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Sample records for agar disk diffusion

  1. Agar disk diffusion (Bauer-Kirby) tests with various fastidious and nonfastidious reference (ATCC) strains: comparison of several agar media.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H; Leonhard, B

    1994-01-01

    Several agar media (Mueller-Hinton agar, MHA; diagnostic sensitivity test agar, DSTA; Schaedler agar, SchA; Todd-Hewitt agar with added yeast extract, THYA; Wilkins-Chalgren agar, WCA) were compared using the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test against six nonfastidious quality control strains: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and ATCC 29213, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and ATCC 35218, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. MHA, DSTA, and THYA yielded essentially comparable inhibition zones. However, WCA and SchA antagonized cotrimoxazole and aminoglycoside antibiotics; furthermore, SchA antagonized polymyxin B, and both WCA and SchA antagonized imipenem against the P. aeruginosa strain, but not against the E. coli strains. Sheep blood-MHA (Bl-MHA), WCA, THYA, and DSTA were examined with Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 13813, and Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 6306. In comparison with Bl-MHA, both WCA and THYA yielded comparable inhibition zones against S. pyogenes; DSTA afforded suboptimal growth. DSTA yielded larger inhibition zones with the majority of antimicrobial drugs against S. agalactiae, whereas WCA and THYA enhanced the activity of oxacillin and penicillin G against this strain. S. pneumoniae strain ATCC 6306 grew well on Bl-MHA, yielded suboptimal growth on WCA and faint growth on THYA, and failed to grow on DSTA. Chocolate-supplemented sheep blood-MHA (CHOC-MHA) was compared with Haemophilus test medium (HTM), WCA with added NAD, and THYA with added hematin and NAD against Haemophilus influenzae strains ATCC 35056 and ATCC 49247. The activities of doxycycline and rifampin were enhanced against both strains by HTM, WCA+NAD, and THYA+hematin+NAD. Only WCA+NAD antagonized cotrimoxazole against both H. influenzae strains, an effect due to thymidine; however, HTM antagonized cotrimoxazole against S. aureus ATCC 25923 and E. coli ATCC 25922. It was concluded that Bl-MHA performed best for

  2. Tentative inhibition zone criteria (Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion method) for rifampin against staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H; Spohr, M; Bauer, D

    1987-01-01

    Two of 359 (0.6%) clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 of 218 (5.5%) clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci were resistant or of intermediate susceptibility against rifampin as based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints obtained with the agar dilution method: MIC greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml = resistant; MIC 0.25-1 microgram/ml = intermediate susceptible; MIC less than 0.125 microgram/ml = susceptible. The following inhibition zone criteria with 2 micrograms rifampin disks were proposed for staphylococcal isolates utilizing the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test: diameter of inhibition zones less than or equal to 13 mm = resistant; diameter 14-21 mm = intermediate susceptible; diameter greater than or equal to 22 mm = susceptible.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brazilian Clostridium difficile strains determined by agar dilution and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Edmir Geraldo; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients worldwide. While metronidazole and vancomycin are the most prescribed antibiotics for the treatment of this infection, teicoplanin, tigecycline and nitazoxanide are alternatives drugs. Knowledge on the antibiotic susceptibility profiles is a basic step to differentiate recurrence from treatment failure due to antimicrobial resistance. Because C. difficile antimicrobial susceptibility is largely unknown in Brazil, we aimed to determine the profile of C. difficile strains cultivated from stool samples of inpatients with diarrhea and a positive toxin A/B test using both agar dilution and disk diffusion methods. All 50 strains tested were sensitive to metronidazole according to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints with an MIC90 value of 2μg/mL. Nitazoxanide and tigecycline were highly active in vitro against these strains with an MIC90 value of 0.125μg/mL for both antimicrobials. The MIC90 were 4μg/mL and 2μg/mL for vancomycin and teicoplanin, respectively. A resistance rate of 8% was observed for moxifloxacin. Disk diffusion can be used as an alternative to screen for moxifloxacin resistance, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and metronidazole susceptibility, but it cannot be used for testing glycopeptides. Our results suggest that C. difficile strains from São Paulo city, Brazil, are susceptible to metronidazole and have low MIC90 values for most of the current therapeutic options available in Brazil.

  4. Inaccuracy of the disk diffusion method compared with the agar dilution method for susceptibility testing of Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Lehtopolku, Mirva; Kotilainen, Pirkko; Puukka, Pauli; Nakari, Ulla-Maija; Siitonen, Anja; Eerola, Erkki; Huovinen, Pentti; Hakanen, Antti J

    2012-01-01

    The agar dilution method has been standardized by the CLSI for the susceptibility testing of Campylobacter species, and according to these standards, the disk diffusion method should be used only in screening for macrolide and ciprofloxacin resistance. Nevertheless, the disk diffusion test is currently widely used, since it is easy to perform in clinical microbiology laboratories. In this study, the disk diffusion method was compared to the agar dilution method by analyzing the in vitro activities of seven antimicrobial agents against 174 Campylobacter strains collected in Finland between 2003 and 2008. Recommendations of the CLSI were followed using Mueller-Hinton agar plates with 5% of sheep blood. For each strain, the disk diffusion tests were performed two to four times. Of the 33 erythromycin-resistant strains (MIC, ≥16 μg/ml), 24 (73%) constantly showed a 6-mm erythromycin inhibition zone (i.e., no inhibition), while for seven strains the inhibition zone varied from 6 to 44 mm in repeated measurements. Among the 141 erythromycin-susceptible strains (MIC, <16 μg/ml), erythromycin inhibition zones varied between 6 and 61 mm. Of the 87 ciprofloxacin-resistant strains, 47 (54%) showed 6-mm inhibition zones, while 40 strains showed inhibition zones between 6 and 60 mm. Significant differences between the repetitions were observed in the disk diffusion for all antimicrobial agents and all strains except for the macrolide-resistant strains regarding the macrolides. For 17 (10%) strains, the variation in repeated measurements was substantial. These results show that the disk diffusion method may not be a reliable tool for the susceptibility testing of Campylobacter spp. Further studies are needed to assess whether the disk diffusion test could be improved or whether all susceptibilities of campylobacters should be tested using an MIC-based method.

  5. Josamycin: interpretation of inhibition zones with the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test as compared with erythromycin.

    PubMed

    Karthein, J; Spohr, M; Traub, W H

    1986-01-01

    A total of 432 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (128), coagulase-negative staphylococci (123), group A and B beta-hemolytic streptococci (61), group D streptococci (30), Streptococcus penumoniae (29), Haemophilus influenzae (19), Haemophilus parainfluenzae (12), and Legionella pneumophila (30) were examined with the agar dilution and Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion tests for susceptibility to josamycin as compared with erythromycin. On a weight-for-weight basis, erythromycin was more active than josamycin against all bacterial species, including L. pneumophila. Josamycin inhibited 18 of 23 S. aureus and 11 of 16 coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains resistant to erythromycin. Utilizing minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) breakpoints of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml (sensitive), 4 microgram/ml (intermediate) and of greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml (resistant), and inhibition zone criteria of greater than or equal to 18 mm diameter (sensitive), 14-17 mm (intermediate), and less than or equal to 13 mm (resistant), and excluding L. pneumophila, there was good correlation between erythromycin MIC and corresponding disk diffusion data for staphylococci and streptococci, but not for Haemophilus species. In comparison, josamycin yielded a significant number of minor discrepant data for group D streptococci and Haemophilus species. It is suggested that erythromycin and josamycin should not be tested against Haemophilus species, and that josamycin should be excluded from test batteries against enterococci. Erythromycin-resistant staphylococci require separate testing with josamycin.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori isolates from Brazilian children and adolescents: comparing agar dilution, E-test, and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Silvio Kazuo; Gales, Ana Cristina; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori is increasingly important due to resistance to the most used antimicrobials agents. Only agar dilution method is approved by CLSI, but it is difficult to perform routinely. We evaluated the reliability of E-test and disk diffusion comparing to agar dilution method on Helicobacter pylori antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, furazolidone, metronidazole and tetracycline using E-test, disk-diffusion and agar dilution method in 77 consecutive Helicobacter pylori strains from dyspeptic children and adolescents. Resistance rates were: amoxicillin - 10.4%, 9% and 68.8%; clarithromycin - 19.5%, 20.8%, 36.3%; metronidazole - 40.2%33.7%, 38.9%, respectively by agar dilution, E-test and disk diffusion method. Furazolidone and tetracycline showed no resistance rates. Metronidazole presented strong correlation to E-test (r = 0.7992, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.6962, p < 0.0001). Clarithromycin presented moderate correlation to E-test (r = 0.6369, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.5656, p < 0.0001). Amoxicillin presented weak correlation to E-test (r = 0.3565, p = 0.0015) and disk diffusion (r=-0.3565, p = 0.0015). Tetracycline presented weak correlation with E-test (r = 0.2346, p = 0.04) and furazolidone to disk diffusion (r=-0.0288, p = 0.8038). E-test presented better agreement with gold standard. It is an easy and reliable method for Helicobacter pylori susceptibility testing. Disk diffusion method presented high disagreement and high rates of major errors.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy assessment of Sensititre and agar disk diffusion for determining antimicrobial resistance profiles of bovine clinical mastitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Saini, V; Riekerink, R G M Olde; McClure, J T; Barkema, H W

    2011-04-01

    Determining the accuracy and precision of a measuring instrument is pertinent in antimicrobial susceptibility testing. This study was conducted to predict the diagnostic accuracy of the Sensititre MIC mastitis panel (Sensititre) and agar disk diffusion (ADD) method with reference to the manual broth microdilution test method for antimicrobial resistance profiling of Escherichia coli (n = 156), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 154), streptococcal (n = 116), and enterococcal (n = 31) bovine clinical mastitis isolates. The activities of ampicillin, ceftiofur, cephalothin, erythromycin, oxacillin, penicillin, the penicillin-novobiocin combination, pirlimycin, and tetracycline were tested against the isolates. Diagnostic accuracy was determined by estimating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve; intertest essential and categorical agreements were determined as well. Sensititre and the ADD method demonstrated moderate to highly accurate (71 to 99%) and moderate to perfect (71 to 100%) predictive accuracies for 74 and 76% of the isolate-antimicrobial MIC combinations, respectively. However, the diagnostic accuracy was low for S. aureus-ceftiofur/oxacillin combinations and other streptococcus-ampicillin combinations by either testing method. Essential agreement between Sensititre automatic MIC readings and MIC readings obtained by the broth microdilution test method was 87%. Essential agreement between Sensititre automatic and manual MIC reading methods was 97%. Furthermore, the ADD test method and Sensititre MIC method exhibited 92 and 91% categorical agreement (sensitive, intermediate, resistant) of results, respectively, compared with the reference method. However, both methods demonstrated lower agreement for E. coli-ampicillin/cephalothin combinations than for Gram-positive isolates. In conclusion, the Sensititre and ADD methods had moderate to high diagnostic accuracy and very good essential and categorical agreement for most udder pathogen

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility of Stenotrophomonas (Xanthomonas) maltophilia: comparative (NCCLS criteria) evaluation of antimicrobial drugs with the agar dilution and the agar disk diffusion (Bauer-Kirby) tests.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H; Leonhard, B; Bauer, D

    1998-01-01

    Ninety-six clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were examined with the agar dilution method for susceptibility to 19 antimicrobial drugs. Doxycycline, cotrimoxazole, timentin, ofloxacin, fosfomycin, and piperacillin + tazobactam, in that order, inhibited the majority of strains. All isolates were resistant to nitrofurantoin. Concurrent disk susceptibility (Bauer-Kirby method) testing, using currently valid NCCLS interpretative criteria for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uncovered a significant incidence of very major (category I), major (category II), and minor (categories III and IV) discrepancies for aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, and piperacillin + tazobactam and ticarcillin + clavulanic acid. Therefore, new interpretative criteria indicative of intermediate (I) susceptibility of S. maltophilia to these various antibiotics were proposed. In addition, new intermediate susceptibility criteria were proposed for the two beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. It was recommended to exclude ciprofloxacin from test batteries against this microorganism due to the wide scatter of minimal inhibitory concentration values and diameters of inhibition zones; the same was true for polymyxin B. It is hoped that the proposed modified, species-specific criteria will improve the clinical utility of laboratory-generated disk antibiograms with respect to the inherently multiple antibiotic-resistant, opportunistic pathogen S. maltophilia.

  9. In vitro susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates: Comparison of disk diffusion, Etest®, agar dilution, and broth microdilution methods.

    PubMed

    Fehlberg, Lorena Cristina Corrêa; Nicoletti, Adriana Gianinni; Ramos, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; de Matos, Adriana Pereira; Girardello, Raquel; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Broth microdilution, agar dilution, Etest® and disk diffusion techniques were compared to evaluate the susceptibility profile of 82 Bcc clinical isolates against six antimicrobials as recommended by CLSI. Broth microdilution was considered the "gold standard" method. The regression analysis was applied to determine the essential (EA) and categorical (CA) agreement rates. STX (MIC50, 1 mg/L) was the most potent antimicrobial tested against Bcc isolates. The worst in vitro activity was observed for chloramphenicol (MIC50, 16 mg/L) and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (MIC50, >256 mg/L). The EA among broth microdilution and agar dilution results was good for the majority of antimicrobial tested. When comparing broth microdilution and Etest®, ceftazidime, SXT and chloramphenicol exhibited EA rates below 90%. SXT showed an excellent CA (100%) when dilution methodologies were compared. However, a low CA rate was found for this agent between dilution and disk diffusion methodologies resulting in unacceptable very major and minor error rates.

  10. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Flavobacterium psychrophilum from Chilean Salmon Farms and Their Epidemiological Cut-Off Values Using Agar Dilution and Disk Diffusion Methods

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Claudio D.; Smith, Peter; Rojas, Rodrigo; Contreras-Lynch, Sergio; Vega, J. M. Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the most important bacterial pathogen for freshwater farmed salmonids in Chile. The aims of this study were to determine the susceptibility to antimicrobials used in fish farming of Chilean isolates and to calculate their epidemiological cut-off (COWT) values. A number of 125 Chilean isolates of F. psychrophilum were isolated from reared salmonids presenting clinical symptoms indicative of flavobacteriosis and their identities were confirmed by 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction. Susceptibility to antibacterials was tested on diluted Mueller-Hinton by using an agar dilution MIC method and a disk diffusion method. The COWT values calculated by Normalized Resistance Interpretation (NRI) analysis allow isolates to be categorized either as wild-type fully susceptible (WT) or as manifesting reduced susceptibility (NWT). When MIC data was used, NRI analysis calculated a COWT of ≤0.125, ≤2, and ≤0.5 μg mL-1 for amoxicillin, florfenicol, and oxytetracycline, respectively. For the quinolones, the COWT were ≤1, ≤0.5, and ≤0.125 μg mL-1 for oxolinic acid, flumequine, and enrofloxacin, respectively. The disk diffusion data sets obtained in this work were extremely diverse and were spread over a wide range. For the quinolones there was a close agreement between the frequencies of NWT isolates calculated using MIC and disk data. For oxolinic acid, flumequine, and enrofloxacin the frequencies were 45, 39, and 38% using MIC data, and 42, 41, and 44%, when disk data were used. There was less agreement with the other antimicrobials, because NWT frequencies obtained using MIC and disk data, respectively, were 24 and 10% for amoxicillin, 8 and 2% for florfenicol, and 70 and 64% for oxytetracycline. Considering that the MIC data was more precise than the disk diffusion data, MIC determination would be the preferred method for susceptibility testing for this species and the NWT frequencies derived from the MIC data sets should be considered

  11. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Flavobacterium psychrophilum from Chilean Salmon Farms and Their Epidemiological Cut-Off Values Using Agar Dilution and Disk Diffusion Methods.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Claudio D; Smith, Peter; Rojas, Rodrigo; Contreras-Lynch, Sergio; Vega, J M Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the most important bacterial pathogen for freshwater farmed salmonids in Chile. The aims of this study were to determine the susceptibility to antimicrobials used in fish farming of Chilean isolates and to calculate their epidemiological cut-off (COWT) values. A number of 125 Chilean isolates of F. psychrophilum were isolated from reared salmonids presenting clinical symptoms indicative of flavobacteriosis and their identities were confirmed by 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction. Susceptibility to antibacterials was tested on diluted Mueller-Hinton by using an agar dilution MIC method and a disk diffusion method. The COWT values calculated by Normalized Resistance Interpretation (NRI) analysis allow isolates to be categorized either as wild-type fully susceptible (WT) or as manifesting reduced susceptibility (NWT). When MIC data was used, NRI analysis calculated a COWT of ≤0.125, ≤2, and ≤0.5 μg mL(-1) for amoxicillin, florfenicol, and oxytetracycline, respectively. For the quinolones, the COWT were ≤1, ≤0.5, and ≤0.125 μg mL(-1) for oxolinic acid, flumequine, and enrofloxacin, respectively. The disk diffusion data sets obtained in this work were extremely diverse and were spread over a wide range. For the quinolones there was a close agreement between the frequencies of NWT isolates calculated using MIC and disk data. For oxolinic acid, flumequine, and enrofloxacin the frequencies were 45, 39, and 38% using MIC data, and 42, 41, and 44%, when disk data were used. There was less agreement with the other antimicrobials, because NWT frequencies obtained using MIC and disk data, respectively, were 24 and 10% for amoxicillin, 8 and 2% for florfenicol, and 70 and 64% for oxytetracycline. Considering that the MIC data was more precise than the disk diffusion data, MIC determination would be the preferred method for susceptibility testing for this species and the NWT frequencies derived from the MIC data sets should be

  12. Oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus saprophyticus using disk diffusion, agar dilution, broth microdilution, and the Vitek GPS-105 card.

    PubMed

    Ramotar, K; Woods, W; Toye, B

    2001-08-01

    Eighty-three mecA negative isolates of S. saprophyticus had oxacillin zone diameters agar dilution, broth microdilution, or the Vitek GPS-105 card. Greater than 90% of these isolates would be considered resistant using NCCLS M7-A5, M100-S10 criteria. These results suggest that the current NCCLS MIC and zone diameter breakpoints for oxacillin resistance in coagulase-negative Staphylococci are not appropriate for S. saprophyticus as they do not correlate with the presence of the mecA gene.

  13. A comparison of serial plate agar dilution, Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion, and the Vitek AutoMicrobic system for the determination of susceptibilities of Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ten antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Fekete, T; Tumah, H; Woodwell, J; Truant, A; Satishchandran, V; Axelrod, P; Kreter, B

    1994-04-01

    The use of rapid, automated technologies for assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility and determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations has been evolving for over a decade. We compared the Vitek AutoMicrobic system and Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards methods of serial plate agar dilution for qualitative and quantitative susceptibilities of 301 hospital isolates of Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antibiotics tested were aztreonam, cefoperazone, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, piperacillin, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, and tobramycin. Agar dilution and Bauer-Kirby results were more strongly correlated for all three genera than were the results for agar dilution and Vitek. If agar dilution is presumed to be the "gold standard," Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion had only half the number of false susceptibles as did the Vitek. Thus, the Vitek AutoMicrobic system seems to be somewhat less reliable for both qualitative and quantitative measurement of susceptibility and resistance than is Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion.

  14. Diffusion Disk Susceptibility Testing with Cefaclor

    PubMed Central

    Shadomy, Smith; Carver, Melinda

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of the standardized 30-μg cephalothin disk and that of an experimental 30-μg cefaclor disk in predicting probable clinical susceptibility to cefaclor were compared. Quantitative determinations of cefaclor susceptibility were measured by the World Health Organization International Collaborative Study agar dilution procedure; diffusion disk tests were performed by the standardized U.S. Food and Drug Administration disk test. The cephalothin disk erred in predicting probable susceptibility in 52% of isolates of Enterococcus spp. resistant to 16 μg or less of cefaclor per ml; the cefaclor disk did not. The cephalothin disk erred in correctly predicting susceptibility in only 20% of cefaclor-susceptible isolates of Enterobacter spp.; the cefaclor disk correctly predicted susceptibility for 70%. These results indicate the need for further evaluation of a separate cefaclor disk for use in susceptibility testing with this new cephalosporin. PMID:646345

  15. Performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method, the CLSI agar screen method, and the Vitek 2 automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing system for detection of clinical isolates of Enterococci with low- and medium-level VanB-type vancomycin resistance: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Kristin; Giske, Christian G; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Matuschek, Erika; Schønning, Kristian; Leegaard, Truls M; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn

    2014-05-01

    Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect low-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci were evaluated in a Scandinavian multicenter study (n=28). A phenotypically and genotypically well-characterized diverse collection of Enterococcus faecalis (n=12) and Enterococcus faecium (n=18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n=5), Norwegian (n=13), and Swedish (n=10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n=28) and the CLSI agar screen (n=18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n=5). The EUCAST disk diffusion method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P=0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME rate, 0%; specificity, 1). The performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method was challenged by differences in vancomycin inhibition zone sizes as well as the experience of the personnel in interpreting fuzzy zone edges as an indication of vancomycin resistance. Laboratories using Oxoid agar (P<0.0001) or Merck Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar (P=0.027) for the disk diffusion assay performed significantly better than did laboratories using BBL MH II medium. Laboratories using Difco brain heart infusion (BHI) agar for the CLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P=0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI agar. In conclusion, both the EUCAST disk diffusion and CLSI agar screening methods performed acceptably (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.94 to 0.98) in the detection of VanB-type vancomycin-resistant enterococci with low-level resistance. Importantly, use of the CLSI agar screen requires careful monitoring of the vancomycin concentration in the plates. Moreover, disk diffusion methodology requires that personnel be trained in interpreting zone edges.

  16. Metronidazole susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori: comparison of disk, broth, and agar dilution methods and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    DeCross, A J; Marshall, B J; McCallum, R W; Hoffman, S R; Barrett, L J; Guerrant, R L

    1993-01-01

    Since the methods for metronidazole susceptibility testing of Helicobacter pylori have not been standardized or validated, we compared three methods that are used to test the metronidazole susceptibilities of 25 isolates of H. pylori. Specifically, we examined the methods of Steer's replicator agar dilution, tube broth microdilution, and modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion. The metronidazole disk zone sizes obtained by the disk diffusion method correlated well (r = 0.74) with the MICs obtained by the agar dilution method. Afterward, the disk diffusion method was used to characterize the metronidazole susceptibilities of 44 isolates of H. pylori. Dual therapy (bismuth and metronidazole) proved to be highly effective against metronidazole-susceptible strains (81.6% eradication rate) but fared poorly against resistant strains (16.7% eradication rate; P < 0.01). Using agar dilution testing, we validated the modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method for metronidazole susceptibility testing of H. pylori and conclude that it is practical, accurate, and clinically applicable. PMID:8370723

  17. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-09-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (T c) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at T c was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL(-1), and T c was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R (2) = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii.

  18. A comparison of antibiotic disks from different sources on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar media in evaluation of antibacterial susceptibility testing

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Neda; Salmanzadeh-Ahrabi, Siavosh; Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Rezaei-Hemami, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Antibacterial susceptibility testing of clinical bacterial isolates through disk diffusion method plays a major role in antibacterial treatment. One of the main factors affecting the result of these tests is the type, structure and quality of the disks. The main objective of this study was to compare the agreement of antibiotic disks originated from three companies on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar. Materials and Methods: Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar media were used in disk diffusion method. Seventy clinical isolates from Enterobacteriaceae family (21 Klebsiella spp., 36 Escherichia coli, 1 Enterobacter spp. and 12 Shigella spp.) were investigated in the study. After obtaining data, the results were interpreted as resistant, sensitive or intermediate. Kappa coefficient measured the agreement of two media. Coefficient of variation (CV) was also calculated for antibiotic disks. Results: The kappa agreement values for three types of antibiotic disks on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar plates were good or excellent for all the examined antibiotics. CV values were also very satisfactory in the majority of cases. Conclusion: Antibiotic disks from three manufacturers can successfully be used on both Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar plates. PMID:28149489

  19. Validation of a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method for metronidazole susceptibility testing of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Midolo, P D; Turnidge, J; Lambert, J R; Bell, J M

    1995-03-01

    Triple antimicrobial therapy that includes metronidazole has been recommended as a first-line therapy for Helicobacter pylori because it has the highest eradication rates. However, resistance in H. pylori to metronidazole has been reported worldwide and its presence may reduce the efficacy of triple therapy. Various methods for testing H. pylori against metronidazole have been used including agar dilution, disk diffusion and the Etest but there has been little standardization of methods. One hundred isolates of H. pylori from different patients were tested for susceptibility to metronidazole by agar dilution, Etest and disk diffusion (5 micrograms disk). The agar dilution results confirmed the MIC susceptibility breakpoint to be < or = 8 micrograms/ml. Using this breakpoint there was close agreement (98%) between Etest and agar dilution results. For susceptible strains, MICs by E-test were generally one twofold dilution lower. Using the error-rate bounded method, agreement between disk diffusion zone diameter and MIC was 98% for agar dilution with breakpoints of > or = 12 mm and < or = 8 micrograms/ml and 100% for Etest with breakpoints of > or = 12 mm and < or = 8 micrograms/ml. The Etest discriminated better than agar dilution between susceptible and resistant strains and was simple to perform. The disk diffusion test is a reliable and cheaper alternative to the Etest with susceptibility being a zone diameter > or = 12 mm with a 5 micrograms disk. The prevalence of metronidazole resistance in this study was 40% by Etest.

  20. Disk Diffusion Testing Using Candida sp. Colonies Taken Directly from CHROMagar Candida Medium May Decrease Time Required To Obtain Results

    PubMed Central

    Klevay, Michael; Ebinger, Alex; Diekema, Daniel; Messer, Shawn; Hollis, Richard; Pfaller, Michael

    2005-01-01

    We compared results of disk diffusion antifungal susceptibility testing from Candida sp. strains passaged on CHROMagar and on potato dextrose agar. The overall categorical agreements for fluconazole and voriconazole disk testing were 95% and 98% with 0% and 0.5% very major errors, respectively. Disk diffusion testing by the CLSI (formerly NCCLS) M44-A method can be performed accurately by taking inocula directly from CHROMagar. PMID:16000489

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Disk Diffusion with Microdilution Assay in Susceptibility Testing of Caspofungin against Aspergillus and Fusarium Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Arikan, Sevtap; Paetznick, Victor; Rex, John H.

    2002-01-01

    We compared the disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods for susceptibility testing of caspofungin against Aspergillus (n = 78) and Fusarium (n = 22) isolates. Microdilution testing followed the NCCLS M-38P guidelines but was performed in antibiotic medium 3 supplemented to 2% glucose (AM3). Disk diffusion assays were performed on AM3 agar plates with a 2-μg caspofungin disk. By both methods, caspofungin showed favorable activity against Aspergillus isolates and no activity against Fusarium isolates. In the disk-based format, intrazonal growth that was not influenced by the drug concentration gradient was consistently observed for all of the Aspergillus isolates tested. PMID:12183278

  2. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of chelating agents using the agar diffusion method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of 2 metal chelators. Concentrations of 0 to 40 mM of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediamine-N,N’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) were prepared in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The pH of the solutions was adjusted to 1...

  3. Simulation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate by diffusion-reaction based continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaoling; Nie, Kai; Li, Mingpeng; Sun, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Various species of bacteria form highly organized spatially-structured aggregates known as biofilms. To understand how microenvironments impact biofilm growth dynamics, we propose a diffusion-reaction continuum model to simulate the formation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar plate. The extended finite element method combined with level set method are employed to perform the simulation, numerical results show the quantitative relationship between colony morphologies and nutrient depletion over time. Considering that the production of polysaccharide in wild-type cells may enhance biofilm spreading on the agar plate, we inoculate mutant colony incapable of producing polysaccharide to verify our results. Predictions of the glutamate source biofilm’s shape parameters agree with the experimental mutant colony better than that of glycerol source biofilm, suggesting that glutamate is rate limiting nutrient for Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate, and the diffusion-limited is a better description to the experiment. In addition, we find that the diffusion time scale is of the same magnitude as growth process, and the common-employed quasi-steady approximation is not applicable here.

  4. Evaluation of a cefoxitin disk diffusion test for the detection of mecA-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Higashide, Masato; Kuroda, Makoto; Ohkawa, Saburo; Ohta, Toshiko

    2006-06-01

    In order to validate the current Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria for the detection of mecA-mediated resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus, 101 clinical isolates, including 8 mecA-positive isolates, were investigated. All the isolates were in the range of the resistant category for coagulase-negative staphylococci with the 1 microg oxacillin disk diffusion method and agar dilution method, despite 93 isolates (92%) being mecA-negative. On the other hand, the 30 microg cefoxitin disk diffusion method showed clearly distinguishable zone diameters between the mecA-positive and -negative isolates. However, four of the mecA-negative isolates that would be considered resistant were false positive, and the current interpretive criteria of the CLSI may thus require reconsideration. This study suggests that the cefoxitin disk diffusion method could be more suitable than the oxacillin disk diffusion method for detecting mecA-mediated resistance in S. saprophyticus.

  5. Evaluation of disk diffusion and Etest compared to broth microdilution for antifungal susceptibility testing of posaconazole against clinical isolates of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Messer, Shawn A; Diekema, Daniel J; Hollis, Richard J; Boyken, Linda B; Tendolkar, Shailesh; Kroeger, Jennifer; Pfaller, Michael A

    2007-04-01

    We performed Etest, disk diffusion, and broth microdilution susceptibility testing of posaconazole against 146 clinical isolates of filamentous fungi. By using provisional breakpoints for comparison purposes only, categorical agreement between the results of the agar-based methods and those of broth microdilution were 96 to 98%, with no very major errors. These agar-based methods hold promise as simple and reliable methods for determining the posaconazole susceptibilities of filamentous fungi.

  6. Control of Drug Diffusion Behavior of Xanthan and Locust Bean Gum Gel by Agar Gel.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Yoshihiro; Kakino, Yukari; Tsukamoto, Hoshi; Tahara, Kohei; Onodera, Risako; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Oral gel formulations are known as easy to administer drug products for patients who have problems taking drugs including those with conditions such as dysphagia. In addition, there are numerous commercially available oral gel products, most of which are immediate-release formulation that release their pharmaceutical ingredient content by diffusion. This study is focused on developing oral gel formulations that reduce the dosing frequency and dosage compared to the conventional types. This is with the aim of facilitating the use of gel formulations for producing pharmaceutical agents with different dose regimens, thereby enhancing patient convenience. Here, we used naturally derived high-molecular-weight agar (Ag), xanthan gum (Xa), and locust bean gum (Lo) as gel bases to prepare a variety of gel membranes, and evaluated the diffusion coefficient of the model substances. The result revealed that the Ag content in the Xa-Lo combination gel concentration-dependently increased the diffusion coefficient. Moreover, these findings were applied in an attempt to mask the taste of intensely bitter levofloxacin. The results indicated that the Xa-Lo combination gel exhibited a significantly superior masking effect to that of the Ag gel. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using oral gel formulations to modulate the controlled-release functionality of pharmaceutical agents.

  7. SELF-GRAVITY, RESONANCES AND ORBITAL DIFFUSION IN STELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Fouvry, Jean-Baptiste; Pichon, Christophe; Binney, James

    2015-06-10

    Fluctuations in a stellar system's gravitational field cause the orbits of stars to evolve. The resulting evolution of the system can be computed with the orbit-averaged Fokker–Planck equation once the diffusion tensor is known. We present the formalism that enables one to compute the diffusion tensor from a given source of noise in the gravitational field when the system's dynamical response to that noise is included. In the case of a cool stellar disk we are able to reduce the computation of the diffusion tensor to a one-dimensional integral. We implement this formula for a tapered Mestel disk that is exposed to shot noise and find that we are able to explain analytically the principal features of a numerical simulation of such a disk. In particular the formation of narrow ridges of enhanced density in action space is recovered. As the disk's value of Toomre's Q is reduced and the disk becomes more responsive, there is a transition from a regime of heating in the inner regions of the disk through the inner Lindblad resonance to one of radial migration of near-circular orbits via the corotation resonance in the intermediate regions of the disk. The formalism developed here provides the ideal framework in which to study the long-term evolution of all kinds of stellar disks.

  8. Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing of members of the family Legionellaceae including erythromycin-resistant variants of Legionella micdadei.

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, J N; McDevitt, D A; Pasculle, A W

    1984-01-01

    Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing of members of the family Legionellaceae was accomplished on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar by allowing the bacteria to grow for 6 h before placement of the disks, followed by an additional 42-h incubation period before the inhibitory zones were measured. This system was standardized by comparing the zone sizes with the MICs for 20 antimicrobial agents of nine bacterial strains in five Legionella species and of 19 laboratory-derived, erythromycin-resistant variants of Legionella micdadei. A high, linear correlation between zone size and MIC was found for erythromycin, trimethoprim, penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, cefamandole, cefoxitin, moxalactam, chloramphenicol, vancomycin, and clindamycin. Disk susceptibility testing could be employed to screen Legionella isolates for resistance to any of these antimicrobial agents, of which only erythromycin is known to be efficacious in the treatment of legionellosis. With selected antibiotics, disk susceptibility patterns also appeared to accurately identify to the species level the legionellae. The range of the MICs of the legionellae for rifampin and the aminoglycosides was too small to determine whether the correlation of zone size with MIC was linear. However, laboratory-derived, high-level rifampin-resistant variants of L. micdadei demonstrated no inhibition zone around the rifampin disk, indicating that disk susceptibility testing would likely identify a rifampin-resistant clinical isolate. Of the antimicrobial agents tested, the only agents for which disk susceptibility testing was definitely not possible on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar were oxacillin, the tetracyclines, and the sulfonamides. PMID:6565706

  9. Interpretation of the Disk Diffusion Susceptibility Test for Amikacin: Report of a Collaborative Study

    PubMed Central

    Washington, John A.; Yu, Pauline K. W.; Gavan, Thomas L.; Schoenknecht, Fritz D.; Thornsberry, Clyde

    1979-01-01

    Because excessively high rates of false resistance have been encountered with the 10-μg amikacin disk in diffusion susceptibility tests, a study was performed to examine existing zone diameter interpretative criteria and to compare the accuracy of 10- and 30-μg amikacin disks by the error rate-bounded classification scheme. Although current zone diameter interpretative criteria eliminate false susceptibles, there is an unacceptably high rate of false resistants. This problem can be resolved in most instances by revising the zone diameter interpretative criteria for the 10-μg disk (resistant, ≤9 mm; indeterminate, 10 to 11 mm; susceptible, ≥12 mm) or, preferably, by replacing the 10-μg disk with a 30-μg disk and adopting new interpretative criteria (resistant, ≤14 mm; indeterminate, 15 to 16 mm; susceptible, ≥17 mm). Because of significant differences in performance among media, it is necessary to include Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 among controls routinely tested and to exclude from use lots of Mueller-Hinton agar yielding results outside the 75% tolerance (90% confidence) limits for amikacin. PMID:464567

  10. Infrared thermography analysis of thermal diffusion induced by RF magnetic field on agar phantoms loaded with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, Jose; Macías, J. D.; Caballero-Aguilar, L.; Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several treatments for fighting malignant tumors have been designed. However these procedures have well known inconveniences, depending on their applicability, tumor size and side effects, among others. Magnetic hyperthermia is a safe, non-invasive method for cancer therapy. This treatment is applied via elevation of target tissue temperature by dissipation of heat from Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs), previously located within the tumor. The induction of heat causes cell death and therefore the removal of the tumor. In this work the thermal diffusion in phantoms of agar loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied using the infrared thermography technique, which is widely used in biology/medicine (e.g. skin temperature mapping). Agar is one of the materials used to simulate different types of body tissues, these samples are known as "phantoms". Agar is of natural origin, low cost and high degree of biocompatibility. In this work the agar gel was embedded with MNPs by coprecipitation and placed in an alternating magnetic field radiation. As a consequence, the energy from the radiation source is dissipated as heat and then transferred from the MNP to the gel, increasing its temperature. For the temperature analysis, the samples of agar gel were stimulated by RF magnetic field generated by coils. Heating was measured with infrared thermography using a Thermovision A20M infrared camera. Thermographic images allowed obtaining the dependence of thermal diffusion in the phantom as a function of the magnitude of the applied RF magnetic field and the load of magnetic particles.

  11. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM MAGNETICALLY DIFFUSIVE ACCRETION DISKS. I. EJECTION EFFICIENCY VERSUS FIELD STRENGTH AND DIFFUSIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikhnezami, Somayeh; Fendt, Christian; Porth, Oliver; Vaidya, Bhargav; Ghanbari, Jamshid E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the launching of jets and outflows from magnetically diffusive accretion disks. Using the PLUTO code, we solve the time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations taking into account the disk and jet evolution simultaneously. The main question we address is which kind of disks launch jets and which kind of disks do not? In particular, we study how the magnitude and distribution of the (turbulent) magnetic diffusivity affect mass loading and jet acceleration. We apply a turbulent magnetic diffusivity based on {alpha}-prescription, but also investigate examples where the scale height of diffusivity is larger than that of the disk gas pressure. We further investigate how the ejection efficiency is governed by the magnetic field strength. Our simulations last for up to 5000 dynamical timescales corresponding to 900 orbital periods of the inner disk. As a general result, we observe a continuous and robust outflow launched from the inner part of the disk, expanding into a collimated jet of superfast-magnetosonic speed. For long timescales, the disk's internal dynamics change, as due to outflow ejection and disk accretion the disk mass decreases. For magnetocentrifugally driven jets, we find that for (1) less diffusive disks, (2) a stronger magnetic field, (3) a low poloidal diffusivity, or (4) a lower numerical diffusivity (resolution), the mass loading of the outflow is increased-resulting in more powerful jets with high-mass flux. For weak magnetization, the (weak) outflow is driven by the magnetic pressure gradient. We consider in detail the advection and diffusion of magnetic flux within the disk and we find that the disk and outflow magnetization may substantially change in time. This may have severe impact on the launching and formation process-an initially highly magnetized disk may evolve into a disk of weak magnetization which cannot drive strong outflows. We further investigate the jet asymptotic velocity and the jet rotational velocity in

  12. Criteria for the interpretation of the pipemidic acid agar diffusion test by the Kirby-Bauer method.

    PubMed

    Grimm, H

    1983-01-01

    The antibiotic sensitivity of 296 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 294 isolates of other species was measured by the agar diffusion test with 20 micrograms pipemidic acid (Deblaston) discs on Mueller-Hinton agar by the Kirby-Bauer method. The correlation between inhibition zone diameter and minimal inhibitory concentration was worked out by regression analysis. In all bacterial species investigated, an inhibition zone of 14 mm or more indicates sensitivity to pipemidic acid. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa an intermediate zone of 11 to 13 mm is recommended.

  13. Multilaboratory evaluation of disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria meningitidis isolates.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, James H; Crawford, Sharon A; Fulcher, Letitia C; Glennen, Anita; Harrington, Susan M; Swenson, Jana; Lynfield, Ruth; Murray, Patrick R; Tenover, Fred C

    2006-05-01

    In 2005, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute published MIC interpretive criteria for 13 antimicrobial agents used for either therapy or prophylaxis of Neisseria meningitidis infections. The MIC method includes the use of lysed horse blood-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth with incubation in 5% CO2 for 20 to 24 h. Since some clinical laboratories might prefer the option of disk diffusion testing for infrequently encountered isolates a multicenter collaborative study was conducted to evaluate the reproducibility of a disk diffusion method for testing isolates of N. meningitidis. Interpretive criteria were developed for 12 antimicrobial agents. Four laboratories tested a common collection of 50 meningococcal strains and then tested 25 unique isolates per laboratory. Isolates were tested using Mueller-Hinton sheep blood agar plates incubated for 20 to 24 h in 5% CO2; they were also tested by the reference broth microdilution method in parallel. Pooling of the MIC and disk diffusion data from the common and unique isolates provided a sufficient sample size to develop susceptible, intermediate, and resistant zone diameter interpretive criteria using the error rate-bounded method for the following agents: chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and rifampin. Due to the lack of resistant strains at the present time, "susceptible only" interpretive criteria were proposed for cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, meropenem, azithromycin, and minocycline. The numbers of minor interpretive errors with penicillin and ampicillin disk tests were unacceptably high and precluded recommended testing of those agents by the disk method. However, amdinocillin, an agent that preferentially binds to the altered penicillin binding protein responsible for diminished penicillin susceptibility, has potential utility as a surrogate screening reagent for ampicillin resistance. A disk diffusion breakpoint was derived for nalidixic acid to serve as a surrogate marker for

  14. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strains using agar diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna B

    2011-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis is a common soil saprotroph and has been isolated from air, organic waste and also from plant, animal and human tissues. Scopulariopsis has mainly been associated in humans with superficial mycoses, but it has also been described as the cause of subcutaneous and invasive infections. The most common aetiological agent of infections in humans is Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. This species has been reported to be resistant in vitro to broad-spectrum antifungal agents available today. The aim of the study was to establish in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 35 S. brevicaulis strains against amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (FC), caspofungin (CAS), terbinafine (TER), ciclopirox (CIC), voriconazole (VOR), clotrimazole (CTR), miconazole (MCZ), econazole (ECO), ketoconazole (KET), itraconazole (ITR), and fluconazole (FLU). Antifungal susceptibility tests were evaluated by an agar diffusion method (Neo-Sensitabs, Rosco, Denmark). AMB, FC, CAS, ITR and FLU showed no antifungal activity against S. brevicaulis. TER, CIC, CTR, KET, VOR, ECO, and MCZ revealed inhibitory activity for S. brevicaulis, but it varied for each of the drugs. The best antifungal effect was observed for TER and CIC. All isolates had large inhibition zones for TER and CIC. CTR was also inhibitory for all tested S. brevicaulis isolates, but the diameters of inhibition zones were smaller than for TER and CIC. Nearly 89% isolates showed inhibition zones for KET and the mean diameter of the inhibition zone was comparable to CTR. The least antifungal activity exhibited VQR, ECO and MCZ. Because of the multiresistance of S. brevicaulis, infections due to this species may not respond to particular antifungal treatment and other therapeutic approaches should be considered, e.g., combined therapy and/or surgery.

  15. Use of agar diffusion assay to evaluate bactericidal activity of formulations of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids (FA). Wells in agar media seeded with bacteria were filled with FA-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions, plates were incubated, and zones of inhibition were measured. The relationship between bacteric...

  16. Analysis of MIC and disk diffusion testing variables for gepotidacin and comparator agents against select bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Koeth, L K; DiFranco-Fisher, J M; Scangarella-Oman, N E; Miller, L A

    2017-03-22

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of testing parameters on the in vitro activity of gepotidacin, a new triazaacenaphthylene antibacterial agent for the treatment of conventional and biothreat pathogens. CLSI methods, and variations of these methods were used to test 10 Staphylococcus aureus, 10 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 10 Haemophilus influenzae, and 5 Escherichia coli by MIC and 30 S. aureus, 15 S. pneumoniae and 15 S. pyogenes by disk diffusion (DD) methods. Levofloxacin and linezolid were tested as comparator agents for MIC and DD methods, respectively. Broth microdilution (BMD), macrodilution (MD) and agar dilution (AD) methods were compared. Variations in media, temperature, incubation time, CO2 and inoculum concentration were tested by all methods and pH, calcium, magnesium, zinc, potassium, thymidine and polysorbate 80 were tested by BMD and DD. The addition of albumin, serum and lung surfactant was studied by BMD. The variables that impacted results the most were high inoculum and pH 5.5 (no growth of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae by BMD). Gepotidacin AD MIC results were increased and disk zone diameters were decreased for all species in 10% CO2 incubation. The following variables had a minimal effect on gepotidacin results: pH, agar method atmospheric condition, temperature, and addition of serum and albumin for broth methods. There were also some slight differences in gepotidacin disk results between disk manufacturers and some agar types, and also with potassium and thymidine for S. pneumoniae For all other variations, gepotidacin MIC and disk results were considered comparable to reference results.

  17. SNOW LINES AS PROBES OF TURBULENT DIFFUSION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.

    2014-07-20

    Sharp chemical discontinuities can occur in protoplanetary disks, particularly at ''snow lines'' where a gas-phase species freezes out to form ice grains. Such sharp discontinuities will diffuse out due to the turbulence suspected to drive angular momentum transport in accretion disks. We demonstrate that the concentration gradient—in the vicinity of the snow line—of a species present outside a snow line but destroyed inside is strongly sensitive to the level of turbulent diffusion (provided the chemical and transport timescales are decoupled) and provides a direct measurement of the radial ''Schmidt number'' (the ratio of the angular momentum transport to radial turbulent diffusion). Taking as an example the tracer species N{sub 2}H{sup +}, which is expected to be destroyed inside the CO snow line (as recently observed in TW Hya) we show that ALMA observations possess significant angular resolution to constrain the Schmidt number. Since different turbulent driving mechanisms predict different Schmidt numbers, a direct measurement of the Schmidt number in accretion disks would allow inferences to be made about the nature of the turbulence.

  18. Snow Lines as Probes of Turbulent Diffusion in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.

    2014-07-01

    Sharp chemical discontinuities can occur in protoplanetary disks, particularly at "snow lines" where a gas-phase species freezes out to form ice grains. Such sharp discontinuities will diffuse out due to the turbulence suspected to drive angular momentum transport in accretion disks. We demonstrate that the concentration gradient—in the vicinity of the snow line—of a species present outside a snow line but destroyed inside is strongly sensitive to the level of turbulent diffusion (provided the chemical and transport timescales are decoupled) and provides a direct measurement of the radial "Schmidt number" (the ratio of the angular momentum transport to radial turbulent diffusion). Taking as an example the tracer species N2H+, which is expected to be destroyed inside the CO snow line (as recently observed in TW Hya) we show that ALMA observations possess significant angular resolution to constrain the Schmidt number. Since different turbulent driving mechanisms predict different Schmidt numbers, a direct measurement of the Schmidt number in accretion disks would allow inferences to be made about the nature of the turbulence.

  19. Interpretive accuracy of the disk diffusion method for testing newer orally administered cephalosporins against Morganella morganii.

    PubMed Central

    Biedenbach, D J; Jones, R N; Erwin, M E

    1993-01-01

    Eight newer orally administered cephems (cefdinir, cefetamet, cefixime, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, ceftibuten, cefuroxime, and loracarbef) were tested against 100 clinical strains of Morganella morganii to determine the extent of serious interpretive very major (false-susceptible) errors when current criteria for the disk diffusion test are applied. Agar dilution MICs and disk diffusion tests were performed as recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (Villanova, Pa.) (NCCLS), and the methods were compared by regression analysis using the method of least squares and by error rate bounding. The following results are listed in the order of increasing error rates: cefdinir, loracarbef, and cefprozil, < or = 1% very major error; ceftibuten, 8% minor errors; cefuroxime, 21% minor errors; cefixime, cefpodoxime, and cefetamet, very major errors of 15, 24, and 36%, respectively. M. morganii produces unacceptable rates of test error with cefuroxime, cefixime, cefpodoxime, and cefetamet. The latter two cephalosporins currently have NCCLS table footnote warnings covering the problem observed with this organism. The inclusion of cefuroxime and cefixime in the NCCLS table footnote is strongly recommended. PMID:8253998

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Endodontic Medicaments and Vehicles using Agar Well Diffusion Method on Facultative and Obligate Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Kishore G; Sogi, Suma

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to determine the relative antimicrobial effectiveness of these endodontic medicaments and various vehicles using an agar well diffusion assay. Materials and methods Double Antibiotic Paste(DAP), modified DAP, 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate and their combination with four vehicles namely Polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG), Propylene glycol (PG), combinations of PG with PEG and lastly Glycerine were tested using agar well diffusion assay. The minimum bactericidal concentration was noted against four standard strains of organisms ie Streptococcus mutans ATCC( American Type Culture Collection) 25175, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12598, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 35550 and Eschericia coli ATCC 25922. Successful endodontic therapy depends upon thorough disinfection of root canals. In some refractory cases, routine endodontic therapy is not sufficient, so intracanal medicaments are used for proper disinfection of canals. Issues of resistance, limited spectrum of activity and lack of antifungal properties, the hunt for the ideal intracanal medicament continues. In this regard, the vehicles used to form the pastes play a supportive role by forming the appropriate consistency for placement and may dramatically influence their chemical characteristics like their solubility and diffusion. Thus, inorder to use safer and equally effective intracanal medicaments, Chlorhexidine gluconate is being unveiled in this study. Results The difference between the four vehicles when combined with the same endodontic medicament studied above is nonsignificant (NS) except against Porphyromonas gingivalis. Propylene glycol is significantly effective than Glycerine when used with DAP ie C+M medicament combination. (p = 0.029) Conclusion 2% chlorhexidine gluconate and modified DAP can definitely replace DAP and triple antibiotic paste as end-odontic medicaments with chlorhexidine having an added advantage of bactericidal action, substantivity, biocompatibility, low toxicity

  1. Practical agar-based disk potentiation test for detection of fosfomycin-nonsusceptible Escherichia coli clinical isolates producing glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Genki; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Natsumi; Kimura, Kouji; Yamada, Keiko; Jin, Wanchun; Shibayama, Keigo; Yagi, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Kumiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2014-09-01

    The number of reports concerning Escherichia coli clinical isolates that produce glutathione S-transferases responsible for fosfomycin resistance (FR-GSTs) has been increasing. We have developed a disk-based potentiation test in which FR-GST producers expand the growth inhibition zone around a Kirby-Bauer disk containing fosfomycin in combination with sodium phosphonoformate (PPF). PPF, an analog of fosfomycin, is a transition-state inhibitor of FosA(PA), a type of FR-GST from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Considering its mechanism of action, PPF was expected to inhibit a variety of FR-GSTs. In the presence of PPF, zone enlargement around the disk containing fosfomycin was observed for FosA3-, FosA4-, and FosC2-producing E. coli clinical isolates. Moreover, the growth inhibition zone was remarkably enlarged when the Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar plate contained 25 μg/ml glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). When we retrospectively tested 12 fosfomycin-resistant (MIC, ≥256 μg/ml) E. coli clinical isolates from our hospital with the potentiation test, 6 FR-GST producers were positive phenotypically by potentiation disk and were positive for FR-GST genes: 5 harbored fosA3 and 1 harbored fosA4. To identify the production of FR-GSTs, we set the provisional cutoff value, 5-mm enlargement, by adding PPF to a fosfomycin disk on the MH agar plates containing G6P. Our disk-based potentiation test reliably identifies FR-GST producers and can be performed easily; therefore, it will be advantageous in epidemiological surveys and infection control of fosfomycin-resistant bacteria in clinical settings.

