceptibility testing was performed by NCCLS M27-A and FACS methods. The correlation of MICs (NCCLS M27-A and FACS) and clinical outcome was calculated. In 83% of the cases, the MICs of fluconazole determined by FACS were within 1 dilution of the MICs determined by the NCCLS M27-A method. For proposed susceptibility breakpoints, there was 100% agreement between the M27-A and FACS methods. In the FACS assay, a fluconazole MIC of <1 μg/ml was associated with cure (P < 0.001) whereas an MIC of ≥1 μg/ml was associated with death (P < 0.001). The M27-A-derived fluconazole MICs did not correlate with outcome (P = 1 and P = 0.133). PMID:11427554

  18. Pithomyces species (Montagnulaceae) from clinical specimens: identification and antifungal susceptibility profiles.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Keith Cássia; Sutton, Deanna A; Gené, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Capilla, Javier; Madrid, Hugo; Decock, Cony; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Guarro, Josep

    2014-10-01

    The fungal genus Pithomyces comprises numerous dematiaceous saprobic species commonly found on dead leaves and stems of a great variety of plants. Occasionally, they have been recovered from clinical specimens. We morphologically and molecularly (rDNA sequences) investigated a set of 42 isolates tentatively identified as Pithomyces recovered from clinical specimens in the United States. The predominant species were P. chartarum and P. sacchari (33.3% each), followed by Pithomyces sp. I (28.6%) and P. maydicus (4.8%). Most of the isolates were obtained from samples of superficial tissue (50%), the respiratory tract (21.4%), and the nasal region (19%). In general, these fungi were highly susceptible in vitro to the eight antifungal agents tested.

  19. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida spp. to terconazole and other azole antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Gerarden, T

    1989-01-01

    Terconazole is a triazole ketal derivative with potent, broad-spectrum antifungal activity. We investigated the in vitro activity of terconazole, miconazole, and clotrimazole, against 94 clinical isolates of Candida spp.: C. albicans (n = 68), C. tropicalis (n = 18), and C. parapsilosis (n = 8). In vitro susceptibility testing was performed using a broth microdilution method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of terconazole were less than those of miconazole against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis but higher against C. tropicalis. Terconazole was more active than clotrimazole against C. parapsilosis and less active against C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Terconazole inhibited the uptake of 14C-labeled glucose, leucine, and hypoxanthine into C. albicans and caused the rapid release of intracellular K+. Based on these studies, terconazole has promising anticandidal activity and warrants further in vitro and in vivo investigation.

  20. Phylogeny of the Clinically Relevant Species of the Emerging Fungus Trichoderma and Their Antifungal Susceptibilities

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Sutton, Deanna A.; Cano-Lira, José F.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Guarro, Josep

    2014-01-01

    A set of 73 isolates of the emerging fungus Trichoderma isolated from human and animal clinical specimens were characterized morphologically and molecularly using a multilocus sequence analysis that included the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and fragments of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (Tef1), endochitinase CHI18-5 (Chi18-5), and actin 1 (Act1) genes. The most frequent species was Trichoderma longibrachiatum (26%), followed by Trichoderma citrinoviride (18%), the Hypocrea lixii/Trichoderma harzianum species complex (15%), the newly described species Trichoderma bissettii (12%), and Trichoderma orientale (11%). The most common anatomical sites of isolation in human clinical specimens were the respiratory tract (40%), followed by deep tissue (30%) and superficial tissues (26%), while all the animal-associated isolates were obtained from superficial tissue samples. Susceptibilities of the isolates to eight antifungal drugs in vitro showed mostly high MICs, except for voriconazole and the echinocandins. PMID:24719448

  1. Phylogeny of the clinically relevant species of the emerging fungus Trichoderma and their antifungal susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Sutton, Deanna A; Cano-Lira, José F; Gené, Josepa; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Guarro, Josep

    2014-06-01

    A set of 73 isolates of the emerging fungus Trichoderma isolated from human and animal clinical specimens were characterized morphologically and molecularly using a multilocus sequence analysis that included the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and fragments of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (Tef1), endochitinase CHI18-5 (Chi18-5), and actin 1 (Act1) genes. The most frequent species was Trichoderma longibrachiatum (26%), followed by Trichoderma citrinoviride (18%), the Hypocrea lixii/Trichoderma harzianum species complex (15%), the newly described species Trichoderma bissettii (12%), and Trichoderma orientale (11%). The most common anatomical sites of isolation in human clinical specimens were the respiratory tract (40%), followed by deep tissue (30%) and superficial tissues (26%), while all the animal-associated isolates were obtained from superficial tissue samples. Susceptibilities of the isolates to eight antifungal drugs in vitro showed mostly high MICs, except for voriconazole and the echinocandins.

  2. Isolation, identification and antifungal susceptibility of lemon pathogenic and non pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, María Cristina; Santa Runco, Rosa; Navarro, Antonio Roberto

    2005-03-01

    Numerous species of filamentous fungi were isolated from lemon on different plantations in the province of Tucuman, Argentina. The techniques suggested by the Subcommittee of Antifungal Susceptibility of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, (USA) were adapted. The effect of three different concentrations of the fungicides imazalil, guazatine, SOPP and thiabendazole on the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium moniliforme, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus clavatus, Geotrichum candidum, Rhizopus sp, Penicillium sp, Penicillium digitatum and Mucor sp were studied. All the tested strains were resistant to thiabendazole. We assayed a mixture of SOPP (5%), guazatine (350 ppm) and imazalil (100 ppm), which showed a synergic effect on Rhizopus sp. Mucor sp was the only fungus resistant to the four fungicides tested as well as to the above mentioned mixture.

  3. In vitro antifungal susceptibility profiles of Cryptococcus species isolated from HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis patients in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Nyazika, Tinashe K; Herkert, Patricia F; Hagen, Ferry; Mateveke, Kudzanai; Robertson, Valerie J; Meis, Jacques F

    2016-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the leading cause of cryptococcosis in HIV-infected subjects worldwide. Treatment of cryptococcosis is based on amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole. In Zimbabwe, little is known about antifungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus. Sixty-eight genotyped Cryptococcus isolates were tested for antifungal profiles. Amphotericin B, isavuconazole, and voriconazole showed higher activity than other triazoles. Fluconazole and flucytosine were less effective, with geometric mean MICs of 2.24 and 2.67mg/L for C. neoformans AFLP1/VNI, 1.38 and 1.53mg/L for C. neoformans AFLP1A/VNB/VNII and AFLP1B/VNII, and 1.85 and 0.68mg/L for Cryptococcus tetragattii, respectively. A significant difference between flucytosine geometric mean MICs of C. neoformans and C. tetragattii was observed (P=0.0002). The majority of isolates (n=66/68; 97.1%) had a wild-type MIC phenotype of all antifungal agents. This study demonstrates a favorable situation with respect to the tested antifungals agents. Continued surveillance of antifungal susceptibility profiles is important due to the high burden of cryptococcosis in Africa.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori isolates from Brazilian children and adolescents: comparing agar dilution, E-test, and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Silvio Kazuo; Gales, Ana Cristina; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori is increasingly important due to resistance to the most used antimicrobials agents. Only agar dilution method is approved by CLSI, but it is difficult to perform routinely. We evaluated the reliability of E-test and disk diffusion comparing to agar dilution method on Helicobacter pylori antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, furazolidone, metronidazole and tetracycline using E-test, disk-diffusion and agar dilution method in 77 consecutive Helicobacter pylori strains from dyspeptic children and adolescents. Resistance rates were: amoxicillin - 10.4%, 9% and 68.8%; clarithromycin - 19.5%, 20.8%, 36.3%; metronidazole - 40.2%33.7%, 38.9%, respectively by agar dilution, E-test and disk diffusion method. Furazolidone and tetracycline showed no resistance rates. Metronidazole presented strong correlation to E-test (r = 0.7992, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.6962, p < 0.0001). Clarithromycin presented moderate correlation to E-test (r = 0.6369, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.5656, p < 0.0001). Amoxicillin presented weak correlation to E-test (r = 0.3565, p = 0.0015) and disk diffusion (r=-0.3565, p = 0.0015). Tetracycline presented weak correlation with E-test (r = 0.2346, p = 0.04) and furazolidone to disk diffusion (r=-0.0288, p = 0.8038). E-test presented better agreement with gold standard. It is an easy and reliable method for Helicobacter pylori susceptibility testing. Disk diffusion method presented high disagreement and high rates of major errors.

  5. Antifungal Susceptibilities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginitis and Epidemiology of Recurrent Cases

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Sandra S.; Galask, Rudolph P.; Messer, Shawn A.; Hollis, Richard J.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Pfaller, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    There are limited data regarding the antifungal susceptibility of yeast causing vulvovaginal candidiasis, since cultures are rarely performed. Susceptibility testing was performed on vaginal yeast isolates collected from January 1998 to March 2001 from 429 patients with suspected vulvovaginal candidiasis. The charts of 84 patients with multiple positive cultures were reviewed. The 593 yeast isolates were Candida albicans (n = 420), Candida glabrata (n = 112), Candida parapsilosis (n = 30), Candida krusei (n = 12), Saccharomyces cerevisiae ( n = 9), Candida tropicalis (n = 8), Candida lusitaniae (n = 1), and Trichosporon sp. (n = 1). Multiple species suggesting mixed infection were isolated from 27 cultures. Resistance to fluconazole and flucytosine was observed infrequently (3.7% and 3.0%); 16.2% of isolates were resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 1 μg/ml). The four imidazoles (econazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, and ketoconazole) were active: 94.3 to 98.5% were susceptible at ≤1 μg/ml. Among different species, elevated fluconazole MICs (≥16 μg/ml) were only observed in C. glabrata (15.2% resistant [R], 51.8% susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]), C. parapsilosis (3.3% S-DD), S. cerevisiae (11.1% S-DD), and C. krusei (50% S-DD, 41.7% R, considered intrinsically fluconazole resistant). Resistance to itraconazole was observed among C. glabrata (74.1%), C. krusei (58.3%), S. cerevisiae (55.6%), and C. parapsilosis (3.4%). Among 84 patients with recurrent episodes, non-albicans species were more common (42% versus 20%). A ≥4-fold rise in fluconazole MIC was observed in only one patient with C. parapsilosis. These results support the use of azoles for empirical therapy of uncomplicated candidal vulvovaginitis. Recurrent episodes are more often caused by non-albicans species, for which azole agents are less likely to be effective. PMID:15872235

  6. In vitro susceptibility testing of dermatophytes isolated in Goiania, Brazil, against five antifungal agents by broth microdilution method.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Miranda, Karla Carvalho; Fernandes, Orionalda de Fatima Lisboa; Soares, Ailton José; Silva, Maria do Rosário Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    The antifungal activities of fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, terbinafine and griseofulvin were tested by broth microdilution technique, against 60 dermatophytes isolated from nail or skin specimens from Goiania city patients, Brazil. In this study, the microtiter plates were incubated at 28 masculineC allowing a reading of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) after four days of incubation for Trichophyton mentagrophytes and five days for T. rubrum and Microsporum canis. Most of the dermatophytes had uniform patterns of susceptibility to the antifungal agents tested. Low MIC values as 0.03 microg/mL were found for 33.3%, 31.6% and 15% of isolates for itraconazole, ketoconazole and terbinafine, respectively.

  7. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates collected from oral cavities of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Moris, D V; Melhem, M S C; Martins, M A; Souza, L R; Kacew, S; Szeszs, M W; Carvalho, L R; Pimenta-Rodrigues, M V; Berghs, H A M; Mendes, R P

    2012-12-01

    At present, few data are available on the prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates from HIV-infected individuals. The C. parapsilosis complex comprises three species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis. Fifteen of 318 Candida isolates were identified as members of the C. parapsilosis complex by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The prevalence of C. parapsilosis complex isolates was 4.7 %, 2.2 % being identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 2.5 % as C. metapsilosis, while no C. orthopsilosis was isolated. This is believed to be the first study that has identified isolates of C. metapsilosis obtained from the oral cavity of HIV-infected individuals. Antifungal susceptibility tests indicated that all the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), ketoconazole (KTC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC) and caspofungin (CASPO). Although isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis were susceptible to FLC, isolates of C. metapsilosis showed a tendency for higher MICs (≥1.0 µg ml(-1)). Based upon the frequency of candidiasis and the fact that certain isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex respond differently to FLC therapy, our data may be of therapeutic relevance with respect to susceptibility and potential resistance to specific antifungal agents. Our data suggest that C. metapsilosis can be a human commensal; its importance as a pathogen has yet to be confirmed.

  8. Veronaea botryosa: molecular identification with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and in vitro antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Badali, Hamid; Yazdanparast, Seyed Amir; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Mousavi, Bita; de Hoog, G Sybren; Klaassen, Corné H W; Meis, Jacques F

    2013-06-01

    Inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of 18 isolates of Veronaea botryosa originating from clinical and environmental sources was studied using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). The species was originally described from the environment, but several severe cases of disseminated infection in apparently healthy individuals have been reported worldwide. All tested strains of V. botryosa, identified on the basis of sequencing and phenotypic and physiological criteria prior to our study, were confirmed by AFLP analysis, yielding a clear separation of V. botryosa as a rather homogeneous group from related species. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing resulted in MIC90s across all strains in increasing order posaconazole (0.25 μg/ml), itraconazole (1 μg/ml), voriconazole (4 μg/ml), terbinafine (4 μg/ml), caspofungin (8 μg/ml), anidulafungin (8 μg/ml), isavuconazole (16 μg/ml), amphotericin B (16 μg/ml), and fluconazole (32 μg/ml). Overall, the isolates showed a uniform pattern of low MICs of itraconazole and posaconazole, but high MICs for remaining agents. The echinocandins (caspofungin and anidulafungin) had no activity against V. botryosa. There was no statistically significant difference between susceptibilities of environmental (n = 11) and clinical (n = 7) isolates of V. botryosa (P > 0.05).

  9. Genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility testing of Trichosporon asahii isolated of Intensive Care Units patients

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Silva, Rosana Bellan; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Matsumoto, Marcelo Teruyuki; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Benaducci, Tatiane; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2008-01-01

    Trichosporon asahii is an opportunistic pathogen, associated with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. In this study, ten isolates, recovered from oral cavity and urine of patients in Intensive Care Units (ICU) over six months, were identified by classical and molecular methods, typed by RAPD and tested in vitro for susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. A total agreement between the identification of Trichosporon sp by PCR based on sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions (ITS) and on the sequences of small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was found. Randomly amplified of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), with primers P6 and M13, was used to determine the genomic profiles. The dendogram analysis indicated that almost all strains showed similarity >0.9 among them and all strains were multidrug-resistant. This study brings new results on the identification and genotyping of T. asahii isolated from Brazilian ICU patients and information about their antifungal drugs susceptibility. PMID:24031270

  10. Antifungal Drug Susceptibility and Phylogenetic Diversity among Cryptococcus Isolates from Dogs and Cats in North America

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Lisa M.; Meyer, Wieland; Firacative, Carolina; Thompson, George R.; Samitz, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Molecular types of the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex that infect dogs and cats differ regionally and with host species. Antifungal drug susceptibility can vary with molecular type, but the susceptibility of Cryptococcus isolates from dogs and cats is largely unknown. Cryptococcus isolates from 15 dogs and 27 cats were typed using URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP), PCR fingerprinting, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Susceptibility was determined using a microdilution assay (Sensititre YeastOne; Trek Diagnostic Systems). MICs were compared among groups. The 42 isolates studied comprised molecular types VGI (7%), VGIIa (7%), VGIIb (5%), VGIIc (5%), VGIII (38%), VGIV (2%), VNI (33%), and VNII (2%), as determined by URA5 RFLP. The VGIV isolate was more closely related to VGIII according to MLST. All VGIII isolates were from cats. All sequence types identified from veterinary isolates clustered with isolates from humans. VGIII isolates showed considerable genetic diversity compared with other Cryptococcus molecular types and could be divided into two major subgroups. Compared with C. neoformans MICs, C. gattii MICs were lower for flucytosine, and VGIII MICs were lower for flucytosine and itraconazole. For all drugs except itraconazole, C. gattii isolates exhibited a wider range of MICs than C. neoformans. MICs varied with Cryptococcus species and molecular type in dogs and cats, and MICs of VGIII isolates were most variable and may reflect phylogenetic diversity in this group. Because sequence types of dogs and cats reflect those infecting humans, these observations may also have implications for treatment of human cryptococcosis. PMID:24696030

  11. A comparison of antibiotic disks from different sources on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar media in evaluation of antibacterial susceptibility testing

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Neda; Salmanzadeh-Ahrabi, Siavosh; Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Rezaei-Hemami, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Antibacterial susceptibility testing of clinical bacterial isolates through disk diffusion method plays a major role in antibacterial treatment. One of the main factors affecting the result of these tests is the type, structure and quality of the disks. The main objective of this study was to compare the agreement of antibiotic disks originated from three companies on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar. Materials and Methods: Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar media were used in disk diffusion method. Seventy clinical isolates from Enterobacteriaceae family (21 Klebsiella spp., 36 Escherichia coli, 1 Enterobacter spp. and 12 Shigella spp.) were investigated in the study. After obtaining data, the results were interpreted as resistant, sensitive or intermediate. Kappa coefficient measured the agreement of two media. Coefficient of variation (CV) was also calculated for antibiotic disks. Results: The kappa agreement values for three types of antibiotic disks on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar plates were good or excellent for all the examined antibiotics. CV values were also very satisfactory in the majority of cases. Conclusion: Antibiotic disks from three manufacturers can successfully be used on both Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar plates. PMID:28149489

  12. Biofilm production and antifungal susceptibility of co-cultured Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis isolated from canine seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bumroongthai, K; Chetanachan, P; Niyomtham, W; Yurayart, C; Prapasarakul, N

    2016-07-01

    The yeasts Malassezia (M.) pachydermatis and Candida (C.) parapsilosis are often co-isolated in case of canine seborrhea dermatitis (SD) and also are emerging as opportunistic pathogens of immunocompromised human beings. Increased information about how their relationship results in biofilm production and an antifungal response would be useful to inform treatment and control. This study was designed to investigate biofilm production derived from co-culture of M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis from dog skin and to determine their in vitro antifungal susceptibility. We demonstrated that regardless of yeast strain or origin all single and dual cultures produced biofilms within 24 hours, and the greatest amount was present after 72 hours. Biofilm production from mixed cultures was greater than for single strains (P < .05). All sessile forms of the single and dual cultures were resistant to the tested antifungals itraconazole and ketoconazole, whereas planktonic forms were susceptible. The study suggests that dual cultures produce stronger biofilms that are likely to enhance persistence in skin lesions in dogs and result in greater resistance to antifungal treatment.

  13. Species diversity, antifungal susceptibility and phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Exophiala spp. infecting patients in different medical centres in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Wendy C; Gonçalves, Sarah S; Santos, Daniel W C L; Padovan, Ana Carolina B; Bizerra, Fernando C; Melo, Analy S A

    2017-05-01

    The Exophiala genus is responsible for many superficial and invasive infections resulting from black fungi. Identification of Exophiala at the species level is based on morphological observations complemented by molecular tests. The aim of this study was to identify 23 clinical isolates of Exophiala spp. and evaluate the antifungal susceptibility to seven different agents. Molecular identification was based on an analysis of ITS region of rDNA using genomic databases. The micromorphology was evaluated by microculture and scanning electron microscopy. The susceptibility tests were performed using the antifungal agents 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), amphotericin B (AMB), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC), posaconazole (PSC), caspofungin (CFG) and terbinafine (TRB). The ITS analysis identified 100% of the following isolates as: E. dermatitidis (8), E. xenobiotica (6), E. bergeri (4), E. oligosperma (3), E. spinifera (1) and E. mesophila (1). The antifungal susceptibility tests showed that the triazoles compounds were in vitro the most active agents against Exophiala. ITS sequencing enabled the accurate identification of the 23 tested isolates. The triazoles, particularly itraconazole and posaconazole, exhibited MIC values lower than AMB, CAS and 5-FC. Although the guidelines do not indicate AMB for treatment against Exophiala spp., this study showed activity for all of the tested species, except E. mesophila.

  14. Evaluation of disk diffusion and Etest compared to broth microdilution for antifungal susceptibility testing of posaconazole against clinical isolates of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Messer, Shawn A; Diekema, Daniel J; Hollis, Richard J; Boyken, Linda B; Tendolkar, Shailesh; Kroeger, Jennifer; Pfaller, Michael A

    2007-04-01

    We performed Etest, disk diffusion, and broth microdilution susceptibility testing of posaconazole against 146 clinical isolates of filamentous fungi. By using provisional breakpoints for comparison purposes only, categorical agreement between the results of the agar-based methods and those of broth microdilution were 96 to 98%, with no very major errors. These agar-based methods hold promise as simple and reliable methods for determining the posaconazole susceptibilities of filamentous fungi.

  15. Resistance Surveillance in Candida albicans: A Five-Year Antifungal Susceptibility Evaluation in a Brazilian University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Peron, Isabela Haddad; Reichert-Lima, Franqueline; Busso-Lopes, Ariane Fidelis; Nagasako, Cristiane Kibune; Lyra, Luzia; Moretti, Maria Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans caused 44% of the overall candidemia episodes from 2006 to 2010 in our university tertiary care hospital. As different antifungal agents are used in therapy and also immunocompromised patients receive fluconazole prophylaxis in our institution, this study aimed to perform an antifungal susceptibility surveillance with the C.albicans bloodstream isolates and to characterize the fluconazole resistance in 2 non-blood C.albicans isolates by sequencing ERG11 gene. The study included 147 C. albicans bloodstream samples and 2 fluconazole resistant isolates: one from oral cavity (LIF 12560 fluconazole MIC: 8μg/mL) and one from esophageal cavity (LIF-E10 fluconazole MIC: 64μg/mL) of two different patients previously treated with oral fluconazole. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B (AMB), 5-flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC), caspofungin (CASP) was performed by broth microdilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute documents (M27-A3 and M27-S4, CLSI). All blood isolates were classified as susceptible according to CLSI guidelines for all evaluated antifungal agents (MIC range: 0,125–1.00 μg/mL for AMB, ≤0.125–1.00 μg/mL for 5FC, ≤0.125–0.5 μg/mL for FLC, ≤0.015–0.125 μg/mL for ITC, ≤0.015–0.06 μg/mL for VRC and ≤0.015–0.125 μg/mL for CASP). In this study, we also amplified and sequenced the ERG11 gene of LIF 12560 and LIF-E10 C.albicans isolates. Six mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions were found (E116D, T128K, E266D, A298V, G448V and G464S) and these mutations were previously described as associated with fluconazole resistance. Despite the large consumption of antifungals in our institution, resistant blood isolates were not found over the trial period. Further studies should be conducted, but it may be that the very prolonged direct contact with the oral antifungal agent administered to the patient from which

  16. Geographic and temporal trends in isolation and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis: a global assessment from the ARTEMIS DISK Antifungal Surveillance Program, 2001 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Gibbs, D L; Newell, V A; Ng, K P; Colombo, A; Finquelievich, J; Barnes, R; Wadula, J

    2008-03-01

    We examined data from the ARTEMIS DISK Antifungal Surveillance Program to describe geographic and temporal trends in the isolation of Candida parapsilosis from clinical specimens and the in vitro susceptibilities of 9,371 isolates to fluconazole and voriconazole. We also report the in vitro susceptibility of bloodstream infection (BSI) isolates of C. parapsilosis to the echinocandins, anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin. C. parapsilosis represented 6.6% of the 141,383 isolates of Candida collected from 2001 to 2005 and was most common among isolates from North America (14.3%) and Latin America (9.9%). High levels of susceptibility to both fluconazole (90.8 to 95.8%) and voriconazole (95.3 to 98.1%) were observed in all geographic regions with the exception of the Africa and Middle East region (79.3 and 85.8% susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively). C. parapsilosis was most often isolated from blood and skin and/or soft tissue specimens and from patients hospitalized in the medical, surgical, intensive care unit (ICU) and dermatology services. Notably, isolates from the surgical ICU were the least susceptible to fluconazole (86.3%). There was no evidence of increasing azole resistance over time among C. parapsilosis isolates tested from 2001 to 2005. Of BSI isolates tested against the three echinocandins, 92, 99, and 100% were inhibited by concentrations of < or = 2 microg/ml of anidulafungin (621 isolates tested), caspofungin (1,447 isolates tested), and micafungin (539 isolates tested), respectively. C. parapsilosis is a ubiquitous pathogen that remains susceptible to the azoles and echinocandins; however, both the frequency of isolation and the resistance of C. parapsilosis to fluconazole and voriconazole may vary by geographic region and clinical service.

  17. Standardized methods and quality control limits for agar and broth microdilution susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    Waites, Ken B; Duffy, Lynn B; Bébéar, Cécile M; Matlow, Anne; Talkington, Deborah F; Kenny, George E; Totten, Patricia A; Bade, Donald J; Zheng, Xiaotian; Davidson, Maureen K; Shortridge, Virginia D; Watts, Jeffrey L; Brown, Steven D

    2012-11-01

    An international multilaboratory collaborative study was conducted to develop standard media and consensus methods for the performance and quality control of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum using broth microdilution and agar dilution techniques. A reference strain from the American Type Culture Collection was designated for each species, which was to be used for quality control purposes. Repeat testing of replicate samples of each reference strain by participating laboratories utilizing both methods and different lots of media enabled a 3- to 4-dilution MIC range to be established for drugs in several different classes, including tetracyclines, macrolides, ketolides, lincosamides, and fluoroquinolones. This represents the first multilaboratory collaboration to standardize susceptibility testing methods and to designate quality control parameters to ensure accurate and reliable assay results for mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas that infect humans.

  18. Antifungal activity of essential oils from Iranian plants against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sharifzadeh, Aghil; Shokri, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assay the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants against both fluconazole (FLU)-resistant and FLU-susceptible C. albicans strains isolated from HIV positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). Materials and Methods: The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation method from Myrtus communis (My. communis), Zingiber officinale roscoe (Z. officinale roscoe), Matricaria chamomilla (Ma. chamomilla), Trachyspermum ammi (T. ammi) and Origanum vulgare (O. vulgare). The susceptibility test was based on the M27-A2 methodology. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were obtained by gas chromatography- mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Results: In GC-MS analysis, thymol (63.40%), linalool (42%), α-pinene (27.87%), α-pinene (22.10%), and zingiberene (31.79%) were found to be the major components of T. ammi, O. vulgare, My. communis, Ma. chamomilla and Z. officinale roscoe, respectively. The results showed that essential oils have different levels of antifungal activity. O. vulgare and T. ammi essential oils were found to be the most efficient (P<0.05). The main finding was that the susceptibilities of FLU-resistant C. albicans to essential oils were higher than those of the FLU-susceptible yeasts. Conclusion: Results of this study indicated that the oils from medicinal plants could be used as potential anti FLU-resistant C. albicans agents. PMID:27222835

  19. Oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus saprophyticus using disk diffusion, agar dilution, broth microdilution, and the Vitek GPS-105 card.

    PubMed

    Ramotar, K; Woods, W; Toye, B

    2001-08-01

    Eighty-three mecA negative isolates of S. saprophyticus had oxacillin zone diameters agar dilution, broth microdilution, or the Vitek GPS-105 card. Greater than 90% of these isolates would be considered resistant using NCCLS M7-A5, M100-S10 criteria. These results suggest that the current NCCLS MIC and zone diameter breakpoints for oxacillin resistance in coagulase-negative Staphylococci are not appropriate for S. saprophyticus as they do not correlate with the presence of the mecA gene.

  20. Fungal peritonitis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) in Brazil: molecular identification, biofilm production and antifungal susceptibility of the agents.

    PubMed

    Giacobino, Juliana; Montelli, Augusto Cezar; Barretti, Pasqual; Bruder-Nascimento, Ariane; Caramori, Jacqueline Teixeira; Barbosa, Luciano; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents data on fungal peritonitis (FP) in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) at the University Hospital of Botucatu Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. In a total of 422 patients, 30 developed FP, from which the medical records and the fungal isolates of 23 patient cases were studied. All patients presented abdominal pain, cloudy peritoneal effluent, needed hospitalization, had the catheter removed and were treated with fluconazole or fluconazole plus 5-flucitosine; six of them died due to FP. Concerning the agents, it was observed that Candida parapsilosis was the leading species (9/23), followed by Candida albicans (5/23), Candida orthopsilosis (4/23), Candida tropicalis (3/23), Candida guilliermondii (1/23), and Kodamaea ohmeri (1/23). All the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, voriconazole and caspofungin whereas C. albicans isolates were susceptible to all antifungals tested. Resistance to fluconazole was observed in three isolates of C. orthopsilosis, and dose-dependent susceptibility to this antifungal was observed in two isolates of C. parapsilosis and in the K. ohmeri isolate. Biofilm production estimates were high or moderate in most isolates, especially in C. albicans species, and low in C. parapsilosis species, with a marked variation among the isolates. This Brazilian study reinforces that FP in PD is caused by a diverse group of yeasts, most prevalently C. parapsilosis sensu stricto species. In addition, they present significant variation in susceptibility to antifungals and biofilm production, thus contributing to the complexity and severity of the clinical features.

  1. Nectar yeasts of the Metschnikowia clade are highly susceptible to azole antifungals widely used in medicine and agriculture.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Vega, Clara; Pozo, María I; Lenaerts, Marijke; Van Assche, Ado; Herrera, Carlos M; Jacquemyn, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2016-02-01

    The widespread use of azole antifungals in medicine and agriculture and the resulting long-persistent residues could potentially affect beneficial fungi. However, there is very little information on the tolerance of non-target environmental fungi to azoles. In this study, we assessed the susceptibility of diverse plant- and insect-associated yeasts from the Metschnikowia clade, including several ecologically important species, to widely used medical and agricultural azoles (epoxiconazole, imazalil, ketoconazole and voriconazole). A total of 120 strains from six species were tested. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by the EUCAST broth microdilution procedure after some necessary modifications were made. The majority of species tested were highly susceptible to epoxiconazole, ketoconazole and voriconazole (>95% of strains showed MICs ≤ 0.125 mg l(-1)). Most strains were also very susceptible to imazalil, although MIC values were generally higher than for the other azoles. Furthermore, certain Metschnikowia reukaufii strains displayed a 'trailing' phenotype (i.e. showed reduced but persistent growth at antifungal concentrations above the MIC), but this characteristic was dependent on test conditions. It was concluded that exposure to azoles may pose a risk for ecologically relevant yeasts from the Metschnikowia clade, and thus could potentially impinge on the tripartite interaction linking these fungi with plants and their insect pollinators.

  2. Antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans to four antifungal drugs determined by two techniques.

    PubMed

    Moraes, E M P; Prímola, N S; Hamdan, Júnia Soares

    2003-06-01

    A total of 64 Cryptococcus neoformans strains, including clinical and environmental Brazilian isolates var. neoformans and var. gattii, were tested for susceptibility to amphotericin B, 5-flucytosine, fluconazole and itraconazole. The tests were performed according to the recommendations of National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standards and the method of macrodilution in liquid medium of Shadomy et al. [Manual de Microbiologia Clínica, 4th ed. Buenos Aires: Editorial Medica Panamericana, 1987: 1229-38]. For most drugs there was a significant difference between the readings taken at 24 and 48 h with both methods. When the minimum inhibitory concentrations obtained by the two techniques were compared, significant differences were observed for amphotericin B and fluconazole. Overall, differences in drug susceptibility with respect to the origin of the isolates or the variety of the fungus were not observed. As an exception, the gattii variety exhibited a high resistance rate to amphotericin B when the technique of Shadomy et al. was applied, a fact possibly related to the greater difficulty for treatment of the disease caused by this fungal variety.

  3. Antifungal susceptibility, enzymatic activity, PCR-fingerprinting and ITS sequencing of environmental Cryptococcus laurentii isolates from Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Andrade-Silva, Leonardo; Mora, Delio Jose; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Pedrosa, André Luiz; da Silva, Paulo Roberto; Andrade, Anderson Assunção; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2012-07-01

    Cryptococcus laurentii has been classically considered a saprophytic species, although several cases of human infection have been already reported. This study aimed to evaluate the phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysins activity, the antifungal susceptibility profile, the genetic variability by M13 and (GACA)(4) fingerprinting and the internal transcribe spacer (ITS) sequencing of 38 C. laurentii isolates recovered from captive bird droppings and surrounding hospital areas. All of them exhibited phospholipase activity, while the hemolytic activity was evidenced in 34 (89.4%) isolates. None of them exhibited proteinase activity. Twenty-seven isolates (71.1%) presented susceptibility dose dependent to fluconazole. Most isolates (94.7%) were susceptible to voriconazole, while one (2.65%) was resistant to this drug. Twenty-one (55.3%) isolates showed reduced susceptibility to itraconazole while nine (23.7%) were resistant. Three (7.9%) and five (13.1%) isolates exhibited resistance to ketoconazole and amphotericin B, respectively. Most C. laurentii fingerprinting obtained with M13 and (GACA)(4) showed high heterogeneity. By using the two primers, seven (18.4%) isolates grouped as A (CL2, CL7, and CL8), B (CL35, CL38) and C (CL29, CL30) with 100% similarity. Different from most variable surrounding hospital isolates, all but one of the pet shops strains clustered with the two primers, although they had been recovered from different neighborhoods. All isolates were identified as C. laurentii phylogenetic group I by ITS sequencing. Thus, the presence of virulence factors, a decreased antifungal susceptibility and a heterogeneous molecular pattern of the C. laurentii isolates here described suggests this species can be a potential pathogen in the context of the immunocompromised population.

  4. Epidemiology and Antifungal Susceptibility of Bloodstream Fungal Isolates in Pediatric Patients: a Spanish Multicenter Prospective Survey ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pemán, Javier; Cantón, Emilia; Linares-Sicilia, María José; Roselló, Eva María; Borrell, Nuria; Ruiz-Pérez-de-Pipaon, María Teresa; Guinea, Jesús; García, Julio; Porras, Aurelio; García-Tapia, Ana María; Pérez-del-Molino, Luisa; Suárez, Anabel; Alcoba, Julia; García-García, Inmaculada

    2011-01-01

    Data on fungemia epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of isolates from children are scarce, leading frequently to pediatric empirical treatment based on available adult data. The present study was designed to update the epidemiological, mycological, and in vitro susceptibility data on fungal isolates from children with fungemia in Spain. All fungemia episodes were identified prospectively by blood culture over 13 months at 30 hospitals. Tests of susceptibility to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin were performed at participant institutions by a microdilution colorimetric method. New species-specific clinical breakpoints for fluconazole, voriconazole, and echinocandins were also applied. A total of 203 episodes of fungemia in 200 children were identified. A higher proportion of fungal isolates was from general wards than intensive care units (ICU). Candida parapsilosis (46.8%), Candida albicans (36.5%), Candida tropicalis (5.9%), Candida glabrata (3.9%), and Candida guilliermondii (2.5%) were the leading species. C. parapsilosis was the predominant species except in neonates. C. albicans was the most frequent in neonatal ICU settings (51.9%). Intravascular catheter (79.3%), surgery (35%), prematurity (30%), and neutropenia (11%) were the most frequent predisposing factors. Most Candida isolates (95.1%) were susceptible to all antifungals. When the new species-specific clinical breakpoints were applied, all C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible to echinocandins except one, which was micafungin resistant. This is the largest published series of fungemia episodes in the pediatric setting. C. parapsilosis is the most prevalent species in Spain, followed by C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Resistance to azole and echinocandin agents is extremely rare among Candida species. The fluconazole resistance rate in Spain has decreased in the last 10 years. PMID:22012014

  5. Antifungal Efficacy during Candida krusei Infection in Non-Conventional Models Correlates with the Yeast In Vitro Susceptibility Profile

    PubMed Central

    Scorzoni, Liliana; de Lucas, Maria Pilar; Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Lozano, Encarnación; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Mendes-Giannini, Maria Jose; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of opportunistic fungal infections has increased in recent decades due to the growing proportion of immunocompromised patients in our society. Candida krusei has been described as a causative agent of disseminated fungal infections in susceptible patients. Although its prevalence remains low among yeast infections (2–5%), its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole makes this yeast important from epidemiologic aspects. Non mammalian organisms are feasible models to study fungal virulence and drug efficacy. In this work we have used the lepidopteran Galleria mellonella and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as models to assess antifungal efficacy during infection by C. krusei. This yeast killed G. mellonella at 25, 30 and 37°C and reduced haemocytic density. Infected larvae melanized in a dose-dependent manner. Fluconazole did not protect against C. krusei infection, in contrast to amphotericin B, voriconazole or caspofungin. However, the doses of these antifungals required to obtain larvae protection were always higher during C. krusei infection than during C. albicans infection. Similar results were found in the model host C. elegans. Our work demonstrates that non mammalian models are useful tools to investigate in vivo antifungal efficacy and virulence of C. krusei. PMID:23555877

  6. In vitro susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates: Comparison of disk diffusion, Etest®, agar dilution, and broth microdilution methods.

    PubMed

    Fehlberg, Lorena Cristina Corrêa; Nicoletti, Adriana Gianinni; Ramos, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; de Matos, Adriana Pereira; Girardello, Raquel; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Broth microdilution, agar dilution, Etest® and disk diffusion techniques were compared to evaluate the susceptibility profile of 82 Bcc clinical isolates against six antimicrobials as recommended by CLSI. Broth microdilution was considered the "gold standard" method. The regression analysis was applied to determine the essential (EA) and categorical (CA) agreement rates. STX (MIC50, 1 mg/L) was the most potent antimicrobial tested against Bcc isolates. The worst in vitro activity was observed for chloramphenicol (MIC50, 16 mg/L) and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (MIC50, >256 mg/L). The EA among broth microdilution and agar dilution results was good for the majority of antimicrobial tested. When comparing broth microdilution and Etest®, ceftazidime, SXT and chloramphenicol exhibited EA rates below 90%. SXT showed an excellent CA (100%) when dilution methodologies were compared. However, a low CA rate was found for this agent between dilution and disk diffusion methodologies resulting in unacceptable very major and minor error rates.

  7. Comparative study of agar diffusion test and the NCCLS macrobroth method for in vitro susceptibility testing of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Soni, L M; Burattini, M N; Pignatari, A C; Gompertz, O F; Colombo, A L

    1999-01-01

    We performed a prospective double-blind study to evaluate the correlation between inhibition zones obtained by a disk-diffusion test, using Neo-sensitabs of fluconazole (Rosco Diagnostica), and the MICs generated by the NCCLS macrobroth dilution assay. Eighty clinical isolates, representing 5 of the clinically relevant species of Candida, were tested simultaneously by both methods. A clear inverse correlation was found between the results obtained by both tests (r = -0.69). In addition, there was high degree of agreement between methods in the identification of susceptible isolates. However, the resistance definition by disk-diffusion test had a positive predictive value of only 17%. Our data support the hypothesis that Rosco Fluconazole Neo-sensitabs have potential as a screening test for the identification of Candida isolates susceptible to fluconazole. Resistant isolates should be further investigated by standardized broth procedures.

  8. Antifungal susceptibility and molecular typing of 115 Candida albicans isolates obtained from vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in 3 Shanghai maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chunmei; Zhang, Hongju; Tang, Zhenhua; Chen, Huifen; Gao, Jing; Yue, Chaoyan

    2016-05-01

    In our multicenter study, we studied the distribution of Candida species in vulvovaginal candidiasis patients and investigated antifungal susceptibility profile and genotype of Candida albicans in vaginal swab. A total of 115 Candida albicans strains were detected in 135 clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration determinations showed that 83% and 81% of the 115 Candida albicans strains were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) was applied to identify clonally related isolates from different patients at the local level. All tested strains were classified into genotype A (77.4%), genotype B (18.3%), and genotype C (4.3%). Genotype A was further classified into five subtypes and genotype B into two subtypes.Candida albicans was the dominant pathogen of vulvovaginal candidiasis, the majority belonging to genotype A in this study. Exposure to azoles is a risk factor for the emergence of azole resistance among Candida albicans isolated from VVC patients.

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Flavobacterium psychrophilum from Chilean Salmon Farms and Their Epidemiological Cut-Off Values Using Agar Dilution and Disk Diffusion Methods

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Claudio D.; Smith, Peter; Rojas, Rodrigo; Contreras-Lynch, Sergio; Vega, J. M. Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the most important bacterial pathogen for freshwater farmed salmonids in Chile. The aims of this study were to determine the susceptibility to antimicrobials used in fish farming of Chilean isolates and to calculate their epidemiological cut-off (COWT) values. A number of 125 Chilean isolates of F. psychrophilum were isolated from reared salmonids presenting clinical symptoms indicative of flavobacteriosis and their identities were confirmed by 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction. Susceptibility to antibacterials was tested on diluted Mueller-Hinton by using an agar dilution MIC method and a disk diffusion method. The COWT values calculated by Normalized Resistance Interpretation (NRI) analysis allow isolates to be categorized either as wild-type fully susceptible (WT) or as manifesting reduced susceptibility (NWT). When MIC data was used, NRI analysis calculated a COWT of ≤0.125, ≤2, and ≤0.5 μg mL-1 for amoxicillin, florfenicol, and oxytetracycline, respectively. For the quinolones, the COWT were ≤1, ≤0.5, and ≤0.125 μg mL-1 for oxolinic acid, flumequine, and enrofloxacin, respectively. The disk diffusion data sets obtained in this work were extremely diverse and were spread over a wide range. For the quinolones there was a close agreement between the frequencies of NWT isolates calculated using MIC and disk data. For oxolinic acid, flumequine, and enrofloxacin the frequencies were 45, 39, and 38% using MIC data, and 42, 41, and 44%, when disk data were used. There was less agreement with the other antimicrobials, because NWT frequencies obtained using MIC and disk data, respectively, were 24 and 10% for amoxicillin, 8 and 2% for florfenicol, and 70 and 64% for oxytetracycline. Considering that the MIC data was more precise than the disk diffusion data, MIC determination would be the preferred method for susceptibility testing for this species and the NWT frequencies derived from the MIC data sets should be considered

  10. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Flavobacterium psychrophilum from Chilean Salmon Farms and Their Epidemiological Cut-Off Values Using Agar Dilution and Disk Diffusion Methods.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Claudio D; Smith, Peter; Rojas, Rodrigo; Contreras-Lynch, Sergio; Vega, J M Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the most important bacterial pathogen for freshwater farmed salmonids in Chile. The aims of this study were to determine the susceptibility to antimicrobials used in fish farming of Chilean isolates and to calculate their epidemiological cut-off (COWT) values. A number of 125 Chilean isolates of F. psychrophilum were isolated from reared salmonids presenting clinical symptoms indicative of flavobacteriosis and their identities were confirmed by 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction. Susceptibility to antibacterials was tested on diluted Mueller-Hinton by using an agar dilution MIC method and a disk diffusion method. The COWT values calculated by Normalized Resistance Interpretation (NRI) analysis allow isolates to be categorized either as wild-type fully susceptible (WT) or as manifesting reduced susceptibility (NWT). When MIC data was used, NRI analysis calculated a COWT of ≤0.125, ≤2, and ≤0.5 μg mL(-1) for amoxicillin, florfenicol, and oxytetracycline, respectively. For the quinolones, the COWT were ≤1, ≤0.5, and ≤0.125 μg mL(-1) for oxolinic acid, flumequine, and enrofloxacin, respectively. The disk diffusion data sets obtained in this work were extremely diverse and were spread over a wide range. For the quinolones there was a close agreement between the frequencies of NWT isolates calculated using MIC and disk data. For oxolinic acid, flumequine, and enrofloxacin the frequencies were 45, 39, and 38% using MIC data, and 42, 41, and 44%, when disk data were used. There was less agreement with the other antimicrobials, because NWT frequencies obtained using MIC and disk data, respectively, were 24 and 10% for amoxicillin, 8 and 2% for florfenicol, and 70 and 64% for oxytetracycline. Considering that the MIC data was more precise than the disk diffusion data, MIC determination would be the preferred method for susceptibility testing for this species and the NWT frequencies derived from the MIC data sets should be

  11. Candida parapsilosis (sensu lato) isolated from hospitals located in the Southeast of Brazil: Species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and virulence attributes.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, Mariangela; Souza, Lucieri O P; Gandra, Rafael M; Galdino, Anna Clara M; Baptista, Andréa R S; Nunes, Ana Paula F; Ribeiro, Mariceli A; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2015-12-01

    Candida parapsilosis (sensu lato), which represents a fungal complex composed of three genetically related species - Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis, has emerged as an important yeast causing fungemia worldwide. The goal of the present work was to assess the prevalence, antifungal susceptibility and production of virulence traits in 53 clinical isolates previously identified as C. parapsilosis (sensu lato) obtained from hospitals located in the Southeast of Brazil. Species forming this fungal complex are physiologically/morphologically indistinguishable; however, polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism of FKS1 gene has solved the identification inaccuracy, revealing that 43 (81.1%) isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 10 (18.9%) as C. orthopsilosis. No C. metapsilosis was found. The geographic distribution of these Candida species was uniform among the studied Brazilian States (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo). All C. orthopsilosis and almost all C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (95.3%) isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin. Nevertheless, one C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolate was resistant to fluconazole and another one was resistant to caspofungin. C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates exhibited higher MIC mean values to amphotericin B, fluconazole and caspofungin than those of C. orthopsilosis, while C. orthopsilosis isolates displayed higher MIC mean to itraconazole compared to C. parapsilosis sensu stricto. Identical MIC mean values to voriconazole were measured for these Candida species. All the isolates of both species were able to form biofilm on polystyrene surface. Impressively, biofilm-growing cells of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. orthopsilosis exhibited a considerable resistance to all antifungal agents tested. Pseudohyphae were observed in 67.4% and 80

  12. Effect of pH on In Vitro Susceptibility of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans to 11 Antifungal Agents and Implications for Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Danby, Claire S.; Boikov, Dina; Rautemaa-Richardson, Rina

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) due to Candida glabrata is challenging, with limited therapeutic options. Unexplained disappointing clinical efficacy has been reported with systemic and topical azole antifungal agents in spite of in vitro susceptibility. Given that the vaginal pH of patients with VVC is unchanged at 4 to 4.5, we studied the effect of pH on the in vitro activity of 11 antifungal agents against 40 C. glabrata isolates and compared activity against 15 fluconazole-sensitive and 10 reduced-fluconazole-susceptibility C. albicans strains. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ciclopirox olamine, amphotericin B, and caspofungin was determined using the CLSI method for yeast susceptibility testing. Test media were buffered to pHs of 7, 6, 5, and 4. Under conditions of reduced pH, C. glabrata isolates remained susceptible to caspofungin and flucytosine; however, there was a dramatic increase in the MIC90 for amphotericin B and every azole drug tested. Although susceptible to other azole drugs tested at pH 7, C. albicans strains with reduced fluconazole susceptibility also demonstrated reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B and all azoles at pH 4. In contrast, fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates remained susceptible at low pH to azoles, in keeping with clinical observations. In selecting agents for treatment of recurrent C. glabrata vaginitis, clinicians should recognize the limitations of in vitro susceptibility testing utilizing pH 7.0. PMID:22232293

  13. Epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility, and ERG11 mutations of Candida species isolated from pregnant Chinese Han women.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Su, M Q; Ma, Y Y; Xin, Y J; Han, R B; Zhang, R; Wen, J; Hao, X K

    2016-04-28

    The widespread use of antifungal agents has led to increasing azole resistance in Candida species. A major azole-resistance mechanism involves point mutations in the ERG11 gene, which encodes cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14a-demethylase. In this study, vaginal swabs were obtained from 657 pregnant Chinese Han women and cultured appropriately. The open reading frame of the obtained fungal species were amplified by PCR and sequenced; additionally, the ERG11 gene of the isolated Candida species was amplified and sequenced, and the antifungal susceptibility of the isolated species was determined. The vaginal swabs of 124 women produced fungal cultures; five species of Candida were isolated from the patients, among which Candida albicans was predominant. Twelve C. albicans isolates (13.8%) were resistant to fluconazole and 2 (2.2%) were resistant to itraconazole. Seventeen mutations, including 9 silent and 8 missense mutations, were identified in the ERG11 gene of 31 C. albicans isolates. Our findings suggest that infection caused by C. albicans and non-C. albicansis common in Chinese Han women of reproductive age. Moreover, the relationship between Candida infection and certain epidemiological factors emphasizes the need to educate women about the precise diagnosis and punctual treatment of vaginitis.

  14. Multilocus Phylogeny and Antifungal Susceptibility of Aspergillus Section Circumdati from Clinical Samples and Description of A. pseudosclerotiorum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, J P Z; Sutton, D A; Gené, J; García, D; Wiederhold, N; Peterson, S W; Guarro, J

    2017-03-01

    A multilocus phylogenetic study was carried out to assess species identity of a set of 34 clinical isolates from Aspergillus section Circumdati from the United States and to determine their in vitro antifungal susceptibility against eight antifungal drugs. The genetic markers used were the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, and fragments of the beta-tubulin (BenA), calmodulin (CaM), and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) genes. The drugs tested were amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, and terbinafine. The most common species sampled was A. westerdijkiae (29.4%), followed by a novel species, which was described here as A. pseudosclerotiorum (23.5%). Other species identified were A. sclerotiorum (17.6%), A. ochraceus (8.8%), A. subramanianii (8.8%), and A. insulicola and A. ochraceopetaliformis, with two isolates (5.9%) of each. The drugs that showed the most potent activity were caspofungin, micafungin, and terbinafine, while amphotericin B showed the least activity.

  15. A comparison of serial plate agar dilution, Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion, and the Vitek AutoMicrobic system for the determination of susceptibilities of Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ten antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Fekete, T; Tumah, H; Woodwell, J; Truant, A; Satishchandran, V; Axelrod, P; Kreter, B

    1994-04-01

    The use of rapid, automated technologies for assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility and determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations has been evolving for over a decade. We compared the Vitek AutoMicrobic system and Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards methods of serial plate agar dilution for qualitative and quantitative susceptibilities of 301 hospital isolates of Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antibiotics tested were aztreonam, cefoperazone, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, piperacillin, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, and tobramycin. Agar dilution and Bauer-Kirby results were more strongly correlated for all three genera than were the results for agar dilution and Vitek. If agar dilution is presumed to be the "gold standard," Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion had only half the number of false susceptibles as did the Vitek. Thus, the Vitek AutoMicrobic system seems to be somewhat less reliable for both qualitative and quantitative measurement of susceptibility and resistance than is Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion.

  16. Antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates in Jabalpur, a city of Madhya Pradesh in Central India.

    PubMed

    Gutch, Ruchi Sethi; Nawange, Shesh Rao; Singh, Shankar Mohan; Yadu, Ruchika; Tiwari, Aditi; Gumasta, Richa; Kavishwar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present antifungal susceptibility data of clinical and environmental isolates of Central Indian Cryptococcus neoformans (Serotype A, n = 8 and n = 50 respectively) and Cryptococcus gattii (Serotype B, n = 01 and n = 04 respectively). Susceptibilities to fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole were determined by using NCCLS broth micro-dilution methodology. The total number of resistant strains for fluconazole in case of C. neoformans and C. gattii showed a significant difference by using chi-square test (p < 0.05*), while considering fisher's exact p value was nonsignificant (p > 0.05). However, the total number of resistant strains for itraconazole and ketoconazole was not found statistically significant. A comparison of geometric means of clinical and environmental strains of C. gattii and C. neoformans was not found statistically significant using student 't' test (p value > 0.05 NS). Though less, the antifungal data obtained in this study suggests that primary resistance among environmental and clinical isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii against tested antifungal was present and C. gattii comparatively was less susceptible than C. neoformans var. grubii isolates to fluconazole than to itraconazole and ketoconazole. A continuous surveillance of antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii is desirable to monitor the emergence of any resistant strains for better management of cryptococcosis patients.

  17. Oral Candidiasis among Cancer Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Chennai, South India: An Evaluation of Clinicomycological Association and Antifungal Susceptibility Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Katragadda, Radhika; Thyagarajan, Ravinder; Vajravelu, Leela; Manikesi, Suganthi; Kaliappan, Shanmugam

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is one of the common manifestations seen in cancer patients on cytotoxic therapy and invasion into deeper tissues can occur if not treated promptly. Emergence of antifungal drug resistance is of serious concern owing to the associated morbidity and mortality. The present study aims at evaluation of clinicomycological association and antifungal drug susceptibility among the 180 recruited patients with cancer on chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy with signs or symptoms suggestive of oral candidiasis. Speciation and antifungal susceptibility was done by Microbroth dilution method for fluconazole, Itraconazole, and Amphotericin B as per standard microbiological techniques. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant). Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated (94) (58%) followed by Candida tropicalis (34) (20.9%). Fluconazole and Itraconazole showed an overall resistance rate of 14% and 14.8%, respectively. All the isolates were susceptible to Amphotericin B. There was a significant association between the presence of dry mouth and isolation of Candida (p < 0.001). Such clinicomicrobiological associations can help in associating certain symptoms with the isolation of Candida. Species level identification with in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern is essential to choose the appropriate drug and to predict the outcome of therapy. PMID:27403171

  18. Antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates in Jabalpur, a city of Madhya Pradesh in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Gutch, Ruchi Sethi; Nawange, Shesh Rao; Singh, Shankar Mohan; Yadu, Ruchika; Tiwari, Aditi; Gumasta, Richa; Kavishwar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present antifungal susceptibility data of clinical and environmental isolates of Central Indian Cryptococcus neoformans (Serotype A, n = 8 and n = 50 respectively) and Cryptococcus gattii (Serotype B, n = 01 and n = 04 respectively). Susceptibilities to fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole were determined by using NCCLS broth micro-dilution methodology. The total number of resistant strains for fluconazole in case of C. neoformans and C. gattii showed a significant difference by using chi-square test (p < 0.05*), while considering fisher's exact p value was nonsignificant (p > 0.05). However, the total number of resistant strains for itraconazole and ketoconazole was not found statistically significant. A comparison of geometric means of clinical and environmental strains of C. gattii and C. neoformans was not found statistically significant using student ‘t’ test (p value > 0.05 NS). Though less, the antifungal data obtained in this study suggests that primary resistance among environmental and clinical isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii against tested antifungal was present and C. gattii comparatively was less susceptible than C. neoformans var. grubii isolates to fluconazole than to itraconazole and ketoconazole. A continuous surveillance of antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii is desirable to monitor the emergence of any resistant strains for better management of cryptococcosis patients. PMID:26691471

  19. Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis in a Multi-Center Chinese Collection of Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xin; Xiao, Meng; Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Wang, He; Yu, Shu-Ying; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Candida nivariensis and C. bracarensis are two emerging cryptic species within the C. glabrata complex. Thirteen of these isolates from 10 hospitals in China were studied for their species identification and antifungal susceptibilities. Phenotypic and molecular [rDNA ITS sequencing, D1/D2 sequencing and ITS sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE)] and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS identification methods were compared for their performance in species identification. Twelve of 13 (92.3%) isolates were identified as C. nivariensis and one as C. bracarensis using ITS sequencing as the reference method. Results obtained by D1/D2 sequencing and ITS SCGE were concordant with ITS sequencing results for all (100%) isolates. SCGE was able to subtype 12 C. nivariensis into four ITS SCGE length types. All isolates failed to be identified by the Vitek MALDI-TOF MS system (bioMérieux), whilst the Bruker MS system (Bruker Daltoniks) correctly identified all C. nivariensis isolates but using a lowered (≥1.700) cut-off score for species assignment; the C. bracarensis isolate was identified but with score <1.700. The Vitek 2 Compact system could not identify 11 C. nivariensis and one C. bracarensis isolate and misidentified the remaining C. nivarensis strain as “C. glabrata.” All isolates were susceptible-dose dependent to fluconazole [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range 0.5–4 μg/mL] and were classed as susceptible to echinocandins (MICs ≤ 0.06 μg/mL). All 13 isolates had low MICs for other azoles (MICs ≤ 0.5 μg/mL), amphotericin B (MICs ≤ 2 μg/mL) and 5-flucytosine (MICs ≤ 0.25 μg/mL). Our results reinforce the need for molecular differentiation of species of C. nivarensis and C. bracarensis. The performance of MALDI-TOF may be improved by adding mass spectral profiles (MSPs) into the current databases. The antifungal susceptibility profile of isolates should be monitored. PMID:28154553

  20. [Antifungal susceptibility profiles of Candida species to triazole: application of new CLSI species-specific clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values for characterization of antifungal resistance].

    PubMed

    Karabıçak, Nilgün; Alem, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing has newly introduced species-specific clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for fluconazole and voriconazole. When CBPs can not be determined, wild-type minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions are detected and epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) provide valuable means for the detection of emerging resistance. The aim of this study is to determine triazole resistance patterns in Candida species by the recently revised CLSI CBPs. A total of 140 Candida strains isolated from blood cultures of patients with invasive candidiasis hospitalized in various intensive care units in Turkey and sent to our reference laboratory between 2011-2012, were included in the study. The isolates were identified by conventional methods, and susceptibility testing was performed against fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole, by the 24-h CLSI broth microdilution (BMD) method. Azole resistance rates for all Candida species were determined using the new species-specific CLSI CBPs and ECVs criteria, when appropriate. The species distribution of the isolates were as follows; C.parapsilosis (n= 31 ), C.tropicalis (n= 26 ), C.glabrata (n= 21), C.albicans (n= 18), C.lusitaniae (n= 16), C.krusei (n= 16), C.kefyr (n= 9), C.guilliermondii (n= 2), and C.dubliniensis (n= 1). According to the newly determined CLSI CBPs for fluconazole and C.albicans, C.parapsilosis, C.tropicalis [susceptible (S), ≤ 2 µg/ml; dose-dependent susceptible (SDD), 4 µg/ml; resistant (R), ≥ 8 µg/ml], and C.glabrata (SDD, ≤ 32 µg/ml; R≥ 64 µg/ml) and for voriconazole and C.albicans, C.parapsilosis, C.tropicalis (S, ≤ 0.12 µg/ml; SDD, 0.25-0.5 µg/ml; R, ≥ 1 µg/ml), and C.krusei (S, ≤ 0.5 µg/ml; SDD, 1 µg/ml; R, ≥ 2 µg/ml), it was found that three of C.albicans, one of C.parapsilosis and one of C.glabrata isolates were resistant to fluconazole, while two of C.albicans and two of C

  1. Species Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Species Belonging to Aspergillus Section Nigri▿

    PubMed Central

    Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Mellado, Emilia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2009-01-01

    A phylogenetic analysis was performed for 34 Aspergillus strains belonging to section Nigri. Molecular methods allowed for the correct classification into three different clades (A. niger, A. tubingensis, and A. foetidus). Correlation with in vitro itraconazole susceptibility distinguished the following three profiles: susceptible, resistant, and showing a paradoxical effect. A number of different species whose morphological features resemble those of A. niger showed unusual MICs to itraconazole that have never been described for the Aspergillus genus. PMID:19635955

  2. Histoplasmosis in HIV-positive patients in Ceará, Brazil: clinical-laboratory aspects and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum isolates.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Fechine, Maria A B; Mesquita, Jacó R L; Cordeiro, Rossana A; Rocha, Marcos F G; Monteiro, André J; Lima, Rita A C; Caetano, Érica P; Pereira, Juliana F; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Camargo, Zoilo P; Sidrim, José J C

    2012-08-01

    This study contains a descriptive analysis of histoplasmosis in AIDS patients between 2006 and 2010 in the state of Ceará, Brazil. Additionally, the in vitro susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum isolates obtained during this period was assessed. We report 208 cases of patients with histoplasmosis and AIDS, describing the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic aspects. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility test was carried out by the microdilution method, according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, with H. capsulatum in the filamentous and yeast phases, against the antifungals amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin. In 38.9% of the cases, histoplasmosis was the first indicator of AIDS and in 85.8% of the patients the CD4 cell count was lower than 100 cells/mm(3). The lactate dehydrogenase levels were high in all the patients evaluated, with impairment of hepatic and renal function and evolution to death in 42.3% of the cases. The in vitro susceptibility profile demonstrated there was no antifungal resistance among the isolates evaluated. There was a significant increase in the number of histoplasmosis cases in HIV-positive patients during the period surveyed in the state of Ceará, northeastern Brazil, but no antifungal resistance among the recovered isolates of H. capsulatum.

  3. Candida glabrata species complex prevalence and antifungal susceptibility testing in a culture collection: First description of Candida nivariensis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Morales-López, Soraya Eugenia; Taverna, Constanza G; Bosco-Borgeat, María Eugenia; Maldonado, Ivana; Vivot, Walter; Szusz, Wanda; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Córdoba, Susana B

    2016-12-01

    The presence of the cryptic species belonging to the Candida glabrata complex has not been studied in Argentina. We analyzed a collection of 117 clinical isolates of C. glabrata complex belonging to a National Culture Collection of Instituto Nacional de Microbiología "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán" from Argentina (40 isolates from blood samples, 18 from other normally sterile sites, 20 from vagina, 14 from urine, 7 from oral cavity, 3 from catheter, 1 from a stool sample and 14 isolates whose clinical origin was not recorded). The aims of this work were to determine the prevalence of the cryptic species Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis and to evaluate the susceptibility profile of isolates against nine antifungal drugs. Identification was carried out by using classical phenotypic tests, CHROMagar™ Candida, PCR and MALDI-TOF. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin and anidulafungin were determined according to the EDef 7.3 (EUCAST) reference document. Of the 117 isolates, 114 were identified as C. glabrata and three as C. nivariensis by using PCR and MALDI-TOF. There were no major differences between C. nivariensis and C. glabrata susceptibility profiles. No resistant strains were found to echinocandins. We have found that the percentage of C. nivariensis in our culture collection was 2.56. This is the first description of C. nivariensis in Argentina, and data obtained could contribute to the knowledge of the epidemiology of this cryptic species.

  4. Identification, antifungal susceptibility and scanning electron microscopy of a keratinolytic strain of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa: a primary causative agent of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcel M L; dos Santos, Luana P B; Dornelas-Ribeiro, Marcos; Vermelho, Alane B; Rozental, Sonia

    2009-04-01

    Onychomycosis is a dermatological problem of high prevalence that mainly affects the hallux toenail. Onychomycosis caused by the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was identified using colony morphology, light microscopy, urease and carbohydrate metabolism in a 57-year-old immunocompetent patient from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy of nail fragments, processed by a noncoating method, led to the observation with fine detail of the structures of both nail and fungus involved in the infection. Yeasts were mainly found inside grooves in the nail. Budding yeasts presented a spiral pattern of growth and blastoconidia were found in the nail groove region. Keratinase assays and keratin enzymography revealed that this isolate was highly capable of degrading keratin. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed that the fungus was susceptible to low concentrations of amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine and resistant to high concentrations of fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and terbinafine. These findings showed data for the first time concerning the interaction of R. mucilaginosa in toenail infection and suggest that this emerging yeast should also be considered an opportunistic primary causative agent of onychomycosis.

  5. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans and its related species Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana isolated from vulvovaginal samples in a hospital of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Theill, Laura; Dudiuk, Catiana; Morano, Susana; Gamarra, Soledad; Nardin, María Elena; Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Candida africana taxonomical status is controversial. It was proposed as a separate species within the Candida albicans species complex; however, phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is an unusual variety of C. albicans. The prevalence of C. albicans-related species (Candida dubliniensis and C. africana) as vulvovaginal pathogens is not known in Argentina. Moreover, data on antifungal susceptibility of isolates causing vulvovaginal candidiasis is scarce. The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of C. dubliniensis and C. africana in vaginal samples and to evaluate the antifungal susceptibilities of vaginal C. albicans species complex strains. We used a molecular-based method coupled with a new pooled DNA extraction methodology to differentiate C. dubliniensis and C. africana in a collection of 287 strains originally identified as C. albicans isolated from an Argentinian hospital during 2013. Antifungal susceptibilities to fluconazole, clotrimazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B and terbinafine were evaluated by using the CLSI M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Of the 287 isolates, 4 C. dubliniensis and one C. africana strains (1.39% and 0.35% prevalence, respectively) were identified. This is the first description of C. africana in Argentina and its identification was confirmed by sequencing the ITS2 region and the hwp1 gene. C. dubliniensis and C. africana strains showed very low MIC values for all the tested antifungals. Fluconazole-reduced-susceptibility and azole cross-resistance were observed in 3.55% and 1.41% of the C. albicans isolates, respectively. These results demonstrate that antifungal resistance is still a rare phenomenon in this kind of isolates.

  6. In vitro susceptibilities of clinical and environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans to five antifungal drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Franzot, S P; Hamdan, J S

    1996-01-01

    A total of 53 Cryptococcus neoformans strains, including clinical and environmental Brazilian isolates, were tested for their susceptibilities to amphotericin B, 5-flucytosine, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole. The tests were performed according to the National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standards recommendations (document M27-P). In general, there was a remarkable homogeneity of results for all strains, and comparable MICs were found for environmental and clinical isolates. This paper represents the first contribution in which susceptibility data for Brazilian C. neoformans isolates are provided. PMID:8851624

  7. [Catheterization and fungal infection risk in the University Hospital of Tlemcen: epidemiology and susceptibility to antifungals].

    PubMed

    Seghir, A; Boucherit-Otmani, Z; Belkherroubi-Sari, L; Boucherit, K

    2014-12-01

    Fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and are frequently associated with the implantation of vascular catheters, especially in immune-compromised patients. Unfortunately, the therapeutic arsenal available for the treatment of these infections, caused generally by the yeasts of the genus Candida is still limited because of the toxicity and/or of the emergence of resistance against some antifungal agents. That is why we have undertaken this study, which is to determine the incidence and the degree of sensitivity of Candida spp., isolated from peripheral venous catheters at the University Hospital of Tlemcen (Algeria) to caspofungin and amphotericin B. The results show that the rate of colonization of vascular catheters was 19 % by yeasts of Candida spp., of which 60 % are Candida parapsilosis, 20 % Candida albicans, 14.3 % Candida glabrata and 5.7 % Candida famata. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for amphotericin B are between 0.5 and 2 μg/mL and for caspofungin, they are between 0.125 and 2 μg/mL.

  8. Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida Species: A Comparison of Vitek-2 System with Conventional and Molecular Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ravinder; Dhakad, Megh Singh; Goyal, Ritu; Haque, Absarul; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients; an accurate and early identification is a prerequisite need to be taken as an effective measure for the management of patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the conventional identification of Candida species with identification by Vitek-2 system and the antifungal susceptibility testing (AST) by broth microdilution method with Vitek-2 AST system. Materials and Methods: A total of 172 Candida isolates were subjected for identification by the conventional methods, Vitek-2 system, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. AST was carried out as per the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 document and by Vitek-2 system. Results: Candida albicans (82.51%) was the most common Candida species followed by Candida tropicalis (6.29%), Candida krusei (4.89%), Candida parapsilosis (3.49%), and Candida glabrata (2.79%). With Vitek-2 system, of the 172 isolates, 155 Candida isolates were correctly identified, 13 were misidentified, and four were with low discrimination. Whereas with conventional methods, 171 Candida isolates were correctly identified and only a single isolate of C. albicans was misidentified as C. tropicalis. The average measurement of agreement between the Vitek-2 system and conventional methods was >94%. Most of the isolates were susceptible to fluconazole (88.95%) and amphotericin B (97.67%). The measurement of agreement between the methods of AST was >94% for fluconazole and >99% for amphotericin B, which was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The study confirmed the importance and reliability of conventional and molecular methods, and the acceptable agreements suggest Vitek-2 system an alternative method for speciation and sensitivity testing of Candida species infections. PMID:27942193

  9. Molecular Characterization of Gβ-Like Protein CpcB Involved in Antifungal Drug Susceptibility and Virulence in A. fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhendong; Chai, Yanfei; Zhang, Caiyun; Feng, Ruoyun; Sang, Hong; Lu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an airborne human fungal pathogen that can survive in a wide range of environmental condition. G protein complex transduces external signals from a variety of stimuli outside a cell to its interior effectors in all eukaryotes. Gβ-like CpcB (cross pathway control B) belongs to a WD40 repeat protein family with the conserved G–H and W–D residues. Previous studies have demonstrated that Gβ-like proteins cooperate with related signal transduction proteins to function during many important developmental processes in A. fumigatus. However, the molecular characteristics of Gβ-like CpcB have not yet been identified. In this study, we demonstrated that the G–H residues in WD repeat 1, 2, 3, and the W–D residue in WD repeat 2 of CpcB are required not only to control normal hyphal growth and conidiation but also to affect antifungal drug susceptibility. The enhanced drug resistance might be due to reduced intracellular drug accumulation and altered ergosterol component. Moreover, we find that the first G–H residue of CpcB plays an important role in the virulence of A. fumigatus. To our knowledge, this is the first report for finding the importance of the conserved G–H and W–D residues for a Gβ-like protein in understanding of G protein functions. PMID:26903985

  10. Conidial germination in Scedosporium apiospermum, S. aurantiacum, S. minutisporum and Lomentospora prolificans: influence of growth conditions and antifungal susceptibility profiles

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Thaís Pereira; Aor, Ana Carolina; de Oliveira, Simone Santiago Carvalho; Branquinha, Marta Helena; dos Santos, André Luis Souza

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated some growth conditions capable of inducing the conidial germination in Scedosporium apiospermum, S. aurantiacum, S. minutisporum and Lomentospora prolificans. Germination in Sabouraud medium (pH 7.0, 37ºC, 5% CO2) showed to be a typically time-dependent event, reaching ~75% in S. minutisporum and > 90% in S. apiospermum, S. aurantiacum and L. prolificans after 4 h. Similar germination rate was observed when conidia were incubated under different media and pHs. Contrarily, temperature and CO2 tension modulated the germination. The isotropic conidial growth (swelling) and germ tube-like projection were evidenced by microscopy and cytometry. Morphometric parameters augmented in a time-dependent fashion, evidencing changes in size and granularity of fungal cells compared with dormant 0 h conidia. In parallel, a clear increase in the mitochondrial activity was measured during the transformation of conidia-into-germinated conidia. Susceptibility profiles to itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin varied regarding each morphotype and each fungal species. Overall, the minimal inhibitory concentrations for hyphae were higher than conidia and germinated conidia, except for caspofungin. Collectively, our study add new data about the conidia-into-hyphae transformation in Scedosporium and Lomentospora species, which is a relevant biological process of these molds directly connected to their antifungal resistance and pathogenicity mechanisms. PMID:27355215

  11. Melanization of a meristematic mutant of Fonsecaea monophora increases tolerance to stress factors while no effects on antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiufeng; Zhang, Junmin; Najafzadeh, M J; Badali, Hamid; Li, Xiqing; Xi, Liyan; de Hoog, G S

    2011-11-01

    Melanin is a complex polymer, which is widely distributed in nature, and is known as an important virulence factor in opportunistic and pathogenic fungi. In this study, three melanin mutants of Fonsecaea monophora from a case of chromoblastomycosis were generated from a parent strain that lacked hyphal morphology but was meristematic instead. Two albino mutants, one of which (CBS 125187) produced secreted melanin and another (CBS 125149) lacked melanin, grew faster than a mutant with cell-wall-associated and secreted melanin (CBS 125188) and than the meristematic parent strain (CBS 122845) (P < 0.05). The albino strains were also more sensitive to low pH, high UV radiation, and oxidative stress (P < 0.05). However, susceptibility testing against eight antifungal agents showed no statistical difference (P > 0.05). The discovery of three melanin mutants of a single meristematic mutant provided an alternative way to study the role of cell-wall-associated and secreted melanins in the pathogenesis of black fungi.

  12. Candida species diversity and antifungal susceptibility patterns in oral samples of HIV/AIDS patients in Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Clark-Ordóñez, Isadora; Callejas-Negrete, Olga A; Aréchiga-Carvajal, Elva T; Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa R

    2016-09-14

    Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic fungal infection in HIV patients. The aims of this study were to identify the prevalence of carriers of Candida, Candida species diversity, and in vitro susceptibility to antifungal drugs. In 297 HIV/AIDS patients in Baja California, Mexico, Candida strains were identified by molecular methods (PCR-RFLP) from isolates of oral rinses of patients in Tijuana, Mexicali, and Ensenada. 56.3% of patients were colonized or infected with Candida In Tijuana, there was a significantly higher percentage of carriers (75.5%). Out of the 181 strains that were isolated, 71.8% were Candida albicans and 28.2% were non-albicans species. The most common non-albicans species was Candida tropicalis (12.2%), followed by Candida glabrata (8.3%), Candida parapsilosis (2.2%), Candida krusei (1.7%), and Candida guilliermondii (1.1%). Candida dubliniensis was not isolated. Two associated species were found in 11 patients. In Mexicali and Ensenada, there was a lower proportion of Candida carriers compared to other regions in Mexico and worldwide, however, in Tijuana, a border town with many peculiarities, a higher carrier rate was found. In this population, only a high viral load was associated with oral Candida carriers. Other factors such as gender, use of antiretroviral therapy, CD4(+) T-lymphocyte levels, time since diagnosis, and alcohol/ tobacco consumption, were not associated with Candida carriers.

  13. [Evaluation of the VITEK 2 system (AST-YSO1 cards) for antifungal susceptibility testing against different Candida species].

    PubMed

    Ochiuzzi, María E; Arechavala, Alicia; Guelfand, Liliana; Maldonado, Ivana; Soloaga, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the results of antifungal susceptibility for various Candida species using the Vitek 2 semi-automated system (AST-YSO1 cards, bioMérieux), and to compare them with those obtained by the CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) broth microdilution reference method (Document M27-A3,2008). The essential agreement (EA) was > 90%, except for Candida glabrata against voriconazole (VCZ); and for Candida krusei against fluconazole (FCZ). The overall categorical agreement (CA) was > 90% when FCZ was evaluated and 89.5% at 24h and 80.7% at 48 h for VCZ. The average time for obtaining results was 15.5h. Minor errors were 7.8% at 24h and 6.1% at 48 h for FCZ, and 10.5% at 24h and 19.3% at 48 h for VCZ. There was only one very major error for FCZ against Candida parapsilosis and no major errors were observed. For amphotericin B, only three isolates showed MICs ≥ 2 μg/ml. The Vitek 2 system detected the MIC value for various Candida species and showed excellent agreement with the reference method proposed by the CLSI.

  14. Genetic diversity of Aspergillus species isolated from onychomycosis and Aspergillus hongkongensis sp. nov., with implications to antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chi-Ching; Hui, Teresa W S; Lee, Kim-Chung; Chen, Jonathan H K; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Tam, Emily W T; Chan, Jasper F W; Wu, Andrea L; Cheung, Mei; Tse, Brian P H; Wu, Alan K L; Lai, Christopher K C; Tsang, Dominic N C; Que, Tak-Lun; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-02-01

    Thirteen Aspergillus isolates recovered from nails of 13 patients (fingernails, n=2; toenails, n=11) with onychomycosis were characterized. Twelve strains were identified by multilocus sequencing as Aspergillus spp. (Aspergillus sydowii [n=4], Aspergillus welwitschiae [n=3], Aspergillus terreus [n=2], Aspergillus flavus [n=1], Aspergillus tubingensis [n=1], and Aspergillus unguis [n=1]). Isolates of A. terreus, A. flavus, and A. unguis were also identifiable by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The 13th isolate (HKU49(T)) possessed unique morphological characteristics different from other Aspergillus spp. Molecular characterization also unambiguously showed that HKU49(T) was distinct from other Aspergillus spp. We propose the novel species Aspergillus hongkongensis to describe this previously unknown fungus. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed most Aspergillus isolates had low MICs against itraconazole and voriconazole, but all Aspergillus isolates had high MICs against fluconazole. A diverse spectrum of Aspergillus species is associated with onychomycosis. Itraconazole and voriconazole are probably better drug options for Aspergillus onychomycosis.

  15. In vitro antifungal susceptibility profiles and genotypes of 308 clinical and environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and Cryptococcus gattii serotype B from north-western India.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Randhawa, Harbans Singh; Sundar, Gandhi; Kathuria, Shallu; Prakash, Anupam; Khan, Ziauddin; Sun, Sheng; Xu, Jianping

    2011-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are aetiological agents of cryptococcosis, a major opportunistic systemic mycosis of increasing global importance. This study reports the antifungal susceptibility profiles of clinical and environmental isolates of C. neoformans var. grubii, genotype VNI/AFLP1 (n = 246), and C. gattii serotype B, genotype VGI/AFLP4 (n = 62), originating from patients and environmental sources in north-western India. All of the C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii isolates were mating type α. Using the broth microdilution method, both species were found to be susceptible to the antifungals tested except for two clinical C. neoformans var. grubii isolates that were resistant to 5-flucytosine (MIC >64 µg ml⁻¹). Data on the geometric mean of MICs revealed that C. gattii was significantly less susceptible than C. neoformans var. grubii to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole (P<0.0001). In addition, the MIC₉₀ of C. gattii was twofold higher than that of C. neoformans var. grubii for fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole. However, no statistically significant difference in susceptibility of the two Cryptococcus species was observed against amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine. Furthermore, the environmental C. neoformans var. grubii isolates were significantly less susceptible to fluconazole, itraconazole and 5-flucytosine (P<0.0001) than the clinical isolates. A continued surveillance of antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental strains of C. neoformans and C. gattii is desirable to monitor the emergence of any resistant strains in order to ensure more successful therapy of cryptococcosis.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of PASCO and National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-A Broth Microdilution Methods for Antifungal Drug Susceptibility Testing of Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A.; Motley, Milwood; Warnock, David W.; Morrison, Christine J.

    2000-01-01

    The PASCO antifungal susceptibility test system, developed in collaboration with a commercial company, is a broth microdilution assay which is faster and easier to use than the reference broth microdilution test performed according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) document M27-A guidelines. Advantages of the PASCO system include the system's inclusion of quality-controlled, premade antifungal panels containing 10, twofold serial dilutions of drugs and a one-step inoculation system whereby all wells are simultaneously inoculated in a single step. For the prototype panel, we chose eight antifungal agents for in vitro testing (amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, and terconazole) and compared the results with those of the NCCLS method for testing 74 yeast isolates (14 Candida albicans, 10 Candida glabrata, 10 Candida tropicalis, 10 Candida krusei, 10 Candida dubliniensis, 10 Candida parapsilosis, and 10 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates). The overall agreements between the methods were 91% for fluconazole, 89% for amphotericin B and ketoconazole, 85% for itraconazole, 80% for flucytosine, 77% for terconazole, 66% for miconazole, and 53% for clotrimazole. In contrast to the M27-A reference method, the PASCO method classified as resistant seven itraconazole-susceptible isolates (9%), two fluconazole-susceptible isolates (3%), and three flucytosine-susceptible isolates (4%), representing 12 major errors. In addition, it classified two fluconazole-resistant isolates (3%) and one flucytosine-resistant isolate (1%) as susceptible, representing three very major errors. Overall, the agreement between the methods was greater than or equal to 80% for four of the seven species tested (C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. neoformans). The lowest agreement between methods was observed for miconazole and clotrimazole and for C. krusei isolates tested against terconazole. When the

  17. Comparative evaluation of PASCO and national committee for clinical laboratory standards M27-A broth microdilution methods for antifungal drug susceptibility testing of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Arthington-Skaggs, B A; Motley, M; Warnock, D W; Morrison, C J

    2000-06-01

    The PASCO antifungal susceptibility test system, developed in collaboration with a commercial company, is a broth microdilution assay which is faster and easier to use than the reference broth microdilution test performed according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) document M27-A guidelines. Advantages of the PASCO system include the system's inclusion of quality-controlled, premade antifungal panels containing 10, twofold serial dilutions of drugs and a one-step inoculation system whereby all wells are simultaneously inoculated in a single step. For the prototype panel, we chose eight antifungal agents for in vitro testing (amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, and terconazole) and compared the results with those of the NCCLS method for testing 74 yeast isolates (14 Candida albicans, 10 Candida glabrata, 10 Candida tropicalis, 10 Candida krusei, 10 Candida dubliniensis, 10 Candida parapsilosis, and 10 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates). The overall agreements between the methods were 91% for fluconazole, 89% for amphotericin B and ketoconazole, 85% for itraconazole, 80% for flucytosine, 77% for terconazole, 66% for miconazole, and 53% for clotrimazole. In contrast to the M27-A reference method, the PASCO method classified as resistant seven itraconazole-susceptible isolates (9%), two fluconazole-susceptible isolates (3%), and three flucytosine-susceptible isolates (4%), representing 12 major errors. In addition, it classified two fluconazole-resistant isolates (3%) and one flucytosine-resistant isolate (1%) as susceptible, representing three very major errors. Overall, the agreement between the methods was greater than or equal to 80% for four of the seven species tested (C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. neoformans). The lowest agreement between methods was observed for miconazole and clotrimazole and for C. krusei isolates tested against terconazole. When the

  18. Antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia furfur, Malassezia sympodialis, and Malassezia globosa to azole drugs and amphotericin B evaluated using a broth microdilution method.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Florencia D; Sosa, María de los A; Fernández, Mariana S; Cattana, María E; Córdoba, Susana B; Giusiano, Gustavo E

    2014-08-01

    We studied the in vitro activity of fluconazole (FCZ), ketoconazole (KTZ), miconazole (MCZ), voriconazole (VCZ), itraconazole (ITZ) and amphotericin B (AMB) against the three major pathogenic Malassezia species, M. globosa, M. sympodialis, and M. furfur. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined using the broth microdilution method in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. To support lipid-dependent yeast development, glucose, peptone, ox bile, malt extract, glycerol, and Tween supplements were added to Roswell Park Memorial Institute RPMI 1640 medium. The supplemented medium allowed good growth of all three species studied. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were recorded after 72 h of incubation at 32ºC. The three species showed different susceptibility profiles for the drugs tested. Malassezia sympodialis was the most susceptible and M. furfur the least susceptible species. KTZ, ITZ, and VCZ were the most active drugs, showing low variability among isolates of the same species. FCZ, MCZ, and AMB showed high MICs and wide MIC ranges. Differences observed emphasize the need to accurately identify and evaluate antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia species. Further investigations and collaborative studies are essential for correlating in vitro results with clinical outcomes since the existing limited data do not allow definitive conclusions.

  19. Sporothrix schenckii COMPLEX: SUSCEPTIBILITIES TO COMBINED ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ENZYMATIC PROFILES

    PubMed Central

    OLIVEIRA, Daniele Carvalho; de LORETO, Érico Silva; MARIO, Débora Alves Nunes; LOPES, Paulo G. Markus; NEVES, Louise Vignolles; da ROCHA, Marta Pires; SANTURIO, Janio Morais; ALVES, Sydney Hartz

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Sporothrix schenckiiwas reclassified as a complex encompassing six cryptic species, which calls for the reassessment of clinical and epidemiological data of these new species. We evaluated the susceptibility of Sporothrix albicans (n = 1) , S. brasiliensis (n = 6) , S. globosa (n = 1), S. mexicana(n = 1) and S. schenckii(n = 36) to terbinafine (TRB) alone and in combination with itraconazole (ITZ), ketoconazole (KTZ), and voriconazole (VRZ) by a checkerboard microdilution method and determined the enzymatic profile of these species with the API-ZYM kit. Most interactions were additive (27.5%, 32.5% and 5%) or indifferent (70%, 50% and 52.5%) for TRB+KTZ, TRB+ITZ and TRB+VRZ, respectively. Antagonisms were observed in 42.5% of isolates for the TRB+VRZ combination. Based on enzymatic profiling, the Sporothrix schenckii strains were categorized into 14 biotypes. Leucine arylamidase (LA) activity was observed only for S. albicans and S. mexicana. The species S. globosaand S. mexicanawere the only species without β-glucosidase (GS) activity. Our results may contribute to a better understanding of virulence and resistance among species of the genus Sporothrixin further studies. PMID:26422151

  20. Molecular characterisation and antifungal susceptibility of clinical Trichosporon isolates in India.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Vijaylatha; Honnavar, Prasanna; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Pamidi, Umabala; Ghosh, Anup; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2016-08-01

    In Asian countries, Trichosporon infection is a well-known disease in Japan. In India, the infection is increasingly recognised. The study was conducted to characterise the clinical Trichosporon isolates from India by phenotypic and molecular techniques. A total of 31 Trichosporon clinical isolates, recovered from patients of 14 hospitals across India were sequenced (ITS and IGS1 regions of rDNA). In vitro drug susceptibility testing of the isolates was performed against amphotericin-B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole. IGS1, rather than ITS sequences, correctly identified the isolates: Trichosporon asahii, 20; Trichosporon ovoides, 3; Trichosporon inkin, 2; Trichosporon asteroides, 1; Trichosporon mucoides, 1; Trichosporon loubieri, 1; Trichosporon debeurmannianum, 1; and Trichosporon dermatis, 1. Trichosporon asahii genotype III was the most common type, followed by genotype I and VII. Both these targets did not help to identify one Trichosporon to the species level. Trichosporon debeurmannianum, T. dermatis and T. asteroides were isolated for the first time from a human disease in India. The minimum inhibitory concentrations for voriconazole and posaconazole were within effective range. The study highlights the presence of wide range of Trichosporon species causing infection in India. Voriconazole or posaconazole may be the better drugs to treat such patients.

  1. [Investigation of the correlation between biofilm forming ability of urinary Candida isolates with the use of urinary catheters and change of antifungal susceptibility in the presence of biofilm].

    PubMed

    Aslan, Hacer; Gülmez, Dolunay

    2016-04-01

    Frequency of Candida species causing urinary tract infections is increasing, and this increase is outstanding in nosocomial urinary tract infections especially in intensive care units. The ability of biofilm formation that is contributed to the virulence of the yeast, plays a role in the pathogenesis of biomaterial-related infections and also constitutes a risk for treatment failure. The aims of this study were to compare biofilm forming abilities of Candida strains isolated from urine cultures of patients with and without urinary catheters, and to investigate the change of antifungal susceptibility in the presence of biofilm. A total of 50 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures of 25 patients with urinary catheters (10 C.tropicalis, 6 C.glabrata, 4 C.albicans, 4 C.parapsilosis, 1 C.krusei) and 25 without urinary catheters (8 C.tropicalis, 6 C.albicans, 4 C.krusei, 3 C.parapsilosis, 2 C.kefyr, 1 C.glabrata, 1 C.lusitaniae) were included in the study. Biofilm forming ability was tested by Congo red agar (CRA) and microplate XTT [2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction methods. Fluconazole (FLU) and amphotericin B (AMP-B) susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by reference microdilution method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for planktonic cells and by XTT reduction assay in case of biofilm presence. Biofilm formation was detected in 12 (24%) by CRA and 50 (100%) of the isolates by XTT reduction method. None of the C.albicans (n= 10) and C.tropicalis (n= 18) strains were detected as biofilm positive by CRA, however, these strains were strongly positive by XTT reduction method. No statistically significant correlation was detected between the presence of urinary catheter and biofilm forming ability of the isolate (p> 0.05). This might be caused by the advantage of biofilm forming strains in adhesion to bladder mucosa at the initial stages of infection. For all of the isolates in

  2. Inhibition of heat-shock protein 90 enhances the susceptibility to antifungals and reduces the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Evangelista, Antonio José de Jesus; Serpa, Rosana; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; de Melo, Charlline Vládia Silva; de Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Franco, Jônatas da Silva; de Alencar, Lucas Pereira; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fébio Gadelha

    2016-02-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are chaperones required for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis in different fungal pathogens, playing an important role in the infectious process. This study investigated the effect of pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 by radicicol on the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex--agents of the most common life-threatening fungal infection amongst immunocompromised patients. The influence of Hsp90 inhibition was investigated regarding in vitro susceptibility to antifungal agents of planktonic and sessile cells, ergosterol concentration, cell membrane integrity, growth at 37 °C, production of virulence factors in vitro, and experimental infection in Caenorhabditis elegans. Hsp90 inhibition inhibited the in vitro growth of planktonic cells of Cryptococcus spp. at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2 μg ml(-1) and increased the in vitro inhibitory effect of azoles, especially fluconazole (FLC) (P < 0.05). Inhibition of Hsp90 also increased the antifungal activity of azoles against biofilm formation and mature biofilms of Cryptococcus spp., notably for Cryptococcus gattii. Furthermore, Hsp90 inhibition compromised the permeability of the cell membrane, and reduced planktonic growth at 37 °C and the capsular size of Cryptococcus spp. In addition, Hsp90 inhibition enhanced the antifungal activity of FLC during experimental infection using Caenorhabditis elegans. Therefore, our results indicate that Hsp90 inhibition can be an important strategy in the development of new antifungal drugs.

  3. Identification and Functional Characterization of Rca1, a Transcription Factor Involved in both Antifungal Susceptibility and Host Response in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Pradervand, Sylvain; Ischer, Françoise; Coste, Alix T.; Ferrari, Sélène; Harshman, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The identification of novel transcription factors associated with antifungal response may allow the discovery of fungus-specific targets for new therapeutic strategies. A collection of 241 Candida albicans transcriptional regulator mutants was screened for altered susceptibility to fluconazole, caspofungin, amphotericin B, and 5-fluorocytosine. Thirteen of these mutants not yet identified in terms of their role in antifungal response were further investigated, and the function of one of them, a mutant of orf19.6102 (RCA1), was characterized by transcriptome analysis. Strand-specific RNA sequencing and phenotypic tests assigned Rca1 as the regulator of hyphal formation through the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signaling pathway and the transcription factor Efg1, but also probably through its interaction with a transcriptional repressor, most likely Tup1. The mechanisms responsible for the high level of resistance to caspofungin and fluconazole observed resulting from RCA1 deletion were investigated. From our observations, we propose that caspofungin resistance was the consequence of the deregulation of cell wall gene expression and that fluconazole resistance was linked to the modulation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway activity. In conclusion, our large-scale screening of a C. albicans transcription factor mutant collection allowed the identification of new effectors of the response to antifungals. The functional characterization of Rca1 assigned this transcription factor and its downstream targets as promising candidates for the development of new therapeutic strategies, as Rca1 influences host sensing, hyphal development, and antifungal response. PMID:22581526

  4. Molecular epidemiology and in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of 108 clinical Cryptococcus neoformans sensu lato and Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato isolates from Denmark.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ferry; Hare Jensen, Rasmus; Meis, Jacques F; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2016-09-01

    Cryptococcosis is mainly caused by members of the Cryptococcus gattii/Cryptococcus neoformans species complexes. Here, we report the molecular characterisation and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Danish clinical cryptococcal isolates. Species, genotype, serotype and mating type were determined by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting and qPCR. EUCAST E.Def 7.2 MICs were determined for amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole and isavuconazole. Most isolates were C. neoformans (serotype A; n = 66) and belonged to genotype AFLP1/VNI (n = 61) or AFLP1B/VNII (n = 5) followed by Cryptococcus deneoformans (serotype D; genotype AFLP2, n = 20), C. neoformans × C. deneoformans hybrids (serotype AD; genotype AFLP3, n = 13) and Cryptococcus curvatus (n = 2). Six isolates were C. gattii sensu lato, and one isolate was a C. deneoformans × C. gattii hybrid (genotype AFLP8). All isolates were amphotericin B susceptible. Flucytosine susceptibility was uniform MIC50 of 4-8 mg l(-1) except for C. curvatus (MICs >32 mg l(-1) ). Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato isolates were somewhat less susceptible to the azoles. MICs of fluconazole (>32 mg l(-1) ), voriconazole (≥0.5 mg l(-1) ) and isavuconazole (0.06 and 0.25 mg l(-1) respectively) were elevated compared to the wild-type population for 1/19 C. deneoformans and 1/2 C. curvatus isolates. Flucytosine MIC was elevated for 1/61 C. neoformans (>32 mg l(-1) ). Antifungal susceptibility revealed species-specific differential susceptibility, but suggested acquired resistance was an infrequent phenomenon.

  5. Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Bloodstream Yeast Isolates by Sensititre YeastOne over Nine Years at a Large Italian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Spanu, Teresa; Fiori, Barbara; De Maio, Flavio; De Carolis, Elena; Giaquinto, Alessia; Prete, Valentina; De Angelis, Giulia; Torelli, Riccardo; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Vella, Antonietta; De Luca, Alessio; Tumbarello, Mario; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) is an affordable alternative to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference method for antifungal susceptibility testing. In this study, the MICs of yeast isolates from 1,214 bloodstream infection episodes, generated by SYO during hospital laboratory activity (January 2005 to December 2013), were reanalyzed using current CLSI clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoff values to assign susceptibility (or the wild-type [WT] phenotype) to systemic antifungal agents. Excluding Candida albicans (57.4% of all isolates [n = 1,250]), the most predominant species were Candida parapsilosis complex (20.9%), Candida tropicalis (8.2%), Candida glabrata (6.4%), Candida guilliermondii (1.6%), and Candida krusei (1.3%). Among the non-Candida species (1.9%), 7 were Cryptococcus neoformans and 17 were other species, mainly Rhodotorula species. Over 97% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to amphotericin B and flucytosine. Rates of susceptibility (WT phenotype) to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were 98.7% in C. albicans, 92.3% in the C. parapsilosis complex, 96.1% in C. tropicalis, 92.5% in C. glabrata, 100% in C. guilliermondii, and 100% (excluding fluconazole) in C. krusei. The fluconazole-resistant isolates consisted of 6 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 3 C. glabrata isolates, 2 C. albicans isolates, 2 C. tropicalis isolates, and 1 Candida lusitaniae isolate. Of the non-Candida isolates, 2 C. neoformans isolates had the non-WT phenotype for susceptibility to fluconazole, whereas Rhodotorula isolates had elevated azole MICs. Overall, 99.7% to 99.8% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to echinocandins, but 3 isolates were nonsusceptible (either intermediate or resistant) to caspofungin (C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei), anidulafungin (C. albicans and C. guilliermondii), and micafungin (C. albicans). However, when the intrinsically resistant non-Candida isolates were included

  6. Genotyping and antifungal susceptibility testing of multiple Malassezia pachydermatis isolates from otitis and dermatitis cases in pets: is it really worth the effort?

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E; Peláez, Teresa; Blanco, José L

    2016-01-01

    A total of 216 colonies of Malassezia pachydermatis from 28 cases of fungal otitis or dermatitis in pets were genotyped by M13 fingerprinting and tested for antifungal susceptibility. A huge genetic diversity was found (157 M13 types in total), with all animals having a polyclonal pattern of infection (5.4 ± 1.5 genotypes/sample). Furthermore, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that most genetic diversity (44%) was found at the within sample level. In contrast, variability in antifungal susceptibility among isolates from the same sample was less important, with different M13 types displaying in most cases identical or very similar MIC results. Most isolates displayed high in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, terbinafine and all azoles tested except fluconazole, for which MIC values were always ≥4 μg/ml and a 26.9% of isolates displayed values ≥32 μg/ml. We conclude that although characterization of multiple yeast isolates results in a considerable increase in laboratory workload and expenses, it may help to get a better understanding of the epidemiology of M. pachydermatis in a given patient population.

  7. Fusarium keratitis in South India: causative agents, their antifungal susceptibilities and a rapid identification method for the Fusarium solani species complex.

    PubMed

    Homa, Mónika; Shobana, Coimbatore S; Singh, Yendrembam R B; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Selvam, Kanesan P; Kredics, László; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Galgóczy, László

    2013-09-01

    Seventy Fusarium isolates derived from human keratomycosis were identified based on partial sequences of the β-tubulin (β-TUB) and translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) genes. Most of the isolates were confirmed as members of the F. solani species complex (75.71%), followed by the F. dimerum species complex (8.57%), the F. fujikuroi species complex (8.57%), the F. oxysporum species complex (4.29%) and the F. incarnatum-equiseti species complex (2.86%). A combined phylogenetic tree was estimated including all the 70 isolates. Isolates belonging to different species complexes formed separate clades. In this study, we also report the first isolation of F. napiforme from human keratomycosis. A new method based on a specific EcoRI restriction site in the EF-1α gene was developed for the rapid identification of F. solani. In vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates to seven antifungals were determined by broth microdilution method. Terbinafine, natamycin and amphotericin B proved to be the most effective drugs, followed by voriconazole. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of clotrimazole, econazole and itraconazole were generally high (≥64 μg ml(-1) ). The interactions between the two most effective antifungals (natamycin and terbinafine) were determined by checkerboard microdilution method. Synergism (71.8%) or no interaction (28.2%) was revealed between the two compounds.

  8. Echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for clinical opportunistic yeast and mold isolates collected from 2010 to 2011: application of new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values for characterization of geographic and temporal trends of antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Woosley, Leah N; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program monitors global susceptibility and resistance rates of newer and established antifungal agents. We report the echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility patterns for 3,418 contemporary clinical isolates of yeasts and molds. The isolates were obtained from 98 laboratories in 34 countries during 2010 and 2011. Yeasts not presumptively identified by CHROMagar, the trehalose test, or growth at 42°C and all molds were sequence identified using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S (yeasts) or ITS, translation elongation factor (TEF), and 28S (molds) genes. Susceptibility testing was performed against 7 antifungals (anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole) using CLSI methods. Rates of resistance to all agents were determined using the new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff value criteria, as appropriate. Sequencing of fks hot spots was performed for echinocandin non-wild-type (WT) strains. Isolates included 3,107 from 21 Candida spp., 146 from 9 Aspergillus spp., 84 from Cryptococcus neoformans, 40 from 23 other mold species, and 41 from 9 other yeast species. Among Candida spp., resistance to the echinocandins was low (0.0 to 1.7%). Candida albicans and Candida glabrata that were resistant to anidulafungin, caspofungin, or micafungin were shown to have fks mutations. Resistance to fluconazole was low among the isolates of C. albicans (0.4%), Candida tropicalis (1.3%), and Candida parapsilosis (2.1%); however, 8.8% of C. glabrata isolates were resistant to fluconazole. Among echinocandin-resistant C. glabrata isolates from 2011, 38% were fluconazole resistant. Voriconazole was active against all Candida spp. except C. glabrata (10.5% non-WT), whereas posaconazole showed decreased activity against C. albicans (4.4%) and Candida krusei (15.2% non-WT). All agents except for the echinocandins were active against C. neoformans, and the

  9. Trends in Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida spp. Isolated from Pediatric and Adult Patients with Bloodstream Infections: SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 1997 to 2000

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.; Diekema, D. J.; Jones, R. N.; Messer, S. A.; Hollis, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    From 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2000, 2,047 bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp. were reported from hospitals in the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe participating in the SENTRY Antifungal Surveillance Program. Among individuals in four age groups (≤1, 2 to 15, 16 to 64, and ≥65 years) Candida albicans was the most common species, causing 60, 55, 55, and 50% of infections, respectively. C. glabrata caused 17 to 23% of BSIs in those ages 16 to 64 and ≥65 years, whereas it caused only 3% of BSIs in the individuals in the two younger age groups (P < 0.001). C. parapsilosis (which caused 21 to 24% of BSIs) and C. tropicalis (which caused 7 to 10% of BSIs) were more common than C. glabrata in individuals ages ≤1 year and 2 to 15 years. Isolates of Candida spp. showed a trend of decreasing susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, and amphotericin B with increasing patient age (P ≤ 0.01). None of the C. glabrata isolates from individuals ≤1 year old were resistant to fluconazole, whereas they made up 5 to 9% of isolates from individuals ages 16 to 64 and ≥65 years. Isolates of C. tropicalis from patients ≤1 year old were more susceptible to flucytosine (MIC at which 90% of isolates are inhibited [MIC90], 0.5 μg/ml; 0% resistant isolates) than those from patients ≥65 years old (MIC90, 32 μg/ml; 11% resistant isolates). The investigational triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole were all highly active against all species of Candida from individuals in all age groups. These data demonstrate differences in the species distributions of pathogens and differences in antifungal resistance among isolates from individuals in the pediatric and adult age groups. Ongoing surveillance will enhance efforts to limit the extent of antifungal resistance in individuals in various age groups. PMID:11880404

  10. Frequency of clinically isolated strains of oral Candida species at Kagoshima University Hospital, Japan, and their susceptibility to antifungal drugs in 2006–2007 and 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The isolation frequency and susceptibility to antifungal agents of oral Candida isolates from patients with oral candidiasis (OC) were compared between studies conducted in 2006–2007 and 2012–2013. Methods A total158 strains was isolated from 112 patients who visited Kagoshima University Hospital for the treatment of OC during the 14-month period from February 2012 and March 2013, and evaluated on the isolation frequency of each Candida strain and the susceptibility against antifungal drugs as compared to those evaluated in 2006–2007. Results There was a higher frequency of xerostomia as a chief complaint and of autoimmune disease in the 2012–2013 study than in the 2006–2007 study. More than 95% of Candida isolates were C. albicans and C. glabrata. In addition, the proportion of the latter increased from 12.3% in the 2006–2007 study to 23.4% in the 2012–2013 study, while the proportion of the former decreased from 86.2% to 72.8%, respectively. C. albicans was isolated in almost all patients, while C. glabrata was only isolated concomitantly with C. albicans. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were not significantly different between groups with a few exceptions. Candida isolates, of which MICs surpassed break points, apparently increased for miconazole and itraconazole against C. glabrata in the 2012–2013 study, but this was not statistically significant. As a result, more cases of autoimmune disease, a greater number of C. glabrata isolates, and higher resistance to azoles were seen in the 2012–2013 study than in the 2006–2007 study. Conclusion These data indicate that with recent increases in C. glabrata infection, a causative fungus of OC, and in C. glabrata resistance to azoles, caution is needed in the selection of antifungal drugs for the treatment of OC. PMID:24552136

  11. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility of yeast isolates causing fungemia collected in a population-based study in Spain in 2010 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Guinea, Jesús; Zaragoza, Óscar; Escribano, Pilar; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Sánchez-Reus, Ferrán; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    We report the molecular identifications and antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates causing fungemia collected in the CANDIPOP population-based study conducted in 29 Spanish hospitals. A total of 781 isolates (from 767 patients, 14 of them having mixed fungemia) were collected. The species found most frequently were Candida albicans (44.6%), Candida parapsilosis (24.5%), Candida glabrata (13.2%), Candida tropicalis (7.6%), Candida krusei (1.9%), Candida guilliermondii (1.7%), and Candida lusitaniae (1.3%). Other Candida and non-Candida species accounted for approximately 5% of the isolates. The presence of cryptic species was low. Compared to findings of previous studies conducted in Spain, the frequency of C. glabrata has increased. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by using EUCAST and CLSI M27-A3 reference procedures; the two methods were comparable. The rate of fluconazole-susceptible isolates was 80%, which appears to be a decrease compared to findings of previous studies, explained mainly by the higher frequency of C. glabrata. Using the species-specific breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values, the rate of voriconazole and posaconazole in vitro resistance was low (<2%). In the case of C. tropicalis, using the EUCAST procedure, the rate of azole resistance was around 20%. There was a correlation between the previous use of azoles and the presence of fluconazole-resistant isolates. Resistance to echinocandins was very rare (2%), and resistance to amphotericin B also was very uncommon. The sequencing of the hot spot (HS) regions from FKS1 or FKS2 genes in echinocandin-resistant isolates revealed previously described point mutations. The decrease in the susceptibility to fluconazole in Spanish isolates should be closely monitored in future studies.

  12. Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility of Yeast Isolates Causing Fungemia Collected in a Population-Based Study in Spain in 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Guinea, Jesús; Zaragoza, Óscar; Escribano, Pilar; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Sánchez-Reus, Ferrán

    2014-01-01

    We report the molecular identifications and antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates causing fungemia collected in the CANDIPOP population-based study conducted in 29 Spanish hospitals. A total of 781 isolates (from 767 patients, 14 of them having mixed fungemia) were collected. The species found most frequently were Candida albicans (44.6%), Candida parapsilosis (24.5%), Candida glabrata (13.2%), Candida tropicalis (7.6%), Candida krusei (1.9%), Candida guilliermondii (1.7%), and Candida lusitaniae (1.3%). Other Candida and non-Candida species accounted for approximately 5% of the isolates. The presence of cryptic species was low. Compared to findings of previous studies conducted in Spain, the frequency of C. glabrata has increased. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by using EUCAST and CLSI M27-A3 reference procedures; the two methods were comparable. The rate of fluconazole-susceptible isolates was 80%, which appears to be a decrease compared to findings of previous studies, explained mainly by the higher frequency of C. glabrata. Using the species-specific breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values, the rate of voriconazole and posaconazole in vitro resistance was low (<2%). In the case of C. tropicalis, using the EUCAST procedure, the rate of azole resistance was around 20%. There was a correlation between the previous use of azoles and the presence of fluconazole-resistant isolates. Resistance to echinocandins was very rare (2%), and resistance to amphotericin B also was very uncommon. The sequencing of the hot spot (HS) regions from FKS1 or FKS2 genes in echinocandin-resistant isolates revealed previously described point mutations. The decrease in the susceptibility to fluconazole in Spanish isolates should be closely monitored in future studies. PMID:24366741

  13. Invitro antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species to liposomal amphotericin B, determined using CLSI broth microdilution, and amphotericin B deoxycholate, measured using the Etest.

    PubMed

    Lovero, Grazia; De Giglio, Osvalda; Rutigliano, Serafina; Diella, Giusy; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2017-03-01

    The antifungal susceptibilities of 598 isolates of Candida spp. (bloodstream and other sterile sites) to liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) versus amphotericin B (AmB) were determined. MICs were calculated using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution (M27-A3) method for L-AmB and the Etest method for AmB. The MIC50/MIC90 (µg ml-1) values for L-AmB broth microdilution and AmB Etest were 0.25/1 and 0.19/0.5, respectively. The overall essential agreement (±2 dilutions) was 91.5 %, ranging from 37.5 % (Candida lusitaniae) to 100 % (Candida glabrata and Candida krusei). Categorical agreement between the two methods was categorized based on a previously published breakpoint (susceptible/resistant MIC cut-off of 1 µg ml-1). The overall categorical agreement at the 48 h reading was 97.3 %, ranging from 72.7 % (C. krusei) to 100 % (Candida albicans). Major and very major discrepancies occurred in 2.3 and 0.3 %, respectively. Spearman's ρ was 0.48 (P<0.0001). These results demonstrate the utility of the AmB Etest as a surrogate marker to predict the sensibility and resistance of Candida spp. to L-AmB and thus to support its use in antifungal treatment.