  2. Comparative study of agar diffusion test and the NCCLS macrobroth method for in vitro susceptibility testing of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Soni, L M; Burattini, M N; Pignatari, A C; Gompertz, O F; Colombo, A L

    1999-01-01

    We performed a prospective double-blind study to evaluate the correlation between inhibition zones obtained by a disk-diffusion test, using Neo-sensitabs of fluconazole (Rosco Diagnostica), and the MICs generated by the NCCLS macrobroth dilution assay. Eighty clinical isolates, representing 5 of the clinically relevant species of Candida, were tested simultaneously by both methods. A clear inverse correlation was found between the results obtained by both tests (r = -0.69). In addition, there was high degree of agreement between methods in the identification of susceptible isolates. However, the resistance definition by disk-diffusion test had a positive predictive value of only 17%. Our data support the hypothesis that Rosco Fluconazole Neo-sensitabs have potential as a screening test for the identification of Candida isolates susceptible to fluconazole. Resistant isolates should be further investigated by standardized broth procedures.

  3. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa; Urbán, Edit

    2015-02-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides fragilis group isolates the need of susceptibility testing in routine laboratories is increasing. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing in case of different clinical isolates of Bacteroides spp by comparing zone diameter results with MICs obtained earlier during an Europe-wide antibiotic susceptibility surveillance, and to propose zone diameter breakpoints, which correlate for the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. We tested 381 clinical isolates of the B. fragilis group to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline by agar dilution method previously. The inhibition zones of the same antibiotics including meropenem disc were determined by the disc diffusion on Brucella blood agar supplemented with haemin and vitamin K1. Plates were incubated at 37 °C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 24 h. The zone diameters were read at 100% inhibition. In case of discrepant results MICs were determined by gradient test and compared with the inhibition zones on the same plate. We found a good agreement between the inhibition zone diameters and the MICs for imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin and tigecyclin. The inhibition zone diameters of meropenem also separated clearly the isolates, which can be considered wild-type isolates. In case of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and piperacillin/tazobactam intermediate and susceptible isolates according to the MIC determination, overlap during the zone diameter determination. Isolates with an inhibition zone <23 mm for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and <25 mm for piperacillin/tazobactam should be retested by a MIC determination method. The 10 μg clindamycin disc clearly separated the resistant and the susceptible population of B. fragilis group strains. In the case of cefoxitin only resistant population could be separated with an inhibition

  4. The agar diffusion scratch assay - A novel method to assess the bioactive and cytotoxic potential of new materials and compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pusnik, Mascha; Imeri, Minire; Deppierraz, Grégoire; Bruinink, Arie; Zinn, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    A profound in vitro evaluation not only of the cytotoxic but also of bioactive potential of a given compound or material is crucial for predicting potential effects in the in vivo situation. However, most of the current methods have weaknesses in either the quantitative or qualitative assessment of cytotoxicity and/or bioactivity of the test compound. Here we describe a novel assay combining the ISO 10993-5 agar diffusion test and the scratch also termed wound healing assay. In contrast to these original tests this assay is able to detect and distinguish between cytotoxic, cell migration modifying and cytotoxic plus cell migration modifying compounds, and this at higher sensitivity and in a quantitative way. PMID:26861591

  5. SILVER NANOPARTICLES-DISK DIFFUSION TEST AGAINST Escherichia coli ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Afrânio; Maia, Kamila Rocha; Mallman, Eduardo José Jucá; Cunha, Maria da Conceição Dos Santos Oliveira; Maciel, Antonio Auberson Martins; Souza, Ieda Pereira de; Menezes, Everardo Albuquerque; Fechine, Pierre Basílio Almeida

    2016-09-22

    Nanotechnology can be a valuable ally in the treatment of infections. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are structures that have antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to produce AgNPs by green methods, characterize these structures, and assess their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli associated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. AgNPs were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disk diffusion method against 10 strains of E. coli. The synthesized AgNPs showed a spherical shape and a size of 85.07 ± 12.86 nm (mean ± SD). AgNPs increased the activity of ciprofloxacin by 40% and may represent a new therapeutic option for the treatment of bacterial infections.

  6. SILVER NANOPARTICLES-DISK DIFFUSION TEST AGAINST Escherichia coli ISOLATES

    PubMed Central

    CUNHA, Francisco Afrânio; MAIA, Kamila Rocha; MALLMAN, Eduardo José Jucá; CUNHA, Maria da Conceição dos Santos Oliveira; MACIEL, Antonio Auberson Martins; de SOUZA, Ieda Pereira; MENEZES, Everardo Albuquerque; FECHINE, Pierre Basílio Almeida

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Nanotechnology can be a valuable ally in the treatment of infections. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are structures that have antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to produce AgNPs by green methods, characterize these structures, and assess their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli associated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. AgNPs were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disk diffusion method against 10 strains of E. coli. The synthesized AgNPs showed a spherical shape and a size of 85.07 ± 12.86 nm (mean ± SD). AgNPs increased the activity of ciprofloxacin by 40% and may represent a new therapeutic option for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:27680178

  7. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  8. Galactic Winds Driven by Isotropic and Anisotropic Cosmic-Ray Diffusion in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmor, R.; Pfrommer, C.; Simpson, C. M.; Springel, V.

    2016-06-01

    The physics of cosmic rays (CRs) is a promising candidate for explaining the driving of galactic winds and outflows. Recent galaxy formation simulations have demonstrated the need for active CR transport either in the form of diffusion or streaming to successfully launch winds in galaxies. However, due to computational limitations, most previous simulations have modeled CR transport isotropically. Here, we discuss high-resolution simulations of isolated disk galaxies in a 1011 M ⊙ halo with the moving-mesh code Arepo that include injection of CRs from supernovae, advective transport, CR cooling, and CR transport through isotropic or anisotropic diffusion. We show that either mode of diffusion leads to the formation of strong bipolar outflows. However, they develop significantly later in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion compared to the simulation with isotropic diffusion. Moreover, we find that isotropic diffusion allows most of the CRs to quickly diffuse out of the disk, while in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion, most CRs remain in the disk once the magnetic field becomes dominated by its azimuthal component, which occurs after ˜300 Myr. This has important consequences for the gas dynamics in the disk. In particular, we show that isotropic diffusion strongly suppresses the amplification of the magnetic field in the disk compared to anisotropic or no diffusion models. We therefore conclude that reliable simulations which include CR transport inevitably need to account for anisotropic diffusion.

  9. Comparison of E-Test, disk diffusion and a modified CLSI broth microdilution (M 38-A) method for in vitro testing of itraconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole against dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Carmen Castro; Serrano, Maria Carmen; Valverde, Anastasio; Pemán, Javier; Almeida, Carmen; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella

    2008-03-01

    We compared two agar-based methods, the E-test and the disk diffusion method with the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference broth microdilution method (CLSI M38-A; MD). Forty six dermatophytes strains including 30 Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 8 T. rubrum and 8 M. gypseum were tested against three antifungal agents, i.e., fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC) and voriconazole (VRC). The level of agreement between the E-test and MD (+/-2 dilutions) was 45.6% for fluconazole, 19.5% for itraconazole and 52.1% for voriconazole. The results obtained with disk diffusion had low correlation with the results obtained by the CLSI broth microdilution reference method with azoles.

  10. Evaluation of an Automated System for Reading and Interpreting Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Fastidious Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Idelevich, Evgeny A.; Becker, Karsten; Schmitz, Janne; Knaack, Dennis; Peters, Georg; Köck, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Results of disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing depend on individual visual reading of inhibition zone diameters. Therefore, automated reading using camera systems might represent a useful tool for standardization. In this study, the ADAGIO automated system (Bio-Rad) was evaluated for reading disk diffusion tests of fastidious bacteria. 144 clinical isolates (68 β-haemolytic streptococci, 28 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 18 viridans group streptococci, 13 Haemophilus influenzae, 7 Moraxella catarrhalis, and 10 Campylobacter jejuni) were tested on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated horse blood and 20 mg/L β-NAD (MH-F, Oxoid) according to EUCAST. Plates were read manually with a ruler and automatically using the ADAGIO system. Inhibition zone diameters, indicated by the automated system, were visually controlled and adjusted, if necessary. Among 1548 isolate-antibiotic combinations, comparison of automated vs. manual reading yielded categorical agreement (CA) without visual adjustment of the automatically determined zone diameters in 81.4%. In 20% (309 of 1548) of tests it was deemed necessary to adjust the automatically determined zone diameter after visual control. After adjustment, CA was 94.8%; very major errors (false susceptible interpretation), major errors (false resistant interpretation) and minor errors (false categorization involving intermediate result), calculated according to the ISO 20776–2 guideline, accounted to 13.7% (13 of 95 resistant results), 3.3% (47 of 1424 susceptible results) and 1.4% (21 of 1548 total results), respectively, compared to manual reading. The ADAGIO system allowed for automated reading of disk diffusion testing in fastidious bacteria and, after visual validation of the automated results, yielded good categorical agreement with manual reading. PMID:27391898

  11. Utility of in-house fluconazole disk diffusion susceptibility testing in the treatment of candidemia.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, David W; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Arons, Viktoria; Hollins, Randy M; Rostas, Sara E; Weiser, Linda M; Baden, Lindsey R; Marty, Francisco M; Koo, Sophia

    2016-03-01

    Among 302 first candidemia episodes, 210 (69.6%) were initially treated with an echinocandin or polyene (E/P) antifungal drug. In 137 (72.5%) patients with fluconazole-susceptible isolates, treatment was changed to fluconazole based on disk diffusion susceptibility testing. Clinical outcomes were not compromised in patients receiving E/P who were de-escalated to fluconazole for treatment of candidemia based on disk diffusion results.

  12. Utility of in-house fluconazole disk diffusion susceptibility testing in the treatment of candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Kubiak, David W.; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Arons, Viktoria; Hollins, Randy M.; Rostas, Sara E.; Weiser, Linda M.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Marty, Francisco M.; Koo, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Among 302 first candidemia episodes, 210 (69.6%) were initially treated with an echinocandin or polyene (E/P) antifungal drug. In 137 (72.5%) patients with fluconazole-susceptible isolates, treatment was changed to fluconazole based on disk diffusion susceptibility testing. Clinical outcomes were not compromised in patients receiving E/P who were de-escalated to fluconazole for treatment of candidemia based on disk diffusion results. PMID:26763713

  13. Disk diffusion quality control guidelines for NVP-PDF 713: a novel peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Anderegg, Tamara R; Jones, Ronald N

    2004-01-01

    NVP-PDF713 is a peptide deformylase inhibitor that has emerged as a candidate for treating Gram-positive infections and selected Gram-negative species that commonly cause community-acquired respiratory tract infections. This report summarizes the results of a multi-center (seven participants) disk diffusion quality control (QC) investigation for NVP PDF-713 using guidelines of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards and the standardized disk diffusion method. A total of 420 NVP-PDF 713 zone diameter values were generated for each QC organism. The proposed zone diameter ranges contained 97.6-99.8% of the reported participant results and were: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 (25-35 mm), Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619 (30-37 mm), and Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 49247 (24-32 mm). These QC criteria for the disk diffusion method should be applied during the NVP-PDF 713 clinical trials to maximize test accuracy.

  14. Standardization of Operator-Dependent Variables Affecting Precision and Accuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Florian P.; Pfiffner, Tamara; Böttger, Erik C.; Furrer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Parameters like zone reading, inoculum density, and plate streaking influence the precision and accuracy of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). While improved reading precision has been demonstrated using automated imaging systems, standardization of the inoculum and of plate streaking have not been systematically investigated yet. This study analyzed whether photometrically controlled inoculum preparation and/or automated inoculation could further improve the standardization of disk diffusion. Suspensions of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 of 0.5 McFarland standard were prepared by 10 operators using both visual comparison to turbidity standards and a Densichek photometer (bioMérieux), and the resulting CFU counts were determined. Furthermore, eight experienced operators each inoculated 10 Mueller-Hinton agar plates using a single 0.5 McFarland standard bacterial suspension of E. coli ATCC 25922 using regular cotton swabs, dry flocked swabs (Copan, Brescia, Italy), or an automated streaking device (BD-Kiestra, Drachten, Netherlands). The mean CFU counts obtained from 0.5 McFarland standard E. coli ATCC 25922 suspensions were significantly different for suspensions prepared by eye and by Densichek (P < 0.001). Preparation by eye resulted in counts that were closer to the CLSI/EUCAST target of 108 CFU/ml than those resulting from Densichek preparation. No significant differences in the standard deviations of the CFU counts were observed. The interoperator differences in standard deviations when dry flocked swabs were used decreased significantly compared to the differences when regular cotton swabs were used, whereas the mean of the standard deviations of all operators together was not significantly altered. In contrast, automated streaking significantly reduced both interoperator differences, i.e., the individual standard deviations, compared to the standard deviations for the manual method, and the mean of the

  15. Turbulent-diffusion Mediated CO Depletion in Weakly Turbulent Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Bai, Xue-Ning; Öberg, Karin

    2017-02-01

    Volatiles, especially CO, are important gas tracers of protoplanetary disks (PPDs). Freeze-out and sublimation processes determine their division between gas and solid phases, which affects both which disk regions can be traced by which volatiles, and the formation and composition of planets. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have suggested that CO is substantially depleted from the gas in the outer regions of PPDs, i.e., more depleted than would be expected from a simple balance between freeze-out and sublimation. In this paper, we show that the gas dynamics in the outer PPDs facilitates volatile depletion through turbulent diffusion. Using a simple 1D model that incorporates dust settling, turbulent diffusion of dust and volatiles, as well as volatile freeze-out/sublimation processes, we find that as long as turbulence in the cold midplane is sufficiently weak to allow a majority of the small grains to settle, CO in the warm surface layer can diffuse into the midplane region and deplete by freeze-out. The level of depletion sensitively depends on the level of disk turbulence. Based on recent disk simulations that suggest a layered turbulence profile with very weak midplane turbulence and strong turbulence at the disk surface, CO and other volatiles can be efficiently depleted by up to an order of magnitude over Myr timescales.

  16. Diffusive Particle Acceleration in Shocked, Viscous Accretion Disks: Green's Function Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.; Das, Santabrata; Le, Truong

    2011-12-01

    The acceleration of relativistic particles in a viscous accretion disk containing a standing shock is investigated as a possible explanation for the energetic outflows observed around radio-loud black holes. The energy/space distribution of the accelerated particles is computed by solving a transport equation that includes the effects of first-order Fermi acceleration, bulk advection, spatial diffusion, and particle escape. The velocity profile of the accreting gas is described using a model for shocked viscous disks recently developed by the authors, and the corresponding Green's function distribution for the accelerated particles in the disk and the outflow is obtained using a classical method based on eigenfunction analysis. The accretion-driven, diffusive shock acceleration scenario explored here is conceptually similar to the standard model for the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova-driven shocks. However, in the disk application, the distribution of the accelerated particles is much harder than would be expected for a plane-parallel shock with the same compression ratio. Hence the disk environment plays a key role in enhancing the efficiency of the shock acceleration process. The presence of the shock helps to stabilize the disk by reducing the Bernoulli parameter, while channeling the excess binding energy into the escaping relativistic particles. In applications to M87 and Sgr A*, we find that the kinetic power in the jet is {\\sim}0.01\\,\\dot{M} c^2, and the outflowing relativistic particles have a mean energy ~300 times larger than that of the thermal gas in the disk at the shock radius. Our results suggest that a standing shock may be an essential ingredient in accretion onto underfed black holes, helping to resolve the long-standing problem of the stability of advection-dominated accretion disks.

  17. Comparison of results of fluconazole and voriconazole disk diffusion testing for Candida spp. with results from a central reference laboratory in the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Boyken, Linda; Hollis, Richard J; Kroeger, Jennifer; Messer, Shawn A; Tendolkar, Shailesh; Diekema, Daniel J

    2009-09-01

    The accuracy of antifungal susceptibility testing is important for reliable resistance surveillance and for the clinical management of patients with serious infections due to Candida spp. Our primary objective was to compare the results of fluconazole and voriconazole disk diffusion testing of 3227 Candida spp. performed by 47 centers participating in the ARTEMIS program with disk diffusion and MIC results obtained by the central reference laboratory. The overall categoric agreement between participant disk diffusion test results and reference MIC results was 87% for fluconazole and 95.2% for voriconazole. Likewise good agreement was observed between participant disk diffusion test results and reference laboratory disk diffusion test results, with an agreement of 90.5%, 1% very major error (VME), and 3.4% major error (ME) for fluconazole and 94.2%, 1.1% VME, and 2.5% ME for voriconazole. The disk diffusion test was reliable for detecting those isolates of Candida spp. that were characterized as resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole by MIC testing. External quality assurance data obtained by surveillance programs such as the ARTEMIS Global Antifungal Surveillance Program ensure the generation of useful surveillance data and result in the continued improvement of antifungal susceptibility testing protocols.

  18. Synergy of β-Lactams with Vancomycin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Correlation of Disk Diffusion and Checkerboard Methods.

    PubMed

    Sy, Cheng Len; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chen, Chii Shiang; Chen, Yao-Shen; Tsai, Hung-Chin; Wann, Shue-Renn; Wu, Kuan-Sheng; Chen, Jui-Kuang; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Liu, Yung-Ching

    2016-03-01

    Modified disk diffusion (MDD) and checkerboard tests were employed to assess the synergy of combinations of vancomycin and β-lactam antibiotics for 59 clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Mu50 (ATCC 700699). Bacterial inocula equivalent to 0.5 and 2.0 McFarland standard were inoculated on agar plates containing 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 μg/ml of vancomycin. Oxacillin-, cefazolin-, and cefoxitin-impregnated disks were applied to the surface, and the zones of inhibition were measured at 24 h. The CLSI-recommended checkerboard method was used as a reference to detect synergy. The MICs for vancomycin were determined using the Etest method, broth microdilution, and the Vitek 2 automated system. Synergy was observed with the checkerboard method in 51% to 60% of the isolates when vancomycin was combined with any β-lactam. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices were significantly lower in MRSA isolates with higher vancomycin MIC combinations (P < 0.05). The overall agreement between the MDD and checkerboard methods to detect synergy in MRSA isolates with bacterial inocula equivalent to McFarland standard 0.5 were 33.0% and 62.5% for oxacillin, 45.1% and 52.4% for cefazolin, and 43.1% and 52.4% for cefoxitin when combined with 0.5 and 2 μg/ml of vancomycin, respectively. Based on our study, the simple MDD method is not recommended as a replacement for the checkerboard method to detect synergy. However, it may serve as an initial screening method for the detection of potential synergy when it is not feasible to perform other labor-intensive synergy tests.

  19. Calibration of fusidic acid disk diffusion susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus areus.

    PubMed

    Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Kõljalg, Siiri; Karlsson, Inga; Kronvall, Göran

    2002-10-01

    Single strain regression analysis, SRA, was used to calibrate disk diffusion fusidic acid susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus in two laboratories using different standard methods but the same interpretative MIC limits. SRA equation constants were calculated using five different fusidic acid disk contents (1.5, 5, 15, 50, 150 microg). These disks were tested on five separate occasions against quality control strain S. aureus ATCC 29213. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) method was employed in Tartu, Estonia (TE) and the Swedish Reference Group for Antibiotics (SRGA) method in Sweden at the Karolinska Hospital (KS). SRA constants obtained were used for calculating zone breakpoints corresponding to MIC breakpoints recommended by the SRGA (S < or = 0.5 mg/L, R > or = 1 mg/L). Zone diameter histograms from KS, performed with a 50 microg disk, and from TE, using a 10 microg disk, showed a clustering of wild type strains around 41 mm and 30 mm, respectively, reflecting differences in methodology. Zone breakpoints calculated from the equations were validated by comparison with the histograms. Breakpoints were also calculated for a suggested lower disk content in Sweden, 10 microg, and validated in tests of clinical isolates and by histogram analysis.

  20. Bridging the gap: disk formation in the Class 0 phase with ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Basu, Shantanu; Kunz, Matthew W.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations have revealed catastrophic magnetic braking in the protostellar phase, which prevents the formation of a centrifugal disk around a nascent protostar. Aims: We determine if non-ideal MHD, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation determined from a detailed chemical network model, will allow for disk formation at the earliest stages of star formation. Methods: We employ the axisymmetric thin-disk approximation in order to resolve a dynamic range of 9 orders of magnitude in length and 16 orders of magnitude in density, while also calculating partial ionization using up to 19 species in a detailed chemical equilibrium model. Magnetic braking is applied to the rotation using a steady-state approximation, and a barotropic relation is used to capture the thermal evolution. Results: We resolve the formation of the first and second cores, with expansion waves at the periphery of each, a magnetic diffusion shock, and prestellar infall profiles at larger radii. Power-law profiles in each region can be understood analytically. After the formation of the second core, the centrifugal support rises rapidly and a low-mass disk of radius ≈ 10 R⊙ is formed at the earliest stage of star formation, when the second core has mass ~10-3 M⊙. The mass-to-flux ratio is ~104 times the critical value in the central region. Conclusions: A small centrifugal disk can form in the earliest stage of star formation, due to a shut-off of magnetic braking caused by magnetic field dissipation in the first core region. There is enough angular momentum loss to allow the second collapse to occur directly, and a low-mass stellar core to form with a surrounding disk. The disk mass and size will depend upon how the angular momentum transport mechanisms within the disk can keep up with mass infall onto the disk. Accounting only for direct infall, we estimate that the disk will remain ≲10 AU, undetectable even by ALMA, for

  1. Diffuse X-rays from the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    An anisotropic feature of the diffuse hard X-ray background that tracks the concentration of interstellar hydrogen in the plane of the galaxy is reported. This feature supports a model of galactic X-ray emission by subrelativistic cosmic rays via a bremsstrahlung process. The measurement was carried out on August 9, 1971, using two multianode multilayer gas proportional counters onboard Aerobee 170 flight 13.08. A schematic diagram of the detectors is shown. This type of construction and the appropriate utilization of the signals from the many anodes result in a low detector background, a perequisite before undertaking a measurement of possible small variations in the brightness of the X-ray sky.

  2. Direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing from respiratory tract specimens: focus on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Perez, Leandro Reus Rodrigues; Freitas, Ana Lúcia Peixoto de; Barth, Afonso Luís; Dias, Cícero Armídio Gomes

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of direct disk diffusion (DDD) testing to respiratory tract specimens for the prediction of the antimicrobial susceptibility profile. DDD was performed on 144 specimens containing P. aeruginosa and the disk diffusion test was used as reference method. Agreement with the reference method was 77.8% for amikacin, 69.4% for cefepime, 86.1% for levofloxacin, 87.5% for meropenem, and 62.5% for piperacillin/tazobactam. Very major errors were observed for all agents, except levofloxacin. Our study showed that DDD results are inaccurate and may lead to errors in early decision-making regarding antibiotic therapy for lower respiratory tract infections.

  3. Disk Diffusion Assay to Assess the Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Algal Extracts.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Andrew P; Smith, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    Marine algae are a relatively untapped source of bioactive natural products, including those with antimicrobial activities. The ability to assess the antimicrobial activity of cell extracts derived from algal cultures is vital to identifying species that may produce useful novel antibiotics. One assay that is used widely for this purpose is the disk diffusion assay due to its simplicity, rapidity, and low cost. Moreover, this assay gives output data that are easy to interpret and can be used to screen many samples at once irrespective of the solvent used during preparation. In this chapter, a step-by-step protocol for performing a disk diffusion assay is described. The assay is particularly well suited to testing algal cell extracts and fractions resulting from separation through bioassay-guided approaches.

  4. Cefotetan, a new cephamycin: comparison of in vitro antimicrobial activity with other cephems, beta-lactamase stability, and preliminary recommendations for disk diffusion testing.

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, L W; Jones, R N; Barry, A L; Thornsberry, C; Fuchs, P C; Gavan, T L; Gerlach, E H; Sommers, H M

    1982-01-01

    Cefotetan is a new, potent, 7 alpha-methoxy cephalosporin (cephamycin). The in vitro activity of cefotetan tested in a multiphasic, collaborative study against 12,260 consecutive clinical isolates and 448 selected isolates showed 93% of Enterobacteriaceae, 90% of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (broth dilution), 83% of Bacteroides fragilis, and 72% of non-enterococcal streptococci to be inhibited by less than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml. Beta-Lactamase-producing and -nonproducing Haemophilus influenzae strains were inhibited by less than or equal to 1.0 micrograms/ml. Cefotetan's inhibitory spectrum paralleled those of the newest generation of cephems and exceeded those of cefoxitin and cefamandole. No useful activity was present against Streptococcus faecalis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cefotetan was bactericidal without significant inoculum effect and was highly resistant to hydrolysis by Richmond-Sykes types I, III, and IV beta-lactamases. Hydrolysis of the chromogenic cephalosporin PADAC (pyridine-2-azo-p-dimethylaniline cephalosporin) by type I beta-lactamases was markedly inhibited by concentrations of cefotetan similar to those of the potent inhibitor dicloxacillin. Analysis of agar disk diffusion for several disk potencies and broth dilution susceptibility tests by regression and error rate-bounding methods produced preliminary tentative zone standards (30-micrograms disk, using minimal inhibitory concentration breakpoints of less than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml susceptible and greater than 32 micrograms/ml resistant, or 75-micrograms disk, using minimal inhibitory concentration breakpoints of less than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml susceptible and greater than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml resistant) of greater than or equal to 18 mm susceptible, less than or equal to 14 mm resistant, and 15 to 17 mm indeterminate. Staphylococcus aureus testing with the 30-micrograms disk is not recommended. PMID:6983862

  5. Effect of Culture Medium on the Disk Diffusion Method for Determining Antifungal Susceptibilities of Dermatophytes

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Torres, Belkys; Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso; Inza, Isabel; Guarro, Josep

    2006-01-01

    We have evaluated a disk diffusion method to determine the activities of five drugs against 50 strains of dermatophytes and to assess the influence of the culture medium (antibiotic medium 3, high-resolution medium, and RPMI) on the inhibition zone diameters (IZD). There were no differences among the medium/drug combinations, except for itraconazole-RPMI, which showed the narrowest IZD. PMID:16723589

  6. Trapping of diffusing particles by clusters of absorbing disks on a reflecting wall with disk centers on sites of a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Dagdug, Leonardo; Vazquez, Marco-Vinicio; Lizunov, Vladimir A.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2013-02-01

    A simple approximate formula is derived for the rate constant that describes steady-state flux of diffusing particles through a cluster of perfectly absorbing disks on the otherwise reflecting flat wall, assuming that the disk centers occupy neighboring sites of a square lattice. A distinctive feature of trapping by a disk cluster is that disks located at the cluster periphery shield the disks in the center of the cluster. This competition of the disks for diffusing particles makes it impossible to find an exact analytical solution for the rate constant in the general case. To derive the approximate formula, we use a recently suggested approach [A. M. Berezhkovskii, L. Dagdug, V. A. Lizunov, J. Zimmerberg, and S. M. Bezrukov, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 211102 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4726015, which is based on the replacement of the disk cluster by an effective uniform partially absorbing spot. The formula shows how the rate constant depends on the size and shape of the cluster. To check the accuracy of the formula, we compare its predictions with the values of the rate constant obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations. The comparison made for 18 clusters of various shapes and sizes shows good agreement between the theoretical predictions and numerical results.

  7. Normal and anomalous diffusion in highly confined hard disk fluid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ball, C D; MacWilliam, N D; Percus, J K; Bowles, R K

    2009-02-07

    Monte Carlo simulation is used to study binary mixtures of two-dimensional hard disks, confined to long, narrow, structureless pores with hard walls, in a regime of pore sizes where the large particles exhibit single file diffusion while the small particles diffuse normally. The dynamics of the small particles can be understood in the context of a hopping time, tau(21), that measures the time it takes for a small particle to escape the single file cage formed by its large particle neighbors, and can be linked to the long time diffusion coefficient. We find that tau(21) follows a power law as a function of the reduced pore radius for a wide range of particle size ratios with an exponent, alpha, that is independent of the size ratio, but linearly dependent on the Monte Carlo step size used in the dynamic scheme. The mean squared displacement of the small particles as a function of time exhibits two dynamic crossovers. The first, from normal to anomalous diffusion, occurs at intermediate times then the system returns to normal diffusion in the long time limit. We also find that the diffusion coefficient is related to tau(21) through a power law with exponent beta=-0.5, as predicted by theory. Finally, we show that particle separation in a binary mixture will be optimal at the pore radius that causes the large particles to undergo their transition from normal to anomalous diffusion.

  8. Evaluation of the PREVI® Isola automated seeder system compared to reference manual inoculation for antibiotic susceptibility testing by the disk diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Le Page, S; van Belkum, A; Fulchiron, C; Huguet, R; Raoult, D; Rolain, J-M

    2015-09-01

    The disk diffusion (DD) method remains the most popular manual technique for antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) in clinical microbiology laboratories. This is because of its simplicity, reproducibility, and limited cost compared to (automated) microdilution systems, which are usually less sensitive at detecting certain important mechanisms of resistance. Here, we evaluate the PREVI® Isola automated seeder system using a new protocol for spreading bacterial suspensions (eight deposits of calibrated inocula of bacteria, followed by two rounds of rotation) in comparison with manual DD reference testing on a large series of clinical and reference strains. The average time required for seeding one agar plate for DD with this new protocol was 51 s per plate, i.e., 70 agar plates/h. Reproducibility and repeatability was assessed on three reference and three randomly chosen clinical strains, as usually requested by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST), and was excellent compared to the manual method. The standard deviations of zones of growth inhibition showed no statistical discrimination. The correlation between the two methods, assessed using 294 clinical isolates and a panel of six antibiotics (n = 3,528 zones of growth inhibition measured), was excellent, with a correlation coefficient of 0.977. The new PREVI® Isola protocol adapted for DD had a sensitivity of 99 % and a specificity of 100 % compared to the manual technique for interpreting DD as recommended by the EUCAST.

  9. Assessing the antimicrobial activity of zinc oxide thin films using disk diffusion and biofilm reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gittard, Shaun D.; Perfect, John R.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Wei, Wei; Jin, Chunming; Narayan, Roger J.

    2009-03-01

    The electronic and chemical properties of semiconductor materials may be useful in preventing growth of microorganisms. In this article, in vitro methods for assessing microbial growth on semiconductor materials will be presented. The structural and biological properties of silicon wafers coated with zinc oxide thin films were evaluated using atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and MTT viability assay. The antimicrobial properties of zinc oxide thin films were established using disk diffusion and CDC Biofilm Reactor studies. Our results suggest that zinc oxide and other semiconductor materials may play a leading role in providing antimicrobial functionality to the next-generation medical devices.

  10. Disk prediffusion is a reliable method for testing colistin susceptibility in porcine E. coli strains.

    PubMed

    Boyen, F; Vangroenweghe, F; Butaye, P; De Graef, E; Castryck, F; Heylen, P; Vanrobaeys, M; Haesebrouck, F

    2010-08-26

    During the last few years, acquired resistance to colistin in Escherichia coli, but also in other bacterial species, has been reported. It has been shown that the disk diffusion test is not a reliable method for the detection of this resistance. Therefore, there is a need for a reliable and cheap test to determine colistin susceptibility of pathogenic E. coli strains. In the current research, the colistin susceptibility of E. coli isolated during the period 2005-2006 from pigs was determined. Results obtained with the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion test (Neosensitabs, Rosco), the disk prediffusion test (Neosensitabs, Rosco) and the E-test (AB Biodisk) were compared with the results of the reference agar dilution assay. The MIC values or inhibition zones showed a bimodal distribution for the results obtained by all test methods, except the disk diffusion assay, suggesting acquired resistance in 15 strains (9.6%). The E-test and disk prediffusion assay generated results within acceptable levels compared to the reference agar dilution assay. The categorical agreement with the results obtained by the agar dilution method were good to very good for all tests, except the disk diffusion assay. In conclusion, current results suggest that, in addition to the E-test, the disk prediffusion test is a reliable, alternative agar-based colistin susceptibility method for testing colistin susceptibility of E. coli isolates in diagnostic bacteriology.

  11. THREE-DIMENSIONAL LAGRANGIAN TURBULENT DIFFUSION OF DUST GRAINS IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK: METHOD AND FIRST APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Aleon, Jerome

    2011-08-10

    In order to understand how the chemical and isotopic compositions of dust grains in a gaseous turbulent protoplanetary disk are altered during their journey in the disk, it is important to determine their individual trajectories. We study here the dust-diffusive transport using Lagrangian numerical simulations using the popular 'turbulent diffusion' formalism. However, it is naturally expressed in an Eulerian form, which does not allow the trajectories of individual particles to be studied. We present a simple stochastic and physically justified procedure for modeling turbulent diffusion in a Lagrangian form that overcomes these difficulties. We show that a net diffusive flux F of the dust appears and that it is proportional to the gas density ({rho}) gradient and the dust diffusion coefficient D{sub d}: (F = D{sub d} /{rho} x grad({rho})). It induces an inward transport of dust in the disk's midplane, while favoring outward transport in the disk's upper layers. We present tests and applications comparing dust diffusion in the midplane and upper layers as well as sample trajectories of particles with different sizes. We also discuss potential applications for cosmochemistry and smoothed particle hydrodynamic codes.

  12. Thermo-Diffusion and Diffuso-Thermo Effects on MHD Squeezing Flow Between Parallel Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sheikh Irfanullah; Mohyud-Din, Syed Tauseef; Bin-Mohsin, Bandar

    In this article, Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) squeezing flow between two parallel disks is considered. The upper disk is taken to be solid and the lower one is permeable. Soret and Dufour effects are measured to explore the thermal-diffusion and diffusion-thermo effects. Governing PDEs are converted into system of ODEs with the support of suitable similarity transforms. Homotopy analysis method (HAM) has been employed to obtain the expressions for velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. Effects of different emerging parameters such as squeezing number S, Hartman number M, Prandtl number Pr, Eckert number Ec, dimensionless length δ and Schmidt number Sc on the flow are also discussed with the help of graphs for velocity, temperature and concentration. The local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers along with convergence of the series solutions are presented with the help of graphs. From the results obtained, we observed that the physical quantities like skin friction coefficient increases with increasing value of Hartmann number M in the blowing case (A<0) whereas a fall is observed in the suction case (A>0). However, the rate of heat transfer at upper wall increases with increasing values of Dufour number Du and Soret number Sr for both the suction (A>0) and blowing flow (A<0), whereas, for the larger values of Dufour number Du and smaller values of Soret number Sr, a rapid fall is observed in Sherwood number Sh for both the suction (A>0) and blowing (A<0) cases. A numerical solution is obtained by employing Runge-Kutta method of order four (RK-4) to check the validity and reliability of the developed algorithm. A well agreement is found between both the solutions.

  13. Standardization of disk diffusion test and its clinical significance for susceptibility testing of metronidazole against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, H; Keane, C T; Beattie, S; O'Morain, C A

    1994-01-01

    Susceptibilities of 121 clinical Helicobacter pylori strains to metronidazole were determined by both a 5-micrograms metronidazole disk diffusion test and a plate dilution method in duplicate and after different periods of incubation. The distribution of MICs of metronidazole against H. pylori among the strains was found to be bimodal. The diameters of inhibitory zones obtained by the disk diffusion test and the MICs obtained by the plate dilution method correlated well, especially after 4 days of incubation (r = 0.77). An inhibitory zone diameter of 20 mm was found to correspond to a MIC of 8 micrograms/ml and is recommended as a suitable zone for differentiating susceptibility and resistance with a 5-micrograms metronidazole disk. Three interpretive categories of susceptibility results were defined; strains with inhibitory zone diameters of more than 26 mm were defined as susceptible (MIC, < 4 micrograms/ml), strains with zone diameters of 20 to 26 mm were deemed intermediate (MIC, 4 to 8 micrograms/ml), and those with zone diameters of less than 20 mm were deemed resistant (MIC, > 8 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, 76 H. pylori-positive patients with duodenal ulcers or nonulcer dyspepsia were treated with a 1 week of triple therapy (colloidal bismuth subcitrate, metronidazole, and tetracycline). H. pylori strains were isolated before treatment from antral biopsies from those patients, and the metronidazole susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the disk diffusion test. H. pylori status was evaluated again 4 weeks after completion of treatment. The eradication rates for susceptible, intermediate, and resistant strains were 95.9% (47 of 49), 62.5% (5 of 8), and 52.6% (10 of 19), respectively. It is included that the 5-micrograms disk diffusion test is easy to perform and gives final results similar to those of the plate dilution method. The three interpretive categories of susceptibility may be of benefit for clinical choice of chemotherapy in eradicating

  14. Discrepancies between disk diffusion and broth susceptibility studies of the activity of ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid against ticarcillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Manian, F A; Alford, R H

    1986-01-01

    Ticarcillin and clavulanic acid in combination were tested against 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin by disk diffusion. A total of 21 isolates (53%) were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion, under currently recommended criteria for ticarcillin susceptibility. Macro-broth dilution tests (ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid, 2 micrograms/ml) confirmed susceptibility (MIC less than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml) of only 8 (38%) of 21 isolates. Time-kill studies of disk diffusion susceptible isolates indicated 2 log10 or greater killing of most isolates at 6 h in broth containing ticarcillin (64 micrograms/ml) combined with clavulanic acid (1, 2, 5, or 10 micrograms/ml). After 6 h, regrowth was common in all concentrations of clavulanic acid except 10 micrograms/ml. Regrowth populations were resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate by MIC determination. Poor bactericidal activity of ticarcillin-clavulanate against ticarcillin-resistant P. aeruginosa was confirmed, as most isolates did not undergo 99.9% or greater killing at 24 h in all concentrations of clavulanic acid. Serotype O-11 was our most common serotype and was associated with disk diffusion "pseudosusceptibility." Concomitant disk diffusion testing of ticarcillin-clavulanate and ticarcillin is recommended for testing the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin should as a rule be considered also resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate, despite apparent susceptibility by disk diffusion. PMID:3092732

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aquatic bacteria: quality control disk diffusion ranges for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 at 22 and 28 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Walker, R D; Baya, A; Clemens, K; Coles, M; Hawke, J P; Henricson, B E; Hsu, H M; Mathers, J J; Oaks, J L; Papapetropoulou, M; Reimschuessel, R

    2003-09-01

    Quality control (QC) ranges for disk diffusion susceptibility testing of aquatic bacterial isolates were proposed as a result of a multilaboratory study conducted according to procedures established by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Ranges were proposed for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 at 22 and 28 degrees C for nine different antimicrobial agents (ampicillin, enrofloxacin, erythromycin, florfenicol, gentamicin, oxolinic acid, oxytetracycline, ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). All tests were conducted on standard Mueller-Hinton agar. With >/=95% of all data points fitting within the proposed QC ranges, the results from this study comply with NCCLS guidelines and have been accepted by the NCCLS Subcommittee for Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. These QC guidelines will permit greater accuracy in interpreting results and, for the first time, the ability to reliably compare susceptibility test data between aquatic animal disease diagnostic laboratories.

  16. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Aquatic Bacteria: Quality Control Disk Diffusion Ranges for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 at 22 and 28°C

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R. A.; Walker, R. D.; Baya, A.; Clemens, K.; Coles, M.; Hawke, J. P.; Henricson, B. E.; Hsu, H. M.; Mathers, J. J.; Oaks, J. L.; Papapetropoulou, M.; Reimschuessel, R.

    2003-01-01

    Quality control (QC) ranges for disk diffusion susceptibility testing of aquatic bacterial isolates were proposed as a result of a multilaboratory study conducted according to procedures established by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Ranges were proposed for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 at 22 and 28°C for nine different antimicrobial agents (ampicillin, enrofloxacin, erythromycin, florfenicol, gentamicin, oxolinic acid, oxytetracycline, ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). All tests were conducted on standard Mueller-Hinton agar. With ≥95% of all data points fitting within the proposed QC ranges, the results from this study comply with NCCLS guidelines and have been accepted by the NCCLS Subcommittee for Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. These QC guidelines will permit greater accuracy in interpreting results and, for the first time, the ability to reliably compare susceptibility test data between aquatic animal disease diagnostic laboratories. PMID:12958263

  17. Synergistic potential of ceftazidime plus amikacin or levofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa as determined using a checkerboard and a disk diffusion technique.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Maria Pia; Piccoli, Laura; Mingoia, Marina; Marchetti, Federico; Varaldo, Pietro Emanuele

    2005-10-01

    The synergistic potential of ceftazidime plus amikacin or levofloxacin was assessed against 61 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with variable susceptibility patterns to the 3 antibiotics. A checkerboard broth method and a disk diffusion method were used and compared. The latter, also easy to perform as a triple-disk assay, could be a helpful laboratory screening tool for drug synergism to drive possible combination treatments.

  18. Oxacillin disk diffusion testing for the prediction of penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Horna, Gertrudis; Molero, María L; Benites, Liliana; Roman, Sigri; Carbajal, Luz; Mercado, Erik; Castillo, María E; Zerpa, Rito; Chaparro, Eduardo; Hernandez, Roger; Silva, Wilda; Campos, Francisco; Saenz, Andy; Reyes, Isabel; Villalobos, Alex; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2016-08-01

    Objective To 1) describe the correlation between the zones of inhibition in 1-µg oxacillin disk diffusion (ODD) tests and penicillin and ceftriaxone minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of meningeal and non-meningeal strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 2) evaluate the usefulness of the ODD test as a predictor of susceptibility to penicillin in S. pneumoniae and as a quick and cost-effective method easily implemented in a routine clinical laboratory setting. Methods S. pneumoniae isolates from healthy nasopharyngeal carriers less than 2 years old, obtained in a multicentric cross-sectional study conducted in various Peruvian hospitals and health centers from 2007 to 2009, were analyzed. Using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints, the correlation between the zones of inhibition of the ODD test and the MICs of penicillin and ceftriaxone was determined. Results Of the 571 S. pneumoniae isolates, 314 (55%) showed resistance to penicillin (MIC ≥ 0.12 µg/mL) and 124 (21.7%) showed resistance to ceftriaxone (MIC ≥ 1 µg/mL). Comparison of the ODD test zones of inhibition and the penicillin MICs, using the CLSI meningeal breakpoints, showed good correlation (Cohen's kappa coefficient = 0.8239). Conclusions There was good correlation between ODD zones of inhibition and penicillin meningeal breakpoints but weak correlation between the ODD results and non-meningeal breakpoints for both penicillin and ceftriaxone. Therefore, the ODD test appears to be a useful tool for predicting penicillin resistance in cases of meningeal strains of S. pneumoniae, particularly in low- and middle- income countries, where MIC determination is not routinely available.

  19. Exact calculations of survival probability for diffusion on growing lines, disks, and spheres: The role of dimension.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Matthew J; Baker, Ruth E

    2015-09-07

    Unlike standard applications of transport theory, the transport of molecules and cells during embryonic development often takes place within growing multidimensional tissues. In this work, we consider a model of diffusion on uniformly growing lines, disks, and spheres. An exact solution of the partial differential equation governing the diffusion of a population of individuals on the growing domain is derived. Using this solution, we study the survival probability, S(t). For the standard non-growing case with an absorbing boundary, we observe that S(t) decays to zero in the long time limit. In contrast, when the domain grows linearly or exponentially with time, we show that S(t) decays to a constant, positive value, indicating that a proportion of the diffusing substance remains on the growing domain indefinitely. Comparing S(t) for diffusion on lines, disks, and spheres indicates that there are minimal differences in S(t) in the limit of zero growth and minimal differences in S(t) in the limit of fast growth. In contrast, for intermediate growth rates, we observe modest differences in S(t) between different geometries. These differences can be quantified by evaluating the exact expressions derived and presented here.

  20. Dusty Disks, Diffuse Clouds, and Dim Suns: Galactic Science with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Watson, D. M.; Uchida, K. I.; Forrest, W. J.; VanCleve, J. E.; Herter, T. L.; Sloan, G. C.; Furlan, E.; Wilson, J. C.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope has now been in routine science operations since Dec. 14,2003. The IRS Science Team has used a portion of their guaranteed time to pursue three major science themes in galactic astronomy: the evolution of protostellar disks and debris disks; the composition and evolution of diffuse matter and clouds in the interstellar medium; and the composition and structure of brown dwarfs and low-mass main-sequence stars. We report here on the results from the first five months of IRS observations in these programs. Full IRS Spectra have already been obtained for large samples of YSO/protoplanetary disks in the Taurus and TW Hya associations, and or debris disks around main-sequence stars, in which many aspects of the evolution of planetary systems can be addressed for the first time. As anticipated, the mid-infrared IRS observations of brown dwarfs have yielded important new information about their atmospheres, including the identification of NH3 and measurements of new methane features. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407. Support for this work was provided by NASA's Office of Space Science.

  1. The Growth of Steroidobacter agariperforans sp. nov., a Novel Agar-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Soil, is Enhanced by the Diffusible Metabolites Produced by Bacteria Belonging to Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Masao; Hosoda, Akifumi; Ogura, Kenjiro; Ikenaga, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium was isolated from soil collected in a vegetable cropping field. The growth of this isolate was enhanced by supplying culture supernatants of bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the novel bacterium, strain KA5–BT, belonged to the genus Steroidobacter in Gammaproteobacteria, but differed from its closest relative, Steroidobacter denitrificans FST, at the species level with 96.5% similarity. Strain KA5–BT was strictly aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore forming, and had a straight to slightly curved rod shape. Cytochrome oxidase and catalase activities were positive. The strain grew on media containing culture supernatants in a temperature range of 15–37°C and between pH 4.5 and 9.0, with optimal growth occurring at 30°C and pH 6.0–8.0. No growth occurred at 10 or 42°C or at NaCl concentrations more than 3% (w/v). The main cellular fatty acids were iso–C15:0, C16:1ω7c, and iso–C17:1ω9c. The main quinone was ubiquinone-8 and DNA G+C content was 62.9 mol%. In contrast, strain FST was motile, did not grow on the agar plate, and its dominant cellular fatty acids were C15:0 and C17:1ω8c. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain KA5–BT (JCM 18477T = KCTC 32107T) represents a novel species in genus Steroidobacter, for which the name Steroidobacter agariperforans sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:24621511

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE DENSE NEUTRAL AND DIFFUSE IONIZED GAS IN THE THICK DISKS OF TWO EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rueff, Katherine M.; Howk, J. Christopher; Pitterle, Marissa; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Savage, Blair D.

    2013-03-15

    We present high-resolution, optical images (BVI + H{alpha}) of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Large Binocular Telescope, and WIYN 3.5 m telescope reveal an extensive population of filamentary dust absorption seen to z {approx}2-2.5 kpc. Many of these dusty thick disk structures have characteristics reminiscent of molecular clouds found in the Milky Way disk. Our H{alpha} images show that the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies is dominated by a smooth, diffuse component. The strongly filamentary morphologies of the dust absorption have no counterpart in the smoothly distributed H{alpha} emission. We argue that the thick disk DIG and dust-bearing filaments trace physically distinct phases of the thick disk ISM, the latter tracing a dense, warm or cold neutral medium. The dense, dusty matter in the thick disks of spiral galaxies is largely tracing matter ejected from the thin disk via energetic feedback from massive stars. The high densities of the gas may be a result of converging gas flows. This dense material fuels some thick disk star formation, as evidenced by the presence of thick disk H II regions.

  3. Evaluation of cefoxitin disk diffusion breakpoint for detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from dogs.

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Jones, Rebekah D; Videla, Ricardo; Kania, Stephen A

    2012-09-01

    Cefoxitin disk diffusion susceptibility testing is a recommended screening method for the detection of methicillin resistance in human isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. A retrospective analysis of 1,146 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs was conducted to determine if screening by the cefoxitin disk method can be similarly useful with S. pseudintermedius. The distribution of cefoxitin growth inhibition zone diameters within this collection was bimodal and correlated well with the results of methicillin resistance gene (mecA) detection by polymerase chain reaction. Of the isolates, 5% had discordant results and, when retested, 84% of these were in agreement. While a greater diversity of isolates and interlaboratory comparisons must be tested, the current study suggests that an epidemiological breakpoint (of approximately ≤ 30 mm = resistant; ≥ 31 = susceptible) can be established to predict methicillin resistance in S. pseudintermedius.

  4. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus directly by loop-mediated isothermal amplification and direct cefoxitin disk diffusion tests.