  14. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility and Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Fusarium verticillioides (F. moniliforme) and Fusarium thapsinum▿

    PubMed Central

    Azor, Mónica; Gené, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Sutton, Deanna A.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Guarro, Josep

    2008-01-01

    A microdilution method was used to test 11 antifungal drugs against clinical isolates of Fusarium thapsinum and three different phylogenetic clades of Fusarium verticillioides that were characterized by sequencing a region of the β-tubulin gene. Terbinafine was the most-active drug against both species, followed by posaconazole against F. verticillioides. PMID:18391027

  15. Comparison of species-level identification and antifungal susceptibility results from diagnostic and reference laboratories for bloodstream Candida surveillance isolates, South Africa, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Serisha D; Govender, Nevashan; Patel, Jaymati; Zietsman, Inge L; Wadula, Jeannette; Coovadia, Yacoob; Kularatne, Ranmini; Seetharam, Sharona; Govender, Nelesh P

    2016-11-01

    From February 2009 through August 2010, we compared species-level identification of bloodstream Candida isolates and susceptibility to fluconazole, voriconazole, and caspofungin between diagnostic and reference South African laboratories during national surveillance for candidemia. Diagnostic laboratories identified isolates to genus/species level and performed antifungal susceptibility testing, as indicated. At a reference laboratory, viable Candida isolates were identified to species-level using automated systems, biochemical tests, or DNA sequencing; broth dilution susceptibility testing was performed. Categorical agreement (CA) was calculated for susceptibility results of isolates with concordant species identification. Overall, 2172 incident cases were detected, 773 (36%) by surveillance audit. The Vitek 2 YST system (bioMérieux Inc, Marcy l'Etoile, France) was used for identification (360/863, 42%) and susceptibility testing (198/473, 42%) of a large proportion of isolates. For the five most common species (n = 1181), species-level identification was identical in the majority of cases (Candida albicans: 98% (507/517); Candida parapsilosis: 92% (450/488); Candida glabrata: 89% (89/100); Candida tropicalis: 91% (49/54), and Candida krusei: 86% (19/22)). However, diagnostic laboratories were significantly less likely to correctly identify Candida species other than C. albicans versus C. albicans (607/664, 91% vs. 507/517, 98%; P < .001). Susceptibility data were compared for isolates belonging to the five most common species and fluconazole, voriconazole, and caspofungin in 860, 580, and 99 cases, respectively. Diagnostic laboratories significantly under-reported fluconazole resistance in C. parapsilosis (225/393, 57% vs. 239/393, 61%; P < .001) but over-reported fluconazole non-susceptibility in C. albicans (36/362, 10% vs. 3/362, 0.8%; P < .001). Diagnostic laboratories were less likely to correctly identify Candida species other than C. albicans, under

  16. Time-Kill Kinetics and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Non-fumigatus Aspergillus Species Isolated from Patients with Ocular Mycoses.

    PubMed

    Öz, Yasemin; Özdemir, Havva Gül; Gökbolat, Egemen; Kiraz, Nuri; Ilkit, Macit; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2016-04-01

    Aspergillus species can cause ocular morbidity and blindness, and thus, appropriate antifungal therapy is needed. We investigated the in vitro activity of itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin, anidulafungin, and amphotericin B against 14 Aspergillus isolates obtained from patients with ocular mycoses, using the CLSI reference broth microdilution methodology. In addition, time-kill assays were performed, exposing each isolate separately to 1-, 4-, and 16-fold concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each antifungal agent. A sigmoid maximum-effect (E max) model was used to fit the time-kill curve data. The drug effect was further evaluated by measuring an increase/decrease in the killing rate of the tested isolates. The MICs of amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole were 0.5-1.0, 1.0, 0.5-1.0, and 0.25 µg/ml for A. brasiliensis, A. niger, and A. tubingensis isolates, respectively, and 2.0-4.0, 0.5, 1.0 for A. flavus, and 0.12-0.25 µg/ml for A. nomius isolates, respectively. A. calidoustus had the highest MIC range for the azoles (4.0-16.0 µg/ml) among all isolates tested. The minimum effective concentrations of caspofungin and anidulafungin were ≤0.03-0.5 µg/ml and ≤0.03 µg/ml for all isolates, respectively. Posaconazole demonstrated maximal killing rates (E(max) = 0.63 h(-1), r(2) = 0.71) against 14 ocular Aspergillus isolates, followed by amphotericin B (E(max) = 0.39 h(-1), r(2) = 0.87), voriconazole (E(max) = 0.35 h(-1), r(2) = 0.098), and itraconazole (E(max) = 0.01 h(-1), r(2) = 0.98). Overall, the antifungal susceptibility of the non-fumigatus Aspergillus isolates tested was species and antifungal agent dependent. Analysis of the kinetic growth assays, along with consideration of the killing rates, revealed that posaconazole was the most effective antifungal against all of the isolates.

  17. Effects of the association of antifungal drugs on the antimicrobial action of endodontic sealers.

    PubMed

    Weckwerth, Paulo Henrique; Lima, Fellipe Lombardo de Souza; Greatti, Vanessa Raquel; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to determine the susceptibility of oral specimens and ATCC lineages of Candida albicans for five endodontic sealers, which were pure and associated with two antifungal drugs, and to analyze their effect on the physical properties. For this purpose, 30 lineages of C. albicans, collected from the oral cavity of patients assisted at the endodontics clinic of the Universidade Sagrado Coração, were analyzed. Yeasts susceptibility to the sealers was tested by diffusion on agar plates. Physical properties were evaluated according to the ADA specification no. 57. The pure versions of the Sealer 26, AH Plus, Endofill, Fillapex, and Sealapex demonstrated antifungal activity, with Endofill presenting the greatest inhibition zones. All cements, except for Endofill, had their antifungal actions enhanced by addition of ketoconazole and fluconazole (p < 0.05), and the AH Plus presented the best antifungal activity. The addition of antifungal drugs did not interfere with the setting time and flowability of the sealers. It was concluded that the addition of antifungals to endodontic sealers enhanced the antimicrobial action of most cements tested without altering their physical properties.

  18. Evaluation of Virulence Factors In vitro, Resistance to Osmotic Stress and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida tropicalis Isolated from the Coastal Environment of Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Zuza-Alves, Diana L.; de Medeiros, Sayama S. T. Q.; de Souza, Luanda B. F. C.; Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P.; Francisco, Elaine C.; de Araújo, Maria C. B.; Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G.; Neves, Rejane P.; Melo, Analy S. de Azevedo; Chaves, Guilherme M.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been developed regarding human health risks associated with the recreational use of beaches contaminated with domestic sewage. These wastes contain various micro-organisms, including Candida tropicalis. In this context, the objective of this study was to characterize C. tropicalis isolates from the sandy beach of Ponta Negra, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, regarding the expression of in vitro virulence factors, adaptation to osmotic stress and susceptibility to antifungal drugs. We analyzed 62 environmental isolates and observed a great variation among them for the various virulence factors evaluated. In general, environmental isolates were more adherent to human buccal epithelial cells (HBEC) than C. tropicalis ATCC13803 reference strain, and they also showed increased biofilm production. Most of the isolates presented wrinkled phenotypes on Spider medium (34 isolates, 54.8%). The majority of the isolates also showed higher proteinase production than control strains, but low phospholipase activity. In addition, 35 isolates (56.4%) had high hemolytic activity (hemolysis index > 0.55). With regard to C. tropicalis resistance to osmotic stress, 85.4% of the isolates were able to grow in a liquid medium containing 15% sodium chloride. The strains were highly resistant to the azoles tested (fluconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole). Fifteen strains were resistant to the three azoles tested (24.2%). Some strains were also resistant to amphotericin B (14 isolates; 22.6%), while all of them were susceptible for the echinocandins tested, except for a single strain of intermediate susceptibility to micafungin. Our results demonstrate that C. tropicalis isolated from the sand can fully express virulence attributes and showed a high persistence capacity on the coastal environment; in addition of showing high minimal inhibitory concentrations to several antifungal drugs used in current clinical practice, demonstrating that environmental isolates may

  19. Point prevalence, microbiology and antifungal susceptibility patterns of oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting Mexican HIV/AIDS patients and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-06-01

    We have conducted a longitudinal study over a 3-year period to address the point prevalence, microbiological characteristics and antifungal susceptibility patterns of yeast isolates colonizing or infecting the oral cavities of 111 HIV-infected (51 adults, 60 children) and 201 non HIV-infected (109 adults, 92 children) Mexican persons. Regarding the epidemiology of oral candidiasis, Candida albicans was the most frequent species isolated. Seventy-one out of 85 isolates from colonized persons were C. albicans (83.5%), 27 isolates of them were from HIV-infected children and 44 from non HIV-infected patients. Sixty-two isolates belonged to serotype A which was the most prevalent serotype of C. albicans. Non-albicans species (Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilosis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were isolated from 16.5% of colonized patients and from 38.5% patients with candidiasis or Candida-related lesions. There were nine episodes of infection or colonization by at least 2 different yeast species. In the case of HIV/AIDS patients, it was determined that yeast carriage was not associated with the number of CD4+ cells or the viral load, but HAART reduced the prevalence of oral candidiasis. Overall, most patients harbored strains in vitro susceptible to fluconazole, however 10.8% of the yeasts were resistant to one or more azole antifungal agents and 29% were intermediate susceptible to them. On the contrary, 5-fluorocytosine was very active against all isolates tested, and amphotericin B was active against 97.9% of them.

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans isolates from Yaoundé human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients exhibited intra-individual genetic diversity and variation in antifungal susceptibility profiles between isolates from the same patient.

    PubMed

    Kammalac Ngouana, Thierry; Drakulovski, Pascal; Krasteva, Donika; Kouanfack, Charles; Reynes, Jacques; Delaporte, Eric; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam; Mallié, Michèle; Bertout, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a dreadful opportunistic fungal infection amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. One complication in the management of the disease is the possible infection of a patient by two or more different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. This study investigated the intra-individual genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility of C. neoformans isolates from Yaoundé (Cameroon) HIV-infected patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Twenty-five clinical isolates were obtained during a prospective study. Five colonies were randomly collected from each initial sample. The 150 isolates obtained (125 colonies and 25 initial samples) were submitted to serotyping by multiplex PCR. Genotyping analyses were achieved using RFLP, and minisatellite- and microsatellite-length polymorphism. The antifungal susceptibility testing was carried out using a Sensititre YeastOne kit. Seven antifungals were tested: itraconazole, fluconazole, amphotericin B, ketoconazole, 5-fluorocytosine, posaconazole and voriconazole. The 150 isolates were identified as C. neoformans serotype A and genotype VNI. The microsatellite and minisatellite sequence analyses generated 15 genotypes. Six out of 25 (24 %) patients were found to be infected by two different genotypes. Antifungal susceptibility showed several profiles: posaconazole (0.015-0.25 µg ml-1), amphotericin B (0.06-1 µg ml-1), fluconazole (0.5-16 µg ml-1), itraconazole (0.008-0.12 µg ml-1), ketoconazole (0.008-0.12 µg ml-1), 5-fluorocytosine (0.25-16 µg ml-1) and voriconazole (0.008-0.12 µg ml-1). It was noted that isolates from the same patient might present different susceptibility profiles to an antifungal drug with differences of more than four dilutions. The results achieved highlighted the possible presence of isolates with different genotypes in a patient with dissimilar antifungal susceptibility profiles during a single episode of cryptococcal meningitis.

  1. The diversity and antifungal susceptibility of the yeasts isolated from coconut water and reconstituted fruit juices in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Natália O P; Piló, Fernanda B; Freitas, Larissa F D; Gomes, Fátima C O; Johann, Susana; Nardi, Regina M D; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterise the yeasts present in the reconstituted fruit juices and coconut water extracted with "coconut machines", both collected from commercial outlets in a Brazilian city, and to investigate the antifungal resistance of isolates from these beverages that were able to grow at 37°C. The yeast population counts in the coconut water samples ranged from 1.7 to >6.5logcfu/ml, and in the reconstituted fruit juices, the counts ranged from 1.5 to >5.5logcfu/ml. Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida boidinii, Candidaintermedia, Candidaoleophila, Candidaparapsilosis, Candidasantamariae, Candidatropicalis, Clavispora lusitaniae, Kloeckera apis, Lachancea fermentati, Pichia fermentans and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were the most frequent species isolated from these beverages. At least 18 yeast species isolated from these beverages have been reported as opportunistic pathogens. Eight yeast isolates were resistant to fluconazole, seven were resistant to itraconazole, and 26 to amphotericin B. Some yeast species were resistant to more than one of the antifungal drugs tested. Two isolates of C. tropicalis from the reconstituted fruit juices exhibited resistance to all three drugs. The presence of yeast strains that are resistant to commonly used antifungal drugs suggests a potential risk, at least to immunocompromised individuals who consume these beverages.

  2. Comparison of the Vitek 2 antifungal susceptibility system with the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Broth Microdilution Reference Methods and with the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest techniques for in vitro detection of antifungal resistance in yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Cuesta, Isabel; Buitrago, Maria J; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L

    2010-05-01

    The commercial technique Vitek 2 system for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast species was evaluated. A collection of 154 clinical yeast isolates, including amphotericin B- and azole-resistant organisms, was tested. Results were compared with those obtained by the reference procedures of both the CLSI and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Two other commercial techniques approved for clinical use, the Etest and the Sensititre YeastOne, were included in the comparative exercise as well. The average essential agreement (EA) between the Vitek 2 system and the reference procedures was >95%, comparable with the average EAs observed between the reference procedures and the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest. The EA values were >97% for Candida spp. and stood at 92% for Cryptococcus neoformans. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between the commercial techniques and the reference procedures were statistically significant (P<0.01). Percentages of very major errors were 2.6% between Vitek 2 and the EUCAST technique and 1.6% between Vitek 2 and the CLSI technique. The Vitek 2 MIC results were available after 14 to 18 h of incubation for all Candida spp. (average time to reading, 15.5 h). The Vitek 2 system was shown to be a reliable technique to determine antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast species and a more rapid and easier alternative for clinical laboratories than the procedures developed by either the CLSI or EUCAST.

  3. Antifungal polypeptides

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Ellanskaya, Irina; Ellanskaya, legal representative, Natalia; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K.; Schepers, Eric; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2009-09-15

    The invention relates to antifungal compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a fungal pathogen. Compositions including antifungal polypeptides isolated from a fungal fermentation broth are provided.

  4. Antifungal Drug Susceptibility of Candida Species Isolated from HIV-Positive Patients Recruited at a Public Hospital in São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Terças, Ana L. G.; Marques, Sirlei G.; Moffa, Eduardo B.; Alves, Márcia B.; de Azevedo, Conceição M. P. S.; Siqueira, Walter L.; Monteiro, Cristina A.

    2017-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common fungal infection in hospitalized patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Its progression results in invasive infections, which are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to quickly and accurately identify Candida spp. from oral mucosa of AIDS patients recruited at Presidente Vargas Hospital, in São Luís city, Brazil and to evaluate the sensitivity profile of these fungi to antifungals by using an automated system. Isolates were collected from oropharyngeal mucosa of 52 hospitalized AIDS patients, under anti-viral and antifungal therapies. Patients were included in research if they were HIV-positive, above 18 years of age and after obtaining their written consent. CHROMagar®Candida and the automated ViteK-2®system were used to isolate and identify Candida spp., respectively. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed using the ViteK-2®system, complemented with the Etest®, using the drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, flucytosine, and voriconazole. Oropharyngeal candidiasis had a high prevalence in these hospitalized AIDS patients (83%), and the most prevalent species was Candida albicans (56%). Antifungal susceptibility test showed that 64.7% of the Candida spp. were susceptible, 11.8% were dose-dependent sensitive, and 23.5% were resistant. All the Candida krusei and Candida famata isolates and two of Candida glabrata were resistant to fluconazole. Most of AIDS patients presented oropharyngeal candidiasis and C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species. The results showed high variability in resistance among isolated species and indicates the need to identify the Candida spp. involved in the infection and the need to test antifungal susceptibility as a guide in drug therapy in patients hospitalized with AIDS. This is the first relate about AIDS patients monitoring in a public hospital in São Luís concerning the precise identification and establishing of

  5. Geographic variation in the frequency of isolation and fluconazole and voriconazole susceptibilities of Candida glabrata: an assessment from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J; Gibbs, David L; Newell, Vance A; Barton, Richard; Bijie, Hu; Bille, Jacques; Chang, Shan-Chwen; da Luz Martins, Maria; Duse, Adriano; Dzierzanowska, Danuta; Ellis, David; Finquelievich, Jorge; Gould, Ian; Gur, Deniz; Hoosen, Anwar; Lee, Kyungwon; Mallatova, Nada; Mallie, Michele; Peng, N G Kee; Petrikos, George; Santiago, Axel; Trupl, Jan; VanDen Abeele, Ann Marie; Wadula, Jeannette; Zaidi, Mussaret

    2010-06-01

    Geographic differences in frequency and azole resistance among Candida glabrata may impact empiric antifungal therapy choice. We examined geographic variation in isolation and azole susceptibility of C. glabrata. We examined 23 305 clinical isolates of C. glabrata during ARTEMIS DISK global surveillance. Susceptibility testing to fluconazole and voriconazole was assessed by disk diffusion, and the results were grouped by geographic location: North America (NA) (2470 isolates), Latin America (LA) (2039), Europe (EU) (12 439), Africa and the Middle East (AME) (728), and Asia-Pacific (AP) (5629). Overall, C. glabrata accounted for 11.6% of 201 653 isolates of Candida and varied as a proportion of all Candida isolated from 7.4% in LA to 21.1% in NA. Decreased susceptibility (S) to fluconazole was observed in all geographic regions and ranged from 62.8% in AME to 76.7% in LA. Variation in fluconazole susceptibility was observed within each region: AP (range, 50-100% S), AME (48-86.9%), EU (44.8-88%), LA (43-92%), and NA (74.5-91.6%). Voriconazole was more active than fluconazole (range, 82.3-84.2% S) with similar regional variation. Among 22 sentinel sites participating in ARTEMIS from 2001 through 2007 (84 140 total isolates, 8163 C. glabrata), the frequency of C. glabrata isolation increased in 14 sites and the frequency of fluconazole resistance (R) increased in 11 sites over the 7-year period of study. The sites with the highest cumulative rates of fluconazole R were in Poland (22% R), the Czech Republic (27% R), Venezuela (27% R), and Greece (33% R). C. glabrata was most often isolated from blood, normally sterile body fluids and urine. There is substantial geographic and institutional variation in both frequency of isolation and azole resistance among C. glabrata. Prompt species identification and fluconazole susceptibility testing are necessary to optimize therapy for invasive candidiasis.

  6. Use of amplified fragment length polymorphism to identify 42 Cladophialophora strains related to cerebral phaeohyphomycosis with in vitro antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Badali, Hamid; de Hoog, G Sybren; Curfs-Breuker, Ilse; Klaassen, Corné H W; Meis, Jacques F

    2010-07-01

    The amplified fragment length polymorphism technique has been applied to identify neurotropic chaetothyrialean black yeasts and relatives from clinical sources. Cladophialophora bantiana, C. emmonsii, C. arxii, C. devriesii, and C. modesta, previously identified on the basis of sequencing and phenotypic and physiological criteria, were confirmed by cluster analysis, demonstrating the clear separation of C. bantiana as a rather homogeneous group from the other species. C. bantiana is a neurotropic fungus causing cerebral abscesses with a mortality of up to 70%. Successful therapy consists of neurosurgical intervention and optimal antifungal therapy. Since the latter is not clearly defined in a large series, we tested the in vitro activities of eight antifungal drugs against clinical isolates of C. bantiana (n = 37), C. modesta (n = 2), C. arxii (n = 1), C. emmonsii (n = 1), and C. devriesii (n = 1), all of which had caused invasive infections. The resulting MIC(90)s for all neurotropic C. bantiana strains were as follows, in increasing order: posaconazole, 0.125 microg/ml; itraconazole, 0.125 microg/ml; isavuconazole, 0.5 microg/ml; amphotericin B, 1 microg/ml; voriconazole, 2 microg/ml; anidulafungin, 2 microg/ml; caspofungin, 4 microg/ml; and fluconazole, 64 microg/ml. On the basis of these in vitro results and the findings of previous clinical and animal studies, posaconazole seems to be a good alternative to the standard treatment, amphotericin B, for C. bantiana cerebral infections. The new agent isavuconazole, which is also available as an intravenous preparation, has adequate activity against C. bantiana.

  7. Antifungal susceptibilities of clinical and environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans in Goiânia city, Goiás, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto; Fernandes, Orionalda de Fátima Lisboa; Kobayashi, Cláudia Castelo Branco Artiaga; Passos, Xisto Sena; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Lemos, Janine Aquino; Souza-Júnior, Ary Henrique; Silva, Maria do Rosário Rodrigues

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the antifungal activities of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole in 70 Cryptococcus neoformans strains obtained from cerebrospinal fluid from AIDS patients and 40 C. neoformans strains isolated from the environment. Four clinical isolates were identified as C. neoformans var. gattii. The susceptibility test was done using a broth microdilution method according to NCCLS M27-A2. Range minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for C. neoformans clinical isolates were 0.06-1.0 microg/mL for amphotericin B, 0.125-8 microg/mL for fluconazole, 0.03-0.5 microg/mL for itraconazole and 0.03-0.25 microg/mL for voriconazole. C. neoformans environmental isolates showed range MICs 0.015-0.125 microg/mL, 0.25-2.0 microg/mL, 0.007-0.125 microg/mL and 0.03-0.25 microg/mL for amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole respectively. The MICs results obtained from clinical and environmental isolates showed similar pattern of susceptibility and no resistance has been found in our isolates.

  8. Influence of Shaking on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Cryptococcus neoformans: a Comparison of the NCCLS Standard M27A Medium, Buffered Yeast Nitrogen Base, and RPMI–2% Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.; Martín-Díez, Francisco; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodero, Laura; Carpintero, Yolanda; Gorgojo, Begoña

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a nonfermentative yeast that requires oxygen for growth. The shaking of culture media achieves good oxygenation, promoting the growth of cryptococci. In this study, three test media (RPMI 1640, RPMI 1640–2% glucose, and buffered yeast nitrogen base [BYNB]) recommended in the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27A standard were examined. Growth abilities and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in microplates incubated at 35°C for 48 h were determined. The results indicated that shaking and an inoculum size of 105 CFU/ml yielded optimal growth of this yeast. Compared to RPMI 1640, supplementation of RPMI 1640 with 2% glucose did not significantly improve growth of C. neoformans and resulted in an 8.7-h delay of exponential growth. Cryptococcal growth in RPMI 1640 at 24 h was notably better than that in RPMI–2% glucose, although by 48 h the growths were comparable. The MIC range of amphotericin B observed for the C. neoformans strains grown in RPMI 1640 with or without glucose was too narrow to allow the separation of susceptible and resistant strains based on clinical outcome. The widest ranges of MICs of flucytosine and fluconazole were obtained with BYNB. This work demonstrates the need for a new antifungal susceptibility test for C. neoformans. PMID:10639369

  9. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Epidemiology, Molecular Identification, and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis Isolated from Patients with Candidemia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cantón, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena; Miranda-Zapico, Ilargi; Álvarez, María; Merino, Paloma; Campos-Herrero, Isolina; Marco, Francesc; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gomez G.; Yagüe, Genoveva; Guna, Remedios; Rubio, Carmen; Miranda, Consuelo; Pazos, Carmen; Velasco, David

    2011-01-01

    A 13-month prospective multicenter study including 44 hospitals was carried out to evaluate the epidemiology of Candida parapsilosis complex candidemia in Spain. Susceptibility to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin was tested by the microdilution colorimetric method. A total of 364 C. parapsilosis complex isolates were identified by molecular methods: C. parapsilosis (90.7%), Candida orthopsilosis (8.2%), and Candida metapsilosis (1.1%). Most candidemias (C. parapsilosis, 76.4%; C. orthopsilosis, 70.0%; C. metapsilosis, 100%) were observed in adults. No C. orthopsilosis or C. metapsilosis candidemias occurred in neonates. C. parapsilosis was most frequent in adult intensive care unit (28.8%), surgery (20.9%), and internal medicine (19.7%) departments; and C. orthopsilosis was most frequent in hematology (28.6%), pediatrics (12.0%), and neonatology (11.5%) departments. The geographic distribution of C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis was not uniform. According to CLSI clinical breakpoints, all C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis isolates were susceptible to the nine agents tested. Resistance (MICs > 1 mg/liter) was observed only in C. parapsilosis: amphotericin B, posaconazole, itraconazole, and caspofungin (0.3% each), anidulafungin (1.9%), and micafungin (2.5%). Applying the new species-specific fluconazole and echinocandin breakpoints, the rates of resistance to fluconazole for C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis increased to 4.8% and 0.3%, respectively; conversely, for C. parapsilosis they shifted from 1.9 to 0.6% (anidulafungin) and from 2.5 to 0.6% (micafungin). Our study confirms the different prevalence of C. parapsilosis complex candidemia among age groups: neither C. orthopsilosis nor C. metapsilosis was isolated from neonates; interestingly, C. metapsilosis was isolated only from adults and the elderly. The disparity in antifungal susceptibility among species

  10. Antifungal agent susceptibilities and interpretation of Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis isolated from dogs with and without seborrheic dermatitis skin.

    PubMed

    Yurayart, Chompoonek; Nuchnoul, Noppawan; Moolkum, Pornsawan; Jirasuksiri, Supitcha; Niyomtham, Waree; Chindamporn, Ariya; Kajiwara, Susumu; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2013-10-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis are recognized as commensal yeasts on the skin of healthy dogs but also causative agents of eborrheic dermatitis, especially in atopic dogs. We determined and compared the susceptibility levels of yeasts isolated from dogs with and without seborrheic dermatitis (SD) using the disk diffusion method (DD) for itraconazole (ITZ), ketoconazole (KTZ), nystatin (NYS), terbinafine (TERB) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and the broth microdilution method (BMD) for ITZ and KTZ. The reliability between the methods was assessed using an agreement analysis and linear regression. Forty-five M. pachydermatis and 28 C. parapsilosis isolates were identified based on physiological characteristics and an approved molecular analysis. By DD, all tested M. pachydermatis isolates were susceptible to ITZ, KTZ, NYS and TERB but resistant to 5-FC. Only 46 - 60% of the tested C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible to KTZ, TERB and 5-FC, but ITZ and NYS were effective against all. By BMD, over 95% of M. pachydermatis isolates were susceptible to KTZ and ITZ with an MIC90 < 0.03 and 0.12 μg/ml, respectively. The frequency of KTZ- and ITZ-resistant C. parapsilosis was 29% and 7%, and the MIC90 values were 1 μg/ml and 0.5-1 μg/ml, respectively. Regarding the agreement analysis, 2.2% of minor errors were observed in M. pachydermatis and 0.2-1% of very major errors occurred among C. parapsilosis. There were no significant differences in the yeast resistance rates between dogs with and without SD. KTZ and ITZ were still efficacious for M. pachydermatis but a high rate of KTZ resistant was reported in C. parapsilosis.

  11. Antifungal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lepak, Alexander J; Andes, David R

    2014-11-10

    Successful treatment of infectious diseases requires choice of the most suitable antimicrobial agent, comprising consideration of drug pharmacokinetics (PK), including penetration into infection site, pathogen susceptibility, optimal route of drug administration, drug dose, frequency of administration, duration of therapy, and drug toxicity. Antimicrobial pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies consider these variables and have been useful in drug development, optimizing dosing regimens, determining susceptibility breakpoints, and limiting toxicity of antifungal therapy. Here the concepts of antifungal PK/PD studies are reviewed, with emphasis on methodology and application. The initial sections of this review focus on principles and methodology. Then the pharmacodynamics of each major antifungal drug class (polyenes, flucytosine, azoles, and echinocandins) is discussed. Finally, the review discusses novel areas of pharmacodynamic investigation in the study and application of combination therapy.

  12. Multicenter Comparison of the Etest and EUCAST Methods for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida Isolates to Micafungin

    PubMed Central

    Bougnoux, M.-E.; Accoceberry, I.; Angoulvant, A.; Bailly, E.; Botterel, F.; Chevrier, S.; Chouaki, T.; Dalle, F.; Datry, A.; Dupuis, A.; Fekkar, A.; Gangneux, J. P.; Guitard, J.; Hennequin, C.; Le Govic, Y.; Le Pape, P.; Maubon, D.; Sautour, M.; Sendid, B.; Chandenier, J.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility of 933 Candida isolates, from 16 French hospitals, to micafungin was determined using the Etest in each center. All isolates were then sent to a single center for determination of MICs by the EUCAST reference method. Overall essential agreement between the two tests was 98.5% at ±2 log2 dilutions and 90.2% at ±1 log2 dilutions. Categorical agreement was 98.2%. The Etest is a valuable alternative to EUCAST for the routine determination of micafungin MICs in medical mycology laboratories. PMID:27297480

  13. Multicenter Comparison of the Etest and EUCAST Methods for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida Isolates to Micafungin.

    PubMed

    Bougnoux, M-E; Dannaoui, E; Accoceberry, I; Angoulvant, A; Bailly, E; Botterel, F; Chevrier, S; Chouaki, T; Cornet, M; Dalle, F; Datry, A; Dupuis, A; Fekkar, A; Gangneux, J P; Guitard, J; Hennequin, C; Le Govic, Y; Le Pape, P; Maubon, D; Ranque, S; Sautour, M; Sendid, B; Chandenier, J

    2016-08-01

    In vitro susceptibility of 933 Candida isolates, from 16 French hospitals, to micafungin was determined using the Etest in each center. All isolates were then sent to a single center for determination of MICs by the EUCAST reference method. Overall essential agreement between the two tests was 98.5% at ±2 log2 dilutions and 90.2% at ±1 log2 dilutions. Categorical agreement was 98.2%. The Etest is a valuable alternative to EUCAST for the routine determination of micafungin MICs in medical mycology laboratories.

  14. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of the yeast- and mould-phases of the dimorphic fungal pathogen, Emergomyces africanus (formerly Emmonsia species), from HIV-infected South African patients.

    PubMed

    Maphanga, Tsidiso G; Britz, Erika; Zulu, Thokozile G; Mpembe, Ruth S; Naicker, Serisha D; Schwartz, Ilan S; Govender, Nelesh P

    2017-03-29

    Introduction: Disseminated emmonsiosis is an important AIDS-related mycosis in South Africa caused by Emergomyces africanus, a newly-described and -renamed dimorphic fungal pathogen. In vitro antifungal susceptibility data can guide management.Materials and Methods: Identification of invasive clinical isolates was confirmed phenotypically and by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region. Yeast and mould-phase MICs for fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin, anidulafungin, micafungin and flucytosine were determined using custom-made frozen broth microdilution (BMD) panels, as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. MICs for amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole were determined by Etest.Results: Fifty unique Emergomyces africanus isolates were tested. Yeast- and mould-phase geometric mean (GM) BMD and Etest MICs values were 0.01 mg/L for itraconazole. Voriconazole and posaconazole GM BMD MICs were 0.01 mg/L for both phases, while GM Etest MICs were 0.001 mg/L and 0.002 mg/L, respectively. Fluconazole GM BMD MICs were 0.18 mg/L for both phases. For amphotericin B, GM Etest MICs for the yeast- and mould-phases were 0.03 mg/L and 0.01 mg/L. The echinocandins and flucytosine had very limited in vitro activity. Treatment and outcome data were available for 37 patients; in a multivariable model including MIC data, only isolation from blood (OR 8.6, 95% CI 1.3 - 54.4, p = 0.02) or bone marrow (OR 12.1, 95% CI 1.2 - 120.2, p = 0.03) (vs. skin biopsy) was associated with death.Conclusions:In vitro susceptibility data support management of disseminated emmonsiosis with amphotericin B followed by itraconazole, voriconazole or posaconazole. Fluconazole was a relatively less potent agent.

  15. Molecular typing and antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus neoformans species complex isolates in Goiania, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, L K H; Souza Junior, A H; Costa, C R; Faganello, J; Vainstein, M H; Chagas, A L B; Souza, A C M; Silva, M R R

    2010-01-01

    A total of 124 Cryptococcus isolates, including 84 clinical strains obtained from cerebrospinal fluid from AIDS patients and 40 environmental isolates from pigeon excreta and from Eucalyptus trees, were studied. The varieties, serotypes, phospholipase activity and molecular profile of these isolates were determined. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii serotype A was identified in 120 isolates and Cryptococcus gattii serotype B in four isolates. The clinical isolates showed higher phospholipase activity than environmental isolates. Similar patterns of in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole and no resistance were found for all isolates. Molecular type VNI (C. neoformans var. grubii) was recovered in 80 clinical and 40 environmental isolates while the type VGIII (C. gattii) was found in four clinical isolates. This study demonstrated for the first time the molecular types of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus isolates in the midwest Brazil region.

  16. Candida albicans bloodstream isolates in a German university hospital are genetically heterogenous and susceptible to commonly used antifungals.

    PubMed

    Huyke, Johanna; Martin, Ronny; Walther, Grit; Weber, Michael; Kaerger, Kerstin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Elias, Johannes; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    From an eight-year-span, 99 Candida bloodstream isolates were collected at the University Hospital Wuerzburg, Germany. In this study, all strains were analyzed using molecular and phenotypic typing methods. Confirmatory species identification revealed three isolates that were initially diagnosed as C. albicans to be actually C. dubliniensis. Two isolates contained a mixed culture of C. albicans and C. glabrata, in one of the specimens both species could be separated while it was not possible to recover C. albicans in the other sample. The remaining 95 C. albicans isolates were profiled by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Phylogenetic analyses showed a highly heterogenous collection of strains, associated with many different clades and constituting a set of new diploid sequence types (DST). For all strains with identical DST, patient data were reviewed for potential nosocomial transmission. In addition, all isolates were tested for their susceptibility to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole. No clinically relevant resistance could be detected. Furthermore, these data underline that correlation between minimal inhibitory concentrations for caspofungin and anidulafungin is low.

  17. Pigments of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian; Schliemann, Willibald

    2007-01-01

    The complex pigment pattern of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) cap skins has been studied by LC-DAD and mass spectrometry. Among the betaxanthins the corresponding derivatives of serine, threonine, ethanolamine, alanine, Dopa, phenylalanine and tryptophan are reported for the first time to contribute to the pigment pattern of fly agarics. Betalamic acid, the chromophoric precursor of betaxanthins and betacyanins, muscaflavin and seco-dopas were also detected. Furthermore, the red-purple muscapurpurin and the red muscarubrin were tentatively assigned while further six betacyanin-like components could not be structurally allocated. Stability studies indicated a high susceptibility of pigment extracts to degradation which led to rapid colour loss thus rendering a complete characterization of betacyanin-like compounds impossible at present. Taking into account these difficulties the presented results may be a starting point for a comprehensive characterization of the pigment composition of fly agarics.

  18. Genotyping of Fusarium Isolates from Onychomycoses in Colombia: Detection of Two New Species Within the Fusarium solani Species Complex and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Suarez, Marcela; Cano-Lira, José Francisco; de García, María Caridad Cepero; Sopo, Leticia; De Bedout, Catalina; Cano, Luz Elena; García, Ana María; Motta, Adriana; Amézquita, Adolfo; Cárdenas, Martha; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Guarro, Josep; Restrepo, Silvia; Celis, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Fusariosis have been increasing in Colombia in recent years, but its epidemiology is poorly known. We have morphologically and molecularly characterized 89 isolates of Fusarium obtained between 2010 and 2012 in the cities of Bogotá and Medellín. Using a multi-locus sequence analysis of rDNA internal transcribed spacer, a fragment of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (Tef-1α) and of the RNA-dependent polymerase subunit II (Rpb2) genes, we identified the phylogenetic species and circulating haplotypes. Since most of the isolates studied were from onychomycoses (nearly 90 %), we carried out an epidemiological study to determine the risk factors associated with such infections. Five phylogenetic species of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), i.e., F. falciforme, F. keratoplasticum, F. lichenicola, F. petroliphilum, and FSSC 6 as well as two of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC), i.e., FOSC 3 and FOSC 4, were identified. The most prevalent species were FOSC 3 (38.2%) followed by F. keratoplasticum (33.7%). In addition, our isolates were distributed into 23 haplotypes (14 into FOSC and nine into FSSC). Two of the FSSC phylogenetic species and two haplotypes of FSSC were not described before. Our results demonstrate that recipients of pedicure treatments have a lower probability of acquiring onychomycosis than those not receiving such treatments. The antifungal susceptibility of all the isolates to five clinically available agents showed that amphotericin B was the most active drug, while the azoles exhibited lower in vitro activity.

  19. Antifungal and Antibacterial Metabolites from a French Poplar Type Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Boisard, Séverine; Le Ray, Anne-Marie; Landreau, Anne; Kempf, Marie; Cassisa, Viviane; Flurin, Catherine; Richomme, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    During this study, the in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activities of different extracts (aqueous and organic) obtained from a French propolis batch were evaluated. Antifungal activity was evaluated by broth microdilution on three pathogenic strains: Candida albicans, C. glabrata, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Antibacterial activity was assayed using agar dilution method on 36 Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains including Staphylococcus aureus. Organic extracts showed a significant antifungal activity against C. albicans and C. glabrata (MIC80 between 16 and 31 µg/mL) but only a weak activity towards A. fumigatus (MIC80 = 250 µg/mL). DCM based extracts exhibited a selective Gram-positive antibacterial activity, especially against S. aureus (SA) and several of its methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) strains (MIC100 30–97 µg/mL). A new and active derivative of catechin was also identified whereas a synergistic antimicrobial effect was noticed during this study. PMID:25873978

  20. EUCAST breakpoints for antifungals.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Arendrup, Maiken C; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Donnelly, J Peter; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2010-03-01

    Susceptibility testing of fungi and development of interpretative breakpoints has become increasingly important due to the growing incidence of invasive fungal infections, the number and classes of antifungals, and the emerging reports of acquired resistance. The subcommittee on antifungal susceptibility testing of the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) has developed standards for susceptibility testing of fermentative yeasts and molds as well as proposing breakpoints for fluconazole and voriconazole against Candida. The aim of this work is to describe the EUCAST process of setting breakpoints for antifungals. Five aspects are evaluated during the process of developing breakpoints: 1) the most common dosage used in each European country, 2) the definition of the wild-type population for each target microorganism at the species level and the determination of epidemiological cutoffs, 3) the drug's pharmacokinetics and 4) pharmacodynamics, including Monte Carlo simulations, and 5) the correlation of MICs with clinical outcome of patients treated with the compound. When insufficient data are available (e.g., due to lack of information on the clinical outcome of infections caused by isolates with an elevated MIC), epidemiological cutoff values, rather than breakpoints, are recommended until the necessary information becomes available.

  1. Performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method, the CLSI agar screen method, and the Vitek 2 automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing system for detection of clinical isolates of Enterococci with low- and medium-level VanB-type vancomycin resistance: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Kristin; Giske, Christian G; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Matuschek, Erika; Schønning, Kristian; Leegaard, Truls M; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn

    2014-05-01

    Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect low-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci were evaluated in a Scandinavian multicenter study (n=28). A phenotypically and genotypically well-characterized diverse collection of Enterococcus faecalis (n=12) and Enterococcus faecium (n=18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n=5), Norwegian (n=13), and Swedish (n=10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n=28) and the CLSI agar screen (n=18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n=5). The EUCAST disk diffusion method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P=0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME rate, 0%; specificity, 1). The performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method was challenged by differences in vancomycin inhibition zone sizes as well as the experience of the personnel in interpreting fuzzy zone edges as an indication of vancomycin resistance. Laboratories using Oxoid agar (P<0.0001) or Merck Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar (P=0.027) for the disk diffusion assay performed significantly better than did laboratories using BBL MH II medium. Laboratories using Difco brain heart infusion (BHI) agar for the CLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P=0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI agar. In conclusion, both the EUCAST disk diffusion and CLSI agar screening methods performed acceptably (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.94 to 0.98) in the detection of VanB-type vancomycin-resistant enterococci with low-level resistance. Importantly, use of the CLSI agar screen requires careful monitoring of the vancomycin concentration in the plates. Moreover, disk diffusion methodology requires that personnel be trained in interpreting zone edges.

  2. Comprehensive approach for the detection of antifungal compounds using a susceptible strain of Candida albicans and confirmation of in vivo activity with the Galleria mellonella model.

    PubMed

    Favre-Godal, Quentin; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Queiroz, Emerson Ferreira; Conan, Céline; Marcourt, Laurence; Wardojo, Bambang Prajogo Eko; Voinesco, Francine; Buchwalder, Aurélie; Gindro, Katia; Sanglard, Dominique; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2014-09-01

    An efficient screening strategy for the identification of potentially interesting low-abundance antifungal natural products in crude extracts that combines both a sensitive bioautography assay and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) microfractionation was developed. This method relies on high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) bioautography with a hypersusceptible engineered strain of Candida albicans (DSY2621) for bioactivity detection, followed by the evaluation of wild type strains in standard microdilution antifungal assays. Active extracts were microfractionated by HPLC in 96-well plates, and the fractions were subsequently submitted to the bioassay. This procedure enabled precise localisation of the antifungal compounds directly in the HPLC chromatograms of the crude extracts. HPLC-PDA-mass spectrometry (MS) data obtained in parallel to the HPLC antifungal profiles provided a first chemical screening about the bioactive constituents. Transposition of the HPLC analytical conditions to medium-pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC) allowed the efficient isolation of the active constituents in mg amounts for structure confirmation and more extensive characterisation of their biological activities. The antifungal properties of the isolated natural products were evaluated by their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in a dilution assay against both wild type and engineered strains of C. albicans. The biological activity of the most promising agents was further evaluated in vitro by electron microscopy and in vivo in a Galleria mellonella model of C. albicans infection. The overall procedure represents a rational and comprehensive means of evaluating antifungal activity from various perspectives for the selection of initial hits that can be explored in more in-depth mode-of-action studies. This strategy is illustrated by the identification and bioactivity evaluation of a series of antifungal compounds from the methanolic extract of a Rubiaceae

  3. Antifungal activity of Cynara scolymus L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X F; Zhang, H X; Lo, R

    2005-01-01

    Chloroform, ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of Cynara scolymus L. leaves, heads and stems were tested for their antifungal activity using the agar-well diffusion assay technique. The leaves extracts and the ethanol fractions were found to be the most effective extract against all the tested organisms.

  4. Electro-osmosis in gels: Application to Agar-Agar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, Fabien; Boscus, Jérôme; Bénet, Jean-Claude

    2008-10-01

    Widely used in food- and bio-engineering as a reference material, Agar-Agar gel is the focus of an experimental investigation concerning the electro-osmosis phenomenon. After presenting the experimental methods, one trial is discussed in detail. A fair reproducibility of results is obtained, and the averaged electro-osmotic permeability is provided. This value lies in the range generally measured on various kind of soils, even if Agar-Agar gel does not share any micro-structural characteristics with soils. To cite this article: F. Cherblanc et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  5. Molecular epidemiology and in-vitro antifungal susceptibility of Aspergillus terreus species complex isolates in Delhi, India: evidence of genetic diversity by amplified fragment length polymorphism and microsatellite typing.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Shallu; Sharma, Cheshta; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Agarwal, Puneet; Agarwal, Kshitij; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus terreus is emerging as an etiologic agent of invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals in several medical centers in the world. Infections due to A. terreus are of concern due to its resistance to amphotericin B, in vivo and in vitro, resulting in poor response to antifungal therapy and high mortality. Herein we examined a large collection of molecularly characterized, geographically diverse A. terreus isolates (n = 140) from clinical and environmental sources in India for the occurrence of cryptic A. terreus species. The population structure of the Indian A. terreus isolates and their association with those outside India was determined using microsatellite based typing (STR) technique and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis (AFLP). Additionally, in vitro antifungal susceptibility of A. terreus isolates was determined against 7 antifungals. Sequence analyses of the calmodulin locus identified the recently described cryptic species A. hortai, comprising 1.4% of Aspergillus section Terrei isolates cultured from cases of aspergilloma and probable invasive aspergillosis not reported previously. All the nine markers used for STR typing of A. terreus species complex proved to be highly polymorphic. The presence of high genetic diversity revealing 75 distinct genotypes among 101 Indian A. terreus isolates was similar to the marked heterogeneity noticed in the 47 global A. terreus population exhibiting 38 unique genotypes mainly among isolates from North America and Europe. Also, AFLP analysis showed distinct banding patterns for genotypically diverse A. terreus isolates. Furthermore, no correlation between a particular genotype and amphotericin B susceptibility was observed. Overall, 8% of the A. terreus isolates exhibited low MICs of amphotericin B. All the echinocandins and azoles (voriconazole, posaconazole and isavuconazole) demonstrated high potency against all the isolates. The study emphasizes the need of molecular

  6. Molecular Epidemiology and In-Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Aspergillus terreus Species Complex Isolates in Delhi, India: Evidence of Genetic Diversity by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism and Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Shallu; Sharma, Cheshta; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Agarwal, Puneet; Agarwal, Kshitij; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F.; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus terreus is emerging as an etiologic agent of invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals in several medical centers in the world. Infections due to A. terreus are of concern due to its resistance to amphotericin B, in vivo and in vitro, resulting in poor response to antifungal therapy and high mortality. Herein we examined a large collection of molecularly characterized, geographically diverse A. terreus isolates (n = 140) from clinical and environmental sources in India for the occurrence of cryptic A. terreus species. The population structure of the Indian A. terreus isolates and their association with those outside India was determined using microsatellite based typing (STR) technique and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis (AFLP). Additionally, in vitro antifungal susceptibility of A. terreus isolates was determined against 7 antifungals. Sequence analyses of the calmodulin locus identified the recently described cryptic species A. hortai, comprising 1.4% of Aspergillus section Terrei isolates cultured from cases of aspergilloma and probable invasive aspergillosis not reported previously. All the nine markers used for STR typing of A. terreus species complex proved to be highly polymorphic. The presence of high genetic diversity revealing 75 distinct genotypes among 101 Indian A. terreus isolates was similar to the marked heterogeneity noticed in the 47 global A. terreus population exhibiting 38 unique genotypes mainly among isolates from North America and Europe. Also, AFLP analysis showed distinct banding patterns for genotypically diverse A. terreus isolates. Furthermore, no correlation between a particular genotype and amphotericin B susceptibility was observed. Overall, 8% of the A. terreus isolates exhibited low MICs of amphotericin B. All the echinocandins and azoles (voriconazole, posaconazole and isavuconazole) demonstrated high potency against all the isolates. The study emphasizes the need of molecular

  7. In vitro assessment of antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, K

    1986-01-01

    Several studies have documented the variability in the susceptibility pattern of fungi to antifungal drugs, and fungi possess resistance determinants to negate the effects of antifungal agents. In vitro assessment of both resistance and susceptibility are measured by suitable concentration endpoints of the antifungal drug, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). MICs serve as the main parameter to define the fungistatic action on fungi growing in culture. For the antifungals used for treatment of local mycoses, the limit between a MIC value indicating susceptibility and one indicating resistance is usually determined empirically on the basis of the correlation between MIC values, and either positive or negative response to chemotherapy. The principles of susceptibility testing of fungi are essentially the same as those for bacteria. However, testing with fungi must deal with the fact that interpretation of the results is complicated by inherent differences in fungal morphology, growth rate, and optimal culture conditions. Several factors could adversely affect the test results and must be considered in the design of susceptibility testing of fungi. It is obvious when the present data on fungal susceptibility testing are reviewed that much more work on standardization of techniques and interpretation of results is necessary. This presentation will focus on the in vitro susceptibility testing for determining primary and secondary drug resistance of griseofulvin and azole antifungal agents, and the correlation between the activities of these antifungals in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Screening of antifungal agents using ethanol precipitation and bioautography of medicinal and food plants.

    PubMed

    Schmourlo, Gracilene; Mendonça-Filho, Ricardo R; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Costa, Sônia S

    2005-01-15

    In the search for bioactive compounds, bioautography and ethanol precipitation of macromolecules (proteins, polysaccharides, etc.) of plant aqueous extracts were associated in an antifungal screening. Thus, the supernatants, precipitates (obtained by ethanol precipitation) and aqueous extracts were investigated of medicinal and fruit bearing plants used against skin diseases by the Brazilian population. The agar diffusion and broth dilution methods were used to assess the activity against three fungi: Candida albicans, Trichophyton rubrum and Cryptococcus neoformans. The results, evaluated by the diameter of the inhibition zone of fungal growth, indicate that six plant species, among the 16 investigated, showed significant antifungal activity. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on plant extracts that showed high efficacy against the tested microorganisms. The most susceptible yeast was Trichophyton rubrum and the best antifungal activity was shown by Xanthosoma sagittifolium supernatant. The bioautography was performed only for the aqueous extracts and supernatants of those plants that showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, using n-butanol/acetic acid/water (BAW) 8:1:1 to develop silica gel TLC plates. Clear inhibition zones were observed for aqueous extracts of Schinus molle (R(f) 0.89) and Schinus terebinthifolius (R(f) 0.80) against Candida albicans, as for supernatant of Anacardium occidentale (R(f) 0.31) against Cryptococcus neoformans. The separation of macromolecules from metabolites, as in the case of Anacardium occidentale, Solanum sp. and Xanthosoma sagittifolium, enhances antifungal activity. In other cases, the antifungal activity is destroyed, as observed for Momordica charantia, Schinus molle and Schinus terebinthifolius.

  9. Gravimorphogenesis in agarics.

    PubMed

    Moore, D; Hock, B; Greening, J P; Kern, V D; Novak Frazer, L; Monzer, J

    1996-03-01

    The shape changes which occur in agaric fruit bodies in response to change in the direction of gravity, usually referred to as gravitropism are morphogenetic changes. Our interest in what we prefer to call gravimorphogenesis is to use it to examine morphogenesis experimentally. We are examining two agarics, Coprinus cinereus and Flammulina velutipes, and applying the best available technologies, including video analysis, all forms of electron microscopy, computer-aided image analysis and experiments in orbit in Spacelab. Responses to gravity of the two organisms differ in ways which can be related to their ecological and structural adaptations. C. cinereus reacts extremely rapidly; its fruit body can regain the vertical within 3 h of being placed horizontal, whereas F. velutipes requires 12 h to bend through 90 degrees. The fungi also differ in the bulk of tissue involved in the response. In Coprinus, a zone extending several cm down from the apex is normally involved in bending. In Flammulina, gravisensing is limited to a region just a few mm immediately below the cap, although curvature is performed in a zone of up to 2 cm below. Flammulina cultures were flown on the Spacelab D-2 mission in 1993, and fruit body disorientation in orbit provides the first definitive proof that 'gravitropism' really is a response to the unidirectional gravity vector. Experiments with different clinostat rotation rates in Flammulina indicate that the perception threshold is about 10(-4) x g. Analysis of different times of exposure to an altered gravity vector prior to clinorotation in Coprinus reveals that the perception time is 7 minutes and that continued response requires continued exposure. Cell size determinations in Coprinus demonstrate that cells of the stem increase in length, not diameter, to produce the growth differential. In Flammulina a unique population of highly electron-transparent microvacuoles changes in distribution; decreasing in upper cells and increasing in the

  10. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  11. In vitro antifungal activity of sertaconazole compared with nine other drugs against 250 clinical isolates of dermatophytes and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, A J; Guglietta, A; Palacín, C; Casals, J; del Valle, O; Guardià, C; Rodríguez, V; Quindós, G

    2004-12-01

    We have tested 250 strains belonging to 15 species of clinically important dermatophytes and Scopulariopsis against ten antifungal drugs using an agar diffusion method (NeoSensitabstrade mark, Rosco, Taastrup, Denmark). Some of the experimental factors were adapted to dermatophyte development, such as temperature (28 vs. 35 degrees C) and time of incubation (2-5 days vs. 21-74 h). The antifungals used are itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, clotrimazole, sertaconazole, terbinafine, tioconazole, fluconazole, isoconazole and econazole. Except for fluconazole, all the drugs tested have shown to be highly effective, especially sertaconazole and terbinafine. Percentages of susceptibility ranged between 94% for terbinafine, 87.6% for sertaconazole and 86.4% clotrimazole; 81.6% econazole; 42.8% fluconazole; 57.2% isoconazole; 78.4% itraconazole; 74.4% ketoconazole; 73.3% miconazole, and 85.2% for tioconazole. Percentages of resistance were similar between sertaconazole and terbinafine (4%) but in contrast to the 48% obtained for fluconazole.