    PubMed

    Metwally, L; Gomaa, N; Hassan, R

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the utility of 2 methods for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) directly from signal-positive blood culture bottles: loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, and direct cefoxitin disk diffusion (DCDD) test using a 30 μg cefoxitin disk. In parallel, standard microbiological identification and oxacillin susceptibility testing with MecA PCR was performed. Of 60 blood cultures positive for Gram-positive cocci in clusters, LAMP (via detection of the FemA and MecA genes) showed 100% sensitivity and specificity for identification of MRSA/MSSA. When coagulase-negative staphylococci were tested, sensitivity for detection of methicillin resistance was 91.7% and specificity was 100%. DCDD along with direct tube coagulase assay detected only 80.6% of MRSA/MSSA. LAMP showed higher diagnostic accuracy although DCDD was more cost-effective and did not require additional reagents or supplies.

  5. TDtest: easy detection of bacterial tolerance and persistence in clinical isolates by a modified disk-diffusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Gefen, Orit; Chekol, Betty; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Balaban, Nathalie Q.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic tolerance - the ability for prolonged survival under bactericidal treatments - is a potentially clinically significant phenomenon that is commonly overlooked in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Recent in vitro experiments show that high tolerance can evolve under intermittent antibiotic treatments in as little as eight exposures to high doses of antibiotics, suggesting that tolerance may evolve also in patients. However, tests for antibiotic susceptibilities, such as the disk-diffusion assay, evaluate only the concentration at which a bacterial strain stops growing, namely resistance level. High tolerance strains will not be detected using these tests. We present a simple modification of the standard disk-diffusion assay that allows the semi-quantitative evaluation of tolerance levels. This novel method, the “TDtest”, enabled the detection of tolerant and persistent bacteria by promoting the growth of the surviving bacteria in the inhibition zone, once the antibiotic has diffused away. Using the TDtest, we were able to detect different levels of antibiotic tolerance in clinical isolates of E. coli. The TDtest also identified antibiotics that effectively eliminate tolerant bacteria. The additional information on drug susceptibility provided by the TDtest should enable tailoring better treatment regimens for pathogenic bacteria. PMID:28145464

  6. Chiropractic management of a veteran with lower back pain associated with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hypertrophy and degenerative disk disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jan A.; Wolfe, Tristy M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to report the response of chiropractic care of a geriatric veteran with degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Clinical Features A 74-year-old man presented with low back pain (LBP) and loss of feeling in his lower extremities for 3 months. The LBP was of insidious onset with a 10/10 pain rating on the numeric pain scale (NPS) and history of degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hypertrophy. Oswestry questionnaire was 44% and health status questionnaire was 52%, which were below average for his age. The patient presented with antalgia and severe difficulty with ambulation and thus used a walker. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic care included Activator Methods protocol. Two weeks into treatment, he reported no back pain; and after 4 treatments, he was able to walk with a cane instead of a walker. The NPS decreased from a 10/10 to a 0/10, and his Revised Oswestry score decreased from 44/100 to 13.3/100. His Health Status Questionnaire score increased 25 points to 77/100, bringing him from below average for his age to above average for his age. Follow-up with the patient at approximately 1 year and 9 months showed an Oswestry score of 10/100 and a Health Status Questionnaire score of 67/100, still above average for his age. Conclusion The findings in this case study showed that Activator-assisted spinal manipulative therapy had positive subjective and objective results for LBP and ambulation in a geriatric veteran with degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. PMID:23843763

  7. Evaluation of disk approximation and single-well broth tests for detection of inducible clindamycin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, James H; McElmeel, M Leticia; Fulcher, Letitia C; McGee, Lesley; Glennen, Anita

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated an agar disk diffusion D-zone test and an erythromycin-clindamycin (ERY + CLI) single-well broth test for inducible CLI resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The standard CLSI disk approximation test and a single-well combination test incorporating 1 plus 0.5 μg/ml ERY + CLI detected >96% of isolates containing the ermB determinant.

  8. Single-disk diffusion testing (Kirby-Bauer) of susceptibility of Proteus mirabilis to chloramphenicol: significance of the intermediate category.

    PubMed

    Furtado, G L; Medeiros, A A

    1980-10-01

    The significance of the intermediate category of the single-disk diffusion test (Kirby-Bauer) of antibiotic susceptibility has never been clearly defined. Thirty-two percent of 756 clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis were of intermediate susceptibility to chloramphenicol, a higher percentage than for any other species. The breakpoint separating susceptible and intermediate isolates nearly bisected the frequency distribution of zone diameters of P. mirabilis but not that of the other species. The breakpoint separating susceptible and intermediate isolates nearly bisected the frequency distribution of zone diameters of P. mirabillis but not that of the other species tested. By serial broth dilution testing, the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of chloramphenicol of 50 individual isolates of P. mirabilis were 3.9 to 22.1 micrograms/ml (geometric mean, 8.0), whereas the MICs of susceptible Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, and Enterobacter strains were 2.0 to 3.9 micrograms/ml (geometric mean, 2.9). Seventy percent of isolates of P. mirabilis with MICs of 7.8 to 15.6 micrograms/ml were classified as susceptible by disk testing. We conclude that existing Kirby-Bauer breakpoints do not accurately discriminate P. mirabilis isolates that are marginally susceptible to chloramphenicol. These data underscore the difficulty of applying a single set of breakpoints to all species and suggest that species-specific breakpoints would more accurately predict the MIC equivalent of given zone diameters.

  9. Determination of disk diffusion susceptibility testing interpretive criteria using model-based analysis: development and implementation.

    PubMed

    DePalma, Glen; Turnidge, John; Craig, Bruce A

    2017-02-01

    The determination of diffusion test breakpoints has become a challenging issue due to the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics. Currently, the most commonly-used method for determining these breakpoints is the modified error-rate bounded method. Its use has remained widespread despite the introduction of several model-based methods that have been shown superior in terms of precision and accuracy. However, the computational complexities associated with these new approaches has been a significant barrier for clinicians. To remedy this, we developed and examine the utility of a free online software package designed for the determination of diffusion test breakpoints: dBETS (diffusion Breakpoint Estimation Testing Software). This software package allows clinicians to easily analyze data from susceptibility experiments through visualization, error-rate bounded, and model-based approaches. We analyze four publicly available data sets from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute using dBETS.

  10. Comparison of the BD Phoenix system with the cefoxitin disk diffusion test for detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Mencacci, Antonella; Montecarlo, Ines; Gonfia, Francesca; Moretti, Amedeo; Cardaccia, Angela; Farinelli, Senia; Pagliochini, Maria Rita; Giuliani, Angela; Basileo, Michela; Pasticci, Maria Bruna; Bistoni, Francesco

    2009-07-01

    The BD Phoenix system was compared to the cefoxitin disk diffusion test for detection of methicillin (meticillin) resistance in 1,066 Staphylococcus aureus and 1,121 coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) clinical isolates. The sensitivity for Phoenix was 100%. The specificities were 99.86% for S. aureus and 88.4% for CoNS.

  11. Herniated disk

    MedlinePlus

    Lumbar radiculopathy; Cervical radiculopathy; Herniated intervertebral disk; Prolapsed intervertebral disk; Slipped disk; Ruptured disk; Herniated nucleus pulposus: Low back pain - herniated disk; LBP - herniated disk; Sciatica - herniated disk; Herniated disk

  12. Electro-osmosis in gels: Application to Agar-Agar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, Fabien; Boscus, Jérôme; Bénet, Jean-Claude

    2008-10-01

    Widely used in food- and bio-engineering as a reference material, Agar-Agar gel is the focus of an experimental investigation concerning the electro-osmosis phenomenon. After presenting the experimental methods, one trial is discussed in detail. A fair reproducibility of results is obtained, and the averaged electro-osmotic permeability is provided. This value lies in the range generally measured on various kind of soils, even if Agar-Agar gel does not share any micro-structural characteristics with soils. To cite this article: F. Cherblanc et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  13. Gravimorphogenesis in agarics.

    PubMed

    Moore, D; Hock, B; Greening, J P; Kern, V D; Novak Frazer, L; Monzer, J

    1996-03-01

    The shape changes which occur in agaric fruit bodies in response to change in the direction of gravity, usually referred to as gravitropism are morphogenetic changes. Our interest in what we prefer to call gravimorphogenesis is to use it to examine morphogenesis experimentally. We are examining two agarics, Coprinus cinereus and Flammulina velutipes, and applying the best available technologies, including video analysis, all forms of electron microscopy, computer-aided image analysis and experiments in orbit in Spacelab. Responses to gravity of the two organisms differ in ways which can be related to their ecological and structural adaptations. C. cinereus reacts extremely rapidly; its fruit body can regain the vertical within 3 h of being placed horizontal, whereas F. velutipes requires 12 h to bend through 90 degrees. The fungi also differ in the bulk of tissue involved in the response. In Coprinus, a zone extending several cm down from the apex is normally involved in bending. In Flammulina, gravisensing is limited to a region just a few mm immediately below the cap, although curvature is performed in a zone of up to 2 cm below. Flammulina cultures were flown on the Spacelab D-2 mission in 1993, and fruit body disorientation in orbit provides the first definitive proof that 'gravitropism' really is a response to the unidirectional gravity vector. Experiments with different clinostat rotation rates in Flammulina indicate that the perception threshold is about 10(-4) x g. Analysis of different times of exposure to an altered gravity vector prior to clinorotation in Coprinus reveals that the perception time is 7 minutes and that continued response requires continued exposure. Cell size determinations in Coprinus demonstrate that cells of the stem increase in length, not diameter, to produce the growth differential. In Flammulina a unique population of highly electron-transparent microvacuoles changes in distribution; decreasing in upper cells and increasing in the

  14. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  15. The Performance of Direct Disk Diffusion for Community Acquired Bacteremia due to Gram-Negative Bacilli and Its Impact on Physician Treatment Decisions.

    PubMed

    Daley, Peter; Comerford, Adam; Umali, Jurgienne; Penney, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing provides faster results than standard microtitre susceptibility. The direct result may impact patient outcome in sepsis if it is accurate and if physicians use the information to promptly and appropriately change antibiotic treatment. Objective. To compare the performance of direct disk diffusion with standard susceptibility and to consider physician decisions in response to these early results, for community acquired bacteremia with Gram-negative Bacilli. Methods. Retrospective observational study of all positive blood cultures with Gram-negative Bacilli, collected over one year. Physician antibiotic treatment decisions were assessed by an infectious diseases physician based on information available to the physician at the time of the decision. Results. 89 bottles growing Gram-negative Bacilli were included in the analysis. Direct disk diffusion agreement with standard susceptibility varied widely. In 47 cases (52.8%), the physician should have changed to a narrower spectrum but did not, in 18 cases (20.2%), the physician correctly narrowed from appropriate broad coverage, and in 8 cases (9.0%), the empiric therapy was correct. Discussion. Because inoculum is not standardized, direct susceptibility results do not agree with standard susceptibility results for all drugs. Physicians do not act on direct susceptibility results. Conclusion. Direct susceptibility should be discontinued in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  16. The Performance of Direct Disk Diffusion for Community Acquired Bacteremia due to Gram-Negative Bacilli and Its Impact on Physician Treatment Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Peter; Comerford, Adam; Umali, Jurgienne; Penney, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing provides faster results than standard microtitre susceptibility. The direct result may impact patient outcome in sepsis if it is accurate and if physicians use the information to promptly and appropriately change antibiotic treatment. Objective. To compare the performance of direct disk diffusion with standard susceptibility and to consider physician decisions in response to these early results, for community acquired bacteremia with Gram-negative Bacilli. Methods. Retrospective observational study of all positive blood cultures with Gram-negative Bacilli, collected over one year. Physician antibiotic treatment decisions were assessed by an infectious diseases physician based on information available to the physician at the time of the decision. Results. 89 bottles growing Gram-negative Bacilli were included in the analysis. Direct disk diffusion agreement with standard susceptibility varied widely. In 47 cases (52.8%), the physician should have changed to a narrower spectrum but did not, in 18 cases (20.2%), the physician correctly narrowed from appropriate broad coverage, and in 8 cases (9.0%), the empiric therapy was correct. Discussion. Because inoculum is not standardized, direct susceptibility results do not agree with standard susceptibility results for all drugs. Physicians do not act on direct susceptibility results. Conclusion. Direct susceptibility should be discontinued in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:27366172

  17. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of an ozonated oil with chlorhexidine digluconate and povidone-iodine. A disk diffusion test.

    PubMed

    Montevecchi, Marco; Dorigo, Antonio; Cricca, Monica; Checchi, Luigi

    2013-07-01

    Ozonated oils are antiseptics obtained from the chemical reaction between ozone and unsaturated fatty acids of vegetable oils. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effectiveness of a commercially available ozonated oil (O3-Oil), in comparison with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and 10% povidone-iodine (PVP-I) through a disk diffusion test. For each antiseptic a series of two-fold dilutions was made, obtaining seven dilutions: 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, 1:16, 1:32, 1:64 and 1:128. The undiluted antiseptics and the seven dilutions were tested against two freeze-dried bacterial strains: Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg). O3-Oil showed significantly greater diameters of growth inhibition (p<0.01) than CHX and PVP-I in all dilutions for both tested strains. CHX lost any antibacterial efficacy when diluted more than 1:32. At the highest dilution, the diameters of growth inhibition against Sa were 20.67±0.58 mm and 15.33±0.58 mm, for O3-Oil and PVP-I, respectively. At the same dilution, the diameters of growth inhibition against Pg were: 19.00 mm for O3-Oil and 13.67±0.58 mm for PVP-I. The promising results obtained for the O3-Oil, against the opportunistic Sa, and Pg, one of the main periodontal pathogens, suggest its potential applicability for periodontal treatment. Further preclinical and clinical investigations are warranted.

  18. In vitro susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens to a combination of penicillin and framycetin: development of interpretive criteria for testing by broth microdilution and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Pillar, C M; Stoneburner, A; Shinabarger, D L; Abbeloos, E; Goby, L; Bradley, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Dry cow therapy is an important part of mastitis control. This therapy typically consists of an antibiotic or antibiotics administered at a single dose by intramammary infusion at dry off to treat or prevent infection by prevalent mastitis pathogens. A combination dry cow therapy consisting of the active components penicillin and framycetin is currently used in several countries. Despite its use, standardized methods for the susceptibility testing of this combination against mastitis pathogens have not been established. In this study, which used Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methodology, preliminary interpretive criteria for the broth microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing of mastitis pathogens to penicillin combined with framycetin (2:1 wt/wt) were established based on the amount of drug achieved and maintained postadministration in the udder. Based on resulting MIC distributions of recent veterinary field isolates and a subset of isolates preselected for resistance to β-lactams or aminoglycosides and concentrations achieved postadministration, criteria for broth microdilution testing of the combination (susceptible, intermediate, resistant in micrograms per milliliter) were set as follows: Escherichia coli ≤8/4, 16/8, ≥32/16; Staphylococcus spp. ≤2/1, 4/2-8/4, >16/8; Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae <0.25/0.12, 0.5/0.25-2/1, >4/2. A disk diffusion test using disks containing 100 μg of framycetin and 10 IU of penicillin was also developed, and preliminary interpretive criteria (susceptible, intermediate, resistant in millimeters) were set based on correlation to broth MIC values and the minimization of interpretive errors between isolates tested concurrently by broth microdilution and disk diffusion as follows: E. coli ≥18, 16-17, ≤15; Staphylococcus spp. ≥21, 18-20, ≤17; Strep. uberis and Strep. dysgalactiae ≥21, 19-20, ≤18. In addition, ranges for the quality control of the testing of

  19. Evaluating the in vitro susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens to a combination of kanamycin and cefalexin: Recommendations for a disk diffusion test.

    PubMed

    Pillar, C M; Goby, L; Draghi, D; Grover, P; Thornsberry, C

    2009-12-01

    Cows suffering from bovine mastitis have markedly reduced milk production because of inflammation within the udder subsequent to infection and damage from bacterial toxins. Antibiotic treatment is commonly used as a preventative and therapeutic measure for bovine mastitis. The most common pathogens include Staphylococcus aureus, various streptococci (Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis), and coliforms (Escherichia coli), which can be contracted from other infected cows or from the environment. A combination of kanamycin and cefalexin (1:1.5 wt/wt) is currently used therapeutically in Europe for the treatment of bovine mastitis, although standardized methods for the in vitro determination of the susceptibility of target pathogens have not been developed. This study evaluates the appropriate broth microdilution testing criteria for kanamycin and cefalexin administered in combination and reports the development of a disk diffusion test. At a ratio of kanamycin:cefalexin relevant to that observed in milk postadministration (10:1 wt/wt), the minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined against 307 isolates of target mastitis pathogens (staphylococci, streptococci, and E. coli). Based on achievable concentrations in milk and the resulting distribution of minimum inhibitory concentrations, preliminary broth breakpoints for kanamycin/cefalexin (10:1 fixed ratio) of or=32/3.2 microg/mL resistant were applied to evaluated staphylococci, streptococci, and E. coli. Parallel testing by disk diffusion and resulting error-rate bounded analysis using a combined disk concentration of 30 microg of kanamycin and 15 microg of cefalexin resulted in the establishment of preliminary disk interpretive breakpoints of >or=20 mm susceptible, 18 to 19 mm intermediate, and

  20. Comparison of the accuracy of disk diffusion zone diameters obtained by manual zone measurements to that by automated zone measurements to determine antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lestari, Endang Sri; Severin, Juliëtte A; Filius, P Margreet G; Kuntaman, Kuntaman; Offra Duerink, D; Hadi, Usman; Wahjono, Hendro; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2008-10-01

    Although a variety of techniques are available for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, disk diffusion methods remain the most widely used. We compared the accuracy of disk diffusion zone diameters as obtained by manual zone measurements in a low resource country (Indonesia) to that by automated zone measurements (Oxoid aura image system) in a high resource setting (the Netherlands) to determine susceptibility categories (sensitive, intermediate susceptible or resistant). A total of 683 isolates were studied, including 294 Staphylococcus aureus, 195 Escherichia coli and 194 other Enterobacteriaceae. Antimicrobial agents included tetracycline, oxacillin, gentamicin, erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol for S. aureus and ampicillin, gentamicin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol for E. coli and other Enterobacteriaceae. Of the 4098 drug-organism combinations, overall category agreement (CA), major discrepancy (MD) and minor discrepancy (mD) between the two methods were 82.4% (3379/4098), 6.0% (244/4098) and 11.6% (475/4098), respectively. One hundred and sixty three of 244 MDs were resolved using reference broth microdilution method. Overall very major error (VME), major error (ME) and minor error (mE) of manual zone measurement were 28.8%, 45.4% and 4.9%, respectively and for the aura image system 4.9%, 16.0% and 4.9%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the disk diffusion method with manual zone measurement in Indonesia is reliable for susceptibility testing. The use of an automated zone reader, such as the aura image system, will reduce the number of errors, and thus improve the accuracy of susceptibility test results for medically relevant bacteria.

  1. Correlation between the VITEK2 system and cefoxitin disk diffusion for the daily detection of oxacillin resistance in a large number of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Bemer, P; Juvin, M E; Le Gargasson, G; Drugeon, H; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of the new VITEK2 AST-P551 card with the cefoxitin disk diffusion method for the daily detection of methicillin resistance with a high number of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates. Detection of the PBP2a protein or mecA gene was performed for each discordant case. Seventy (3.3%) isolates out of 2,107 clinical strains showed discordant results, two very major errors, four major errors and 64 minor errors. Fifty-nine (84%) discordant results were resolved, with a final overall agreement of 99.5%. Eleven (0.5%) strains remained discordant (minor error [mE]). Four of 370 MRSA strains were misclassified as susceptible in daily practice by the cefoxitin disk diffusion method. All of these strains were resistant to aminoglycosides and/or fluoroquinolones. The VITEK2 system is highly reliable for methicillin resistance detection at the routine level. Oxacillin-susceptible classified clinical strains with associated resistance patterns required attention.

  2. In vitro susceptibility testing of Geotrichum capitatum: comparison of the E-test, disk diffusion, and Sensititre colorimetric methods with the NCCLS M27-A2 broth microdilution reference method.

    PubMed

    Girmenia, C; Pizzarelli, G; D'Antonio, D; Cristini, F; Martino, P

    2003-12-01

    The in vitro activities of amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole against 23 isolates of Geotrichum capitatum were determined by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) M27-A2 microdilution method and the Sensititre and agar diffusion methods. Amphotericin B and voriconazole appeared to be the more active drugs. Sensititre showed the highest rates of agreement with the NCCLS M27-A2 method.

  3. Comparison of spiral gradient and conventional agar dilution for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M; Molitoris, E; Jashnian, F; Finegold, S M

    1991-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed on brucella laked blood agar with 340 isolates and 14 antimicrobial agents by the standard agar dilution technique and the spiral gradient technique in which antibiotic concentrations were established by diffusion from the agar surface. For comparison, spiral gradient MICs were determined by calculating antimicrobial concentrations at growth endpoints and rounding up to the next twofold incremental concentration. The cumulative percentage of strains susceptible at the breakpoint determined from spiral gradient data was within 10%, generally, of the percentage of strains susceptible at the breakpoint determined from agar dilution data. The overall agreement between the two techniques (within one doubling dilution) was 90.6%. The spiral gradient agar dilution technique is a reasonable alternative to the conventional agar dilution technique for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Images PMID:1929262

  4. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy at the oil-water interface: hard disk diffusion behavior in dilute beta-lactoglobulin layers precedes monolayer formation.

    PubMed

    Donsmark, Jesper; Rischel, Christian

    2007-06-05

    We have performed a thorough characterization of fluorescence correlations spectroscopy (FCS) applied to oil-water interfaces of viscous oil droplets in aqueous solution, including numerical wave-optical calculations of the detection geometry and regularized multicomponent analysis of sample data. It is shown how significant errors in the estimation of the surface concentration can be avoided when FCS is applied to an interface region. We present data on the adsorption dynamics of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a well-studied model system. It is found that electrostatic repulsion slows the adsorption process and reduces the initial saturation density far below the monolayer concentration. During the first stages of adsorption, the diffusion coefficients of adsorbed protein closely follow the 2D hard disk model of Lahtinen et al.1 in response to increased surface concentration, which suggests that protein-protein interactions are limited to long-range Coulombic interactions at this stage.

  5. Palladium nanoparticles decorated on reduced graphene oxide rotating disk electrodes toward ultrasensitive hydrazine detection: effects of particle size and hydrodynamic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Krittayavathananon, Atiweena; Srimuk, Pattarachai; Luanwuthi, Santamon; Sawangphruk, Montree

    2014-12-16

    Although metal nanoparticle/graphene composites have been widely used as the electrode in electrochemical sensors, two effects, consisting of the particle size of the nanoparticles and the hydrodynamic diffusion of analytes to the electrodes, are not yet fully understood. In this work, palladium nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (PdNPs/rGO) composites were synthesized using an in situ polyol method. Palladium(II) ions and graphene oxide were reduced together with a reducing agent, ethylene glycol. By varying the concentration of palladium(II) nitrate, PdNPs with different sizes were decorated on the surface of rGO sheets. The as-fabricated PdNPs/rGO rotating disk electrodes (RDEs) were investigated toward hydrazine detection. Overall, a 3.7 ± 1.4 nm diameter PdNPs/rGO RDE exhibits high performance with a rather low limit of detection of about 7 nM at a rotation speed of 6000 rpm and provides a wide linear range of 0.1-1000 μM with R(2) = 0.995 at 2000 rpm. This electrode is highly selective to hydrazine without interference from uric acid, glucose, ammonia, caffeine, methylamine, ethylenediamine, hydroxylamine, n-butylamine, adenosine, cytosine, guanine, thymine, and l-arginine. The PdNPs/rGO RDEs with larger sizes show lower detection performance. Interestingly, the detection performance of the electrodes is sensitive to the hydrodynamic diffusion of hydrazine. The as-fabricated electrode can detect trace hydrazine in wastewater with high stability, demonstrating its practical use as an electrochemical sensor. These findings may lead to an awareness of the effect of the hydrodynamic diffusion of analyte that has been previously ignored, and the 3.7 ± 1.4 nm PdNPs/rGO RDE may be useful toward trace hydrazine detection, especially in wastewater from related chemical industries.

  6. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pain if the back is stressed. A herniated disk is a disk that ruptures. This allows the ... or back pain. Your doctor will diagnose a herniated disk with a physical exam and, sometimes, imaging tests. ...

  7. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by agar: effects of NaCl and ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on agar was investigated as a function of temperature (308-328 K), different concentrations of NaCl and HCl and various weight percentages of binary mixtures of ethanol with water. It was observed that the maximum experimental adsorption capacity, qm, exp, in water is up to 50 mg g-1 and decreases with increase in weight percentage of ethanol and NaCl and HCl concentration compared to that of water. Analysis of data using ARIAN model showed that MB adsorbs as monomer and dimer on the surface of agar. Binding constants of MB to agar were calculated using the Temkin isotherm. The process is exothermic in water and other solutions. The mean adsorption energy (E) value indicated binding of MB to agar is chemical adsorption. Kinetics of this interaction obeys from the pseudo-second-order model and diffusion of the MB molecules into the agar is the main rate-controlling step. PMID:22339759

  8. Results from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Study, 1997 to 2007: 10.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of noncandidal yeast species to fluconazole and voriconazole determined by CLSI standardized disk diffusion testing.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Gibbs, D L; Newell, V A; Bijie, H; Dzierzanowska, D; Klimko, N N; Letscher-Bru, V; Lisalova, M; Muehlethaler, K; Rennison, C; Zaidi, M

    2009-01-01

    Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results determined by the CLSI M44-A disk diffusion method for 11,240 isolates of noncandidal yeasts were collected from 134 study sites in 40 countries from June 1997 through December 2007. Data were collected for 8,717 yeast isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 through 2007. A total of 22 different species/organism groups were isolated, of which Cryptococcus neoformans was the most common (31.2% of all isolates). Overall, Cryptococcus (32.9%), Saccharomyces (11.7%), Trichosporon (10.6%), and Rhodotorula (4.1%) were the most commonly identified genera. The overall percentages of isolates in each category (susceptible, susceptible dose dependent, and resistant) were 78.0%, 9.5%, and 12.5% and 92.7%, 2.3%, and 5.0% for fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively. Less than 30% of fluconazole-resistant isolates of Cryptococcus spp., Cryptococcus albidus, Cryptococcus laurentii, Trichosporon beigelii/Trichosporon cutaneum, Rhodotorula spp., Rhodotorula rubra/Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and Rhodotorula glutinis remained susceptible to voriconazole. Emerging resistance to fluconazole was documented among isolates of C. neoformans from the Asia-Pacific, Africa/Middle East, and Latin American regions but not among isolates from Europe or North America. This survey documents the continuing broad spectrum of activity of voriconazole against opportunistic yeast pathogens but identifies several of the less common species with decreased azole susceptibility. These organisms may pose a future threat to optimal antifungal therapy and emphasize the importance of prompt and accurate species identification.

  9. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  10. Comparison of a highly automated 5-h susceptibility testing system, the Cobas-Bact, with two reference methods: Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and broth microdilution.

    PubMed

    Murray, P R; Niles, A C; Heeren, R L

    1987-12-01

    The results of susceptibility tests performed with the Cobas-Bact system were compared with those of the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and the broth microdilution methods. The evaluation included tests with 24 antibiotics against 250 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae and 13 antibiotics against 100 gram-positive cocci. Complete agreements between the Cobas-Bact and Kirby-Bauer methods were 82.8 and 84.5% for gram-positive cocci and gram-negative bacilli, respectively. Agreements between the Cobas-Bact and broth microdilution methods were 76.7% for gram-positive cocci and 84.8% for gram-negative bacilli. Complete agreements between the Kirby-Bauer and broth microdilution methods were 87.0% for gram-positive cocci and 92.2% for gram-negative bacilli. Despite generally satisfactory results with most organism-antibiotic combinations tested, additional modifications of the Cobas-Bact system are required to reduce the number of major and very major discrepancies, as well as to permit testing of Pseudomonas spp. and other gram-negative nonfermentative bacilli.

  11. The physicochemical property characterization of agar acetate.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Jingkun; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-09-22

    A series of agar acetates with different degree of substitution (DS) were prepared, and their properties were determined and analyzed. The results showed that the gelling temperature, the gel melting temperature, the gel strength, the gel hardness, the gel fracturability, the gel springiness and the solution apparent viscosity of agar acetates all decreased except that their gel cohesiveness increased with the increase of DS. The variation process of agar molecules in solution from coil to helix could be also observed by measuring solution optical rotation in a lower concentration at which even the solution could not form a gel. The gel skeleton structures of agar acetates were of porous network structures, and the pores became smaller and denser with the increase of DS. After acetylation, the water holding capacity of the agar was improved, but its thermal stability was lowered.

  12. Molecular characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and its correlation with clinical laboratory standards institute interpretive criteria for disk diffusion susceptibility testing in enterobacteriaceae isolates in Thaialnd.

    PubMed

    Tangkoskul, Teerawit; Tiengrim, Surapee; Onsomang, Supiluck; Pati, Naratchaphan; Aswapokee, Nalinee; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2012-11-01

    We performed extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) phenotypic testing and molecular characterization of three ESBL genes (TEM, SHV and CTX-M) and susceptibility testing by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) disk diffusion method against three cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime) and a cephamycin (cefoxitin) among 128 Thai Escherichia coli and 84 Thai Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates. ESBL production was discovered in 62% of E. coli and 43% of K. pneumoniae isolates. All isolates susceptible to ceftriaxone were ESBL-negative. Nearly all isolates non-susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime and cefepime produced ESBL; the presence of CTX-M genes in the isolates correlated with a ceftriaxone non-susceptible phenotype. Thirty-nine of 83 isolates (47%) of ceftazidime-susceptible E. coli and 50 of 99 isolates (50.5%) of cefepime-susceptible E. coli were ESBL-producing. SHV-type beta-lactamase genes were more prevalent among K. pneumoniae than E. coli isolates. CTX-M was the major ESBL gene harbored by ESBL-producers in both E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates. Non-CTX-M ESBL-producers were found only among K. pneumoniae isolates. This study reveals an increase in ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae among Thai isolates and demonstrates gaps in the current CLSI disk diffusion susceptibility guidelines; it indicates the results of ceftazidime and cefepime disk diffusion susceptibility testing using CLSI criteria should be interpreted with caution.

  13. Results from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Study, 1997 to 2007: a 10.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of Candida Species to fluconazole and voriconazole as determined by CLSI standardized disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Gibbs, D L; Newell, V A; Ellis, D; Tullio, V; Rodloff, A; Fu, W; Ling, T A

    2010-04-01

    Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results for 256,882 isolates of Candida spp. were collected from 142 sites in 41 countries from June 1997 to December 2007. Data were collected for 197,619 isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 to 2007. A total of 31 different species of Candida were isolated. Increased rates of isolation of the common non-albicans species C. glabrata (10.2% to 11.7%), C. tropicalis (5.4% to 8.0%), and C. parapsilosis (4.8% to 5.6%) were noted when the time periods 1997 to 2000 and 2005 to 2007 were compared. Investigators tested clinical isolates of Candida spp. by the CLSI M44-A disk diffusion method. Overall, 90.2% of Candida isolates tested were susceptible (S) to fluconazole; however, 13 of 31 species identified exhibited decreased susceptibility (<75% S), similar to that seen with the resistant (R) species C. glabrata and C. krusei. Among 197,619 isolates of Candida spp. tested against voriconazole, 95.0% were S and 3% were R. About 30% of fluconazole-R isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. rugosa, C. lipolytica, C. pelliculosa, C. apicola, C. haemulonii, C. humicola, C. lambica, and C. ciferrii remained S to voriconazole. An increase in fluconazole resistance over time was seen with C. parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, C. lusitaniae, C. sake, and C. pelliculosa. Among the emerging fluconazole-R species were C. guilliermondii (11.4% R), C. inconspicua (53.2% R), C. rugosa (41.8% R), and C. norvegensis (40.7% R). The rates of isolation of C. rugosa, C. inconspicua, and C. norvegensis increased by 5- to 10-fold over the 10.5-year study period. C. guilliermondii and C. rugosa were most prominent in Latin America, whereas C. inconspicua and C. norvegensis were most common in Eastern European countries. This survey identifies several less-common species of Candida with decreased susceptibility to azoles. These organisms may pose a future threat to optimal antifungal therapy and underscore the importance of prompt and

  14. Carbapenem susceptibility testing errors using three automated systems, disk diffusion, Etest, and broth microdilution and carbapenem resistance genes in isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex.

    PubMed

    Markelz, Ana Elizabeth; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Yu, Xin; Zera, Wendy C; Hospenthal, Duane R; Beckius, Miriam L; Calvano, Tatjana; Akers, Kevin S

    2011-10-01

    The Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex (ABC) is associated with increasing carbapenem resistance, necessitating accurate resistance testing to maximize therapeutic options. We determined the accuracy of carbapenem antimicrobial susceptibility tests for ABC isolates and surveyed them for genetic determinants of carbapenem resistance. A total of 107 single-patient ABC isolates from blood and wound infections from 2006 to 2008 were evaluated. MICs of imipenem, meropenem, and doripenem determined by broth microdilution (BMD) were compared to results obtained by disk diffusion, Etest, and automated methods (the MicroScan, Phoenix, and Vitek 2 systems). Discordant results were categorized as very major errors (VME), major errors (ME), and minor errors (mE). DNA sequences encoding OXA beta-lactamase enzymes (bla(OXA-23-like), bla(OXA-24-like), bla(OXA-58-like), and bla(OXA-51-like)) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) (IMP, VIM, and SIM1) were identified by PCR, as was the KPC2 carbapenemase gene. Imipenem was more active than meropenem and doripenem. The percentage of susceptibility was 37.4% for imipenem, 35.5% for meropenem, and 3.7% for doripenem. Manual methods were more accurate than automated methods. bla(OXA-23-like) and bla(OXA-24-like) were the primary resistance genes found. bla(OXA-58-like), MBLs, and KPC2 were not present. Both automated testing and manual testing for susceptibility to doripenem were very inaccurate, with VME rates ranging between 2.8 and 30.8%. International variability in carbapenem breakpoints and the absence of CLSI breakpoints for doripenem present a challenge in susceptibility testing.

  15. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  16. Morphological development of Morchella conica mycelium on different agar media.

    PubMed

    Guler, P; Ozkaya, E G

    2009-07-01

    The present study presents the development of mycelium of Morchella conica where different concentration of sucrose added at different agar media. For this sucrose have been added as 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00 and 1.25% concentration to wheat agar potato dextrose agar malt extract agar and complete medium yeast agar The radial growth speed, morphologic specifications, radial growth radius and pigmentation of mycelium were taken as criteria, the development period of mycelium in wheat agar was completed in 4 days and mycelium were very thin. The colonization period of the mycelium was determined; 7 days in potato dextrose agar 5 days in malt extract agar and 5 days at complete medium yeast agar. The development of the mycelium; at potato dextrose agar was dense and circular; at malt extract agar and at completed medium yeast agar was rhizomorphic. Mycelium has developed very well at sucrose medium and formed creamy and light yellow pigmentation.

  17. Protoplanetary Disks as (Possibly) Viscous Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2017-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks are believed to evolve on megayear timescales in a diffusive (viscous) manner as a result of angular momentum transport driven by internal stresses. Here we use a sample of 26 protoplanetary disks resolved by ALMA with measured (dust-based) masses and stellar accretion rates to derive the dimensionless α-viscosity values for individual objects, with the goal of constraining the angular momentum transport mechanism. We find that the inferred values of α do not cluster around a single value, but instead have a broad distribution extending from 10‑4 to 0.04. Moreover, they correlate with neither the global disk parameters (mass, size, surface density) nor the stellar characteristics (mass, luminosity, radius). However, we do find a strong linear correlation between α and the central mass accretion rate \\dot{M}. This correlation is unlikely to result from the direct physical effect of \\dot{M} on internal stress on global scales. Instead, we suggest that it is caused by the decoupling of stellar \\dot{M} from the global disk characteristics in one of the following ways: (1) The behavior (and range) of α is controlled by a yet-unidentified parameter (e.g., ionization fraction, magnetic field strength, or geometry), ultimately driving the variation of \\dot{M}. (2) The central \\dot{M} is decoupled from the global accretion rate as a result of an instability, or mass accumulation (or loss in a wind or planetary accretion) in the inner disk. (3) Perhaps the most intriguing possibility is that angular momentum in protoplanetary disks is transported nonviscously, e.g., via magnetohydrodynamic winds or spiral density waves.

  18. Pigments of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian; Schliemann, Willibald

    2007-01-01

    The complex pigment pattern of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) cap skins has been studied by LC-DAD and mass spectrometry. Among the betaxanthins the corresponding derivatives of serine, threonine, ethanolamine, alanine, Dopa, phenylalanine and tryptophan are reported for the first time to contribute to the pigment pattern of fly agarics. Betalamic acid, the chromophoric precursor of betaxanthins and betacyanins, muscaflavin and seco-dopas were also detected. Furthermore, the red-purple muscapurpurin and the red muscarubrin were tentatively assigned while further six betacyanin-like components could not be structurally allocated. Stability studies indicated a high susceptibility of pigment extracts to degradation which led to rapid colour loss thus rendering a complete characterization of betacyanin-like compounds impossible at present. Taking into account these difficulties the presented results may be a starting point for a comprehensive characterization of the pigment composition of fly agarics.

  19. Standard operating procedure to prepare agar phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, R. M.; Santos, T. Q.; Oliveira, D. P.; Souza, R. M.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Agar phantoms are widely used as soft tissue mimics and some preparation techniques are described in the literature. There are also standards that describe the recipe of a soft tissue mimicking material (TMM). However some details of manufacture process are not clearly defined. The standardization of the phantom's preparation can produce a metrological impact on the results of the acoustic properties measured. In this direction, this paper presents a standard operating procedure (SOP) to prepare the agar TMM described on the IEC 60601-237.

  20. Use of agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Velimirović, Milica; Wagner, Stephan; Micić Batka, Vesna; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    A major obstacle for use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles as a nontoxic material for effective in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) is the high production cost. For that reason, submicro-scale milled zero-valent iron particles were recently developed (milled ZVI, UVR-FIA, Germany) by grinding macroscopic raw materials of elementary iron as a cheaper alternative to products produced by solid-state reduction. However, milled ZVI particles tend to aggregate and due to the rather large particle size (d50= 11.9 µm) also rapidly sediment. To prevent aggregation and consequently sedimentation of milled ZVI particles and therefore improve the mobility after in situ application, the use of a stabilizer is considered in literature as a most promising option. In this study, milled ZVI particles (1 g L-1 of particle concentration) were stabilized by environmentally friendly polymer agar agar (>0.5 g L-1), which had a positive impact on the milled ZVI stability. Sedimentation rate was significantly decreased by increasing the suspension viscosity. Column transport experiments were performed for bare and agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles in commercially available fine grained quartz sand (DORSILIT® Nr.8, Gebrüder Dorfner GmbH Co, Germany) and different porous media collected from brownfields. The experiments were carried out under field relevant injection conditions of 100 m d-1. The maximal travel distance (LT) of less than 10 cm was determined for non-stabilized suspension in fine grained quartz sand, while agar agar (1 g L-1) stabilized milled ZVI suspension revealed LT of 12 m. Similar results were observed for porous media from brownfields showing that mobility of agar agar stabilized particle suspensions was significantly improved compared to bare particles. Based on the mobility data, agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles could be used for in situ application. Finally, lab-scale batch degradation

  1. Nebra Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pásztor, Emília

    An important archaeological find from the Bronze Age has come to light in Germany. It is a round bronze disk adorned with gold figures that might be interpreted as symbols for stars, the sun, and the moon, making the disk the oldest known surviving depiction of celestial objects in Europe. By comparing the iconography and ideography of the disk with archaeological finds, ethnographic material, and historical notes of different cultures and periods, the conclusion has been reached that the compositional elements might be understood as the depiction of a traditional folk worldview.

  2. Magnetic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinson, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic disk recording was invented in 1953 and has undergone intensive development ever since. As a result of this 38 years of development, the cost per byte and the areal density have halved and doubled respectively every 2-2 1/2 years. Today, the cost per byte is lower than 10(exp -6) dollars per byte and area densities exceed 100 10(exp 6) bits per square inch. In this talk, the recent achievements in magnetic disk recording are first surveyed briefly. Then, the principal areas of current technical development are outlined. Finally, some comments are made about the future of magnetic disk recording.

  3. Disk Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A new material known as AlBeMet, developed by Brush Wellman for research applications in the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, is now used for high performance disk drives. AlBeMet is a compression of aluminum, beryllium metal matrix composite. It reduces system weight and its high thermal conductivity can effectively remove heat and increase an electrical system's lifetime. The lighter, stiffer AlBeMet (AlBeMet 160) used in the disk drive means heads can be moved faster, improving disk performance.

  4. Disk diffusion susceptibility testing of two macrolide antimicrobial agents: revised interpretive criteria for erythromycin and preliminary guidelines for roxithromycin (RU 965).

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R N; Barry, A L; Fuchs, P C; Thornsberry, C

    1986-01-01

    The 15-micrograms erythromycin disk was twice evaluated for interpretive accuracy against 417 and then 266 strains of gram-positive cocci, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae by using the criteria suggested by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. These studies suggest a revision of streptococcal and Staphylococcus sp. interpretive guidelines to criteria (greater than or equal to 23 mm = susceptible, less than or equal to 13 mm = resistant) that are more compatible with in vivo erythromycin concentrations. It is also recommended that zone diameters be modified for H. influenzae (greater than or equal to 23 mm = susceptible, less than 22 mm = resistant) and that meningococci not be tested. A wide moderately susceptible category (1.0 to 4.0 micrograms/ml) would primarily include enterococcus strains and those organisms that would then respond only to parenteral administration of erythromycin. Roxithromycin (RU 965 or RU 28965), a new oxime ether erythromycin derivative, was also evaluated by investigator-prepared 15-micrograms disks and later with 30- and 60-micrograms commercial disks. Although roxithromycin was comparable to erythromycin in activity and regression line statistics, changes in the susceptible disk criteria were necessary because of superior roxithromycin serum concentrations and a longer serum half-life. Preliminary susceptible breakpoint criteria were greater than 21 mm = susceptible, 10 to 20 mm = indeterminate, and less than or equal to 9 mm = resistant. By using the recommended interpretive criteria for both macrolides, less than 98% absolute agreement was obtained, therefore suggesting the application of a spectrum class concept. PMID:3091634

  5. Is a New Standard Needed for Diffusion Methods for In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Fosfomycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa?

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Martínez-García, Laura; Morosini, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed fosfomycin susceptibility results in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates obtained by MIC gradient strips and disk diffusion methods using two different inocula, 108 and 106 CFU/ml, and compared them to the agar dilution reference method. Essential and categorical agreements were 93.6% and 95%, respectively, for the 106 CFU/ml alternative inoculum, and they were 67.6% and 78.2%, respectively, for the standard inoculum (108 CFU/ml). The use of the 106 CFU/ml inoculum improves the agreement values and inhibition zone readings. PMID:26643341

  6. Ultrasonic backscatter coefficients for weakly scattering, agar spheres in agar phantoms

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Anderson, Janelle J.; Herd, Maria-Teresa; Ma, Darryl; Haak, Alexander; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Zagzebski, James A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Hall, Timothy J.; O’Brien, William D.

    2010-01-01

    Applicability of ultrasound phantoms to biological tissue has been limited because most phantoms have generally used strong scatterers. The objective was to develop very weakly scattering phantoms, whose acoustic scattering properties are likely closer to those of tissues and then compare theoretical simulations and experimental backscatter coefficient (BSC) results. The phantoms consisted of agar spheres of various diameters (nominally between 90 and 212 μm), containing ultrafiltered milk, suspended in an agar background. BSC estimates were performed at two institutions over the frequency range 1–13 MHz, and compared to three models. Excellent agreement was shown between the two laboratory results as well as with the three models. PMID:20707460

  7. Multi-laboratory assessment of the linezolid spectrum of activity using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method: Report of the Zyvox Antimicrobial Potency Study (ZAPS) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N; Ballow, C H; Biedenbach, D J

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro activity of linezolid against common Gram-positive pathogens was compared to that of penicillin or ampicillin or oxacillin (depending upon genus), cefazolin, erythromycin, clindamycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, levofloxacin, nitrofurantoin and vancomycin by disk diffusion methods. One hundred and six centers (31 states in US) tested recent clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterococcus faecium, E. faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and other streptococci. Testing was conducted using the standardized disk diffusion method and concurrent quality control testing was performed. Strains with linezolid zone diameters of < or = 20 mm were requested for referral to the microbiology monitor for confirmation. A total of 3,100 isolates (97% compliance) were tested. Susceptibility (zone diameters, > or = 21 mm) of staphylococci and streptococci to linezolid was reported in 100% and 99.4% of staphylococci and streptococci, respectively. Susceptibility (zone diameters, > or = 23 mm) of enterococci to linezolid was 96.0% with only three isolates (0.4%) reported as resistant (zone diameters, < or = 20 mm; unconfirmed). Among a total of nine isolates (0.3%) reported to have zone diameters 20 mm, six were not submitted for further testing, two were contaminated with Gram-negative bacilli and one was determined to be linezolid-susceptible. There were no differences in linezolid susceptibility in the vancomycin- or oxacillin- or penicillin-resistant subsets of strains. This susceptibility pattern for US medical centers is indicative of the excellent and nearly complete in vitro activity against the key Gram-positive pathogens for which linezolid has received US Food and Drug Administration indications for clinical use.

  8. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium.

  9. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  10. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (∼80 °C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials.

  11. Automatic Surface Inoculation of Agar Trays1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Judd R.; Mills, Stacey M.; Boykin, Elizabeth H.

    1972-01-01

    A machine is described which automatically inoculates a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture by use of either a conventional inoculating loop or a cotton swab. Isolated colonies were obtained with an inoculating loop when a heavy inoculum (109 cells/ml) was used or with a cotton swab when a light inoculum (ca. 104 cells/ml) was used. Trays containing combinations of differential or selective media were used to (i) separate mixtures of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, (ii) facilitate isolation of organisms from clinical specimens, and (iii) compare colony growth characteristics of pure cultures. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. Images PMID:16349943

  12. Poisoning with brown fly agaric, Amanita regalis.

    PubMed

    Elonen, E; Tarssanen, L; Härkönen, M

    1979-01-01

    Three patients ate different amounts of a common northern mushroom, brown fly agaric, Amanita regalis. All of them believed they had eaten delicious parasol mushrooms, Macrolepiota procera. The symptoms of poisoning began 1--2 hours after ingestion of the mushrooms. All the patients had marked gastrointestinal symptoms: nausea and heavy vomiting. Two had central nervous system manifestations and cholinergic symptoms: hallucinations, confusion, or loss of consciousness as well as copious salivation, or sweating. All patients recovered within 4--24 hours without any damage to liver, kidneys or central nervous system. It seems that cooking the mushrooms does not completely neutralize the toxic agents of Amanita regalis. The analysis of fried mushrooms shows that it may be possible to identify mushrooms reliably from the remains of a meal.

  13. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  14. Optical disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Swafford, B.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the different types of optical storage technology is presented. Research efforts to integrate this technology into the VAX/VMS environment are discussed. In addition, plans for future applications of optical disk technology are described. The applications should prove to be beneficial to the NSSDC user community as a whole. Of particular interest is the concentration on the collaboration with the Dynamics Explorer project.

  15. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  16. Non-Isothermal effects on Be Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R. G.; Carciofi, A. C.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, the viscous decretion disk model has emerged as the new paradigm for Be star disks. In this contribution, we propose a simple analytical model to estimate the continuum infrared excess arising from these circumstellar disks, in the light of the currently accepted scenario. We demonstrate that the disk can be satisfactorily described by a two component system: an inner optically thick region, which we call the pseudo-photosphere, and a diffuse outer part. In particular, a direct connexion between the disk brightness profile and the thermal structure is derived, and then confronted to realistic numerical simulations. This result quantifies how the non-isothermality of the disk ultimately affects both infrared measured fluxes and visibilities.

  17. Micro-agar salt bridge in patch-clamp electrode holder stabilizes electrode potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xuesi M.; Feldman, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining a stable electrode potential is critical for patch-clamp measurements. The electrode potential of conventional patch electrode-holder assembly, where an Ag/AgCl wire is in direct contact with the patch pipette filling solution, is subject to drift if the pipette solution contains a low concentration of chloride ions (Cl−). We developed an agar bridge of 3 M KCl filled in a polyimide microtubing which forms an electrical connection between an Ag/AgCl wire and the pipette solution. We examined the offset potentials of the micro-agar salt bridge electrode assembly in parallel with a conventional electrode assembly in generic recording conditions (the pipette solution contained 5 mM NaCl). The junction potential between the Ag/AgCl wire and the pipette filling solution in the conventional electrode contributed to most of the offset potential drift observed during the course of 30 min recordings. The drift was up to 27.3 mV after several changes of the glass pipette. In contrast, the micro-agar salt bridge stabilized the electrode potential within typically 2 mV without affecting the patch electrode resistance, capacitance or noise level. Numerical simulations showed that Cl− diffusion from the agar bridge to the tip caused a negligible 0.4 μM Cl− concentration change at the pipette tip within 30 min. This method is easy to implement and provides long-term recording stability. The micro-agar salt bridge can fit in most commercial patch electrode holders and can be conveniently maintained. PMID:16916545

  18. Selected elements in fly agaric Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Kunito, T; Kubota, R; Lipka, K; Mazur, A; Falandysz, Justyna J; Tanabe, S

    2007-09-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb, Rb, Se, Sb, Sr, V, Tl and Zn have been determined in the whole fruiting bodies, as well as separately in caps and stalks, of fly agaric collected from three geographically distant sites in northern part of Poland. The elements were determined using ICP-MS, ICP-OES, HG-AAS and CV-AAS, respectively. For elements such as Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Ga, Mo, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, Tl, and V concentrations were similar in the caps and stalks, respectively, and for K, Zn, Ag, Ca, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Rb and Se were greater in the caps, while for Co, Cs and Na in the stalks. For Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sr, Tl and V concentration in the caps showed spatial variations (P<0.05), while for Cu, K, Mg, Na, Se and Zn was independent of the site. The elements such as K with median or mean in the caps between 37,000 and 43,000 microg/g.dm and Mg with 920 and 1,100 microg/g dm were most abundant. Next, within median values range from approximately 100 to 500 microg/g dm were such as Ca, Fe and Al, and in descending order they followed by Rb (100-400 microg/g dm); V, Na, Zn (50-200 microg/g dm); Cu, Mn (10-50 microg/g dm); Cd (10-20 microg/g dm); Se (5 microg/g dm); Ba (<1-3); Cr, Ag, Pb, Sr (<1-2 microg/g dm); Cs, Co, Hg (<1-1 microg/g dm); Ga (<0.5), Sb, Mo and Tl (<0.1 microg/g dm).