  12. Results from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Study, 1997 to 2007: a 10.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of Candida Species to fluconazole and voriconazole as determined by CLSI standardized disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Gibbs, D L; Newell, V A; Ellis, D; Tullio, V; Rodloff, A; Fu, W; Ling, T A

    2010-04-01

    Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results for 256,882 isolates of Candida spp. were collected from 142 sites in 41 countries from June 1997 to December 2007. Data were collected for 197,619 isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 to 2007. A total of 31 different species of Candida were isolated. Increased rates of isolation of the common non-albicans species C. glabrata (10.2% to 11.7%), C. tropicalis (5.4% to 8.0%), and C. parapsilosis (4.8% to 5.6%) were noted when the time periods 1997 to 2000 and 2005 to 2007 were compared. Investigators tested clinical isolates of Candida spp. by the CLSI M44-A disk diffusion method. Overall, 90.2% of Candida isolates tested were susceptible (S) to fluconazole; however, 13 of 31 species identified exhibited decreased susceptibility (<75% S), similar to that seen with the resistant (R) species C. glabrata and C. krusei. Among 197,619 isolates of Candida spp. tested against voriconazole, 95.0% were S and 3% were R. About 30% of fluconazole-R isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. rugosa, C. lipolytica, C. pelliculosa, C. apicola, C. haemulonii, C. humicola, C. lambica, and C. ciferrii remained S to voriconazole. An increase in fluconazole resistance over time was seen with C. parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, C. lusitaniae, C. sake, and C. pelliculosa. Among the emerging fluconazole-R species were C. guilliermondii (11.4% R), C. inconspicua (53.2% R), C. rugosa (41.8% R), and C. norvegensis (40.7% R). The rates of isolation of C. rugosa, C. inconspicua, and C. norvegensis increased by 5- to 10-fold over the 10.5-year study period. C. guilliermondii and C. rugosa were most prominent in Latin America, whereas C. inconspicua and C. norvegensis were most common in Eastern European countries. This survey identifies several less-common species of Candida with decreased susceptibility to azoles. These organisms may pose a future threat to optimal antifungal therapy and underscore the importance of prompt and

  13. Results from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Study, 1997 to 2007: 10.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of noncandidal yeast species to fluconazole and voriconazole determined by CLSI standardized disk diffusion testing.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Gibbs, D L; Newell, V A; Bijie, H; Dzierzanowska, D; Klimko, N N; Letscher-Bru, V; Lisalova, M; Muehlethaler, K; Rennison, C; Zaidi, M

    2009-01-01

    Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results determined by the CLSI M44-A disk diffusion method for 11,240 isolates of noncandidal yeasts were collected from 134 study sites in 40 countries from June 1997 through December 2007. Data were collected for 8,717 yeast isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 through 2007. A total of 22 different species/organism groups were isolated, of which Cryptococcus neoformans was the most common (31.2% of all isolates). Overall, Cryptococcus (32.9%), Saccharomyces (11.7%), Trichosporon (10.6%), and Rhodotorula (4.1%) were the most commonly identified genera. The overall percentages of isolates in each category (susceptible, susceptible dose dependent, and resistant) were 78.0%, 9.5%, and 12.5% and 92.7%, 2.3%, and 5.0% for fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively. Less than 30% of fluconazole-resistant isolates of Cryptococcus spp., Cryptococcus albidus, Cryptococcus laurentii, Trichosporon beigelii/Trichosporon cutaneum, Rhodotorula spp., Rhodotorula rubra/Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and Rhodotorula glutinis remained susceptible to voriconazole. Emerging resistance to fluconazole was documented among isolates of C. neoformans from the Asia-Pacific, Africa/Middle East, and Latin American regions but not among isolates from Europe or North America. This survey documents the continuing broad spectrum of activity of voriconazole against opportunistic yeast pathogens but identifies several of the less common species with decreased azole susceptibility. These organisms may pose a future threat to optimal antifungal therapy and emphasize the importance of prompt and accurate species identification.

  14. Antifungal Activity of Cinnamon Oil and Olive Oil against Candida Spp. Isolated from Blood Stream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Hina; Singh, Gajender; Punia, Parul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recently non-albicans Candida has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in blood stream infections. Some species of the Candida are becoming increasingly resistant to first line and second line antifungals such as echinocandins and fluconazole. In view of increasing global antifungal resistance, role of alternative and better antifungals like natural plant products need to be explored. Essential oils are known to exhibit antimicrobial activity against various fungi. Hence, we evaluated the efficacy of cinnamon oil and olive oil against Candida spp. Aim To evaluate the invitro antifungal activity of olive oil and cinnamon oil against blood stream Candida isolates. Materials and Methods The present prospective observational study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology at a tertiary care teaching hospital during one year June 2011-July 2012. Blood samples were collected from 1376 patients clinically suspected to have fungal septicaemia, out of which 100 (7.2%) Candida isolates obtained, were speciated by conventional methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing of all the isolates was done against fluconazole, voriconazole as per NCCL (M27-A2) and against olive oil and cinnamon oil by agar well diffusion method. Results Prevalence of Candidemia was 7.26%. C. albicans (85.3%) and C. parapsilosis (85.7%) were most sensitive to fluconazole followed by C. tropicalis (67.4%). All isolates were 100% sensitive to voriconazole. Both oils were found to be effective against nearly 50% of the Candida isolates. About 55.5% of fluconazole resistant C. krusei strains were sensitive to olive and cinnamon oil. Conclusion Fluconazole resistant non-albicans Candida has emerged as major cause of Candidemia. Cinnamon and olive oil show marked sensitivity against albicans and non-albicans spp. PMID:27656437

  15. Patterns of in vitro activity of itraconazole and imidazole antifungal agents against Candida albicans with decreased susceptibility to fluconazole from Spain.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Suarez, J V; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L

    1995-07-01

    Two groups of recent clinical isolates of Candida albicans consisting of 101 isolates for which fluconazole MICs were < or = 0.5 microgram/ml (n = 50) and > or = 4.0 micrograms/ml (n = 51), respectively, were compared for their susceptibilities to fluconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ketoconazole, and itraconazole. Susceptibility tests were performed by a photometer-read broth microdilution method with an improved RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 18 g of glucose per liter (RPMI-2% glucose; J. L. Rodríguez-Tudela and J. V. Martínez-Suárez, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 38:45-48, 1994). Preparation of drugs, basal medium, and inocula was done by the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The MIC endpoint was calculated objectively from the turbidimetric data read at 24 h as the lowest drug concentration at which growth was just equal to or less than 20% of that in the positive control well (MIC 80%). In vitro susceptibility testing separated azole-susceptible strains from the strains with decreased susceptibilities to azoles if wide ranges of concentrations (20 doubling dilutions) were used for ketoconazole, miconazole, and clotrimazole. By comparison with isolates for which fluconazole MICs were < or = 0.5 microgram/ml, those isolates for which fluconazole MICs were > or = 4.0 micrograms/ml were in general less susceptible to other azole drugs, but different patterns of decreased susceptibility were found, including uniform increases in the MICs of all azole derivatives, higher MICs of several azoles but not others, and elevated MICs of fluconazole only. On the other hand, decreased susceptibility to any other azole drug was never found among strains for which MICs of fluconazole were lower.

  16. [In vitro antifungal resistance in Candida albicans from HIV-infected patients with and without oral candidosis.].

    PubMed

    Ceballos Salobreña, A; Gaitán Cepeda, L A; Orihuela Cañada, F; Olea Barrionuevo, D; Ceballos García, L; Quindós, G

    1999-12-01

    The main purpose of this study has been to determine the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates from HIV-infected or AIDS patients, depending on the presence of oral candidosis. The oral cavity of 307 HIV-infected or AIDS patients was examined and an oral swab was cultured on Sabouraud glucose agar and studied by conventional mycological methods. In vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested by disk diffusion with Neo-Sensitabs tablets (Rosco Diagnostica, Dinamarca). One hundred and thirty five Candida albicans isolates (91 serotype A, 38 serotype B, three C. albicans variety stellatoidea and three untyped isolates), three Candida krusei and two Candida glabrata were obtained. All the isolates were susceptible to nystatin and amphotericin B. However, 7.9% isolates were resistant to fluconazole and 2.9% isolates were resistant to ketoconazole or itraconazole. Nearly all C. krusei and C. glabrata isolates, 31% patients with candidosis and 20% Candida-colonized patients showed decreased susceptibility to azoles. This study shows that polyenes had a great in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates from HIV-infected patients and that in vitro resistance to azoles is not as high as observed in other countries.

  17. Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Clinical Isolates of the Candida rugosa Species Complex and Proposal of the New Species Candida neorugosa

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Katihuska; Sutton, Deanna A.; Cano, Josep; Fothergill, Annette W.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Zhang, Sean; Watkins, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Candida rugosa is a poorly known fungal species occasionally involved in human infections. A molecular analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal genes of 24 clinical isolates phenotypically identified as C. rugosa demonstrated that only 10 (41.6%) isolates belonged to that species. The other isolates were identified as Candida pararugosa (41.6%) and Candida pseudorugosa (8.3%). The remaining two isolates, from human and equine infections, respectively, were clearly different from the others and represent a new species proposed here as Candida neorugosa. The closest species by D1/D2 sequences was the type strain of C. rugosa, with only 92.3% similarity. C. neorugosa can also be differentiated from all other species of the C. rugosa complex by phenotypic features. The eight antifungal drugs tested showed high in vitro activity against the 24 isolates included in the study. PMID:22553236

  18. Comparison of the Sensititre YeastOne colorimetric antifungal panel with CLSI microdilution for antifungal susceptibility testing of the echinocandins against Candida spp., using new clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Chaturvedi, V; Diekema, D J; Ghannoum, M A; Holliday, N M; Killian, S B; Knapp, C C; Messer, S A; Miskou, A; Ramani, R

    2012-08-01

    A commercially prepared dried colorimetric microdilution panel (Sensititre Yeast One, TREK Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH, USA) was compared in 3 different laboratories with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference microdilution method by testing 2 quality control strains, 25 reproducibility strains, and 404 isolates of Candida spp. against anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin. Reference CLSI BMD MIC end points and YeastOne colorimetric end points were read after 24 h of incubation. Excellent (100%) essential agreement (within 2 dilutions) between the reference and colorimetric MICs was observed. Categorical agreement (CA) between the 2 methods was assessed using the new species-specific clinical breakpoints (CBPs): susceptible (S), ≤0.25 μg/mL; intermediate (I), 0.5 μg/mL; and resistant (R), ≥1 μg/mL, for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei, and ≤2 μg/mL (S), 4 μg/mL (I), and ≥8 μg/mL (R) for C. parapsilosis and all 3 echinocandins. The new CBPs for anidulafungin and caspofungin and C. glabrata are ≤0.12 μg/mL (S), 0.25 μg/mL (I), and ≥0.5 μg/mL (R), whereas those for micafungin are ≤0.06 μg/mL (S), 0.12 μg/mL (I), and ≥0.25 μg/mL (R). Due to the lack of CBPs for any of the echinocandins and C. lusitaniae, the epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) were used for this species to categorize the isolates as wild-type (WT; MIC ≤ECV) and non-WT (MIC >ECV), respectively, for anidulafungin (≤2 μg/mL/>2 μg/mL), caspofungin (≤1 μg/mL/>1 μg/mL), and micafungin (≤0.5 μg/mL/>0.5 μg/mL). CA ranged from 93.6% (caspofungin) to 99.6% (micafungin) with less than 1% very major or major errors. The YeastOne colorimetric method remains comparable to the CLSI BMD reference method for testing the susceptibility of Candida spp. to the echinocandins when using the new (lower) CBPs and ECVs. Further study using defined fks mutant strains of Candida is warranted.

  19. In vitro susceptibilities of Candida and Aspergillus species to Melaleuca alternafolia (tea tree) oil.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, J A; Arganoza, M T; Boikov, D; Akins, R A; Vaishampayan, J K

    2000-06-01

    Candida species are an important cause of opportunistic infection in the oral cavity of immunocompromised patients, especially HIV infected patients. Melaleuca oil obtained commercially was investigated since it is known to have broad antifungal properties. The in-vitro susceptibilities of Aspergillus and susceptible and resistant Candida species were performed utilizing serial dilutions in microtiter plates with Sabouraud dextrose agar and the commercial preparation of Melaleuca. As a comparator, in vitro susceptibilities to amphotericin B and fluconazole were also determined using the broth microdilution technique. The results demonstrate that Melaleuca inhibited the Candida species. However, the growth of Aspergillus was not inhibited at the concentrations tested. Thus, preparations containing Melaleuca alternafolia may be a useful alternative for superficial candidal infections. In fact, it may be a useful alternative regimen for advanced HIV-positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis refractory to fluconazole. However, controlled clinical studies to evaluate its efficacy are still needed.

  20. Evaluation of antifungal combination against Cryptococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Reichert-Lima, Franqueline; Busso-Lopes, Ariane F; Lyra, Luzia; Peron, Isabela Haddad; Taguchi, Hideaki; Mikami, Yuzuru; Kamei, Katsuiko; Moretti, Maria Luiza; Schreiber, Angelica Z

    2016-09-01

    The second cause of death among systemic mycoses, cryptococcosis treatment represents a challenge since that 5-flucytosine is not currently available in Brazil. Looking for alternatives, this study evaluated antifungal agents, alone and combined, correlating susceptibility to genotypes. Eighty Cryptococcus clinical isolates were genotyped by URA5 gene restriction fragment length polymorphism. Antifungal susceptibility was assessed following CLSI-M27A3 for amphotericin (AMB), 5-flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FCZ), voriconazole (VRZ), itraconazole (ITZ) and terbinafine (TRB). Drug interaction chequerboard assay evaluated: AMB + 5FC, AMB + FCZ, AMB + TRB and FCZ + TRB. Molecular typing divided isolates into 14 C. deuterogattii (VGII) and C. neoformans isolates were found to belong to genotype VNI (n = 62) and VNII (n = 4). C. neoformans VNII was significantly less susceptible than VNI (P = 0.0407) to AMB; C. deuterogattii was significantly less susceptible than VNI and VNII to VRZ (P < 0.0001). C. deuterogattii was less susceptible than C. neoformans VNI for FCZ (P = 0.0170), ITZ (P < 0.0001) and TRB (P = 0.0090). The combination FCZ + TRB showed 95.16% of synergistic effect against C. neoformans genotype VNI isolates and all combinations showed 100% of synergism against genotype VNII isolates, suggesting the relevance of cryptococcal genotyping as it is widely known that the various genotypes (now species) have significant impact in antifungal susceptibilities and clinical outcome. In difficult-to-treat cryptococcosis, terbinafine and different antifungal combinations might be alternatives to 5FC.

  1. Comparative evaluation of Etest and sensititre yeastone panels against the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A2 reference broth microdilution method for testing Candida susceptibility to seven antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Barbara D; Byrne, Terry C; Smith, Kelly L; Hanson, Kimberly E; Anstrom, Kevin J; Perfect, John R; Reller, L Barth

    2007-03-01

    To assess their utility for antifungal susceptibility testing in our clinical laboratory, the Etest and Sensititre methods were compared with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A2 reference broth microdilution method. Fluconazole (FL), itraconazole (I), voriconazole (V), posaconazole (P), flucytosine (FC), caspofungin (C), and amphotericin B (A) were tested with 212 Candida isolates. Reference MICs were determined after 48 h of incubation, and Etest and Sensititre MICs were determined after 24 h and 48 h of incubation. Overall, excellent essential agreement (EA) between the reference and test methods was observed for Etest (95%) and Sensititre (91%). Etest showed an >or=92% EA for MICs for all drugs tested; Sensititre showed a >or=92% EA for MICs for I, FC, A, and C but 82% for FL and 85% for V. The overall categorical agreement (CA) was 90% for Etest and 88% for Sensititre; minor errors accounted for the majority of all categorical errors for both systems. Categorical agreement was lowest for Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis with both test systems. Etest and Sensititre provided better CA at 24 h compared to 48 h for C. glabrata; however, CA for C. glabrata was <80% for FL with both test systems despite MIC determination at 24 h. Agreement between technologists for both methods was >or=98% for each agent against all organisms tested. Overall, Etest and Sensititre methods compared favorably with the CLSI reference method for determining the susceptibility of Candida. However, further evaluation of their performance for determining the MICs of azoles, particularly for C. glabrata, is warranted.

  2. In vitro antifungal activity of topical and systemic antifungal drugs against Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Rojas, Florencia; Tur-Tur, Cristina; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Diez, Gustavo Ortiz; Espada, Carmen Martín; Payá, María Jesús; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-09-01

    The strict nutritional requirements of Malassezia species make it difficult to test the antifungal susceptibility. Treatments of the chronic and recurrent infections associated with Malassezia spp. are usually ineffective. The objective of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profile of 76 clinical isolates of Malassezia species against 16 antifungal drugs used for topical or systemic treatment. Isolates were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by a modified microdilution method based on the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. The modifications allowed a good growth of all tested species. High in vitro antifungal activity of most tested drugs was observed, especially triazole derivatives, except for fluconazole which presented the highest MICs and widest range of concentrations. Ketoconazole and itraconazole demonstrated a great activity. Higher MICs values were obtained with Malassezia furfur indicating a low susceptibility to most of the antifungal agents tested. Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia pachydermatis were found to be more-susceptible species than M. furfur, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia restricta. Topical substances were also active but provide higher MICs than the compounds for systemic use. The differences observed in the antifungals activity and interspecies variability demonstrated the importance to studying the susceptibility profile of each species to obtain reliable information for defining an effective treatment regimen.

  3. Impact of endpoint definition on the outcome of antifungal susceptibility tests with Candida species: 24- versus 48-h incubation and 50 versus 80% reduction in growth.

    PubMed

    St-Germain, G

    2001-01-01

    The growth inhibition patterns of 764 clinical yeast isolates, in response to amphotericin B, flucytosine, itraconazole and fluconazole, were studied in order to determine the frequency of trailing growth and any impact this, as well as 24- or 48-h incubation periods, may have on minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results. A broth microdilution method following National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standard No. M27A recommendations was used. Trailing growth was observed mainly with azoles. Furthermore, over 98% of isolates exhibiting a trailing effect at 24 h with fluconazole and itraconazole were either Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. When comparing 24- and 48-h IC50 values, discrepancies were observed with itraconazole and fluconazole, respectively, in 18 and 11% of C. albicans and 24 and 30% of C. tropicalis. When comparing IC50 and IC80 values at 24 h, discrepancies were again essentially seen with itraconazole and fluconazole, respectively, in 11 and 10% of C. albicans, and 17 and 27% of C. tropicalis. In susceptibility tests performed with a microdilution method and read spectrophotometrically, 48-h IC80 values result in an unlikely high number of resistant isolates, indicating that a 24-h incubation and a 50% reduction in optical density may correlate better with clinical outcome.

  4. [Minimal inhibitory concentrations of Candida species to five antifungals by using the reference dilution micromethod and the E-test.].

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, J M; Madrenys, N; Jiménez, T; Saballs, P

    1997-09-01

    It is accepted that the frequency of candidosis has increased during the last decade, specially in hospitalized patients. The more frequent use of azole antifungals and the recognition of isolates of Candida sp resistant to these and other drugs such as 5-fluorocytosine constitute a great need for a reproducible and useful C. albicans in vitro susceptibility testing method for monitoring antifungal therapy in clinical mycological laboratories. The E-test is a novel agar diffussion technique for testing the susceptibility of yeasts against a defined continous gradient of drug and could be used by most clinical laboratories. In this study the E-test and the NCCLS reference microbroth method (M27-P guidelines) were used to determine the MICs of amphotericin B, 5-flucytosine, itraconazole, fluconazole and ketoconazole for 50 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Torulopsis glabrata, C. tropicalis and Hansenula anomala and five reference ATCC strains. The main purpose of the study was to compare the results obtained by the two methods. In general good agreement (+/- 1 dilution) was otained between both methods, despite differences observed for some species-antifungal combinations in which the MICs were lower by the E-test than by the microbroth method. MICs for C. albicans and T. glabrata to amphotericin B were < 0.50 microg/mL. Two isolates of C. albicans and two others of H. anomala, showed MIC < 8 microg/mL for 5- flucytosine. All isolates of T. glabrata and 40% of C. albicans showed MICs > 16 microg/mL for fluconazole. The results of this study indicate that E-test is an alternative for susceptibility testing to the NCCLS reference method. Because its simplicity it seems to be an easier test for routine clinical laboratories.

  5. Comparison of the Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility system with CLSI microdilution for antifungal susceptibility testing of fluconazole and voriconazole against Candida spp., using new clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J; Procop, Gary W; Rinaldi, Michael G

    2013-09-01

    A commercially available, fully automated yeast susceptibility test system (Vitek 2; bioMérieux, Marcy d'Etoile, France) was compared in 3 different laboratories with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference microdilution (BMD) method by testing 2 quality control strains, 10 reproducibility strains, and 425 isolates of Candida spp. against fluconazole and voriconazole. Reference CLSI BMD MIC endpoints and Vitek 2 MIC endpoints were read after 24 hours and 9.1-27.1 hours incubation, respectively. Excellent essential agreement (within 2 dilutions) between the reference and Vitek 2 MICs was observed for fluconazole (97.9%) and voriconazole (96.7%). Categorical agreement (CA) between the 2 methods was assessed using the new species-specific clinical breakpoints (CBPs): susceptible (S) ≤2 μg/mL, susceptible dose-dependent (SDD) 4 μg/mL, and resistant (R) ≥8 μg/mL for fluconazole and Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida parapsilosis and ≤32 μg/mL (SDD), ≥64 μg/mL (R) for Candida glabrata; S ≤0.12 μg/mL, SDD 0.25-0.5 μg/mL, R ≥1 μg/mL for voriconazole and C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis, and ≤0.5 μg/mL (S), 1 μg/mL (SDD), ≥2 μg/mL (R) for Candida krusei. The epidemiological cutoff value (ECV) of 0.5 μg/mL for voriconazole and C. glabrata was used to differentiate wild-type (WT; MIC ≤ ECV) from non-WT (MIC > ECV) strains of this species. Due to the lack of CBPs for the less common species, the ECVs for fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively, were used for Candida lusitaniae (2 μg/mL and 0.03 μg/mL), Candida dubliniensis (0.5 μg/mL and 0.03 μg/mL), Candida guilliermondii (8 μg/mL and 0.25 μg/mL), and Candida pelliculosa (4 μg/mL and 0.25 μg/mL) to categorize isolates of these species as WT and non-WT. CA between the 2 methods was 96.8% for fluconazole and 96.5% for voriconazole with less than 1% very major errors and 1.3-3.0% major errors. The Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility system

  6. Identification by Molecular Methods and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Clinically Significant Rare Aspergillus Species in a Referral Chest Hospital in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Masih, Aradhana; Singh, Pradeep K; Kathuria, Shallu; Agarwal, Kshitij; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species cause a wide spectrum of clinical infections. Although Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus remain the most commonly isolated species in aspergillosis, in the last decade, rare and cryptic Aspergillus species have emerged in diverse clinical settings. The present study analyzed the distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility profiles of rare Aspergillus species in clinical samples from patients with suspected aspergillosis in 8 medical centers in India. Further, a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in-house database was developed to identify these clinically relevant Aspergillus species. β-Tubulin and calmodulin gene sequencing identified 45 rare Aspergillus isolates to the species level, except for a solitary isolate. They included 23 less common Aspergillus species belonging to 12 sections, mainly in Circumdati, Nidulantes, Flavi, Terrei, Versicolores, Aspergillus, and Nigri Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identified only 8 (38%) of the 23 rare Aspergillus isolates to the species level. Following the creation of an in-house database with the remaining 14 species not available in the Bruker database, the MALDI-TOF MS identification rate increased to 95%. Overall, high MICs of ≥2 μg/ml were noted for amphotericin B in 29% of the rare Aspergillus species, followed by voriconazole in 20% and isavuconazole in 7%, whereas MICs of >0.5 μg/ml for posaconazole were observed in 15% of the isolates. Regarding the clinical diagnoses in 45 patients with positive rare Aspergillus species cultures, 19 (42%) were regarded to represent colonization. In the remaining 26 patients, rare Aspergillus species were the etiologic agent of invasive, chronic, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, keratitis, and mycetoma.

  7. Identification by Molecular Methods and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Clinically Significant Rare Aspergillus Species in a Referral Chest Hospital in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Masih, Aradhana; Singh, Pradeep K.; Kathuria, Shallu; Agarwal, Kshitij

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus species cause a wide spectrum of clinical infections. Although Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus remain the most commonly isolated species in aspergillosis, in the last decade, rare and cryptic Aspergillus species have emerged in diverse clinical settings. The present study analyzed the distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility profiles of rare Aspergillus species in clinical samples from patients with suspected aspergillosis in 8 medical centers in India. Further, a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry in-house database was developed to identify these clinically relevant Aspergillus species. β-Tubulin and calmodulin gene sequencing identified 45 rare Aspergillus isolates to the species level, except for a solitary isolate. They included 23 less common Aspergillus species belonging to 12 sections, mainly in Circumdati, Nidulantes, Flavi, Terrei, Versicolores, Aspergillus, and Nigri. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identified only 8 (38%) of the 23 rare Aspergillus isolates to the species level. Following the creation of an in-house database with the remaining 14 species not available in the Bruker database, the MALDI-TOF MS identification rate increased to 95%. Overall, high MICs of ≥2 μg/ml were noted for amphotericin B in 29% of the rare Aspergillus species, followed by voriconazole in 20% and isavuconazole in 7%, whereas MICs of >0.5 μg/ml for posaconazole were observed in 15% of the isolates. Regarding the clinical diagnoses in 45 patients with positive rare Aspergillus species cultures, 19 (42%) were regarded to represent colonization. In the remaining 26 patients, rare Aspergillus species were the etiologic agent of invasive, chronic, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, keratitis, and mycetoma. PMID:27413188

  8. Antifungal activity of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil) against pathogenic fungi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Haustein, U F; Brandt, W

    1996-01-01

    The in vitro antifungal activity of tea oil, the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, has been evaluated against 26 strains of various dermatophyte species, 54 yeasts, among them 32 strains of Candida albicans and other Candida sp. as well as 22 different Malassezia furfur strains. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of tea tree oil were measured by agar dilution technique. Tea tree oil was found to be able to inhibit growth of all clinical fungal isolates. For the investigated dermatophytes MIC values from 1,112.5 to 4,450.0 micrograms/ml with a geometric mean of 1,431.5 micrograms/ml were demonstrated. Both C. albicans strains and the other strains belonging to the genus Candida and Trichosporon appeared to be slightly less susceptible to tea tree oil in vitro. However, their MIC values, which varied from 2,225.0 to 4,450.0 micrograms/ml (geometric mean 4,080 micrograms/ml), indicated moderate susceptibility to the essential oil of M. alternifolia. The lipophilic yeast M. furfur seemed to be most susceptible to tea tree oil. MIC values between 556.2 and 4,450.0 micrograms/ml (geometric mean 1,261.5 micrograms/ml) were found against the tested M. furfur strains. However, when calculated as percentage tea tree oil of the agar, the above-mentioned concentrations correspond to 0.5-0.44% tea tree oil content. These values are far below the usual relatively high therapeutic concentrations of the agent; approximately 5-10% solution or even the concentrated essential oil are used for external treatment. In comparison with tea tree oil, in vitro susceptibility against miconazole, an established topical antifungal, was tested. As expected, very low MIC values for miconazole were found for dermatophytes (geometric mean 0.2 microgram/ml), yeasts (geometric mean 1.0 microgram/ml), and M. furfur (geometric mean 2.34 micrograms/ml). It is suggested that the in vivo effect of tea tree oil ointment in the therapy of fungal infections of the skin and mucous membranes as

  9. [Presumptive identification of Candida spp. and other clinically important yeasts: usefulness of Brilliance Candida Agar].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Claudia; López, Mónica; Arechavala, Alicia; Perrone, María Del Carmen; Guelfand, Liliana; Bianchi, Mario

    2010-06-30

    Fungal infections caused by yeasts have increased during the last decades and invasive forms represent a serious problem for human health. Candida albicans is the species most frequently isolated from clinical samples. However, other emerging yeast pathogens are increasingly responsible for mycotic infections, and some of them are resistant to some antifungal drugs. Consequently, it is necessary to have methods that can provide a rapid presumptive identification at species level. Numerous chromogenic agar media have been shown to be of value as diagnostic tools. We have compared a chromogenic medium, Brilliance Candida Agar, with CHROMagar Candida, the chromogenic medium most used in our country. A multicentre study was conducted in 16 Hospitals belonging to the Mycology Net of Buenos Aires City Government. A total of 240 yeast isolates were included in this research. The new chromogenic agar showed results very similar to those obtained with CHROMagar Candida.

  10. Antifungal activity of three mouth rinses--in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Abirami, C P; Venugopal, Pankajalakshmi V

    2005-01-01

    Mouthrinses are nowadays routinely included in the home care oral hygiene maintenance besides dentifrice/tooth paste. Mouthrinses prevent bacterial attachment and prevent or slow down bacterial proliferation. Fungal organisms have now gained more importance due to increased incidence of AIDS/HIV. This has necessitated for mouthrinses to possess antifungal activity also. The mouthrinses used were Povidone iodine ( Wokadine), Thymol with Eucalyptol and Benzoic acid (Listerine) and fluoride with Triclosan (Colgate Plax), which were tested against oral isolates of different species of Candida. The agar diffusion test was used to evaluate the inhibitory activity of the mouthrinses and all of them exhibited antifungal activity especially against Candida albicans.

  11. Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris Misidentified as Candida haemulonii: Characterization by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and DNA Sequencing and Its Antifungal Susceptibility Profile Variability by Vitek 2, CLSI Broth Microdilution, and Etest Method

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Shallu; Singh, Pradeep K.; Sharma, Cheshta; Prakash, Anupam; Masih, Aradhana; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Candida auris is a multidrug-resistant yeast that causes a wide spectrum of infections, especially in intensive care settings. We investigated C. auris prevalence among 102 clinical isolates previously identified as Candida haemulonii or Candida famata by the Vitek 2 system. Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing confirmed 88.2% of the isolates as C. auris, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) easily separated all related species, viz., C. auris (n = 90), C. haemulonii (n = 6), C. haemulonii var. vulnera (n = 1), and Candida duobushaemulonii (n = 5). The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined using CLSI broth microdilution (CLSI-BMD), the Vitek 2 antifungal susceptibility test, and the Etest method. C. auris isolates revealed uniformly elevated fluconazole MICs (MIC50, 64 μg/ml), and an alarming percentage of isolates (37%) exhibited elevated caspofungin MICs by CLSI-BMD. Notably, 34% of C. auris isolates had coexisting elevated MICs (≥2 μg/ml) for both fluconazole and voriconazole, and 10% of the isolates had elevated coexisting MICs (≥2 μg/ml) to two additional azoles, i.e., posaconazole and isavuconazole. In contrast to reduced amphotericin B MICs by CLSI-BMD (MIC50, 1 μg/ml) for C. auris, elevated MICs were noted by Vitek 2 (MIC50, 8 μg/ml), which were statistically significant. Candida auris remains an unnoticed pathogen in routine microbiology laboratories, as 90% of the isolates characterized by commercial identification systems are misidentified as C. haemulonii. MALDI-TOF MS proved to be a more robust diagnostic technique for rapid identification of C. auris. Considering that misleading elevated MICs of amphotericin B by the Vitek AST-YS07 card may lead to the selection of inappropriate therapy, a cautionary approach is recommended for laboratories relying on commercial systems for identification and antifungal susceptibility testing of rare yeasts. PMID:25809970

  12. Resistance to antifungal therapies.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Banerjee, Atanu; Shah, Abdul Haseeb

    2017-02-28

    The evolution of antifungal resistance among fungal pathogens has rendered the limited arsenal of antifungal drugs futile. Considering the recent rise in the number of nosocomial fungal infections in immunocompromised patients, the emerging clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) has become a matter of grave concern for medical professionals. Despite advances in therapeutic interventions, it has not yet been possible to devise convincing strategies to combat antifungal resistance. Comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance is essential for identification of novel targets that do not promote or delay emergence of drug resistance. The present study discusses features and limitations of the currently available antifungals, mechanisms of antifungal resistance and highlights the emerging therapeutic strategies that could be deployed to combat MDR.

  13. Anti-fungal activities of medicinal plants extracts of Ivorian pharmacopoeia

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Kra Adou Koffi; Marcel, Ahon Gnamien; Djè, Djo-Bi; Sitapha, Ouattara; Adama, Coulibaly; Joseph, Djaman Allico

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study was to evaluate in vitro anti-fungal activity of aqueous and hydroethanolic from medicinal plants extracts collected in Côte d’Ivoire. Materials and Methods: Plants extracts were prepared by homogenization and separately incorporated to Sabouraud agar using the agar slanted double dilution method. Ketoconazole was used as standards for anti-fungal assay. The anti-fungal tests were performed by sowing 1000 cells of Candida albicans on the previously prepared medium culture. Anti-fungal activity was determined by evaluating anti-fungal parameters values (minimal fungicidal concentrations [MFC] and IC50). Results: The results showed that all extracts possessed anti-fungal activities whose levels vary from plant species to another. Eight of them had a satisfactory anti-candidosic activity and extracts from Terminalia species were the most active. Among them the Terminalia superba extracts generated the strongest activities (MFC = 0.0975 mg/mL). Compared with ketoconazole (MFC = 0.390 mg/mL), the T. superba extracts, aqueous (MFC = 0.195 mg/mL) and hydroethanolic (0.0975 mg/mL) were successively twice and four times more active. The worst anti-fungal activity (MFC = 1600 mg/mL) was obtained with the Guarea cedrata aqueous extract. Conclusion: All medicinal plants extracts produced anti-fungal activities, and T. superba was the most active. PMID:26401367

  14. Improved method for azole antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, M A; Lapa, E W; Passero, P G

    1988-01-01

    A reproducible method is described for the determination of the MICs of ketoconazole, miconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole with sharp endpoints when employed with either yeasts or molds. A semisolid medium is used with controlled pH and standardized inoculum. The time of reading results is a critical factor in the conduct of this test. The medium is simple to prepare and has a relatively long refrigerator shelf life in a user-ready state, requiring only the addition of a freshly prepared inoculum after restoration to room temperature. Images PMID:2846651

  15. Tentative inhibition zone criteria (Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion method) for rifampin against staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H; Spohr, M; Bauer, D

    1987-01-01

    Two of 359 (0.6%) clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 of 218 (5.5%) clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci were resistant or of intermediate susceptibility against rifampin as based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints obtained with the agar dilution method: MIC greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml = resistant; MIC 0.25-1 microgram/ml = intermediate susceptible; MIC less than 0.125 microgram/ml = susceptible. The following inhibition zone criteria with 2 micrograms rifampin disks were proposed for staphylococcal isolates utilizing the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test: diameter of inhibition zones less than or equal to 13 mm = resistant; diameter 14-21 mm = intermediate susceptible; diameter greater than or equal to 22 mm = susceptible.

  16. The physicochemical property characterization of agar acetate.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Jingkun; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-09-22

    A series of agar acetates with different degree of substitution (DS) were prepared, and their properties were determined and analyzed. The results showed that the gelling temperature, the gel melting temperature, the gel strength, the gel hardness, the gel fracturability, the gel springiness and the solution apparent viscosity of agar acetates all decreased except that their gel cohesiveness increased with the increase of DS. The variation process of agar molecules in solution from coil to helix could be also observed by measuring solution optical rotation in a lower concentration at which even the solution could not form a gel. The gel skeleton structures of agar acetates were of porous network structures, and the pores became smaller and denser with the increase of DS. After acetylation, the water holding capacity of the agar was improved, but its thermal stability was lowered.

  17. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of crude plant extracts from Colombian biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Niño, Jaime; Mosquera, Oscar M; Correa, Yaned M

    2012-12-01

    On a global scale, people have used plants to treat diseases and infections, and this has raised interest on the plant biodiversity potencial in the search of antimicrobial principles. In this work, 75 crude n-hexanes, dichloromethane and methanol extracts from the aerial parts of 25 plants belonging to four botanical families (Asteraceae, Euphorbiaceae, Rubiaceae and Solanaceae), collected at the Natural Regional Park Ucumari (Risaralda, Colombia), were evaluated for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by the agar well diffusion method. The antibacterial activities were assayed against two Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, and three Gram-negative ones named, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, the same plant extracts were tested against the yeast Candida albicans and the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium solani. Overall, the plant extracts examined displayed better bactericide rather than fungicide activities. In general, the best antibacterial activity was showed by the plant extracts from the Rubiaceae family, followed in order by the extracts from the Euphorbiaceae and Solanaceae ones. It is important to emphasize the great activity displayed by the methanol extract of Alchornea coelophylla (Euphorbiaceae) that inhibited four out of five bacteria tested (B. Subtilis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and E. coli). Furthermore, the best Minimal Inhibitory Concentration for the extracts with antifungal activities were displayed by the dichloromethane extracts from Acalypha diversifolia and Euphorbia sp (Euphorbiaceae). The most susceptible fungus evaluated was F. Solani since 60% and 20% of the dichloromethane and methanol extracts evaluated inhibited the growth of this phytopathogenic fungus. The antimicrobial activity of the different plant extracts examined in this work could be related to the secondary metabolites contents and their interaction and susceptibility of

  18. [In vitro antifungal activity of anidulafungin].

    PubMed

    Quindós, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena

    2008-06-01

    Anidulafungin is a new and very useful pharmacological tool for the treatment of invasive mycoses. The antifungal spectrum of anidulafungin reaches the most common pathogenic fungi. Anidulafungin is especially active against the genera Candida and Aspergillus. Its antifungal mechanism is based on the inhibition of the beta-1,3-D-glucan synthesis, an essential molecule for the cell wall architecture, with different consequences for Candida and Aspergillus, being anidulafungin fungicide for the former and fungistatic for the latter. This review describes the in vitro antifungal spectrum of anidulafungin based in the scientific and medical literature of recent years. We can underline that most than 99% of Candida isolates are susceptible to < or = 2 microg/ml of anidulafungin. MIC are very low (< or =0.125 microg/ml) for most clinical isolates of the species Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei while Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii isolates are susceptible to anidulafungin concentrations < or = 2 microg/ml. An excellent activity of anidulafungin has been also described against Aspergillus, Pneumocystis and other fungi. However, its activity is very low against Cryptococcus and the Zygomycetes. The excellent activity of anidulafungin has made this antifungal a first line therapeutic indication for candidemia and invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic patients.

  19. Susceptibility to Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil of yeasts isolated from the mouths of patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Bagg, Jeremy; Jackson, Margaret S; Petrina Sweeney, M; Ramage, Gordon; Davies, Andrew N

    2006-05-01

    Yeasts that are resistant to azole antifungal drugs are increasingly isolated from the mouths of cancer patients suffering from oral fungal infections. Tea tree oil is an agent possessing antimicrobial properties that may prove useful in the prevention and management of infections caused by these organisms. In this study, 301 yeasts isolated from the mouths of 199 patients suffering from advanced cancer were examined by an in vitro agar dilution assay for susceptibility to tea tree oil. All of the isolates tested were susceptible, including 41 that were known to be resistant to both fluconazole and itraconazole. Clinical studies of tea tree oil as an agent for the prevention and treatment of oral fungal infections in immunocompromised patients merit consideration.

  20. Antifungal effect and mechanism of garlic oil on Penicillium funiculosum.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ru; Shi, Qing-Shan; Liang, Qing; Huang, Xiao-Mo; Chen, Yi-Ben

    2014-10-01

    Garlic oil is a kind of fungicide, but little is known about its antifungal effects and mechanism. In this study, the chemical constituents, antifungal activity, and effects of garlic oil were studied with Penicillium funiculosum as a model strain. Results showed that the minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs, v/v) were 0.125 and 0.0313 % in agar medium and broth medium, respectively, suggesting that the garlic oil had a strong antifungal activity. The main ingredients of garlic oil were identified as sulfides, mainly including disulfides (36 %), trisulfides (32 %) and monosulfides (29 %) by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS), which were estimated as the dominant antifungal factors. The observation results by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicated that garlic oil could firstly penetrate into hyphae cells and even their organelles, and then destroy the cellular structure, finally leading to the leakage of both cytoplasm and macromolecules. Further proteomic analysis displayed garlic oil was able to induce a stimulated or weakened expression of some key proteins for physiological metabolism. Therefore, our study proved that garlic oil can work multiple sites of the hyphae of P. funiculosum to cause their death. The high antifungal effects of garlic oil makes it a broad application prospect in antifungal industries.

  1. Triazole antifungals: a review.

    PubMed

    Peyton, L R; Gallagher, S; Hashemzadeh, M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections and systemic mycosis, whether from nosocomial infection or immunodeficiency, have been on an upward trend for numerous years. Despite advancements in antifungal medication, treatment in certain patients can still be difficult for reasons such as impaired organ function, limited administration routes or poor safety profiles of the available antifungal medications. The growing number of invasive fungal species becoming resistant to current antifungal medications is of appreciable concern. Triazole compounds containing one or more 1,2,4-triazole rings have been shown to contain some of the most potent antifungal properties. Itracon-azole and fluconazole were some of the first triazoles synthesized, but had limitations associated with their use. Second-generation triazoles such as voriconazole, posa-conazole, albaconazole, efinaconazole, ravuconazole and isavuconazole are all derivatives of either itraconazole or fluconazole, and designed to overcome the deficiencies of their parent drugs. The goal of this manuscript is to review antifungal agents derived from triazole.

  2. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  3. Antifungal activity of Eugenia umbelliflora against dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Machado, Karina E; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Cruz, Rosana C B; Meyre-Silva, Christiane; Cruz, Alexandre Bella

    2009-09-01

    Antifungal activities of Eugenia umbelliflora Berg. (Myrtaceae) were tested in vitro against a panel of standard and clinical isolates of human fungal pathogens (dermatophytes and opportunistic saprobes). Methanol extracts of leaves and fruits of E. umbelliflora were separately prepared and partitioned, to yield dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtOAc) and aqueous fractions (Aq). Three compounds (1-3) were obtained from the DCM extract using chromatographic procedures. Antifungal assays were performed using agar dilution techniques. Both extracts (fruits and leaves), their DCM and EtOAc fractions, and compound 2 (betulin and betulinic acid) presented selective antifungal activity against dermatophytes (Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes), with MIC values between 200 and 1000 microg/mL, and interestingly, inhibited 4/5 species with MIC values of < or = 500 microg/mL. The aqueous fractions of fruits and leaves, and compounds 1 (alpha, beta amyrin) and 3 (taraxerol) were inactive up to the maximum concentrations tested (1000 microg/mL).

  4. Comparison of echinocandin antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Eschenauer, Gregory; DePestel, Daryl D; Carver, Peggy L

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infections, especially those due to Aspergillus spp. and Candida spp., continues to increase. Despite advances in medical practice, the associated mortality from these infections continues to be substantial. The echinocandin antifungals provide clinicians with another treatment option for serious fungal infections. These agents possess a completely novel mechanism of action, are relatively well-tolerated, and have a low potential for serious drug–drug interactions. At the present time, the echinocandins are an option for the treatment of infections due Candida spp (such as esophageal candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, and candidemia). In addition, caspofungin is a viable option for the treatment of refractory aspergillosis. Although micafungin is not Food and Drug Administration-approved for this indication, recent data suggests that it may also be effective. Finally, caspofungin- or micafungin-containing combination therapy should be a consideration for the treatment of severe infections due to Aspergillus spp. Although the echinocandins share many common properties, data regarding their differences are emerging at a rapid pace. Anidulafungin exhibits a unique pharmacokinetic profile, and limited cases have shown a potential far activity in isolates with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations to caspofungin and micafungin. Caspofungin appears to have a slightly higher incidence of side effects and potential for drug–drug interactions. This, combined with some evidence of decreasing susceptibility among some strains of Candida, may lessen its future utility. However, one must take these findings in the context of substantially more data and use with caspofungin compared with the other agents. Micafungin appears to be very similar to caspofungin, with very few obvious differences between the two agents. PMID:18360617

  5. Morphological development of Morchella conica mycelium on different agar media.

    PubMed

    Guler, P; Ozkaya, E G

    2009-07-01

    The present study presents the development of mycelium of Morchella conica where different concentration of sucrose added at different agar media. For this sucrose have been added as 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00 and 1.25% concentration to wheat agar potato dextrose agar malt extract agar and complete medium yeast agar The radial growth speed, morphologic specifications, radial growth radius and pigmentation of mycelium were taken as criteria, the development period of mycelium in wheat agar was completed in 4 days and mycelium were very thin. The colonization period of the mycelium was determined; 7 days in potato dextrose agar 5 days in malt extract agar and 5 days at complete medium yeast agar. The development of the mycelium; at potato dextrose agar was dense and circular; at malt extract agar and at completed medium yeast agar was rhizomorphic. Mycelium has developed very well at sucrose medium and formed creamy and light yellow pigmentation.

  6. Chemogenomic profiling predicts antifungal synergies

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Gregor; Lee, Anna Y; Epp, Elias; Fredette, Amélie; Surprenant, Jamie; Harcus, Doreen; Scott, Michelle; Tan, Elaine; Nishimura, Tamiko; Whiteway, Malcolm; Hallett, Michael; Thomas, David Y

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapies, HIV infections, and treatments to block organ transplant rejection are creating a population of immunocompromised individuals at serious risk of systemic fungal infections. Since single-agent therapies are susceptible to failure due to either inherent or acquired resistance, alternative therapeutic approaches such as multi-agent therapies are needed. We have developed a bioinformatics-driven approach that efficiently predicts compound synergy for such combinatorial therapies. The approach uses chemogenomic profiles in order to identify compound profiles that have a statistically significant degree of similarity to a fluconazole profile. The compounds identified were then experimentally verified to be synergistic with fluconazole and with each other, in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Our method is therefore capable of accurately predicting compound synergy to aid the development of combinatorial antifungal therapies. PMID:20029371

  7. Development of a novel in vitro onychomycosis model for the evaluation of topical antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Sleven, Reindert; Lanckacker, Ellen; Boulet, Gaëlle; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2015-05-01

    A novel in vitro onychomycosis model was developed to easily predict the topical activity potential of novel antifungal drugs. The model encompasses drug activity and diffusion through bovine hoof slices in a single experimental set-up. Results correspond well with the antifungal susceptibility assay and Franz cell diffusion test.

  8. Antifungal compounds from cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Tânia K; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P D; Fiore, Marli F; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-04-13

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders.

  9. Standard operating procedure to prepare agar phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, R. M.; Santos, T. Q.; Oliveira, D. P.; Souza, R. M.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Agar phantoms are widely used as soft tissue mimics and some preparation techniques are described in the literature. There are also standards that describe the recipe of a soft tissue mimicking material (TMM). However some details of manufacture process are not clearly defined. The standardization of the phantom's preparation can produce a metrological impact on the results of the acoustic properties measured. In this direction, this paper presents a standard operating procedure (SOP) to prepare the agar TMM described on the IEC 60601-237.

  10. Use of agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Velimirović, Milica; Wagner, Stephan; Micić Batka, Vesna; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    A major obstacle for use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles as a nontoxic material for effective in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) is the high production cost. For that reason, submicro-scale milled zero-valent iron particles were recently developed (milled ZVI, UVR-FIA, Germany) by grinding macroscopic raw materials of elementary iron as a cheaper alternative to products produced by solid-state reduction. However, milled ZVI particles tend to aggregate and due to the rather large particle size (d50= 11.9 µm) also rapidly sediment. To prevent aggregation and consequently sedimentation of milled ZVI particles and therefore improve the mobility after in situ application, the use of a stabilizer is considered in literature as a most promising option. In this study, milled ZVI particles (1 g L-1 of particle concentration) were stabilized by environmentally friendly polymer agar agar (>0.5 g L-1), which had a positive impact on the milled ZVI stability. Sedimentation rate was significantly decreased by increasing the suspension viscosity. Column transport experiments were performed for bare and agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles in commercially available fine grained quartz sand (DORSILIT® Nr.8, Gebrüder Dorfner GmbH Co, Germany) and different porous media collected from brownfields. The experiments were carried out under field relevant injection conditions of 100 m d-1. The maximal travel distance (LT) of less than 10 cm was determined for non-stabilized suspension in fine grained quartz sand, while agar agar (1 g L-1) stabilized milled ZVI suspension revealed LT of 12 m. Similar results were observed for porous media from brownfields showing that mobility of agar agar stabilized particle suspensions was significantly improved compared to bare particles. Based on the mobility data, agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles could be used for in situ application. Finally, lab-scale batch degradation

  11. Antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lortholary, O; Dupont, B

    1997-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with almost all types of immunodeficiencies. These infections may be nosocomial (aspergillosis) or community acquired (cryptococcosis), or both (candidiasis). Endemic mycoses such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and penicilliosis may infect many immunocompromised hosts in some geographic areas and thereby create major public health problems. With the wide availability of oral azoles, antifungal prophylactic strategies have been extensively developed. However, only a few well-designed studies involving strict criteria have been performed, mostly in patients with hematological malignancies or AIDS. In these situations, the best dose and duration of administration of the antifungal drug often remain to be determined. In high-risk neutropenic or bone marrow transplant patients, fluconazole is effective for the prevention of superficial and/or systemic candidal infections but is not always able to prolong overall survival and potentially selects less susceptible or resistant Candida spp. Primary prophylaxis against aspergillosis remains investigative. At present, no standard general recommendation for primary antifungal prophylaxis can be proposed for AIDS patients or transplant recipients. However, for persistently immunocompromised patients who previously experienced a noncandidal systemic fungal infection, prolonged suppressive antifungal therapy is often indicated to prevent a relapse. Better strategies for controlling immune deficiencies should also help to avoid some potentially life-threatening deep mycoses. When prescribing antifungal prophylaxis, physicians should be aware of the potential emergence of resistant strains, drug-drug interactions, and the cost. Well-designed, randomized, multicenter clinical trials in high-risk immunocompromised hosts are urgently needed to better define how to prevent severe invasive mycoses. PMID:9227863

  12. Antifungal Amphiphilic Aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C.-W. T.; Takemoto, J.Y.

    2014-01-01

    The attachment of alkyl and other hydrophobic groups to traditional antibacterial kanamycins and neomycins creates amphiphilic aminoglycosides with altered antimicrobial properties. In this review, we summarize the discovery of amphiphilic kanamycins that are antifungal, but not antibacterial, and that inhibit the growth of fungi by perturbation of plasma membrane functions. With low toxicities against plant and mammalian cells, they appear to specifically target the fungal plasma membrane. These new antifungal agents offer new options for fighting fungal pathogens and are examples of reviving old drugs to confront new therapeutic challenges. PMID:25110571

  13. Antifungal activity of mango peel and seed extracts against clinically pathogenic and food spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Dorta, E; González, M; Lobo, M G; Laich, F

    2015-11-26

    The antioxidant and antifungal (antiyeast) properties of mango (Mangifera indica) peel and seed by-products were investigated. Nine extracts were obtained using three cultivars and two extraction methods. Significant differences between cultivars and extraction methods were detected in their bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. The antifungal property was determined using agar diffusion and broth micro-dilution assays against 18 yeast species of the genera Candida, Dekkera, Hanseniaspora, Lodderomyces, Metschnikowia, Pichia, Schizosaccharomyces, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces. All mango extracts showed antifungal activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values were lower for seed than for peel extracts. MICs and MFCs ranged from values <0.1 to 5 and 5 to >30 mgGAE/mL, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed a relationship between antifungal activity, the capacity to inhibit lipid peroxidation and total phenol content. These properties were associated with high levels of proanthocyanidins, gallates and gallotannins in the extracts.

  14. Newer antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Türel, Ozden

    2011-03-01

    The frequency and spectrum of fungal infections have been increasing steadily over the last several decades. The reason for this increase may be explained by the increase in the number of immunocompromised patients due to malignancies, AIDS, invasive surgical procedures and transplantation. In parallel with this increase, several therapeutic options have become available but problems such as intrinsic or acquired antifungal resistance have led researchers to develop new antifungal drugs with expanded effectiveness. Reduced toxicity, enhancement of bioavailability and counteraction of resistance are features desired by clinicians. The aim of this article is to summarize the studies involving isavuconazole, ravuconazole, albaconazole, aminocandin and some other investigational antifungal agents. Most data on the clinical use of ravuconazole, isavuconazole and albaconazole are mainly available as meeting abstracts or limited to animal studies or Phase I/II studies in humans. These new antifungal agents in development offer extended half-lives, possibly reduced drug interaction profiles and good tolerance. In addition to activity against Candida and Aspergillus spp., they have a broad spectrum of activity including activity against resistant and emerging pathogens. The real possibilities of these agents will only be fully understood after adequate randomized clinical trials.