  19. Comparison of inhibitory mold agar to Sabouraud dextrose agar as a primary medium for isolation of fungi.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Theresa; Zinchuk, Riva; Gumpeni, Pramod; Larone, Davise H

    2010-05-01

    Clinical specimens cultured on two selective fungal media, inhibitory mold agar (IMA) and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), were compared with respect to recovery of fungi. Of the 840 fungal isolates recovered, 69.3% grew on both IMA and SDA; 24.9% grew only on IMA; and 5.8% grew only on SDA, showing that IMA is superior (P=0.003).

  20. Differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans on rosemary extract agar and oregano extract agar.

    PubMed

    de Loreto, Erico Silva; Pozzatti, Patrícia; Alves Scheid, Liliane; Santurio, Deise; Morais Santurio, Janio; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently described pathogenic species which shares many phenotypic features with Candida albicans and therefore, may be misidentified in microbiological laboratories. Because molecular methods can be onerous and unfeasible in routine mycological laboratories with restricted budgets such as those in developing countries, phenotypic techniques have been encouraged in the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of these species. We examined the colony morphology and chlamydospore production of 30 C. dubliniensis isolates and 100 C. albicans isolates on two new proposed media: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract agar (REA) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) extract agar (OEA). These substrates are traditionally used as spices and medicinal herbs. In both of these media, all C. dubliniensis isolates (100%) showed rough colonies with peripheral hyphal fringes and abundant chlamydospores after 24 to 48 hr of incubation at 25 degrees C. In contrast, under the same conditions, all isolates of C. albicans (100%) showed smooth colonies without hyphal fringes or chlamydospores. In conclusion, REA and OEA offer a simple, rapid, and inexpensive screening media for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  1. Effect of water structure on gelation of agar in glycerol solutions and phase diagram of agar organogels.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Bohidar, H B

    2012-06-21

    A comprehensive study of hydration of polyanionic agar molecules in its solution and gel phase in glycerol-water binary solvent is reported. Raman spectroscopy results predict differential water structure arrangement for glycerol-water binary solvent, 0.02% (w/v) agar in glycerol solution and 0.3% (w/v) agar organogel. The 3200 cm(-1) Raman band pertaining to ice-like structure of water was found to increase in gel phase alike in glycerol-water solvent while it decreased in agar solutions with increase in glycerol concentration. In contrast, the partially structured water corresponding to the component 3310 cm(-1) of Raman spectra increased in agar solution, and decreased in gel phase similar to glycerol-water solvent case. We have explained these observations based on a simple model where the available oxygen to hydrogen atom ratio in a given solvent-polymer system uniquely defines hydration in solution and gel phases. The gelation concentration was found to increase from 0.18 (for water) to 0.22% (w/v) (50% v/v glycerol solution) as the glycerol concentration was raised. Correspondingly, the gelation temperature, T(g), showed a decline from 40 to 20 °C, and the gel melting temperature, T(m), revealed a reduction from 81 to 65 °C in the same glycerol concentration regime. Two distinctive features are evident here: (i) presence of glycerol as a cosolvent does not favor the gelation of agar as compared to water and (ii) agar organogels are softer than their hydrogels. A unique 3D phase diagram for the agar organogel is proposed. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the agar molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that thermo-mechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and adapted as per application requirement.

  2. Numerical simulation of the Hall effect in magnetized accretion disks with the Pluto code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhaei, Mohammad; Safaei, Ghasem; Abbassi, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the Hall effect in a standard magnetized accretion disk which is accompanied by dissipation due to viscosity and magnetic resistivity. By considering an initial magnetic field, using the PLUTO code, we perform a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation in order to study the effect of Hall diffusion on the physical structure of the disk. Current density and temperature of the disk are significantly modified by Hall diffusion, but the global structure of the disk is not substantially affected. The changes in the current densities and temperature of the disk lead to a modification in the disk luminosity and radiation.

  3. Evaluation of diffusion and dilution methods to determine the antibacterial activity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Klancnik, Anja; Piskernik, Sasa; Jersek, Barbara; Mozina, Sonja Smole

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate diffusion and dilution methods for determining the antibacterial activity of plant extracts and their mixtures. Several methods for measurement of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of a plant extract are available, but there is no standard procedure as there is for antibiotics. We tested different plant extracts, their mixtures and phenolic acids on selected gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Listeria monocytogenes) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Infantis, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli) with the disk diffusion, agar dilution, broth microdilution and macrodilution methods. The disk diffusion method was appropriate only as a preliminary screening test prior to quantitative MIC determination with dilution methods. A comparison of the results for MIC obtained by agar dilution and broth microdilution was possible only for gram-positive bacteria, and indicated the latter as the most accurate way of assessing the antimicrobial effect. The microdilution method with TTC (2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) or INT (2-p-iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride) to indicate the viability of aerobic bacteria was found to be the best alternative approach, while only ATP determination was appropriate for microaerophilic Campylobacter spp. Using survival curves the kinetics of bacterial inactivation on plant extract exposure was followed for 24h and in this way the MIC values determined by the microdilution method were confirmed as the concentrations of extracts that inhibited bacterial growth. We suggest evaluation of the antibacterial activity of plant extracts using the broth microdilution method as a fast screening method for MIC determination and the macrodilution method at selected MIC values to confirm bacterial inactivation. Campylobacter spp. showed a similar sensitivity to plant extracts as the tested gram-positive bacteria, but S

  4. Use of agar/glycerol and agar/glycerol/water as a translucent brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Jermy, Mark C; Winter, Taylor; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    The suitability of agar/glycerol/water and agar/glycerol mixtures as brain simulants was investigated. Test specimens (n=15) (50x27×37mm) were fabricated for these different mixtures and conditioned to 12°C, 22°C, and 26°C prior to testing. For comparison, fresh deer brain specimens (n=20) were sourced and prepared to the same dimensions as the agar/glycerol(/water) mixtures and conditioned to 12°C and 37°C. High impact tests were carried out with a 0.22-caliber air rifle pellet and a high-speed camera was used to record the projectile as it passed through the specimens, allowing for energy loss and vertical displacement velocity calculation. Although the agar/glycerol/water mixture presented with similar vertical expansion and contraction of the specimens to the warm and cold deer brains, a two-fold decrease of the vertical expansion and contraction was noticed with the agar/glycerol specimens. Also considerably less extrusion of this mixture out of the exit and entry sides after specimen penetration was observed. Of the simulants tested, agar/glycerol/water was the most suitable brain simulant for ballistic testing and impact studies.

  5. Thermal stability of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuang-Liang; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2014-05-01

    The absence of thermal instability in the high/soft state of black hole X-ray binaries, in disagreement with the standard thin disk theory, has been a long-standing riddle for theoretical astronomers. We have tried to resolve this question by studying the thermal stability of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds in the M-dot −Σ plane. It is found that disk winds can greatly decrease the disk temperature and thus help the disk become more stable at a given accretion rate. The critical accretion rate, M-dot {sub crit}, corresponding to the thermal instability threshold, is significantly increased in the presence of disk winds. For α = 0.01 and B {sub φ} = 10B {sub p}, the disk is quite stable even for a very weak initial poloidal magnetic field [β{sub p,0}∼2000,β{sub p}=(P{sub gas}+P{sub rad})/(B{sub p}{sup 2}/8π)]. However, when B {sub φ} = B {sub p} or B {sub φ} = 0.1B {sub p}, a somewhat stronger (but still weak) field (β{sub p,} {sub 0} ∼ 200 or β{sub p,} {sub 0} ∼ 20) is required to make the disk stable. Nevertheless, despite the great increase of M-dot {sub crit}, the luminosity threshold, corresponding to instability, remains almost constant or decreases slowly with increasing M-dot {sub crit} due to decreased gas temperature. The advection and diffusion timescales of the large-scale magnetic field threading the disk are also investigated in this work. We find that the advection timescale can be smaller than the diffusion timescale in a disk with winds, because the disk winds take away most of the gravitational energy released in the disk, resulting in the decrease of the magnetic diffusivity η and the increase of the diffusion timescale.

  6. Nonaxisymmetric evolution in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1994-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional, multigridded hydrodynamical simulation of the collapse of an axisymmetric, rotating, 1 solar mass protostellar cloud, which forms a resolved, hydrotastic disk. The code includes the effects of physical viscosity, radiative transfer and radiative acceleration but not magnetic fields. We examine how the disk is affected by the inclusion of turbulent viscosity by comparing a viscous simulation with an inviscid model evolved from the same initial conditions, and we derive a disk evolutionary timescale on the order of 300,000 years if alpha = 0.01. Effects arising from non-axisymmetric gravitational instabilities in the protostellar disk are followed with a three-dimensional SPH code, starting from the two-dimensional structure. We find that the disk is prone to a series of spiral instabilities with primary azimulthal mode number m = 1 and m = 2. The torques induced by these nonaxisymmetric structures elicit material transport of angular momentum and mass through the disk, readjusting the surface density profile toward more stable configurations. We present a series of analyses which characterize both the development and the likely source of the instabilities. We speculate that an evolving disk which maintains a minimum Toomre Q-value approximately 1.4 will have a total evolutionary span of several times 10(exp 5) years, comparable to, but somewhat shorter than the evolutionary timescale resulting from viscous turbulence alone. We compare the evolution resulting from nonaxisymmetric instabilities with solutions of a one-dimensional viscous diffusion equation applied to the initial surface density and temperature profile. We find that an effective alpha-value of 0.03 is a good fit to the results of the simulation. However, the effective alpha will depend on the minimum Q in the disk at the time the instability is activated. We argue that the major fraction of the transport characterized by the value of alpha is due to the action of

  7. Assessment of disk MHD generators for a base load powerplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.; Retallick, F. D.; Lu, C. L.; Stella, M.; Teare, J. D.; Loubsky, W. J.; Louis, J. F.; Misra, B.

    1981-01-01

    Results from a study of the disk MHD generator are presented. Both open and closed cycle disk systems were investigated. Costing of the open cycle disk components (nozzle, channel, diffuser, radiant boiler, magnet and power management) was done. However, no detailed costing was done for the closed cycle systems. Preliminary plant design for the open cycle systems was also completed. Based on the system study results, an economic assessment of the open cycle systems is presented. Costs of the open cycle disk conponents are less than comparable linear generator components. Also, costs of electricity for the open cycle disk systems are competitive with comparable linear systems. Advantages of the disk design simplicity are considered. Improvements in the channel availability or a reduction in the channel lifetime requirement are possible as a result of the disk design.

  8. Orbital Evolution of Moons in Weakly Accreting Circumplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yuri I.; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Gressel, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the formation of hot and massive circumplanetary disks (CPDs) and the orbital evolution of satellites formed in these disks. Because of the comparatively small size-scale of the sub-disk, quick magnetic diffusion prevents the magnetorotational instability (MRI) from being well developed at ionization levels that would allow MRI in the parent protoplanetary disk. In the absence of significant angular momentum transport, continuous mass supply from the parental protoplanetary disk leads to the formation of a massive CPD. We have developed an evolutionary model for this scenario and have estimated the orbital evolution of satellites within the disk. We find, in a certain temperature range, that inward migration of a satellite can be stopped by a change in the structure due to the opacity transitions. Moreover, by capturing second and third migrating satellites in mean motion resonances, a compact system in Laplace resonance can be formed in our disk models.

  9. The Warped Disk of Integral-Sign Galaxy PGC 20348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, H. B.

    2007-03-01

    We examine the morphology and luminosity distribution of a strongly warped spiral galaxy PGC 20348 by conducting a detailed BVI CCD surface photometry using BOAO 1.8m telescope. The radial surface brightness shows a break at warp radius (r_{w}) with a shallow gradient in the inner disk and a steeper gradient in the outer disk. The luminosity of east side of the disk is ˜ 0.5 mag fainter than the west side at r > r_{w}. The reason for the asymmetric luminosity distribution is thought to be the asymmetric flarings that result in the formation of a large diffuse region at the edge of the east disk and a smaller diffuse region at the west disk. The vertical luminosity profiles show a thick disk component whose scale heights increase with increasing galactocentric distances. The warp of PGC 20348 seems to be made by the tidal interactions with the two massive companion galaxies since the flarings and radial increase of disk scale heights are thought to be general properties of tidally perturbed disks. According to the colors of the two clumps inside the diffuse region at the edge of the east disk, they seem to be sites of active star formation triggered by tidal forces from the companion galaxies.

  10. Hyperspectral imaging for detecting pathogens grown on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Line, John E.; Park, Bosoon; Windham, William R.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth pattern, color, etc.) of colonies grown on agar plates has been widely used to tentatively differentiate organisms. However, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate target organisms like Campylobacters from other contaminants grown together on the same agar plates. A hyperspectral imaging system operating at the visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectral region from 400 nm to 900 nm was set up to measure spectral signatures of 17 different Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter subspecies. Protocols for culturing, imaging samples and for calibrating measured data were developed. The VNIR spectral library of all 17 organisms commonly encountered in poultry was established from calibrated hyperspectral images. A classification algorithm was developed to locate and identify Campylobacters, non-Campylobacter contaminants, and background agars with 99.29% accuracy. This research has a potential to be expanded to detect other pathogens grown on agar media.

  11. Universal growth of microdomains and gelation transition in agar hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Saxena, Anita; Bohidar, H B

    2008-03-27

    Investigations were carried out on aqueous sols and gels of agar (extracted from red seaweed Gelidiella acerosa) to explore the growth of microdomains en route to gelation. Isothermal frequency sweep studies on gel samples revealed master plots showing power-law dependence of gel elastic modulus, |G*|, on oscillation frequency, omega as |G*| approximately omegan, independent of temperature, with 0.5diffusion coefficients and q is the scattering wave vector. This yielded hydrodynamic radii (from DS), with RS varying from approximately 20 nm (for sol) to 250 nm (at gelation point). The second hydrodynamic radius (from DL) obtained was RL in the range of approximately 200-500 nm (for sol) to approximately 1000 nm (at 38 degrees C, gelation point). These data could be universally fitted to RS approximately epsilon(-3/5) and RL approximately epsilon-1/3 (epsilon=(T/Tg-1), T>Tg). The S(q,t) behavior close to the gel transition point (Tg approximately (38+/-3 degrees C determined from rheology) followed a stretched exponential function: S(t)=A exp(-t/ts)beta. The beta factor increased from 0.25 to 1 as the gel temperature approached 25 degrees C from Tg, and relaxation time, ts, showed a peak at T approximately 30 degrees C. The SLS data (in the sol state) suggested the scaling of scattered intensity, Is(q) approximately epsilon(-gamma) (epsilon=(T/Tg-1), T>Tg) with gamma=0.13+/-0.03, and the presence of two distinct domains characterized by a Guinier regime (low q) and a power-law regime (high q). Close to and above Tg (+2 degrees C), IS(q) scaled with q as Is(q) approximately q(-alpha) with alpha=2.2+/-0.2, which decreased to 1.4+/-1 just below Tg (-2 degrees C), implying a coil-helix transition for 0.2% (w/v) and 0.3% (w/v) samples. For a 0.01% sample, alpha=3.5+/-0.5 which

  12. Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) poisoning, case report and review.

    PubMed

    Satora, Leszek; Pach, Dorota; Butryn, Beata; Hydzik, Piotr; Balicka-Slusarczyk, Barbara

    2005-06-01

    Gathering and eating mushrooms and other plants containing psychoactive substances has become increasingly popular among young people experimenting with drugs. Dried fly agaric Amanita muscaria fruiting bodies were eaten by five young persons (18-21 years of age) at a party in order to evoke hallucinations. Visual and auditory hallucinations occurred in four of them, whereas a 18-year-old girl lost consciousness. The following morning, she went to the Clinic of Toxicology. Due to the fact that not all the active substances present in the fly agaric have been identified, and some of them have an effect after a period of latency, the patient was admitted for several days of observation during which check-up examinations were performed. After four days without any problems, she was discharged. The poisoning regressed with no organ complications. The remaining persons who had eaten the fly agaric were free from any complaints.

  13. DISK PUMP FEASIBILITY INVESTIGATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The disk pump was investigated at the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) to determine the feasibility of using a novel viscous pumping... pump primarily for application as an inducer. The disk pump differs drastically from conventional pumps because of the following major factors: (1) The...The pump inlet relative velocity is equal only to the through flow velocity between the disks. Therefore, there is good indication that the disk pump will

  14. Accretion disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Accretion disk electrodynamic phenomena are separable into two classes: (1) disks and coronas with turbulent magnetic fields; (2) disks and black holes which are connected to a large-scale external magnetic field. Turbulent fields may originate in an alpha-omega dynamo, provide anomalous viscous transport, and sustain an active corona by magnetic buoyancy. The large-scale field can extract energy and angular momentum from the disk and black hole, and be dynamically configured into a collimated relativistic jet.

  15. Lysine-iron agar in the detection of Arizona cultures.

    PubMed

    EDWARDS, P R; FIFE, M A

    1961-11-01

    A lysine-iron agar is described and recommended for the detection of Arizona strains which ferment lactose rapidly. Black colonies which appear on bismuth sulfite agar should be transferred to the medium. Salmonellae and Arizona cultures produce a distinctive reaction since they are the only recognized groups of enteric bacteria which regularly produce lysine decarboxylase rapidly and form large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Use of the medium is particularly recommended in the examination of specimens from enteric infections in which shigellae and salmonellae are not detected.

  16. Method for Measuring Changes in Surface Tension on Agar

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, David S.; Dworkin, Martin

    1983-01-01

    The surface tension of agar surfaces was determined by measuring the contact angles formed by drops of various hydrophobic liquids on the surface and then calculating the composite surface free energy function by solving a series of simultaneous equations derived from these data. This method was used to measure the change in the surface tension of agar produced by the addition of various concentrations of albumin. The resulting curve was typical of the effect of increasing concentrations of surfactants on surface tension. The method was compared with other methods of determining surface tension of solids, and it was concluded that the technique used here provided the most reliable results. PMID:16346273

  17. Understanding Floppy Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Pamela

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the floppy disk with an analogy to the phonograph record, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and capabilities of hard-sectored and soft-sectored floppy disks. She concludes that, at present, the floppy disk will continue to be the primary choice of personal computer manufacturers and their customers. (KC)

  18. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Floppy Disk Utility Program transfers programs between files on the hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System (RDOS).

  19. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A floppy disk utility program is described which transfers programs between files on a hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System. Sample operations are given.

  20. High average power scaleable thin-disk laser

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Bibeau, Camille; Payne, Stephen A.; Powell, Howard; Krupke, William F.; Sutton, Steven B.

    2002-01-01

    Using a thin disk laser gain element with an undoped cap layer enables the scaling of lasers to extremely high average output power values. Ordinarily, the power scaling of such thin disk lasers is limited by the deleterious effects of amplified spontaneous emission. By using an undoped cap layer diffusion bonded to the thin disk, the onset of amplified spontaneous emission does not occur as readily as if no cap layer is used, and much larger transverse thin disks can be effectively used as laser gain elements. This invention can be used as a high average power laser for material processing applications as well as for weapon and air defense applications.

  1. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN EARLY PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; Lazarian, Alexander; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo

    2016-03-10

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian and Vishniac model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe.” In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M{sub ⊙} protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, “reconnection diffusion,” removes the magnetic flux from the disk; the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the absolute value of the magnetic flux through the disk. We demonstrate that for the first mechanism, turbulence causes a magnetic flux transport outward from the inner disk to the ambient medium, thus decreasing the coupling of the disk to the ambient material. A similar effect is achieved through the change of the magnetic field's topology from a split monopole configuration to a dipole configuration. We explore how both mechanisms prevent the catastrophic loss of disk angular momentum and compare both above turbulent reconnection mechanisms with alternative mechanisms from the literature.

  2. Magnetic Fields in Early Protostellar Disk Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; Lazarian, Alexander; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo

    2016-03-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe.” In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M⊙ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, “reconnection diffusion,” removes the magnetic flux from the disk; the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the absolute value of the magnetic flux through the disk. We demonstrate that for the first mechanism, turbulence causes a magnetic flux transport outward from the inner disk to the ambient medium, thus decreasing the coupling of the disk to the ambient material. A similar effect is achieved through the change of the magnetic field's topology from a split monopole configuration to a dipole configuration. We explore how both mechanisms prevent the catastrophic loss of disk angular momentum and compare both above turbulent reconnection mechanisms with alternative mechanisms from the literature.

  3. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Kastner, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling.

  4. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  9. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  10. An improved agar medium for growth of Geobacillus thermoglucosidarius strains.

    PubMed

    Javed, M; Baghaei-Yazdi, N; Qin, W; Amartey, S

    2017-01-01

    Geobacillus species have potential applications in many biotechnological processes. They are fastidious in their vitamin and amino acid requirements. A new semi-defined agar medium (SDM) was developed which gave consistently high viable cell counts of various G. thermoglucosidasius strains (5×10(8)-6×10(8)cfu/ml) under aerobic conditions at 70°C.

  11. [Modification of the lysine-iron agar (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wauters, G

    1975-12-01

    The addition of L-phenylalanine to the lysine-iron agar described by Edwards and Fife ]1] allows a more valuable screening of the Proteus group based on its deamination properties. Some minor modifications of the indicator and thiosulfate content lead to improve and earlier recording of the results.

  12. Thermal-induced ageing of agar solutions: impact on the structural and mechanical properties of agar gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bosi; Bentaleb, Ahmed; Louerat, Frédéric; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    Numerous hydrogels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature, aqueous polymer solutions brought to a boil. Although the incubation time of the polymer solution at such a high temperature could be used as a tuning parameter, its impact on the subsequent gelation has been poorly investigated. Here we study the effect of prolonged heating at 80°C on a 1.5% wt solution of agar, a natural polysaccharide. The incubation time is varied from a few hours up to five days. We show that the agar sol. continuously degrades as the result of both the hydrolysis and the intermolecular oxidation of the polymer chains. Furthermore, electronic microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments reveal that gels formed from older agar sols display an increasingly coarser microstructure composed of micron-sized aggregated pieces of polysaccharides, in contrast with the fibrous-like structure of gels made from fresh sols. Along with structural changes prolonged incubation time leads to weaker gels of lower shear elastic modulus. Finally, macro-indentation experiments coupled to direct visualization show that increasing the incubation time of the agar sol. decreases the yield strain of the gel by a factor of three, while the rupture scenario turns continuously from brittle to ductile-like. Acknowledging funding from BioMérieux & CNRS.

  13. Development of a selective agar plate for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Jung-Su; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-17

    This study was conducted to develop a selective medium for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Campylobacter spp. (n=4), non-Campylobacter (showing positive results on Campylobacter selective agar) strains (n=49) isolated from fresh produce, indicator bacteria (n=13), and spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce (n=15) were plated on four Campylobacter selective media. Bolton agar and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) exhibited higher sensitivity for Campylobacter spp. than did Preston agar and Hunt agar, although certain non-Campylobacter strains isolated from fresh produce by using a selective agar isolation method, were still able to grow on Bolton agar and mCCDA. To inhibit the growth of non-Campylobacter strains, Bolton agar and mCCDA were supplemented with 5 antibiotics (rifampicin, polymyxin B, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyruvate, ferrous sulfate) and the growth of Campylobacter spp. (n=7) and non-Campylobacter strains (n=44) was evaluated. Although Bolton agar supplemented with rifampicin (BR agar) exhibited a higher selectivity for Campylobacter spp. than did mCCDA supplemented with antibiotics, certain non-Campylobacter strains were still able to grow on BR agar (18.8%). When BR agar with various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were tested with Campylobacter spp. (n=8) and non-Campylobacter (n=7), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was inhibitory against 3 of 7 non-Campylobacter strains. Finally, we validated the use of BR agar containing 50mg/L sulfamethoxazole (BRS agar) or 0.5mg/L ciprofloxacin (BRCS agar) and other selective agars for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and fresh produce. All chicken samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. when tested on mCCDA, BR agar, and BRS agar. In fresh produce samples, BRS agar exhibited the highest selectivity for Campylobacter spp., demonstrating its suitability for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

  14. Disks in elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Rix, H.; White, S.D.M. )

    1990-10-01

    The abundance and strength of disk components in elliptical galaxies are investigated by studying the photometric properties of models containing a spheroidal r exp 1/4-law bulge and a weak exponential disk. Pointed isophotes are observed in a substantial fraction of elliptical galaxies. If these isophote distortions are interpreted in the framework of the present models, then the statistics of observed samples suggest that almost all radio-weak ellipticals could have disks containing roughly 20 percent of the light. It is shown that the E5 galaxy NGC 4660 has the photometric signatures of a disk containing a third of the light. 30 refs.

  15. Astounding Jumping Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzdziol, Edward S.

    1991-01-01

    Activities involving concave rubber disks are utilized to illustrate the scientific principles of kinetic and potential energy. Provides teacher instructions and questions related to the activity. (MDH)

  16. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  17. Comparison of dosimetry gels prepared by agar and bovine gelatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sağsöz, M. E.; Korkut, Ö.; Alemdar, N.; Aktaş, S.; Çalı, E. B.; Kantarcı, M.

    2016-04-01

    Gel dosimeters are unique materials capable of showing three dimensional (3D) dose distributions of therapeutic or diagnostic exposures. Fricke gel dosimeters can be considered as chemical dosimeters that rely on a radiation-induced chemical reaction. Dose distribution of Fricke solutions containing Fe+2 ions determines the transformation of acidic, oxygen saturated Fe+2 ions to Fe+3 ions by the ionizing radiation in aqueous solutions. In this study we produced two different types of gel dosimeters using agar and bovine gelatin with similar fabrication methods. We compared the magnetic resonance (MR) T1 imaging responses of these two gel dosimeters to acquire a dose dependency of MR intensities. In conclusion agar gel dosimeters found to be produced easily and more consistent.

  18. A modified agar plate method for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Kasuya, S; Khamboonruang, C; Sukhavat, K; Ieda, M; Takatsuka, N; Kita, K; Ohtomo, H

    1991-10-01

    The agar plate method is a new technique with high detection rates for coprological diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. This report details modifications of the technique and establishes a standardized procedure. We recommend that all plates should be carefully observed using a microscope because macroscopic observation can lead to false negative results. It is also advisable to pour formalin solution directly into microscopically positive dishes to collect worms by sedimentation. This procedure enables one to observe worms otherwise hidden. Sealing dishes with adhesive tape prevents larvae from crawling out of the dishes, eliminating any possibility in the reduction of detection rates, and greatly improves the safety conditions for the technician performing the procedure. We consider the agar plate method to be superior to the filter paper method in detecting Strongyloides, and we believe that it will eventually become the technique of choice.

  19. Phenotypic identification of Candida albicans by growth on chocolate agar.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Chirag C; Johnson, Elizabeth; Baker, Mark E; Haynes, Ken; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we describe a simple method for the identification of Candida albicans in clinical samples. A total of 383 clinical isolates of Candida species were streaked onto chocolate agar and incubated for 48 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of an atmosphere of 6% CO2. All 208 of the C. albicans isolates tested, developed an easy to identify filamentous colony morphology. Of 175 other Candida species tested, 172 (98.3%) were distinguishable from C. albicans by their smooth colony morphology. Three isolates (1.7%) exhibited weak filamentation after prolonged incubation. Although not a routine medium in medical mycology a significant advantage of using chocolate agar lies in its use in clinical bacteriology laboratories for the isolation of fastidious bacteria. Implementation of the proposed method is applicable across a range of specimen types, thus allowing the direct identification of C. albicans in clinical samples. This simple method may allow a quicker entry into directed treatment.

  20. Agar-degrading bacteria isolated from Antarctic macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Roxana; Leiva, Sergio

    2017-03-10

    This study describes the taxonomic diversity of pigmented, agar-degrading bacteria isolated from the surface of macroalgae collected in King George Island, Antarctica. A total of 30 pigmented, agarolytic bacteria were isolated from the surface of the Antarctic macroalgae Adenocystis utricularis, Monostroma hariotii, Iridaea cordata, and Pantoneura plocamioides. Based on the 16S rRNA data, the agarolytic isolates were affiliated to the genera Algibacter, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Cellulophaga, Citricoccus, Labedella, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Salinibacterium, Sanguibacter, and Zobellia. Isolates phylogenetically related to Cellulophaga algicola showed the highest agarase activity in culture supernatants when tested at 4 and 37 °C. This is the first investigation of pigmented agar-degrading bacteria, members of microbial communities associated with Antarctic macroalgae, and the results suggest that they represent a potential source of cold-adapted agarases of possible biotechnological interest.

  1. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    PubMed

    Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech; Parafati, Lucia; Musilova, Sarka; Bunesova, Vera; Vlkova, Eva; Killer, Jiri; Mrazek, Jakub; Kmet, Vladimir; Svejstil, Roman

    2014-11-17

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is a bacterial species exclusively found in the human intestinal tract. This species is becoming increasingly popular as a probiotic organism added to lyophilized products. In this study, porcine mucin was used as the sole carbon source for the selective enumeration of B. bifidum in probiotic food additives. Thirty-six bifidobacterial strains were cultivated in broth with mucin. Only 13 strains of B. bifidum utilized the mucin to produce acids. B. bifidum was selectively enumerated in eight probiotic food supplements using agar (MM agar) containing mupirocin (100 mg/L) and mucin (20 g/L) as the sole carbon source. MM agar was fully selective if the B. bifidum species was presented together with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum species and with lactic acid bacteria (lactobacilli, streptococci). Isolated strains of B. bifidum were identified using biochemical, PCR, MALDI-TOF procedures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The novel selective medium was also suitable for the isolation of B. bifidum strains from human fecal samples.

  2. Structure, compressibility factor, and dynamics of highly size-asymmetric binary hard-disk liquids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Sun, Zhao-Yan; An, Li-Jia

    2012-09-14

    By using event-driven molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate effects of varying the area fraction of the smaller component on structure, compressibility factor, and dynamics of the highly size-asymmetric binary hard-disk liquids. We find that the static pair correlations of the large disks are only weakly perturbed by adding small disks. The higher-order static correlations of the large disks, by contrast, can be strongly affected. Accordingly, the static correlation length deduced from the bond-orientation correlation functions first decreases significantly and then tends to reach a plateau as the area fraction of the small disks increases. The compressibility factor of the system first decreases and then increases upon increasing the area fraction of the small disks and separating different contributions to it allows to rationalize this non-monotonic phenomenon. Furthermore, adding small disks can influence dynamics of the system in quantitative and qualitative ways. For the large disks, the structural relaxation time increases monotonically with increasing the area fraction of the small disks at low and moderate area fractions of the large disks. In particular, "reentrant" behavior appears at sufficiently high area fractions of the large disks, strongly resembling the reentrant glass transition in short-ranged attractive colloids and the inverted glass transition in binary hard spheres with large size disparity. By tuning the area fraction of the small disks, relaxation process for the small disks shows concave-to-convex crossover and logarithmic decay behavior, as found in other binary mixtures with large size disparity. Moreover, diffusion of both species is suppressed by adding small disks. Long-time diffusion for the small disks shows power-law-like behavior at sufficiently high area fractions of the small disks, which implies precursors of a glass transition for the large disks and a localization transition for the small disks. Therefore, our results

  3. Reprocessing in Luminous Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. Robbins; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We develop and investigate a procedure that accounts for disk reprocessing of photons that originate in the disk itself. Surface temperatures and simple, black body spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostellar disks are calculated. In disks that flare with radius, reprocessing of stellar photons results in temperature profiles considerably shallower than r(sup -3/4). Including the disk as a radiation source (as in the case of actively secreting disks) along with the stellar source further flattens the temperature profile. Disks that flare strongly near the star and then smoothly curve over and become shadowed at some distance ("decreasing curvature" disks) exhibit nearly power-law temperature profiles which result in power-law infrared SEDs with slopes in agreement with typical observations of young stellar objects. Disk models in which the photospheric thickness is controlled by the local opacity and in which the temperature decreases with radius naturally show this shape. Uniformly flaring models do not match observations as well; progressively stronger reprocessing at larger radii leads to SEDs that flatten toward the infrared or even have a second peak at the wavelength corresponding (through the Wien law) to the temperature of the outer edge of the disk. In FU Orionis outbursting systems, the dominant source of energy is the disk itself. The details of the reprocessing depend sensitively on the assumed disk shape and emitted temperature profile. The thermal instability outburst models of Bell Lin reproduce trends in the observed SEDs of Fuors with T varies as r(sup -3/4) in the inner disk (r approx. less than 0.25au corresponding to lambda approx. less than 10 microns) and T varies as r(sup -1/2) in the outer disk. Surface irradiation during outburst and quiescence is compared in the region of planet formation (1 - 10 au). The contrast between the two phases is diminished by the importance of the reprocessing of photons from the relatively high mass

  4. Reproducibility of control organism zone diameters for batches of IsoSensitest agar manufactured from 1996 to 2000 using the BSAC disc susceptibility test method.

    PubMed

    Landrygan, Janine; James, Peter A; Brooks, Dawn; Kubiak, Elizabeth M

    2002-02-01

    The BSAC Working Party on Susceptibility Testing has recently suggested that the performance of IsoSensitest agar has changed since 1991. Twenty batches of IsoSensitest agar that had been manufactured between 1996 and 2000 were tested using the BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method. Antibiotic discs containing amoxicillin 10 microg, ceftazidime 30 microg, gentamicin 10 microg, ciprofloxacin 1 microg and colistin sulphate 25 microg were tested on each batch of media 12 times against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 where appropriate. There was a small reduction in zone sizes for most antibiotics on batches of media that were near their expiration date, but otherwise zone sizes were remarkably consistent. We could find no evidence to suggest that a change in the performance of IsoSensitest agar for the disc diffusion method had occurred since 1996.

  5. Chemical evolution of turbulent protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D.; Henning, T. H.

    2007-12-01

    The importance of turbulent diffusion for disk chemical evolution is discussed. The time-dependent abundances and column densities are modeled with a 1D/2D turbulent mixing chemistry including gas-grain interactions and surface reactions and compared to the results obtained with a static (non-mixing, non-grain growth) model. We find that due to turbulent transport abundances of many observationally important molecules get higher over the disk, in particular in cold midplane, leading to higher column densities than in the static model. A notable exception is the fractional ionization that remains the same in all models. We conclude that the observed column densities in the DM Tau disk fit better with a 2D mixing model.

  6. The Milky Way disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.

    2015-08-01

    This review summarises the invited presentation I gave on the Milky Way disc. The idea underneath was to touch those topics that can be considered hot nowadays in the Galactic disk research: the reality of the thick disk, the spiral structure of the Milky Way, and the properties of the outer Galactic disk. A lot of work has been done in recent years on these topics, but a coherent and clear picture is still missing. Detailed studies with high quality spectroscopic data seem to support a dual Galactic disk, with a clear separation into a thin and a thick component. Much confusion and very discrepant ideas still exist concerning the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Our location in the disk makes it impossible to observe it, and we can only infer it. This process of inference is still far from being mature, and depends a lot on the selected tracers, the adopted models and their limitations, which in many cases are neither properly accounted for, nor pondered enough. Finally, there are very different opinions on the size (scale length, truncation radius) of the Galactic disk, and on the interpretation of the observed outer disk stellar populations in terms either of external entities (Monoceros, Triangulus-Andromeda, Canis Major), or as manifestations of genuine disk properties (e.g., warp and flare).

  7. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  8. Investigation of selected disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The large disk systems offered by IBM, UNIVAC, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Data General were examined. In particular, these disk systems were analyzed in terms of how well available operating systems take advantage of the respective disk controller's transfer rates, and to what degree all available data for optimizing disk usage is effectively employed. In the course of this analysis, generic functions and components of disk systems were defined and the capabilities of the surveyed disk system were investigated.

  9. LUNAR ACCRETION FROM A ROCHE-INTERIOR FLUID DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Julien; Canup, Robin M. E-mail: robin@boulder.swri.edu

    2012-11-20

    We use a hybrid numerical approach to simulate the formation of the Moon from an impact-generated disk, consisting of a fluid model for the disk inside the Roche limit and an N-body code to describe accretion outside the Roche limit. As the inner disk spreads due to a thermally regulated viscosity, material is delivered across the Roche limit and accretes into moonlets that are added to the N-body simulation. Contrary to an accretion timescale of a few months obtained with prior pure N-body codes, here the final stage of the Moon's growth is controlled by the slow spreading of the inner disk, resulting in a total lunar accretion timescale of {approx}10{sup 2} years. It has been proposed that the inner disk may compositionally equilibrate with the Earth through diffusive mixing, which offers a potential explanation for the identical oxygen isotope compositions of the Earth and Moon. However, the mass fraction of the final Moon that is derived from the inner disk is limited by resonant torques between the disk and exterior growing moons. For initial disks containing <2.5 lunar masses (M{sub Last-Quarter-Moon }), we find that a final Moon with mass > 0.8 M{sub Last-Quarter-Moon} contains {<=}60% material derived from the inner disk, with this material preferentially delivered to the Moon at the end of its accretion.

  10. PLANETESIMAL AND PROTOPLANET DYNAMICS IN A TURBULENT PROTOPLANETARY DISK: IDEAL UNSTRATIFIED DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Menou, Kristen E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or

    2009-12-20

    The dynamics of planetesimals and planetary cores may be strongly influenced by density perturbations driven by magneto-rotational turbulence in their natal protoplanetary gas disks. Using the local shearing box approximation, we perform numerical simulations of planetesimals moving as massless particles in a turbulent, magnetized, unstratified gas disk. Our fiducial disk model shows turbulent accretion characterized by a Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter of alpha approx 10{sup -2}, with rms density perturbations of approx10%. We measure the statistical evolution of particle orbital properties in our simulations including mean radius, eccentricity, and velocity dispersion. We confirm random walk growth in time of all three properties, the first time that this has been done with direct orbital integration in a local model. We find that the growth rate increases with the box size used at least up to boxes of eight scale heights in horizontal size. However, even our largest boxes show velocity dispersions sufficiently low that collisional destruction of planetesimals should be unimportant in the inner disk throughout its lifetime. Our direct integrations agree with earlier torque measurements showing that type I migration dominates over diffusive migration by stochastic torques for most objects in the planetary core and terrestrial planet mass range. Diffusive migration remains important for objects in the mass range of kilometer-sized planetesimals. Discrepancies in the derived magnitude of turbulence between local and global simulations of magneto-rotationally unstable disks remains an open issue, with important consequences for planet formation scenarios.

  11. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by an electrospinning technique using water as the solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operated at 50 deg C, to avoid agar gelation. Pure agar solution 1% (w/w) showed inadequ...

  12. Development of an eco-friendly agar extraction technique from the red seaweed Gracilaria lemaneiformis.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yuanling

    2008-05-01

    The red seaweed, Gracilaria lemaneiformis growing as an aquaculture bioremediator along the coasts of Liaodong Peninsula, China, was investigated for the agar production. An eco-friendly method called agar photobleaching extraction process was developed for the benefit of workers' health and safety of the environment. The native agar (NA), alkali-modified agar (AA), chemical-bleached agar (CA) and photobleached agar (PA), which were extracted using different processes, were evaluated for their physical and chemical properties. The PA showed most desirable performances in terms of gel strength, gelling temperature, sulfate content and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose content. Among the different processed agars, PA gel strength was 1913 g/cm2, the highest among the different processed agars, which increased 8.6% on the basis of the AA. Further we applied this new technique to extract agars from Gracilaria asiatica, and similar results were obtained with that of G. lemaneiformis. This indicates that the agar photobleaching extraction process is a feasible method for Gracilaria species and has a potential application. During the whole agar photobleaching extraction process the pigment content of G. lemaneiformis declined gradually and the TOC concentration in photobleaching solution increased along with the increase in the irradiation time. The mechanism of agar photobleaching could be elucidated by the photolysis theory.

  13. The Disk and Environment of HD 100546

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present coronagraphic imaging of the nearest Herbig Be star with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board HST, K-short imaging with ADONIS from the 3.6m telescope at La Silla, and mid-IR imaging with OSCIR using the 4m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We confirm the disk detection reported by Pantin et al. The brightest material associated with the disk is located within 3.5 sec (365 AU) of the star, but disk material can be traced to 5 sec. (515 AU) based on the surface brightness distribution. Spiral dark lanes are seen beyond 200 AU. HD 100546 is accompanied by a diffuse envelope which is more highly flared than the disk and which extends 10 sec (1000 AU) from the star. Far from the star, a band of nebulosity running from NNW to SSE is seen, compatible with the orientation of filaments in DC 292.6-7.9. Closer to the star, the bands are bowed out to the W and WSW, in the direction of HD 100546's proper motion. The OSCIR images show that the source is slightly extended at 11.7 microns, but unresolved at 10 and 18 microns. The mid-IR color temperatures are consistent with central clearing of the disk, supporting the inference of Pantin et al. This study is based on observations made with HST, and at ESO.

  14. DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY ENHANCED RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang Hsien; Li Zhiyun

    2010-06-20

    Disk formation in magnetized cloud cores is hindered by magnetic braking. Previous work has shown that for realistic levels of core magnetization, the magnetic field suppresses the formation of rotationally supported disks during the protostellar mass accretion phase of low-mass star formation both in the ideal MHD limit and in the presence of ambipolar diffusion for typical rates of cosmic-ray ionization. Additional effects, such as ohmic dissipation, the Hall effect, and protostellar outflow, are needed to weaken the magnetic braking and enable the formation of persistent, rotationally supported, protostellar disks. In this paper, we first demonstrate that the classic microscopic resistivity is not large enough to enable disk formation by itself. We then experiment with a set of enhanced values for the resistivity in the range {eta} = 10{sup 17}-10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. We find that a value of order 10{sup 19} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} is needed to enable the formation of a 10{sup 2} AU scale Keplerian disk; the value depends somewhat on the degree of core magnetization. The required resistivity is a few orders of magnitude larger than the classic microscopic values. Whether it can be achieved naturally during protostellar collapse remains to be determined.

  15. Choline chloride based ionic liquid analogues as tool for the fabrication of agar films with improved mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Latona, Nicholas; Liu, Cheng-Kung; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2014-10-13

    In the present paper, we test the suitability of ChCl/urea (DES-U) and ChCl/glycerol (DES-G) eutectic mixtures, each one prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, for the production of agar films. A three-step process is proposed: pre-solubilization of polymer in DES followed by compression-molding and subsequent drying. The mechanical properties, water resistance and microstructure of the films were evaluated at different polymer concentrations (i.e. 2-6%, w/w). DES-U showed by far, the best film forming ability. Agreeing with the diffusion and SEM data, films with the best mechanical properties were found at the lowest and highest agar concentrations (tensile strengths of 24.2-42 MPa and elongations of 15.4-38.9%). The water sorption and contact angle studies suggested increased hydrophilicity for the film containing the lowest concentration of agar. The use of choline chloride based ionic liquid analogues as solvent and plasticizer might be a promising tool for the development of new non-aqueous materials based on seaweed polysaccharides.

  16. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  17. Linear corotation torques in non-barotropic disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, David

    2014-02-20

    A fully analytic expression for the linear corotation torque to first order in eccentricity for planets in non-barotropic protoplanetary disks is derived, taking into account the effect of disk entropy gradients. This torque formula is applicable to both the co-orbital, corotation torques and the non-co-orbital, corotation torques—for planets in orbits with non-zero eccentricity—in disks where the thermal diffusivity and viscosity are sufficient to maintain the linearity of these interactions. While the co-orbital, corotation torque is important for migration of planets in Type I migration, the non-co-orbital, corotation torque plays an important role in the eccentricity evolution of giant planets that have opened gaps in the disk. The presence of an entropy gradient in the disk can significantly modify the corotation torque in both these cases.

  18. On the Gravitational Stability of Gravito-turbulent Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-06-01

    Low mass, self-gravitating accretion disks admit quasi-steady, “gravito-turbulent” states in which cooling balances turbulent viscous heating. However, numerical simulations show that gravito-turbulence cannot be sustained beyond dynamical timescales when the cooling rate or corresponding turbulent viscosity is too large. The result is disk fragmentation. We motivate and quantify an interpretation of disk fragmentation as the inability to maintain gravito-turbulence due to formal secondary instabilities driven by: (1) cooling, which reduces pressure support; and/or (2) viscosity, which reduces rotational support. We analyze the axisymmetric gravitational stability of viscous, non-adiabatic accretion disks with internal heating, external irradiation, and cooling in the shearing box approximation. We consider parameterized cooling functions in 2D and 3D disks, as well as radiative diffusion in 3D. We show that generally there is no critical cooling rate/viscosity below which the disk is formally stable, although interesting limits appear for unstable modes with lengthscales on the order of the disk thickness. We apply this new linear theory to protoplanetary disks subject to gravito-turbulence modeled as an effective viscosity, and cooling regulated by dust opacity. We find that viscosity renders the disk beyond ˜60 au dynamically unstable on radial lengthscales a few times the local disk thickness. This is coincident with the empirical condition for disk fragmentation based on a maximum sustainable stress. We suggest turbulent stresses can play an active role in realistic disk fragmentation by removing rotational stabilization against self-gravity, and that the observed transition in behavior from gravito-turbulent to fragmenting may reflect instability of the gravito-turbulent state itself.

  19. Photon Bubbles and the Vertical Structure of Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2006-06-01

    We consider the effects of ``photon bubble'' shock trains on the vertical structure of radiation pressure-dominated accretion disks. These density inhomogeneities are expected to develop spontaneously in radiation-dominated accretion disks where magnetic pressure exceeds gas pressure, even in the presence of magnetorotational instability (MRI). They increase the rate at which radiation escapes from the disk and may allow disks to exceed the Eddington limit by a substantial factor without blowing themselves apart. To refine our earlier analysis of photon bubble transport in accretion disks, we generalize the theory of photon bubbles to include the effects of finite optical depths and radiation damping. Modifications to the diffusion law at low τ tend to ``fill in'' the low-density regions of photon bubbles, while radiation damping inhibits the formation of photon bubbles at large radii, small accretion rates, and small heights above the equatorial plane. Accretion disks dominated by photon bubble transport may reach luminosities from 10 to >100 times the Eddington limit (LEdd), depending on the mass of the central object, while remaining geometrically thin. However, photon bubble-dominated disks with α-viscosity are subject to the same thermal and viscous instabilities that plague standard radiation pressure-dominated disks, suggesting that they may be intrinsically unsteady. Photon bubbles can lead to a ``core-halo'' vertical disk structure. In super-Eddington disks the halo forms the base of a wind, which carries away substantial energy and mass, but not enough to prevent the luminosity from exceeding LEdd. Photon bubble-dominated disks may have smaller color corrections than standard accretion disks of the same luminosity. They remain viable contenders for some ultraluminous X-ray sources and may play a role in the rapid growth of supermassive black holes at high redshift.

  20. Photoevaporation of Circumstellar Disks Revisited: The Dust-free Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Photoevaporation by stellar ionizing radiation is believed to play an important role in the dispersal of disks around young stars. The mass-loss model for dust-free disks developed by Hollenbach et al. is currently regarded as the conventional one and has been used in a wide variety of studies. However, the rate in this model was derived using the crude so-called 1+1D approximation of ionizing radiation transfer, which assumes that diffuse radiation propagates in a direction vertical to the disk. In this study, we revisit the photoevaporation of dust-free disks by solving the two-dimensional axisymmetric radiative transfer for steady-state disks. Unlike that solved by the conventional model, we determine that direct stellar radiation is more important than the diffuse field at the disk surface. The radial density distribution at the ionization boundary is represented by a single power law with index -3/2 in contrast to the conventional double power law. For this distribution, the photoevaporation rate from the entire disk can be written as a function of the ionizing photon emissivity ΦEUV from the central star and the disk outer radius r d as follows: \\dot{M}_PE = 5.4 \\times 10^{-5} (\\Phi _EUV/10^{49}\\ s^{-1})^{1/2} (r_d/1000\\ AU)^{1/2} \\ M_\\odot \\ yr^{-1}. This new rate depends on the outer disk radius rather than on the gravitational radius as in the conventional model, because of the enhanced contribution to the mass loss from the outer disk annuli. In addition, we discuss its applications to present-day as well as primordial star formation.