  15. Antifungal activity of steroidal glycosides from Yucca gloriosa L.

    PubMed

    Favel, A; Kemertelidze, E; Benidze, M; Fallague, K; Regli, P

    2005-02-01

    The antifungal activity of a crude steroidal glycoside extract from Yucca gloriosa flowers, named alexin, was investigated in vitro against a panel of human pathogenic fungi, yeasts as well as dermatophytes and filamentous species. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by an agar dilution method. Alexin had a broad spectrum of antifungal activity, found to reside entirely in the spirostanoid fraction. The major tigogenyl glycosides, yuccaloeside B and yuccaloeside C, exhibited MICs between 0.39 and 6.25 microg[sol ]mL for all the tested yeast strains except for two (C. lusitaniae and C. kefyr). They were also active against several clinical Candida isolates known to be resistant to the usual antifungal agents. The MICs for the dermatophytes were between 0.78 and 12.5 microg[sol ]mL. The most sensitive filamentous species was A. fumigatus (MIC = 1.56 microg[sol ]mL). For most of the strains, the MICs of both glycosides were similar to those of the reference antifungal agent.

  16. Current and Emerging Azole Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Daniel J.; Hitchcock, Christopher A.; Sibley, Carol M.

    1999-01-01

    Major developments in research into the azole class of antifungal agents during the 1990s have provided expanded options for the treatment of many opportunistic and endemic fungal infections. Fluconazole and itraconazole have proved to be safer than both amphotericin B and ketoconazole. Despite these advances, serious fungal infections remain difficult to treat, and resistance to the available drugs is emerging. This review describes present and future uses of the currently available azole antifungal agents in the treatment of systemic and superficial fungal infections and provides a brief overview of the current status of in vitro susceptibility testing and the growing problem of clinical resistance to the azoles. Use of the currently available azoles in combination with other antifungal agents with different mechanisms of action is likely to provide enhanced efficacy. Detailed information on some of the second-generation triazoles being developed to provide extended coverage of opportunistic, endemic, and emerging fungal pathogens, as well as those in which resistance to older agents is becoming problematic, is provided. PMID:9880474

  17. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma as an antifungal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Peng; Wu Haiyan; Sun Yi; Liu Wei; Li Ruoyu; Zhu Weidong; Lopez, Jose L.; Zhang Jue; Fang Jing

    2011-01-10

    A microhollow cathode based, direct-current, atmospheric pressure, He/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to inactive antifungal resistants Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata in air and in water. Effective inactivation (>90%) was achieved in 10 min in air and 1 min in water. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed drastic reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration after plasma treatment. The inactivation was attributed to the reactive oxygen species generated in plasma or in water. Hydroxyl and singlet molecular oxygen radicals were detected in plasma-water system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This approach proposed a promising clinical dermatology therapy.

  18. In Vitro Antifungal Activities against Moulds Isolated from Dermatological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nizam, Tzar; Binting, Rabiatul Adawiyah AG.; Mohd Saari, Shafika; Kumar, Thivyananthini Vijaya; Muhammad, Marianayati; Satim, Hartini; Yusoff, Hamidah; Santhanam, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of various antifungal agents against moulds isolated from dermatological specimens. Methods We identified 29 moulds from dermatological specimens between October 2012 and March 2013 by conventional methods. We performed antifungal susceptibility testing on six antifungal agents, amphotericin B, clotrimazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and terbinafine, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines contained in the M38-A2 document. Results Most antifungal agents were active against the dermatophytes, except for terbinafine against Trichophyton rubrum (geometric mean MIC, MICGM 3.17 μg/mL). The dematiaceous moulds were relatively susceptible to amphotericin B and azoles (MICGM 0.17–0.34 μg/mL), but not to terbinafine (MICGM 3.62 μg/mL). Septate hyaline moulds showed variable results between the relatively more susceptible Aspergillus spp. (MICGM 0.25–4 μg/mL) and the more resistant Fusarium spp. (MICGM 5.66–32 μg/mL). The zygomycetes were susceptible to amphotericin B (MICGM 0.5 μg/mL) and clotrimazole (MICGM 0.08 μg/mL), but not to other azoles (MICGM 2.52–4 μg/mL). Conclusion Amphotericin B and clotrimazole were the most effective antifungal agents against all moulds excepting Fusarium spp., while terbinafine was useful against dermatophytes (except T. rubrum) and Aspergillus spp. However, a larger study is required to draw more solid conclusions. PMID:27418867

  19. Ultrasonic backscatter coefficients for weakly scattering, agar spheres in agar phantoms

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Anderson, Janelle J.; Herd, Maria-Teresa; Ma, Darryl; Haak, Alexander; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Zagzebski, James A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Hall, Timothy J.; O’Brien, William D.

    2010-01-01

    Applicability of ultrasound phantoms to biological tissue has been limited because most phantoms have generally used strong scatterers. The objective was to develop very weakly scattering phantoms, whose acoustic scattering properties are likely closer to those of tissues and then compare theoretical simulations and experimental backscatter coefficient (BSC) results. The phantoms consisted of agar spheres of various diameters (nominally between 90 and 212 μm), containing ultrafiltered milk, suspended in an agar background. BSC estimates were performed at two institutions over the frequency range 1–13 MHz, and compared to three models. Excellent agreement was shown between the two laboratory results as well as with the three models. PMID:20707460

  20. Antifungal Lock Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walraven, Carla J.

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of intravascular devices, such as central venous and hemodialysis catheters, in the past 2 decades has paralleled the increasing incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs). Candida albicans is the fourth leading cause of hospital-associated BSIs. The propensity of C. albicans to form biofilms on these catheters has made these infections difficult to treat due to multiple factors, including increased resistance to antifungal agents. Thus, curing CR-BSIs caused by Candida species usually requires catheter removal in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Alternatively, antimicrobial lock therapy has received significant interest and shown promise as a strategy to treat CR-BSIs due to Candida species. The existing in vitro, animal, and patient data for treatment of Candida-related CR-BSIs are reviewed. The most promising antifungal lock therapy (AfLT) strategies include use of amphotericin, ethanol, or echinocandins. Clinical trials are needed to further define the safety and efficacy of AfLT. PMID:23070153

  1. Antifungal drug resistance among Candida species: mechanisms and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of Candida infections has changed in recent years. Although Candida albicans is still the main cause of invasive candidiasis in most clinical settings, a substantial proportion of patients is now infected with non-albicans Candida species. The various Candida species vary in their susceptibility to the most commonly used antifungal agents, and the intrinsic resistance to antifungal therapy seen in some species, along with the development of acquired resistance during treatment in others, is becoming a major problem in the management of Candida infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms and clinical impact of antifungal drug resistance is essential for the efficient treatment of patients with Candida infection and for improving treatment outcomes. Herein, we report resistance to the azoles and echinocandins among Candida species.

  2. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium.

  3. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  4. Antifungal adjuvants: Preserving and extending the antifungal arsenal.

    PubMed

    Butts, Arielle; Palmer, Glen E; Rogers, P David

    2017-02-17

    As the rates of systemic fungal infections continue to rise and antifungal drug resistance becomes more prevalent, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic options. This issue is exacerbated by the limited number of systemic antifungal drug classes. However, the discovery, development, and approval of novel antifungals is an extensive process that often takes decades. For this reason, there is growing interest and research into the possibility of combining existing therapies with various adjuvants that either enhance activity or overcome existing mechanisms of resistance. Reports of antifungal adjuvants range from plant extracts to repurposed compounds, to synthetic peptides. This approach would potentially prolong the utility of currently approved antifungals and mitigate the ongoing development of resistance.

  5. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (∼80 °C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials.

  6. Automatic Surface Inoculation of Agar Trays1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Judd R.; Mills, Stacey M.; Boykin, Elizabeth H.

    1972-01-01

    A machine is described which automatically inoculates a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture by use of either a conventional inoculating loop or a cotton swab. Isolated colonies were obtained with an inoculating loop when a heavy inoculum (109 cells/ml) was used or with a cotton swab when a light inoculum (ca. 104 cells/ml) was used. Trays containing combinations of differential or selective media were used to (i) separate mixtures of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, (ii) facilitate isolation of organisms from clinical specimens, and (iii) compare colony growth characteristics of pure cultures. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. Images PMID:16349943

  7. Poisoning with brown fly agaric, Amanita regalis.

    PubMed

    Elonen, E; Tarssanen, L; Härkönen, M

    1979-01-01

    Three patients ate different amounts of a common northern mushroom, brown fly agaric, Amanita regalis. All of them believed they had eaten delicious parasol mushrooms, Macrolepiota procera. The symptoms of poisoning began 1--2 hours after ingestion of the mushrooms. All the patients had marked gastrointestinal symptoms: nausea and heavy vomiting. Two had central nervous system manifestations and cholinergic symptoms: hallucinations, confusion, or loss of consciousness as well as copious salivation, or sweating. All patients recovered within 4--24 hours without any damage to liver, kidneys or central nervous system. It seems that cooking the mushrooms does not completely neutralize the toxic agents of Amanita regalis. The analysis of fried mushrooms shows that it may be possible to identify mushrooms reliably from the remains of a meal.

  8. Activation of Melanin Synthesis in Alternaria infectoria by Antifungal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Chantal; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Silva, Branca M. A.; Nakouzi-Naranjo, Antonio; Zuzarte, Mónica; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Stark, Ruth E.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The importance of Alternaria species fungi to human health ranges from their role as etiological agents of serious infections with poor prognoses in immunosuppressed individuals to their association with respiratory allergic diseases. The present work focuses on Alternaria infectoria, which was used as a model organism of the genus, and was designed to unravel melanin production in response to antifungals. After we characterized the pigment produced by A. infectoria, we studied the dynamics of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin production during growth, the degree of melanization in response to antifungals, and how melanization affected susceptibility to several classes of therapeutic drugs. We demonstrate that A. infectoria increased melanin deposition in cell walls in response to nikkomycin Z, caspofungin, and itraconazole but not in response to fluconazole or amphotericin B. These results indicate that A. infectoria activates DHN-melanin synthesis in response to certain antifungal drugs, possibly as a protective mechanism against these drugs. Inhibition of DHN-melanin synthesis by pyroquilon resulted in a lower minimum effective concentration (MEC) of caspofungin and enhanced morphological changes (increased hyphal balloon size), characterized by thinner and less organized A. infectoria cell walls. In summary, A. infectoria synthesizes melanin in response to certain antifungal drugs, and its susceptibility is influenced by melanization, suggesting the therapeutic potential of drug combinations that affect melanin synthesis. PMID:26711773

  9. Activation of Melanin Synthesis in Alternaria infectoria by Antifungal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Chantal; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Silva, Branca M A; Nakouzi-Naranjo, Antonio; Zuzarte, Mónica; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Stark, Ruth E; Casadevall, Arturo; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2015-12-28

    The importance of Alternaria species fungi to human health ranges from their role as etiological agents of serious infections with poor prognoses in immunosuppressed individuals to their association with respiratory allergic diseases. The present work focuses on Alternaria infectoria, which was used as a model organism of the genus, and was designed to unravel melanin production in response to antifungals. After we characterized the pigment produced by A. infectoria, we studied the dynamics of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin production during growth, the degree of melanization in response to antifungals, and how melanization affected susceptibility to several classes of therapeutic drugs. We demonstrate that A. infectoria increased melanin deposition in cell walls in response to nikkomycin Z, caspofungin, and itraconazole but not in response to fluconazole or amphotericin B. These results indicate that A. infectoria activates DHN-melanin synthesis in response to certain antifungal drugs, possibly as a protective mechanism against these drugs. Inhibition of DHN-melanin synthesis by pyroquilon resulted in a lower minimum effective concentration (MEC) of caspofungin and enhanced morphological changes (increased hyphal balloon size), characterized by thinner and less organized A. infectoria cell walls. In summary, A. infectoria synthesizes melanin in response to certain antifungal drugs, and its susceptibility is influenced by melanization, suggesting the therapeutic potential of drug combinations that affect melanin synthesis.

  10. Antifungal properties of ethanolic extract and its active compounds from Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana (Florin) heartwood.

    PubMed

    Yen, Tsair-Bor; Chang, Hui-Ting; Hsieh, Chun-Chun; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2008-07-01

    The ethanolic extract of Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana heartwood was screened for antifungal compounds by agar dilution assay and liquid chromatography. Two compounds, beta-thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin, responsible for the antifungal property of C. macrolepis var. formosana heartwood were isolated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and identified by 1H NMR and 13C NMR. The antifungal activities of these two compounds were further evaluated against total 15 fungi, including wood decay fungi, tree pathogenic fungi and molds. The hexane soluble fraction showed the strongest antifungal activities among all fractions. beta-Thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin exhibited not only very strong antifungal activity, but also broad antifungal spectrum. The MIC values of beta-thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin were in the range of 5.0-50.0 microg/ml. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to study the structural change of fungal hyphae induced by beta-thujaplicin. Strong cell wall shrinkage indicated the fungicidal effect could be attributed to the combined actions of metal chelating and cytoplasm leakage. It also suggests that the role of metal chelating is indispensable in the design of environmental-friendly fungicides.

  11. Tissue Penetration of Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Timothy; Troke, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the tissue penetration of systemically administered antifungal agents is critical for a proper appreciation of their antifungal efficacy in animals and humans. Both the time course of an antifungal drug and its absolute concentrations within tissues may differ significantly from those observed in the bloodstream. In addition, tissue concentrations must also be interpreted within the context of the pathogenesis of the various invasive fungal infections, which differ significantly. There are major technical obstacles to the estimation of concentrations of antifungal agents in various tissue subcompartments, yet these agents, even those within the same class, may exhibit markedly different tissue distributions. This review explores these issues and provides a summary of tissue concentrations of 11 currently licensed systemic antifungal agents. It also explores the therapeutic implications of their distribution at various sites of infection. PMID:24396137

  12. New facets of antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Lin; Yu, Shang-Jie; Heitman, Joseph; Wellington, Melanie; Chen, Ying-Lien

    2017-02-17

    Invasive fungal infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, and such infections are a substantial burden to healthcare systems around the world. However, the clinically available armamentarium for invasive fungal diseases is limited to 3 main classes (i.e., polyenes, triazoles, and echinocandins), and each has defined limitations related to spectrum of activity, development of resistance, and toxicity. Further, current antifungal therapies are hampered by limited clinical efficacy, high rates of toxicity, and significant variability in pharmacokinetic properties. New antifungal agents, new formulations, and novel combination regimens may improve the care of patients in the future by providing improved strategies to combat challenges associated with currently available antifungal agents. Likewise, therapeutic drug monitoring may be helpful, but its present use remains controversial due to the lack of available data. This article discusses new facets of antifungal therapy with a focus on new antifungal formulations and the synergistic effects between drugs used in combination therapy.

  13. Evaluation of topical antifungal products in an in vitro onychomycosis model.

    PubMed

    Sleven, Reindert; Lanckacker, Ellen; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Many topical commercial products are currently available for the treatment of onychomycosis. However, limited data are available concerning their antifungal activity. Using an in vitro onychomycosis model, the daily application of seven nail formulations was compared to the antifungal reference drug amorolfine (Loceryl(®) ) and evaluated for inhibitory activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes using an agar diffusion test. Of all commercial nail formulations, only Excilor(®) and Nailner(®) demonstrated inhibitory activity, which was much lower compared to the daily application of Loceryl(®) . However, Excilor(®) showed similar efficacy compared to the conventional weekly application of Loceryl(®) . These results suggest a role for organic acids in the antifungal effect of Excilor(®) (acetic acid, ethyl lactate) and Nailner(®) (lactic acid, citric acid, ethyl lactate) as all tested formulations without organic acids were inactive.

  14. Triazole Susceptibilities in Thermotolerant Fungal Isolates from Outdoor Air in the Seoul Capital Area in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungeun; Xu, Siyu; Bivila, Chemmeri Padasseri; Lee, Hyeyoung; Park, Myung Soo; Lim, Young Woon; Yamamoto, Naomichi

    2015-01-01

    Emerging fungi resistant to triazoles are a concern because of the increased use of medical triazoles and exposure to agricultural triazoles. However, little is known about the levels of triazole susceptibility in outdoor airborne fungi making it difficult to assess the risks of inhalation exposure to airborne, antifungal-resistant fungi. This study examined triazole susceptibilities of the airborne thermotolerant fungi isolated from the ambient air of the Seoul Capital Area of South Korea. We used impactor air sampling with triazole-containing nutrient agar plates as the collection substrates to screen for airborne fungal isolates based on their triazole susceptibilities. This study estimated that 0.17% of all the culturable fungi belong to the pathogenic thermotolerant taxa, among which each isolate of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus tubingensis showed a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 μg/mL or greater for itraconazole. Their concentration in air was 0.4 CFU/m3. Seven human pathogenic Paecilomyces variotii isolates had MICs of 32 μg/mL or greater and lower than 2 μg/mL for the agricultural fungicide tebuconazole and the medical triazole itraconazole, respectively. Though the concentration was low, our results confirm the presence of airborne fungi with high MICs for itraconazole in ambient air. Inhalation is an important exposure route because people inhale more than 10 m3 of air each day. Vigilance is preferred over monitoring for the emergence of triazole-resistant fungal pathogens in ambient outdoor air. PMID:26405807

  15. In vitro susceptibilities of Aspergillus spp. causing otomycosis to amphotericin B, voriconazole and itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ayse Demet; Kiraz, Nuri

    2007-11-01

    Otomycosis is worldwide in distribution and most commonly caused by Aspergillus species. Amphotericin B, itraconazole and voriconazole are used for the treatment of aspergillosis, but recently an increase in resistance to these agents has been reported. We aimed at investigating the in vitro activities of amphotericin B, voriconazole and itraconazole against Aspergillus isolates causing otomycosis. Mycological analysis of samples from the ear canals of patients was performed by culturing onto Sabouraud Dextrose Agar and by evaluating microscopically. Aspergillus species were identified with colony morphology and microscopic appearance, and tested for susceptibilities to amphotericin B, itraconazole and voriconazole by the CLSI reference broth microdilution method (M38-A document). A total of 120 isolates from 120 patients, comprising 57 Aspergillus niger, 42 Aspergillus fumigatus, nine Aspergillus flavus, six Aspergillus nidulans and six Aspergillus terreus strains were tested. No resistance was determined against amphotericin B and voriconazole, while six A. fumigatus and three A. niger isolates were resistant to itraconazole. In vitro data obtained in this study showed the resistance to itraconazole, while all of the isolates were susceptible to voriconazole and amphotericin B. Voriconazole seemed to be an alternative in the treatment of infections related to Aspergillus spp. but further studies are needed to learn more about the antifungal resistance of different species of Aspergillus to different agents.

  16. Antifungal and antibacterial activity of marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    El Amraoui, B; El Amraoui, M; Cohen, N; Fassouane, A

    2014-03-01

    In order to explore marine microorganisms with pharmaceutical potential, marine bacteria, collected from different coastal areas of the Moroccan Atlantic Ocean, were previously isolated from seawater, sediment, marine invertebrates and seaweeds. The antimicrobial activities of these microorganisms were investigated against the pathogens involved in human pathologies. Whole cultures of 34 marine microorganisms were screened for antimicrobial activities using the method of agar diffusion against three Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria, and against yeast. The results showed that among the 34 isolates studied, 28 (82%) strains have antimicrobial activity against at least one pathogen studied, 11 (32%) strains have antifungal activity and 24 (76%) strains are active against Gram-positive bacteria, while 21 (62%) strains are active against Gram-negative bacteria. Among isolates having antimicrobial activity, 14 were identified and were assigned to the genera Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Alcaligenes, Bacillus, Chromobacterium, Enterococcus, Pantoea and Pseudomonas. Due to a competitive role for space and nutrient, the marine microorganisms can produce antibiotic substance; therefore, these marine microorganisms were expected to be potential resources of natural antibiotic products.

  17. Comparison of charcoal- and starch-based media for testing susceptibilities of Legionella species to macrolides, azalides, and fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Pendland, S L; Martin, S J; Chen, C; Schreckenberger, P C; Danziger, L H

    1997-01-01

    We compared growth characteristics of 46 Legionella strains grown on buffered charcoal yeast extract alpha (BCYE alpha) agar and buffered starch yeast extract (BSYE) agar and MICs of macrolides, azalides, and fluoroquinolones for these organisms. Growth was poor and not reproducible on BSYE agar. Growth was excellent on BCYE alpha, and MICs were easy to interpret. BCYE alpha is superior to BSYE for testing susceptibilities of Legionella species by agar dilution. PMID:9350781

  18. Mechanisms of echinocandin antifungal drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections due to Candida and Aspergillus species cause extensive morbidity and mortality, especially among immunosuppressed patients, and antifungal therapy is critical to patient management. Yet only a few drug classes are available to treat invasive fungal diseases, and this problem is compounded by the emergence of antifungal resistance. Echinocandin drugs are the preferred choice to treat candidiasis. They are the first cell wall–active agents and target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which catalyzes the biosynthesis of β-1,3-glucan, a key cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failures occur rarely among common Candida species, with the exception of Candida glabrata, which are frequently multidrug resistant. Echinocandin resistance in susceptible species is always acquired during therapy. The mechanism of resistance involves amino acid changes in hot-spot regions of Fks subunits of glucan synthase, which decrease the sensitivity of the enzyme to drug. Cellular stress response pathways lead to drug adaptation, which promote the formation of resistant fks strains. Clinical factors promoting echinocandin resistance include empiric therapy, prophylaxis, gastrointestinal reservoirs, and intra-abdominal infections. A better understanding of the echinocandin resistance mechanism, along with cellular and clinical factors promoting resistance, will promote more effective strategies to overcome and prevent echinocandin resistance. PMID:26190298

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans-based Model Systems for Antifungal Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2013-01-01

    The substantial morbidity and mortality associated with invasive fungal infections constitute undisputed tokens of their severity. The continued expansion of susceptible population groups (such as immunocompromised individuals, patients undergoing extensive surgery, and those hospitalized with serious underlying diseases especially in the intensive care unit) and the limitations of current antifungal agents due to toxicity issues or to the development of resistance, mandate the development of novel antifungal drugs. Currently, drug discovery is transitioning from the traditional in vitro large-scale screens of chemical libraries to more complex bioassays, including in vivo studies on whole animals; invertebrates, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, are thus gaining momentum as screening tools. Key pathogenesis features of fungal infections, including filament formation, are expressed in certain invertebrate and mammalian hosts; among the various potential hosts, C. elegans provides an attractive platform both for the study of host-pathogen interactions and the identification of new antifungal agents. Advantages of compound screening in this facile, relatively inexpensive and not as ethically challenged whole-animal context, include the simultaneous assessment of antifungal efficacy and toxicity that could result in the identification of compounds with distinct mechanisms of action, for example by promoting host immune responses or by impeding fungal virulence factors. With the recent advent of using predictive models to screen for compounds with improved chances of bioavailability in the nematode a priori, high-throughput screening of chemical libraries using the C. elegans-c. albicans antifungal discovery assay holds even greater promise for the identification of novel antifungal agents in the near future. PMID:21470110

  20. Selected elements in fly agaric Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Kunito, T; Kubota, R; Lipka, K; Mazur, A; Falandysz, Justyna J; Tanabe, S

    2007-09-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb, Rb, Se, Sb, Sr, V, Tl and Zn have been determined in the whole fruiting bodies, as well as separately in caps and stalks, of fly agaric collected from three geographically distant sites in northern part of Poland. The elements were determined using ICP-MS, ICP-OES, HG-AAS and CV-AAS, respectively. For elements such as Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Ga, Mo, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, Tl, and V concentrations were similar in the caps and stalks, respectively, and for K, Zn, Ag, Ca, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Rb and Se were greater in the caps, while for Co, Cs and Na in the stalks. For Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sr, Tl and V concentration in the caps showed spatial variations (P<0.05), while for Cu, K, Mg, Na, Se and Zn was independent of the site. The elements such as K with median or mean in the caps between 37,000 and 43,000 microg/g.dm and Mg with 920 and 1,100 microg/g dm were most abundant. Next, within median values range from approximately 100 to 500 microg/g dm were such as Ca, Fe and Al, and in descending order they followed by Rb (100-400 microg/g dm); V, Na, Zn (50-200 microg/g dm); Cu, Mn (10-50 microg/g dm); Cd (10-20 microg/g dm); Se (5 microg/g dm); Ba (<1-3); Cr, Ag, Pb, Sr (<1-2 microg/g dm); Cs, Co, Hg (<1-1 microg/g dm); Ga (<0.5), Sb, Mo and Tl (<0.1 microg/g dm).

  1. Clinical pharmacology of antifungal compounds.

    PubMed

    Groll, Andreas H; Gea-Banacloche, Juan C; Glasmacher, Axel; Just-Nuebling, Gudrun; Maschmeyer, Georg; Walsh, Thomas J

    2003-03-01

    Prompted by the worldwide surge in fungal infections, the past decade has witnessed a considerable expansion in antifungal drug research. New compounds have entered the clinical arena, and major progress has been made in defining paradigms of antifungal therapies. This article provides an up-to-date review on the clinical pharmacology, indications, and dosage recommendations of approved and currently investigational therapeutics for treatment of invasive fungal infections in adult and pediatric patients.

  2. Comparison of inhibitory mold agar to Sabouraud dextrose agar as a primary medium for isolation of fungi.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Theresa; Zinchuk, Riva; Gumpeni, Pramod; Larone, Davise H

    2010-05-01

    Clinical specimens cultured on two selective fungal media, inhibitory mold agar (IMA) and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), were compared with respect to recovery of fungi. Of the 840 fungal isolates recovered, 69.3% grew on both IMA and SDA; 24.9% grew only on IMA; and 5.8% grew only on SDA, showing that IMA is superior (P=0.003).

  3. Differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans on rosemary extract agar and oregano extract agar.

    PubMed

    de Loreto, Erico Silva; Pozzatti, Patrícia; Alves Scheid, Liliane; Santurio, Deise; Morais Santurio, Janio; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently described pathogenic species which shares many phenotypic features with Candida albicans and therefore, may be misidentified in microbiological laboratories. Because molecular methods can be onerous and unfeasible in routine mycological laboratories with restricted budgets such as those in developing countries, phenotypic techniques have been encouraged in the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of these species. We examined the colony morphology and chlamydospore production of 30 C. dubliniensis isolates and 100 C. albicans isolates on two new proposed media: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract agar (REA) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) extract agar (OEA). These substrates are traditionally used as spices and medicinal herbs. In both of these media, all C. dubliniensis isolates (100%) showed rough colonies with peripheral hyphal fringes and abundant chlamydospores after 24 to 48 hr of incubation at 25 degrees C. In contrast, under the same conditions, all isolates of C. albicans (100%) showed smooth colonies without hyphal fringes or chlamydospores. In conclusion, REA and OEA offer a simple, rapid, and inexpensive screening media for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  4. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus

    PubMed Central

    Cold, Emma R.; Freyria, Nastasia J.; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS– 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS– 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications. PMID:27149378

  5. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus.

    PubMed

    Cold, Emma R; Freyria, Nastasia J; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications.

  6. Candida antifungal drug resistance in sub-Saharan African populations: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Africa, Charlene Wilma Joyce; Abrantes, Pedro Miguel dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Background: Candida infections are responsible for increased morbidity and mortality rates in at-risk patients, especially in developing countries where there is limited access to antifungal drugs and a high burden of HIV co-infection.  Objectives: This study aimed to identify antifungal drug resistance patterns within the subcontinent of Africa.  Methods: A literature search was conducted on published studies that employed antifungal susceptibility testing on clinical Candida isolates from sub-Saharan African countries using Pubmed and Google Scholar.  Results: A total of 21 studies from 8 countries constituted this review. Only studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and employing antifungal drug susceptibility testing were included. Regional differences in Candida species prevalence and resistance patterns were identified.  Discussion: The outcomes of this review highlight the need for a revision of antifungal therapy guidelines in regions most affected by Candida drug resistance.  Better controls in antimicrobial drug distribution and the implementation of regional antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance programmes are required in order to reduce the high Candida drug resistance levels seen to be emerging in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:28154753

  7. Diffusion Disk Susceptibility Testing with Cefaclor

    PubMed Central

    Shadomy, Smith; Carver, Melinda

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of the standardized 30-μg cephalothin disk and that of an experimental 30-μg cefaclor disk in predicting probable clinical susceptibility to cefaclor were compared. Quantitative determinations of cefaclor susceptibility were measured by the World Health Organization International Collaborative Study agar dilution procedure; diffusion disk tests were performed by the standardized U.S. Food and Drug Administration disk test. The cephalothin disk erred in predicting probable susceptibility in 52% of isolates of Enterococcus spp. resistant to 16 μg or less of cefaclor per ml; the cefaclor disk did not. The cephalothin disk erred in correctly predicting susceptibility in only 20% of cefaclor-susceptible isolates of Enterobacter spp.; the cefaclor disk correctly predicted susceptibility for 70%. These results indicate the need for further evaluation of a separate cefaclor disk for use in susceptibility testing with this new cephalosporin. PMID:646345

  8. Macrolide susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H; Morozumi, T; Munthali, G; Mitani, K; Ito, N; Yamamoto, K

    1996-01-01

    Twenty strains of Mycoplasma hyorhinis were investigated for their in vitro susceptibilities to 15 antimicrobial agents by broth and agar dilution methods. Two of the 20 field strains showed low susceptibility to 14- and 16-membered macrolide antimicrobial agents tested. The two field strains were considered inducibly resistant to macrolides. PMID:8849222

  9. Effect of water structure on gelation of agar in glycerol solutions and phase diagram of agar organogels.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Bohidar, H B

    2012-06-21

    A comprehensive study of hydration of polyanionic agar molecules in its solution and gel phase in glycerol-water binary solvent is reported. Raman spectroscopy results predict differential water structure arrangement for glycerol-water binary solvent, 0.02% (w/v) agar in glycerol solution and 0.3% (w/v) agar organogel. The 3200 cm(-1) Raman band pertaining to ice-like structure of water was found to increase in gel phase alike in glycerol-water solvent while it decreased in agar solutions with increase in glycerol concentration. In contrast, the partially structured water corresponding to the component 3310 cm(-1) of Raman spectra increased in agar solution, and decreased in gel phase similar to glycerol-water solvent case. We have explained these observations based on a simple model where the available oxygen to hydrogen atom ratio in a given solvent-polymer system uniquely defines hydration in solution and gel phases. The gelation concentration was found to increase from 0.18 (for water) to 0.22% (w/v) (50% v/v glycerol solution) as the glycerol concentration was raised. Correspondingly, the gelation temperature, T(g), showed a decline from 40 to 20 °C, and the gel melting temperature, T(m), revealed a reduction from 81 to 65 °C in the same glycerol concentration regime. Two distinctive features are evident here: (i) presence of glycerol as a cosolvent does not favor the gelation of agar as compared to water and (ii) agar organogels are softer than their hydrogels. A unique 3D phase diagram for the agar organogel is proposed. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the agar molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that thermo-mechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and adapted as per application requirement.

  10. Evaluation of brilliance CRE agar for the detection of carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bracco, Silvia; Migliavacca, Roberta; Pini, Beatrice; Corbo, Nicoletta; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Brigante, Gioconda; Piazza, Aurora; Micheletti, Piero; Luzzaro, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of the new chromogenic medium BrillianceTM CREAgar (Thermo Fisher Scientific) for determining the limit of detection of carbapenem-resistant enterobacteria (CRE). A total of 70 clinical isolates were studied. Of these, 30 were well-characterized CRE, including Klebsiella pneumoniae strains producing KPC-, VIM-, and OXA-type enzymes, VIM-positive Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli, NDM-positive E. coli, and enterobacterial isolates characterized by porin loss associated with ESBL production or AmpC hyperproduction. Ten carbapenem-resistant non-fermentative isolates were also included as well as 30 carbapenem-susceptible isolates. Carbapenem-resistant strains were inoculated at three different concentrations onto Brilliance CRE Agar (from 1.5x101 CFU/ml up to 1.5x104 CFU/ml) whereas carbapenem-susceptible isolates were inoculated at a concentration of 1.5x102 CFU/ml. The medium sustained the growth of carbapenem-resistant isolates, showing detection limits from 1.5x101 CFU/ml (in 31/40 cases) to 1.5x104 CFU/ml. No growth was observed with carbapenem-sensitive control strains. Our results indicate that the Brilliance CRE Agar allows the growth of carbapenem-resistant isolates with low detection limits and could represent a useful screening medium for both enterobacteria and non-fermentative Gram-negative strains resistant to carbapenems.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of a Novel Antifungal Small Molecule against Candida Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Kwok Yong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Dan; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2014-01-01

    Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of humans worldwide and has become a major clinical problem because of the growing number of immunocompromised patients, who are susceptible to infection. Moreover, the number of available antifungals is limited, and antifungal-resistant Candida strains are emerging. New and effective antifungals are therefore urgently needed. Here, we discovered a small molecule with activity against Candida spp. both in vitro and in vivo. We screened a library of 50,240 small molecules for inhibitors of yeast-to-hypha transition, a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans. This screening identified 20 active compounds. Further examination of the in vitro antifungal and anti-biofilm properties of these compounds, using a range of Candida spp., led to the discovery of SM21, a highly potent antifungal molecule (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.2 – 1.6 µg/ml). In vitro, SM21 was toxic to fungi but not to various human cell lines or bacterial species and was active against Candida isolates that are resistant to existing antifungal agents. Moreover, SM21 was relatively more effective against biofilms of Candida spp. than the current antifungal agents. In vivo, SM21 prevented the death of mice in a systemic candidiasis model and was also more effective than the common antifungal nystatin at reducing the extent of tongue lesions in a mouse model of oral candidiasis. Propidium iodide uptake assay showed that SM21 affected the integrity of the cell membrane. Taken together, our results indicate that SM21 has the potential to be developed as a novel antifungal agent for clinical use. PMID:24465737

  12. Comparison of susceptibility patterns using commercially available susceptibility testing methods performed on prevalent Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Cretella, David; Barber, Katie E; King, S Travis; Stover, Kayla R

    2016-12-01

    The rising rates of invasive fungal infections caused by non-albicans Candida and the increasing emergence of antifungal resistance complicate the management of invasive candidiasis. Accurate and timely antifungal susceptibility testing is critical to targeting antifungal therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare commercially available susceptibility testing methods using prospectively collected Candida isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed on 74 Candida isolates collected from July 2014 to March 2015 using broth microdilution according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute method, Etest, Vitek 2 (YS-05) and Sensititre. Essential agreement and categorical agreement (CA) were assessed using the reference method. Of the 34 total blood isolates collected, Candida albicans comprised only 38 % (13) of the Candida spp. with Candidaglabrata being nearly as prevalent (29 %, 10). CA using Etest was 86 % for fluconazole, 72 % for caspofungin, 98 % for micafungin and 97 % for anidulafungin. Vitek 2 CA was 90 % for fluconazole and 98 % for caspofungin. Sensititre CA was 93 % for fluconazole, 98 % for caspofungin, 98 % for micafungin and 100 % for anidulafungin. Although our study tested a small population of Candida isolates, our results were variable by method. When implementing antifungal susceptibility testing, clinicians should be aware of the strengths and limitations of each testing method.

  13. Special Issue: Novel Antifungal Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Poeta, Maurizio Del

    2016-01-01

    This Special Issue is designed to highlight the latest research and development on new antifungal compounds with mechanisms of action different from the ones of polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins. The papers presented here highlight new pathways and targets that could be exploited for the future development of new antifungal agents to be used alone or in combination with existing antifungals. A computational model for better predicting antifungal drug resistance is also presented. PMID:28058254

  14. Factors affecting antimicrobial susceptibility of Fusobacterium species.

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, M D; Del Bene, V E; Lewis, J W

    1987-01-01

    Fifteen clinical isolates of Fusobacterium species were studied to determine their quality of growth on five agar media, their susceptibility to penicillin, cephalothin, cefoxitin, and cefotaxime, the inoculum effect, and the presence of L forms and beta-lactamase. Wilkins-Chalgren agar supported confluent growth best, but Fusobacterium nucleatum exhibited poor growth on all agar media. Most isolates exhibited poor reproducibility of MIC results with repeated agar dilution testing. However, most isolates were susceptible to all antibiotics at the breakpoint concentrations. No inoculum effect was observed, but preparation of an inoculum at a 0.5 McFarland nephelometric standard produced a lower than expected number of CFU (10(6) CFU) in some isolates. L forms were frequently seen. No beta-lactamase was found. The variability in MICs seen with beta-lactam antibiotics was not found when clindamycin was tested. MIC studies with Fusobacterium spp. may be complicated by poor growth on agar media, poor reproducibility, and small inoculum size. PMID:3494743

  15. Treating chromoblastomycosis with systemic antifungals.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Paredes-Solís, Vanessa; Saúl, Amado

    2004-02-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is a subcutaneous mycosis for which there is no treatment of choice but rather, several treatment options, with low cure rates and many relapses. The choice of treatment should consider several conditions, such as the causal agent (the most common one being Fonsecaea pedrosoi ), extension of the lesions, clinical topography and health status of the patient. Most oral and systemic antifungals have been used; the best results have been obtained with itraconazole and terbinafine at high doses, for a mean of 6 - 12 months. In extensive and refractory cases, chemotherapy with oral antifungals may be associated with thermotherapy (local heat and/or cryosurgery). Limited or early cases may be managed with surgical methods, always associated with oral antifungal agents. It is important to determine the in vitro sensitivity of the major causal agents to the various drugs, by estimating the minimum inhibitory concentration, as well as drug tolerability and drug interactions.

  16. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication. PMID:27648203

  17. Enhanced chlorine resistance of tap water-adapted Legionella pneumophila as compared with agar medium-passaged strains.

    PubMed

    Kuchta, J M; States, S J; McGlaughlin, J E; Overmeyer, J H; Wadowsky, R M; McNamara, A M; Wolford, R S; Yee, R B

    1985-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bacteria maintained in a low-nutrient "natural" environment such as swimming pool water are much more resistant to disinfection by various chemical agents than strains maintained on rich media. In the present study a comparison was made of the chlorine (Cl2) susceptibility of hot-water tank isolates of Legionella pneumophila maintained in tap water and strains passaged on either nonselective buffered charcoal-yeast extract or selective differential glycine-vancomycin-polymyxin agar medium. Our earlier work has shown that environmental and clinical isolates of L. pneumophila maintained on agar medium are much more resistant to Cl2 than coliforms are. Under the present experimental conditions (21 degrees C, pH 7.6 to 8.0, and 0.25 mg of free residual Cl2 per liter, we found the tap water-maintained L. pneumophila strains to be even more resistant than the agar-passaged isolates. Under these conditions, 99% kill of tap water-maintained strains of L. pneumophila was usually achieved within 60 to 90 min compared with 10 min for agar-passaged strains. Samples from plumbing fixtures in a hospital yielded legionellae which were "super"-chlorine resistant when assayed under natural conditions. After one agar passage their resistance dropped to levels of comparable strains which had not been previously exposed to additional chlorination. These studies more closely approximate natural conditions than our previous work and show that tap water-maintained L. pneumophila is even more resistant to Cl2 than its already resistant agar medium-passaged counterpart.

  18. Use of agar/glycerol and agar/glycerol/water as a translucent brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Jermy, Mark C; Winter, Taylor; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    The suitability of agar/glycerol/water and agar/glycerol mixtures as brain simulants was investigated. Test specimens (n=15) (50x27×37mm) were fabricated for these different mixtures and conditioned to 12°C, 22°C, and 26°C prior to testing. For comparison, fresh deer brain specimens (n=20) were sourced and prepared to the same dimensions as the agar/glycerol(/water) mixtures and conditioned to 12°C and 37°C. High impact tests were carried out with a 0.22-caliber air rifle pellet and a high-speed camera was used to record the projectile as it passed through the specimens, allowing for energy loss and vertical displacement velocity calculation. Although the agar/glycerol/water mixture presented with similar vertical expansion and contraction of the specimens to the warm and cold deer brains, a two-fold decrease of the vertical expansion and contraction was noticed with the agar/glycerol specimens. Also considerably less extrusion of this mixture out of the exit and entry sides after specimen penetration was observed. Of the simulants tested, agar/glycerol/water was the most suitable brain simulant for ballistic testing and impact studies.

  19. Antitumor and antifungal activities of organic extracts of seacucumber Holothuria atra from the southeast coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhinakaran, Devaraj Isaac; Lipton, Aaron Premnath

    2015-02-01

    In phylum Echinodermata, the family Holothuridae is distinguished by its capacity of bioactive compounds. Sea cucumber Holothuria atra is commonly known as the lollyfish. The antifungal activity was detected using agar well diffusion method against the various fungal strains such as Trichoderma viride, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavis, Candida albicans and Penicillium chrysogenum. Relatively high antifungal activity was seen against Candida albicans at 100 μL-1 concentration of extracts. Zone of inhibition was measured at 18 mm of diameter. The anti-tumor activities were detected against the Vero and Hep2 cell lines using MTT assay. The cells were treated with H. atra extract at concentrations 0.078-10mg mL-1. The extract showed high proliferative activity against the Hep2 cells. The body wall extracts of sea cucumber ( H. atra) showed effective antifungal and antitumor activities. All these findings suggest that the extracts could be used for the development of drugs.

  20. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; Blood Culture ; Bacterial Wound Culture ; AFB Testing ; MRSA ; ...

  1. Biochemical approaches to selective antifungal activity. Focus on azole antifungals.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bossche, H; Marichal, P; Gorrens, J; Coene, M C; Willemsens, G; Bellens, D; Roels, I; Moereels, H; Janssen, P A

    1989-01-01

    Azole antifungals (e.g. the imidazoles: miconazole, clotrimazole, bifonazole, imazalil, ketoconazole, and the triazoles: diniconazole, triadimenol, propiconazole, fluconazole and itraconazole) inhibit in fungal cells the 14 alpha-demethylation of lanosterol or 24-methylenedihydrolanosterol. The consequent inhibition of ergosterol synthesis originates from binding of the unsubstituted nitrogen (N-3 or N-4) of their imidazole or triazole moiety to the heme iron and from binding of their N-1 substituent to the apoprotein of a cytochrome P-450 (P-450(14)DM) of the endoplasmic reticulum. Great differences in both potency and selectivity are found between the different azole antifungals. For example, after 16h of growth of Candida albicans in medium supplemented with [14C]-acetate and increasing concentrations of itraconazole, 100% inhibition of ergosterol synthesis is achieved at 3 x 10(-8) M. Complete inhibition of this synthesis by fluconazole is obtained at 10(-5) M only. The agrochemical imidazole derivative, imazalil, shows high selectivity, it has almost 80 and 98 times more affinity for the Candida P-450(s) than for those of the piglet testes microsomes and bovine adrenal mitochondria, respectively. However, the topically active imidazole antifungal, bifonazole, has the highest affinity for P-450(s) of the testicular microsomes. The triazole antifungal itraconazole inhibits at 10(-5) M the P-450-dependent aromatase by 17.9, whereas 50% inhibition of this enzyme is obtained at about 7.5 x 10(-6)M of the bistriazole derivative fluconazole. The overall results show that both the affinity for the fungal P-450(14)DM and the selectivity are determined by the nitrogen heterocycle and the hydrophobic N-1 substituent of the azole antifungals. The latter has certainly a greater impact. The presence of a triazole and a long hypdrophobic nonligating portion form the basis for itraconazole's potency and selectivity.

  2. Comparison of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus Agar Medium to Conventional Media for Detection of Staphylococcus aureus in Respiratory Samples

    PubMed Central

    Flayhart, Diane; Lema, Clara; Borek, Anita; Carroll, Karen C.

    2004-01-01

    Screening for Staphylococcus aureus has become routine in certain patient populations. This study is the first clinical evaluation of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus agar (CSA) medium (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, Md.) for detection of S. aureus in nasal surveillance cultures and in respiratory samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. S. aureus colonies appear mauve on CSA. Other organisms are inhibited or produce a distinctly different colony color. S. aureus was identified from all media by slide coagulase, exogenous DNase, and mannitol fermentation assays. Susceptibility testing was performed using the agar dilution method. A total of 679 samples were evaluated. All samples were inoculated onto CSA. Nasal surveillance cultures were inoculated onto sheep blood agar (SBA) (BD Diagnostics), and samples from CF patients were inoculated onto mannitol salt agar (MSA) (BD Diagnostics). Of the 679 samples cultured, 200 organisms produced a mauve color on CSA (suspicious for S. aureus) and 180 were positive for S. aureus on SBA or MSA. Of 200 CSA-positive samples 191 were identified as S. aureus. Nine mauve colonies were slide coagulase negative and were subsequently identified as Staphylococcus lugdunensis (one), Staphylococcus epidermidis (three), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one), and Corynebacterium species (four). CSA improved the ability to detect S. aureus by recovering 12 S. aureus isolates missed by conventional media. Of the 192 S. aureus isolates recovered, 122 were methicillin susceptible and 70 were methicillin resistant. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of CSA in this study were 99.5 and 98%, respectively. There was no difference in the performance of the slide coagulase test or in susceptibility testing performed on S. aureus recovered from CSA compared to SBA or MSA. Our data support the use of CSA in place of standard culture media for detection of S. aureus in heavily contaminated respiratory samples. PMID:15297498

  3. Antifungal activity of juniper extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sawdust from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane or ethanol and the extracts tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These species studied represent the junipers with the greatest potential for co...

  4. Antifungal activity against Candida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Iñigo, Melania; Pemán, Javier; Del Pozo, Jose L

    2012-10-01

    Candida species have two distinct lifestyles: planktonic, and surface-attached communities called biofilms. Mature C. albicans biofilms show a complex three-dimensional architecture with extensive spatial heterogeneity, and consist of a dense network of yeast, hyphae, and pseudohyphae encased within a matrix of exopolymeric material. Several key processes are likely to play vital roles at the different stages of biofilm development, such as cell-substrate and cell-cell adherence, hyphal development, and quorum sensing. Biofilm formation is a survival strategy, since biofilm yeasts are more resistant to antifungals and environmental stress. Antifungal resistance is a multifactorial process that includes multidrug efflux pumps, target proteins of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Most studies agree in presenting azoles as agents with poor activity against Candida spp. biofilms. However, recent studies have demonstrated that echinocandins and amphotericin B exhibit remarkable activity against C. albicans and Candida non-albicans biofilms. The association of Candida species with biofilm formation increases the therapeutic complexity of foreign body-related yeast infections. The traditional approach to the management of these infections has been to explant the affected device. There is a strong medical but also economical motivation for the development of novel anti-fungal biofilm strategies due to the constantly increasing resistance of Candida biofilms to conventional antifungals, and the high mortality caused by related infections. A better description of the extent and role of yeast in biofilms may be critical for developing novel therapeutic strategies in the clinical setting.

  5. Antifungal resistance in yeast vaginitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dun, E.

    1999-01-01

    The increased number of vaginal yeast infections in the past few years has been a disturbing trend, and the scientific community has been searching for its etiology. Several theories have been put forth to explain the apparent increase. First, the recent widespread availability of low-dosage, azole-based over-the-counter antifungal medications for vaginal yeast infections encourages women to self-diagnose and treat, and women may be misdiagnosing themselves. Their vaginitis may be caused by bacteria, parasites or may be a symptom of another underlying health condition. As a result, they may be unnecessarily and chronically expose themselves to antifungal medications and encourage fungal resistance. Second, medical technology has increased the life span of seriously immune compromised individuals, yet these individuals are frequently plagued by opportunistic fungal infections. Long-term and intense azole-based antifungal treatment has been linked to an increase in resistant Candida and non-Candida species. Thus, the future of limiting antifungal resistance lies in identifying the factors promoting resistance and implementing policies to prevent it. PMID:10907778

  6. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Epigallocatechin 3-O-Gallate against Clinical Isolates of Dermatophytes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong Joo; Taguchi, Hideaki; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Matsuzawa, Tetsuhiro; Hyon, Suong-Hyu

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EGCg) has growth-inhibitory effect on clinical isolates of Candida species. In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity of EGCg and antifungal agents against thirty-five of dermatophytes clinically isolated by the international guidelines (M38-A2). All isolates exhibited good susceptibility to EGCg (MIC50, 2-4 µg/mL, MIC90, 4-8 µg/mL, and geometric mean (GM) MICs, 3.36-4 µg/mL) than those of fluconazole (MIC50, 2-16 µg/mL, MIC90, 4-32 µg/mL, and GM MICs, 3.45-25.8 µg/mL) and flucytosin (MIC50, MIC90, and GM MICs, >64 µg/mL), although they were less susceptible to other antifungal agents, such as amphotericin B, itraconazole, and miconazole. These activities of EGCg were approximately 4-fold higher than those of fluconazole, and were 4 to 16-fold higher than flucytosin. This result indicates that EGCg can inhibit pathogenic dermatophyte species. Therefore, we suggest that EGCg may be effectively used solely as a possible agent or combined with other antifungal agents for antifungal therapy in dermatophytosis. PMID:21488200

  7. Hyperspectral imaging for detecting pathogens grown on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Line, John E.; Park, Bosoon; Windham, William R.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth pattern, color, etc.) of colonies grown on agar plates has been widely used to tentatively differentiate organisms. However, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate target organisms like Campylobacters from other contaminants grown together on the same agar plates. A hyperspectral imaging system operating at the visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectral region from 400 nm to 900 nm was set up to measure spectral signatures of 17 different Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter subspecies. Protocols for culturing, imaging samples and for calibrating measured data were developed. The VNIR spectral library of all 17 organisms commonly encountered in poultry was established from calibrated hyperspectral images. A classification algorithm was developed to locate and identify Campylobacters, non-Campylobacter contaminants, and background agars with 99.29% accuracy. This research has a potential to be expanded to detect other pathogens grown on agar media.

  8. Candida tropicalis Antifungal Cross-Resistance Is Related to Different Azole Target (Erg11p) Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Forastiero, A.; Mesa-Arango, A. C.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Alcazar-Fuoli, L.; Bernal-Martinez, L.; Pelaez, T.; Lopez, J. F.; Grimalt, J. O.; Gomez-Lopez, A.; Cuesta, I.; Zaragoza, O.

    2013-01-01

    Candida tropicalis ranks between third and fourth among Candida species most commonly isolated from clinical specimens. Invasive candidiasis and candidemia are treated with amphotericin B or echinocandins as first-line therapy, with extended-spectrum triazoles as acceptable alternatives. Candida tropicalis is usually susceptible to all antifungal agents, although several azole drug-resistant clinical isolates are being reported. However, C. tropicalis resistant to amphotericin B is uncommon, and only a few strains have reliably demonstrated a high level of resistance to this agent. The resistance mechanisms operating in C. tropicalis strains isolated from clinical samples showing resistance to azole drugs alone or with amphotericin B cross-resistance were elucidated. Antifungal drug resistance was related to mutations of the azole target (Erg11p) with or without alterations of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. The antifungal drug resistance shown in vitro correlated very well with the results obtained in vivo using the model host Galleria mellonella. Using this panel of strains, the G. mellonella model system was validated as a simple, nonmammalian minihost model that can be used to study in vitro-in vivo correlation of antifungals in C. tropicalis. The development in C. tropicalis of antifungal drug resistance with different mechanisms during antifungal treatment has potential clinical impact and deserves specific prospective studies. PMID:23877676

  9. Antifungal activity of sourdough fermented wheat germ used as an ingredient for bread making.

    PubMed

    Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Cassone, Angela; Coda, Rossana; Gobbetti, Marco

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed at investigating the antifungal activity of sourdough fermented (Lactobacillus plantarum LB1 and Lactobacillus rossiae LB5) wheat germ (SFWG). Preliminarily, methanol and water/salt-soluble extracts from SFWG were assayed by agar diffusion towards Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1. As shown by hyphal radial growth rate, the water/salt-soluble extract showed the inhibition of various fungi isolated from bakeries. The antifungal activity was attributed to a mixture of organic acids and peptides which were synthesized during fermentation. Formic (24.7mM) acid showed the highest antifungal activity. Four peptides, having similarities with well known antifungal sequences, were identified and chemically synthesized. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 2.5-15.2mg/ml. Slices of bread made by addition of 4% (wt/wt) of freeze dried SFWG were packed in polyethylene bags and stored at room temperature. Slices did not show contamination by fungi until at least 28days of storage and behaved as the calcium propionate (0.3%, wt/wt).

  10. Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) poisoning, case report and review.

    PubMed

    Satora, Leszek; Pach, Dorota; Butryn, Beata; Hydzik, Piotr; Balicka-Slusarczyk, Barbara

    2005-06-01

    Gathering and eating mushrooms and other plants containing psychoactive substances has become increasingly popular among young people experimenting with drugs. Dried fly agaric Amanita muscaria fruiting bodies were eaten by five young persons (18-21 years of age) at a party in order to evoke hallucinations. Visual and auditory hallucinations occurred in four of them, whereas a 18-year-old girl lost consciousness. The following morning, she went to the Clinic of Toxicology. Due to the fact that not all the active substances present in the fly agaric have been identified, and some of them have an effect after a period of latency, the patient was admitted for several days of observation during which check-up examinations were performed. After four days without any problems, she was discharged. The poisoning regressed with no organ complications. The remaining persons who had eaten the fly agaric were free from any complaints.