  1. PHOTOEVAPORATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS REVISITED: THE DUST-FREE CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-08-20

    Photoevaporation by stellar ionizing radiation is believed to play an important role in the dispersal of disks around young stars. The mass-loss model for dust-free disks developed by Hollenbach et al. is currently regarded as the conventional one and has been used in a wide variety of studies. However, the rate in this model was derived using the crude so-called 1+1D approximation of ionizing radiation transfer, which assumes that diffuse radiation propagates in a direction vertical to the disk. In this study, we revisit the photoevaporation of dust-free disks by solving the two-dimensional axisymmetric radiative transfer for steady-state disks. Unlike that solved by the conventional model, we determine that direct stellar radiation is more important than the diffuse field at the disk surface. The radial density distribution at the ionization boundary is represented by a single power law with index -3/2 in contrast to the conventional double power law. For this distribution, the photoevaporation rate from the entire disk can be written as a function of the ionizing photon emissivity {Phi}{sub EUV} from the central star and the disk outer radius r{sub d} as follows: M-dot{sub PE} = 5.4 x 10{sup -5} ({Phi}{sub EUV}/10{sup 49} s{sup -1}){sup 1/2} (r{sub d}/1000 AU){sup 1/2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This new rate depends on the outer disk radius rather than on the gravitational radius as in the conventional model, because of the enhanced contribution to the mass loss from the outer disk annuli. In addition, we discuss its applications to present-day as well as primordial star formation.

  2. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  3. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  4. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  5. Planet Forming Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubow, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The project achieved many of its objectives. The main area of investigation was the interaction of young binary stars with surrounding protostellar disks. A secondary objective was the interaction of young planets with their central stars and surrounding disks. The grant funds were used to support visits by coinvestigators and visitors: Pawel Artymowicz, James Pringle, and Gordon Ogilvie. Funds were also used to support travel to meetings by Lubow and to provide partial salary support.

  6. Optic disk drusen.

    PubMed

    Auw-Haedrich, Claudia; Staubach, Flemming; Witschel, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    Optic disk drusen occur in 3.4 to 24 per 1,000 population and are bilateral in approximately 75%. Disturbance in the axonal metabolism in the presence of a small scleral canal--regardless of eyelength--is considered responsible for the development. The drusen increase in size, becoming more visible with age due to continuing calcium apposition, and they are associated with visual field defects in a considerable number of patients. Patients do not usually notice these defects, despite their progressive nature over the years, and this indicates an insidious course. A correct diagnosis of optic disk drusen is mandatory, although effective treatment is not yet available. It is most important to differentiate optic disk drusen from papilledema in order to avoid unnecessary neurological examinations, but also to avoid overlooking genuine neurologic disorders. Because optic disk drusen can cause severe visual field defects, patients require individual consultation regarding work issues and whether or not to drive. Optic disk drusen can be accompanied by vascular complications as well. In some cases these vascular changes--for example, choroidal neovascularization--are treatable. Patients with optic disk drusen should undergo regular visual field, IOP, and nerve fiber layer examinations. In patients with deteriorating visual field and borderline IOP, we recommend antiglaucomatous therapy.

  7. Disk Precession in Pleione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, R.

    2007-03-01

    From the polarimetric observation of Pleione, we found that the intrinsic polarization angle varied from 60° to 130° in 1974-2003. The Hα profile also changed dramatically from the edge-on type (shell-line profile) to the surface-on type (wine-bottle profile). These facts clearly indicate the spatial motion of the disk axis. We interpret these variations in terms of the disk precession, caused by the secondary of this spectroscopic binary with a period of 218d. We performed the χ^2 minimization for the polarization angle, assuming uniform precession with an imposed condition that the shell maximum occurred at edge-on view. The resulting precession angle is 59° with a period of 81 years. Then, we can describe chronologically the spatial motion of disk axis. We also derived the Hα disk radius from the peak separation, assuming the Keplerian disk. The precession of the disk gives natural explanation of the mysterious long-term spectroscopic behaviors of this star.

  8. A stirred bath technique for diffusivity measurements in cell matrices.

    PubMed

    Chresand, T J; Dale, B E; Hanson, S L; Gillies, R J

    1988-10-05

    A stirred bath technique was developed for determining effective diffusivities in cell matrices. The technique involves cell immobilization in a dilute gel which has negligible effect on solute diffusion. Agar and collagen were tested as immobilizing gels. Agar gel was shown to have minor interactions with the diffusion of various biological molecules, and was used for immobilization of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells. Diffusivities of glucose and lactic acid were measured in EAT matrices for cell loadings between 20 and 45 vol %. Treatment with glutaraldehyde was effective in quenching the metabolic activity of the cells while preserving their physical properties and diffusive resistance. The measured data agree favorably with predictions based on Maxwell's equation for effective diffusion in a periodic composite material. The stirred bath technique is useful for diffusivity determinations in immobilized matrices or free slurries, and is applicable to both microbial and mammalian cell systems.

  9. Comparison of Fecal Coliform Agar and Violet Red Bile Lactose Agar for Fecal Coliform Enumeration in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, A.; Wanegue, C.; Baylac, P.

    2002-01-01

    A 24-h direct plating method for fecal coliform enumeration with a resuscitation step (preincubation for 2 h at 37 ± 1°C and transfer to 44 ± 1°C for 22 h) using fecal coliform agar (FCA) was compared with the 24-h standardized violet red bile lactose agar (VRBL) method. FCA and VRBL have equivalent specificities and sensitivities, except for lactose-positive non-fecal coliforms such as Hafnia alvei, which could form typical colonies on FCA and VRBL. Recovery of cold-stressed Escherichia coli in mashed potatoes on FCA was about 1 log unit lower than that with VRBL. When the FCA method was compared with standard VRBL for enumeration of fecal coliforms, based on counting carried out on 170 different food samples, results were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Based on 203 typical identified colonies selected as found on VRBL and FCA, the latter medium appears to allow the enumeration of more true fecal coliforms and has higher performance in certain ways (specificity, sensitivity, and negative and positive predictive values) than VRBL. Most colonies clearly identified on both media were E. coli and H. alvei, a non-fecal coliform. Therefore, the replacement of fecal coliform enumeration by E. coli enumeration to estimate food sanitary quality should be recommended. PMID:11916678

  10. Diversity of Debris Disks - Constraining the Disk Outer Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Smith, Paul; Su, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Existing Spitzer observations of debris disks show a wide range of diversity in disk morphologies and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The majority of debris disks observed with Spitzer are not resolved, resulting in very few direct constraints on disk extent. In general, SEDs alone have little diagnostic power beyond some basic statistics. However, as demonstrated by some Spitzer observations of nearby systems (beta Leo and gamma Oph), the spectra of the excess emission in the IRS and MIPS-SED wavelength range can help to put tighter constraints on disk properties such as minimum/maximum grain sizes and inner/outer disk radii. The dust continuum slopes are very useful to differentiate between various disk structures and constrain the dust mass. We need to study sufficient numbers of disks to explore their characteristics systematically. Therefore, we propose to obtain MIPS-SED observations of 27 debris disks that already have IRS-LL spectra and MIPS 24 and 70 micron photometry.

  11. Characterization of Leptospiral Chemoreceptors Using a Microscopic Agar Drop Assay.

    PubMed

    Affroze, Samia; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Takabe, Kyosuke; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is induced by sensing chemical stimuli via chemoreceptors embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, enabling the cells to migrate toward nutrients or away from toxins. The chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. have been well studied and are functionally classified on the basis of detectable substrates. The spirochete Leptospira possesses more than ten chemoreceptors and shows attractive or repellent responses against some sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids. However, the roles of these chemoreceptors have not been investigated. In this study, we conducted a chemotaxis assay called microscopic agar drop assay in combination with competition experiments, determining whether two kinds of attractants are recognized by the same type of chemoreceptor in the saprophytic Leptospira strain, Leptospira biflexa. Analyzing the competition effect observed between several pairs of chemicals, we found that L. biflexa senses sugars via chemoreceptors different from those that sense amino acids and fatty acids.

  12. Surface migration of Staphylococcus xylosus on low-agar media.

    PubMed

    Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2008-05-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is a commensal species commonly found on the skin of mammals, but also currently used as starter culture for meat fermentation. Most strains of this species colonize by forming a biofilm on abiotic surfaces. We show here that the majority of S. xylosus strains also exhibit extensive colony spreading on the surface of soft agar media. This phenomenon seemed to be independent of biofilm-forming ability. It occurred in different culture media and was dependent on temperature. Formation of a giant S. xylosus colony did not involve a biosurfactant. Microscopic observation showed that the front of the giant colony comprised a single layer of spacing cells with more packed cells in the median area. Supplementation of the soft media with DNase I increased S. xylosus colony spreading, indicating that extracellular DNA may be involved in limiting the phenomenon. The ability of S. xylosus to spread on semi-solid surfaces may constitute an advantage for surface colonization.

  13. Normal force controlled rheology applied to agar gelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bosi; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous polymer solutions. During the sol-gel transition, such materials may experience a volume contraction which is traditionally overlooked as rheological measurements are usually performed in geometries of constant volume. In this article, we revisit the formation of 1.5\\% wt. agar gels through a series of benchmark rheological experiments performed with a plate-plate geometry. We demonstrate on that particular gel of polysaccharides that the contraction associated with the sol/gel transition cannot be neglected. Indeed, imposing a constant gap width during the gelation results in the strain hardening of the sample, as evidenced by the large negative normal force that develops. Such hardening leads to the slow drift in time of the gel elastic modulus $G'$ towards ever larger values, and thus to an erroneous estimate of $G'$. As an alternative, we show that imposing a constant normal force equals to zero during the gelation, instead of a constant gap width, suppresses the hardening as the decrease of the gap compensates for the sample contraction. Using normal force controlled rheology, we then investigate the impact of thermal history on 1.5\\% wt. agar gels. We show that neither the value of the cooling rate, nor the introduction of a constant temperature stage during the cooling process influence the gel elastic properties. Instead, $G'$ only depends on the terminal temperature reached at the end of the cooling ramp, as confirmed by direct imaging of the gel microstructure by cryoelectron microscopy. The present work offers an extensive review of the technical difficulties associated with the rheology of hydrogels and paves the way for a systematic use of normal force controlled rheology to monitor non-isochoric processes.

  14. Planetesimal and Protoplanet Dynamics in a Turbulent Protoplanetary Disk: Ideal Stratified Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Menou, Kristen

    2012-04-01

    Due to the gravitational influence of density fluctuations driven by magneto-rotational instability in the gas disk, planetesimals and protoplanets undergo diffusive radial migration as well as changes in other orbital properties. The magnitude of the effect on particle orbits can have important consequences for planet formation scenarios. We use the local-shearing-box approximation to simulate an ideal, isothermal, magnetized gas disk with vertical density stratification and simultaneously evolve numerous massless particles moving under the gravitational field of the gas and the host star. We measure the evolution of the particle orbital properties, including mean radius, eccentricity, inclination, and velocity dispersion, and its dependence on the disk properties and the particle initial conditions. Although the results converge with resolution for fixed box dimensions, we find the response of the particles to the gravity of the turbulent gas correlates with the horizontal box size, up to 16 disk scale heights. This correlation indicates that caution should be exercised when interpreting local-shearing-box models involving gravitational physics of magneto-rotational turbulence. Based on heuristic arguments, nevertheless, the criterion Lh /R ~ O(1), where Lh is the horizontal box size and R is the distance to the host star, is proposed to possibly circumvent this conundrum. If this criterion holds, we can still conclude that magneto-rotational turbulence seems likely to be ineffective at driving either diffusive migration or collisional erosion under most circumstances.

  15. PLANETESIMAL AND PROTOPLANET DYNAMICS IN A TURBULENT PROTOPLANETARY DISK: IDEAL STRATIFIED DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Menou, Kristen E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2012-04-01

    Due to the gravitational influence of density fluctuations driven by magneto-rotational instability in the gas disk, planetesimals and protoplanets undergo diffusive radial migration as well as changes in other orbital properties. The magnitude of the effect on particle orbits can have important consequences for planet formation scenarios. We use the local-shearing-box approximation to simulate an ideal, isothermal, magnetized gas disk with vertical density stratification and simultaneously evolve numerous massless particles moving under the gravitational field of the gas and the host star. We measure the evolution of the particle orbital properties, including mean radius, eccentricity, inclination, and velocity dispersion, and its dependence on the disk properties and the particle initial conditions. Although the results converge with resolution for fixed box dimensions, we find the response of the particles to the gravity of the turbulent gas correlates with the horizontal box size, up to 16 disk scale heights. This correlation indicates that caution should be exercised when interpreting local-shearing-box models involving gravitational physics of magneto-rotational turbulence. Based on heuristic arguments, nevertheless, the criterion L{sub h} /R {approx} O(1), where L{sub h} is the horizontal box size and R is the distance to the host star, is proposed to possibly circumvent this conundrum. If this criterion holds, we can still conclude that magneto-rotational turbulence seems likely to be ineffective at driving either diffusive migration or collisional erosion under most circumstances.

  16. PLANETESIMAL DISK MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R. E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed

    2009-12-10

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  17. Spiral Structure and Fragmentation in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, E. I.; Basu, S.

    2005-12-01

    The susceptibility of protostellar disks to gravitational instability and subsequent formation of protoplanetary clumps is currently under debate. We perform numerical simulations of gravitational cloud core collapse until approximately 99% of the initial cloud core mass is accreted by the central protostar and protostellar disk system. We find that the protostellar disk is gravitationally unstable, even in the later phase of negligible mass infall from the surrounding envelope, and quickly develops a flocculent spiral structure. The spiral structure is sharp in the early phase of disk evolution and is diffuse in the later phase. In the early phase, when the mass infall from the envelope is sufficiently high, dense protoplanetary clumps form within the spiral arms. Some of the clumps get dispersed over the course of several orbital periods and the others are driven onto the protostar. These episodes of clump infall can increase the luminosity of the protostar by a factor of up to ˜ 1000. This work was supported by a grant from NSERC. EIV acknowledges support from a CITA National Fellowship.

  18. Computing Temperatures in Optically Thick Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capuder, Lawrence F.. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    We worked with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simulate the transfer of energy through protoplanetary disks, where planet formation occurs. The code tracks photons from the star into the disk, through scattering, absorption and re-emission, until they escape to infinity. High optical depths in the disk interior dominate the computation time because it takes the photon packet many interactions to get out of the region. High optical depths also receive few photons and therefore do not have well-estimated temperatures. We applied a modified random walk (MRW) approximation for treating high optical depths and to speed up the Monte Carlo calculations. The MRW is implemented by calculating the average number of interactions the photon packet will undergo in diffusing within a single cell of the spatial grid and then updating the packet position, packet frequencies, and local radiation absorption rate appropriately. The MRW approximation was then tested for accuracy and speed compared to the original code. We determined that MRW provides accurate answers to Monte Carlo Radiative transfer simulations. The speed gained from using MRW is shown to be proportional to the disk mass.

  19. Supersized Disk (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated ImageData Graph

    This illustration compares the size of a gargantuan star and its surrounding dusty disk (top) to that of our solar system. Monstrous disks like this one were discovered around two 'hypergiant' stars by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers believe these disks might contain the early 'seeds' of planets, or possibly leftover debris from planets that already formed.

    The hypergiant stars, called R 66 and R 126, are located about 170,000 light-years away in our Milky Way's nearest neighbor galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. The stars are about 100 times wider than the sun, or big enough to encompass an orbit equivalent to Earth's. The plump stars are heavy, at 30 and 70 times the mass of the sun, respectively. They are the most massive stars known to sport disks.

    The disks themselves are also bloated, with masses equal to several Jupiters. The disks begin at a distance approximately 120 times greater than that between Earth and the sun, or 120 astronomical units, and terminate at a distance of about 2,500 astronomical units.

    Hypergiant stars are the puffed-up, aging descendants of the most massive class of stars, called 'O' stars. The stars are so massive that their cores ultimately collapse under their own weight, triggering incredible explosions called supernovae. If any planets circled near the stars during one of these blasts, they would most likely be destroyed.

    The orbital distances in this picture are plotted on a logarithmic scale. This means that a given distance shown here represents proportionally larger actual distances as you move to the right. The sun and planets in our solar system have been scaled up in size for better viewing. Little Dust Grains in Giant Stellar Disks The graph above of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the composition of a monstrous disk of what may be planet-forming dust circling the colossal 'hypergiant' star

  20. Spiral disk packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi

    2017-04-01

    It is shown that van Iterson's metric for disk packings, proposed in 1907 in the study of a centric model of spiral phyllotaxis, defines a bounded distance function in the plane. This metric is also related to the bifurcation of Voronoi tilings for logarithmic spiral lattices, through the continued fraction expansion of the divergence angle. The phase diagrams of disk packings and Voronoi tilings for logarithmic spirals are dual graphs to each other. This gives a rigorous proof that van Iterson's diagram in the centric model is connected and simply connected. It is a nonlinear analog of the duality between the phase diagrams for disk packings and Voronoi tilings on the linear lattices, having the modular group symmetry.

  1. Triaxiality in disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertola, F.; Vietri, M.; Zeilinger, W.W. Roma, Osservatorio Astronomico, Rome European Southern Observatory, Garching )

    1991-06-01

    Thirty-two bulges of nearby spirals have been observed, to detect misalignment between disk and bulge apparent major axes. Such misalignment is unequivocally present in the majority of observed objects. This may be due to the triaxiality of disks, bulges, or both. The probability distribution function for the axial ratios is derived under the two extreme hypotheses, i.e., that either only disks (case I) or only bulges (case II) are triaxial: the observational data are equally well fitted by either one. Since dynamical evidence and the internal twisting of isophotes show that bulges are triaxial, case I is unlikely, but an intermediate case cannot be ruled out. These distribution functions are compared with available constraints; in particular, that of case II is projected and compared with the distribution of apparent ellipticities of minor-axis dust-lane ellipticals and of all ellipticals. Both tests show that the observed and derived distributions are consistent. 34 refs.

  2. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  3. Theory of protostellar accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruden, S.

    1994-01-01

    I will present an overview of the current paradigm for the theory of gaseous accretion disks around young stars. Protostellar disks form from the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores. The disks evolve via outward angular momentum transport provided by several mechanisms: gravitational instabilities, thermal convective turbulence, and magnetic stresses. I will review the conditions under which these mechanisms are efficient and consistent with the observed disk evolutionary timescales of several million years. Time permitting, I will discuss outbursts in protostellar disks (FU Orionis variables), the effect of planet formation on disk structure, and the dispersal of remnant gas.

  4. From Disks to Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    This pedagogical chapter covers the theory of planet formation, with an emphasis on the physical processes relevant to current research. After summarizing empirical constraints from astronomical and geophysical data, we describe the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks. We consider the growth of planetesimals and of larger solid protoplanets, followed by the accretion of planetary atmospheres, including the core accretion instability. We also examine the possibility that gas disks fragment directly into giant planets and/or brown dwarfs. We defer a detailed description of planet migration and dynamical evolution to other work, such as the complementary chapter in this series by Morbidelli.

  5. Lupus Alma Disk Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, Megan

    2016-07-01

    We present the first unbiased ALMA survey of both dust and gas in a large sample of protoplanetary disks. We surveyed 100 sources in the nearby (150-200 pc), young (1-2 Myr) Lupus region to constrain M_dust to 2 M_Mars and M_gas to 1 M_Jup. Most disks have masses < MMSN and gas-to-dust ratios < ISM. Such rapid gas depletion may explain the prevalence of super-Earths in the exoplanet population.

  6. C/C composite brake disk nondestructive evaluation by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tsuchin P.; Poudel, Anish; Filip, Peter

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the non-destructive evaluation of thick Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composite aircraft brake disks by using transient infrared thermography (IRT) approach. Thermal diffusivity measurement technique was applied to identify the subsurface anomalies in thick C/C brake disks. In addition, finite element analysis (FEA) modeling tool was used to determine the transient thermal response of the C/C disks that were subjected to flash heating. For this, series of finite element models were built and thermal responses with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models by using custom built in-house IRT system and commercial turnkey system. The analysis and experimental results showed good correlation between thermal diffusivity value and anomalies within the disk. It was demonstrated that the step-heating transient thermal approach could be effectively applied to obtain the whole field thermal diffusivity value of C/C composites.

  7. Residual Agar Determination in Bacterial Spores by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or non-irradiated and not in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 108 spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only 3 false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.

  8. Biochemical differentiation of the Enterobacteriaceae with the aid of lysine-iron-agar.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J G; Kunz, L J; Barron, W; Ewing, W H

    1966-03-01

    A procedure is described for identifying members of the family Enterobacteriaceae isolated from clinical specimens. The methods are based on primary differentiation of the various groups of bacteria by the use of Kligler Iron Agar and lysine-iron-agar. For identification of Salmonella, Shigella, and Arizona group organisms from stools, Triple Sugar Iron Agar and lysine-iron-agar are employed. The usefulness of this schema for diagnostic bacteriology laboratories is discussed. It is not intended to replace methods used in reference or research laboratories.

  9. Dead Zone Accretion Flows in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Neal; Sano, T.

    2008-01-01

    Planets form inside protostellar disks in a dead zone where the electrical resistivity of the gas is too high for magnetic forces to drive turbulence. We show that much of the dead zone nevertheless is active and flows toward the star while smooth, large-scale magnetic fields transfer the orbital angular momentum radially outward. Stellar X-ray and radionuclide ionization sustain a weak coupling of the dead zone gas to the magnetic fields, despite the rapid recombination of free charges on dust grains. Net radial magnetic fields are generated in the magnetorotational turbulence in the electrically conducting top and bottom surface layers of the disk, and reach the midplane by ohmic diffusion. A toroidal component to the fields is produced near the midplane by the orbital shear. The process is similar to the magnetization of the solar tachocline. The result is a laminar, magnetically driven accretion flow in the region where the planets form.

  10. Comparison of isolation of Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale) from peptone-starch-dextrose agar and Columbia colistin-nalidoxic acid agar.

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, R L; Washington JA, I I

    1976-01-01

    A total of 447 cervical or vaginal specimens were inoculated in parallel onto peptone-starch-dextrose (PSD) and Columbia colistin (10 mg/ml)-nalidixic acid (15 mug/ml) (CNA) agar and were incubated for 48 h at 35 degrees C in an atmosphere with 2 to 10% CO2. One hundred (22.4%) of the cultures were positive for Haemophilus vaginalis. Forty-eight of the isolates were recovered from both PSD and Columbia CNA agar, five from PSD only, and 47 from Columbia CNA agar only (P less than 0.001). On Columbia CNA agar, 76 of the isolates were detected after 24 h of incubation, and the remainder were detected within 4 days of incubation. PMID:1085777

  11. Development and validation of a microbiological agar assay for determination of cefuroxime sodium in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Cleber A; Agarrayua, Danielle A; Laporta, Luciane V; Machado, Jaison C; Manfio, Maria L; Bittencourt, Celso F

    2009-06-01

    Cefuroxime (CFU) is a semi-synthetic cephalosporin with a relatively broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and belongs to the second generation of cephalosporins. Regarding the quality control of medicines, a validated microbiological assay for determination of cefuroxime sodium in pharmaceutical formulations has not been reported yet. With this purpose, this paper reports the development and validation of a simple, sensitive, accurate and reproducible agar diffusion method to quantify CFU sodium in injectable formulations. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of CFU upon the strain of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P used as test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance and were found to be linear (r=0.9998) in the selected range of 8.0-32.0 microg/ml; precise [repeatability: relative standard deviation (RSD)=1.56%; intermediate precision: between-day RSD=1.27%; between analyst RSD=1.13%] and accurate (101.58%). The bioassay specificity was studied by evaluation of degraded sample at 50 degrees C with analysis at 0, 24 and 48 h in parallel with the pharmacopeial liquid chromatography method for CFU. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed bioassay, which allows reliable quantitation of CFU sodium in pharmaceutical samples and therefore can be used as a useful alternative methodology for the routine quality control of this medicine.

  12. Development and Validation of a Microbiological Agar Assay for Determination of Orbifloxacin in Pharmaceutical Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Cazedey, Edith C. L.; Salgado, Hérida R. N.

    2011-01-01

    Orbifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and belongs to the third generation of quinolones. Regarding the quality control of medicines, a validated microbiological assay for determination of orbifloxacin in pharmaceutical formulations has not as yet been reported. For this purpose, this paper reports the development and validation of a simple, sensitive, accurate and reproducible agar diffusion method to quantify orbifloxacin in tablet formulations. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of orbifloxacin upon the strain of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 used as test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance and were found to be linear (r = 0.9992) in the selected range of 16.0–64.0 μg/mL, precise with relative standard deviation (RSD) of repeatability intraday = 2.88%, intermediate precision RSD = 3.33%, and accurate (100.31%). The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed bioassay, which allows reliable orbifloxacin quantitation in pharmaceutical samples and therefore can be used as a useful alternative methodology for the routine quality control of this medicine. PMID:24310597

  13. Evolution of protoplanetary disks with dynamo magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    The notion that planetary systems are formed within dusty disks is certainly not a new one; the modern planet formation paradigm is based on suggestions made by Laplace more than 200 years ago. More recently, the foundations of accretion disk theory where initially developed with this problem in mind, and in the last decade astronomical observations have indicated that many young stars have disks around them. Such observations support the generally accepted model of a viscous Keplerian accretion disk for the early stages of planetary system formation. However, one of the major uncertainties remaining in understanding the dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks is the mechanism responsible for the transport of angular momentum and subsequent mass accretion through the disk. This is a fundamental piece of the planetary system genesis problem since such mechanisms will determine the environment in which planets are formed. Among the mechanisms suggested for this effect is the Maxwell stress associated with a magnetic field treading the disk. Due to the low internal temperatures through most of the disk, even the question of the existence of a magnetic field must be seriously studied before including magnetic effects in the disk dynamics. On the other hand, from meteoritic evidence it is believed that magnetic fields of significant magnitude existed in the earliest, PP-disk-like, stage of our own solar system's evolution. Hence, the hypothesis that PP disks are magnetized is not made solely on the basis of theory. Previous studies have addressed the problem of the existence of a magnetic field in a steady-state disk and have found that the low conductivity results in a fast diffusion of the magnetic field on timescales much shorter than the evolutionary timescale. Hence the only way for a magnetic field to exist in PP disks for a considerable portion of their lifetimes is for it to be continuously regenerated. In the present work, we present results on the self

  14. Freddi: Fast Rise Exponential Decay accretion Disk model Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanchev, K. L.; Lipunova, G. V.

    2016-10-01

    Freddi (Fast Rise Exponential Decay: accretion Disk model Implementation) solves 1-D evolution equations of the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk. It simulates fast rise exponential decay (FRED) light curves of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The basic equation of the viscous evolution relates the surface density and viscous stresses and is of diffusion type; evolution of the accretion rate can be found on solving the equation. The distribution of viscous stresses defines the emission from the source. The standard model for the accretion disk is implied; the inner boundary of the disk is at the ISCO or can be explicitely set. The boundary conditions in the disk are the zero stress at the inner boundary and the zero accretion rate at the outer boundary. The conditions are suitable during the outbursts in X-ray binary transients with black holes. In a binary system, the accretion disk is radially confined. In Freddi, the outer radius of the disk can be set explicitely or calculated as the position of the tidal truncation radius.

  15. Herniated disk repair (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is one of the most common causes of lower back pain. The mainstay of treatment for herniated disks is an initial period of rest with pain and anti-inflammatory medications followed by physical therapy. If pain and symptoms persist, surgery to remove ...

  16. Solar disk sextant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Minott, P.; Endal, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of an instrument, called the solar disk sextant, to be used in space to measure the shape and the size of the sun and their variations. The instrumental parameters required to produce sufficient sensitivity to address the problems of solar oblateness, solar pulsations, and global size changes of climatic importance are given.

  17. The diffusion of contaminant through an accretion disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, C. J.; Pringle, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The manner in which a trace contaminant diffuses through an accretion disk is calculated. For a steady disk in which the ratio of diffusivity to viscosity, zeta, is taken to be constant through the disk and for which the surface density distribution is taken to be a power law, analytic solutions to the time-dependent equations governing contaminant evolution are presented. The amount of contaminant which can diffuse its way outwards against the bulk inward accretion flow is calculated, and it is shown that this is a sensitive function of a and zeta.

  18. Chondrites and the Protoplanetary Disk, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The papers discussed the following: The Formation Process of Adhering and Consorting Compound Chondrules Inferred Their Petrology and Major-Element Composition. The Prospect of High-Precision Pb Isotopic Dating of Meteorites. Evolution of UV-Irradiated Protoplanetary Disks. A Model for the Formation of E Chondrites. Oxygen Isotopic Diffusion and Exchange Experiments on Olivine and Chondrule Melts: Preliminary Results. Shock Heating: Origin of Shock Waves in the Protoplanetary Disk. Thermal Structures of Protoplanetary Disks. Meteoritical Astrophysics: A New Subdiscipline. Origin and Thermal History of FeNi-Metal in Primitive Chondrites. The Collisions of Chondrules Behind Shock Waves. Primary Signatures of the Nebular Dust Preserved in Accretionary Rims and Matrices of CV Chondrites. History of Thermally Processed Solids in the Protoplanetary Disk: Reconciling Theoretical Models and Meteoritical. Evidence Evaporation and Condensation During CAI and Chondrule Formation. Shock Heating: Effects on Chondritic Material. Rhounite-bearing Inclusions E201 and E202 from Efremovka: Constraints from Trace. Element Measurements Element Mapping in Anhydrous IDPs: Identification of the Host Phases of Major/Minor Elements as a Test of Nebula Condensation Models. Theoretical Studies of Disk Evolution Around Solar Mass Stars. Chemical Effects of High-Temperature Processing of Silicates. I-Xe and the Chronology of the Early Solar System. The Effects of X-Rays on the Gas and Dust in Young Stellar Objects. Origin of Short-lived Radionuclides in the Early Solar System. On Early Solar System Chronology: Implications of an Initially Heterogeneous Distribution of Short-lived Radionuclides. The Origin of Short-lived Radionuclides and Early Solar System Irradiation. Disequilibrium Melting and Oxygen Isotope Exchange of CAIs and Chondrules in the Solar Nebula. Mineralogy and Chemistry of Fine-grained Matrices, Rims, and Dark Inclusions in the CR Carbonaceous Chondrites Acfer/El Djouf 001 and

  19. Kingella kingae intervertebral disk infection.

    PubMed

    Amir, J; Shockelford, P G

    1991-05-01

    Disk inflammation in children is believed to result from infection, and Staphylococcus aureus is reported to be the organism most commonly isolated from cases of intervertebral disk infection. A case of disk inflammation caused by the unusual pathogen Kingella kingae is described. The antibiotic susceptibility of other K. kingae isolates and the clinical features of 11 other previously reported cases of disk infection caused by this microorganism are reviewed.

  20. Hydrodynamic Viscosity in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Wolfgang J.; Strittmatter, Peter A.; Biermann, Peter L.

    We propose a generalized accretion disk viscosity prescription based on hydrodynamically driven turbulence at the critical effective Reynolds number. This approach is consistent with recent re-analysis by Richard & Zahn (1999) of experimental results on turbulent Couette-Taylor flows. This new β-viscosity formulation applies to both selfgravitating and non-selfgravitating disks and is shown to yield the standard α-disk prescription in the case of shock dissipation limited, non-selfgravitating disks.

  1. NAS agar is more suitable than McKay agar for primary culture of Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) fastidious bacteria, S. intermedius in particular.

    PubMed

    Raclavsky, Vladislav; Novotny, Radko; Stary, Lubomir; Navratilova, Lucie; Zatloukal, Jaromir; Jakubec, Petr; Zapalka, Martin; Kopriva, Frantisek; Kolek, Vitezslav

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) is a group of three streptococcal species (S. anginosus, intermedius and constellatus) that act as opportunist pathogens, among others in cystic fibrosis. Due to their fastidious character, they are both difficult to cultivate and to differentiate from less pathogenic streptococcal species, therefore being most probably underdiagnosed. Semi-selective McKay agar and NAS agar were developed to facilitate SMG recovery from clinical samples; however, direct comparison of recovery rates has not been published yet. We tested the performance of both media on 123 patient samples and demonstrated general superiority of NAS agar for SMG recovery during primary cultivation convincingly. This observation was also confirmed by quantitative drop tests during subculture. Despite the undisputed overall superiority of NAS agar over McKay agar, a smaller fraction of strains grew better on McKay agar. Inter-strain differences were the most probable explanation. Therefore, when economic conditions are not limiting and maximum recovery rate is desirable, both plates are advised to be used in parallel for primary cultivation of clinical samples.

  2. Hall Effect–Mediated Magnetic Flux Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2017-02-01

    The global evolution of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) has recently been shown to be largely controlled by the amount of poloidal magnetic flux threading the disk. The amount of magnetic flux must also coevolve with the disk, as a result of magnetic flux transport, a process that is poorly understood. In weakly ionized gas as in PPDs, magnetic flux is largely frozen in the electron fluid, except when resistivity is large. When the disk is largely laminar, we show that the relative drift between the electrons and ions (the Hall drift), and the ions and neutral fluids (ambipolar drift) can play a dominant role on the transport of magnetic flux. Using two-dimensional simulations that incorporate the Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion (AD) with prescribed diffusivities, we show that when large-scale poloidal field is aligned with disk rotation, the Hall effect rapidly drags magnetic flux inward at the midplane region, while it slowly pushes flux outward above/below the midplane. This leads to a highly radially elongated field configuration as a global manifestation of the Hall-shear instability. This field configuration further promotes rapid outward flux transport by AD at the midplane, leading to instability saturation. In quasi-steady state, magnetic flux is transported outward at approximately the same rate at all heights, and the rate is comparable to the Hall-free case. For anti-aligned field polarity, the Hall effect consistently transports magnetic flux outward, leading to a largely vertical field configuration in the midplane region. The field lines in the upper layer first bend radially inward and then outward to launch a disk wind. Overall, the net rate of outward flux transport is about twice as fast as that of the aligned case. In addition, the rate of flux transport increases with increasing disk magnetization. The absolute rate of transport is sensitive to disk microphysics, which remains to be explored in future studies.

  3. Detection of relatively penicillin G-resistant Neisseria meningitidis by disk susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, J; Mendelman, P M; Sako, M U; Chaffin, D O; Smith, A L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1987-01-01

    Beginning in 1985, relatively penicillin G-resistant (Penr) meningococci which did not produce beta-lactamase were isolated from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of patients in Spain. We identified 16 Penr (mean MIC, 0.3 microgram/ml; range, 0.1 to 0.7 microgram/ml) and 12 penicillin-susceptible (Pens; mean MIC, less than or equal to 0.06 microgram/ml) strains of Neisseria meningitidis by the agar dilution technique using an inoculum of 10(4) CFU and questioned which disk susceptibility test would best differentiate these two populations. We compared the disk susceptibility of these strains using disks containing 2 (P2) and 10 (P10) U of penicillin G, 2 (Am2) and 10 (Am10) micrograms of ampicillin, and 1 microgram of oxacillin (OX1). We also investigated susceptibility with disks containing 30 micrograms of each of cephalothin (CF30), cefoxitin (FOX30), cefuroxime (CXM30), and cefotaxime (CTX30) and 75 micrograms of cefoperazone (CFP75) and determined by cluster analysis any correlation with the zone diameters obtained with P2 disks. Using the P2 and AM2 disks (in contrast to the P10 and AM10 disks), we correctly differentiated all the Penr from Pens isolates. In addition, the zone diameters with the P2 disk gave the best correlation with the penicillin G MIC determinations. All 16 Penr strains and 3 of 12 Pens strains showed zone diameters of 6 mm around OX1 disks, limiting the usefulness of OX1 disks. The zone diameters obtained with CF30, CXM30, and OX1 disks correlated with those obtained with the P2 disk, which suggests that these antibiotics have similar effects on these strains. In contrast, the data obtained with FOX30, CTX30, and CFP75 disks did not cluster with those obtained with the P2 disk, which suggests that there was a difference in the bacterial target or reflects their greater activity. We conclude that the P2 disk tests more readily identify Penr meningococci than do the standard P10 disk tests. PMID:3124729

  4. HIGH-TEMPERATURE IONIZATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, Steven J.; Turner, Neal J.

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the abundances of electrons and ions in the hot (≳500 K), dusty parts of protoplanetary disks, treating for the first time the effects of thermionic and ion emission from the dust grains. High-temperature ionization modeling has involved simply assuming that alkali elements such as potassium occur as gas-phase atoms and are collisionally ionized following the Saha equation. We show that the Saha equation often does not hold, because free charges are produced by thermionic and ion emission and destroyed when they stick to grain surfaces. This means the ionization state depends not on the first ionization potential of the alkali atoms, but rather on the grains’ work functions. The charged species’ abundances typically rise abruptly above about 800 K, with little qualitative dependence on the work function, gas density, or dust-to-gas mass ratio. Applying our results, we find that protoplanetary disks’ dead zone, where high diffusivities stifle magnetorotational turbulence, has its inner edge located where the temperature exceeds a threshold value ≈1000 K. The threshold is set by ambipolar diffusion except at the highest densities, where it is set by Ohmic resistivity. We find that the disk gas can be diffusively loaded onto the stellar magnetosphere at temperatures below a similar threshold. We investigate whether the “short-circuit” instability of current sheets can operate in disks and find that it cannot, or works only in a narrow range of conditions; it appears not to be the chondrule formation mechanism. We also suggest that thermionic emission is important for determining the rate of Ohmic heating in hot Jupiters.

  5. Chemical Signposts in Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleeves, I.; Bergin, E. A.; Fogel, J.

    2011-05-01

    In the era of the Kepler Mission, the detection of numerous multi-planet systems has demonstrated that planet-formation appears to be a rather ubiquitous phenomenon. Such systems are believed to form from nascent protoplanetary disks, whose environment sets the stage for initial planetary chemical composition and evolution. However, disk systems typically vary by orders of magnitude in radiation field, densities and temperatures, and thus complex disk models are necessary to fully understand this unique chemical environment. Further evidence for disks as progenitors to planetary systems comes from Spitzer surveys of young disk systems, which have revealed a class of objects known as ``transition disks''. These systems appear to have inner voids and gaps in the dust opacity, possibly indicative of planet evolution and disk clearing. This physical evolution in the dust disk will significantly impact its chemical nature, and therefore these potentially planet-forming systems in ``transition'' should have unique chemical signatures. We predict one such signature to be an active chemistry at the wall interface where the conditions are such that the disk is both heated and optically thick to the photo-dissociating UV. The net result is a wide variety of gas-phase molecules, appearing in line emission as bright molecular rings far from the central star. This behavior should also reveal a wealth of information about the physical conditions in this actively evolving zone between the inner ``cleared'' disk and the massive outer disk. For this presentation I will discuss the features of our disk chemical model pipeline and select model results of transition disk systems. I will also highlight the exciting future of protoplanetary disk chemistry in the era of ALMA, which will truly revolutionize our understanding of the chemical nature of disks.

  6. Formation and evolution of the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikina, Tamara V.; Makalkin, A. B.

    1991-01-01

    A disk formation model during collapse of the protosolar nebula, yielding a low-mass protoplanetary disk is presented. The following subject areas are covered: (1) circumstellar disks; (2) conditions for the formation of stars with disks; (3) early evolution of the protoplanetary disk; and (4) temperature conditions and the convection in the protoplanetary disk.

  7. Evaluation of fluorogenic TSC agar for recovering Clostridium perfringens in groundwater samples.

    PubMed

    Araujo, M; Sueiro, R A; Gómez, M J; Garrido, M J

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is widely recognised as a reliable water pollution indicator. Since several media can be employed for the membrane filtration enumeration of this microorganism, the main aim of this work was to investigate the ability of fluorocult-supplemented TSC-agar (Merck) for recovering Cl. perfringens from public springs used for direct human consumption. Cl. perfringens recovery was also performed on mCP agar (Cultimed) according to Directive 98/83 as well as on TSC-Agar (Merck), TSN-Agar (Merck) and SPS-Agar (BBL) media. Variance analysis of data obtained showed no statistically significant differences in the counts obtained among all media employed in this work. However, the Cl. perfringens recovery efficiencies with TSC and fluorogenic TSC agars were significantly greater (P = < 0.05) than the corresponding values of mCP and TSN media. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that fluorogenic TSC agar was the most specific medium for Cl. perfringens recovery in groundwater samples (85.3% of typical colonies and 82.8% of atypical colonies confirmed). In summary, the membrane filtration technique with fluorogenic TSC agar showed the best performance characteristics of all the media tested as judged by their recovery efficiency and specificity in these water samples.

  8. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-01-22

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by electrospinning technique, using water as solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operating at 50°C, to avoid agar gelation. Agar pure solution (1 wt%) showed inadequate spinnability regardless of the used electrospinning conditions. The addition of a co-blending polymer such as PVA (10 wt% starting solution) improved the solutions viscoelasticity and hence, the solutions spinnability. Agar/PVA solutions were prepared with different mass ratios (100/0, 50/50, 40/60, 30/70, 20/80 and 0/100) and electrospun at various sets of electrospinning conditions. Best nanofibers were obtained with 30/70 and 20/80 agar/PVA blends while samples with higher agar contents (50/50 and 40/60 agar/PVA) were harder to process and led to discontinuous fibrous mats. This first set of encouraging results can open a new window of opportunities for agar-based biomaterials in the form of nanofibers.

  9. Characteristics of thermoplastic sugar palm Starch/Agar blend: Thermal, tensile, and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Jumaidin, R; Sapuan, S M; Jawaid, M; Ishak, M R; Sahari, J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to study the behavior of biodegradable sugar palm starch (SPS) based thermoplastic containing agar in the range of 10-40wt%. The thermoplastics were melt-mixed and then hot pressed at 140°C for 10min. SEM investigation showed good miscibility between SPS and agar. FT-IR analysis confirmed that SPS and agar were compatible and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds existed between them. Incorporation of agar increased the thermoplastic starch tensile properties (Young's modulus and tensile strength). The thermal stability and moisture uptake increased with increasing agar content. The present work shows that starch-based thermoplastics with 30wt% agar content have the highest tensile strength. Higher content of agar (40wt%) resulted to more rough cleavage fracture and slight decrease in the tensile strength. In conclusion, the addition of agar improved the thermal and tensile properties of thermoplastic SPS which widened the potential application of this eco-friendly material. The most promising applications for this eco-friendly material are short-life products such as packaging, container, tray, etc.

  10. Feasibility of the inflow disk generator for open-cycle MHD power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Lear, W. E.; Eustis, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A feasibility study of the inflow disk MHD generator for baseload applications was performed. Each design element, i.e., the combustor, the inlet flow path, the generator channel, the diffuser and the magnet, was studied in detail in order to provide a comprehensive assessment of the inflow disk generator. Based on these results, the performance of the inflow disk generator was calculated for two different thermal inputs: 1250 MW(th) and 2500 MW(th). It was shown that the performance of the inflow disk generator is similar to that of the diagonal generator within the uncertainty of the analysis.

  11. [Evaluation of a new medium, eggplant (Solanum melongena) agar as a screening medium for Cryptococcus neoformans in environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Sengul, Mustafa; Ergin, Cağrı; Kartal, Tuğba

    2014-04-01

    Cryptococcus neofomans is an encapsulated yeast-like fungus that causes life-threatening infections, especially in immunosuppresive patients. C.neoformans infection is believed to be acquired via inhalation of aerosolized particles from the environment. Avian guano, decaying tree hollows and soil are the related known environmental niches. Brown pigmented yeast growth from the precursors in growth media is an important step for the identification and isolation of C.neoformans. Seeds of plants in nature are preferred owing to easy accessibility and low costs for the preparation of such media. Guizotia abysinicca (Niger seed) as Staib agar, Helianthus annus (Sunflower) as Pal's medium, Brassica nigra (Mustard) agar, tobacco agar, Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean) seed agar, Perilla frutescens (Beefsteak plant) seed agar, Rubus fruticosus (Blackberry) agar and ground red hot pepper agar are pigment-based selective media for the differentiation of C.neoformans. The aim of this study was to observe the pigment production of C.neoformans in a new medium based on eggplant (Solanum melongena) and also to compare its performance with the simplified Staib, Pal's and tobacco agar for isolation from the environment. Three different eggplant-based medium (S.melongena Melanzaza viserba, S.melongena Pinstripe F1 and S.ovigerum Ivory F1) were included in the study. Pigment-forming eggplant medium, simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and tobacco agar were used for the cultivation of the environmental swabbed samples from 19 Eucalyptus camaldulensis trunk hollows in continuous colonization region. While pigment formation were observed with S.melongena Melanzaza viserba and S.melongena Pinstripe F1 containing media, S.ovigerum Ivory F1 medium was found to be non-reactive. In colonization area (Gökova-Akyaka, Turkey), 11 (57.9%) out of 19 E.camaldulensis samples were positive with simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar while 10 (52.6%) of them are positive with tobacco agar. C

  12. ISOPHOT observations of circumstellar disks around young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robberto, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Natta, A.; Beckwith, S. V. W.

    1999-03-01

    We observed 97 stars in five young clusters at 25 and 60 μm with ISOPHOT to determine the frequency of infrared emission from circumstellar disks. The clusters have ages between 1 and 300 Myr. Most stars (5/6) that have near-infrared excess emission, thought to be indicative of accretion disks, exhibit far-infrared emission; only one object that has no excess emission in the near-infrared exhibits far-infrared excess emission. No stars older than 10 Myr have evidence for optically-thick disks. These results show that dust in the disks between about 0.3 and 3 AU disappears on timescales of ~ 10 Myr, identical within the uncertainties to the timescale for cessation of accretion as indicated by near-infrared observations of similar samples. Detection of one object whose dust optical depth is intermediate between opaque and transparent suggests that the duration of the transition phase between optically-thick and thin disk emission is less than 300,000 yr. Broad-band photometry between 2.5 and 100 μm, low resolution spectra between 2 and 12 μm, and 200 μm maps of 18 young stars (1-3 Myr old) in the Taurus and Chamaeleon dark clouds suggests that the irradiation dominates over viscous dissipation of mass accretion in the heating of the disk. The spectral energy distributions are consistent with those predicted by models of disks heated centrally by the stellar/accretion photosphere or by scattering from a diffuse halo surrounding the disk. The observations demonstrate that heating by accretion through the disks contributes little or no power to the energy budget at distances more than a few tenths AU from the central star.

  13. The Evolving Properties of Water in a Dynamic Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, Fred

    2015-08-01

    Protoplanetary disks are dynamic objects, through which mass and angular momentum are transported as part of the final stages of pre-main sequence evolution of their central stars. These disks are also rich chemical factories, in which materials inherited from the interstellar medium are transformed through a series of reactions (involving, gases, solids, ions, and photons) to the eventual building blocks of the planets.The chemical and physical evolution of a protoplanetary disk are intimately connected. Both solids and gases are subjected to large-scale motions associated with disk evolution and diffusion within the gas. Solids also settle toward the disk midplane and migrate inwards due to gravity and gas drag. This dynamical evolution exposes primitive materials to a range of physical conditions (pressure, temperature, radiation environment) within the disk. It is the integrated effects of these environments that define the physical and chemical properties of a solid grain prior to its incorporation into a planetesimal or planet.Water serves as an interesting tracer of this evolution, as it would be processed in a variety of ways within a protoplanetary disk. I will discuss new methods that allow us to trace the dynamical movement of water vapor and ice throughout the lifetime of a protoplanetary disk and to determine the physical environments to which the water would be exposed. In particular, I will show how the early evolution of a protoplanetary disk impacts the D/H ratio of the water inherited by planetary materials. I will also explore how photodesorption of water by UV photons can lead to the formation of amorphous ice and thus the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles at levels that are much greater than predicted by equilibrium chemistry models. These effects combine to lead to constantly evolving properties of water during the early stages of planet formation. I will also discuss how the observed properties of Solar System bodies constrain these

  14. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A.; Testi, L.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Natta, A.; Scholz, A.

    2014-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J = 3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks' physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large; the smallest one has an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density, and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks, data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low-mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, as well as the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low-mass objects.

  15. A novel agar formulation for isolation and direct enumeration of Vibrio vulnificus from oyster tissue.

    PubMed

    Griffitt, Kimberly J; Grimes, D Jay

    2013-08-01

    A new selective and differential medium, Vibrio vulnificus X-Gal (VVX), was developed for direct enumeration of V. vulnificus (Vv) from oyster samples. This agar utilizes cellobiose and lactose as carbon sources, and the antibiotics colistin and polymyxin B as selective agents. Hydrolysis of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl- beta-d-galactopyranoside (x-gal), used in the agar as a lactose analog, produces an insoluble blue dye that makes lactose positive colonies easily distinguishable from any non-lactose fermenting bacteria. Various bacterial species were spot plated onto thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar (TCBS), and CHROMagar Vibrio, two vibrio-specific selective agars, non-selective agar, and VVX to compare selectivity of VVX to other widely used media. A V. vulnificus pure culture was serially diluted on VVX and non-selective agar to determine the VVX percent recovery. Water and oyster samples were spread plated on VVX agar and allowed to incubate for 16-18 h at 33 °C. Blue and white colonies from VVX agar were picked and screened by end point PCR for the Vv hemolysin vvhA. VVX agar showed a significant improvement over TCBS and CHROMagar at preventing non-target growth. There was an 87.5% recovery compared to non-selective plating and a 98% positivity rate of blue colonies picked from oyster tissue plating. The findings suggest that this new agar is a fast, distinctive, and accurate method for enumeration of V. vulnificus from the environment.

  16. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas.

  17. Bladed disk vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to better understand the vibratory response of bladed disk assemblies that occur in jet engines or turbopumps. Two basic problems were investigated: how friction affects flutter; and how friction, mistuning, and stage aerodynamics affect resonance. Understanding these phenomena allows a better understanding of why some stages have high vibratory stresses, how best to manage those stresses, and what to do about reducing them if they are too large.

  18. Gaseous Inner Disks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    spectral line diagnostics have been used as probes of the gas in inner disks. These include transitions of molecular hydrogen at UV, near-infrared, and...mid-infrared wavelengths (Sections 2.4, 2.5) and the fundamental ro-vibrational transitions of the OH molecule (Section 2.2). Additional potential...phase and sufficiently ex- cited to produce rovibrational features in the infrared. Com- plementary atomic transitions are likely to be good probes of

  19. DISK-SATELLITE INTERACTION IN DISKS WITH DENSITY GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-10-10

    Gravitational coupling between a gaseous disk and an orbiting perturber leads to angular momentum exchange between them that can result in gap opening by planets in protoplanetary disks and clearing of gas by binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) embedded in accretion disks. Understanding the co-evolution of the disk and the orbit of the perturber in these circumstances requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of the torque exerted by the latter on a highly non-uniform disk. Here we explore disk-satellite interaction in disks with gaps in linear approximation both in Fourier and in physical space, explicitly incorporating the disk non-uniformity in the fluid equations. Density gradients strongly displace the positions of Lindblad resonances in the disk (which often occur at multiple locations), and the waveforms of modes excited close to the gap edge get modified compared to the uniform disk case. The spatial distribution of the excitation torque density is found to be quite different from the existing prescriptions: most of the torque is exerted in a rather narrow region near the gap edge where Lindblad resonances accumulate, followed by an exponential falloff with the distance from the perturber. Despite these differences, for a given gap profile, the full integrated torque exerted on the disk agrees with the conventional uniform disk theory prediction at the level of {approx}10%. The nonlinearity of the density wave excited by the perturber is shown to decrease as the wave travels out of the gap, slowing down its nonlinear evolution and damping. Our results suggest that gap opening in protoplanetary disks and gas clearing around SMBH binaries can be more efficient than the existing theories predict. They pave the way for self-consistent calculations of the gap structure and the orbital evolution of the perturber using accurate prescription for the torque density behavior.

  20. Growth of an ice disk: dependence of critical thickness for disk instability on supercooling of water.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Etsuro; Sekerka, Robert F; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2009-04-09

    The appearance of an asymmetrical pattern that occurs when a disk crystal of ice grows from supercooled water was studied by using an analysis of growth rates for radius and thickness. The growth of the radius is controlled by transport of latent heat and is calculated by solving the diffusion equation for the temperature field surrounding the disk. The growth of the thickness is governed by the generation and lateral motion of steps and is expressed as a power function of the supercooling at the center of a basal face. Symmetry breaking with respect to the basal face of an ice disk crystal is observed when the thickness reaches a critical value; then one basal face becomes larger than the other and the disk loses its cylindrical shape. Subsequently, morphological instability occurs at the edge of the larger basal face of the asymmetrical shape (Shimada, W.; Furukawa, Y. J. Phys. Chem. 1997, B101, 6171-6173). We show that the critical thickness is related to the critical condition for the stable growth of a basal face. A difference of growth rates between two basal faces is a possible mechanism for the appearance of the asymmetrical shape.

  1. STEADY STATE DUST DISTRIBUTIONS IN DISK VORTICES: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS AND APPLICATIONS TO TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir; Lin, Min-Kai E-mail: mklin924@cita.utoronto.ca

    2013-09-20

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array has returned images of transitional disks in which large asymmetries are seen in the distribution of millimeter sized dust in the outer disk. The explanation in vogue borrows from the vortex literature and suggests that these asymmetries are the result of dust trapping in giant vortices, excited via Rossby wave instabilities at planetary gap edges. Due to the drag force, dust trapped in vortices will accumulate in the center and diffusion is needed to maintain a steady state over the lifetime of the disk. While previous work derived semi-analytical models of the process, in this paper we provide analytical steady-steady solutions. Exact solutions exist for certain vortex models. The solution is determined by the vortex rotation profile, the gas scale height, the vortex aspect ratio, and the ratio of dust diffusion to gas-dust friction. In principle, all of these quantities can be derived from observations, which would validate the model and also provide constrains on the strength of the turbulence inside the vortex core. Based on our solution, we derive quantities such as the gas-dust contrast, the trapped dust mass, and the dust contrast at the same orbital location. We apply our model to the recently imaged Oph IRS 48 system, finding values within the range of the observational uncertainties.

  2. Continuous degradation of maltose: improvement in stability and catalytic properties of maltase (α-glucosidase) through immobilization using agar-agar gel as a support.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Karim, Asad; Aman, Afsheen; Marchetti, Roberta; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maltose degrading enzyme was immobilized within agar-agar support via entrapment method due to its industrial utilization. The maximum immobilization efficiency (82.77%) was achieved using 4.0% agar-agar keeping the diameter of bead up to 3.0 mm. The matrix entrapment showed maximum catalytic activity at pH 7.0 and temperature 65 °C. Substrate saturation kinetics showed that the K m of immobilized enzyme increased from 1.717 to 2.117 mM ml(-1) where as Vmax decreased from 8,411 to 7,450 U ml(-1 )min(-1) as compared to free enzyme. The immobilization significantly increased the stability of maltase against various temperatures and immobilized maltase retain 100% of its original activity after 2 h at 50 °C, whereas the free maltase only showed 60% residual activity under same condition. The reusability of entrapped maltase showed activity up to 12 cycles and retained 50% of activity even after 5th cycle. Storage stability of agar entrapped maltase retain 73% of its initial activity even after 2 months when stored at 30 °C while free enzyme showed only 37% activity at same storage conditions.

  3. DVD - digital versatile disks

    SciTech Connect

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    An international standard has emerged for the first true multimedia format. Digital Versatile Disk (by its official name), you may know it as Digital Video Disks. DVD has applications in movies, music, games, information CD-ROMS, and many other areas where massive amounts of digital information is needed. Did I say massive amounts of data? Would you believe over 17 gigabytes on a single piece of plastic the size of an audio-CD? That`s the promise, at least, by the group of nine electronics manufacturers who have agreed to the format specification, and who hope to make this goal a reality by 1998. In this major agreement, which didn`t come easily, the manufacturers will combine Sony and Phillip`s one side double-layer NMCD format with Toshiba and Matsushita`s double sided Super-Density disk. By Spring of this year, they plan to market the first 4.7 gigabyte units. The question is: Will DVD take off? Some believe that read-only disks recorded with movies will be about as popular as video laser disks. They say that until the eraseable/writable DVD arrives, the consumer will most likely not buy it. Also, DVD has a good market for replacement of CD- Roms. Back in the early 80`s, the international committee deciding the format of the audio compact disk decided its length would be 73 minutes. This, they declared, would allow Beethoven`s 9th Symphony to be contained entirely on a single CD. Similarly, today it was agreed that playback length of a single sided, single layer DVD would be 133 minutes, long enough to hold 94% of all feature-length movies. Further, audio can be in Dolby`s AC-3 stereo or 5.1 tracks of surround sound, better than CD-quality audio (16-bits at 48kHz). In addition, there are three to five language tracks, copy protection and parental ``locks`` for R rated movies. DVD will be backwards compatible with current CD-ROM and audio CD formats. Added versatility comes by way of multiple aspect rations: 4:3 pan-scan, 4:3 letterbox, and 16:9 widescreen. MPEG

  4. Magnetically Self-regulated Formation of Early Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Commerçon, Benoît; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The formation of protoplanetary disks during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disk radius, r≃ 18 {au} {({η }{AD}/0.1{{s}})}2/9{({B}z/0.1{{G}})}-4/9{(M/0.1{M}⊙ )}1/3, where M is the total disk plus protostar mass, {η }{AD} is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient, and B z is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is significantly smaller than the disks that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variations of a factor 100 in core mass, a factor 10 in the level of turbulence, a factor 5 in rotation, and magnetic mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratios 2 and 5. The disk radius estimates are found to agree with the numerical simulations within less than a factor 2. A striking prediction of our analysis is the weak dependence of circumstellar disk radii upon the various relevant quantities, suggesting weak variations among class-0 disk sizes. In some cases, we note the onset of large spiral arms beyond this radius.

  5. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  6. PROPERTIES OF GRAVITOTURBULENT ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2009-10-10

    We explore the properties of cold gravitoturbulent accretion disks-non-fragmenting disks hovering on the verge of gravitational instability (GI)-using a realistic prescription for the effective viscosity caused by gravitational torques. This prescription is based on a direct relationship between the angular momentum transport in a thin accretion disk and the disk cooling in a steady state. Assuming that opacity is dominated by dust we are able to self-consistently derive disk properties for a given M-dot assuming marginal gravitational stability. We also allow external irradiation of the disk and account for a non-zero background viscosity, which can be due to the magneto-rotational instability. Spatial transitions between different co-existing disk states (e.g., between irradiated and self-luminous or between gravitoturbulent and viscous) are described and the location of the boundary at which the disk must fragment is determined in a variety of situations. We demonstrate in particular that at low enough M-dot external irradiation stabilizes the gravitoturbulent disk against fragmentation to very large distances thus providing means of steady mass transport to the central object. Implications of our results for the possibility of planet formation by GI in protoplanetary disks and star formation in the Galactic center and for the problem of feeding supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei are discussed.

  7. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  8. A Hidden Pitfall in the Preparation of Agar Media Undermines Microorganism Cultivability

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kosei; Daimon, Serina; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiologists have been using agar growth medium for over 120 years. It revolutionized microbiology in the 1890s when microbiologists were seeking effective methods to isolate microorganisms, which led to the successful cultivation of microorganisms as single clones. But there has been a disparity between total cell counts and cultivable cell counts on plates, often referred to as the “great plate count anomaly,” that has long been a phenomenon that still remains unsolved. Here, we report that a common practice microbiologists have employed to prepare agar medium has a hidden pitfall: when phosphate was autoclaved together with agar to prepare solid growth media (PT medium), total colony counts were remarkably lower than those grown on agar plates in which phosphate and agar were separately autoclaved and mixed right before solidification (PS medium). We used a pure culture of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca T-27T and three representative sources of environmental samples, soil, sediment, and water, as inocula and compared colony counts between PT and PS agar plates. There were higher numbers of CFU on PS medium than on PT medium using G. aurantiaca or any of the environmental samples. Chemical analysis of PT agar plates suggested that hydrogen peroxide was contributing to growth inhibition. Comparison of 454 pyrosequences of the environmental samples to the isolates revealed that taxa grown on PS medium were more reflective of the original community structure than those grown on PT medium. Moreover, more hitherto-uncultivated microbes grew on PS than on PT medium. PMID:25281372

  9. Detection of Agar, by Analysis of Sugar Markers, Associated with Bacillus Anthracis Spores, After Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Colburn, Heather A.; Fox, Alvin; Fox, Karen F.; Harley, William M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-08-01

    Detection of small quantities of agar associated with spores of Bacillus anthracis could provide key information regarding its source or growth characteristics. Agar, widely used in growth of bacteria on solid surfaces, consists primarily of repeating polysaccharide units of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (AGal) and galactose (Gal) with sulfated and O-methylated galactoses present as minor constituents. Two variants of the alditol acetate procedure were evaluated for detection of potential agar markers associated with spores. The first method employed a reductive hydrolysis step, to stabilize labile anhydrogalactose, by converting to anhydrogalactitol. The second eliminated the reductive hydrolysis step simplifying the procedure. Anhydrogalactitol, derived from agar, was detected using both derivatization methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. However, challenges with artefactual background (reductive hydrolysis) or marker destruction (hydrolysis) lead to the search for alternative sugar markers. A minor agar component, 6-O-methyl galactose (6-O-M gal), was readily detected in agar-grown but not broth-grown bacteria. Detection was optimized by the use of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). With appropriate choice of sugar marker and analytical procedure, detection of sugar markers for agar has considerable potential in microbial forensics.

  10. EXor Outbursts from Disk Amplification of Stellar Magnetic Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Philip J.

    2016-12-01

    EXor outbursts—moderate-amplitude disk accretion events observed in Class I and Class II protostellar sources—have timescales and amplitudes that are consistent with the viscous accumulation and release of gas in the inner disk near the dead zone boundary. We suggest that outbursts are indirectly triggered by stellar dynamo cycles, via poloidal magnetic flux that diffuses radially outward through the disk. Interior to the dead zone the strength of the net field modulates the efficiency of angular momentum transport by the magnetorotational instability. In the dead zone changes in the polarity of the net field may lead to stronger outbursts because of the dominant role of the Hall effect in this region of the disk. At the level of simple estimates we show that changes to kG-strength stellar fields could stimulate disk outbursts on 0.1 au scales, though this optimistic conclusion depends upon the uncertain efficiency of net flux transport through the inner disk. The model predicts a close association between observational tracers of stellar magnetic activity and EXor events.

  11. The disk-halo interface in edge-on spirals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walterbos, Rene; Braun, Robert; Norman, Colin

    1993-01-01

    We are studying the disk-halo interface in several edge-on spiral galaxies through extensive imagery in H(alpha) and other emission lines from Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG), also referred to as the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM). In addition, for the nearby Sc galaxy NGC4631 we have obtained x-ray observations with ROSAT, to map the distribution of hot (10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7)) gas in the disk and halo. Here we present initial results for two late-type spirals, NGC4244 and NGC4631.

  12. Dust outflows from quiescent spiral disks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, P. B.; Rand, R. J.; Xilouris, E. M.; Bevan, S.; Ferguson, A. M.; Davies, J. I.; Bianchi, S.

    2000-07-01

    We have conducted a search for ``dust chimneys'' in a sample of 10 highly-inclined spiral galaxies (i=86-90deg) which we had previously observed in the Hα emission line (Rand 1996). We have procured B-band CCD images for this purpose and employed unsharp-masking techniques to accentuate the structure of the dust lane. A scattering+absorption radiation transfer model enabled us to separate 5 galaxies from the sample which are sufficiently inclined (i>87deg) for us to reliably identify and quantify dust clouds residing at over 2 scale-heights above the disk. Three of these galaxies possess numerous curvi-linear chimney structures stretching up to 2 kpc from the midplane and the fraction of total galactic dust contained in such structures is of order 1%. Optical extinction offers a lower limit to the amount of dust contained in the extraplanar layer but, by examining the transparent submm thermal emission from NGC 891, we fix an upper limit of 5%. Our results are consistent with a similar recent study by Howk & Savage (1999) which indicates that about half of quiescent spiral disks possess detectable dust chimneys. We have compared our optical images with the corresponding Hα emission-line radiation. We do not find a detailed spatial correspondance between dust chimneys and either sites of recent star-formation or the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas. This is somewhat surprising given that FIR-bright galaxies, such as M 82, are known to entrain dust at the working surface of the starburst-driven outflow (traced in Hα ). It is possible a global correlation exists, with disks experiencing overall higher rates of star-formation also possessing the greatest number of chimneys. This may indicate a timescale difference between the two phenomena with the Hα phase lasting ~ 106 yr but chimneys requiring ~ 107 yr to form. Additionally, we have investigated the edge-on disk NGC 55 which, being ten times closer than galaxies in our main sample, allows us to examine in greater

  13. THE COSMIC BATTERY IN ASTROPHYSICAL ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Nathanail, Antonios; Katsanikas, Matthaios

    2015-06-01

    The aberrated radiation pressure at the inner edge of the accretion disk around an astrophysical black hole imparts a relative azimuthal velocity on the electrons with respect to the ions which gives rise to a ring electric current that generates large-scale poloidal magnetic field loops. This is the Cosmic Battery established by Contopoulos and Kazanas in 1998. In the present work we perform realistic numerical simulations of this important astrophysical mechanism in advection-dominated accretion flows, ADAFs. We confirm the original prediction that the inner parts of the loops are continuously advected toward the central black hole and contribute to the growth of the large-scale magnetic field, whereas the outer parts of the loops are continuously diffusing outward through the turbulent accretion flow. This process of inward advection of the axial field and outward diffusion of the return field proceeds all the way to equipartition, thus generating astrophysically significant magnetic fields on astrophysically relevant timescales. We confirm that there exists a critical value of the magnetic Prandtl number between unity and 10 in the outer disk above which the Cosmic Battery mechanism is suppressed.

  14. Magnetic reconnection process in accretion disk systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piovezan, P.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.

    2009-08-01

    At the present study, we investigate the role of magnetic reconnection in three different astrophysical systems, namely young stellar objects (YSO's), microquasars, and active galactic nuclei (AGN's). In the case of microquasars and AGN's, violent reconnection episodes between the magnetic field lines of the inner disk region (which are established by a turbulent dynamo) and those anchored into the black hole are able to heat the coronal/disk gas and accelerate particles to relativistic velocities through a diffusive first-order Fermi-like process within the reconnection site that will produce relativistic blobs. The heating of the coronal/disk gas is able to produce a steep X-ray spectrum with a luminosity that is consistent with the observations and we argue that it is being produced mainly at the foot of the reconnection zone, while the Fermi-like acceleration process within the reconnection site results a power-law electron distribution with N(E) ∝ E-α, with α=5/2, and a corresponding synchrotron radio power-law spectrum with a spectral index that is compatible with that observed during the radio flares in microquasars (Sν ∝ ν-0.75). The scaling laws that we derive for AGN's indicate that the same mechanism may be occurring there. Finally, in the case of the YSO's, a similar magnetic configuration can be reached. The amount of magnetic energy that can be extracted from the inner disk region can heat the coronal gas to temperatures of the order of 10^8 K and could explain the observed X-ray flaring emission.

  15. Dynamics of flux tubes in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, E. T.; Duncan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The study of magnetized plasmas in astrophysics is complicated by a number of factors, not the least of which is that in considering magnetic fields in stars or accretion disks, we are considering plasmas with densities well above those we can study in the laboratory. In particular, whereas laboratory plasmas are dominated by the confining magnetic field pressure, stars, and probably accretion disks, have magnetic fields whose beta (ratio of gas pressure to magnetic field pressure) is much greater than 1. Observations of the Sun suggest that under such circumstances the magnetic field breaks apart into discrete flux tubes with a small filling factor. On the other hand, theoretical treatments of MHD turbulence in high-beta plasmas tend to assume that the field is more or less homogeneously distributed throughout the plasma. Here we consider a simple model for the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in a turbulent medium. We discuss the mechanism by which small inhomogeneities evolve into discrete flux tubes and the size and distribution of such flux tubes. We then apply the model to accretion disks. We find that the fibrilation of the magnetic field does not enhance magnetic buoyancy. We also note that the evolution of an initially diffuse field in a turbulent medium, e.g., any uniform field in a shearing flow, will initially show exponential growth as the flux tubes form. This growth saturates when the flux tube formation is complete and cannot be used as the basis for a self-sustaining dynamo effect. Since the typical state of the magnetic field is a collection of intense flux tubes, this effect is of limited interest. However, it may be important early in the evolution of the galactic magnetic field, and it will play a large role in numerical simulations. Finally, we note that the formation of flux tubes is an essential ingredient in any successful dynamo model for stars or accretion disks.

  16. Membrane-assisted culture of fungal mycelium on agar plates for RNA extraction and pharmacological analyses.

    PubMed

    Lange, Mario; Müller, Carolin; Peiter, Edgar

    2014-05-15

    Fungal mycelium grown in liquid culture is easy to harvest for RNA extraction and gene expression analyses, but liquid cultures often develop rather heterogeneously. In contrast, growth of fungal mycelium on agar plates is highly reproducible. However, this biological material cannot be harvested easily for downstream analyses. This article describes a PVDF (polyvinylidene difluoride) membrane-assisted agar plate culture method that enables the harvest of mycelium grown on agar plates. This culture method leads to a strongly reduced variation in gene expression between biological replicates and requires less growth space as compared with liquid cultures.

  17. Growth characteristics of Bacillus anthracis compared to other Bacillus spp. on the selective nutrient media Anthrax Blood Agar and Cereus Ident Agar.

    PubMed

    Tomaso, Herbert; Bartling, Carsten; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Hagen, Ralf M; Scholz, Holger C; Beyer, Wolfgang; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    Anthrax Blood Agar (ABA) and Cereus Ident Agar (CEI) were evaluated as selective growth media for the isolation of Bacillus anthracis using 92 B. anthracis and 132 other Bacillus strains from 30 species. The positive predictive values for the identification of B. anthracis on ABA, CEI, and the combination of both were 72%, 71%, and 90%, respectively. Thus, less than 10% of all species were misidentified using both nutrient media. Species which might be misidentified as B. anthracis were B. cereus, B. mycoides, and B. thuringiensis. Particularly, 30% of B. weihenstephanensis strains were misidentified as B. anthracis.

  18. A Simple Experiment for Visualizing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helseth, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple and fascinating experiment for studying diffusion in gels using a pH-sensitive dye. By doping agar with methyl red, we obtain a gel which rapidly reacts to changes in pH by changing its absorption spectrum. The pH gradients can be followed using a digital camera, and we demonstrate here that the pH-sensitive colour changes can…

  19. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized.

  20. Lightweight Disk Alloy Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    2001 (1982). 45. K C. Russell and J. W Eddington , JI Mat. Sci., 6, 20 (1972). 46. M. J. Lequeux, Ph.D. Thesis, Univ. de Paris-Sud (1979). 47. P S ...AD-A237 064 UGHTWEIGHT DISK ALLOY DEVELOPMENT S . M. Russel, C. C. Law and M. J. Blackburn Uted Te lowkles Corpoaton Prat & Whtney Govnment Enes...Space Propulo P. 0. Box 109600 West Palm Beach, FL 33410-9600 P. C. Clapp and D. M. Pease Istitute of Materials Science 9 ELECT Fg AW 11il S E Final

  1. Transition circumnstellar disks in Lupus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. A.; Schreiber, M. R.; Cieza, L. A.; Rebassa-Manssergas, A.; Williams, J. P.; Merin, B.; Smith-Castelli, A.; Orellana, M.

    2011-10-01

    Based on Spitzer selected YSOs, we present a study of transition disks located in Lupus. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain their defining characteristic: an inner opacity hole and an optically thick outer disk. These processes are: planet formation, grain growth, photoevaporation, tidal truncation in close binaries. We have carried out Adaptive Optics (AO) imaging, submillimeter photometry, and echelle spectroscopy in order to observationally characterize our transition disk sample. With the analyzed data we can distinguish the four scenarios and identify candidate transition disk systems that are currently forming planets. Such objects are excellent targets to be followed-up with Herschel and ALMA.

  2. Disk Evolution: Testing The Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Phil

    2016-07-01

    Models for planet formation and observable large-scale structure in protoplanetary disks are built on a foundation of gas-phase physics. In the simplest telling, it is assumed that the disk evolves due to turbulence, and that photoevaporation is the dominant driver of mass loss. How secure is this foundation to our understanding? I will review recent results from magnetohydrodynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks, which suggest a modified picture in which MHD winds and fossil magnetic flux play a critical role. I will discuss what these theoretical results may imply for observations of disks.

  3. Gravitational Instability in Planetesimal Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, Bryce T.; Lithwick, Yoram; Pan, Margaret; Rein, Hanno; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-11-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) has been proposed as a method of forming giant gas planets enhanced by disk thermodynamics in a protoplanetary disk (Boss, 1997, Science 276; Durisen et al., 2007, Protostars and Planets V) and as a method of forming planetesimals through the focusing of boulders by the interaction between solids and gases in a turbulent circumstellar disk (Johansen et al., 2007, Nature 448; Youdin & Goodman, 2005, Astrophys. J. 620). GI is mediated through a gaseous circumstellar disk in each each of these scenarios. We explore the possibility of GI occurring in a planetesimal disk devoid of gas. In this regime, mutual collisions between planetesimals are required to dissipate their orbital shear and velocity dispersion enough for collapse to occur as described by the Toomre stability criterion (Toomre, 1964, Astrophys. J. 139; Toomre, 1981, Structure and Evolution of Normal Galaxies). How frequent must collisions be between planetesimals in a gravitationally stable planetesimal disk for GI to occur? Are there collisional rates where GI is postponed indefinitely in an equilibrium state between gravitational stirring and collisional cooling? We present 3D shearing sheet simulations using the REBOUND N-body code with the symplectic epicyclic integrator (Rein & Liu, 2011, A&A 537; Rein & Tremaine, 2011, MNRAS 415) in which the candidate collision rates are within a few orders of magnitude of the disk dynamical lifetime. Our simulations suggest that collisions rate directly controls disk cooling. The shape of the disk cooling curve is independent of the collision rate when scaled to the collision time.

  4. Extragalactic diffuse (C II) emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Suzanne C.; Geis, Norbert; Townes, Charles H.; Genzel, R.; Herrmann, F.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Stacey, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The 158 micro m (CII) line has been mapped in the galaxies Centaurus A, M83, NGC 6946, and NGC 891. The emission exists over very large scales, peaking in the nuclei and extending beyond the spiral arms and molecular disks. While most of the (CII) emission from the nuclei and spiral arms originates in photodissociated gas, the diffuse atomic gas can account for much of the (CII) emission in the extended regions.

  5. CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, S.; Casassus, S.; Van der Plas, G.; Christiaens, V.; Ménard, F.; Roman, P.; Cieza, L.; Hales, A. S.; Pinte, C.

    2015-01-10

    Inner cavities and annular gaps in circumstellar disks are possible signposts of giant planet formation. The young star HD 142527 hosts a massive protoplanetary disk with a large cavity that extends up to 140 AU from the central star, as seen in continuum images at infrared and millimeter wavelengths. Estimates of the survival of gas inside disk cavities are needed to discriminate between clearing scenarios. We present a spatially and spectrally resolved carbon monoxide isotopologue observations of the gas-rich disk HD 142527, in the J = 2-1 line of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We detect emission coming from inside the dust-depleted cavity in all three isotopologues. Based on our analysis of the gas in the dust cavity, the {sup 12}CO emission is optically thick, while {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are both optically thin. The total mass of residual gas inside the cavity is ∼1.5-2 M {sub Jup}. We model the gas with an axisymmetric disk model. Our best-fit model shows that the cavity radius is much smaller in CO than it is in millimeter continuum and scattered light observations, with a gas cavity that does not extend beyond 105 AU (at 3σ). The gap wall at its outer edge is diffuse and smooth in the gas distribution, while in dust continuum it is manifestly sharper. The inclination angle, as estimated from the high velocity channel maps, is 28 ± 0.5 deg, higher than in previous estimates, assuming a fix central star mass of 2.2 M {sub ☉}.

  6. A fresh liver agar substrate for rearing small numbers of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruner, Susan V.; Slone, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Forensically important calliphorids can be reared on a mixture of beef liver and agar. Small pieces of meat, especially fresh or frozen beef liver, will desiccate in 2–6 h, but this simple-to-make feeding substrate remains moist for at least 12 h at 25 and 30°C without desiccation, even in small (5 g) amounts. We determined the survivorship of small numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (first-instar larvae to adult eclosion) raised on 5 g of liver agar and fresh beef liver. We found that all larvae raised on 5 g of liver died due to desiccation, but survivorship on 5 g of liver agar was equivalent to that on larger (50 g) pieces of either liver agar or beef liver.

  7. A fresh liver agar substrate for rearing small numbers of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Gruner, Susan V; Slone, Daniel H

    2014-05-01

    Forensically important calliphorids can be reared on a mixture of beef liver and agar. Small pieces of meat, especially fresh or frozen beef liver, will desiccate in 2-6 h, but this simple-to-make feeding substrate remains moist for at least 12 h at 25 and 30 degrees C without desiccation, even in small (5 g) amounts. We determined the survivorship of small numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (first-instar larvae to adult eclosion) raised on 5 g of liver agar and fresh beef liver. We found that all larvae raised on 5 g of liver died due to desiccation, but survivorship on 5 g of liver agar was equivalent to that on larger (50 g) pieces of either liver agar or beef liver.

  8. Proton beam writing of microstructures in Agar gel for patterned cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larisch, Wolfgang; Koal, Torsten; Werner, Ronald; Hohlweg, Marcus; Reinert, Tilo; Butz, Tilman

    2011-10-01

    A rather useful prerequisite for many biological and biophysical studies, e.g., for cell-cell communication or neuronal networks, is confined cell growth on micro-structured surfaces. Solidified Agar layers have smooth surfaces which are electrically neutral and thus inhibit receptor binding and cell adhesion. For the first time, Agar microstructures have been manufactured using proton beam writing (PBW). In the irradiated Agar material the polysaccharides are split into oligosaccharides which can easily be washed off leaving Agar-free areas for cell adhesion. The beam diameter of 1 μm allows the fabrication of compartments accommodating single cells which are connected by micrometer-sized channels. Using the external beam the production process is very fast. Up to 50 Petri dishes can be produced per day which makes this technique very suitable for biological investigations which require large throughputs.

  9. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR COLLAPSE: NONIDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC EFFECTS AND EARLY FORMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2015-03-10

    The transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields is a crucial physical process in the formation and evolution of stars and disks. Because the ionization degree in star-forming clouds is extremely low, nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects such as ambipolar diffusion and ohmic dissipation work strongly during protostellar collapse. These effects have significant impacts in the early phase of star formation as they redistribute magnetic flux and suppress angular momentum transport by magnetic fields. We perform three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion. Without these effects, magnetic fields transport angular momentum so efficiently that no rotationally supported disk is formed even after the second collapse. Ohmic dissipation works only in a relatively high density region within the first core and suppresses angular momentum transport, enabling formation of a very small rotationally supported disk after the second collapse. With both ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion, these effects work effectively in almost the entire region within the first core and significant magnetic flux loss occurs. As a result, a rotationally supported disk is formed even before a protostellar core forms. The size of the disk is still small, about 5 AU at the end of the first core phase, but this disk will grow later as gas accretion continues. Thus, the nonideal MHD effects can resolve the so-called magnetic braking catastrophe while keeping the disk size small in the early phase, which is implied from recent interferometric observations.

  10. Disk MHD generator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retallick, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    Directly-fired, separately-fired, and oxygen-augmented MHD power plants incorporating a disk geometry for the MHD generator were studied. The base parameters defined for four near-optimum-performance MHD steam power systems of various types are presented. The finally selected systems consisted of (1) two directly fired cases, one at 1920 K (2996F) preheat and the other at 1650 K (2500 F) preheat, (2) a separately-fired case where the air is preheated to the same level as the higher temperature directly-fired cases, and (3) an oxygen augmented case with the same generator inlet temperature of 2839 (4650F) as the high temperature directly-fired and separately-fired cases. Supersonic Mach numbers at the generator inlet, gas inlet swirl, and constant Hall field operation were specified based on disk generator optimization. System pressures were based on optimization of MHD net power. Supercritical reheat stream plants were used in all cases. Open and closed cycle component costs are summarized and compared.

  11. Xanthan gum: an economical partial substitute for agar in microbial culture media.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Shashi B; Jain, Ruchi

    2006-04-01

    Xanthan gum, microbial desiccation-resistant polysaccharide prepared commercially by aerobic submerged fermentation from Xanthomonas campestris, has been successfully used alone and in combination with agar for microbial culture media. As illustrative examples, eight bacteria and eight fungi were grown on media solidified with either agar (A, 1.5%), xanthan gum (X, 1%), or combinations of both (0.9% X + 0.1% A, 0.8% X + 0.2% A, 0.7% X + 0.3% A, 0.6% X + 0.4% A). All fungi and bacteria exhibited normal growth and differentiation in all these treatments. Rather, growth of most of the fungi was better on xanthan (alone) and xanthan + agar media than agar medium. As the media gelled with xanthan gum alone flow, it was not possible to incubate Petri plates in inverted position. Moreover, because of the softness, streaking of bacteria was difficult on such media. However, these problems could be overcome by partially replacing xanthan gum with 0.3% agar. Bacterial enumeration studies carried out for Serratia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. by serial dilution and pour-plate method on agar (1.5%), 0.7%/0.6% X + 0.3%/0.4% A yielded similar counts. Selective media, succinate medium for Pseudomonas sp., and MacConkey broth medium for Escherichia coli gelled with 0.7%/0.6% X + 0.3%/0.4% A did not support growth of other bacteria when inoculated along with the above-mentioned bacteria. Likewise, differential medium, CRMA (Congo red mannitol agar) gelled with xanthan-agar combination could differentiate between Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium sp.

  12. Genome Sequence of the Agar-Degrading Marine Bacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. Strain G7

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Byung Kwon; Chi, Won-Jae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Choi, Soobeom; Chang, Yong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine gammaproteobacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7, which was isolated from coastal seawater to be utilized as a bioresource for production of agar-derived biofuels. The 3.91-Mb genome contains a number of genes encoding algal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes such as agarases and sulfatases. PMID:23209220

  13. Isolation of Asticcacaulis sp. SA7, a novel agar-degrading alphaproteobacterium.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Akifumi; Sakai, Masao

    2006-03-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium, strain SA7, was isolated from plant roots cultivated in soil. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence showed that strain SA7 is affiliated with the genus Asticcacaulis. Strain SA7 produced extracellular agarase, and grew utilizing agar in the culture medium as sole carbon source. Zymogram analysis showed that strain SA7 extracellularly secreted single agarase protein (about 70 kDa).

  14. Low density, microcellular, dopable, agar/gelatin foams for pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, W.F.; Aubert, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    Low-density, microcellular foams prepared from the natural polymers agar and gelatin have been developed for pulsed-power physics experiments. Numerous experiments were supported with foams having densities at or below 10 mg/cm{sup 3}. For some of the experiments, the agar/gelatin foam was uniformly doped with metallic elements using soluble salts. Depending on the method of preparation, cell sizes were typically below 10 microns and for one process were below 1.0 micron.

  15. Growth and phenotypic characterization of Legionella species on semisolid media made with washed agar.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J E; Jones, G W; Engleberg, N C

    1993-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila (and 28 Legionella species) grew efficiently on charcoal-free, buffered yeast extract medium made with washed agar and without apparent loss of infectivity for U937 cells. Because charcoal-free, buffered yeast extract is transparent, it is a suitable base for indicator media and pigment detection. In standard media, charcoal apparently prevents agar contaminants from inhibiting Legionella growth. Images PMID:8417021

  16. A twisted disk equation that describes warped galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, K.

    1994-01-01

    Warped H1 gas layers in the outer regions of spiral galaxies usually display a noticeably twisted structure. This structure is thought to arise primarily as a result of differential precession in the H1 disk as it settles toward a 'preferred orientation' in an underlying dark halo potential well that is not spherically symmetric. In an attempt to better understand the structure and evolution of these twisted, warped disk structures, we have utilized the 'twist-equation' formalism. Specifically, we have generalized the twist equation to allow the treatment of non-Keplerian disks and from it have derived the steady-state structure of twisted disks that develop from free precession in a nonspherical, logarithmic halo potential. This generalized equation can also be used to examine the time-evolutionary behavior of warped galaxy disks.

  17. [GROWTH OF MICROMYCETES FROM DIFFERENT ECOLOGICAL NICHES ON AGAR NUTRIENT MEDIA].

    PubMed

    Kurchenko, I M; Yurieva, E M; Voychuk, S I

    2015-01-01

    Radial growth rate of (K(r)) 153 strains 6 species of micromycetes from different ecological niches was studied on 7 agar media: three standard (malt extract agar, potato-dextrose agar, Czapek's agar), and on agar media with plant polymers (carboxymethylcellulose, xylan, soluble starch and apple pectin). Endophytic and plant pathogenic strains (biotrophs) of all studied species did not differ significantly in their ability to grow on nutrient media of different composition--average values of K(r) for these two groups were the same (0,200 and 0,199 mm/h, respectively). Soil micromycetes (saprophytes) characterized by the lowest average growth rate (0,169 mm/h) and significantly differed from the endophytic and plant pathogenic ones. Average of the radial growth rates of studied microscopic fungi were higher on standard nutrient media than with plant polymers ones. Growth parameters of endophytes and plant pathogens of all studied species on various agar media differed from the soil strains. High growth rate of endophytic and plant pathogenic strains of Fusarium poae, Alternaria alternata and Ceratocystis sp. provides them the rapid colonization of plants. Penicillium funiculosum strains equally can exist as saprophytes in soil and as endophytic plant symbionts. A wide range of K(r) variation of endophytic dark pigmented Mycelia sterilia indicates the presence in this group of different species of micromycetes, which have no sporulation.

  18. Complex impedance and conductivity of agar-based ion-conducting polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwanya, A. C.; Amaechi, C. I.; Udounwa, A. E.; Osuji, R. U.; Maaza, M.; Ezema, F. I.

    2015-04-01

    Agar-based electrolyte standing films with different salts and weak acids as ion and proton conductors were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometry, photoluminescence emission spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The salts used are lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) and potassium perchlorate (KClO4), while the weak acids used are acetic acid (CH3COOH) and lactic acid (C3H6O3). The values of the ion conductivity obtained for the agar-based polymer films are 6.54 × 10-8, 9.12 × 10-8, 3.53 × 10-8, 2.24 × 10-8 S/cm for the agar/acetic acid, agar/lactic acid, agar/LiClO4 and agar/KClO4 polymer films, respectively. As a function of temperature, the ion conductivity exhibits an Arrhenius behavior and the estimated activation energy is ≈0.1 eV for all the samples. The samples depicted high values of dielectric permittivity toward low frequencies which is due mostly to electrode polarization effect. The samples showed very high transparency (85-98 %) in the visible region, and this high transparency is one of the major requirements for application in electrochromic devices (ECD). The values of conductivity and activation energy obtained indicate that the electrolytes are good materials for application in ECD.

  19. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  20. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  1. Circumstellar disks and planetary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huélamo, N.

    2017-03-01

    Circumstellar disks are very common around young intermediate-, low-mass stars, and brown dwarfs. They are the cradle of planetary systems, although the mechanism to form planets is still unknown. In this text I review some advances in the field of circumstellar disks and planetary formation coming from observations.

  2. Scattering from Thin Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectric properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T is sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes (T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  3. Scattering from thin dielectric disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectic properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes, T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  4. Modification of kanamycin-esculin-azide agar to improve selectivity in the enumeration of fecal streptococci from water samples.

    PubMed Central

    Audicana, A; Perales, I; Borrego, J J

    1995-01-01

    Kanamycin-esculin-azide agar was modified by increasing the concentration of sodium azide to 0.4 g liter-1 and replacing kanamycin sulfate with 5 mg of oxolinic acid liter-1. The modification, named oxolinic acid-esculin-azide (OAA) agar, was compared with Slanetz-Bartley and KF agars by using drinking water and seawater samples. The OAA agar showed higher specificity, selectivity, and recovery efficiencies than those obtained by using the other media. In addition, no confirmation of typical colonies was needed when OAA agar was used, which significantly shortens the time of sample processing and increases the accuracy of the method. PMID:8534085

  5. Debris Disks and Hidden Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2008-01-01

    When a planet orbits inside a debris disk like the disk around Vega or Beta Pictoris, the planet may be invisible, but the patterns it creates in the disk may give it away. Observing and decoding these patterns may be the only way we can detect exo-Neptunes orbiting more than 20 AU from their stars, and the only way we can spot planets in systems undergoing the late stages of planet formation. Fortunately, every few months, a new image of a debris disk appears with curious structures begging for explanation. I'll describe some new ideas in the theory of these planet-disk interactions and provide a buyers guide to the latest models (and the planets they predict).

  6. Mass distributions in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, Thomas; Verheijen, Marc; Bershady, Matthew; Westfall, Kyle; Andersen, David; Swaters, Rob

    2017-03-01

    We present results on luminous and dark matter mass distributions in disk galaxies from the DiskMass Survey. As expected for normal disk galaxies, stars dominate the baryonic mass budget in the inner region of the disk; however, at about four optical scale lengths (hR ) the atomic gas starts to become the dominant contributor. Unexpectedly, we find the total baryon to dark-matter fraction within a galaxy stays nearly constant with radius from 1hR out to at least 6hR , with a baryon fraction of 15-50% among galaxies. On average, only one third of the mass within 2.2hR in a disk galaxy is baryonic and these baryons appear to have had only a minor effect on the distribution of the dark matter.

  7. Evolution of magnetized protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the global evolution of a turbulent protoplanetary disk in its viscous stage, incorporating the effects of Maxwell stress due to a large-scale magnetic field permeating disk. We assume that the viscous stress is given by an alpha model. A magnetic field is produced contemporaneously by an alpha omega dynamo mechanism and the resultant Maxwell stress assists the viscous stress in providing the means for disk evolution. The aim of this work is to compare the evolution of magnetized and nonmagnetized disks driven by turbulent viscosity of the same magnitude and thus assess the effects of a self-generated magnetic field on the structure and dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks. Two illustrative examples corresponding to two different initial conditions are considered: a high-mass case that starts with a disk of 0.245 solar mass and angular momentum of 5.6 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s, and a low-mass that case starts with a disk of 0.11 solar mass and angular momentum of 1.8 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s. For each of these two cases the radial development of a disk is calculated numerically assuming a fiducial value of the dimensionless viscosity parameter alpha(sub ss) = 0.01, as well as alpha(sub ss) = 2 x 10(exp -3). In all cases the central star has a mass equal to 1 solar mass. The most striking feature of magnetized disk evolution is the presence of the surface density bulge located in the region of the disk where the dynamo mechanism cannot support a magnetic field. The bulge persists for a time of the order of 10(exp 5)-10(exp 6) yr. The presence and persistence of the surface density bulge may have important implications for the process of planet formation and the overall characteristics of resultant planetary systems.

  8. Multiwavelength search for protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Schmidt-Kaler, Theodor

    1994-01-01

    Infrared emission of circumstellar dust was observed for almost one hundred T Tauri stars. This dust is interpreted to be part of a protoplanetary disk orbiting the central star. T Tauri stars are young stellar objects and evolve into solar type stars. Planets are believed to form in these disks. The spectral energy distribution of a disk depends on its temperature profile. Different disk regions emit at different wavelengths. The disk-star boundary layer is hot and emits H(alpha) radiation. Inner disk regions at around 1 AU with a temperature of a few hundred Kelvin can be probed in near infrared wavelength regimes. Outer disk regions at around 100 AU distance from the star are colder and emit far infrared and sub-millimeter radiation. Also, X-ray emission from the stellar surface can reveal information on disk properties. Emission from the stellar surface and the boundary layer may be shielded by circumstellar gas and dust. T Tauri stars with low H(alpha) emission, i.e. no boundary layer, show stronger X-ray emission than classical T Tauri stars, because the inner disk regions of weak emission-line T Tauri stars may be clear of material. In this paper, first ROSAT all sky survey results on the X-ray emission of T Tauri stars and correlations between X-ray luminosity and properties of T Tauri disks are presented. Due to atmospheric absorption, X-ray and most infrared observations cannot be carried out on Earth, but from Earth orbiting satellites (e.g. IRAS, ROSAT, ISO) or from lunar based observatories, which would have special advantages such as a stable environment.

  9. RAID 7 disk array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Lloyd

    1993-01-01

    Each RAID level reflects a different design architecture. Associated with each is a backdrop of imposed limitations, as well as possibilities which may be exploited within the architectural constraints of that level. There are three unique features that differentiate RAID 7 from all other levels. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to usage of I/O data paths. Each I/O drive (includes all data and one parity drives) as well as each host interface (there may be multiple host interfaces) has independent control and data paths. This means that each can be accessed completely, independently, of the other. This is facilitated by a separate device cache for each device/interface as well. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to device hierarchy and data bus utilization. Each drive and each interface is connected to a high speed data bus controlled by the embedded operating system to make independent transfers to and from central cache. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to the operation of an embedded real time process oriented operating system. This means that exclusive and independent of the host, or multiple host paths, the embedded OS manages all I/O transfers asynchronously across the data and parity drives. A key factor to consider is that of the RAID 7's ability to anticipate and match host I/O usage patterns. This yields the following benefits over RAID's built around micro-code based architectures. RAID 7 appears to the host as a normally connected Big Fast Disk (BFD). RAID 7 appears, from the perspective of the individual disk devices, to minimize the total number of accesses and optimize read/write transfer requests. RAID 7 smoothly integrates the random demands of independent users with the principles of spatial and temporal locality. This optimizes small, large, and time sequenced I/O requests which results in users having an I/O performance which approaches performance to that of main memory.

  10. Stochastic disks that roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes-Cerfon, Miranda

    2016-11-01

    We study a model of rolling particles subject to stochastic fluctuations, which may be relevant in systems of nano- or microscale particles where rolling is an approximation for strong static friction. We consider the simplest possible nontrivial system: a linear polymer of three disks constrained to remain in contact and immersed in an equilibrium heat bath so the internal angle of the polymer changes due to stochastic fluctuations. We compare two cases: one where the disks can slide relative to each other and the other where they are constrained to roll, like gears. Starting from the Langevin equations with arbitrary linear velocity constraints, we use formal homogenization theory to derive the overdamped equations that describe the process in configuration space only. The resulting dynamics have the formal structure of a Brownian motion on a Riemannian or sub-Riemannian manifold, depending on if the velocity constraints are holonomic or nonholonomic. We use this to compute the trimer's equilibrium distribution with and without the rolling constraints. Surprisingly, the two distributions are different. We suggest two possible interpretations of this result: either (i) dry friction (or other dissipative, nonequilibrium forces) changes basic thermodynamic quantities like the free energy of a system, a statement that could be tested experimentally, or (ii) as a lesson in modeling rolling or friction more generally as a velocity constraint when stochastic fluctuations are present. In the latter case, we speculate there could be a "roughness" entropy whose inclusion as an effective force could compensate the constraint and preserve classical Boltzmann statistics. Regardless of the interpretation, our calculation shows the word "rolling" must be used with care when stochastic fluctuations are present.

  11. Chromium and zinc uptake by algae Gelidium and agar extraction algal waste: kinetics and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2007-11-19

    Biosorption of chromium and zinc ions by an industrial algal waste, from agar extraction industry has been studied in a batch system. This biosorbent was compared with the algae Gelidium itself, which is the raw material for agar extraction, and the industrial waste immobilized with polyacrylonitrile (composite material). Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich equilibrium models describe well the equilibrium data. The parameters of Langmuir equilibrium model at pH 5.3 and 20 degrees C were for the algae, q(L)=18 mg Cr(III)g(-1) and 13 mgZn(II)g(-1), K(L) = 0.021l mg(-1)Cr(III) and 0.026l mg(-1) Zn(II); for the algal waste, q(L)=12 mgCr(III)g(-1) and 7mgZn(II)g(-1), K(L)=0.033lmg(-1) Cr(III) and 0.042l mg(-1) Zn(II); for the composite material, q(L) = 9 mgCr(III)g(-1) and 6 mgZn(II)g(-1), K(L)=0.032l mg(-1)Cr(III) and 0.034l mg(-1)Zn(II). The biosorbents exhibited a higher preference for Cr(III) ions and algae Gelidium is the best one. The pseudo-first-order Lagergren and pseudo-second-order models fitted well the kinetic data for the two metal ions. Kinetic constants and equilibrium uptake concentrations given by the pseudo-second-order model for an initial Cr(III) and Zn(II) concentration of approximately 100 mgl(-1), at pH 5.3 and 20 degrees C were k(2,ads)=0.04 g mg(-1)Cr(III)min(-1) and 0.07 g mg(-1)Zn(II)min(-1), q(eq)=11.9 mgCr(III)g(-1) and 9.5 mgZn(II)g(-1) for algae; k(2,ads)=0.17 g mg(-1)Cr(III)min(-1) and 0.19 g mg(-1)Zn(II)min(-1), q(eq)=8.3 mgCr(III)g(-1) and 5.6 mgZn(II)g(-1) for algal waste; k(2,ads)=0.01 g mg(-1)Cr(III)min(-1) and 0.18 g mg(-1)Zn(II)min(-1), q(eq)=8.0 mgCr(III)g(-1) and 4.4 mgZn(II)g(-1) for composite material. Biosorption was modelled using a batch adsorber mass transfer kinetic model, which successfully predicts Cr(III) and Zn(II) concentration profiles. The calculated average homogeneous diffusivities, D(h), were 4.2 x 10(-8), 8.3 x 10(-8) and 1.4 x 10(-8)cm(2)s(-1) for Cr(III) and 4.8 x 10(-8), 9.7 x 10(-8) and 6.2 x 10(-8)cm(2)s(-1

  12. Comparison of Thin Disk and Thick Disk Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, M. M.; Carney, B. W.

    2003-12-01

    If the Milky Way's thick disk is the antecedent of the thin disk, there should be continuity in the chemical and dynamical evolution. Also, there should be continuity in the chemical evolution as showed through element-to-iron ratios compared to [Fe/H]. Previous results (i.e. Prochaska et al. 2000) suggest that the thick and thin disks do not share a common chemical history. Prior results have compared abundance analyses of thick disk stars with literature values for thin disk stars. We have selected two dozen stars, half from each population, based on kinematics and obtained high-resolution blue and red spectra for stars with similar temperatures. The stars are cool enough that their life expectancies exceed the age of the Galaxy. The stellar metallicities range from solar to one-tenth solar. The stars are analyzed using the same sets of absorption lines so that direct comparision can be made between the thick and thin disks. Abundances of alpha elements as well as s- and r- process elements confirm that the thick and thin disks appear to have experienced independent chemical histories.