  11. In Vitro Activities of Six Antifungal Drugs Against Candida glabrata Isolates: An Emerging Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Amirrajab, Nasrin; Badali, Hamid; Didehdar, Mojtaba; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Lotfi, Nazanin; Shokohi, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida glabrata is a pathogenic yeast with several unique biological features and associated with an increased incidence rate of candidiasis. It exhibits a great degree of variation in its pathogenicity and antifungal susceptibility. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the following six antifungal drugs against clinical C. glabrata strains: amphotericin B (AmB), ketoconazole (KTZ), fluconazole (FCZ), itraconazole (ITZ), voriconazole (VCZ), and caspofungin (CASP). Materials and Methods Forty clinical C. glabrata strains were investigated using DNA sequencing. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined as described in clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) documents (M27-A3 and M27-S4). Results The sequence analysis of the isolate confirmed as C. glabrata and deposited on NCBI GenBank under the accession number no. KT763084-KT763123. The geometric mean MICs against all the tested strains were as follows, in increasing order: CASP (0.17 g/mL), VCZ (0.67 g/mL), AmB (1.1 g/mL), ITZ (1.82 g/mL), KTZ (1.85 g/mL), and FCZ (6.7 g/mL). The resistance rates of the isolates to CASP, FCZ, ITZ, VZ, KTZ, and AmB were 5%, 10%, 72.5%, 37.5%, 47.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions These findings confirm that CASP, compared to the other antifungals, is the potent agent for treating candidiasis caused by C. glabrata. However, the clinical efficacy of these novel antifungals remains to be determined. PMID:27540459

  12. Antifungal activity of topical microemulsion containing a thiophene derivative

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Geovani Pereira; de Freitas Araújo Reis, Mysrayn Yargo; da Silva, Dayanne Tomaz Casimiro; Junior, Francisco Jaime Bezerra Mendonça; Converti, Attílio; Pessoa, Adalberto; de Lima Damasceno, Bolívar Ponciano Goulart; da Silva, José Alexsandro

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections have become a major problem of worldwide concern. Yeasts belonging to the Candida genus and the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans are responsible for different clinical manifestations, especially in immunocompromised patients. Antifungal therapies are currently based on a few chemotherapeutic agents that have problems related to effectiveness and resistance profiles. Microemulsions are isotropic, thermodynamically stable transparent systems of oil, water and surfactant that can improve the solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Taking into account the need for more effective and less toxic drugs along with the potential of thiophene derivatives as inhibitors of pathogenic fungi growth, this study aimed to evaluate the antifungal activity of a thiophene derivative (5CN05) embedded in a microemulsion (ME). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined using the microdilution method using amphotericin B as a control. The formulations tested (ME- blank and ME-5CN05) showed physico-chemical properties that would allow their use by the topical route. 5CN05 as such exhibited moderate or weak antifungal activity against Candida species (MIC = 270–540 μg.mL−1) and good activity against C. neoformans (MIC = 17 μg.mL−1). Candida species were susceptible to ME-5CN05 (70–140 μg.mL−1), but C. neoformans was much more, presenting a MIC value of 2.2 μg.mL−1. The results of this work proved promising for the pharmaceutical industry, because they suggest an alternative therapy against C. neoformans. PMID:25242940

  13. Lysine-iron agar in the detection of Arizona cultures.

    PubMed

    EDWARDS, P R; FIFE, M A

    1961-11-01

    A lysine-iron agar is described and recommended for the detection of Arizona strains which ferment lactose rapidly. Black colonies which appear on bismuth sulfite agar should be transferred to the medium. Salmonellae and Arizona cultures produce a distinctive reaction since they are the only recognized groups of enteric bacteria which regularly produce lysine decarboxylase rapidly and form large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Use of the medium is particularly recommended in the examination of specimens from enteric infections in which shigellae and salmonellae are not detected.

  14. Method for Measuring Changes in Surface Tension on Agar

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, David S.; Dworkin, Martin

    1983-01-01

    The surface tension of agar surfaces was determined by measuring the contact angles formed by drops of various hydrophobic liquids on the surface and then calculating the composite surface free energy function by solving a series of simultaneous equations derived from these data. This method was used to measure the change in the surface tension of agar produced by the addition of various concentrations of albumin. The resulting curve was typical of the effect of increasing concentrations of surfactants on surface tension. The method was compared with other methods of determining surface tension of solids, and it was concluded that the technique used here provided the most reliable results. PMID:16346273

  15. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of Streptomyces polymachus sp. nov. isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Manh; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-08-01

    Strain T258T was isolated from forest soil at Bongnae Falls, South Korea. The strain exhibited antimicrobial and antifungal activity against the following strains: Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Paenibacillus larvae, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. Growth occurred on all ISP media tested (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7), Czapek-Dox agar, potato dextrose agar, trypticase soy agar, Bennett's modified agar and nutrient agar at 28 °C. Aerial spores were produced solely on ISP Medium 4; the colour of the aerial mycelium was white and the substrate mycelium was ivory. Melanin production was negative on peptone-yeast extract iron agar (ISP Medium 6). The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained ll-diaminopimelic acid, glutamic acid, alanine and glycine. Whole-cell hydrolysates contained glucose, ribose and galactose. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8) while the minor menaquinone was MK-10(H2). The polar lipids included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The major fatty acids (>10%) were C16 : 0 (29.8%), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) (15.1%), anteiso-C15 : 0 (13.5%) and iso-C15 : 0 (10.3%). DNA-DNA similarity with other strains ranged between 37.84 ± 1.15% and 50.25 ± 1.91 %. On the basis of these data, we suggest that strain T258T represents a novel species that belong to the genus Streptomyces, for which we propose a name Streptomyces polymachus sp. nov. The type strain is T258T ( = KACC 18247T = KEMB 9005-212T = NBRC 110905T).

  16. [Could antifungal lock be useful in the management of candidiasis linked with catheters?].

    PubMed

    Cateau, Estelle; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Imbert, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Fungal biofilms associated with inserted medical devices such as catheters, represent a major risk factor for candidemia. In addition, these biofilm yeasts show a decreased susceptibility to antifungal agents. Recently, a new therapeutic approach has emerged, the "lock therapy", based on the use of high concentrations of antimicrobials, instilled into the lumen of the catheter and left in place for 8 to 12 h. In vitro or in vivo studies have evaluated the interest of antifungal locks using amphotericin B, an azole or echinocandins. The promising results will permit us to discuss the relevance of this technique.

  17. Identification and Susceptibility of Aspergillus Section Nigri in China: Prevalence of Species and Paradoxical Growth in Response to Echinocandins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yali; Wan, Zhe; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Molecular identification and in vitro antifungal susceptibility tests of 43 Aspergillus section Nigri isolates from China were performed. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus tubingensis were present in almost equal numbers. All of the isolates had low MIC/MECs (minimum effective concentrations) for the 7 common antifungals, and a paradoxical effect was observed for the first time in response to caspofungin and micafungin. PMID:25502526

  18. In vitro susceptibility studies of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sahm, D F; Kissinger, J; Gilmore, M S; Murray, P R; Mulder, R; Solliday, J; Clarke, B

    1989-01-01

    Vancomycin resistance exhibited by Enterococcus faecalis isolates V583, V586, and V587 is described. The vancomycin MICs ranged from 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. Although resistant to vancomycin, the isolates were susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC, less than or equal to 0.5 micrograms/ml). Such a glycopeptide susceptibility profile has not been previously described for E. faecalis. Time kill studies showed that vancomycin resistance adversely affected the synergistic activity that vancomycin and aminoglycoside combinations usually demonstrate against enterococci. However, the ability to detect vancomycin resistance varied with the susceptibility testing method used. Whereas broth microdilution, broth macrodilution, and agar dilution methods detected resistance, disk-agar diffusion and the AutoMicrobic system Gram-Positive GPS-A susceptibility card (Vitek Systems Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.) did not. To detect vancomycin resistance reliably and establish the incidence of such E. faecalis isolates, adjustments in some susceptibility testing methods may be necessary. PMID:2554802

  19. Antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities of volatile oils and extracts from stems, leaves, and flowers of Eucalyptus sideroxylon and Eucalyptus torquata.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Hossam M

    2008-03-01

    Eucalyptus species leaves have been traditionally used to heal wounds and fungal infections. Essential oils and extracts of some Eucalyptus species possess antimicrobial and antitumor properties. We sought to determine antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of oils and extracts of leaves, stems, and flowers of Eucalyptus sideroxylon and Eucalyptus torquata grown in Egypt. An agar diffusion method was used to analyze antimicrobial activities of essential oils and extracts of Eucalyptus against medically important gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A sulphorhodamine B assay was used to analyze the in vitro cytotoxic activities of oils and extracts against Human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2), and Human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7). Gram-positive bacteria were highly susceptible to oils and extracts of both Eucalyptus species. With the exception of Escherichia coli, gram-negative bacteria were resistant to extracts, but susceptible to the oil obtained from at least one organ of E sideroxylon and E torquata. Although Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger were resistant to the extracts, essential oils of E sideroxylon and E torquata generally exhibited moderate to high antifungal activities against Candida albicans, A flavus and A niger. Oils of E torquata stems exhibited cytotoxic activities on MCF7 cells followed by oils of E torquata leaves and E sideroxylon leaves. However, oils from both species failed to exert cytotoxic effects on HEPG2 cells. This is the first report of antimicrobial and antitumor properties of E sideroxylon and E torquata. Results suggest a wider use of Eucalyptus species products in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food preparations.

  20. Agar disk diffusion (Bauer-Kirby) tests with various fastidious and nonfastidious reference (ATCC) strains: comparison of several agar media.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H; Leonhard, B

    1994-01-01

    Several agar media (Mueller-Hinton agar, MHA; diagnostic sensitivity test agar, DSTA; Schaedler agar, SchA; Todd-Hewitt agar with added yeast extract, THYA; Wilkins-Chalgren agar, WCA) were compared using the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test against six nonfastidious quality control strains: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and ATCC 29213, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and ATCC 35218, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. MHA, DSTA, and THYA yielded essentially comparable inhibition zones. However, WCA and SchA antagonized cotrimoxazole and aminoglycoside antibiotics; furthermore, SchA antagonized polymyxin B, and both WCA and SchA antagonized imipenem against the P. aeruginosa strain, but not against the E. coli strains. Sheep blood-MHA (Bl-MHA), WCA, THYA, and DSTA were examined with Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 13813, and Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 6306. In comparison with Bl-MHA, both WCA and THYA yielded comparable inhibition zones against S. pyogenes; DSTA afforded suboptimal growth. DSTA yielded larger inhibition zones with the majority of antimicrobial drugs against S. agalactiae, whereas WCA and THYA enhanced the activity of oxacillin and penicillin G against this strain. S. pneumoniae strain ATCC 6306 grew well on Bl-MHA, yielded suboptimal growth on WCA and faint growth on THYA, and failed to grow on DSTA. Chocolate-supplemented sheep blood-MHA (CHOC-MHA) was compared with Haemophilus test medium (HTM), WCA with added NAD, and THYA with added hematin and NAD against Haemophilus influenzae strains ATCC 35056 and ATCC 49247. The activities of doxycycline and rifampin were enhanced against both strains by HTM, WCA+NAD, and THYA+hematin+NAD. Only WCA+NAD antagonized cotrimoxazole against both H. influenzae strains, an effect due to thymidine; however, HTM antagonized cotrimoxazole against S. aureus ATCC 25923 and E. coli ATCC 25922. It was concluded that Bl-MHA performed best for

  1. Antifungal activity of some tetranortriterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Govindachari, T R; Suresh, G; Gopalakrishnan, G; Masilamani, S; Banumathi, B

    2000-06-01

    Natural tetranortriterpenoids such as cedrelone from Toona ciliata, azadiradione from Azadirachta indica, limonin, limonol and nomilinic acid from Citrus medica, along with some cedrelone derivatives were tested for their antifungal activity against Puccinia arachidis, a groundnut rust pathogen. Results show that cedrelone was the most effective in reducing rust pustule emergence. Replacement of functional groups or modification of the A or the B ring in cedrelone reduced the effectiveness indicating the importance of specific structural features for activity.

  2. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  7. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  8. An improved agar medium for growth of Geobacillus thermoglucosidarius strains.

    PubMed

    Javed, M; Baghaei-Yazdi, N; Qin, W; Amartey, S

    2017-01-01

    Geobacillus species have potential applications in many biotechnological processes. They are fastidious in their vitamin and amino acid requirements. A new semi-defined agar medium (SDM) was developed which gave consistently high viable cell counts of various G. thermoglucosidasius strains (5×10(8)-6×10(8)cfu/ml) under aerobic conditions at 70°C.

  9. [Modification of the lysine-iron agar (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wauters, G

    1975-12-01

    The addition of L-phenylalanine to the lysine-iron agar described by Edwards and Fife ]1] allows a more valuable screening of the Proteus group based on its deamination properties. Some minor modifications of the indicator and thiosulfate content lead to improve and earlier recording of the results.

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Endodontic Medicaments and Vehicles using Agar Well Diffusion Method on Facultative and Obligate Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Kishore G; Sogi, Suma

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to determine the relative antimicrobial effectiveness of these endodontic medicaments and various vehicles using an agar well diffusion assay. Materials and methods Double Antibiotic Paste(DAP), modified DAP, 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate and their combination with four vehicles namely Polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG), Propylene glycol (PG), combinations of PG with PEG and lastly Glycerine were tested using agar well diffusion assay. The minimum bactericidal concentration was noted against four standard strains of organisms ie Streptococcus mutans ATCC( American Type Culture Collection) 25175, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12598, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 35550 and Eschericia coli ATCC 25922. Successful endodontic therapy depends upon thorough disinfection of root canals. In some refractory cases, routine endodontic therapy is not sufficient, so intracanal medicaments are used for proper disinfection of canals. Issues of resistance, limited spectrum of activity and lack of antifungal properties, the hunt for the ideal intracanal medicament continues. In this regard, the vehicles used to form the pastes play a supportive role by forming the appropriate consistency for placement and may dramatically influence their chemical characteristics like their solubility and diffusion. Thus, inorder to use safer and equally effective intracanal medicaments, Chlorhexidine gluconate is being unveiled in this study. Results The difference between the four vehicles when combined with the same endodontic medicament studied above is nonsignificant (NS) except against Porphyromonas gingivalis. Propylene glycol is significantly effective than Glycerine when used with DAP ie C+M medicament combination. (p = 0.029) Conclusion 2% chlorhexidine gluconate and modified DAP can definitely replace DAP and triple antibiotic paste as end-odontic medicaments with chlorhexidine having an added advantage of bactericidal action, substantivity, biocompatibility, low toxicity

  11. Antifungal activity against Candida albicans of starch Pickering emulsion with thymol or amphotericin B in suspension and calcium alginate films.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Andrea; Wang, Min S; Chaudhari, Amol; Nitin, Nitin

    2015-09-30

    Conventional antifungal treatments against Candida albicans in the oral cavity often result in increased cytotoxicity. The goal of this study was to determine the potential of starch Pickering emulsion as a delivery vehicle for an antifungal natural phenolic compound such as thymol in simulated saliva fluid (SSF) compared to amphotericin B. An oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion was stabilized using starch particles. Physical stability of the emulsion and disruption induced by α-amylase activity in SSF was evaluated. Encapsulated thymol in o/w emulsion was compared to encapsulated amphotericin B for antifungal activity against C. albicans in suspension using emulsions or zone inhibition assay on agar plates using emulsions dispersed in alginate films. Results showed that the emulsions were stable for at least three weeks. Digestion of the emulsion by α-amylase led to coalescence of emulsion droplets. The antifungal activity of thymol and amphotericin B in emulsion formulation was enhanced upon incubation with α-amylase. Results from the zone inhibition assay demonstrated efficacy of the emulsions dispersed in alginate films. Interestingly, addition of α-amylase to the alginate films resulted in a decreased inhibitory effect. Overall, this study showed that starch Pickering emulsions have a potential to deliver hydrophobic antifungal compounds to treat oral candidiasis.

  12. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia M.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been the focus of intense research toward the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components) are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity, and cytotoxicity are also reviewed. PMID:24688483

  13. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia M; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been the focus of intense research toward the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components) are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity, and cytotoxicity are also reviewed.

  14. Antibacterial and Antifungal Compounds from Marine Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijian; Meng, Wei; Cao, Cong; Wang, Jian; Shan, Wenjun; Wang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015. Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed. The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review. PMID:26042616

  15. Potential Antifungal Targets against a Candida Biofilm Based on an Enzyme in the Arachidonic Acid Cascade—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinning; Wang, Decai; Yu, Cuixiang; Li, Tao; Liu, Jianqiao; Sun, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Candida is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen, especially in biofilm associated infections. The formation of a Candida biofilm can decrease Candida sensitivity to antifungal drugs and cause drug resistance. Although many effective antifungal drugs are available, their applications are limited due to their high toxicity and cost. Seeking new antifungal agents that are effective against biofilm-associated infection is an urgent need. Many research efforts are underway, and some progress has been made in this field. It has been shown that the arachidonic acid cascade plays an important role in fungal morphogenesis and pathogenicity. Notably, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can promote the formation of a Candida biofilm. Recently, the inhibition of PGE2 has received much attention. Studies have shown that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and indomethacin, combined with fluconazole can significantly reduce Candida adhesion and biofilm development and increase fluconazole susceptibility; the MIC of fluconazole can be decrease from 64 to 2 μg/ml when used in combination with ibuprofen. In addition, in vivo studies have also confirmed the antifungal activities of these inhibitors. In this article, we mainly review the relationship between PGE2 and Candida biofilm, summarize the antifungal activities of COX inhibitors and analyze the possible antifungal activity of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (MPGES-1) inhibitors; additionally, other factors that influence PGE2 production are also discussed. Hopefully this review can disclose potential antifungal targets based on the arachidonic acid cascade and provide a prevailing strategy to alleviate Candida albicans biofilm formation. PMID:27999568

  16. Topical antifungals for seborrhoeic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Okokon, Enembe O; Verbeek, Jos H; Ruotsalainen, Jani H; Ojo, Olumuyiwa A; Bakhoya, Victor Nyange

    2015-01-01

    Background Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is distributed worldwide. It commonly affects the scalp, face and flexures of the body. Treatment options include antifungal drugs, steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytic agents and phototherapy. Objectives To assess the effects of antifungal agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and scalp in adolescents and adults. A secondary objective is to assess whether the same interventions are effective in the management of seborrhoeic dermatitis in patients with HIV/AIDS. Search methods We searched the following databases up to December 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (from 1982). We also searched trials registries and checked the bibliographies of published studies for further trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of topical antifungals used for treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis in adolescents and adults, with primary outcome measures of complete clearance of symptoms and improved quality of life. Data collection and analysis Review author pairs independently assessed eligibility for inclusion, extracted study data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. We performed fixed-effect meta-analysis for studies with low statistical heterogeneity and used a random-effects model when heterogeneity was high. Main results We included 51 studies with 9052 participants. Of these, 45 trials assessed treatment outcomes at five weeks or less after commencement of treatment, and six trials assessed outcomes over a longer time frame. We believe that 24 trials had some form of conflict of interest, such as funding by pharmaceutical companies. Among the included studies were 12 ketoconazole trials (N = 3253), 11 ciclopirox trials (N = 3029), two lithium trials (N = 141

  17. An Antifungal Combination Matrix Identifies a Rich Pool of Adjuvant Molecules that Enhance Drug Activity Against Diverse Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Nicole; Spitzer, Michaela; Yu, Tennison; Cerone, Robert P.; Averette, Anna K.; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Heitman, Joseph; Sheppard, Donald C.; Tyers, Mike; Wright, Gerard D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for fungal infections. By combining sub-lethal concentrations of the known antifungals fluconazole, caspofungin, amphotericin B, terbinafine, benomyl and cyprodinil with ~3600 compounds in diverse fungal species, we generated a deep reservoir of chemical-chemical interactions termed the Antifungal Combinations Matrix (ACM). Follow-up susceptibility testing against a fluconazole resistant isolate of C. albicans unveiled ACM combinations capable of potentiating fluconazole in this clinical strain. We used chemical genetics to elucidate the mode-of-action of the antimycobacterial drug clofazimine, a compound with unreported antifungal activity that synergized with several antifungals. Clofazimine induces a cell membrane stress for which the Pkc1 signaling pathway is required for tolerance. Further tests against additional fungal pathogens, including Aspergillus fumigatus, highlighted that clofazimine exhibits efficacy as a combination agent against multiple fungi. Thus, the ACM is a rich reservoir of chemical combinations with therapeutic potential against diverse fungal pathogens. PMID:26549450

  18. Thermal-induced ageing of agar solutions: impact on the structural and mechanical properties of agar gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bosi; Bentaleb, Ahmed; Louerat, Frédéric; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    Numerous hydrogels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature, aqueous polymer solutions brought to a boil. Although the incubation time of the polymer solution at such a high temperature could be used as a tuning parameter, its impact on the subsequent gelation has been poorly investigated. Here we study the effect of prolonged heating at 80°C on a 1.5% wt solution of agar, a natural polysaccharide. The incubation time is varied from a few hours up to five days. We show that the agar sol. continuously degrades as the result of both the hydrolysis and the intermolecular oxidation of the polymer chains. Furthermore, electronic microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments reveal that gels formed from older agar sols display an increasingly coarser microstructure composed of micron-sized aggregated pieces of polysaccharides, in contrast with the fibrous-like structure of gels made from fresh sols. Along with structural changes prolonged incubation time leads to weaker gels of lower shear elastic modulus. Finally, macro-indentation experiments coupled to direct visualization show that increasing the incubation time of the agar sol. decreases the yield strain of the gel by a factor of three, while the rupture scenario turns continuously from brittle to ductile-like. Acknowledging funding from BioMérieux & CNRS.

  19. Development of a selective agar plate for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Jung-Su; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-17

    This study was conducted to develop a selective medium for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Campylobacter spp. (n=4), non-Campylobacter (showing positive results on Campylobacter selective agar) strains (n=49) isolated from fresh produce, indicator bacteria (n=13), and spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce (n=15) were plated on four Campylobacter selective media. Bolton agar and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) exhibited higher sensitivity for Campylobacter spp. than did Preston agar and Hunt agar, although certain non-Campylobacter strains isolated from fresh produce by using a selective agar isolation method, were still able to grow on Bolton agar and mCCDA. To inhibit the growth of non-Campylobacter strains, Bolton agar and mCCDA were supplemented with 5 antibiotics (rifampicin, polymyxin B, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyruvate, ferrous sulfate) and the growth of Campylobacter spp. (n=7) and non-Campylobacter strains (n=44) was evaluated. Although Bolton agar supplemented with rifampicin (BR agar) exhibited a higher selectivity for Campylobacter spp. than did mCCDA supplemented with antibiotics, certain non-Campylobacter strains were still able to grow on BR agar (18.8%). When BR agar with various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were tested with Campylobacter spp. (n=8) and non-Campylobacter (n=7), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was inhibitory against 3 of 7 non-Campylobacter strains. Finally, we validated the use of BR agar containing 50mg/L sulfamethoxazole (BRS agar) or 0.5mg/L ciprofloxacin (BRCS agar) and other selective agars for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and fresh produce. All chicken samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. when tested on mCCDA, BR agar, and BRS agar. In fresh produce samples, BRS agar exhibited the highest selectivity for Campylobacter spp., demonstrating its suitability for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

  20. Susceptibility of Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (Legionella micdadei) and other newly recognized members of the genus Legionella to nineteen antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Pasculle, A W; Dowling, J N; Weyant, R S; Sniffen, J M; Cordes, L G; Gorman, G M; Feeley, J C

    1981-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 11 strains representing the five recognized species of Legionella were determined by agar dilution testing on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar. All of the legionellae tested were susceptible to rifampin, erythromycin, rosaramycin, chloramphenicol, and the aminoglycosides and were resistant to clindamycin and vancomycin. Susceptibilities to penicillins and cephalosporins were variable. Legionella micdadei, Legionella bozemanii, and Legionella gormanii were susceptible to these agents, but minimal inhibitory concentrations for each species were different. Legionella dumoffii resembled Legionella pneumophila in being resistant to penicillin, cephalothin, and cephamandole and susceptible to moxalactam and cefoxitin. All species except L. micdadei produced beta-lactamase. PMID:7325645

  1. Screening of Pharmacologically Active Small Molecule Compounds Identifies Antifungal Agents Against Candida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Watamoto, Takao; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sawase, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Candida species have emerged as important and common opportunistic human pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The current antifungal therapies either have toxic side effects or are insufficiently effect. The aim of this study is develop new small-molecule antifungal compounds by library screening methods using Candida albicans, and to evaluate their antifungal effects on Candida biofilms and cytotoxic effects on human cells. Wild-type C. albicans strain SC5314 was used in library screening. To identify antifungal compounds, we screened a small-molecule library of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC1280TM) using an antifungal susceptibility test (AST). To investigate the antifungal effects of the hit compounds, ASTs were conducted using Candida strains in various growth modes, including biofilms. We tested the cytotoxicity of the hit compounds using human gingival fibroblast (hGF) cells to evaluate their clinical safety. Only 35 compounds were identified by screening, which inhibited the metabolic activity of C. albicans by >50%. Of these, 26 compounds had fungistatic effects and nine compounds had fungicidal effects on C. albicans. Five compounds, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate, ellipticine and CV-3988, had strong fungicidal effects and could inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida biofilms. However, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine were cytotoxic to hGF cells at low concentrations. CV-3988 showed no cytotoxicity at a fungicidal concentration. Four of the compounds identified, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine, had toxic effects on Candida strains and hGF cells. In contrast, CV-3988 had fungicidal effects on Candida strains, but low cytotoxic effects on hGF cells. Therefore, this screening reveals agent, CV-3988 that was previously unknown to be antifungal agent, which could be a novel therapies for superficial mucosal candidiasis. PMID

  2. Rapid flow cytometric susceptibility testing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, R; Ramani, A; Wong, S J

    1997-01-01

    A rapid flow cytometric assay for in vitro antifungal drug susceptibility testing was developed by adapting the proposed reference method for broth macrodilution testing of yeasts. Membrane permeability changes caused by the antifungal agent were measured by flow cytometry using propidium iodide, a nucleic acid-binding fluorochrome largely excluded by the intact cell membrane. We determined the in vitro susceptibility of 31 Candida albicans isolates and two quality control strains (Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and Candida krusei ATCC 6258) to amphotericin B and fluconazole. Amphotericin B MICs ranged from 0.03 to 2.0 microg/ml, while fluconazole MICs ranged from 0.125 to 128 microg/ml. This method results in clear-cut endpoints that were reproducible. Four-hour incubation was required for fluconazole, whereas a 2-h incubation was sufficient for amphotericin B to provide MICs comparable to the reference macrodilution method developed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Tests. Results of these studies show that flow cytometry provides a rapid and sensitive in vitro method for antifungal susceptibility testing of C. albicans. PMID:9276410

  3. Antifungal property of hibicuslide C and its membrane-active mechanism in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji Hong; Jin, Qinglong; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the antifungal activity and mode of action(s) of hibicuslide C derived from Abutilon theophrasti were investigated. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed that hibicuslide C possessed potent activities toward various fungal strains and less hemolytic activity than amphotericin B. To understand the antifungal mechanism(s) of hibicuslide C in Candida albicans, flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide was done. The results showed that hibicuslide C perturbed the plasma membrane of the C. albicans. The analysis of the transmembrane electrical potential with 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide [DiSC3(5)] indicated that hibicuslide C induced membrane depolarization. Furthermore, model membrane studies were performed with calcein encapsulating large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and FITC-dextran (FD) loaded LUVs. These results demonstrated that the antifungal effects of hibicuslide C on the fungal plasma membrane were through the formation of pores with radii between 2.3 nm and 3.3 nm. Finally, in three dimensional flow cytometric contour plots, a reduced cell sizes by the pore-forming action of hibicuslide C were observed. Therefore, the present study suggests that hibicuslide C exerts its antifungal effect by membrane-active mechanism.

  4. Comparison of dosimetry gels prepared by agar and bovine gelatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sağsöz, M. E.; Korkut, Ö.; Alemdar, N.; Aktaş, S.; Çalı, E. B.; Kantarcı, M.

    2016-04-01

    Gel dosimeters are unique materials capable of showing three dimensional (3D) dose distributions of therapeutic or diagnostic exposures. Fricke gel dosimeters can be considered as chemical dosimeters that rely on a radiation-induced chemical reaction. Dose distribution of Fricke solutions containing Fe+2 ions determines the transformation of acidic, oxygen saturated Fe+2 ions to Fe+3 ions by the ionizing radiation in aqueous solutions. In this study we produced two different types of gel dosimeters using agar and bovine gelatin with similar fabrication methods. We compared the magnetic resonance (MR) T1 imaging responses of these two gel dosimeters to acquire a dose dependency of MR intensities. In conclusion agar gel dosimeters found to be produced easily and more consistent.

  5. A modified agar plate method for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Kasuya, S; Khamboonruang, C; Sukhavat, K; Ieda, M; Takatsuka, N; Kita, K; Ohtomo, H

    1991-10-01

    The agar plate method is a new technique with high detection rates for coprological diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. This report details modifications of the technique and establishes a standardized procedure. We recommend that all plates should be carefully observed using a microscope because macroscopic observation can lead to false negative results. It is also advisable to pour formalin solution directly into microscopically positive dishes to collect worms by sedimentation. This procedure enables one to observe worms otherwise hidden. Sealing dishes with adhesive tape prevents larvae from crawling out of the dishes, eliminating any possibility in the reduction of detection rates, and greatly improves the safety conditions for the technician performing the procedure. We consider the agar plate method to be superior to the filter paper method in detecting Strongyloides, and we believe that it will eventually become the technique of choice.

  6. Phenotypic identification of Candida albicans by growth on chocolate agar.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Chirag C; Johnson, Elizabeth; Baker, Mark E; Haynes, Ken; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we describe a simple method for the identification of Candida albicans in clinical samples. A total of 383 clinical isolates of Candida species were streaked onto chocolate agar and incubated for 48 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of an atmosphere of 6% CO2. All 208 of the C. albicans isolates tested, developed an easy to identify filamentous colony morphology. Of 175 other Candida species tested, 172 (98.3%) were distinguishable from C. albicans by their smooth colony morphology. Three isolates (1.7%) exhibited weak filamentation after prolonged incubation. Although not a routine medium in medical mycology a significant advantage of using chocolate agar lies in its use in clinical bacteriology laboratories for the isolation of fastidious bacteria. Implementation of the proposed method is applicable across a range of specimen types, thus allowing the direct identification of C. albicans in clinical samples. This simple method may allow a quicker entry into directed treatment.

  7. Agar-degrading bacteria isolated from Antarctic macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Roxana; Leiva, Sergio

    2017-03-10

    This study describes the taxonomic diversity of pigmented, agar-degrading bacteria isolated from the surface of macroalgae collected in King George Island, Antarctica. A total of 30 pigmented, agarolytic bacteria were isolated from the surface of the Antarctic macroalgae Adenocystis utricularis, Monostroma hariotii, Iridaea cordata, and Pantoneura plocamioides. Based on the 16S rRNA data, the agarolytic isolates were affiliated to the genera Algibacter, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Cellulophaga, Citricoccus, Labedella, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Salinibacterium, Sanguibacter, and Zobellia. Isolates phylogenetically related to Cellulophaga algicola showed the highest agarase activity in culture supernatants when tested at 4 and 37 °C. This is the first investigation of pigmented agar-degrading bacteria, members of microbial communities associated with Antarctic macroalgae, and the results suggest that they represent a potential source of cold-adapted agarases of possible biotechnological interest.

  8. Endogenous nitric oxide accumulation is involved in the antifungal activity of Shikonin against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zebin; Yan, Yu; Dong, Huaihuai; Zhu, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yuanying; Cao, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the antifungal activity of Shikonin (SK) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and to clarify the underlying mechanism. The results showed that the NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and L-arginine could enhance the antifungal activity of SK, whereas the NO production inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) attenuated antifungal action. Using the fluorescent dye 3-amino,4-aminomethyl-2′, 7-difluorescein, diacetate (DAF-FM DA), we found that the accumulation of NO in C. albicans was increased markedly by SK in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, the results of real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the transcription level of YHB1 in C. albicans was greatly increased upon incubation of SK. Consistently, the YHB1-null mutant (yhb1Δ/Δ) exhibited a higher susceptibility to SK than wild-type cells. In addition, although the transcription level of CTA4 in C. albicans was not significantly changed when exposed to SK, the CTA4-null mutant (cta4Δ/Δ) was more susceptible to SK. Collectively, SK is the agent found to execute its antifungal activity directly via endogenous NO accumulation, and NO-mediated damage is related to the suppression of YHB1 and the function of CTA4. PMID:27530748

  9. Melanins Protect Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii from the Antifungal Effects of Terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Brito-Santos, Fábio; Almeida-Silva, Fernando; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Terbinafine is a recommended therapeutic alternative for patients with sporotrichosis who cannot use itraconazole due to drug interactions or side effects. Melanins are involved in resistance to antifungal drugs and Sporothrix species produce three different types of melanin. Therefore, in this study we evaluated whether Sporothrix melanins impact the efficacy of antifungal drugs. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) of two Sporothrix brasiliensis and four Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in the presence of the melanin precursors L-DOPA and L-tyrosine were similar to the MIC determined by the CLSI standard protocol for S. schenckii susceptibility to amphotericin B, ketoconazole, itraconazole or terbinafine. When MICs were determined in the presence of inhibitors to three pathways of melanin synthesis, we observed, in four strains, an increase in terbinafine susceptibility in the presence of tricyclazole, a DHN-melanin inhibitor. In addition, one S. schenckii strain grown in the presence of L-DOPA had a higher MFC value when compared to the control. Growth curves in presence of 2×MIC concentrations of terbinafine showed that pyomelanin and, to a lesser extent, eumelanin were able to protect the fungi against the fungicidal effect of this antifungal drug. Our results suggest that melanin protects the major pathogenic species of the Sporothrix complex from the effects of terbinafine and that the development of new antifungal drugs targeting melanin synthesis may improve sporotrichosis therapies.

  10. Melanins Protect Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii from the Antifungal Effects of Terbinafine

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Brito-Santos, Fábio; Almeida-Silva, Fernando; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Terbinafine is a recommended therapeutic alternative for patients with sporotrichosis who cannot use itraconazole due to drug interactions or side effects. Melanins are involved in resistance to antifungal drugs and Sporothrix species produce three different types of melanin. Therefore, in this study we evaluated whether Sporothrix melanins impact the efficacy of antifungal drugs. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) of two Sporothrix brasiliensis and four Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in the presence of the melanin precursors L-DOPA and L-tyrosine were similar to the MIC determined by the CLSI standard protocol for S. schenckii susceptibility to amphotericin B, ketoconazole, itraconazole or terbinafine. When MICs were determined in the presence of inhibitors to three pathways of melanin synthesis, we observed, in four strains, an increase in terbinafine susceptibility in the presence of tricyclazole, a DHN-melanin inhibitor. In addition, one S. schenckii strain grown in the presence of L-DOPA had a higher MFC value when compared to the control. Growth curves in presence of 2×MIC concentrations of terbinafine showed that pyomelanin and, to a lesser extent, eumelanin were able to protect the fungi against the fungicidal effect of this antifungal drug. Our results suggest that melanin protects the major pathogenic species of the Sporothrix complex from the effects of terbinafine and that the development of new antifungal drugs targeting melanin synthesis may improve sporotrichosis therapies. PMID:27031728

  11. Antifungal activity of extracts from Atacama Desert fungi against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and identification of Aspergillus felis as a promising source of natural bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Graziele; Gonçalves, Vívian N; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Kohlhoff, Markus; Rosa, Carlos A; Zani, Carlos L; Cota, Betania B; Rosa, Luiz H; Johann, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides are responsible for paracoccidioidomycosis. The occurrence of drug toxicity and relapse in this disease justify the development of new antifungal agents. Compounds extracted from fungal extract have showing antifungal activity. Extracts of 78 fungi isolated from rocks of the Atacama Desert were tested in a microdilution assay against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Pb18. Approximately 18% (5) of the extracts showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ≤ 125.0 µg/mL. Among these, extract from the fungus UFMGCB 8030 demonstrated the best results, with an MIC of 15.6 µg/mL. This isolate was identified as Aspergillus felis (by macro and micromorphologies, and internal transcribed spacer, β-tubulin, and ribosomal polymerase II gene analyses) and was grown in five different culture media and extracted with various solvents to optimise its antifungal activity. Potato dextrose agar culture and dichloromethane extraction resulted in an MIC of 1.9 µg/mL against P. brasiliensis and did not show cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested in normal mammalian cell (Vero). This extract was subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation using analytical C18RP-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and an antifungal assay using P. brasiliensis. Analysis of the active fractions by HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to identify the antifungal agents present in the A. felis extracts cytochalasins. These results reveal the potential of A. felis as a producer of bioactive compounds with antifungal activity.

  12. Antifungal activity of extracts from Atacama Desert fungi against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and identification of Aspergillus felis as a promising source of natural bioactive compounds

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Graziele; Gonçalves, Vívian N; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Kohlhoff, Markus; Rosa, Carlos A; Zani, Carlos L; Cota, Betania B; Rosa, Luiz H; Johann, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides are responsible for paracoccidioidomycosis. The occurrence of drug toxicity and relapse in this disease justify the development of new antifungal agents. Compounds extracted from fungal extract have showing antifungal activity. Extracts of 78 fungi isolated from rocks of the Atacama Desert were tested in a microdilution assay against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Pb18. Approximately 18% (5) of the extracts showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values≤ 125.0 µg/mL. Among these, extract from the fungus UFMGCB 8030 demonstrated the best results, with an MIC of 15.6 µg/mL. This isolate was identified as Aspergillus felis (by macro and micromorphologies, and internal transcribed spacer, β-tubulin, and ribosomal polymerase II gene analyses) and was grown in five different culture media and extracted with various solvents to optimise its antifungal activity. Potato dextrose agar culture and dichloromethane extraction resulted in an MIC of 1.9 µg/mL against P. brasiliensis and did not show cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested in normal mammalian cell (Vero). This extract was subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation using analytical C18RP-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and an antifungal assay using P. brasiliensis. Analysis of the active fractions by HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to identify the antifungal agents present in the A. felis extracts cytochalasins. These results reveal the potential of A. felis as a producer of bioactive compounds with antifungal activity. PMID:27008375

  13. Evaluation of antifungal activity of free fatty acids methyl esters fraction isolated from Algerian Linum usitatissimum L. seeds against toxigenic Aspergillus

    PubMed Central

    Abdelillah, Amrouche; Houcine, Benmehdi; Halima, Dalile; Meriem, Chabane sari; Imane, Zaaboub; Eddine, Smahi Djamal; Abdallah, Moussaoui; Daoudi, Chabane sari

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of the major fraction of fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) isolated from Linum usitatissimum L. seeds oil collected from Bechar department (Algeria). Methods The assessment of antifungal activity was carried out in terms of percentage of radial growth on solid medium (potatoes dextrose agar PDA) and biomass growth inhibition on liquid medium (potatoes dextrose broth PDB) against two fungi. Results The FAMEs was found to be effective in inhibiting the radial mycelial growth of Aspergillus flavus more than Aspergillus ochraceus on all tested concentrations. The highest antifungal index was found to be (54.19%) compared to Aspergillus ochraceus (40.48%). The results of the antifungal activity of the FAMEs inhibition of biomass on liquid medium gave no discounted results, but this does not exclude the antifungal activity. Conclusions We can assume that the observed antifungal potency may be due to the abundance of linoleic and α-linolenic acids in linseed oil which appears to be promising to treat fungal infections, storage fungi and food spoilage in food industry field. PMID:23730556

  14. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    PubMed

    Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech; Parafati, Lucia; Musilova, Sarka; Bunesova, Vera; Vlkova, Eva; Killer, Jiri; Mrazek, Jakub; Kmet, Vladimir; Svejstil, Roman

    2014-11-17

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is a bacterial species exclusively found in the human intestinal tract. This species is becoming increasingly popular as a probiotic organism added to lyophilized products. In this study, porcine mucin was used as the sole carbon source for the selective enumeration of B. bifidum in probiotic food additives. Thirty-six bifidobacterial strains were cultivated in broth with mucin. Only 13 strains of B. bifidum utilized the mucin to produce acids. B. bifidum was selectively enumerated in eight probiotic food supplements using agar (MM agar) containing mupirocin (100 mg/L) and mucin (20 g/L) as the sole carbon source. MM agar was fully selective if the B. bifidum species was presented together with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum species and with lactic acid bacteria (lactobacilli, streptococci). Isolated strains of B. bifidum were identified using biochemical, PCR, MALDI-TOF procedures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The novel selective medium was also suitable for the isolation of B. bifidum strains from human fecal samples.

  15. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-09-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (T c) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at T c was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL(-1), and T c was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R (2) = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii.

  16. Antifungal properties of silver nanoparticles against indoor mould growth.

    PubMed

    Ogar, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2015-07-15

    The presence of moulds in indoor environments causes serious diseases and acute or chronic toxicological syndromes. In order to inhibit or prevent the growth of microorganisms on building materials, the disruption of their vital processes or the reduction of reproduction is required. The development of novel techniques that impair the growth of microorganisms on building materials is usually based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). It makes them an alternative to other biocides. AgNPs have proven antibacterial activity and became promising in relation to fungi. The aim of the study was to assess growth and morphology of mycelia of typical indoor fungal species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium cladosporoides, Chaetomium globosum and Stachybotrys chartarum as well as Mortierella alpina, cultured on agar media. The antifungal activity of AgNPs was also tested in relation to C. globosum and S. chartarum grown on the surface of gypsum drywall. It was found that the presence of AgNPs in concentrations of 30-200mg/l significantly decreased the growth of fungi. However, in the case of M. alpina, AgNPs stimulated its growth. Moreover, strong changes in moulds morphology and colour were observed after administration of AgNPs. Parameters of conidiophores/sporangiophores varied depending on mould region and changed significantly after treatment with AgNPs. The experiments have shown antifungal properties of AgNPs against common indoor mould species. Their application to building materials could effectively protect indoor environments from mould development. However, consideration must be given to the fact that the growth of some fungal strains might be stimulated by AgNPs.

  17. Infected nail plate model made of human hair keratin for evaluating the efficacy of different topical antifungal formulations against Trichophyton rubrum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lusiana; Reichl, Stephan; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2013-08-01

    A novel model of infected nail plate for testing the efficacy of topical antifungal formulations has been developed. This model utilized keratin film made of human hair keratin as a nail plate model. Subsequent to infection by Trichophyton rubrum, the common causative agent of onychomycosis, keratin films as infected nail plate models were treated with selected topical formulations, that is cream, gel, and nail lacquer. Bovine hoof was compared to keratin film. In contrast to the common antifungal susceptibility test, the antifungal drugs tested were applied as ready-to-use formulations because the vehicle may modify and control the drug action both in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolating the potency of an antifungal drug from an in vitro susceptibility test only would not be representative of the in vivo situation since these drugs are applied as ready-to-use formulations, for example as a nail lacquer. Although terbinafine has been acknowledged to be the most effective antifungal agent against T. rubrum, its antifungal efficacy was improved by its incorporation into an optimal formulation. Different gels proved superior to cream. Therefore, this study is able to discriminate between efficacies of different topical antifungal formulations based on their activities against T. rubrum.

  18. Antifungal Activity of C-27 Steroidal Saponins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong-Ren; Zhang, Ying; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Li, Xing-Cong

    2006-01-01

    As part of our search for new antifungal agents from natural resources, 22 C-27 steroidal saponins and 6 steroidal sapogenins isolated from several monocotyledonous plants were tested for their antifungal activity against the opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results showed that the antifungal activity of the steroidal saponins was associated with their aglycone moieties and the number and structure of monosaccharide units in their sugar chains. Within the 10 active saponins, four tigogenin saponins (compounds 1 to 4) with a sugar moiety of four or five monosaccharide units exhibited significant activity against C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, comparable to the positive control amphotericin B. The antifungal potency of these compounds was not associated with cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. This suggests that the C-27 steroidal saponins may be considered potential antifungal leads for further preclinical study. PMID:16641439

  19. Acquired Multidrug Antifungal Resistance in Candida lusitaniae during Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Sandra A.; Giulieri, Stefano; Diezi, Manuel; Marchetti, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Candida lusitaniae is usually susceptible to echinocandins. Beta-1,3-glucan synthase encoded by FKS genes is the target of echinocandins. A few missense mutations in the C. lusitaniae FKS1 hot spot 1 (HS1) have been reported. We report here the rapid emergence of antifungal resistance in C. lusitaniae isolated during therapy with amphotericin B (AMB), caspofungin (CAS), and azoles for treatment of persistent candidemia in an immunocompromised child with severe enterocolitis and visceral adenoviral disease. As documented from restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, the five C. lusitaniae isolates examined were related to each other. From antifungal susceptibility and molecular analyses, 5 different profiles (P) were obtained. These profiles included the following: profile 1 (P1) (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 0.5; fluconazole [FLC] MIC, 0.25), determined while the patient was being treated with liposomal AMB for 3 months; P2 (FLC MIC [μg/ml], 0.25; CAS MIC, 4), while the patient was being treated with CAS for 2 weeks; P3 (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 0.5; FLC MIC, 32), while the patient was being treated with azoles and CAS initially followed by azoles alone for a week; P4 (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 8; FLC MIC, 8), while the patient was being treated with both drugs for 3 weeks; and P5 (AMB MIC [μg/ml], 0.125; CAS MIC, 8), while the patient was being treated with AMB and FLC for 2 weeks. CAS resistance was associated with resistance not only to micafungin and anidulafungin but also to AMB. Analysis of CAS resistance revealed 3 novel FKS1 mutations in CAS-resistant isolates (S638Y in P2; S631Y in P4; S638P in P5). While S638Y and -P are within HS1, S631Y is in close proximity to this domain but was confirmed to confer candin resistance using a site-directed mutagenesis approach. FLC resistance could be linked with overexpression of major facilitator gene 7 (MFS7) in C. lusitaniae P2 and P4 and was associated with resistance to 5

  20. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-02

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time.

  1. In vitro susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to 10 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, S K; Crawford, C E; Geddes, G L; Black, W A

    1988-01-01

    After preliminary in vitro screening of 10 antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the MICs of the 6 most promising agents against 27 clinical isolates were determined by agar dilution. The two quinolone compounds tested (difloxacin and A-56620) were the most active, each inhibiting 50% of the strains at concentrations of 4 micrograms/ml. M. tuberculosis strains previously shown to be resistant to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampin, or ethambutol were as susceptible to these quinolone compounds as susceptible strains. PMID:3143305

  2. In vitro antifungal efficacy of four irrigants as a final rinse.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Melissa L; McClanahan, Scott B; Babel, Britta S

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the antifungal efficacy of 6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), 17% ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and BioPure MTAD as a final rinse on Candida albicans in vitro. Forty-eight, single rooted teeth were randomly divided into four groups each with a positive and a negative control. After root canal preparation, experimental teeth were inoculated with Candida albicans (ATCC 60193) and incubated for 72 hours. The groups were rinsed as follows: 1 ml of 6% NaOCl, 0.2 ml of 2% CHX, 1 ml of 17% EDTA, and 5 ml of BioPure MTAD. Aliquots from the experimental teeth were plated on Sabouraud 4% dextrose agar plates and colony-forming units were counted as a measure of antifungal activity. The results showed that 6% NaOCl and 2% CHX were equally effective and statistically significantly superior to BioPure MTAD and 17% EDTA (p < 0.05) in antifungal activity.

  3. Synthesis and in vitro antifungal efficacy of oleoyl-chitosan nanoparticles against plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ke; Shen, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, Xiao; Ju, Xiuyun; Miao, Xiangmin; Tian, Jun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Peng, Xue; Jiang, Jihong; Qin, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    An antifungal dispersion system was prepared by oleoyl-chitosan (O-chitosan) nanoparticles, and the antifungal activity against several plant pathogenic fungi was investigated. Under scanning electron microscopy, the nanoparticles formulation appeared to be uniform with almost spherical shape. The particle size of nanoparticles was around 296.962 nm. Transmission electron microscopy observation showed that nanoparticles could be well distributed in potato dextrose agar medium. Mycelium growth experiment demonstrated that Nigrospora sphaerica, Botryosphaeria dothidea, Nigrospora oryzae and Alternaria tenuissima were chitosan-sensitive, while Gibberella zeae and Fusarium culmorum were chitosan-resistant. The antifungal index was increased as the concentration of nanoparticles increased for chitosan-sensitive fungi. Fatty acid analyses revealed that plasma membranes of chitosan-sensitive fungi were shown to have lower levels of unsaturated fatty acid than chitosan-resistant fungi. Phylogenetic analysis based on ITS gene sequences indicated that two chitosan-resistant fungi had a near phylogenetic relationship. Results showed that O-chitosan nanoparticles could be a useful alternative for controlling pathogenic fungi in agriculture.

  4. Extracellular chitinases of fluorescent pseudomonads antifungal to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi causing carnation wilt.

    PubMed

    Ajit, Naosekpam Singh; Verma, Rajni; Shanmugam, V

    2006-04-01

    Vascular wilt of carnation caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi (Prill. & Delacr.) W. C. Synder & H.N. Hans inflicts substantial yield and quality loss to the crop. Mycolytic enzymes such as chitinases are antifungal and contribute significantly to the antagonistic activity of fluorescent pseudomonads belonging to plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria. Fluorescent pseudomonads antagonistic to the vascular wilt pathogen were studied for their ability to grow and produce chitinases on different substrates. Bacterial cells grown on chitin-containing media showed enhanced growth and enzyme production with increased anti-fungal activity against the pathogen. Furthermore, the cell-free bacterial culture filtrate from chitin-containing media also significantly inhibited the mycelial growth. Both the strains and their cell-free culture filtrate from chitin-amended media showed the formation of lytic zones on chitin agar, indicating chitinolytic ability. Extracellular proteins of highly antagonistic bacterial strain were isolated from cell-free extracts of media amended with chitin and fungal cell wall. These cell-free conditioned media contained one to seven polypeptides. Western blot analysis revealed two isoforms of chitinase with molecular masses of 43 and 18.5 kDa. Further plate assay for mycelial growth inhibition showed the 43-kDa protein to be antifungal. The foregoing studies clearly established the significance of chitinases in the antagonism of fluorescent pseudomonads, showing avenues for possible exploitation in carnation wilt management.

  5. Antifungal activity, toxicity and chemical composition of the essential oil of Coriandrum sativum L. fruits.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruna V; Morais, Selene M; dos Santos Fontenelle, Raquel Oliveira; Queiroz, Vanessa A; Vila-Nova, Nadja S; Pereira, Christiana M C; Brito, Edy S; Neto, Manoel A S; Brito, Erika H S; Cavalcante, Carolina S P; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2012-07-11

    The aims of this study were to test the antifungal activity, toxicity and chemical composition of essential oil from C. sativum L. fruits. The essential oil, obtained by hydro-distillation, was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Linalool was the main constituent (58.22%). The oil was considered bioactive, showing an LC₅₀ value of 23 μg/mL in the Artemia salina lethality test. The antifungal activity was evaluated against Microsporum canis and Candida spp. by the agar-well diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were established by the broth microdilution method. The essential oil induced growth inhibition zones of 28 ± 5.42 and 9.25 ± 0.5 for M. canis and Candida spp. respectively. The MICs and MFCs for M. canis strains ranged from 78 to 620 and 150 to 1,250 μg/mL, and the MICs and MFCs for Candida spp strains ranged from 310 to 620 and 620 to 1,250 μg/mL, respectively. C. sativum essential oil is active in vitro against M. canis and Candida spp. demonstrating good antifungal activity.

  6. A multicentre study of antifungal strategies and outcome of Candida spp. peritonitis in intensive-care units.

    PubMed

    Montravers, P; Mira, J-P; Gangneux, J-P; Leroy, O; Lortholary, O

    2011-07-01

    Information on the species causing Candida peritonitis, their in vitro susceptibility, antifungal strategies in this setting and patient outcome is still scarce. AmarCand was a prospective, non-interventional study in 271 adult intensive-care unit (ICU) patients with proven invasive Candida infection who received systemic antifungal therapy (France, 2005-2006). Of these ICU patients, 93 (median age 65 years, simplified acute physiology score II 52) had Candida peritonitis, including 73 nosocomial peritonitis, 53 concomitant bacterial peritoneal infections and 26 candidaemias. Candida species were C. albicans (n = 63/108 isolates, 58%), C. glabrata (n = 22, 20%), C. krusei (n = 9), C. kefyr (n = 5), C. parapsilosis (n = 3), C. tropicalis (n = 3), C. ciferii (n = 2) and C. lusitaniae (n = 1). Of tested isolates, 28% were fluconazole-resistant or susceptible dose-dependent (C. albicans 3/32, C. glabrata 9/14, C. krusei 4/4). Empiric antifungal treatment was started 1 day (median) after peritonitis diagnosis, with fluconazole (n = 2 patients), caspofungin (n = 12), voriconazole (n = 3), amphotericin B (n = 2), or a combination (n = 4). Following susceptibility testing, empiric antifungal treatment was judged inadequate in 9/45 (20%) patients and modified in 30 patients (fluconazole was replaced by caspofungin (n = 14) or voriconazole (n = 4)). Mortality in ICU was 38% (35/93) and was not influenced by type of Candida species, fluconazole susceptibility, time to treatment, candidaemia, nosocomial acquisition, or concomitant bacterial infection. No specific factors for death were identified. In summary, a high proportion of fluconazole-resistant or susceptible dose-dependent strains was cultured. These results confirm the high mortality rates of Candida peritonitis and plead for additional investigation in this population. Antifungal treatment for severe cases of Candida peritonitis in ICU patients remains the standard care.

  7. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Biopolymers Modified with Ionic Liquid and Laponite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Prakash, Prem; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R; Bohidar, H B

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial properties of modified biopolymers such as gelatin and agar have been investigated. These biopolymers (agar and gelatin) are modified by dissolving in ionic liquid (IL) [1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C2mim][Cl]) and 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([C8mim][Cl])] solutions. It was noticed that agar-ionogel (Ag-IL), gelatin-ionogel (GB-IL), and gelatin organogel (gelatin-glycerol solution along with laponite, nanoclay) nanocomposite (GA-NC) formed are highly stable, optically clear, and transparent without any air bubbles. The antimicrobial activity of these (Ag-IL), (GB-IL), and GA-NC were analyzed for both gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and gram-positive bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pyogenes) and fungus A. niger, C. albicans. Antibacterial and antifungal activity studies were carried out at different dilutions such as 100, 99, and 90 % (v/v). It was found that Ag-IL, GB-IL, and individual IL ([C8mim][Cl]) exhibited superior antimicrobial activities, indicating that longer IL chain enhance the cell membrane permeability of S. aureus, S. pyogenes, and E. coli cells. However, GA-NC nanocomposite and [C2mim][Cl]-based composites does not exhibit any bacterial inhibition activity for all bacterial strains.

  8. Otomycosis in the north of Iran: common pathogens and resistance to antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Shadman; Hassanzadeh, Rasool; Khajeh Jahromi, Sina; Delkhosh Nasrollah Abadi, Azimeh

    2014-05-01

    Otomycosis as a kind of external otitis can be caused by various species of fungi. To use the appropriate treatment, it is necessary to identify the causal agent of otomycosis. The aim of this study was to determine the pathogens that caused otomycosis and also the efficacy of different antifungal agents. 100 patients with diagnosis of otomycosis/otitis extern were entered in this study. Bacterial culture was performed by eosin methylene blue agar, blood agar; and Sabouraud dextrose agar was used to culture the fungal agents. Minimum inhibitory concentration test also was performed to determine the efficacy of Clotrimazole, Fluconazole, Ketoconazole and Nystatin on the fungal pathogens. Otomycosis was confirmed in 43% of patients by positive culture. The most prevalent fungal pathogen was Aspergillus niger which was sensitive to Clotrimazole, Fluconazole, Ketoconazole. Candida albicans was sensitive to all drugs, in which, the most sensitivity was due to fluconazole. The most frequent fungal pathogen in our otomycosis cases is A. niger, and most of fungi that caused otomycosis are sensitive to clotrimazole.

  9. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by an electrospinning technique using water as the solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operated at 50 deg C, to avoid agar gelation. Pure agar solution 1% (w/w) showed inadequ...

  10. Development of an eco-friendly agar extraction technique from the red seaweed Gracilaria lemaneiformis.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yuanling

    2008-05-01

    The red seaweed, Gracilaria lemaneiformis growing as an aquaculture bioremediator along the coasts of Liaodong Peninsula, China, was investigated for the agar production. An eco-friendly method called agar photobleaching extraction process was developed for the benefit of workers' health and safety of the environment. The native agar (NA), alkali-modified agar (AA), chemical-bleached agar (CA) and photobleached agar (PA), which were extracted using different processes, were evaluated for their physical and chemical properties. The PA showed most desirable performances in terms of gel strength, gelling temperature, sulfate content and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose content. Among the different processed agars, PA gel strength was 1913 g/cm2, the highest among the different processed agars, which increased 8.6% on the basis of the AA. Further we applied this new technique to extract agars from Gracilaria asiatica, and similar results were obtained with that of G. lemaneiformis. This indicates that the agar photobleaching extraction process is a feasible method for Gracilaria species and has a potential application. During the whole agar photobleaching extraction process the pigment content of G. lemaneiformis declined gradually and the TOC concentration in photobleaching solution increased along with the increase in the irradiation time. The mechanism of agar photobleaching could be elucidated by the photolysis theory.

  11. Antifungal drug resistance to azoles and polyenes.

    PubMed

    Masiá Canuto, Mar; Gutiérrez Rodero, Félix

    2002-09-01

    There is an increased awareness of the morbidity and mortality associated with fungal infections caused by resistant fungi in various groups of patients. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors associated with antifungal drug resistance. Selection pressure due to the continuous exposure to azoles seems to have an essential role in developing resistance to fluconazole in Candida species. Haematological malignancies, especially acute leukaemia with severe and prolonged neutropenia, seem to be the main risk factors for acquiring deep-seated mycosis caused by resistant filamentous fungi, such us Fusarium species, Scedosporium prolificans, and Aspergillus terreus. The still unacceptably high mortality rate associated with some resistant mycosis indicates that alternatives to existing therapeutic options are needed. Potential measures to overcome antifungal resistance ranges from the development of new drugs with better antifungal activity to improving current therapeutic strategies with the present antifungal agents. Among the new antifungal drugs, inhibitors of beta glucan synthesis and second-generation azole and triazole derivatives have characteristics that render them potentially suitable agents against some resistant fungi. Other strategies including the use of high doses of lipid formulations of amphotericin B, combination therapy, and adjunctive immune therapy with cytokines are under investigation. In addition, antifungal control programmes to prevent extensive and inappropriate use of antifungals may be needed.

  12. Effects of temperature on anti-Candida activities of antifungal antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C

    1993-01-01

    The relative growth (percentage of growth relative to control growth) of 767 Candida isolates representing five species was measured in microcultures at 25 and 37 degrees C. In the presence of 10(-4) M flucytosine, the distribution of relative yeast growth data indicated that Candida albicans isolates were less susceptible at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C, while the opposite was found with 4 x 10(-5) M amorolfine for most of the isolates tested. Repetition of the experiments at four different temperatures with 99 C. albicans isolates and five antifungal agents confirmed a direct relationship between growth inhibition and increasing temperature from 25 to 40 degrees C with amphotericin B, flucytosine, and terconazole; a strong inverse relationship between inhibition and temperature with amorolfine; and a weak inverse relationship with terbinafine. However, these relationships were not always noted with other Candida spp.: in particular, the growth of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis isolates tended to be greater at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C in the presence of the azole-derivative antifungal agents itraconazole and terconazole. These findings stress the species-specific individuality of yeast susceptibility to azole antifungal agents. The results with C. albicans and amorolfine and terbinafine accord with their known in vivo efficacy in mycoses involving low-temperature superficial sites and poor activity against mycoses involving deep body sites. The data also reinforce the need for control of experimental variables such as temperature in the design of standardized yeast susceptibility tests. PMID:8494363

  13. Effects of temperature on anti-Candida activities of antifungal antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Odds, F C

    1993-04-01

    The relative growth (percentage of growth relative to control growth) of 767 Candida isolates representing five species was measured in microcultures at 25 and 37 degrees C. In the presence of 10(-4) M flucytosine, the distribution of relative yeast growth data indicated that Candida albicans isolates were less susceptible at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C, while the opposite was found with 4 x 10(-5) M amorolfine for most of the isolates tested. Repetition of the experiments at four different temperatures with 99 C. albicans isolates and five antifungal agents confirmed a direct relationship between growth inhibition and increasing temperature from 25 to 40 degrees C with amphotericin B, flucytosine, and terconazole; a strong inverse relationship between inhibition and temperature with amorolfine; and a weak inverse relationship with terbinafine. However, these relationships were not always noted with other Candida spp.: in particular, the growth of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis isolates tended to be greater at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C in the presence of the azole-derivative antifungal agents itraconazole and terconazole. These findings stress the species-specific individuality of yeast susceptibility to azole antifungal agents. The results with C. albicans and amorolfine and terbinafine accord with their known in vivo efficacy in mycoses involving low-temperature superficial sites and poor activity against mycoses involving deep body sites. The data also reinforce the need for control of experimental variables such as temperature in the design of standardized yeast susceptibility tests.

  14. Rapid drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium complex using a fluorescence quenching method.

    PubMed

    Marone, P; Bono, L; Carretto, E; Barbarini, D; Telecco, S

    1997-08-01

    Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) is a recently introduced rapid growth detection method which uses an oxygen quenched fluorescent indicator. The present study evaluated the ability of this new method to determine the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Thirty strains recovered from patients with AIDS were tested for susceptibility to clarithromycin, rifabutin, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin and amikacin using MGIT. Results were compared to susceptibilities determined by the agar dilution method. The results obtained showed a 100% correlation between MGIT and the agar dilution method for rifabutin and clarithromycin. There was a 100% correlation between the two methods for azithromycin against 27 strains. MGIT was well correlated with the agar dilution method for detecting resistance to clarithromycin, rifabutin and azithromycin in 4 days, but the correlation was poor when susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin and amikacin were determined. This rapid method is non-radiometric, noninvasive and does not require any special instruments.

  15. Mendelian Genetics of Human Susceptibility to Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lionakis, Michail S.; Netea, Mihai G.; Holland, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    A recent surge in newly described inborn errors of immune function-related genes that result in susceptibility to fungal disease has greatly enhanced our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of antifungal immune responses. Characterization of single-gene defects that predispose to various combinations of superficial and deep-seated infections caused by yeasts, molds, and dimorphic fungi has unmasked the critical role of novel molecules and signaling pathways in mucosal and systemic antifungal host defense. These experiments of nature offer a unique opportunity for developing new knowledge in immunological research and form the foundation for devising immune-based therapeutic approaches for patients infected with fungal pathogens. PMID:24890837

  16. Modern antifungal therapy for neutropenic fever.

    PubMed

    Corey, Melissa

    2006-06-01

    Empirical antifungal therapy has been shown to decrease the number of documented fungal infections in the setting of persistent fever during neutropenia. For decades, amphotericin B deoxycholate has been considered the agent of choice for first-line therapy in this setting. New antifungal agents associated with less toxicity, including the lipid formulations of amphotericin, voriconazole, and caspofungin, are now available and are considered to be suitable alternative first-line agents. In order to ensure appropriate therapy, however, the clinician must consider not only the differences between these antifungals but also patient-specific factors before initiating treatment.

  17. An antifungal protein from ginger rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2005-10-14

    There are very few reports on antifungal proteins from rhizomes and there is none from the family of Zingiberaceae. An antifungal protein with a novel N-terminal sequence was isolated from ginger rhizomes utilizing a protocol that involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, and fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The protein was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel. It exhibited an apparent molecular mass of 32kDa and exerted antifungal activity toward various fungi including Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, and Physalospora piricola.

  18. Antifungal Activity of the Ethanol Extract from Flos Rosae Chinensis with Activity against Fluconazole-Resistant Clinical Candida

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui; Liu, Wei; Dai, Baodi; Yan, Lan

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antifungal activity of a hydroalcoholic extract from Flos Rosae Chinensis (FRC) combined with fluconazole (FCZ) against clinical isolates of Candida albicans resistant to FCZ. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of FRC was determined using a checkerboard microdilution assay. The synergistic effects of the combination of FRC and FCZ against clinical isolates of C. albicans resistant to FCZ were further confirmed by constructing time-growth curves and performing an agar diffusion test. FRC alone exerted efficient antifungal activities against C. albicans within a MIC80 ranging from 20 μg/ml to 40 μg/ml. FRC failed to enhance the effects of FCZ against sensitive C. albicans strains, although it rendered FCZ-resistant C. albicans more sensitive. These results were further confirmed by the result of in vivo study. Our study is the first to discover that FRC can inhibit the growth of C. albicans to a certain degree. An FRC antifungal mechanism study showed that FRC strengthens FCZ to inhibit the action of ergosterol biosynthesis by promoting the transformation of lanosterol to eburicol, suggesting that the antifungal mechanism of FRC involves the inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. PMID:28303159

  19. Nest sanitation through defecation: antifungal properties of wood cockroach feces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Mead, Kerry; Du Comb, William S.; Benson, Ryan W.; Godoy, Veronica G.

    2013-11-01

    The wood cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus nests as family units inside decayed wood, a substrate known for its high microbial load. We tested the hypothesis that defecation within their nests, a common occurrence in this species, reduces the probability of fungal development. Conidia of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, were incubated with crushed feces and subsequently plated on potato dextrose agar. Relative to controls, the viability of fungal conidia was significantly reduced following incubation with feces and was negatively correlated with incubation time. Although the cockroach's hindgut contained abundant β-1,3-glucanase activity, its feces had no detectable enzymatic function. Hence, these enzymes are unlikely the source of the fungistasis. Instead, the antifungal compound(s) of the feces involved heat-sensitive factor(s) of potential microbial origin. When feces were boiled or when they were subjected to ultraviolet radiation and subsequently incubated with conidia, viability was "rescued" and germination rates were similar to those of controls. Filtration experiments indicate that the fungistatic activity of feces results from chemical interference. Because Cryptocercidae cockroaches have been considered appropriate models to make inferences about the factors fostering the evolution of termite sociality, we suggest that nesting in microbe-rich environments likely selected for the coupling of intranest defecation and feces fungistasis in the common ancestor of wood cockroaches and termites. This might in turn have served as a preadaptation that prevented mycosis as these phylogenetically related taxa diverged and evolved respectively into subsocial and eusocial organizations.

  20. Nest sanitation through defecation: antifungal properties of wood cockroach feces.

    PubMed

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B; Mead, Kerry; Du Comb, William S; Benson, Ryan W; Godoy, Veronica G

    2013-11-01

    The wood cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus nests as family units inside decayed wood, a substrate known for its high microbial load. We tested the hypothesis that defecation within their nests, a common occurrence in this species, reduces the probability of fungal development. Conidia of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, were incubated with crushed feces and subsequently plated on potato dextrose agar. Relative to controls, the viability of fungal conidia was significantly reduced following incubation with feces and was negatively correlated with incubation time. Although the cockroach's hindgut contained abundant β-1,3-glucanase activity, its feces had no detectable enzymatic function. Hence, these enzymes are unlikely the source of the fungistasis. Instead, the antifungal compound(s) of the feces involved heat-sensitive factor(s) of potential microbial origin. When feces were boiled or when they were subjected to ultraviolet radiation and subsequently incubated with conidia, viability was "rescued" and germination rates were similar to those of controls. Filtration experiments indicate that the fungistatic activity of feces results from chemical interference. Because Cryptocercidae cockroaches have been considered appropriate models to make inferences about the factors fostering the evolution of termite sociality, we suggest that nesting in microbe-rich environments likely selected for the coupling of intranest defecation and feces fungistasis in the common ancestor of wood cockroaches and termites. This might in turn have served as a preadaptation that prevented mycosis as these phylogenetically related taxa diverged and evolved respectively into subsocial and eusocial organizations.

  1. Antifungal proteins: More than antimicrobials?

    PubMed Central

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Marx, Florentine

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) are widely distributed in nature. In higher eukaryotes, AMPs provide the host with an important defence mechanism against invading pathogens. AMPs of lower eukaryotes and prokaryotes may support successful competition for nutrients with other microorganisms of the same ecological niche. AMPs show a vast variety in structure, function, antimicrobial spectrum and mechanism of action. Most interestingly, there is growing evidence that AMPs also fulfil important biological functions other than antimicrobial activity. The present review focuses on the mechanistic function of small, cationic, cysteine-rich AMPs of mammals, insects, plants and fungi with antifungal activity and specifically aims at summarizing current knowledge concerning additional biological properties which opens novel aspects for their future use in medicine, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23412850

  2. Synthesis, antifungal activities and qualitative structure activity relationship of carabrone hydrazone derivatives as potential antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Ren, Shuang-Xi; He, Ze-Yu; Wang, De-Long; Yan, Xiao-Nan; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2014-03-11

    Aimed at developing novel fungicides for relieving the ever-increasing pressure of agricultural production caused by phytopathogenic fungi, 28 new hydrazone derivatives of carabrone, a natural bioactive sesquisterpene, in three types were designed, synthesized and their antifungal activities against Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lagenarium were evaluated. The result revealed that all the derivatives synthesized exhibited considerable antifungal activities in vitro and in vivo, which led to the improved activities for carabrone and its analogues and further confirmed their potential as antifungal agents.

  3. Novel, Synergistic Antifungal Combinations that Target Translation Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Martinez, Elena; Vallieres, Cindy; Holland, Sara L.; Avery, Simon V.

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet need for new antifungal or fungicide treatments, as resistance to existing treatments grows. Combination treatments help to combat resistance. Here we develop a novel, effective target for combination antifungal therapy. Different aminoglycoside antibiotics combined with different sulphate-transport inhibitors produced strong, synergistic growth-inhibition of several fungi. Combinations decreased the respective MICs by ≥8-fold. Synergy was suppressed in yeast mutants resistant to effects of sulphate-mimetics (like chromate or molybdate) on sulphate transport. By different mechanisms, aminoglycosides and inhibition of sulphate transport cause errors in mRNA translation. The mistranslation rate was stimulated up to 10-fold when the agents were used in combination, consistent with this being the mode of synergistic action. A range of undesirable fungi were susceptible to synergistic inhibition by the combinations, including the human pathogens Candida albicans, C. glabrata and Cryptococcus neoformans, the food spoilage organism Zygosaccharomyces bailii and the phytopathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Zymoseptoria tritici. There was some specificity as certain fungi were unaffected. There was no synergy against bacterial or mammalian cells. The results indicate that translation fidelity is a promising new target for combinatorial treatment of undesirable fungi, the combinations requiring substantially decreased doses of active components compared to each agent alone. PMID:26573415

  4. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of some Mexican medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bustos, E; Velazquez, C; Garibay-Escobar, A; García, Z; Plascencia-Jatomea, M; Cortez-Rocha, M O; Hernandez-Martínez, J; Robles-Zepeda, R E

    2009-12-01

    In Mexico about 4,000 plant species have some medicinal use. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of six Mexican medicinal plants against fungi and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methanolic extracts were prepared from the Mexican medicinal plants Amphypteringium adstrigens, Castella tortuosa, Coutarea latiflora, Ibervillea sonorae, Jatropha cuneata, and Selaginella lepidophylla. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the plants were determined by the broth microdilution method and the radial growth inhibition assay, respectively. All Mexican plants tested showed antimicrobial activity. Among the six plant extracts analyzed, J. cuneata showed the highest growth-inhibitory activity against fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (J. cuneata > A. adstrigens > C. latiflora > C. tortuosa > I. sonorae approximately S. lepidophylla). Shigella flexneri and Staphylococcus aureus were the most susceptible bacteria to plant extracts. Complete inhibition of S. flexneri growth was observed with J. cuneata methanolic extract at 90 microg/mL. This plant extract also showed the strongest antifungal activity against Fusarium verticillioides and Aspergillus niger. Our data suggest that the medicinal plants tested have important antimicrobial properties. This is the first report describing the antimicrobial activities of several of the Mexican medicinal plants used in this study.

  5. Improved medium for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, J H; Redding, J S; Maher, L A; Howell, A W

    1987-01-01

    The need for complex growth media has complicated routine susceptibility testing of Haemophilus influenzae because of antagonism of certain antimicrobial agents by the medium or because of difficulties in interpretation of growth endpoints. Haemophilus test medium (HTM) is a simple, transparent medium for broth- or agar-based tests with H. influenzae. HTM incorporates Mueller-Hinton medium with additions of 15 micrograms of hematin per ml, 15 micrograms of NAD per ml, and 5 mg of yeast extract per ml as growth-promoting additives. Agar or broth microdilution MICs of 10 antimicrobial agents for a collection of 179 H. influenzae isolates determined by using HTM compared favorably with MICs determined by the conventional agar or broth dilution methods recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Disk diffusion tests performed with HTM allowed accurate categorization of susceptible and resistant strains and were easier to interpret than tests performed with Mueller-Hinton chocolate agar. A particular advantage of HTM was the reliability of broth- or agar-based test results with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The results of the study suggest modification of current National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards MIC-interpretive criteria for H. influenzae with amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Error rate-bounded analysis of MICs and disk diffusion zone sizes also suggest modified zone-interpretive criteria for ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline with HTM or conventional media. Interpretive zone sizes are newly proposed for cefaclor and rifampin disk diffusion tests. PMID:3500965

  6. Antifungal Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Isolated from Natural Honey against Pathogenic Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Bulgasem, Bulgasem Y.; Lani, Mohd Nizam; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Fnaish, Sumaya G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in honey as antifungal activity has received little attention and their mechanism of inhibitory of fungi is not fully understood. In this study, LAB were isolated from honey samples from Malaysia, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Twenty-five isolates were confirmed LAB by catalase test and Gram staining, and were screened for antifungal activity. Four LAB showed inhibitory activity against Candida spp. using the dual agar overlay method. And they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum HS isolated from Al-Seder honey, Lactobacillus curvatus HH isolated from Al-Hanon honey, Pediococcus acidilactici HC isolated from Tualang honey and Pediococcus pentosaceus HM isolated from Al-Maray honey by the 16S rDNA sequence. The growth of Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 was strongly inhibited (>15.0 mm) and (10~15 mm) by the isolates of L. curvatus HH and P. pentosaceus HM, respectively. The antifungal activity of the crude supernatant (cell free supernatant, CFS) was evaluated using well diffusion method. The CFS showed high antifungal activity against Candida spp. especially The CFS of L. curvatus HH was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited growth of C. glabrata ATCC 2001, C. parapsilosis ATCC 2201, and C. tropicalis ATCC 750 with inhibitory zone 22.0, 15.6, and 14.7 mm, respectively. While CFS of P. pentosaceus HM was significantly (p < 0.05) effective against C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans with inhibition zone 17.2, 16.0, and 13.3 mm, respectively. The results indicated that LAB isolated from honey produced compounds which can be used to inhibit the growth of the pathogenic Candida species. PMID:28154488

  7. Antifungal Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Isolated from Natural Honey against Pathogenic Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Bulgasem, Bulgasem Y; Lani, Mohd Nizam; Hassan, Zaiton; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Fnaish, Sumaya G

    2016-12-01

    The role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in honey as antifungal activity has received little attention and their mechanism of inhibitory of fungi is not fully understood. In this study, LAB were isolated from honey samples from Malaysia, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Twenty-five isolates were confirmed LAB by catalase test and Gram staining, and were screened for antifungal activity. Four LAB showed inhibitory activity against Candida spp. using the dual agar overlay method. And they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum HS isolated from Al-Seder honey, Lactobacillus curvatus HH isolated from Al-Hanon honey, Pediococcus acidilactici HC isolated from Tualang honey and Pediococcus pentosaceus HM isolated from Al-Maray honey by the 16S rDNA sequence. The growth of Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 was strongly inhibited (>15.0 mm) and (10~15 mm) by the isolates of L. curvatus HH and P. pentosaceus HM, respectively. The antifungal activity of the crude supernatant (cell free supernatant, CFS) was evaluated using well diffusion method. The CFS showed high antifungal activity against Candida spp. especially The CFS of L. curvatus HH was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited growth of C. glabrata ATCC 2001, C. parapsilosis ATCC 2201, and C. tropicalis ATCC 750 with inhibitory zone 22.0, 15.6, and 14.7 mm, respectively. While CFS of P. pentosaceus HM was significantly (p < 0.05) effective against C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans with inhibition zone 17.2, 16.0, and 13.3 mm, respectively. The results indicated that LAB isolated from honey produced compounds which can be used to inhibit the growth of the pathogenic Candida species.

  8. Antifungal activity of Malaysian honey and propolis extracts against pathogens implicated in denture stomatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Nik Yusliyana Nik; Mohamad, Suharni; Abdullah, Haswati@Nurhayati; Rahman, Nurhayu Ab

    2016-12-01

    Malaysian honey and propolis extracts were investigated for their antifungal properties against pathogens implicated in denture stomatitis. Each of the honey and aqueous extracts propolis at net preparation, 1:1 and 1:2 dilutions was evaluated by using agar well diffusion assay and further investigated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) within the range of 500 mg/mL to 62.5 mg/mL against oral fungi. The findings indicated that there was no effect of propolis on Candida spp for both types of propolis based on no inhibition zones was recorded. Meanwhile, for antifungal activity of honey, only honey from Trigona spp has shown activity at net preparation against C. albicans (10.47 ± 0.23 mm), C. tropicalis (12.29 ± 0.23 mm) and C. glabrata (8.69 ± 0.53 mm). For minimum inhibitory concentration, the data indicates that both propolis have shown inhibitory effect at 500 mg/mL. As for honey, Trigona spp was the effective honey that give MIC value at 250 mg/mL against Candida spp. Apis dorsata honey has shown MIC value at 500 mg/mL while Apis mellifera honey had inhibited C.albicans and C.glabrata at 500 mg/mL except for C.tropicalis at 250 mg/mL. It can be concluded that both propolis has shown weaker antifungal activity against oral fungi while only honey produced from Trigona spp had strong antifungal activity compare to other honey against oral fungi implicated in denture stomatitis.

  9. Early state research on antifungal natural products.

    PubMed

    Negri, Melyssa; Salci, Tânia P; Shinobu-Mesquita, Cristiane S; Capoci, Isis R G; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E; Kioshima, Erika Seki

    2014-03-07

    Nosocomial infections caused by fungi have increased greatly in recent years, mainly due to the rising number of immunocompromised patients. However, the available antifungal therapeutic arsenal is limited, and the development of new drugs has been slow. Therefore, the search for alternative drugs with low resistance rates and fewer side effects remains a major challenge. Plants produce a variety of medicinal components that can inhibit pathogen growth. Studies of plant species have been conducted to evaluate the characteristics of natural drug products, including their sustainability, affordability, and antimicrobial activity. A considerable number of studies of medicinal plants and alternative compounds, such as secondary metabolites, phenolic compounds, essential oils and extracts, have been performed. Thus, this review discusses the history of the antifungal arsenal, surveys natural products with potential antifungal activity, discusses strategies to develop derivatives of natural products, and presents perspectives on the development of novel antifungal drug candidates.

  10. Chitin synthase inhibitors as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Preeti M; Tupe, Santosh G; Deshpande, Mukund V

    2013-02-01

    Increased risk of fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients, emerging fungal pathogens, limited repertoire of antifungal drugs and resistance development against the drugs demands for development of new and effective antifungal agents. With greater knowledge of fungal metabolism efforts are being made to inhibit specific enzymes involved in different biochemical pathways for the development of antifungal drugs. Chitin synthase is one such promising target as it is absent in plants and mammals. Nikkomycin Z, a chitin synthase inhibitor is under clinical development. Chitin synthesis in fungi, chitin synthase as a target for antifungal agent development, different chitin synthase inhibitors isolated from natural sources, randomly synthesized and modified from nikkomycin and polyoxin are discussed in this review.

  11. Development of Prophylactic Anti-Fungal Preparations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    telly OW blocke Topical Anti-fungal Prophylaxis Sodium Pyrithione Chemical Assay Drug Persistence, Stratum Corneum Experimental Human Ringworm ...against common ringworm infection.a chemical assay for sodium pyrithione (a known anti-fungal drug) was developed in stratum corneum and its...prophylactic use when and if needed to combat superficial ringworm infections./ Work carried out under this contract and the citations of commercial

  12. Ototopical antifungals and otomycosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Munguia, Raymundo; Daniel, Sam J

    2008-04-01

    There has been an increase in the prevalence of otomycosis in recent years. This has been linked to the extensive use of antibiotic eardrops. Treatment of otomycosis is challenging, and requires a close follow-up. We present a review of the literature on otomycosis, the topical antifungals most commonly used, and discuss their ototoxic potential. Candida albicans and Aspergillus are the most commonly identified organisms. Antifungals from the Azole class seem to be the most effective, followed by Nystatin and Tolnaftate.

  13. Colistin susceptibility testing: evaluation of reliability for cystic fibrosis isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Garber, Elizabeth; Chen, Yunhua; Clock, Sarah A.; Tabibi, Setareh; Miller, Amanda K.; Doctor, Michael; Saiman, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Antibiotic susceptibility methods that are commonly used to test bacterial isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis are of uncertain reliability for the polymyxins. To assess the reliability of four standard testing methods, this pilot study used a challenge set that included polymyxin-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Methods Twenty-five P. aeruginosa and 12 S. maltophilia isolates were tested for susceptibility to colistin (polymyxin E). Repeatability (concordance of replicates performed concurrently), reproducibility (concordance of replicates performed over time) and comparability (concordance of different methods) of agar dilution, broth microdilution, Etest and disc diffusion were assessed through the use of descriptive statistics and scatterplot analyses. Results All four methods displayed excellent repeatability (overall concordance rate of 99%). However, analysis of reproducibility revealed substantially lower rates of concordance (74% for agar dilution, 84% for broth microdilution and Etest, and 91% for disc diffusion). In addition, comparability to agar dilution of the three other methods was generally poor, with overall rates of very major error ranging from 12% for broth microdilution to 18% for Etest and disc diffusion. Conclusions Compared with agar dilution, other susceptibility testing methods give high rates of apparent false polymyxin susceptibility for cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa and S. maltophilia. Prospective study of the correlation between in vitro susceptibility and clinical response is needed to clarify whether these discrepancies reflect oversensitivity of the agar dilution method or insensitivity of the other methods. PMID:20430789

  14. Comparison of Fecal Coliform Agar and Violet Red Bile Lactose Agar for Fecal Coliform Enumeration in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, A.; Wanegue, C.; Baylac, P.

    2002-01-01

    A 24-h direct plating method for fecal coliform enumeration with a resuscitation step (preincubation for 2 h at 37 ± 1°C and transfer to 44 ± 1°C for 22 h) using fecal coliform agar (FCA) was compared with the 24-h standardized violet red bile lactose agar (VRBL) method. FCA and VRBL have equivalent specificities and sensitivities, except for lactose-positive non-fecal coliforms such as Hafnia alvei, which could form typical colonies on FCA and VRBL. Recovery of cold-stressed Escherichia coli in mashed potatoes on FCA was about 1 log unit lower than that with VRBL. When the FCA method was compared with standard VRBL for enumeration of fecal coliforms, based on counting carried out on 170 different food samples, results were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Based on 203 typical identified colonies selected as found on VRBL and FCA, the latter medium appears to allow the enumeration of more true fecal coliforms and has higher performance in certain ways (specificity, sensitivity, and negative and positive predictive values) than VRBL. Most colonies clearly identified on both media were E. coli and H. alvei, a non-fecal coliform. Therefore, the replacement of fecal coliform enumeration by E. coli enumeration to estimate food sanitary quality should be recommended. PMID:11916678

  15. Characterization of the antimicrobial susceptibility of fungi responsible for onychomycosis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Zalacain, A; Obrador, C; Martinez, J P; Viñas, M; Vinuesa, T

    2011-07-01

    Due to the increase of choices relative to antifungals, there is a need to improve the standardization of in vitro methods used to determine the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens. Our study evaluated the in vitro susceptibility of filamentous fungi isolated from patients with toenail onychomycosis against itraconazole, ciclopirox, eberconazole, fluconazole and terbinafine. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of these antifungal agents was determined with 100 isolates, including dermatophytes (70 strains) and non-dermatophyte molds (30 strains). The susceptibility of fungal isolates was measured by using a technique modified for dermatophytes (0.5 × 10(3)-0.5 × 10(4) conidia/ml as inocula) which followed the procedures described by the Antifungal Susceptibility Testing Subcommittee of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (AFST-EUCAST) and the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI M38-A). MIC ranges were 0.016-8.0 μg/ml for itraconazole, ciclopirox and eberconazole, 0.063-32.0 μg/ml for fluonazole, and 0.004-2.0 μg/ml for terbinafine. In vitro susceptibility tests indicated that eberconazole has a broad antimicrobial profile, including dermatophytes, as well as other filamentous fungi. Terbinafine was active (0.016-0.250 μg/ml) against dermatophytes.

  16. Antifungal activity of itraconazole and voriconazole against clinical isolates obtained from animals with mycoses.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Ken; Imaji, Mashio; Osumi, Takafumi; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Kano, Rui; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Watanabe, Toshi

    2009-01-01

    Animal mycosis, particularly deep mycosis, is one of the most challenging conditions encountered by veterinarians. Pathogens causing mycotic infections in animals include fungi such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida spp., and Aspergillus spp. The antifungal drugs used for the treatment of deep mycoses in animals as well as humans are polyenes and azoles. However, the sensitivity of clinical isolates obtained from animals toward these drugs has rarely been assayed. In this study, the antifungal activities of itraconazole and voriconazole against clinical isolates of C. neoformans, Candida spp., and A. fumigatus isolated from animals with mycoses were examined using the broth microdilution method performed according to the guidelines provided by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of itraconazole toward the C. neoformans, Candida spp., and A. fumigatus isolates were 0.125 - 1, 0.125 - 2, and 0.25 - 2 microg/ml, respectively, and those of voriconazole were 0.0625 - 0.5, < or =0.0313 - 0.0625, and 0.0625 - 1 microg/ml, respectively. The results of the MIC analyses implied that the fungal isolates obtained from infected animals exhibit an equivalent degree of susceptibility to itraconazole and voriconazole, as is observed in the case of isolates obtained from humans. The appropriate antifungal therapeutic strategy for the treatment of mycoses in animals must be selected taking into consideration the host immune status and organ function as well as the in vitro sensitivity of the pathogens to antifungal drugs.

  17. Plant latex: a promising antifungal agent for post harvest disease control.

    PubMed

    Sibi, G; Wadhavan, Rashmi; Singh, Sneha; Shukla, Abhilasha; Dhananjaya, K; Ravikumar, K R; Mallesha, H

    2013-12-01

    Bioactive compounds from plant latex are potential source of antifungic against post harvest pathogens. Latex from a total of seven plant species was investigated for its phytochemical and antifungal properties. Six fungi namely Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger, A. terreus, F. solani, P. digitatum and R. arrhizus were isolated from infected fruits and vegetables and tested against various solvent extracts of latex. Analysis of latex extracts with phytochemical tests showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, phenols, saponins, steroids, tannins and terpenoids. Antifungal assay revealed the potential inhibitory activity of petroleum ether extracts against the postharvest fungal isolates. Various degree of sensitivity was observed irrespective of plant species studied with A. terreus and P. digitatum as the most susceptible ones. F. solani and A. fumigatus were moderately sensitive to the latex extracts tested. Among the plants, latex of Thevetia peruviana (75.2%) and Artocarpus heterophyllus (64.8%) were having potential antifungal activity against the isolates followed by Manilkara zapota (51.1%). In conclusion, use of plant latex makes interest to control postharvest fungal diseases and is fitting well with the concept of safety for human health and environment.

  18. Clinical, Cellular, and Molecular Factors That Contribute to Antifungal Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    White, Theodore C.; Marr, Kieren A.; Bowden, Raleigh A.

    1998-01-01

    In the past decade, the frequency of diagnosed fungal infections has risen sharply due to several factors, including the increase in the number of immunosuppressed patients resulting from the AIDS epidemic and treatments during and after organ and bone marrow transplants. Linked with the increase in fungal infections is a recent increase in the frequency with which these infections are recalcitrant to standard antifungal therapy. This review summarizes the factors that contribute to antifungal drug resistance on three levels: (i) clinical factors that result in the inability to successfully treat refractory disease; (ii) cellular factors associated with a resistant fungal strain; and (iii) molecular factors that are ultimately responsible for the resistance phenotype in the cell. Many of the clinical factors that contribute to resistance are associated with the immune status of the patient, with the pharmacology of the drugs, or with the degree or type of fungal infection present. At a cellular level, antifungal drug resistance can be the result of replacement of a susceptible strain with a more resistant strain or species or the alteration of an endogenous strain (by mutation or gene expression) to a resistant phenotype. The molecular mechanisms of resistance that have been identified to date in Candida albicans include overexpression of two types of efflux pumps, overexpression or mutation of the target enzyme, and alteration of other enzymes in the same biosynthetic pathway as the target enzyme. Since the study of antifungal drug resistance is relatively new, other factors that may also contribute to resistance are discussed. PMID:9564569

  19. Antifungal effects of phytocompounds on Candida species alone and in combination with fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mengjiao; Li, Tao; Wan, Jianjian; Li, Xiuyun; Yuan, Lei; Sun, Shujuan

    2017-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections caused by Candida spp. remain the most predominant nosocomial fungal infections. Owing to the increased use of antifungal agents, resistance of Candida spp. to antimycotics has emerged frequently, especially to fluconazole (FLC). To cope with this issue, new efforts have been dedicated to discovering novel antimycotics or new agents that can enhance the susceptibility of Candida spp. to existing antimycotics. The secondary metabolites of plants represent a large library of compounds that are important sources for new drugs or compounds suitable for further modification. Research on the anti-Candida activities of phytocompounds has been carried out in recent years and the results showed that a series of phytocompounds have anti-Candida properties, such as phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, terpenoids and alkaloids. Among these phytocompounds, some displayed potent antifungal activity, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤8 µg/mL, and several compounds were even more effective against drug-resistant Candida spp. than FLC or itraconazole (e.g. honokiol, magnolol and shikonin). Interestingly, quite a few phytocompounds not only displayed anti-Candida activity alone but also synergised with FLC against Candida spp., even leading to a reversal of FLC resistance. This review focuses on summarising the anti-Candida activities of phytocompounds as well as the interactions of phytocompounds with FLC. In addition, we briefly overview the synergistic mechanisms and present the structure of the antimycotic phytocompounds. Hopefully, this analysis will provide insight into antifungal agent discovery and new approaches against antifungal drug resistance.

  20. Validation of a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method for metronidazole susceptibility testing of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Midolo, P D; Turnidge, J; Lambert, J R; Bell, J M

    1995-03-01

    Triple antimicrobial therapy that includes metronidazole has been recommended as a first-line therapy for Helicobacter pylori because it has the highest eradication rates. However, resistance in H. pylori to metronidazole has been reported worldwide and its presence may reduce the efficacy of triple therapy. Various methods for testing H. pylori against metronidazole have been used including agar dilution, disk diffusion and the Etest but there has been little standardization of methods. One hundred isolates of H. pylori from different patients were tested for susceptibility to metronidazole by agar dilution, Etest and disk diffusion (5 micrograms disk). The agar dilution results confirmed the MIC susceptibility breakpoint to be < or = 8 micrograms/ml. Using this breakpoint there was close agreement (98%) between Etest and agar dilution results. For susceptible strains, MICs by E-test were generally one twofold dilution lower. Using the error-rate bounded method, agreement between disk diffusion zone diameter and MIC was 98% for agar dilution with breakpoints of > or = 12 mm and < or = 8 micrograms/ml and 100% for Etest with breakpoints of > or = 12 mm and < or = 8 micrograms/ml. The Etest discriminated better than agar dilution between susceptible and resistant strains and was simple to perform. The disk diffusion test is a reliable and cheaper alternative to the Etest with susceptibility being a zone diameter > or = 12 mm with a 5 micrograms disk. The prevalence of metronidazole resistance in this study was 40% by Etest.

  1. Characterization of Leptospiral Chemoreceptors Using a Microscopic Agar Drop Assay.

    PubMed

    Affroze, Samia; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Takabe, Kyosuke; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is induced by sensing chemical stimuli via chemoreceptors embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, enabling the cells to migrate toward nutrients or away from toxins. The chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. have been well studied and are functionally classified on the basis of detectable substrates. The spirochete Leptospira possesses more than ten chemoreceptors and shows attractive or repellent responses against some sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids. However, the roles of these chemoreceptors have not been investigated. In this study, we conducted a chemotaxis assay called microscopic agar drop assay in combination with competition experiments, determining whether two kinds of attractants are recognized by the same type of chemoreceptor in the saprophytic Leptospira strain, Leptospira biflexa. Analyzing the competition effect observed between several pairs of chemicals, we found that L. biflexa senses sugars via chemoreceptors different from those that sense amino acids and fatty acids.

  2. Surface migration of Staphylococcus xylosus on low-agar media.

    PubMed

    Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2008-05-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is a commensal species commonly found on the skin of mammals, but also currently used as starter culture for meat fermentation. Most strains of this species colonize by forming a biofilm on abiotic surfaces. We show here that the majority of S. xylosus strains also exhibit extensive colony spreading on the surface of soft agar media. This phenomenon seemed to be independent of biofilm-forming ability. It occurred in different culture media and was dependent on temperature. Formation of a giant S. xylosus colony did not involve a biosurfactant. Microscopic observation showed that the front of the giant colony comprised a single layer of spacing cells with more packed cells in the median area. Supplementation of the soft media with DNase I increased S. xylosus colony spreading, indicating that extracellular DNA may be involved in limiting the phenomenon. The ability of S. xylosus to spread on semi-solid surfaces may constitute an advantage for surface colonization.

  3. Susceptibility profile of vaginal yeast isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M A; Dietze, R; Paula, C R; Da Matta, D A; Colombo, A L

    2001-01-01

    Vaginal specimens for culture were obtained from two hundred and five immunocompetent, non-hospitalized patients selected among all women attending the Gynecology and Obstetric Ambulatory Clinic of the University of Espírito Santo, Brazil, during a 2-year period (From 1998 to 1999). Patients were checked for signs and symptoms of vulvovaginitis and previous use of topical and systemic antifungal drugs. Yeast isolates were identified by classical methods and the antifungal susceptibility profile was determined according to NCCLS microbroth assay. The prevalence of vaginal yeast isolates from asymptomatic women was 25% (30/121) and 60% (50/84) among patients with symptoms of vulvovaginitis. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species in both groups (46% and 90%, respectively), followed by C. glabrata (13% and 6%, respectively). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B. Only ten isolates had dose dependent susceptibility (DDS) or resistance to azoles; and seven of these were non-albicans species. Based on our results we suggest that species identification and antifungal susceptibility testing need not be routinely performed in immunocompetent women, and may be reasonable only for the minority of patients with complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis that fail to respond to therapy.

  4. Normal force controlled rheology applied to agar gelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bosi; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous polymer solutions. During the sol-gel transition, such materials may experience a volume contraction which is traditionally overlooked as rheological measurements are usually performed in geometries of constant volume. In this article, we revisit the formation of 1.5\\% wt. agar gels through a series of benchmark rheological experiments performed with a plate-plate geometry. We demonstrate on that particular gel of polysaccharides that the contraction associated with the sol/gel transition cannot be neglected. Indeed, imposing a constant gap width during the gelation results in the strain hardening of the sample, as evidenced by the large negative normal force that develops. Such hardening leads to the slow drift in time of the gel elastic modulus $G'$ towards ever larger values, and thus to an erroneous estimate of $G'$. As an alternative, we show that imposing a constant normal force equals to zero during the gelation, instead of a constant gap width, suppresses the hardening as the decrease of the gap compensates for the sample contraction. Using normal force controlled rheology, we then investigate the impact of thermal history on 1.5\\% wt. agar gels. We show that neither the value of the cooling rate, nor the introduction of a constant temperature stage during the cooling process influence the gel elastic properties. Instead, $G'$ only depends on the terminal temperature reached at the end of the cooling ramp, as confirmed by direct imaging of the gel microstructure by cryoelectron microscopy. The present work offers an extensive review of the technical difficulties associated with the rheology of hydrogels and paves the way for a systematic use of normal force controlled rheology to monitor non-isochoric processes.

  5. Antifungal activity of the essential oil of Angelica major against Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus and dermatophyte species.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Carlos; Salgueiro, Lígia; Gonçalves, Maria-José; Hrimpeng, Karnjana; Pinto, Jéssica; Pinto, Eugénia

    2015-04-01

    The composition and antifungal activity of the essential oil (EO) of Angelica major and its main components α-pinene and cis-β-ocimene against clinically relevant yeasts and moulds were evaluated. EO from the plant's aerial parts was obtained by hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The oil showed high contents of α-pinene (21.8 %) and cis-β-ocimene (30.4 %). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were measured according to the broth macrodilution protocols by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The EO, α-pinene and cis-β-ocimene displayed low MICs and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) against dermatophytes and Cryptococcus neoformans, with α-pinene being the most active. Regarding Candida species, the EO susceptibility profiles seem to be diverse and not correlated with fluconazole susceptibility patterns. Moreover, an inhibition of yeast-mycelium transition was demonstrated at sub-inhibitory concentrations of the EO, α-pinene and cis-β-ocimene in C. albicans. In addition, their haemolytic activity was low. The activity displayed by A. major EO and its main components associated with low cytotoxic activity confirms their potential as an antifungal agent against fungal species frequently implicated in human mycoses, particularly cryptococcosis and dermatophytosis. The association with commercial antifungal compounds could bring benefits, by the effect on germ tube formation, and be used in mucocutaneous candidiasis treatment.

  6. Assessment of Antifungal Activity of Bakuchiol on Oral-Associated Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Mohd-Al-Faisal; Abdul Razak, Fathilah; Himratul-Aznita, Wan Harun

    2015-01-01

    Bakuchiol is an active component of Psoralea glandulosa and Psoralea corylifolia, used in traditional Chinese medicine. The study aimed at investigating the antifungal activity of bakuchiol on planktonic and biofilm forms of orally associated Candida species. The antifungal susceptibility testing was determined by the broth micro dilution technique. Growth kinetics and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of Candida were measured to assess the inhibitory effect of bakuchiol on Candida planktonic cells. Biofilm biomass and cellular metabolic activity were quantitatively estimated by the crystal violet (CV) and the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) assays. All Candida strains have been shown to be susceptible to bakuchiol with the MIC ranges from 12.5 to 100 μg/mL. Significant decrease in specific growth rates and viable counts demonstrates the inhibitory effect of bakuchiol on Candida planktonic cells. A brief exposure to bakuchiol also reduced CSH of Candida (P < 0.05), indicating altered surface properties of yeast cells towards hydrophobic interfaces. Biofilm biomass and cell metabolic activity were mostly decreased, except for C. glabrata (P = 0.29). The antifungal properties of bakuchiol on Candida species in this in vitro study may give insights into the application in therapeutic strategy against Candida infections. PMID:26633986

  7. Aspartic proteinases of Candida spp.: role in pathogenicity and antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Naiara C; Nery, Jéssica M; Dias, Amanda L T

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a serious health risk as they are particularly prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. Candida spp. pathogenicity depends on several factors and secreted aspartic proteinases (Sap) are considered one of the most critical factors as they are associated with adhesion, invasion and tissue damage. The production of proteinases is encoded by a family of 10 genes known as SAP, which are distributed differently among the species. The expression of these genes may be influenced by environmental conditions, which generally result in a higher fungal invasive potential. Non-pathogenic Candida spp. usually have fewer SAP genes, which are not necessarily expressed in the genome. Exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents promotes the development of resistant strains with an increased expression of SAP genes. In general, Candida spp. isolates that are resistant to antifungals show a higher secretion of Sap than the susceptible isolates. The relationship between Sap secretion and the susceptibility profile of the isolates is of great interest, although the role of SAPs in the development of resistance to antifungal agents remains still unclear. This review is the first one to address these issues.

  8. Dermatophyte susceptibility varies towards antimicrobial textiles.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Timo R; Mucha, Helmut; Hoefer, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Dermatophytoses are a widespread problem worldwide. Textiles in contact with infected skin can serve as a carrier for fungus propagation. Hitherto, it is unknown, whether antifungal textiles could contribute in controlling dermatophytes e.g. by disrupting the chain of infection. Testing of antimicrobial fabrics for their antifungal activities therefore is a fundamental prerequisite to assess the putative clinical relevance of textiles for dermatophyte prevention. Fabrics finished with either didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), poly-hexamethylenbiguanide, copper and two silver chloride concentrations were tested for their antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Candida albicans. To prove dermatophyte susceptibility towards the textiles, swatches were subjected to DIN EN 14199 (Trichophyton sp.) or DIN EN ISO 20743 (C. albicans) respectively. In addition, samples were embedded, and semi-thin sections were analysed microscopically. While all samples showed a clear inhibition of C. albicans, activity against Trichophyton sp. varied significantly: For example, DDAC completely inhibited T. rubrum growth, whereas T. mentagrophytes growth remained unaffected even in direct contact to the fibres. The results favour to add T. mentagrophytes as a test organism in textile dermatophyte efficacy tests. Microscopic analysis of swatches allowed detailed evaluation of additional parameters like mycelium thickness, density and hyphae penetration depth into the fabric.

  9. ASDCD: Antifungal Synergistic Drug Combination Database

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Ming-Xi; Ren, Wei; Wang, Quan-Xin; Zhang, Li-Xin; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Finding effective drugs to treat fungal infections has important clinical significance based on high mortality rates, especially in an immunodeficient population. Traditional antifungal drugs with single targets have been reported to cause serious side effects and drug resistance. Nowadays, however, drug combinations, particularly with respect to synergistic interaction, have attracted the attention of researchers. In fact, synergistic drug combinations could simultaneously affect multiple subpopulations, targets, and diseases. Therefore, a strategy that employs synergistic antifungal drug combinations could eliminate the limitations noted above and offer the opportunity to explore this emerging bioactive chemical space. However, it is first necessary to build a powerful database in order to facilitate the analysis of drug combinations. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have built the first Antifungal Synergistic Drug Combination Database (ASDCD), including previously published synergistic antifungal drug combinations, chemical structures, targets, target-related signaling pathways, indications, and other pertinent data. Its current version includes 210 antifungal synergistic drug combinations and 1225 drug-target interactions, involving 105 individual drugs from more than 12,000 references. ASDCD is freely available at http://ASDCD.amss.ac.cn. PMID:24475134

  10. Carboxymethylated chitosan-stabilized copper nanoparticles: a promise to contribute a potent antifungal and antibacterial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantubay, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyay, Sourav K.; Kalita, Himani; Konar, Suraj; Dey, Satyahari; Pathak, Amita; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2015-06-01

    Carboxymethylated chitosan (CMC)-stabilized copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) have been synthesized via chemical reduction of copper(II)-CMC complex in aqueous medium by hydrazine under microwave irradiation in ambient atmosphere. Structural morphology, phase, and chemical compositions of CMC-stabilized Cu-NPs (CMC-Cu-NPs) have been analyzed through high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of CMC-Cu-NPs have been evaluated against Candida tropicalis and Escherichia coli through agar well diffusion method, broth microdilution assay, live-dead assay, and microscopic observation. Antimicrobial activity of spherical CMC-Cu-NPs ( 4-15 nm of diameters) has been observed to be significant for both C. tropicalis and E. coli. The cytotoxicity study indicates that CMC-Cu-NPs have no significant toxic effect against normal cell line, L929.

  11. Antifungal efficacy of plant essential oils against stored grain fungi of Fusarium spp.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Peeyush; Mishra, Sapna; Kumar, Atul; Sharma, Amit Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The control potential of seven plant essential oils was evaluated against Fusarium proliferatum (Matsushima) Nirenberg and Fusarium verticillioides Sheldon. The fungicidal activity was assessed through microtiter plate assay to determine the minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentration of essential oils. The essential oil of Mentha arvensis was adjudged as best for inhibiting the fungal growth, while oil of Thymus vulgaris and Anethum graveolens showed high efficacy in terms of fungicidal activity. The oil of M. arvensis and T. vulgaris also showed good inhibition activity in agar disc diffusion assay. M. arvensis essential oil was analysed for its composition using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealing menthol (63.18 %), menthone (15.08 %), isomenthyl acetate (5.50 %) and limonene (4.31 %) as major components. Significant activity of M. arvensis essential oil against F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides isolates obtained, pave the way for its use as antifungal control agents.

  12. Residual Agar Determination in Bacterial Spores by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or non-irradiated and not in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 108 spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only 3 false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.