  13. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of Cd(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium and agar extraction algal waste.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2006-01-01

    In this study an industrial algal waste from agar extraction has been used as an inexpensive and effective biosorbent for cadmium (II) removal from aqueous solutions. This biosorbent was compared with the algae Gelidium itself, which is the raw material for agar extraction. Equilibrium data follow both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models. The parameters of Langmuir equilibrium model are q(max)=18.0 mgg(-1), b=0.19 mgl(-1) and q(max)=9.7 mgg(-1), b=0.16 mgl(-1), respectively for Gelidium and the algal waste. Kinetic experiments were conducted at initial Cd(II) concentrations in the range 6-91 mgl(-1). Data were fitted to pseudo-first- and second-order Lagergren models. For an initial Cd(II) concentration of 91 mgl(-1) the parameters of the pseudo-first-order Lagergren model are k(1,ads)=0.17 and 0.87 min(-1); q(eq)=16.3 and 8.7 mgg(-1), respectively, for Gelidium and algal waste. Kinetic constants vary with the initial metal concentration. The adsorptive behaviour of biosorbent particles was modelled using a batch reactor mass transfer kinetic model. The model successfully predicts Cd(II) concentration profiles and provides significant insights on the biosorbents performance. The homogeneous diffusivity, D(h), is in the range 0.5-2.2 x10(-8) and 2.1-10.4 x10(-8)cm(2)s(-1), respectively, for Gelidium and algal waste.

  14. Low-state disks and low-beta disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineshige, Shin; Kusnose, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    1995-01-01

    Stellar black hole candidates (BHCs) exhibit bimodal spectral states. We calculate nonthermal disk spectra, demonstrating that a large photon index (alpha (sub x) approximately 2-3) observed in the soft (high) state is due to a copious soft photon supply, whereas soft photon starvation leads to a smaller index (alpha (sub x) approximately 1.5-2) in the hard (low) state. Thus, the absence of the soft component flux in the low state cannot be due to obscuration. A possible disk configuration during the low state is discussed. We proposed that a low-state disk may be a low-beta disk in which magnetic pressure may exceed gas pressure becuase of the suppression of field escape by a strong shear. As a result, disk material will take the form of blobs constricted by mainly toroidal magnetic fields. Fields are dissipated mainly by occasional reconnection events with a huge energy release. This will account for large-amplitude, aperiodic X-ray variations (flickering) and high-energy radiation with small alpha(sub x) from hard state BHCs and possibly from active galactic nuclei. Further, we propose a hysteretic relation between the mass-flow rate and plasma-beta, a ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure, for the spectral evolution of transient BHCs. The disk is in the low-beta state in quiescence and early rise. The low-beta disk is optically thin and affected by advection. A hard-to-soft transition occurs before the peak luminosity, since there is no advection-dominated branch at higher luminosities. An optically thick, high-beta disk appears at small radii. In the decay phase of the light curve, the standard-type disk becomes effectively optically thin, when a soft-hard transition is triggered. High-beta plasmas in the main body shrink to form minute blobs, and low-beta coronal plasma fills interblob space.

  15. The Gas Disk: Evolution and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rab, Christian; Baldovin-Saavedra, Carla; Dionatos, Odysseas; Vorobyov, Eduard; Güdel, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the birthplaces of planetary systems. The evolution of the star-disk system and the disk chemical composition determines the initial conditions for planet formation. Therefore a comprehensive understanding of the main physical and chemical processes in disks is crucial for our understanding of planet formation. We give an overview of the early evolution of disks, discuss the importance of the stellar high-energy radiation for disk evolution and describe the general thermal and chemical structure of disks. Finally we provide an overview of observational tracers of the gas component and disk winds.

  16. A scaling law of radial gas distribution in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1990-01-01

    Based on the idea that local conditions within a galactic disk largely determine the region's evolution time scale, researchers built a theoretical model to take into account molecular cloud and star formations in the disk evolution process. Despite some variations that may be caused by spiral arms and central bulge masses, they found that many late-type galaxies show consistency with the model in their radial atomic and molecular gas profiles. In particular, researchers propose that a scaling law be used to generalize the gas distribution characteristics. This scaling law may be useful in helping to understand the observed gas contents in many galaxies. Their model assumes an exponential mass distribution with disk radius. Most of the mass are in atomic gas state at the beginning of the evolution. Molecular clouds form through a modified Schmidt Law which takes into account gravitational instabilities in a possible three-phase structure of diffuse interstellar medium (McKee and Ostriker, 1977; Balbus and Cowie, 1985); whereas star formation proceeds presumably unaffected by the environmental conditions outside of molecular clouds (Young, 1987). In such a model both atomic and molecular gas profiles in a typical galactic disk (as a result of the evolution) can be fitted simultaneously by adjusting the efficiency constants. Galaxies of different sizes and masses, on the other hand, can be compared with the model by simply scaling their characteristic length scales and shifting their radial ranges to match the assumed disk total mass profile sigma tot(r).

  17. Magnetic Field and Early Evolution of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic field plays a central role in the formation and evolution of circumstellar disks. The magnetic field connects the rapidly rotating central region with the outer envelope and extracts angular momentum from the central region during gravitational collapse of the cloud core. This process is known as magnetic braking. Both analytical and multidimensional simulations have shown that disk formation is strongly suppressed by magnetic braking in moderately magnetised cloud cores in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit. On the other hand, recent observations have provided growing evidence of a relatively large disk several tens of astronomical units in size existing in some Class 0 young stellar objects. This introduces a serious discrepancy between the theoretical study and observations. Various physical mechanisms have been proposed to solve the problem of catastrophic magnetic braking, such as misalignment between the magnetic field and the rotation axis, turbulence, and non-ideal effect. In this paper, we review the mechanism of magnetic braking, its effect on disk formation and early evolution, and the mechanisms that resolve the magnetic braking problem. In particular, we emphasise the importance of non-ideal effects. The combination of magnetic diffusion and thermal evolution during gravitational collapse provides a robust formation process for the circumstellar disk at the very early phase of protostar formation. The rotation induced by the Hall effect can supply a sufficient amount of angular momentum for typical circumstellar disks around T Tauri stars. By examining the combination of the suggested mechanisms, we conclude that the circumstellar disks commonly form in the very early phase of protostar formation.

  18. Protoplanetary and Debris Disk Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Donaldson, Jessica; Debes, John H.; Malumuth, Eliot; Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; SEEDS Team

    2016-01-01

    The types of planets that form around other stars are highly dependent on their natal disk conditions. Therefore, the composition, morphology, and distribution of material in protoplanetary and debris disks are important for planet formation. Here we present the results of studies of two disk systems: AB Aur and AU Mic.The circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur has many interesting features, including spirals, asymmetries, and non-uniformities. However, comparatively little is known about the envelope surrounding the system. Recent work by Tang et al (2012) has suggested that the observed spiral armss may not in fact be in the disk, but instead are due to areas of increased density in the envelope and projection effects. Using Monte Carlo modeling, we find that it is unlikely that the envelope holds enough material to be responsible for such features and that it is more plausible that they form from disk material. Given the likelihood that gravitational perturbations from planets cause the observed spiral morphology, we use archival H band observations of AB Aur with a baseline of 5.5 years to determine the locations of possible planets.The AU Mic debris disk also has many interesting morphological features. Because its disk is edge on, the system is an ideal candidate for color studies using coronagraphic spectroscopy. Spectra of the system were taken by placing a HST/STIS long slit parallel to and overlapping the disk while blocking out the central star with an occulting fiducial bar. Color gradients may reveal the chemical processing that is occuring within the disk. In addition, it may trace the potential composition and architecture of any planetary bodies in the system because collisional break up of planetesimals produces the observed dust in the system. We present the resulting optical reflected spectra (5200 to 10,200 angstroms) from this procedure at several disk locations. We find that the disk is bluest at the innermost locations of the

  19. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-01-01

    Background The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. Methods A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar. PMID:14613587

  20. Mass production of spores of lactic acid-producing Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 on agar plate.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of sporangiospores (spores) of Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 (identical to NRRL 395 and ATCC 9363) on potato-dextrose-agar medium was studied aiming at starting its L(+)-lactic acid fermentation directly from spore inoculation. Various parameters including harvest time, sowed spore density, size of agar plate, height of air space, and incubation mode of plate (agar-on-bottom or agar-on-top) were studied. Ordinarily used shallow Petri dishes were found out to be unsuitable for the full growth of R. oryzae sporangiophores. In a very wide range of the sowed spore density, the smaller it was, the greater the number of the harvested spores was. It was also interesting to find out that R. oryzae grown downward vertically with a deep air space in an agar-on-top mode gave larger amount of spores than in an agar-on-bottom mode at 30°C for 7-day cultivation. Scale-up of the agar plate culture from 26.4 to 292 cm(2) was studied, resulting in the proportional relationship between the number of the harvested spores/plate and the plate area in the deep Petri dishes. The number of plates of 50 cm in diameter needed for 100 m(3) industrial submerged fermentation started directly from 2 × 10(5) spores/mL inoculum size was estimated as about 6, from which it was inferred that such a fermentation would be feasible. Designing a 50 cm plate and a method of spreading and collecting the spores were suggested. Bioprocess technological significance of the "full-scale industrial submerged fermentation started directly from spore inoculation omitting pre-culture" has been discussed.

  1. Evaluation of CP Chromo Select Agar for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Mammad; Waldherr, Kerstin; Kundi, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The European Directive on drinking water quality has included mCP agar as the reference method for recovering Clostridium perfringens from drinking waters. In the present study, three media (mCP, TSCF and CP Chromo Select Agar) were evaluated for recovery of C. perfringens in different surface water samples. Out of 139 water samples, using a membrane filtration technique, 131 samples (94.2%) were found to be presumptively positive for C. perfringens in at least one of the culture media. Green colored colonies on CP Chromo Select Agar (CCP agar) were counted as presumptive C. perfringens isolates. Out of 483 green colonies on CCP agar, 96.3% (465 strains, indole negative) were identified as C. perfringens, and 15 strains (3.1%) were indole positive and were identified as Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium bifermentans or Clostridium tetani. Only 3 strains (0.6%) gave false positive results and were identified as Clostridium fallax, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tertium. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically no significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The mCP method is very onerous for routine screening and bacterial colonies could not be used for further biochemical testing. The colonies on CCP and TSCF were easy to count and subculture for confirmation tests. TSCF detects sulfite-reducing clostridia, including species other than C. perfringens, and in some cases excessive blackening of the agar frustrated counting of the colonies. If the contamination was too high, TSCF did not consistently produce black colonies and as a consequence, the colonies were white and gave false negative results. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that CCP agar was the most useful medium for C. perfringens recovery in water samples.

  2. THE ROLE OF TURBULENT MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN THE FORMATION OF ROTATIONALLY SUPPORTED PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Lima, R.; De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2012-03-01

    The formation of protostellar disks out of molecular cloud cores is still not fully understood. Under ideal MHD conditions, the removal of angular momentum from the disk progenitor by the typically embedded magnetic field may prevent the formation of a rotationally supported disk during the main protostellar accretion phase of low-mass stars. This has been known as the magnetic braking problem and the most investigated mechanism to alleviate this problem and help remove the excess of magnetic flux during the star formation process, the so-called ambipolar diffusion (AD), has been shown to be not sufficient to weaken the magnetic braking at least at this stage of the disk formation. In this work, motivated by recent progress in the understanding of magnetic reconnection in turbulent environments, we appeal to the diffusion of magnetic field mediated by magnetic reconnection as an alternative mechanism for removing magnetic flux. We investigate numerically this mechanism during the later phases of the protostellar disk formation and show its high efficiency. By means of fully three-dimensional MHD simulations, we show that the diffusivity arising from turbulent magnetic reconnection is able to transport magnetic flux to the outskirts of the disk progenitor at timescales compatible with the collapse, allowing the formation of a rotationally supported disk around the protostar of dimensions {approx}100 AU, with a nearly Keplerian profile in the early accretion phase. Since MHD turbulence is expected to be present in protostellar disks, this is a natural mechanism for removing magnetic flux excess and allowing the formation of these disks. This mechanism dismisses the necessity of postulating a hypothetical increase of the ohmic resistivity as discussed in the literature. Together with our earlier work which showed that magnetic flux removal from molecular cloud cores is very efficient, this work calls for reconsidering the relative role of AD in the processes of star

  3. DiskJockey: Protoplanetary disk modeling for dynamical mass derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekala, Ian

    2016-03-01

    DiskJockey derives dynamical masses for T Tauri stars using the Keplerian motion of their circumstellar disks, applied to radio interferometric data from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The package relies on RADMC-3D (ascl:1202.015) to perform the radiative transfer of the disk model. DiskJockey is designed to work in a parallel environment where the calculations for each frequency channel can be distributed to independent processors. Due to the computationally expensive nature of the radiative synthesis, fitting sizable datasets (e.g., SMA and ALMA) will require a substantial amount of CPU cores to explore a posterior distribution in a reasonable timeframe.

  4. Evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in accretion disks around compact and young stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    Geometrically thin, optically thick, turbulent accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of them are the compact components of close binaries, while the others are throught to be T Tauri stars. These accretion disks must be magnetized objects because the accreted matter, whether it comes from the companion star (binaries) or from a collapsing molecular cloud core (single young stars), carries an embedded magnetic field. In addition, most accretion disks are hot and turbulent, thus meeting the condition for the MHD turbulent dynamo to maintain and amplify any seed field magnetic field. In fact, for a disk's magnetic field to persist long enough in comparison with the disk viscous time it must be contemporaneously regenerated because the characteristic diffusion time of a magnetic field is typically much shorter than a disk's viscous time. This is true for most thin accretion disks. Consequently, studying magentic fields in thin disks is usually synonymous with studying magnetic dynamos, a fact that is not commonly recognized in the literature. Progress in studying the structure of many accretion disks was achieved mainly because most disks can be regarded as two-dimensional flows in which vertical and radial structures are largely decoupled. By analogy, in a thin disk, one may expect that vertical and radial structures of the magnetic field are decoupled because the magnetic field diffuses more rapidly to the vertical boundary of the disk than along the radius. Thus, an asymptotic method, called an adiabatic approximation, can be applied to accretion disk dynamo. We can represent the solution to the dynamo equation in the form B = Q(r)b(r,z), where Q(r) describes the field distribution along the radius, while the field distribution across the disk is included in the vector function b, which parametrically depends on r and is normalized by the condition max (b(z)) = 1. The field distribution across the disk is established rapidly, while the radial

  5. Diffusion Controlled Current at a Stationary Finite Disk Electrode. Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Koryta, H. Brezina, J. Prada, and J. Prad4ovi, "Electro- analytical Chemistry", Vol. 11, Chapt. 2, Edited by A. J. Bard, Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1979. 2 D...Minneapolis, Minnesota 55435 Dr. J. Z. Demuth IBM brporties Dr. a. P. Van Duyme Thomas J. Watson sbairch Center Chemistry Departmeat P.O. 3.. 21S

  6. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  7. Disk tides and accretion runaway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.; Hahn, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    It is suggested that tidal interaction of an accreting planetary embryo with the gaseous preplanetary disk may provide a mechanism to breach the so-called runaway limit during the formation of the giant planet cores. The disk tidal torque converts a would-be shepherding object into a 'predator,' which can continue to cannibalize the planetesimal disk. This is more likely to occur in the giant planet region than in the terrestrial zone, providing a natural cause for Jupiter to predate the inner planets and form within the O(10(exp 7) yr) lifetime of the nebula.

  8. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  9. Hall-effect-controlled gas dynamics in protoplanetary disks. I. Wind solutions at the inner disk

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2014-08-20

    The gas dynamics of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is largely controlled by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects including Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Among these the role of the Hall effect is the least explored and most poorly understood. In this series, we have included, for the first time, all three non-ideal MHD effects in a self-consistent manner to investigate the role of the Hall effect on PPD gas dynamics using local shearing-box simulations. In this first paper, we focus on the inner region of PPDs, where previous studies (Bai and Stone 2013; Bai 2013) excluding the Hall effect have revealed that the inner disk up to ∼10 AU is largely laminar, with accretion driven by a magnetocentrifugal wind. We confirm this basic picture and show that the Hall effect modifies the wind solutions depending on the polarity of the large-scale poloidal magnetic field B{sub 0} threading the disk. When B{sub 0}⋅Ω>0, the horizontal magnetic field is strongly amplified toward the disk interior, leading to a stronger disk wind (by ∼50% or less in terms of the wind-driven accretion rate). The enhanced horizontal field also leads to much stronger large-scale Maxwell stress (magnetic braking) that contributes to a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. When B{sub 0}⋅Ω<0, the horizontal magnetic field is reduced, leading to a weaker disk wind (by ≲ 20%) and negligible magnetic braking. Under fiducial parameters, we find that when B{sub 0}⋅Ω>0, the laminar region extends farther to ∼10-15 AU before the magnetorotational instability sets in, while for B{sub 0}⋅Ω<0, the laminar region extends only to ∼3-5 AU for a typical accretion rate of ∼10{sup –8} to10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Scaling relations for the wind properties, especially the wind-driven accretion rate, are provided for aligned and anti-aligned field geometries.

  10. Preparation and characterization of bio-nanocomposite films of agar and silver nanoparticles: laser ablation method.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Jong-Whan; Wang, Long-Feng; Lee, Yonghoon; Hong, Seok-In

    2014-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by a laser ablation method and composite films with the AgNPs and agar were prepared by solvent casting method. UV-vis absorbance test and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis results revealed that non-agglomerated spherical AgNPs were formed by the laser ablation method. The surface color of the resulting agar/AgNPs films exhibited the characteristic plasmonic effect of the AgNPs with the maximum absorption peaks of 400-407 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) test results also exhibited characteristic AgNPs crystals with diffraction peaks observed at 2θ values of 38.39°, 44.49°, and 64.45°, which were corresponding to (111), (200), and (220) crystallographic planes of face-centered cubic (fcc) silver crystals, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results showed that thermal stability of the agar/AgNPs composite films was increased by the inclusion of metallic silver. Water vapor barrier properties and surface hydrophobicity of the agar/AgNPs films increased slightly with the increase in AgNPs content but they were not statistically significant (p>0.05), while mechanical strength and stiffness of the composite films decreased slightly (p<0.05). The agar/AgNPs films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli O157:H7) bacterial pathogens.

  11. Strongyloidiasis detected by the agar plate culture method among patients infected by HIV.

    PubMed

    Urdez-Hernández, E; Jiménez-Galán, S; Antonio-Manríquez, M; DE León-Juárez, E A; Terrazas-Estrada, J J; Hernández-García, M C; García-Zaldívar, P; Estrada-Aguilera, A

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the rate of strongyloidiasis among HIV/AIDS patients, stools and duodenal juice were examined using the agar plate culture method. From January to June 1993, a total of 60 HIV/AIDS patients were required for duodenal aspirate and three serial samples of freshly passed stools. Stools and duodenal aspirate were dispensed on an agar plate culture; after incubation at 28 degrees C during 48 h, screening of plates was made at 10 x. The presence of furrows and worms of short buccal chamber and prominent genital primordium were positive for Strongyloides stercoralis. Most patients were men (91.7%); their mean age, of 33.9 years (SD +/- 10.6); their median CD4(+) T-cells count, of 105/microL (range of 12 to 646). S. stercoralis was detected in three patients (5%). In duodenal juice, the three patients showed the parasite, but in feces, only two (3.3%). In these two individuals, the worms were found in feces by agar culture and Faust's concentration method. The rate of S. stercoralis in feces of HIV/AIDS individuals (3.3%) by agar culture method was similar to that formerly reported from the general Mexican population (2.9%) using standard concentration procedures. Hence, in this immunocompromised population of a low prevalence city, there was no advantage to using an agar plate culture for strongyloidiasis.

  12. Characterization of bionanocomposite films prepared with agar and paper-mulberry pulp nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-09-22

    Crystallized nanocellulose (CNC) was separated from paper-mulberry (Broussonetia kazinoki Siebold) bast pulp by sulfuric acid hydrolysis method and they were blended with agar to prepare bionanocomposite films. The effect of CNC content (1, 3, 5 and 10 wt% based on agar) on the mechanical, water vapor permeability (WVP), and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were studied. Changes of the cellulose fibers in structure, morphology, crystallinity, and thermal properties of the films were evaluated using FT-IR, TEM, SEM, XRD, and TGA analysis methods. The CNC was composed of fibrous and spherical or elliptic granules of nano-cellulose with sizes of 50-60 nm. Properties of agar film such as mechanical and water vapor barrier properties were improved significantly (p<0.05) by blending with the CNC. The tensile modulus and tensile strength of agar film increased by 40% and 25%, respectively, in the composite film with 5 wt% of CNC, and the WVP of agar film decreased by 25% after formation of nanocomposite with 3 wt% of CNC. The CNC obtained from the paper-mulberry bast pulp can be used as a reinforcing agent for the preparation of bio-nanocomposites, and they have a high potential for the development of completely biodegradable food packaging materials.

  13. Strategies to improve the mechanical strength and water resistance of agar films for food packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Gonçalves, Maria P

    2015-11-05

    Agar films possess several properties adequate for food packaging applications. However, their high cost-production and quality variations caused by physiological and environmental factors affecting wild seaweeds make them less attractive for industries. In this work, native (NA) and alkali-modified (AA) agars obtained from sustainably grown seaweeds (integrated multi-trophic aquaculture) were mixed with locust bean gum (LBG) to make 'knife-coated' films with fixed final concentration (1 wt%) and variable agar/LBG ratios. Agar films were easier to process upon LBG addition (viscosity increase and gelling character decrease of the film-forming solutions observed by dynamic oscillatory and steady shear measurements). The mechanical properties and water resistance were optimal for films with 50 and/or 75% LBG contents and best in the case of NA (cheaper to extract). These findings can help reduce the cost-production of agar packaging films. Moreover, the controlled cultivation of seaweeds can provide continuous and reliable feedstock for transformation industries.

  14. Immobilization of urease from pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) on agar tablets and its application in urea assay.

    PubMed

    Mulagalapalli, Swati; Kumar, Sandeep; Kalathur, Ravi Charan Reddy; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2007-09-01

    The pigeonpea urease was immobilized on agar, a common gelling substance. The tablet strips were used as moulds to cast agar tablets of uniform shape and size. The time and temperature of solidification of agar was 6 min and 44 degrees C, respectively. The 5 % agar (w/v) and 0.019 mg protein/agar tablet yielded an optimum immobilization of 51.7%. The optimum pH was shifted through 0.2 U (from 7.3 to 7.5) towards basic side upon immobilization. The optimum temperature of soluble and immobilized urease was 30 degrees C and 60 degrees C, respectively, showing the improvement in thermal stability of urease. There was an increase in K m from 3.23 to 5.07 mM after immobilization. The half-lives of soluble and immobilized urease were 21 and 53 days, respectively, at pH 7.3 and 4 degrees C. The urea was estimated in different blood samples with the help of immobilized urease and the results were consistent with those from clinical pathology laboratory through an autoanalyzer (Zydus Co., Rome, Italy).

  15. Comparison of agar-based media for primary isolation of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, P. R.; Brown, D. F. J.; Wilcox, M. H.; Collyns, T. A.; Walpole, E.; Dillon, J.; Smith, R.; Gopal Rao, G.; Oppenheim, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare four vancomycin-containing agar media for the isolation of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) from clinical fecal specimens: kanamycin---aesculin---azide (KAA) agar; bile---aesculin---polymixin (BAP) agar; aztreonam---amphotericin blood (CBAA) agar; and neomycin blood (CBN) agar. METHODS: Fecal specimens from 125 patients were inoculated onto each medium. Media were examined for enterococci after incubation for up to 48 h. Enterococci were identified to species level, and glycopeptide phenotypes were determined by measuring minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin. RESULTS: GRE were isolated from 44/125 samples. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates, expressing glycopeptide resistance of the VanA or VanB phenotypes, were recovered from 27/33 (82%) specimens on BAP medium, 26/33 (79%) on KAA medium, and 21/33 (64%) on CBN and CBAA media. Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus isolates expressing low-level glycopeptide resistance (VanC phenotype) were recovered from 14/15 (93%) specimens on CBAA medium, 7/15 (47%) on KAA and CBN media, and 6/15 (40%) on BAP medium. CONCLUSIONS: The media tested in this study, with the exception of CBN medium, detected at least 75% of patients colonized by GRE. Further development of BAP, CBAA and KAA media is warranted to improve growth and selectivity.

  16. Antimicrobial and physical-mechanical properties of agar-based films incorporated with grapefruit seed extract.

    PubMed

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-02-15

    The use of synthetic petroleum based packaging films caused serious environmental problems due to their difficulty in recycling and poor biodegradability. Therefore, present study was aimed to develop natural biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging films as an alternative for the synthetic packaging films. As a natural antimicrobial agent, grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been incorporated into agar to prepare antimicrobial packaging film. The films with different concentrations of GSE were prepared by a solvent casting method and the resulting composite films were examined physically and mechanically. In addition, the films were characterized by FE-SEM, XRD, FT-IR and TGA. The incorporation of GSE caused increase in color, UV barrier, moisture content, water solubility and water vapor permeability, while decrease in surface hydrophobicity, tensile strength and elastic modulus of the films. As the concentration of GSE increased from 0.6 to 13.3 μg/mL, the physical and mechanical properties of the films were affected significantly. The addition of GSE changed film microstructure of the film, but did not influence the crystallinity of agar and thermal stability of the agar-based films. The agar/GSE films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against three test food pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. These results suggest that agar/GSE films have potential to be used in an active food packaging systems for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food.

  17. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes.

  18. Magnetic braking in weakly ionized circumstellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenigl, A.

    1986-01-01

    Recent observations of disk-like mass distributions around newly formed stars have provided evidence for rapid rotation on scales similar to less than 0.1pc with specific angular momenta much higher than typical stellar values. A likely mechanism for the extraction of angular momentum from these regions is magnetic braking by means of Alfven waves that propagate into the lower-density ambient medium. However, because of the relatively high particle densities and the correspondingly low implied ionization fractions in these apparent disks, their constituent ions and neutrals need not be well coupled to each other and could develop large relative drift velocities. For this reason, previous treatments of magnetic braking that assumed perfect coupling between ions and neutrals have to be modified in this case. In particular, one has to take into account both the azimuthal drift that develops because only the ions are directly coupled to the magnetic field and the radial drift (or ambipolar diffusion) which leads to a redistribution (and leakage) of the magnetic flux. The results of a preliminary analysis of these effects are described.

  19. Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Aiello, S.; Belleni-Morante, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Protoplanetary disks are the precursors of planetary systems. All building materials needed to assembly the planetary systems are supplied by these reservoirs, including many organic molecules [1,2]. Thus, the physical and chemical properties in Protoplanetary disks set the boundary conditions for the formation and evolution of planets and other solar system bodies. In standard radiative scenario structure and chemistry of protoplanetary disks depend strongly on the nature of central star around which they formed. The dust temperature is manly set by the stellar luminosity, while the chemistry of the whole disk depends on the UV and X ray fluxes [3,4,6,8]. Therefore, a knowledge as accurate as possible of the radiative transfer (RT) inside disks is a prerequisite for their modelling. Actually, real disks are complex, stratified and inhomogeneous environments requiring a detailed dust mixture modelling and the ability to follow the radiation transfer across radial and vertical gradients. Different energetic processes as the mass accretion processes onto the star surface, the viscous dissipative heating dominating the midplane region, and the flared atmospheres radiation reprocessing, have a significant role in the disk structuring [4,5,8]. During the last 10 years many authors suggested various numerical and analytical techniques to resolve the disk temperature structure providing vertical temperature profiles and disk SED databases [4,6]. In this work we present the results of our semi analytical and numerical model solving the radiative transfer problem in two separate interesting disk regions: 1) Disk atmospheres at large radius, r > 10 AU. 2) Vertical disk structure over 1 < r < 10 AU and 10 < r < 100 AU. A simplified analytical approach based on P-N approximation [7] for a rectified disk surface (suitable for limited range of r) is compared and contrasted with a more accurate Monte Carlo integration [5]. Our code can handle arbitrary dust

  20. Magneto-rotational instability in the protolunar disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballido, Augusto; Desch, Steven J.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    We perform the first study of magnetohydrodynamic processes in the protolunar disk (PLD). With the use of published data on the chemical composition of the PLD, along with existing analytical models of the disk structure, we show that the high temperatures that were prevalent in the disk would have led to ionization of Na, K, SiO, Zn and, to a lesser extent, O2. For simplicity, we assume that the disk has a vapor structure. The resulting ionization fractions, together with a relatively weak magnetic field, possibly of planetary origin, would have been sufficient to trigger the magneto-rotational instability, or MRI, as demonstrated by the fact that the Elsasser criterion was met in the PLD: a magnetic field embedded in the flow would have diffused more slowly than the growth rate of the linear perturbations. We calculate the intensity of the resulting magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, as parameterized by the dimensionless ratio α of turbulent stresses to gas pressure, and obtain maximum values α ∼10-2 along most of the vertical extent of the disk, and at different orbital radii. This indicates that, under these conditions, turbulent mixing within the PLD due to the MRI was likely capable of transporting isotopic and chemical species efficiently. To test these results in a conservative manner, we carry out a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a small, rectangular patch of the PLD, located at 4 Earth radii (rE) from the center of the Earth, and assuming once again that the disk is completely gaseous. We use a polytrope-like equation of state. The rectangular patch is threaded initially by a vertical magnetic field with zero net magnetic flux. This field configuration is known to produce relatively weak MRI turbulence in studies of astrophysical accretion disks. We accordingly obtain turbulence with an average intensity α ∼ 7 ×10-6 over the course of 280 orbital periods (133 days at 4rE). Despite this relatively low value of α , the effective turbulent

  1. High-Resolution Near-Infrared Imaging of the Orion 114-426 Silhouette Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughrean, Mark J.; Chen, Hua; Bally, John; Erickson, Ed; Thompson, Rodger; Rieke, Marcia; Schneider, Glenn; Stolovy, Susan; Young, Erick

    1998-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution near-infrared images of the edge-on silhouette circumstellar disk, Orion 114-426, made using NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. Images taken against the bright nebular background of the ionized hydrogen Paα line at 1.87 μm show the major axis of the disk to be approximately 20% smaller than at 0.6 μm, from which we deduce the structure of the edge of the disk. Continuum images of diffuse polar lobes above and below the plane of the disk show a morphology and evolution with wavelength consistent with predictions for reflection nebulae in a diffuse envelope with large polar cavities, surrounding a thin, massless, Keplerian disk, centered on an otherwise hidden central star. We make use of our observations and reasonable assumptions about the underlying disk structure to show that the disk mass is at least 10 M⊕ and plausibly >=5×10-4 Msolar.

  2. Accretion Disks around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, Paola

    1996-04-01

    A method to calculate the structure and brightness distribution of accretion disks surrounding low and intermediate mass young stars is introduced and discussed. The method includes a realistic treatment of the energy transport mechanisms and disk heating by radiation from external sources. The disk is assumed steady, geometrically thin and in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The turbulent viscosity coefficient is expressed using the α prescription and the α parameter and the mass accretion rate are assumed to be constant through the disk. Energy is transported in the vertical direction by: (a) a turbulent flux, computed self-consistently with the viscosity coefficient used to describe the viscous energy dissipation, (b) radiation, using the first moments of the transfer equation, the Eddington approximation, and the Rosseland and Planck Mean Opacities, and (c) convection, taking into account that the convective elements, not necessarily optically thick, lose energy by radiation and turbulent flux. This treatment of the energy transport mechanisms differs from previous work in this field, allowing one to extend, with confidence, the calculation of the disk structure to optically thin regimes. The heating mechanisms considered, which affect the disk's structure and emission, are stellar radiation and a circumstellar envelope which reprocesses and scatters radiation from the star and from the disk itself. In addition to a detailed numerical calculation, an analytical self-consistent formulation of the irradiation of the disk is given. This analytical formulation allows one to understand and extend the numerical results. To evaluate the potential of the method presented in this thesis, a set of models of viscous non-irradiated and irradiated disks are computed. Their predictions are compared with observations of young stellar sources likely to have disks. Given the disk structure and specifying its orientation with respect to the line of sight, the specific

  3. Gravitational instabilities in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohline, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The nonaxisymmetric stability of self-gravitating, geometrically thick accretion disks has been studied for protostellar systems having a wide range of disk-to-central object mass ratios. Global eigenmodes with four distinctly different characters were identified using numerical, nonlinear hydrodynamic techniques. The mode that appears most likely to arise in normal star formation settings, however, resembles the 'eccentric instability' that was identified earlier in thin, nearly Keplerian disks: It presents an open, one-armed spiral pattern that sweeps continuously in a trailing direction through more than 2-pi radians, smoothly connecting the inner and outer edges of the disk, and requires cooperative motion of the point mass for effective amplification. This particular instability promotes the development of a single, self-gravitating clump of material in orbit about the point mass, so its routine appearance in our simulations supports the conjecture that the eccentric instability provides a primary route to the formation of short-period binaries in protostellar systems.

  4. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  5. Possible influence of surfactants and proteins on the efficiency of contact agar microbiological surface sampling.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Sylvie M; Sindic, Marianne; Anceau, Christine; Brostaux, Yves; Detry, Jean G

    2010-11-01

    Agar contact microbiological sampling techniques, based on a transfer of the microorganisms present on a surface to a culture medium, are widely used to assess and control surface cleanliness and to evaluate microbial contamination levels. The effectiveness of these techniques depends on many environmental parameters that influence the strength of attachment of the bacteria to the surface. In the present study, stainless steel and high density polyethylene surfaces were inoculated with known concentrations of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Following an experimental design, the surfaces were sampled with different types of replicate organism direct agar contact plates and Petrifilm; results indicated that recovery rates were influenced by the presence of egg white albumin or Tween 80 in the inoculum solutions or by the introduction of surfactants into the contact agar of the microbiological sampling techniques. The techniques yielded significantly different results, depending on sampling conditions, underlining the need for a standardization of laboratory experiments to allow relevant comparisons of such techniques.

  6. Improved soft-agar colony assay in a fluid processing apparatus.

    PubMed

    Forsman, A D; Herpich, A R; Chapes, S K

    1999-01-01

    The standard method for quantitating bone marrow precursor cells has been to count the number of colony-forming units that form in semisolid (0.3%) agar. Recently we adapted this assay for use in hardware, the Fluid Processing Apparatus, that is flown in standard payload lockers of the space shuttle. When mouse or rat macrophage colony-forming units were measured with this hardware in ground-based assays, we found significantly more colony growth than that seen in standard plate assays. The improved growth correlates with increased agar thickness but also appears to be due to properties inherent to the Fluid Processing Apparatus. This paper describes an improved method for determining bone marrow macrophage precursor numbers in semisolid agar.

  7. [DNA and chemical analyses of commercial fly agaric-related products].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takuro; Kawahara, Nobuo; Fukiharu, Toshimitsu; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Makino, Yukiko; Goda, Yukihiro

    2005-04-01

    Since June 6, 2002, psilocin and psilocybin-containing fungi (commonly called "magic mushrooms") have been regulated by the Narcotics and Psychotropics Control Law in Japan. However, various fly agaric-related products are now entering the Japanese market via the internet. In this study, fly agaric-related products available in this way were investigated for raw materials by DNA analysis and for additives by chemical analysis. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rDNA region suggested that these fly agaric-related products originate from A. muscaria or A. muscaria var. persicina. Furthermore, they were classified into three strains based on the ITS2-LSU nucleotide sequence. Harmine derivatives and/or tryptamine derivatives were detected in some of these products by LC/MS analysis. In accordance with this, the matK gene of Peganum harmala was found in all of the harmine derivative-containing samples.

  8. Expression of an accessory cell phenotype by hairy cells during lymphocyte colony formation in agar culture.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Testa, U; Andre, C; Jouault, H; Reyes, F

    1983-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes require the cooperation of accessory cells to generate lymphocyte colonies in agar culture under PHA stimulation. Various hairy cell enriched fractions, as well as normal monocytes, have been found to be able to initiate colony formation by normal lymphocytes. Leukemic monocytes from CMML patients were also effective, but not the leukemic lymphocytes from CLL patients. The phenotype expressed by HC in agar colonies was further studied using cell surface and enzymatic markers. We have concluded that HC in agar culture in the presence of both normal T lymphocytes and PHA lose the B phenotype that they express in vivo and function like an accessory cell in contrast to normal or leukemic B lymphocytes.

  9. Eradication of bovine leukemia virus infection in commercial dairy herds using the agar gel immunodiffusion test.

    PubMed Central

    Shettigara, P T; Samagh, B S; Lobinowich, E M

    1986-01-01

    Demands for bovine leukemia virus test negative breeding cattle and for semen from bovine leukemia virus test negative bulls by several countries have encouraged the eradication of bovine leukemia virus infection from selected herds in Canada. This project was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of the agar gel immunodiffusion test, standardized to detect anti-bovine leukemia virus glycoprotein antibodies, for eradication of bovine leukemia virus from commercial dairy herds. Of nine participating herds, the prevalence rate of bovine leukemia virus infection was low (less than 10%) in three, medium (11-30%) in four and high (greater than 30%) in two. The herds were tested by the agar gel immunodiffusion test, reactors were removed and the herds were then retested at regular intervals. The results indicate that it is possible to eliminate bovine leukemia virus infection from the herds after two to three cycles of agar gel immunodiffusion tests and prompt removal of the reactors. PMID:3019498

  10. Use of Rambach Propylene Glycol Containing Agar for identification of Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, R; Henderson, R W; Yappow, S

    1991-10-01

    When grown on Rambach Propylene Glycol Containing Agar (Rambach agar), 216 of 230 (93.9%) Salmonella organisms isolated from patients and 54 of 62 (87.1%) Salmonella stock cultures produced a crimson-colored growth. Of the 14 clinical Salmonella isolates which displayed colors other than crimson, 8 were Salmonella typhi, 2 were Salmonella paratyphi A, and 4 belonged to other commonly isolated serotypes. All eight Salmonella stock cultures which failed to produce a crimson color belonged to rarely isolated serotypes. In contrast, of 83 non-Salmonella stock cultures distributed among 29 bacterial species, none produced a crimson color. These results suggest that while Rambach agar cannot preidentify S. typhi and S. paratyphi A, the medium can be used for the presumptive identification and can assist in the definitive identification of the overwhelming majority of Salmonella isolates.

  11. [Presumptive identification of Candida spp. and other clinically important yeasts: usefulness of Brilliance Candida Agar].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Claudia; López, Mónica; Arechavala, Alicia; Perrone, María Del Carmen; Guelfand, Liliana; Bianchi, Mario

    2010-06-30

    Fungal infections caused by yeasts have increased during the last decades and invasive forms represent a serious problem for human health. Candida albicans is the species most frequently isolated from clinical samples. However, other emerging yeast pathogens are increasingly responsible for mycotic infections, and some of them are resistant to some antifungal drugs. Consequently, it is necessary to have methods that can provide a rapid presumptive identification at species level. Numerous chromogenic agar media have been shown to be of value as diagnostic tools. We have compared a chromogenic medium, Brilliance Candida Agar, with CHROMagar Candida, the chromogenic medium most used in our country. A multicentre study was conducted in 16 Hospitals belonging to the Mycology Net of Buenos Aires City Government. A total of 240 yeast isolates were included in this research. The new chromogenic agar showed results very similar to those obtained with CHROMagar Candida.

  12. Agar blue localization of small pulmonary nodules and ground glass opacifications for thoracoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening for lung cancer using high resolution computed tomography (CT) has produced encouraging early results. Extremely small nodules and non-palpable areas of opacifications are able to be detected, but pose a challenge to the thoracic surgeon trying to resect these areas. Methods Forty five patients with ground glass opacifications (GGOs) or small pulmonary nodules underwent pre-operative CT-guided placement of methylene blue dyed agar and/or hook wire needle localization prior to thoracoscopic resection. Progel was applied to any intraoperative air leaks observed after successful resection. Results All lesions were successfully excised thoracoscopically. The blue agar aided in localization of these areas and did not affect the histological architecture during pathologic evaluation. Conclusions Careful pre-operative evaluation and planning, including use of selective CT-guided blue agar localization and hook wire placement, may greatly assist in thoracoscopically locating and resecting these often difficult-to-visualize lesions. PMID:28066669

  13. Water vapor in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzatti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    This thesis is devoted to a study of the conditions and evolution of the planet formation region in young circumstellar disks, by means of spectroscopic observations of molecular gas emission. The main focus of this work is the infrared spectrum of water (H2O), which provides thousands of emission lines tracing the warm and dense gas inward of the water snow line in disks. The analysis includes also emission from some organic molecules that trace the carbon chemistry, C2H2, HCN, and CO2, as well as emission from OH that is connected to the formation and destruction of the water molecule. Two are the main directions explored in this work, for which we used spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope (IRS) and the Very Large Telescope (VISIR and X-shooter). The first is to investigate how variable accretion phenomena occurring during the T Tauri phase affect the molecular environments in the planet formation region of disks. By monitoring T Tauri stars in different phases of accretion, we found that outbursts can remarkably affect their mid-infrared molecular emission. We propose a scenario where accretion flares trigger a recession of the water snow line, increasing water emission from the disk, when the accretion luminosity keeps higher over long enough timescales for the thermal structure of the disk to change (at least a few weeks, as observed in the strongly variable EX Lupi). In addition, enhanced UV radiation is found to produce OH from photodissociation of water in the disk. Organic molecules instead disappear during a strong outburst, and we are currently investigating the long-term evolution of these effects. A second direction was taken to tackle another fundamental problem: the origin of water vapor in inner disks. Some models predict that water is produced by evaporation of icy solids migrating inward of the snow line. One way to probe this scenario is by measuring the abundance of water vapor in the inner disk, and compare it to the oxygen abundance

  14. How to Buy a Disk System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Ivan

    1982-01-01

    Describes floppy disk information storage systems and discusses capabilities and advantages of floppy disks for microcomputer users. The functions of disk operating systems (DOS) are reviewed and the effect of DOS formats on the choice of an appropriate disk drive system is outlined. (JL)

  15. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  16. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, Hideko

    2010-10-20

    We have developed a high-resolution combined physical and chemical model of a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. Our aims were to use our model to calculate the chemical structure of disks on small scales (submilliarcsecond in the inner disk for objects at the distance of Taurus, {approx}140 pc) to investigate the various chemical processes thought to be important in disks and to determine potential molecular tracers of each process. Our gas-phase network was extracted from the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry to which we added gas-grain interactions including freezeout and thermal and non-thermal desorption (cosmic-ray-induced desorption, photodesorption, and X-ray desorption), and a grain-surface network. We find that cosmic-ray-induced desorption has the least effect on our disk chemical structure while photodesorption has a significant effect, enhancing the abundances of most gas-phase molecules throughout the disk and affecting the abundances and distribution of HCN, CN, and CS, in particular. In the outer disk, we also see enhancements in the abundances of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. X-ray desorption is a potentially powerful mechanism in disks, acting to homogenize the fractional abundances of gas-phase species across the depth and increasing the column densities of most molecules, although there remain significant uncertainties in the rates adopted for this process. The addition of grain-surface chemistry enhances the fractional abundances of several small complex organic molecules including CH{sub 3}OH, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} to potentially observable values (i.e., a fractional abundance of {approx}>10{sup -11}).

  17. Rewriteable optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Thomas A.; Rinsland, Pamela L.

    1991-01-01

    A NASA program to develop a high performance (high rate, high capability) rewriteable optical disk recorder for spaceflight applications is presented. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk Drive modules and a modular Controller. Drive performance goals are 10 gigabyte capacity are up to 1.8 gigabits per second rate with concurrent I/O, synchronous data transfer, and 2 to 5 years operating life in orbit. Technology developments, design concepts, current status, and future plans are presented.

  18. Agar-block microcosms for controlled plant tissue decomposition by aerobic fungi.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jonathan S; Jacobson, K Brook

    2011-02-03

    The two principal methods for studying fungal biodegradation of lignocellulosic plant tissues were developed for wood preservative testing (soil-block; agar-block). It is well-accepted that soil-block microcosms yield higher decay rates, fewer moisture issues, lower variability among studies, and higher thresholds of preservative toxicity. Soil-block testing is thus the more utilized technique and has been standardized by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) (method D 1413-07). The soil-block design has drawbacks, however, using locally-variable soil sources and in limiting the control of nutrients external (exogenous) to the decaying tissues. These drawbacks have emerged as a problem in applying this method to other, increasingly popular research aims. These modern aims include degrading lignocellulosics for bioenergy research, testing bioremediation of co-metabolized toxics, evaluating oxidative mechanisms, and tracking translocated elements along hyphal networks. Soil-blocks do not lend enough control in these applications. A refined agar-block approach is necessary. Here, we use the brown rot wood-degrading fungus Serpula lacrymans to degrade wood in agar-block microcosms, using deep Petri dishes with low-calcium agar. We test the role of exogenous gypsum on decay in a time-series, to demonstrate the utility and expected variability. Blocks from a single board rip (longitudinal cut) are conditioned, weighed, autoclaved, and introduced aseptically atop plastic mesh. Fungal inoculations are at each block face, with exogenous gypsum added at interfaces. Harvests are aseptic until the final destructive harvest. These microcosms are designed to avoid block contact with agar or Petri dish walls. Condensation is minimized during plate pours and during incubation. Finally, inoculum/gypsum/wood spacing is minimized but without allowing contact. These less technical aspects of agar-block design are also the most common causes of failure and the key source of

  19. Dynamical Processes in Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beust, H.

    2010-01-01

    Debris disks are dusty and/or gasous disk that are viewed in scattered light and thermal emission around stars around 107-108 yr. It is well known that the dust in these system is not primodial. It is short lived and must be continuously replenished by colliding planetesimals. Most of them appear distorted by the gravitational pertubations by inner planets or stellar companions. This is why these systems are viewed today as young planetary systems. Debris disks are collisional systems. Thanks to collisional cascade towards smaller size, the dust particles are transported outwards by radiation or stellar wind pressure. Below a given blow-off size they escape the system. This model explains the radial density profiles observed. The various asymmetries, clumps and other dynamical structures such as spiral arms are though to originate in gravitational perturbations by planets and/or companions. Planets usually create gaps in disks, but they also sculpt disks via their mean-motion resonances. Clumpy structures are often invoked as resulting from such an interaction. Stellar companions usually truncate the disk, sometimes confining them to thin annular structures. They also help creating spiral patterns, either tidally or by secular interaction. In this context, the situation is different whether the perturbing companions are bound or just passing stars. In any case, dynamical studies (often specific to each system) can greatly help constraining the configuration and the past history of these systems.

  20. Electro-rheological disk pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Vincent M.; Loy, Luke W.

    1993-02-01

    The invention is directed to a device for pumping electro-rheological fluids comprising a casing that defines an inner rotor chamber having a central inlet opening and a peripheral discharge opening. Rotatably disposed within said chamber is a rotor for imparting energy to the pumped electro-rheological fluid comprising of a plurality of non-conducting coaxial substantially parallel spaced disks. On one face of each disk are embedded one or more electrodes and on the opposing face of each disk are attached one or more conductive surfaces. By selectively applying an electric charge to the embedded electrodes, an electric field is produced between the electrodes and the conducting surfaces of adjacent disks. As a result, the viscosity of the electro-rheological fluid exposed to the applied electric field is increased thereby producing electro-rheological fluid vanes between adjacent disks. When the rotor is placed in rotation and a voltage is applied to the embedded electrodes, the electro-rheological fluid that is not exposed to the applied electric field, it is accelerated from the center of the rotor towards the outer periphery by the combined action of the electro-rheological fluid vanes and the friction force acting between the fluid and the rotating disks.

  1. GROWTH OF GRAINS IN BROWN DWARF DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Meru, Farzana; Galvagni, Marina; Olczak, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    We perform coagulation and fragmentation simulations using the new physically motivated model by Garaud et al. to determine growth locally in brown dwarf disks. We show that large grains can grow and that if brown dwarf disks are scaled-down versions of T Tauri disks (in terms of stellar mass, disk mass, and disk radius) growth at an equivalent location with respect to the disk truncation radius can occur to the same size in both disks. We show that similar growth occurs because the collisional timescales in the two disks are comparable. Our model may therefore potentially explain the recent observations of grain growth to millimeter sizes in brown dwarf disks, as seen in T Tauri disks.

  2. Fragmentation of Kozai–Lidov Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the gravitational instability (GI) of a locally isothermal inclined disk around one component of a binary system. Such a disk can undergo global Kozai–Lidov (KL) cycles if the initial disk tilt is above the critical KL angle (of about 40◦). During these cycles, an initially circular disk exchanges its inclination for eccentricity, and vice versa. Self-gravity may suppress the cycles under some circumstances. However, with hydrodynamic simulations that include self-gravity, we show that for a sufficiently high initial disk tilts and for certain disk masses, disks can undergo KL oscillations and fragment due to GI, even when the Toomre Q value for an equivalent undisturbed disk is well within the stable regime (Q> 2). We suggest that KL triggered disk fragmentation provides a mechanism for the efficient formation of giant planets in binary systems and may enhance the fragmentation of disks in massive black hole binaries.

  3. Magneto-thermal Disk Winds from Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Ye, Jiani; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are governed by disk angular-momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular-momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a one-dimensional model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on (1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfvén speed vAp, (2) the sound speed cs near the wind base, and (3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve {R}-2 scaling). When {v}{Ap}\\gg {c}{{s}}, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect vAp to be comparable to cs at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with a total wind mass-loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.