  13. Biochemical differentiation of the Enterobacteriaceae with the aid of lysine-iron-agar.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J G; Kunz, L J; Barron, W; Ewing, W H

    1966-03-01

    A procedure is described for identifying members of the family Enterobacteriaceae isolated from clinical specimens. The methods are based on primary differentiation of the various groups of bacteria by the use of Kligler Iron Agar and lysine-iron-agar. For identification of Salmonella, Shigella, and Arizona group organisms from stools, Triple Sugar Iron Agar and lysine-iron-agar are employed. The usefulness of this schema for diagnostic bacteriology laboratories is discussed. It is not intended to replace methods used in reference or research laboratories.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of fluconazole analogs with triazole-modified scaffold as potent antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyedeh Mahdieh; Badali, Hamid; Irannejad, Hamid; Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Emami, Saeed

    2015-04-01

    In order to find new azole antifungals, we have recently designed a series of triazole alcohols in which one of the 1,2,4-triazol-1-yl group in fluconazole structure has been replaced with 4-amino-5-aryl-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole motif. In this paper, we focused on the structural refinement of the primary lead, by removing the amino group from the structure to achieve 5-aryl-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole derivatives 10a-i and 11a-i. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of title compounds demonstrated that most compounds had potent inhibitory activity against Candida species. Among them, 5-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)triazole analogs 10h and 11h with MIC values of <0.01 to 0.5μg/mL were 4-256 times more potent than fluconazole against Candida species.

  15. The First Case of Total Dystrophic Onychomycosis Caused by Aspergillus clavatus Resistant to Antifungal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Falahati, Mehraban; Ghojoghi, Aynaz; Abastabar, Mahdi; Ghasemi, Zeinab; Farahyar, Shirin; Roudbary, Maryam; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Armaki, Mojtaba Taghizadeh; Hoseinnejad, Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal infection of nails which is mainly caused by dermatophyte species and less often by yeasts and non-dermatophyte molds. We present a case of onychomycosis due to Aspergillus clavatus for the first time worldwide. The patient was an immunocompetent 32-year-old woman who identified with Psoriasis of the nail. The presence of A. clavatus in a nail sample was confirmed using microscopic and culture analysis followed by PCR of the β-tubulin gene. After antifungal susceptibility test, it is revealed that the isolate was resistant to the majority of common antifungal drugs, but finally the patient was treated with itraconazole 200 mg daily. A. clavatus and drug-resistant A. clavatus have not previously been reported from onychomycosis.

  16. Josamycin: interpretation of inhibition zones with the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test as compared with erythromycin.

    PubMed

    Karthein, J; Spohr, M; Traub, W H

    1986-01-01

    A total of 432 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (128), coagulase-negative staphylococci (123), group A and B beta-hemolytic streptococci (61), group D streptococci (30), Streptococcus penumoniae (29), Haemophilus influenzae (19), Haemophilus parainfluenzae (12), and Legionella pneumophila (30) were examined with the agar dilution and Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion tests for susceptibility to josamycin as compared with erythromycin. On a weight-for-weight basis, erythromycin was more active than josamycin against all bacterial species, including L. pneumophila. Josamycin inhibited 18 of 23 S. aureus and 11 of 16 coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains resistant to erythromycin. Utilizing minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) breakpoints of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml (sensitive), 4 microgram/ml (intermediate) and of greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml (resistant), and inhibition zone criteria of greater than or equal to 18 mm diameter (sensitive), 14-17 mm (intermediate), and less than or equal to 13 mm (resistant), and excluding L. pneumophila, there was good correlation between erythromycin MIC and corresponding disk diffusion data for staphylococci and streptococci, but not for Haemophilus species. In comparison, josamycin yielded a significant number of minor discrepant data for group D streptococci and Haemophilus species. It is suggested that erythromycin and josamycin should not be tested against Haemophilus species, and that josamycin should be excluded from test batteries against enterococci. Erythromycin-resistant staphylococci require separate testing with josamycin.

  17. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J; Evans, R T; Lobbins, P M; Genco, R J

    1980-01-01

    The agar dilution technique was used for determination of the antibiotic susceptibilities of 57 oral isolates and 2 nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Tetracycline, minocycline, and chloramphenicol inhibited more than 96% of the strains tested at a concentration of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml; 89% of the strains were inhibited by 2 micrograms of carbenicillin per ml. The other antimicrobial agents tested were less active. Approximately 10% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, and penicillin G at concentrations of 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. These data suggest that tetracycline and minocycline may be valuable drugs in the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections. PMID:6903116

  18. The Hsp90 Co-chaperones Sti1, Aha1, and P23 Regulate Adaptive Responses to Antifungal Azoles

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaokui; Xue, Wei; Yin, Yajing; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Shaojie; Sun, Xianyun

    2016-01-01

    Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) is essential for tumor progression in humans and drug resistance in fungi. However, the roles of its many co-chaperones in antifungal resistance are unknown. In this study, by susceptibility test of Neurospora crassa mutants lacking each of 18 Hsp90/Calcineurin system member genes (including 8 Hsp90 co-chaperone genes) to antifungal drugs and other stresses, we demonstrate that the Hsp90 co-chaperones Sti1 (Hop1 in yeast), Aha1, and P23 (Sba1 in yeast) were required for the basal resistance to antifungal azoles and heat stress. Deletion of any of them resulted in hypersensitivity to azoles and heat. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis showed that the toxic sterols eburicol and 14α-methyl-3,6-diol were significantly accumulated in the sti1 and p23 deletion mutants after ketoconazole treatment, which has been shown before to led to cell membrane stress. At the transcriptional level, Aha1, Sti1, and P23 positively regulate responses to ketoconazole stress by erg11 and erg6, key genes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are highly conserved in fungi, and sti1 and p23 deletion also increased the susceptibility to azoles in Fusarium verticillioides. These results indicate that Hsp90-cochaperones Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are critical for the basal azole resistance and could be potential targets for developing new antifungal agents. PMID:27761133

  19. [Recent advances in the study of new antifungal lead compounds].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-zheng; Sheng, Chun-quan; Zhang, Wan-nian

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, the incidence and mortality rate of invasive fungal infection have increased dramatically, and it is of great significance to develop novel antifungal agents with new chemical structure and new mode of action. In this review, novel antifungal lead compounds reported from 2007 to 2009 are reviewed. Moreover, their chemical structures, antifungal activities and structure-activity relationships have been summarized, which can provide useful information for future study of antifungal agents.

  20. Comparison of isolation of Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale) from peptone-starch-dextrose agar and Columbia colistin-nalidoxic acid agar.

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, R L; Washington JA, I I

    1976-01-01

    A total of 447 cervical or vaginal specimens were inoculated in parallel onto peptone-starch-dextrose (PSD) and Columbia colistin (10 mg/ml)-nalidixic acid (15 mug/ml) (CNA) agar and were incubated for 48 h at 35 degrees C in an atmosphere with 2 to 10% CO2. One hundred (22.4%) of the cultures were positive for Haemophilus vaginalis. Forty-eight of the isolates were recovered from both PSD and Columbia CNA agar, five from PSD only, and 47 from Columbia CNA agar only (P less than 0.001). On Columbia CNA agar, 76 of the isolates were detected after 24 h of incubation, and the remainder were detected within 4 days of incubation. PMID:1085777

  1. Antifungal activities of azole agents against the Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karla Carvalho; de Araujo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Passos, Xisto Sena; de Fátima Lisboa Fernandes, Orionalda; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we identified 95 Malassezia isolates by morphological and biochemical criteria and assessed the in vitro activity of fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole and voriconazole by broth microdilution against these species using slightly modified Leeming-Notman medium. The Malassezia isolates were identified as M. furfur (74), M. sympodialis (11), M. obtusa (8) and M. globosa (2). The modified Leeming-Notman medium used for susceptibility testing allowed good growth of Malassezia spp. Visual reading of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was readily achieved until Day 5 of incubation at 32 degrees C. Although high MIC values of 16 microg/mL for fluconazole were observed in 9.5% of Malassezia isolates, in general these microorganisms were susceptible to all drugs studied. Interestingly, one M. globosa isolate showed high MIC values for voriconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole. For the 95 strains, the MIC ranges were <0.03-4 microg/mL for ketoconazole, <0.03 to >16 microg/mL for voriconazole, <0.125 to >64 microg/mL for fluconazole and <0.03-16 microg/mL for itraconazole. In summary, the good reproducibility and visual readings obtained using modified Leeming-Notman medium suggest that this medium should be proposed for antifungal testing of drugs against Malassezia spp.

  2. Antifungal drug discovery: the process and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, Richard; Sun, Nuo; Gay-Andrieu, Francoise; Groutas, William; Weerawarna, Pathum; Prasad, Sridhar; Alex, Deepu; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest that the global incidence of several types of fungal diseases have traditionally been under-documented. Of these, mortality caused by invasive fungal infections remains disturbingly high, equal to or exceeding deaths caused by drug-resistant tuberculosis and malaria. It is clear that basic research on new antifungal drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tools is needed. In this review, we focus upon antifungal drug discovery including in vitro assays, compound libraries and approaches to target identification. Genome mining has made it possible to identify fungal-specific targets; however, new compounds to these targets are apparently not in the antimicrobial pipeline. We suggest that ‘repurposing’ compounds (off patent) might be a more immediate starting point. Furthermore, we examine the dogma on antifungal discovery and suggest that a major thrust in technologies such as structural biology, homology modeling and virtual imaging is needed to drive discovery. PMID:25046525

  3. New Antifungal Pyranoisoflavone from Ficus tikoua Bur.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shaopeng; Wu, Wenjun; Ji, Zhiqin

    2012-01-01

    Considering the undesirable attributes of synthetic fungicides and the availability of Ficus species in China, the stem of Ficus tikoua Bur. was investigated. One new antifungal pyranoisoflavone, 5,3′,4′-trihydroxy-2″,2″-dimethylpyrano (5″,6″:7,8) isoflavone (1), together with two known isoflavones, wighteone (2) and lupiwighteone (3) (with previously reported antifungal activities), were isolated from ethyl acetate extract by bioassay-guided fractionation. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis, such as NMR (1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOESY), IR, UV and HRMS, as well as ESI-MSn analyses. The antifungal activities of 1–3 against Phytophthora infestans were evaluated by direct spore germination assay, and the IC50 values were 262.442, 198.153 and 90.365 μg·mL−1, respectively. PMID:22837700

  4. [Multicenter study on the monitoring of in vitro susceptibility to tigeeyeline in Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    García C, Patricia; Juliet L, Chrystal; Fernández V, Alejandra; San Martín S, Marcela; Cifuentes D, Marcela; Porte T, Lorena; Braun J, Stephanie; Castillo D, Loriana; Vechiola H, Maggie; Tapia P, Cecilia; Sakurada Z, Andrea; Chanqueo C, Leonardo; Lam E, Marusella; Espinoza P, Mónica; Curcio F, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this multicenter study was to determine tigecycline susceptibility rates, measured by agar diffusion, in nine hospitals in Santiago and to compare these rates with other antimicrobials. Each center studied 20 strains per month. All intermediate and fully resistant strains as well as 10% of susceptibile strains were also studied by the broth microdilution method. Overall, 2301 strains were studied displaying the following susceptibility rates for tigecycline: 100% for Streptococcus sp, Enterococcus sp, and E. coli respectively, 99.8% for Staphylococcus sp, 93% for Klebsiella and 80% for Acinetobacter baumarmii. For Proteus, Providencia and Morganella the susceptibility rates were 4%. For cefotaxime-resistant Klebsiella and imipenem-resistant A. baumarmii susceptibility rates were 95% and 80% respectively. The agar diffusion and broth dilution method were 100% concordant for tigecycline susceptible strains but only 27% for resistant or intermediate strains represented mostly by Acinetobacter baumannii. The majority of these strains (57/59) proved to be susceptible after retesting. The great majority (96,6%) of strains tested from nine Chilean hospitals proved to be susceptible to tigecycline with exception for Proteus, Providencia and Morganella (66% resistance). Using the agar diffusion method for measuring tigecycline susceptibility to A. baumannii may be misleading.

  5. NAS agar is more suitable than McKay agar for primary culture of Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) fastidious bacteria, S. intermedius in particular.

    PubMed

    Raclavsky, Vladislav; Novotny, Radko; Stary, Lubomir; Navratilova, Lucie; Zatloukal, Jaromir; Jakubec, Petr; Zapalka, Martin; Kopriva, Frantisek; Kolek, Vitezslav

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) is a group of three streptococcal species (S. anginosus, intermedius and constellatus) that act as opportunist pathogens, among others in cystic fibrosis. Due to their fastidious character, they are both difficult to cultivate and to differentiate from less pathogenic streptococcal species, therefore being most probably underdiagnosed. Semi-selective McKay agar and NAS agar were developed to facilitate SMG recovery from clinical samples; however, direct comparison of recovery rates has not been published yet. We tested the performance of both media on 123 patient samples and demonstrated general superiority of NAS agar for SMG recovery during primary cultivation convincingly. This observation was also confirmed by quantitative drop tests during subculture. Despite the undisputed overall superiority of NAS agar over McKay agar, a smaller fraction of strains grew better on McKay agar. Inter-strain differences were the most probable explanation. Therefore, when economic conditions are not limiting and maximum recovery rate is desirable, both plates are advised to be used in parallel for primary cultivation of clinical samples.

  6. Antifungal agents in neonates: issues and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Almirante, Benito; Rodríguez, Dolors

    2007-01-01

    Fungal infections are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period, particularly among premature neonates. Four classes of antifungal agents are commonly used in the treatment of fungal infections in pediatric patients: polyene macrolides, fluorinated pyrimidines, triazoles, and echinocandins. Due to the paucity of pediatric data, many recommendations for the use of antifungal agents in this population are derived from the experience in adults. The purpose of this article was to review the published data on fungal infections and antifungal agents, with a focus on neonatal patients, and to provide an overview of the differences in antifungal pharmacology in neonates compared with adults. Pharmacokinetic data suggest dosing differences in children versus adult patients with some antifungals, but not all agents have been fully evaluated. The available pharmacokinetic data on the amphotericin B deoxycholate formulation in neonates exhibit considerable variability; nevertheless, the dosage regimen suggested in the neonatal population is similar to that used in adults. More pharmacokinetic information is available on the liposomal and lipid complex preparations of amphotericin B and fluconazole, and it supports their use in neonates; however, the optimal dosage and duration of therapy is difficult to establish. All amphotericin-B formulations, frequently used in combination with flucytosine, are useful for treating disseminated fungal infections and Candida meningitis in neonates. Fluconazole, with potent in vitro activity against Cryptococcus neoformans and almost all Candida spp., has been used in neonates with invasive candidiasis at dosages of 6 mg/kg/day, and for antifungal prophylaxis in high-risk neonates. There are limited data on itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole use in neonates. Caspofungin, which is active against Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., requires higher doses in children relative to adults, and dosing is

  7. Human mycoses and advances in antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fromtling, R A

    2001-04-01

    The 11th Focus on Fungal Infections meeting was held in Washington, D.C., U.S.A., March 1416, 2001. At the conference, there were well-attended sessions that focused on the pathogenesis and therapy of fungal disease. This report focuses on new information on fungal incidence and pathogenesis as well as on the in vitro and clinical experience of established antifungal drugs (fluconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B, liposomal formulations of amphotericin B, terbinafine) and the newer antifungal compounds approved for use (e.g., caspofungin) and in development (the new-generation azoles: voriconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and the candins, micafungin and anidulafungin).

  8. In vitro susceptibilities of Zygomycota to polyenes.

    PubMed

    Dannaoui, Eric; Meis, Jacques F G M; Mouton, Johan W; Verweij, Paul E

    2002-05-01

    The in vitro activity of polyenes was determined for 36 isolates of Zygomycota including Rhizopus spp. (15), Absidia corymbifera (10), Mucor spp. (6), Rhizomucor spp. (3), Cunninghamella bertholletiae (1) and Apophysomyces elegans (1). All isolates were tested with amphotericin B, heated amphotericin B and nystatin by a broth microdilution test. There were no significant differences between heated and unheated solutions of amphotericin B in terms of their antifungal activities. The MICs of amphotericin B for most of the strains were <2 mg/L. For all isolates, nystatin was significantly less active than amphotericin B (P < 0.001). The one C. bertholletiae and one A. elegans isolates were less susceptible to amphotericin B (MICs 2 mg/L) and were also less susceptible to nystatin.

  9. Laccase Catalyzed Synthesis of Iodinated Phenolic Compounds with Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ihssen, Julian; Schubert, Mark; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is a well known antimicrobial compound. Laccase, an oxidoreductase which couples the one electron oxidation of diverse phenolic and non-phenolic substrates to the reduction of oxygen to water, is capable of oxidizing unreactive iodide to reactive iodine. We have shown previously that laccase-iodide treatment of spruce wood results in a wash-out resistant antimicrobial surface. In this study, we investigated whether phenolic compounds such as vanillin, which resembles sub-structures of softwood lignin, can be directly iodinated by reacting with laccase and iodide, resulting in compounds with antifungal activity. HPLC-MS analysis showed that vanillin was converted to iodovanillin by laccase catalysis at an excess of potassium iodide. No conversion of vanillin occurred in the absence of enzyme. The addition of redox mediators in catalytic concentrations increased the rate of iodide oxidation ten-fold and the yield of iodovanillin by 50%. Iodinated phenolic products were also detected when o-vanillin, ethyl vanillin, acetovanillone and methyl vanillate were incubated with laccase and iodide. At an increased educt concentration of 0.1 M an almost one to one molar ratio of iodide to vanillin could be used without compromising conversion rate, and the insoluble iodovanillin product could be recovered by simple centrifugation. The novel enzymatic synthesis procedure fulfills key criteria of green chemistry. Biocatalytically produced iodovanillin and iodo-ethyl vanillin had significant growth inhibitory effects on several wood degrading fungal species. For Trametes versicolor, a species causing white rot of wood, almost complete growth inhibition and a partial biocidal effect was observed on agar plates. Enzymatic tests indicated that the iodinated compounds acted as enzyme responsive, antimicrobial materials. PMID:24594755

  10. Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri has antifungal effects on oral Candida species in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Mette Rose; Kragelund, Camilla; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Keller, Mette Kirstine; Twetman, Svante

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: An alternative approach for managing Candida infections in the oral cavity by modulating the oral microbiota with probiotic bacteria has been proposed. Objective: The aim was to investigate the antifungal potential of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289) against six oral Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis, and C. parapsilosis). Design: The lactobacilli were tested for their ability to co-aggregate with and inhibit the growth of the yeasts assessed by spectrophotometry and the agar overlay inhibition assay. Additionally, the pH was evaluated with microsensors, and the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by the lactobacilli was verified. Results: Both L. reuteri strains showed co-aggregation abilities with the yeasts. The lactobacilli almost completely inhibited the growth of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, but did not affect C. krusei. Statistically significant differences in co-aggregation and growth inhibition capacities between the two L. reuteri strains were observed (p<0.001). The pH measurements suggested that C. krusei can resist the acids produced by the lactobacilli. Conclusions: L. reuteri exhibited antifungal properties against five of the six most common oral Candida species. Further, the results reconfirms that the probiotic capacity of L. reuteri is strain specific. PMID:28326154

  11. Functional properties and antifungal activity of films based on gliadins containing cinnamaldehyde and natamycin.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Mari Pau; Fajardo, Paula; Gartner, Hunter; Gomez-Estaca, Joaquin; Gavara, Rafael; Almenar, Eva; Hernandez-Munoz, Pilar

    2014-03-03

    Gliadin films cross-linked with cinnamaldehyde (1.5, 3, and 5%) and incorporated with natamycin (0.5%) were prepared by casting, and their antifungal activity, water resistance, and barrier properties were characterized. Incorporation of natamycin gave rise to films with greater water uptake, weight loss and diameter gain, and higher water vapor and oxygen permeabilities. These results may be associated to a looser packing of the protein chains as a consequence of the presence of natamycin. The different cross-linking degree of the matrices influenced the natamycin migration to the agar test media, increasing from 13.3 to 23.7 (μg/g of film) as the percentage of cinnamaldehyde was reduced from 5% to 1.5%. Antifungal activity of films was assayed against common food spoilage fungi (Penicillium species, Alternaria solani, Colletotrichum acutatum). The greatest effectiveness was obtained for films containing natamycin and treated with 5% of cinnamaldehyde. The level of cinnamaldehyde reached in the head-space of the test assay showed a diminishing trend as a function of time, which was in agreement with fungal growth and cinnamaldehyde metabolization. Developed active films were used in the packaging of cheese slices showing promising results for their application in active packaging against food spoilage.

  12. Antifungal activity of Brazilian medicinal plants involved in popular treatment of mycoses.

    PubMed

    Cruz, M C S; Santos, P O; Barbosa, A M; de Mélo, D L F M; Alviano, C S; Antoniolli, A R; Alviano, D S; Trindade, R C

    2007-05-04

    A survey of medicinal plants used to treat common mycoses was done in the Curituba district, Sergipe State, Brazil. One hundred inhabitants were interviewed by health agents and traditional healers. Four different plants were the most cited (more than 50% of the citations): Ziziphus joazeiro, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Bumelia sartorum and Hymenea courbaril. The aqueous extracts obtained following traditional methods and using different parts of these plants, were submitted to drop agar diffusion tests for primary antimicrobial screening. Only the water infusion extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Caesalpinea pyramidalis presented a significant antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, Candida guilliermondii, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Fonsecaea pedrosoi, when compared to the antifungal agent amphotericin B. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the bioactive extracts was evaluated by the microdilution method. Best activity with a MIC of 6.5 microg/ml for both extracts was observed against Trichophyton rubrum and Candida guilliermondii. Ziziphus joazeiro and Caesalpinea pyramidalis extracts presented also low acute toxicity in murine models. The present study validates the folk use of these plant extracts and indicates that they can be effective potential candidates for the development of new strategies to treat fungal infections.

  13. 2,3-Dideoxyglucosides of selected terpene phenols and alcohols as potent antifungal compounds.

    PubMed

    James Bound, D; Murthy, Pushpa S; Srinivas, P

    2016-11-01

    The antifungal activities of novel 2,3-unsaturated and 2,3-dideoxy 1-O-glucosides of carvacrol, thymol, and perillyl alcohol were tested against Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus ochraceus, Fusarium oxysporum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. In the agar well diffusion tests, zones of inhibition for the derivatives of carvacrol, thymol and perillyl alcohol were higher (15-30mm) in the case of filamentous fungi than those for the parent compounds. Their MIC and MFC values indicated that the 2,3-unsaturated and 2,3-dideoxy 1-O-glucosides of carvacrol and thymol exhibited more fungicidal activity than the other compounds. Further, the 2,3-dideoxyglucosides of carvacrol and thymol, exhibited antitoxigenic effects against A. ochraceus and A. flavus and inhibited the production of ochratoxin and aflatoxin-B2. Propidium iodide influx assay demonstrated the lysis of C. albicans cells by carvacrol and its 2,3-unsaturated 1-O-glucoside and the loss of the membrane integrity. These new 2,3-dideoxyglucosides can be useful as antifungal agents and condiments in foods.

  14. Comparative efficacies of commonly used disinfectants and antifungal pharmaceutical spray preparations against dermatophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Ahmad, I; Summerbell, R C

    2001-08-01

    Arthroconidia from five fungal strains belonging to three Trichophyton species, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. raubitschekii and T. tonsurans, were tested against commercial chemical disinfectants and pharmaceutical antifungal agents. The chemical disinfectants included chlorine, phenol, sodium dodecyl sulphate and several quaternary ammonium salts, while the two pharmaceutical preparations contained bifonazole and terbinafine as active agents. Arthroconidia were exposed to the antifungal agent either in a suspension solution for a given period of time and assayed for kill rate, or on a sprayed agar plate and monitored for surviving colonies over a period of 14 days. Chlorine (1%) and terbinafine (0.01%) were found to be high level disinfectants bringing about a rapid inactivation of conidia in all five strains. Phenol was equally effective against T. raubitschekii and T. tonsurans; however, T. mentagrophytes cells were able to survive for up to 1 h in 5% phenol. Quaternary ammonium compounds were less rapid in their action against dermatophytes and were needed at a level of about 0.5% to be completely fungicidal. Three commercial spray formulations with a range of 0.1 to 0.3% quaternary ammonium salts were fungistatic against T. mentagrophytes strains. Bifonazole (1%) was also fungistatic in its action against T. mentagrophytes. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (0.5%) was largely ineffective against Trichophyton arthroconidia.

  15. Antifungal activity of the aqueous extract of Ilex paraguariensis against Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Filip, Rosana; Davicino, Roberto; Anesini, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Malassezia furfur is a lipodependent, dimorphic and saprophyte fungus which causes pityriasis versicolor, dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis in humans. The drugs available to treat this fungal infection are few. These drugs are highly toxic and are costly when used in prolonged treatments. For these reasons, it is necessary to find new compounds to treat these infections. Ilex paraguariensis St Hilaire is a plant that grows in Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the aqueous extract of Ilex paraguariensis on the growth of M. furfur. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was employed to identify and isolate compounds of I. paraguariensis and the agar-well diffusion method was used to assess the antifungal activity of the extract. The fungicidal/fungistatic effect was evaluated by the modified Thompson assay. The results demonstrated that the aqueous extract of Ilex paraguariensis (1000 mg/ml) possesses inhibitory activity against M. furfur. This antimalassezial activity was equivalent to 2.7 microg/ml of ketoconazole. Therefore, the topical use of Ilex paraguariensis extract as alternative antifungal agent can be suggested.

  16. Evaluation of fluorogenic TSC agar for recovering Clostridium perfringens in groundwater samples.

    PubMed

    Araujo, M; Sueiro, R A; Gómez, M J; Garrido, M J

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is widely recognised as a reliable water pollution indicator. Since several media can be employed for the membrane filtration enumeration of this microorganism, the main aim of this work was to investigate the ability of fluorocult-supplemented TSC-agar (Merck) for recovering Cl. perfringens from public springs used for direct human consumption. Cl. perfringens recovery was also performed on mCP agar (Cultimed) according to Directive 98/83 as well as on TSC-Agar (Merck), TSN-Agar (Merck) and SPS-Agar (BBL) media. Variance analysis of data obtained showed no statistically significant differences in the counts obtained among all media employed in this work. However, the Cl. perfringens recovery efficiencies with TSC and fluorogenic TSC agars were significantly greater (P = < 0.05) than the corresponding values of mCP and TSN media. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that fluorogenic TSC agar was the most specific medium for Cl. perfringens recovery in groundwater samples (85.3% of typical colonies and 82.8% of atypical colonies confirmed). In summary, the membrane filtration technique with fluorogenic TSC agar showed the best performance characteristics of all the media tested as judged by their recovery efficiency and specificity in these water samples.

  17. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-01-22

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by electrospinning technique, using water as solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operating at 50°C, to avoid agar gelation. Agar pure solution (1 wt%) showed inadequate spinnability regardless of the used electrospinning conditions. The addition of a co-blending polymer such as PVA (10 wt% starting solution) improved the solutions viscoelasticity and hence, the solutions spinnability. Agar/PVA solutions were prepared with different mass ratios (100/0, 50/50, 40/60, 30/70, 20/80 and 0/100) and electrospun at various sets of electrospinning conditions. Best nanofibers were obtained with 30/70 and 20/80 agar/PVA blends while samples with higher agar contents (50/50 and 40/60 agar/PVA) were harder to process and led to discontinuous fibrous mats. This first set of encouraging results can open a new window of opportunities for agar-based biomaterials in the form of nanofibers.

  18. Characteristics of thermoplastic sugar palm Starch/Agar blend: Thermal, tensile, and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Jumaidin, R; Sapuan, S M; Jawaid, M; Ishak, M R; Sahari, J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to study the behavior of biodegradable sugar palm starch (SPS) based thermoplastic containing agar in the range of 10-40wt%. The thermoplastics were melt-mixed and then hot pressed at 140°C for 10min. SEM investigation showed good miscibility between SPS and agar. FT-IR analysis confirmed that SPS and agar were compatible and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds existed between them. Incorporation of agar increased the thermoplastic starch tensile properties (Young's modulus and tensile strength). The thermal stability and moisture uptake increased with increasing agar content. The present work shows that starch-based thermoplastics with 30wt% agar content have the highest tensile strength. Higher content of agar (40wt%) resulted to more rough cleavage fracture and slight decrease in the tensile strength. In conclusion, the addition of agar improved the thermal and tensile properties of thermoplastic SPS which widened the potential application of this eco-friendly material. The most promising applications for this eco-friendly material are short-life products such as packaging, container, tray, etc.

  19. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by agar: effects of NaCl and ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on agar was investigated as a function of temperature (308-328 K), different concentrations of NaCl and HCl and various weight percentages of binary mixtures of ethanol with water. It was observed that the maximum experimental adsorption capacity, qm, exp, in water is up to 50 mg g-1 and decreases with increase in weight percentage of ethanol and NaCl and HCl concentration compared to that of water. Analysis of data using ARIAN model showed that MB adsorbs as monomer and dimer on the surface of agar. Binding constants of MB to agar were calculated using the Temkin isotherm. The process is exothermic in water and other solutions. The mean adsorption energy (E) value indicated binding of MB to agar is chemical adsorption. Kinetics of this interaction obeys from the pseudo-second-order model and diffusion of the MB molecules into the agar is the main rate-controlling step. PMID:22339759

  20. [Evaluation of a new medium, eggplant (Solanum melongena) agar as a screening medium for Cryptococcus neoformans in environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Sengul, Mustafa; Ergin, Cağrı; Kartal, Tuğba

    2014-04-01

    Cryptococcus neofomans is an encapsulated yeast-like fungus that causes life-threatening infections, especially in immunosuppresive patients. C.neoformans infection is believed to be acquired via inhalation of aerosolized particles from the environment. Avian guano, decaying tree hollows and soil are the related known environmental niches. Brown pigmented yeast growth from the precursors in growth media is an important step for the identification and isolation of C.neoformans. Seeds of plants in nature are preferred owing to easy accessibility and low costs for the preparation of such media. Guizotia abysinicca (Niger seed) as Staib agar, Helianthus annus (Sunflower) as Pal's medium, Brassica nigra (Mustard) agar, tobacco agar, Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean) seed agar, Perilla frutescens (Beefsteak plant) seed agar, Rubus fruticosus (Blackberry) agar and ground red hot pepper agar are pigment-based selective media for the differentiation of C.neoformans. The aim of this study was to observe the pigment production of C.neoformans in a new medium based on eggplant (Solanum melongena) and also to compare its performance with the simplified Staib, Pal's and tobacco agar for isolation from the environment. Three different eggplant-based medium (S.melongena Melanzaza viserba, S.melongena Pinstripe F1 and S.ovigerum Ivory F1) were included in the study. Pigment-forming eggplant medium, simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and tobacco agar were used for the cultivation of the environmental swabbed samples from 19 Eucalyptus camaldulensis trunk hollows in continuous colonization region. While pigment formation were observed with S.melongena Melanzaza viserba and S.melongena Pinstripe F1 containing media, S.ovigerum Ivory F1 medium was found to be non-reactive. In colonization area (Gökova-Akyaka, Turkey), 11 (57.9%) out of 19 E.camaldulensis samples were positive with simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar while 10 (52.6%) of them are positive with tobacco agar. C

  1. Antifungal Activity of Brazilian Propolis Microparticles against Yeasts Isolated from Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Dota, Kelen Fátima Dalben; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Bruschi, Marcos Luciano

    2011-01-01

    Propolis, a resinous compound produced by Apis mellifera L. bees, is known to possess a variety of biological activities and is applied in the therapy of various infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity of propolis ethanol extract (PE) and propolis microparticles (PMs) obtained from a sample of Brazilian propolis against clinical yeast isolates of importance in the vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). PE was used to prepare the microparticles. Yeast isolates (n = 89), obtained from vaginal exudates of patients with VVC, were exposed to the PE and the PMs. Moreover, the main antifungal drugs used in the treatment of VVC (Fluconazole, Voriconazole, Itraconazole, Ketoconazole, Miconazole and Amphotericin B) were also tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined according to the standard broth microdilution method. Some Candida albicans isolates showed resistance or dose-dependent susceptibility for the azolic drugs and Amphotericin B. Non-C. albicans isolates showed more resistance and dose-dependent susceptibility for the azolic drugs than C. albicans. However, all of them were sensitive or dose-dependent susceptible for Amphotericin B. All yeasts were inhibited by PE and PMs, with small variation, independent of the species of yeast. The overall results provided important information for the potential application of PMs in the therapy of VVC and the possible prevention of the occurrence of new symptomatic episodes. PMID:21607012

  2. Antianaerobic Antimicrobials: Spectrum and Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Hannah M.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria recovered from selected cases can influence the choice of antimicrobial therapy. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has standardized many laboratory procedures, including anaerobic susceptibility testing (AST), and has published documents for AST. The standardization of testing methods by the CLSI allows comparisons of resistance trends among various laboratories. Susceptibility testing should be performed on organisms recovered from sterile body sites, those that are isolated in pure culture, or those that are clinically important and have variable or unique susceptibility patterns. Organisms that should be considered for individual isolate testing include highly virulent pathogens for which susceptibility cannot be predicted, such as Bacteroides, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, and Clostridium spp.; Bilophila wadsworthia; and Sutterella wadsworthensis. This review describes the current methods for AST in research and reference laboratories. These methods include the use of agar dilution, broth microdilution, Etest, and the spiral gradient endpoint system. The antimicrobials potentially effective against anaerobic bacteria include beta-lactams, combinations of beta-lactams and beta-lactamase inhibitors, metronidazole, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, macrolides, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones. The spectrum of efficacy, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and resistance patterns against these agents are described. PMID:23824372

  3. Antifungal diterpenes from Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae).

    PubMed

    Rasoamiaranjanahary, Lalao; Marston, Andrew; Guilet, David; Schenk, Kurt; Randimbivololona, Fanantenanirainy; Hostettmann, Kurt

    2003-02-01

    Two new diterpenes, fusicoserpenol A and dolabeserpenoic acid A, with antifungal activity, were isolated from leaves of Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae). Their structures were elucidated by means of spectrometric methods including 1D and 2D NMR experiments and MS analysis. X-ray crystallographic analysis confirmed the structure of fusicoserpenol A and established the relative configuration.

  4. Lipid-based antifungal agents: current status.

    PubMed

    Arikan, S; Rex, J H

    2001-03-01

    Immunocompromised patients are well known to be predisposed to developing invasive fungal infections. These infections are usually difficult to diagnose and more importantly, the resulting mortality rate is high. The limited number of antifungal agents available and their high rate of toxicity are the major factors complicating the issue. However, the development of lipid-based formulations of existing antifungal agents has opened a new era in antifungal therapy. The best examples are the lipid-based amphotericin B preparations, amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC; Abelcet), amphotericin B colloidal dispersion (ABCD; Amphotec or Amphocil), and liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome). These formulations have shown that antifungal activity is maintained while toxicity is reduced. This progress is followed by the incorporation of nystatin into liposomes. Liposomal nystatin formulation is under development and studies of it have provided encouraging data. Finally, lipid-based formulations of hamycin, miconazole, and ketoconazole have been developed but remain experimental. Advances in technology of liposomes and other lipid formulations have provided promising new tools for management of fungal infections.

  5. Antifungal activity of ajoene derived from garlic.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, S; Kasuga, S; Hayashi, N; Ushiroguchi, T; Matsuura, H; Nakagawa, S

    1987-01-01

    The antifungal activity of six fractions derived from garlic was investigated in an in vitro system. Ajoene had the strongest activity in these fractions. The growth of both Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans was inhibited by ajoene at less than 20 micrograms/ml. Images PMID:3555334

  6. Resveratrol lacks antifungal activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Collado-González, Mar; Guirao-Abad, José P; Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2012-06-01

    The putative candicidal activity of resveratrol is currently a matter of controversy. Here, the antifungal activity as well as the antioxidant response of resveratrol against Candida albicans, have been tested in a set of strains with a well-established genetic background At the doses usually employed in antifungal tests (10-40 μg/ml), resveratrol has no effect on the exponential growth of the C. albicans CAI.4 strain, a tenfold increase (400 μg/ml) was required in order to record a certain degree of cell killing, which was negligible in comparison with the strong antifungal effect caused by the addition of amphotericin B (5 μg/ml). An identical pattern was recorded in the prototrophic strains of C. albicans SC5314 and RM-100, whereas the oxidative sensitive trehalose-deficient mutant (tps1/tps1 strain) was totally refractory to the presence of resveratrol. In turn, the serum-induced yeast-to-hypha transition remained unaffected upon addition of different concentrations of resveratrol. Determination of endogenous trehalose and catalase activity, two antioxidant markers in C. albicans; revealed no significant changes in their basal contents induced by resveratrol. Collectively, our results seem to dismiss a main antifungal role as well as the therapeutic application of resveratrol against the infections caused by C. albicans.

  7. Cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives, a novel class of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Shreaz, Sheikh; Wani, Waseem A; Behbehani, Jawad M; Raja, Vaseem; Irshad, Md; Karched, Maribasappa; Ali, Intzar; Siddiqi, Weqar A; Hun, Lee Ting

    2016-07-01

    The last few decades have seen an alarming rise in fungal infections, which currently represent a global health threat. Despite extensive research towards the development of new antifungal agents, only a limited number of antifungal drugs are available in the market. The routinely used polyene agents and many azole antifungals are associated with some common side effects such as severe hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Also, antifungal resistance continues to grow and evolve and complicate patient management, despite the introduction of new antifungal agents. This suitation requires continuous attention. Cinnamaldehyde has been reported to inhibit bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous molds via the inhibition of ATPases, cell wall biosynthesis, and alteration of membrane structure and integrity. In this regard, several novel cinnamaldehyde derivatives were synthesized with the claim of potential antifungal activities. The present article describes antifungal properties of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives against diverse classes of pathogenic fungi. This review will provide an overview of what is currently known about the primary mode of action of cinnamaldehyde. Synergistic approaches for boosting the effectiveness of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives have been highlighted. Also, a keen analysis of the pharmacologically active systems derived from cinnamaldehyde has been discussed. Finally, efforts were made to outline the future perspectives of cinnamaldehyde-based antifungal agents. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge about the antifungal properties and antifungal mode of action of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives and to identify research avenues that can facilitate implementation of cinnamaldehyde as a natural antifungal.

  8. A novel agar formulation for isolation and direct enumeration of Vibrio vulnificus from oyster tissue.

    PubMed

    Griffitt, Kimberly J; Grimes, D Jay

    2013-08-01

    A new selective and differential medium, Vibrio vulnificus X-Gal (VVX), was developed for direct enumeration of V. vulnificus (Vv) from oyster samples. This agar utilizes cellobiose and lactose as carbon sources, and the antibiotics colistin and polymyxin B as selective agents. Hydrolysis of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl- beta-d-galactopyranoside (x-gal), used in the agar as a lactose analog, produces an insoluble blue dye that makes lactose positive colonies easily distinguishable from any non-lactose fermenting bacteria. Various bacterial species were spot plated onto thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar (TCBS), and CHROMagar Vibrio, two vibrio-specific selective agars, non-selective agar, and VVX to compare selectivity of VVX to other widely used media. A V. vulnificus pure culture was serially diluted on VVX and non-selective agar to determine the VVX percent recovery. Water and oyster samples were spread plated on VVX agar and allowed to incubate for 16-18 h at 33 °C. Blue and white colonies from VVX agar were picked and screened by end point PCR for the Vv hemolysin vvhA. VVX agar showed a significant improvement over TCBS and CHROMagar at preventing non-target growth. There was an 87.5% recovery compared to non-selective plating and a 98% positivity rate of blue colonies picked from oyster tissue plating. The findings suggest that this new agar is a fast, distinctive, and accurate method for enumeration of V. vulnificus from the environment.

  9. Antifungal drug resistance pattern of Candida. spp isolated from vaginitis in Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadi, Jasem; Havasian, Mohamad Reza; Panahi, Jafar; Pakzad, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal Candidiasis is the most common and important opportunistic fungal infection in women. By increasing use of antifungal drugs in recent years, it has caused drug resistance. This study aims to evaluate antifungal drugs susceptibility of Candida. spp isolated of women with vaginitis from Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014. samples were collected and cultured from 385 women with vaginitis, then Candida.spp was diagnosed by standard method. Antifungal drug susceptibility test for nystatin 100 unit/disk, fluconazole 10µg/disk, itraconazole 10µg/disk, ketoconazole 10µg/disk, amphotericinB 20µg/disk, clotrimazole 10µg/disk, posaconazole 5µg/disk, and voriconazole 1µg/disk were carried out by M44-A method(CLSI). From all culture positive samples, 150 isolates were Candida albicans and 89 isolates were non-albicans. The resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was 76%, 62%, 72%, 55%, 6%, 7%, 1% and 0%. The highest resistance was seen for fluconazole , itraconazole, and the highest susceptible was seen for nystatin and amphotericin B. These results indicate nystatin and amphotericin B can be used as the first line for empirical therapy of vaginal candidiasis in the district. PMID:26124561

  10. Antifungal activities of the essential oils in Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. Et Perry and Leptospermum petersonii Bailey and their constituents against various dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Jin; Gwak, Ki-Seob; Yang, In; Choi, Won-Sil; Jo, Hyun-Jin; Chang, Je-Won; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, In-Gyu

    2007-10-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigate the potential of using plant oils derived from Leptospermum petersonii Bailey and Syzygium aromaticum L. Merr. Et Perry as natural antifungal agents. The antifungal effects of essential oils at concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 mg/ml on the dermatophytes Microsporum canis (KCTC 6591), Trichophyton mentagrophytes (KCTC 6077), Trichophyton rubrum (KCCM 60443), Epidermophyton floccosum (KCCM 11667), and Microsporum gypseum were evaluated using the agar diffusion method. The major constituents of the active fraction against the dermatophytes were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The antifungal activities of S. aromaticum oil (clove oil) against the dermatophytes tested were highest at a concentration of 0.2 mg/ml, with an effectiveness of more than 60%. Hyphal growth was completely inhibited in T. mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, and M. gypseum by treatment with clove oil at a concentration of 0.2 mg/ml. Eugenol was the most effective antifungal constituent of clove oil against the dermatophytes T. mentagrophytes and M. canis. Morphological changes in the hyphae of T. mentagrophytes, such as damage to the cell wall and cell membrane and the expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum, after treatment with 0.11 mg/ml eugenol were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At a concentration of 0.2 mg/ml, L. petersonii oil (LPO) was more than 90% effective against all of the dermatophytes tested, with the exception of T. rubrum. Geranial was determined to be the most active antifungal constituent of L. petersonii oil. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate that clove and tea tree oils exhibited significant antifungal activities against the dermatophytes tested in this study.

  11. Fosfomycin susceptibility of canine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates.

    PubMed

    DiCicco, Matthew; Weese, Scott; Neethirajan, Suresh; Rousseau, Joyce; Singh, Ameet

    2014-04-01

    The effectiveness of fosfomycin was examined across 31 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strains by agar dilution. Prevalence of the fosfomycin-resistance determinant gene, fosB, was assessed by PCR analysis. Results found that 84% of isolates were fosfomycin-susceptible. Interestingly, 87% of isolates possessed fosB, indicating no association between this putative staphylococci resistance gene and phenotypic resistance. Further evaluation of fosfomycin as a potential treatment of MRSP in dogs is warranted.

  12. Utility of in-house fluconazole disk diffusion susceptibility testing in the treatment of candidemia.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, David W; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Arons, Viktoria; Hollins, Randy M; Rostas, Sara E; Weiser, Linda M; Baden, Lindsey R; Marty, Francisco M; Koo, Sophia

    2016-03-01

    Among 302 first candidemia episodes, 210 (69.6%) were initially treated with an echinocandin or polyene (E/P) antifungal drug. In 137 (72.5%) patients with fluconazole-susceptible isolates, treatment was changed to fluconazole based on disk diffusion susceptibility testing. Clinical outcomes were not compromised in patients receiving E/P who were de-escalated to fluconazole for treatment of candidemia based on disk diffusion results.

  13. Utility of in-house fluconazole disk diffusion susceptibility testing in the treatment of candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Kubiak, David W.; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Arons, Viktoria; Hollins, Randy M.; Rostas, Sara E.; Weiser, Linda M.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Marty, Francisco M.; Koo, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Among 302 first candidemia episodes, 210 (69.6%) were initially treated with an echinocandin or polyene (E/P) antifungal drug. In 137 (72.5%) patients with fluconazole-susceptible isolates, treatment was changed to fluconazole based on disk diffusion susceptibility testing. Clinical outcomes were not compromised in patients receiving E/P who were de-escalated to fluconazole for treatment of candidemia based on disk diffusion results. PMID:26763713

  14. SUSCEPTIBILITY TEST FOR FUNGI: CLINICAL AND LABORATORIAL CORRELATIONS IN MEDICAL MYCOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    ALASTRUEY-IZQUIERDO, Ana; MELHEM, Marcia S.C.; BONFIETTI, Lucas X.; RODRIGUEZ-TUDELA, Juan L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY During recent decades, antifungal susceptibility testing has become standardized and nowadays has the same role of the antibacterial susceptibility testing in microbiology laboratories. American and European standards have been developed, as well as equivalent commercial systems which are more appropriate for clinical laboratories. The detection of resistant strains by means of these systems has allowed the study and understanding of the molecular basis and the mechanisms of resistance of fungal species to antifungal agents. In addition, many studies on the correlation of in vitro results with the outcome of patients have been performed, reaching the conclusion that infections caused by resistant strains have worse outcome than those caused by susceptible fungal isolates. These studies have allowed the development of interpretative breakpoints for Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., the most frequent agents of fungal infections in the world. In summary, antifungal susceptibility tests have become essential tools to guide the treatment of fungal diseases, to know the local and global disease epidemiology, and to identify resistance to antifungals. PMID:26465371

  15. Effects of antifungal agents in sap activity of Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Jesuíno, Rosália Santos Amorim; de Aquino Lemos, Janine; de Fátima Lisboa Fernandes, Orionalda; Hasimoto e Souza, Lúcia Kioko; Passos, Xisto Sena; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2010-02-01

    Some antifungal agents have shown to exert effects on expression of virulent factors of Candida as the production of secretory aspartyl proteinase (Sap). In this study, we sought to determine and to compare the influence of fluconazole and voriconazole in proteinase activity of this microorganism. Thirty-one isolates obtained from oral mucosa of human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV) patients were used in this study. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of fluconazole and voriconazole were determined using the broth microdilution method with RPMI 1640 medium and with yeast carbon base-bovine serum albumin (YCB-BSA) medium. The Sap activity following by digestion of BSA as substrate was determined for four Candida albicans strains arbitrarily chosen according to susceptibility (susceptible or resistant) to fluconazole or voriconazole. Besides, the SAP1 to SAP7 genes were screened by PCR for the same isolates that were determined by the Sap activity. In vitro susceptibility testing using the two media presented similar MIC values. Increased Sap activity was observed in resistant isolates on presence of drugs, but the Sap activity by susceptible isolates to azoles showed different behavior on the presence of drug. We detected the presence of SAP1 to SAP7 genes from all susceptible or resistant C. albicans isolates. The present study provides important data about the proteinase activity and the presence of genes of SAP family in fluconazole and voriconazole susceptible or resistant C. albicans isolates.

  16. Significance of molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility of clinically significant yeasts and moulds in a global antifungal surveillance programme.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Woosley, Leah N; Messer, Shawn A; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2012-10-01

    The increasing diversity of opportunistic fungi causing serious invasive fungal infections (IFI) has been documented. Accurate identification (ID) is important in guiding therapy, determining prognosis for IFIs and in epidemiological surveys. We assessed the utility of PCR-based methods for the ID of yeasts and moulds that either were uncommon, failed conventional ID, or represented unusual biochemical or phenotypic profiles of common species. Among 1,790 viable fungal clinical isolates received during the SENTRY Program in 2010, 322 strains from 40 study sites had ID confirmed by molecular methods. Isolates were previously identified in participant institutions. Yeasts that were not confirmed by morphology on CHROMagar, growth at 45 °C (Candida albicans/dubliniensis), or assimilation of trehalose (C. glabrata) as well as non-Candida yeasts and all moulds were amplified and sequenced using primers amplifying one or more of the following genes: ITS, 28S, β-tubulin (Aspergillus spp.), TEF (Fusarium spp.), IGS (Trichosporon spp.). The isolates selected for molecular ID included 149 isolates of Candida species, 77 of Aspergillus species, 73 non-Candida yeasts, and 23 other moulds (a total of 41 different species). Overall, the ID determined by the submitting site was confirmed for 189 isolates (58.7 %): Aspergillus spp. (64.1 % correct); Candida spp. (60.1 % correct); non-Candida yeasts (58.9 % correct); non-Aspergillus moulds (30.4 % correct). Species with high levels of concordance between conventional and molecular ID included A. fumigatus (95.0  %), C. lusitaniae (100 %), C. dubliniensis (92.3 %), C. kefyr (100 %), and C. neoformans (90.2 %). Only 50.0 % of isolates of C. albicans and 59.1 % of C. glabrata selected due to unusual phenotypic or biochemical features were found to be correctly identified by the submitting site. Molecular methods for the identification of fungal pathogens are an important adjunct to the conventional identification of many less common clinically relevant yeasts and moulds including species of Candida with unusual or erroneous phenotypic or biochemical profiles. Molecular confirmation of fungal identification is essential in epidemiological surveys such as SENTRY.

  17. Evaluation of antifungal activity in essential oil of the Syzygium aromaticum (L.) by extraction, purification and analysis of its main component eugenol.

    PubMed

    Rana, Inder Singh; Rana, Aarti Singh; Rajak, Ram Charan

    2011-10-01

    Antifungal properties of some essential oils have been well documented. Clove oil is reported to have strong antifungal activity against many fungal species. In this study we have evaluated antifungal potential of essential oil of Syzygium aromaticum (L.) against some common fungal pathogens of plants and animals namely, Fusarium moniliforme NCIM 1100, Fusarium oxysporum MTCC 284, Aspergillus sp., Mucor sp., Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum gypseum. All fungal species were found to be inhibited by the oil when tested through agar well diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for all the species. Column chromatography was performed to separate the eugenol rich fraction from clove oil. Out of seven fractions maximum activity was obtained in column fraction II. TLC and HPLC data confirmed presence of considerable Eugenol in fraction II and clove oil. Microscopic study on effect of clove oil and column fraction II on spores of Mucor sp. and M. gypseum showed distortion and shrinkage while it was absent in other column fractions. So it can be concluded that the antifungal action of clove oil is due to its high eugenol content.

  18. Synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity evaluations of novel pyrazole carboxylic and dicarboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mert, Samet; Kasımoğulları, Rahmi; İça, Tuba; Çolak, Ferdağ; Altun, Ahmet; Ok, Salim

    2014-05-06

    A series of pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid and pyrazole-3,4-dicarboxylic acid derivatives were synthesized, the structures were confirmed by their NMR ((1)H and (13)C) and FT-IR spectra, and elemental analyses. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the compounds against five bacterial and five fungal pathogens were screened using modified agar well diffusion assay. Most of the molecules have inhibitory effects on both standard and clinical Candida albicans strains. However, only the molecules 8, 10, 21, and 22 demonstrate some inhibitory effects on Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida glabrata strains. The structure-antifungal activity relationships of the compounds on the C. albicans strains were investigated by electron-conformational method. The pharmacophores and antipharmacophores responsible for the inhibition and non-inhibition of the C. albicans strains were obtained by electronic and geometrical characteristics of the reactive fragments of the molecules. These fragments along with the associated parameters can be used in designing the future more potent antifungal agents. It has been shown that both the positions of electronegative atoms like F and O in the pyrazole substituents and the amount of the associated charges on such atoms are crucial in regulating the strength of antifungal activity for the C. albicans strain.

  19. Continuous degradation of maltose: improvement in stability and catalytic properties of maltase (α-glucosidase) through immobilization using agar-agar gel as a support.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Karim, Asad; Aman, Afsheen; Marchetti, Roberta; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maltose degrading enzyme was immobilized within agar-agar support via entrapment method due to its industrial utilization. The maximum immobilization efficiency (82.77%) was achieved using 4.0% agar-agar keeping the diameter of bead up to 3.0 mm. The matrix entrapment showed maximum catalytic activity at pH 7.0 and temperature 65 °C. Substrate saturation kinetics showed that the K m of immobilized enzyme increased from 1.717 to 2.117 mM ml(-1) where as Vmax decreased from 8,411 to 7,450 U ml(-1 )min(-1) as compared to free enzyme. The immobilization significantly increased the stability of maltase against various temperatures and immobilized maltase retain 100% of its original activity after 2 h at 50 °C, whereas the free maltase only showed 60% residual activity under same condition. The reusability of entrapped maltase showed activity up to 12 cycles and retained 50% of activity even after 5th cycle. Storage stability of agar entrapped maltase retain 73% of its initial activity even after 2 months when stored at 30 °C while free enzyme showed only 37% activity at same storage conditions.

  20. In vitro comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with various susceptibilities to aminoglycosides and ten beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D H; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P

    1984-01-01

    Susceptibilities of 98 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including 33 strains with known mechanisms of amikacin resistance, were tested by the agar dilution method against 10 beta-lactam drugs. Ceftazidime, imipenem, and cefsulodin had the greatest activity, regardless of the aminoglycoside susceptibilities. The strains which were highly resistant to amikacin appeared to be less susceptible to some beta-lactam drugs, especially if their resistance was related to amikacin-inactivating enzymes; statistical significance, however, was observed for aztreonam only. PMID:6428308