  4. Nanoscale Graphene Disk: A Natural Functionally Graded Material–How is Fourier’s Law Violated along Radius Direction of 2D Disk

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nuo; Hu, Shiqian; Ma, Dengke; Lu, Tingyu; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    In this Paper, we investigate numerically and analytically the thermal conductivity of nanoscale graphene disks (NGDs), and discussed the possibility to realize functionally graded material (FGM) with only one material, NGDs. Different from previous studies on divergence/non-diffusive of thermal conductivity in nano-structures with different size, we found a novel non-homogeneous (graded) thermal conductivity along the radius direction in a single nano-disk structure. We found that, instead of a constant value, the NGD has a graded thermal conductivity along the radius direction. That is, Fourier’s law of heat conduction is not valid in two dimensional graphene disk structures Moreover, we show the dependent of NGDs’ thermal conductivity on radius and temperature. Our study might inspire experimentalists to develop NGD based versatile FGMs, improve understanding of the heat removal of hot spots on chips, and enhance thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency by two dimensional disk with a graded thermal conductivity. PMID:26443206

  5. Grain Growth in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Munoz, Laura Maria

    The majority of young, low-mass stars are surrounded by optically thick accretion disks. These circumstellar disks provide large reservoirs of gas and dust that will eventually be transformed into planetary systems. Theory and observations suggest that the earliest stage toward planet formation in a protoplanetary disk is the growth of particles, from sub-micron-sized grains to centimeter- sized pebbles. Theory indicates that small interstellar grains are well coupled into the gas and are incorporated to the disk during the proto-stellar collapse. These dust particles settle toward the disk mid-plane and simultaneously grow through collisional coagulation in a very short timescale. Observationally, grain growth can be inferred by measuring the spectral energy distribution at long wavelengths, which traces the continuum dust emission spectrum and hence the dust opacity. Several observational studies have indicated that the dust component in protoplanetary disks has evolved as compared to interstellar medium dust particles, suggesting at least 4 orders of magnitude in particle-size growth. However, the limited angular resolution and poor sensitivity of previous observations has not allowed for further exploration of this astrophysical process. As part of my thesis, I embarked in an observational program to search for evidence of radial variations in the dust properties across a protoplanetary disk, which may be indicative of grain growth. By making use of high angular resolution observations obtained with CARMA, VLA, and SMA, I searched for radial variations in the dust opacity inside protoplanetary disks. These observations span more than an order of magnitude in wavelength (from sub-millimeter to centimeter wavelengths) and attain spatial resolutions down to 20 AU. I characterized the radial distribution of the circumstellar material and constrained radial variations of the dust opacity spectral index, which may originate from particle growth in these circumstellar

  6. New Agar Technique Compared with Sand Flotation for Obtaining Salt Marsh Culicoides mississippiensis Hoffman (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Larvae,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-26

    compared with 1% and 2% (wt/v) agar formulations for extracting Culicoides ndisaiooippiensis Hoffman larvae from marsh soil samples. The 1% agar formula...been used to recover larvae of biting midges (CuZ.,o;1aa spp .) from salt marsh substrate (soil) samples. They are: (1) sieve-flotation (Kettle and Lawson...Kettle et al., (1975) in which tabanid and culicoid larvae were successfully reared in agar media, we decided that one possibility was to replace the

  7. Chemistry in a Forming Protoplanetary Disk: Main Accretion Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Haruaki; Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the chemistry in a radiation-hydrodynamics model of a star-forming core that evolves from a cold (∼10 K) prestellar core to the main accretion phase in ∼105 years. A rotationally supported gravitationally unstable disk is formed around a protostar. We extract the temporal variation of physical parameters in ∼1.5 × 103 SPH particles that end up in the disk, and perform post-processing calculations of the gas-grain chemistry adopting a three-phase model. Inside the disk, the SPH particles migrate both inward and outward. Since a significant fraction of volatiles such as CO can be trapped in the water-dominant ice in the three-phase model, the ice mantle composition depends not only on the current position in the disk, but also on whether the dust grain has ever experienced higher temperatures than the water sublimation temperature. Stable molecules such as H2O, CH4, NH3, and CH3OH are already abundant at the onset of gravitational collapse and are simply sublimated as the fluid parcels migrate inside the water snow line. On the other hand, various molecules such as carbon chains and complex organic molecules (COMs) are formed in the disk. The COMs abundance sensitively depends on the outcomes of photodissociation and diffusion rates of photofragments in bulk ice mantle. As for S-bearing species, H2S ice is abundant in the collapse phase. In the warm regions in the disk, H2S is sublimated to be destroyed, while SO, H2CS, OCS, and SO2 become abundant.

  8. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  9. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV) wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness), the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution), a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014). 2nd Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  10. Modeling MHD accretion-ejection: episodic ejections of jets triggered by a mean-field disk dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanovs, Deniss; Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2014-11-20

    We present MHD simulations exploring the launching, acceleration, and collimation of jets and disk winds. The evolution of the disk structure is consistently taken into account. Extending our earlier studies, we now consider the self-generation of the magnetic field by an α{sup 2}Ω mean-field dynamo. The disk magnetization remains on a rather low level, which helps to evolve the simulations for T > 10, 000 dynamical time steps on a domain extending 1500 inner disk radii. We find the magnetic field of the inner disk to be similar to the commonly found open field structure, favoring magneto-centrifugal launching. The outer disk field is highly inclined and predominantly radial. Here, differential rotation induces a strong toroidal component, which plays a key role in outflow launching. These outflows from the outer disk are slower, denser, and less collimated. If the dynamo action is not quenched, magnetic flux is continuously generated, diffuses outward through the disk, and fills the entire disk. We have invented a toy model triggering a time-dependent mean-field dynamo. The duty cycles of this dynamo lead to episodic ejections on similar timescales. When the dynamo is suppressed as the magnetization falls below a critical value, the generation of the outflows and also accretion is inhibited. The general result is that we can steer episodic ejection and large-scale jet knots by a disk-intrinsic dynamo that is time-dependent and regenerates the jet-launching magnetic field.

  11. Use of the Soft-agar Overlay Technique to Screen for Bacterially Produced Inhibitory Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hockett, Kevin L.; Baltrus, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The soft-agar overlay technique was originally developed over 70 years ago and has been widely used in several areas of microbiological research, including work with bacteriophages and bacteriocins, proteinaceous antibacterial agents. This approach is relatively inexpensive, with minimal resource requirements. This technique consists of spotting supernatant from a donor strain (potentially harboring a toxic compound(s)) onto a solidified soft agar overlay that is seeded with a bacterial test strain (potentially sensitive to the toxic compound(s)). We utilized this technique to screen a library of Pseudomonas syringae strains for intraspecific killing. By combining this approach with a precipitation step and targeted gene deletions, multiple toxic compounds produced by the same strain can be differentiated. The two antagonistic agents commonly recovered using this technique are bacteriophages and bacteriocins. These two agents can be differentiated using two simple additional tests. Performing a serial dilution on a supernatant containing bacteriophage will result in individual plaques becoming less in number with greater dilution, whereas serial dilution of a supernatant containing bacteriocin will result a clearing zone that becomes uniformly more turbid with greater dilution. Additionally, a bacteriophage will produce a clearing zone when spotted onto a fresh soft agar overlay seeded with the same strain, whereas a bacteriocin will not produce a clearing zone when transferred to a fresh soft agar lawn, owing to the dilution of the bacteriocin. PMID:28117830

  12. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate.

  13. Use of Mueller-Hinton broth and agar in the germ tube test.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Antonella Souza; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Severo, Cecília Bittencourt; Guazzelli, Luciana da Silva; Oliveira, Flávio de Mattos; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is often isolated from clinical samples, thus its presumptive differentiation from other species of the same genus can be based on its ability to form the germ tube in human serum. Nevertheless, there are two other species that share this characteristic: C. dubliniensis and C. africana. The aim of this study was to compare four different substrates to perform the germ tube (GT) test. The Candida spp. isolates were identified using a manual system (135 C. albicans, 24 C. tropicalis and one C. dubliniensis). The germ tube test was performed with fresh, previously frozen serum and Mueller-Hinton (MH) broth and agar. GT was observed in 96% (130/136) of the isolates through the fresh serum technique, 94% (128/136) through previously frozen serum, 92% (125/136) in MH agar, and 90% (122/136) in MH broth. The sensitivity of each test was higher than 90%, with 100% specificity. Both the MH agar and broth were able to identify the true positives, and false positives were not found. However, some C. albicans isolates were not identified. MH agar and broth may be used in laboratory for the rapid presumptive identification of C. albicans, as an alternative method for germ tube test.

  14. Alternative plasticizers for the production of thermo-compressed agar films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully Electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  15. Use of bile-esculin agar for rapid differentiation of Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Lindell, S S; Quinn, P

    1975-01-01

    Bile-esculin agar has been used for several years for the presumptive identification of group D streptococci. All members of the Enterobacteriaceae family will also grow on this medium, but only certain ones can hydrolyze esculin to 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin, which reacts with iron to produce a characteristic blackening of the medium. One thousand and six cultures from clinical specimens representing 20 genera were isolated and identified. Heavy inocula from fresh pure culture isolates on heart infusion agar were placed on bile-esculin agar slants and incubated at 35 C. The slants were examined at 4 h and again at 18 h for esculin hydrolysis. Shigella, Salmonella, Arizona, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus morganii, Providencia alcalifaciens, and Providencia stuartii all produced negative results. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, and Serratia rubidaea produced a positive reaction in 4 h. The other remaining eight genera exhibited varying results. The use of this medium in conjunction with triple sugar iron-lysine iron agar has been of great value in differentiating the Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Serratia group from other Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:1176613

  16. Evaluation of an Automated Instrument for Inoculating and Spreading Samples onto Agar Plates.

    PubMed

    Glasson, J H; Guthrie, L H; Nielsen, D J; Bethell, F A

    2008-04-01

    The findings from a preliminary assessment of a new instrument designed for the inoculation and spreading of specimens for microbiological analysis onto agar plates are described. The study found that the instrument was able to select full or biplates from a number of input cassettes, each containing different agar types. Samples were then inoculated by the instrument onto the agar surfaces and spread by a novel plastic applicator. Following this, the instrument labeled the plates and sorted them into a number of specified output stations. It was found that the instrument was able to inoculate and spread samples over a greater proportion of the agar plate surface than the manual loop-to-plate method. As a consequence, up to 44% more usable colonies were produced per plate from clinical specimens and standard cultures. Viable counts showed that the instrument was able to detect as few as 10(2) CFU/ml in fluids and also facilitated the enumeration of organisms, particularly in specimens such as urine.

  17. Development of hyperspectral imaging technique for salmonella enteritidis and typhimurium on agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a common cause of foodborne disease resulting from the consumption of contaminated food products. Although a direct plating method is widely used for presumptive positive screening of pathogenic Salmonella colonies on agar plates, it is labor-intensive, time-consuming and also prone to...

  18. Analysis of beta-hemolysis in human blood agars by Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Safaei, Akbar; Bazargani, Abdollah; Motamadi, Marjan; Kharazi, Mahboobeh; Mostaghni, Setareh; Pakshir, Keyvan; Ghaedi, Hamid; Afsarian, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the reliability of human blood agar media (HuBA) in identifying Streptococcus pyogenes by hemolysis analysis. We analyze several factors that might affect the accuracy of HuBA media for microbial analysis, including incubation time, blood group, Rh factor and presence of antistreptolysin-o.

  19. Rapid diagnosis of acanthamoeba keratitis using non-nutrient agar with a lawn of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient presented with a corneal foreign body in his only eye. He was treated with prophylactic antibiotics and sent home, but deteriorated. Findings He returned to the hospital 5 days later, and on slit-lamp examination, there was ciliary injection, corneal oedema and a 1 mm × 1 mm corneal abscess with mild anterior uveitis. Corneal scrapings were taken for culture on a non-nutrient agar with a lawn of Escherichia coli, on chocolate agar and on blood agar. He was treated with fortified gentamicin and cefazolin drops. He improved and was discharged 4 days after admission. On day 5, the culture results showed acanthamoeba. He was brought back to the hospital and treated with hourly chlorhexidine drops, ofloxacin six times daily and neomycin/dexamethasone drops once daily. On day 7, he was discharged to continue treatment at home, at which time his visual acuity in that eye was 6/9, and slit-lamp examination showed punctate keratitis and a stromal opacity with mild peripheral infiltration. Conclusions Culture on non-nutrient agar with a lawn of E. coli is a rapid, reliable and less invasive alternative to corneal biopsy for the diagnosis of acanthamoeba infection. We suggest using this method where acanthamoeba is suspected. Owing to the risk of corneal abscess, orthokeratology should be avoided in an amblyopic patient or an only eye. Acanthamoeba infection may be masked by other eye diseases. PMID:23514313

  20. Radiation survival of murine and human melanoma cells utilizing two assay systems: monolayer and soft agar.

    PubMed Central

    Yohem, K. H.; Slymen, D. J.; Bregman, M. D.; Meyskens, F. L.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation response of murine and human melanoma cells assayed in bilayer soft agar and monolayer was examined. Cells from the murine melanoma Cloudman S91 CCL 53.1 cell line and three human melanoma cell strains (C8146C, C8161, and R83-4) developed in our laboratory were irradiated by single dose X-rays and plated either in agar or on plastic. D0 values were the same within 95% confidence intervals for cells from the human melanoma cell strains C8146C, C8161, and R83-4 but were dissimilar for the murine cell line CCL 53.1 Dq values were different for all cells studied. The shape of the survival curve for all four melanomas was not identical for cells assayed in soft agar versus cells grown on plastic. This would indicate that apparent radiosensitivity was influenced by the method of assay although there were no apparent consistent differences between the curves generated by monolayer or bilayer soft agar assays. PMID:3348949

  1. In vitro growth of bioactive nanostructured apatites via agar-gelatin hybrid hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Zhao, Xianghui; Zhou, Yongsheng; Zhu, Peizhi; Zhang, Li; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-12-01

    Biomimetic synthesis of bone-like carbonated apatite with good biocompatibility is a promising strategy for the development of novel biomaterials for bone engineering applications. Most research efforts have been focused on only protein-based or only polysaccharide-based template for synthesis of apatite minerals. To understand the cooperative roles of gelatin and polysaccharide playing in the biomineralization, agar hydrogel, gelatin and agar-gelatin hybrid hydrogel were respectively introduced as mineralization matrix for the in vitro growth of apatite in the study. It was shown that bundle-like carbonated apatite was successfully prepared in agar-gelatin hybrid hydrogel for the first time, through the interaction between apatite and matrix macromolecule under physiological temperature. Moreover, the in vitro biocompatibility of the prepared nanostructured apatite crystals was investigated using CCK-8 assay and alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1. Compared with HA synthesized by traditional method, the obtained apatite in agar-gelatin hybrid hydrogel could provide significantly higher cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity. Through the study, we could better understand the role of gelatin and polysaccharide in bone formation process, and the product is a promising candidate to be used in bone tissue engineering.

  2. Applying Agar's Concept of "Languaculture" to Explain Asian Students' Experiences in the Australian Tertiary Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Lindy; Tsedendamba, Nara

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports part of a broader qualitative case study of Asian students "translation" (Agar, 2006) to study in an Australian university. The paper is concerned with the experiences of eight participants and their involvement in a training programme in the use of language learning strategies (LLS) to support their engagement with…

  3. The relationship between growth in agar, karyotype and prognosis in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, A; Mitelman, F; Olofsson, T; Olsson, I

    1984-04-01

    The growth pattern in agar culture and the karyotype of bone marrow cells were studied in 79 patients with untreated acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (ANLL). Results were divided into the following groups: (A) colony and cluster formation; (B) growth of less than 600 small clusters per 10(5) cells; (C) growth of more than 600 small clusters; (D) no growth in agar. Cytogenetically, the patients were divided into 3 categories: NN, normal metaphases only; AN, both abnormal and normal metaphases and AA, abnormal metaphases only. An association was seen between growth pattern and karyotype: the majority of NN patients (33/37) belonged to group (A + B) while in group (C + D) 20/24 patients were AN or AA. 37 patients were prognostically evaluable. The growth pattern in agar but not the cytogenetic pattern had prognostic implications. 25 patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) were also studied at diagnosis. Different growth patterns in agar had no impact on prognosis. No relationship was detected between growth pattern and karyotype in ALL.

  4. Increased sensitivity of routine laboratory detection of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm by agar-plate culture.

    PubMed

    Jongwutiwes, S; Charoenkorn, M; Sitthichareonchai, P; Akaraborvorn, P; Putaporntip, C

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of agar-plate culture has been evaluated for the detection of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm, compared with direct smear, the formalin-ether sedimentation technique and the filter-paper method. Of 1085 stool samples from the routine laboratory service at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, 241 samples harboured S. stercoralis, 153 hookworm and 2 Rhabditis hominis. The recovery rate of S. stercoralis by agar-plate culture is significantly superior to the other methods (P < 0.005). The ratios of positive results from the methods used to the total number of S. stercoralis-positive cases were as follows: 1:1.03 by agar-plate culture, 1:1.85 by the filter-paper method, 1:1.98 by the sedimentation technique and 1:10.48 by direct stool smear. A similar trend of the efficacy ratio of each method was obtained for hookworm detection. The characteristic furrows left by hookworm larvae, and larvae and adults of S. stercoralis could be used for preliminary species identification. Daily search for furrows on agar plates for up to 6 consecutive days resulted in an increased sensitivity for diagnosis of both S. stercoralis and hookworm infections.

  5. Use of bile-esculin agar for rapid differentiation of Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Lindell, S S; Quinn, P

    1975-05-01

    Bile-esculin agar has been used for several years for the presumptive identification of group D streptococci. All members of the Enterobacteriaceae family will also grow on this medium, but only certain ones can hydrolyze esculin to 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin, which reacts with iron to produce a characteristic blackening of the medium. One thousand and six cultures from clinical specimens representing 20 genera were isolated and identified. Heavy inocula from fresh pure culture isolates on heart infusion agar were placed on bile-esculin agar slants and incubated at 35 C. The slants were examined at 4 h and again at 18 h for esculin hydrolysis. Shigella, Salmonella, Arizona, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus morganii, Providencia alcalifaciens, and Providencia stuartii all produced negative results. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, and Serratia rubidaea produced a positive reaction in 4 h. The other remaining eight genera exhibited varying results. The use of this medium in conjunction with triple sugar iron-lysine iron agar has been of great value in differentiating the Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Serratia group from other Enterobacteriaceae.

  6. Automated agar plate streaker: a linear plater on Society for Biomolecular Sciences standard plates.

    PubMed

    King, Gregory W; Kath, Gary S; Siciliano, Sal; Simpson, Neal; Masurekar, Prakash; Sigmund, Jan; Polishook, Jon; Skwish, Stephen; Bills, Gerald; Genilloud, Olga; Peláez, Fernando; Martín, Jesus; Dufresne, Claude

    2006-09-01

    Several protocols for bacterial isolation and techniques for aerobic plate counting rely on the use of a spiral plater to deposit concentration gradients of microbial suspensions onto a circular agar plate to isolate colony growth. The advantage of applying a gradient of concentrations across the agar surface is that the original microbiological sample can be applied at a single concentration rather than as multiple serial dilutions. The spiral plater gradually dilutes the sample across a compact area and therefore saves time preparing dilutions and multiple agar plates. Commercial spiral platers are not automated and require manual sample loading. Dispensing of the sample volume and rate of gradients are often very limited in range. Furthermore, the spiral sample application cannot be used with rectangular microplates. Another limitation of commercial spiral platers is that they are useful only for dilute, filtered suspensions and cannot plate suspensions of coarse organic particles therefore precluding the use of many kinds of microorganism-containing substrata. An automated agar plate spreader capable of processing 99 rectangular microplates in unattended mode is described. This novel instrument is capable of dispensing discrete volumes of sample in a linear pattern. It can be programmed to dispense a sample suspense at a uniform application rate or across a decreasing concentration gradient.

  7. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance sp...

  8. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Shin, Tae-Sung; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance spectra measured in the visible and near-infrared spectral range from 400 and 1,000 nm (473 narrow spectral bands). Multivariate regression methods were used to estimate and predict hyperspectral data from RGB color values. The six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Eschetichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) were grown on Rainbow agar plates. A line-scan pushbroom hyperspectral image sensor was used to scan 36 agar plates grown with pure STEC colonies at each plate. The 36 hyperspectral images of the agar plates were divided in half to create training and test sets. The mean Rsquared value for hyperspectral image estimation was about 0.98 in the spectral range between 400 and 700 nm for linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial regression models and the detection accuracy of the hyperspectral image classification model with the principal component analysis and k-nearest neighbors for the test set was up to 92% (99% with the original hyperspectral images). Thus, the results of the study suggested that color-based detection may be viable as a multispectral imaging solution without much loss of prediction accuracy compared to hyperspectral imaging.

  9. Mercury in fruiting bodies of Fly Agaric Amanita muscaria (L.: Fr.) Pers. collected from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falandysz, J.; Lipka, K.

    2003-05-01

    Total mercury concentrations were determined in the fruiting bodies of Fly Agaric Amanita muscaria (L.: FL) Pers. and underlying soil substrate collected from several sites in Poland in 1993-2000 to evaluate mercury status as contaminant and bioindicating features of this species. The samples were collected from the spatially distant sites such as: Zaborski Landscape Park, Mierzeja Wiślana Landscape Park, Wdzydzki Landscape Park, Borecka Forest, Tucholskie Forest, Wieluńska Upland, the communities of Gubin, Manowo, Lubiana and Morag. Total mercury content of caps and stalks of Fly agaric varied widely depending on the sites examined. The range of the mean mercury concentrations for all 17 sites was between 96±10 and 1900±1400 ng/g dry wt for the caps and between 6l±32 and 920±760 ng/g dry wt for the stalks, while between 4.4±3.1 and 150±20 ng/g were noted for soil substrate samples from 9 sites examined. Fly agaric independently of the site examined showed relatively good capacity to accumulate total mercury and BCF values varied between 16±10 and 74±15 for the caps and between 11±8 and 42±10 for the stalks. Nevertheless, relatively high bioconcentration potential of mercury by Fly agaric seems to be specific for that species and under soil mercury concentrations noted no bioindication properties of this mushroom could be observed.

  10. Use of the Soft-agar Overlay Technique to Screen for Bacterially Produced Inhibitory Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Kevin L; Baltrus, David A

    2017-01-14

    The soft-agar overlay technique was originally developed over 70 years ago and has been widely used in several areas of microbiological research, including work with bacteriophages and bacteriocins, proteinaceous antibacterial agents. This approach is relatively inexpensive, with minimal resource requirements. This technique consists of spotting supernatant from a donor strain (potentially harboring a toxic compound(s)) onto a solidified soft agar overlay that is seeded with a bacterial test strain (potentially sensitive to the toxic compound(s)). We utilized this technique to screen a library of Pseudomonas syringae strains for intraspecific killing. By combining this approach with a precipitation step and targeted gene deletions, multiple toxic compounds produced by the same strain can be differentiated. The two antagonistic agents commonly recovered using this technique are bacteriophages and bacteriocins. These two agents can be differentiated using two simple additional tests. Performing a serial dilution on a supernatant containing bacteriophage will result in individual plaques becoming less in number with greater dilution, whereas serial dilution of a supernatant containing bacteriocin will result a clearing zone that becomes uniformly more turbid with greater dilution. Additionally, a bacteriophage will produce a clearing zone when spotted onto a fresh soft agar overlay seeded with the same strain, whereas a bacteriocin will not produce a clearing zone when transferred to a fresh soft agar lawn, owing to the dilution of the bacteriocin.

  11. Agar media that indicate acid production from sorbitol by oral microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kalfas, S; Edwardsson, S

    1985-01-01

    Two varieties of agar medium (Trypticase [BBL Microbiology Systems]-serum-sorbitol-bromcresol purple agar [TSSB] and Trypticase-blood-sorbitol-CaCO3 agar [TBSCa]) indicating microbial acid production from sorbitol were tested. The media were devised for use in studies on the prevalence of sorbitol-fermenting human oral microorganisms incubated in an anaerobic or microaerophilic atmosphere containing 5 to 6% CO2. TSSB contains bromcresol purple as the pH indicator and NaHCO3 as the main buffering salt. TBSCa contains CaCO3 as both the buffering salt and the indicator of acid production. The growth yield of pure cultures of oral microorganisms on TBSCa was shown to equal that on blood agar incubated under similar conditions. TSSB inhibited the growth of several bacteria to various extents. The recovery of sorbitol-fermenting microorganisms from oral specimens was the greatest when the specimens were assayed with TBSCa. The poorer results obtained with TSSB were mainly due to the decoloration of the pH indicator in this medium and the presence of greater numbers of sorbitol false-positive colonies. Images PMID:2933424

  12. Influence of different Mueller-Hinton agars and media age on Etest susceptibility testing of tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thean Yen; Ng, Lily Siew Yong; Chen, Dorene Mei Mei

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of different Mueller-Hinton agars and media age on tigecycline MICs, obtained by Etest. Variations in MIC values on different Mueller-Hinton were noted, which may result in changes in categoric susceptibility. The use of stored Mueller-Hinton media had minimal effect on MIC values.

  13. Modeling Antimicrobial Activity of Clorox(R) Using an Agar-Diffusion Test: A New Twist On an Old Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; Carter, William E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes using a computer statistical software package called Minitab to model the sensitivity of several microbes to the disinfectant NaOCl (Clorox') using the Kirby-Bauer technique. Each group of students collects data from one microbe, conducts regression analyses, then chooses the best-fit model based on the highest r-values obtained.…

  14. Kinetics and equilibrium modelling of lead uptake by algae Gelidium and algal waste from agar extraction industry.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2007-05-08

    Pb(II) biosorption onto algae Gelidium, algal waste from agar extraction industry and a composite material was studied. Discrete and continuous site distribution models were used to describe the biosorption equilibrium at different pH (5.3, 4 and 3), considering competition among Pb(II) ions and protons. The affinity distribution function of Pb(II) on the active sites was calculated by the Sips distribution. The Langmuir equilibrium constant was compared with the apparent affinity calculated by the discrete model, showing higher affinity for lead ions at higher pH values. Kinetic experiments were conducted at initial Pb(II) concentrations of 29-104 mgl(-1) and data fitted to pseudo-first Lagergren and second-order models. The adsorptive behaviour of biosorbent particles was modelled using a batch mass transfer kinetic model, which successfully predicts Pb(II) concentration profiles at different initial lead concentration and pH, and provides significant insights on the biosorbents performance. Average values of homogeneous diffusivity, D(h), are 3.6 x 10(-8); 6.1 x 10(-8) and 2.4 x 10(-8)cm(2)s(-1), respectively, for Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. The concentration of lead inside biosorbent particles follows a parabolic profile that becomes linear near equilibrium.

  15. Development and Validation of a Successful Microbiological Agar Assay for Determination of Ceftriaxone Sodium in Powder for Injectable Solution

    PubMed Central

    Aléssio, Patrícia V.; Salgado, Hérida R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Ceftriaxone sodium is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and belongs to the third generation of cephalosporins. Regarding the quality control of medicines, a validated microbiological assay for the determination of ceftriaxone sodium in powder for injectable solution has not been reported yet. This paper reports the development and validation of a simple, accurate and reproducible agar diffusion method to quantify ceftriaxone sodium in powder for injectable solution. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of ceftriaxone sodium on the strain of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 9371 IAL 1027 used as test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance and were found to be linear (r = 0.999) in the selected range of 15.0–60.0 μg/mL, precise with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of repeatability intraday = 1.40%, accurate (100.46%) and robust with a RSD lower than 1.28%. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed bioassay, which allows reliable ceftriaxone sodium quantitation in pharmaceutical samples and therefore can be used as a useful alternative methodology for the routine quality control of this medicine. PMID:24300294

  16. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  17. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  18. Ultrafast disk lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Dirk H.; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Bauer, Dominik; Wolf, Martin; Tan, Chuong; Gebs, Raphael; Budnicki, Aleksander; Wagenblast, Philipp; Weiler, Sascha

    2012-03-01

    Disk lasers with multi-kW continuous wave (CW) output power are widely used in manufacturing, primarily for cutting and welding applications, notably in the automotive industry. The ytterbium disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency, and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Fundamental mode picosecond disk lasers are well established in micro machining at high throughput and perfect precision. Following the world's first market introduction of industrial grade 50 W picosecond lasers (TruMicro 5050) at the Photonics West 2008, the second generation of the TruMicro series 5000 now provides twice the average power (100 W at 1030 nm, or 60 W frequency doubled, green output) at a significantly reduced footprint. Mode-locked disk oscillators achieve by far the highest average power of any unamplified lasers, significantly exceeding the 100 W level in laboratory set-ups. With robust long resonators their multi-microjoule pulse energies begin to compete with typical ultrafast amplifiers. In addition, significant interest in disk technology has recently come from the extreme light laser community, aiming for ultra-high peak powers of petawatts and beyond.

  19. Lightcurves of Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Meng, Huan; Su, Kate

    2012-12-01

    We have recently discovered that some planetary debris disks with extreme fractional luminosities are variable on the timescale of a few years. This behavior opens a new possibility to understand planet building. Two of the known variable disks are around solar-like stars in the age range of 30 to 100+ Myr, which is the expected era of the final stages of terrestrial planet building. Such variability can be attributed to violent collisions (up to ones on the scale of the Moon-forming event between the proto-Earth and another proto-planet). The collisional cascades that are the aftermaths of these events can produce large clouds of tiny dust grains, possibly even condensed from silica vapor. A Spitzer pilot program has obtained the lightcurve of such a debris disk and caught two minor outbursts. Here we propose to continue the lightcurve monitoring with higher sampling rates and to expand it to more disks. The proposed time domain observations are a new dimension of debris disk studies that can bring unique insight to their evolution, providing important constraints on the collisional and dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation.

  20. Studies of Circumstellar Disk Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2004-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope infrared data for our program on disk evolution has been taken (the main IRAC - 3-8 micron exposures; the 24 and 70 micron MIPS data are to come later). We now have deep maps in the four IRAC bands of the 3-Myr-old cluster Trumpler 37, and the 10-Myr-old cluster NGC 7160. Analysis of these data has now begun. We will be combining these data with our ground-based photometric and spectroscopic data to obtain a complete picture of disk frequency as a function of mass through this important age range, which spans the likely epoch of (giant) planet formation in most systems. Analysis of the SIRTF data, and follow-on ground-based spectroscopy on the converted MMT telescope using the wide-field, fiber-fed, multiobject spectrographs, Hectospec and Hectochelle, will be the major activity during the next year.Work was also performed on the following: protoplanetary disk mass accretion rates in very low-mass stars; the inner edge of T Tauri disks; accretion in intermediate-mass T Tauri stars (IMPS); and the near-infrared spectra of the rapidly-accreting protostellar disks FU Ori and V1057 Cyg.

  1. Dynamical evolution of viscous disks around be stars. II. Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Haubois, X.; Mota, B. C.; Carciofi, A. C.; Bednarski, D.; Draper, Z. H.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Rivinius, Th.

    2014-04-10

    Be stars exhibit variability for a great number of observables. Putting the pieces of the disk dynamics together is not an easy task and requires arduous modeling before achieving a good fit to the observational data. In order to guide the modeling process and make it more efficient, it is very instructive to investigate reference dynamical cases. This paper focuses on continuum polarimetric quantities and is the second of a series that aims to demonstrate the capacity of deriving the dynamical history and fundamental parameters of a classical Be star through follow-up of various observables. After a detailed study of the different opacities at play in the formation of polarized spectra, we investigate predictions of polarimetric observables in the continuum for different dynamical scenarios. Our models are based on a coupling of a hydrodynamic viscous decretion simulations in a disk and a three-dimensional non-LTE radiative transfer code. Through introduction of the polarization color diagram (PCD), we show that certain combinations of polarimetric observables exhibit features that are characteristic of a mass-loss history. This diagram also enables estimates of fundamental parameters such as the inclination angle, disk density scale, and the α viscous diffusion parameter. We present the PCD as a powerful diagnosis tool to track the dynamical phases of a Be star, such as disk build-up, dissipation, periodic, and episodic outbursts. Finally, we confront our models with observations of four Be stars that exhibited long-term polarimetric activity.

  2. Hydrodynamical Modeling of Large Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, P.; Krtǐcka, J.

    2016-11-01

    Direct centrifugal ejection from a critically or near-critically rotating surface forms a gaseous equatorial decretion disk. Anomalous viscosity provides the efficient mechanism for transporting the angular momentum outwards. The outer part of the disk can extend up to a very large distance from the parent star. We study the evolution of density, radial and azimuthal velocity, and angular momentum loss rate of equatorial decretion disks out to very distant regions. We investigate how the physical characteristics of the disk depend on the distribution of temperature and viscosity. We also study the magnetorotational instability, which is considered to be the origin of anomalous viscosity in outflowing disks. We use analytical calculations to study the stability of outflowing disks submerged to the magnetic field. At large radii the instability disappears in the region where the disk orbital velocity is roughly equal to the sound speed. Therefore, the disk sonic radius can be roughly considered as an outer disk radius.

  3. Circumstellar Disks in Very Young Embedded Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariñas, Naibí; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Teixeira, Paula S.; Lada, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    We used FLAMINGOS near-IR photometry and spectroscopy and Spitzer mid-IR photometry to study disk fractions in the 1 to 2 Myr old NGC2264 clusters. We find that stars with masses < 0.3 solar masses have lower disk fractions than stars of solar mass or higher at these early ages. We also find that most disks disappear within the first 4 Myr, which is consistent with previous studies of disk lifetimes. Our study suggests that either some very low mass stars form without disks or that their disks are less massive and/or colder than predicted from models and not detected with Spitzer/Flamingos sensitivities.

  4. Nonthermal accretion disk models around neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, M.; Liang, Edison P.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the structure and emission spectra of nonthermal accretion disks around both strongly and weakly magnetized neutron stars. Such disks may be dissipating their gravitational binding energy and transferring their angular momentum via semicontinuous magnetic reconnections. We consider specifically the structure of the disk-stellar magnetospheric boundary where magnetic pressure balances the disk pressure. We consider energy dissipation via reconnection of the stellar field and small-scale disk turbulent fields of opposite polarity. Constraints on the disk emission spectrum are discussed.

  5. Molecular Therapy for Disk Degeneration and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disk contains high amounts of the proteoglycan aggrecan, which confers the disk with a remarkable ability to resist compression. Other molecules such as collagens and noncollagenous proteins in the extracellular matrix are also essential for function. During disk degeneration, aggrecan and other molecules are lost due to proteolysis. This can result in loss of disk height, which can ultimately lead to pain. Biological therapy of intervertebral disk degeneration aims at preventing or restoring primarily aggrecan content and other molecules using therapeutic molecules. The purpose of the article is to review recent advances in biological repair of degenerate disks and pain. PMID:24436869

  6. ALMA observations of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogerheijde, Michiel

    2015-08-01

    The Universe is filled with planetary systems, as recent detections of exo-planets have shown. Such systems grow out of disks of gas and dust that surround newly formed stars. The ground work for our understanding of the structure, composition, and evolution of such disks has been laid with infrared telescopes in the 1980's, 1990's, and 2000's, as well as with millimeter interferometers operating in the United States, France, and Japan. With the construction of the Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array, a new era of studying planet-forming disks has started. The unprecedented leap in sensitivity and angular resolution that ALMA offers, has truely revolutionized our understanding of disks. No longer featureless objects consisting of gas and smalll dust, they are now seen to harbor a rich structure and chemistry. The ongoing planet-formation process sculpts many disks into systems of rings and arcs; grains grown to millimeter-sizes collect in high-pressure areas where they could grow out to asteroids or comets or further generations of planets. This wealth of new information directly addresses bottlenecks in our theoretical understanding of planet formation, such as the question how grains can grow past the 'meter-sized' barrier or overcome the 'drift barrier', and how gas and ice evolve together and ultimately determine the elemental compositions of both giant and terrestrial planets. I will review the recent ALMA results on protoplanetary disks, presenting results on individual objects and from the first populations studies. I will conclude with a forward look, on what we might expect from ALMA in this area for the years and decades to come.

  7. The Stability of Galaxy Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, D. R.; Bershady, M. A.; Martinsson, T.; Swaters, R. A.; Verheijen, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Using measurements of velocity dispersion and mass surface density for both the gas and stellar components, we calculate the multi-component stability (Q) for 30 galaxy disks observed by the DiskMass Survey. Despite their sub-maximality (Bershady et al. 2011, ApJL, 739, 47), we find all disks to be stable with roughly 85% falling in the range 1disk stability and other galaxy properties such as star-formation rate, gas mass fraction, disk maximality, and Hubble type to understand their interdependencies within the context of the secular evolution of galaxy disks. We acknowledge support for this work from the National Science Foundation (AST-0307417, AST-0607516, OISE-0754437, AST-1009491), The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (grant 614.000.807), the UW Graduate School (PRJ13SL, 050167, and the Vilas Associate award), the Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds, and NASA/JPL/Spitzer (GO-30894).

  8. Theory of Protostellar Disk Fromation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Disk formation, once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during the hydrodynamic core collapse, is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, the rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in strict ideal MHD for the observed level of core magnetization. I will discuss the physical reason for this so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe," and review possible resolutions to this problem that have been proposed so far, including non-ideal MHD effects, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and especially turbulence.

  9. Forging Long Shafts On Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilghman, Chris; Askey, William; Hopkins, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Isothermal-forging apparatus produces long shafts integral with disks. Equipment based on modification of conventional isothermal-forging equipment, required stroke cut by more than half. Enables forging of shafts as long as 48 in. (122 cm) on typical modified conventional forging press, otherwise limited to making shafts no longer than 18 in. (46cm). Removable punch, in which forged material cools after plastic deformation, essential novel feature of forging apparatus. Technology used to improve such products as components of gas turbines and turbopumps and of other shaft/disk parts for powerplants, drive trains, or static structures.

  10. Primary plate identification of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci utilizing a two-disk technique.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, E J; Gates, J W

    1979-01-01

    A two-disk system is described which allows primary plate identification of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci could be visualized on primary throat culture plates by using trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to inhibit normal flora. In the heavily inoculated area of Trypticase soy agar plates containing 5% sheep blood, a 25-microgram/ml trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole disk was placed contiguous to a 0.04-U bacitracin disk. A total of 259 throat specimens were examined with this two-disk system. The swabs from these throat specimens were incubated in Todd-Hewitt broth. The bacterial pellet from the broths was stained by fluorescent antibody as a control. Of the cultures that were determined to be positive on the plates, 75% could be read unequivocally after overnight incubation, whereas the remaining 25% required subculture. The plates recovered 91% of the cultures which were considered as true positives by the broth-fluorescent-antibody technique. This method provided a significant savings in time compared with standard plate methods and in cost of materials compared with broth-fluorescent-antibody methods. This technique is particularly valuable for producing rapid results in laboratories where fluorescence microscopy would not be cost-effective. Images PMID:387811

  11. Diffusion of Bacterial Cells in Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Mohari, Bitan; Fuqua, Clay; Setayeshgar, Sima

    2016-01-01

    The chemotaxis signal transduction network regulates the biased random walk of many bacteria in favorable directions and away from harmful ones through modulating the frequency of directional reorientations. In mutants of diverse bacteria lacking the chemotaxis response, migration in classic motility agar, which constitutes a fluid-filled porous medium, is compromised; straight-swimming cells unable to tumble become trapped within the agar matrix. Spontaneous mutations that restore spreading have been previously observed in the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli, and recent work in other bacterial species has isolated and quantified different classes of nonchemotacting mutants exhibiting the same spreading phenotype. We present a theoretical description of bacterial diffusion in a porous medium—the natural habitat for many cell types—which elucidates how diverse modifications of the motility apparatus resulting in a nonzero tumbling frequency allows for unjamming of otherwise straight-swimming cells at internal boundaries and leads to net migration. A unique result of our analysis is increasing diffusive spread with increasing tumbling frequency in the small pore limit, consistent with earlier experimental observations but not captured by previous models. Our theoretical results, combined with a simple model of bacterial diffusion and growth in agar, are compared with our experimental measurements of swim ring expansion as a function of time, demonstrating good quantitative agreement. Our results suggest that the details of the cellular tumbling process may be adapted to enable bacteria to propagate efficiently through complex environments. For engineered, self-propelled microswimmers that navigate via alternating straight runs and changes in direction, these results suggest an optimal reorientation strategy for efficient migration in a porous environment with a given microarchitecture. PMID:26745427

  12. Performance of chromID Clostridium difficile agar compared with BBL C. difficile selective agar for detection of C. difficile in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Bong; Chang, Jiyoung; Shin, Sang Hyun; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Gun Dong; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new chromogenic medium for detection of Clostridium difficile, chromID C. difficile agar (CDIF; bioMérieux, France), by comparison with BBL C. difficile Selective Agar (CDSA; Becton Dickinson and Company, USA). After heat pre-treatment (80℃, 5 min), 185 diarrheal stool samples were inoculated onto the two media types and incubated anaerobically for 24 hr and 48 hr for CDIF and for 48 hr and 72 hr for CDSA. All typical colonies on each medium were examined by Gram staining, and the gram-positive rods confirmed to contain the tpi gene by PCR were identified as C. difficile. C. difficile was recovered from 36 samples by using a combination of the two media. The sensitivity with CDIF 48 hr was highest (100%) and was significantly higher than that with CDIF 24 hr (58.3%; P<0.001), because samples with a low burden of C. difficile tended to require prolonged incubation up to 48 hr (P<0.001). The specificity of CDIF 24 hr and CDIF 48 hr (99.3% and 90.6%, respectively) was significantly higher than that of CDSA 48 hr and CDSA 72 hr (72.5% and 67.1%, respectively; P<0.001). CDIF was effective for detecting C. difficile in heat-pretreated stool specimens, thus reducing unnecessary testing for toxin production in non-C. difficile isolates and turnaround time.

  13. THE KOZAI–LIDOV MECHANISM IN HYDRODYNAMICAL DISKS. II. EFFECTS OF BINARY AND DISK PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  14. The Kozai-Lidov mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. II. Effects of binary and disk parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. (2014b) showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  15. Differentiating non-0157:H7 STEC serogroups from ground beef plated on agar media by hyperspetral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The development of an assay to detect and confirm a positive non-O157:H7 isolate is challenging when mixed morphologically results are obtained from the serogroups growing on Rainbow agar. Rainbow agar is only claimed by the manufacturer to be very specific for E.coli O157:H7 strain...

  16. Effect of lignin on water vapor barrier, mechanical, and structural properties of agar/lignin composite films.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shiv; Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2015-11-01

    Biodegradable composite films were prepared using two renewable resources based biopolymers, agar and lignin alkali. The lignin was used as a reinforcing material and agar as a biopolymer matrix. The effect of lignin concentration (1, 3, 5, and 10wt%) on the performance of the composite films was studied. In addition, the mechanical, water vapor barrier, UV light barrier properties, FE-SEM, and TGA of the films were analyzed. The agar/lignin films exhibited higher mechanical and UV barrier properties along with lower water vapor permeability compared to the neat agar film. The FTIR and SEM results showed the compatibility of lignin with agar polymer. The swelling ratio and moisture content of agar/lignin composite films were decreased with increase in lignin content. The thermostability and char content of agar/lignin composite films increased with increased lignin content. The results suggested that agar/lignin films have a potential to be used as a UV barrier food packaging material for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food.

  17. Global simulations of protoplanetary disks with net magnetic flux. I. Non-ideal MHD case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William; Lesur, Geoffroy; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Context. The planet-forming region of protoplanetary disks is cold, dense, and therefore weakly ionized. For this reason, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is thought to be mostly absent, and another mechanism has to be found to explain gas accretion. It has been proposed that magnetized winds, launched from the ionized disk surface, could drive accretion in the presence of a large-scale magnetic field. Aims: The efficiency and the impact of these surface winds on the disk structure is still highly uncertain. We present the first global simulations of a weakly ionized disk that exhibits large-scale magnetized winds. We also study the impact of self-organization, which was previously demonstrated only in non-stratified models. Methods: We perform numerical simulations of stratified disks with the PLUTO code. We compute the ionization fraction dynamically, and account for all three non-ideal MHD effects: ohmic and ambipolar diffusions, and the Hall drift. Simplified heating and cooling due to non-thermal radiation is also taken into account in the disk atmosphere. Results: We find that disks can be accreting or not, depending on the configuration of the large-scale magnetic field. Magnetothermal winds, driven both by magnetic acceleration and heating of the atmosphere, are obtained in the accreting case. In some cases, these winds are asymmetric, ejecting predominantly on one side of the disk. The wind mass loss rate depends primarily on the average ratio of magnetic to thermal pressure in the disk midplane. The non-accreting case is characterized by a meridional circulation, with accretion layers at the disk surface and decretion in the midplane. Finally, we observe self-organization, resulting in axisymmetric rings of density and associated pressure "bumps". The underlying mechanism and its impact on observable structures are discussed.

  18. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages <=1 Gyr. The specific star formation rate (SFR) during the past few Gyr estimated from AGB star counts is consistent with that computed from mid-infrared observations of star clusters at similar radii, and it is concluded that the disruption timescale for star clusters in the outer disk is Lt1 Gyr. The LF and specific frequency of AGB stars vary with galactocentric radius, in a manner that is indicative of lower luminosity-weighted ages at larger radii. Modest numbers of red supergiants are also found, indicating that there has been star formation during the past 100 Myr, while the ratio of C stars to M giants is consistent with that expected for a solar metallicity system that has experienced a constant SFR for the past few Gyr. The results drawn from the properties of resolved AGB stars are broadly consistent with those deduced from integrated light observations in the UV. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a co-operative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council of Canada (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), the Ministerio da Ciencia e Technologia (Brazil), and the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  19. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H. J. H.; Temmink, H.; Buisman, C. J. N.

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates. PMID:26937632

  20. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H J H; Temmink, H; Buisman, C J N

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates.

  1. Hopping time of a hard disk fluid in a narrow channel.

    PubMed

    Mon, K K; Percus, J K

    2007-09-07

    We use Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) methods to study the self-diffusion of hard disk fluids, confined within a narrow channel. The channels have a pore radius of Rp, above the passing limit of hard disk diameter (sigma(hd)). We focus on the average time (tau(hop)) needed for a hard disk to hop past a nearest neighbor in the longitudinal direction. This parameter plays a key role in a recent theory of the crossover from single-file diffusion to the bulk limit. For narrow channels near the hopping threshold (Rp=1 in units of sigma(hd)), both MC and MD results for tau(hop) diverge as approximately (Rp-1)(-2). Our results indicate that the scaling law exponent does not appear to be dependent on the differences between the two dynamics. This exponent is consistent with the prediction of an approximate transition state theory.

  2. Optical Digital Disks as Mass Storage Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Richard W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the optical digital disk, which stores machine-readable information in digitized form, and discusses their production, cost, present and future applications. The major companies currently active in the disk field are noted. (MBR)

  3. Molecular Gas In Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila

    2016-07-01

    Debris disks are generally thought to be the gas poor descendants of protoplanetary disks. While this characteristic may be true for most debris systems, recent surveys in rotational transitions of carbon monoxide led to a growing sample of debris disks where gas has been detected. The origin of gas in these disks is unclear yet. It may be secondary, i.e., similarly to dust grains it is continuously replenished via erosion of larger bodies. However, because of their youth, one cannot exclude that some disks may be hybrid in the sense that they retain their residual primordial gas, while the dust component may predominantly be second generation. The first observations of gaseous debris disks with ALMA provided examples of both types. This talk will review the currently known CO-rich debris disks with special emphasis on the origin of gas and on the commonly shared disk/host star properties.

  4. Electronic Teaching: Hard Disks and Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Samuel F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes floppy-disk and hard-disk based networks, electronic systems linking microcomputers together for the purpose of sharing peripheral devices, and presents points to remember when shopping for a network. (MBR)

  5. Evolution of Circumstellar and Circumplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Umurhan, O. M.; Gorti, U.

    2017-02-01

    The rapid discovery of exoplanets along with unprecedented imaging of protoplanetary disks is improving our understanding of the various stages of disk evolution leading up to and including planet formation and by association satellite formation.

  6. Excess C/O and C/H in Outer Protoplanetary Disk Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2016-11-01

    The compositions of nascent planets depend on the compositions of their birth disks. In particular, the elemental compositions of gas giant gaseous envelopes depend on the elemental compositions of the disk gas from which the envelopes are accreted. Previous models have demonstrated that sequential freeze-out of O- and C-bearing volatiles in disks will result in supersolar C/O ratios and subsolar C/H ratios in the gas between water and CO snowlines. However, this result does not take into account the expected grain growth and radial drift of pebbles in disks, and the accompanying redistribution of volatiles from the outer to the inner disk. Using a toy model we demonstrate that when drift is considered, CO is enhanced between the water and CO snowline, resulting in both supersolar C/O and C/H ratios in the disk gas in the gas giant formation zone. This result appears to be robust for the disk model as long as there is substantial pebble drift across the CO snowline, and the efficiency of CO vapor diffusion is limited. Gas giants that accrete their gaseous envelopes exterior to the water snowline and do not experience substantial core-envelope mixing may thus feature both superstellar C/O and C/H ratios in their atmospheres. Pebble drift will also affect the nitrogen and noble gas abundances in the planet-forming zones, which may explain some of Jupiter’s peculiar abundance patterns.

  7. Circumnuclear Keplerian Disks in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertola, Francesco; Cappellari, Michele; Funes, S. J., José G.; Corsini, Enrico M.; Pizzella, Alessandro; Beltrán, Juan C. Vega

    1998-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the possibility of inferring the presence of Keplerian gaseous disks using properly equipped optical ground-based telescopes. We have modeled the peculiar bidimensional shape of the emission lines in a sample of five early-type disk galaxies as due to the motion of a gaseous disk rotating in the combined potential of a central pointlike mass and of an extended stellar disk. The value of the central mass concentration estimated for four galaxies of the sample (NGC 2179, NGC 4343, NGC 4435, and NGC 4459) is ~109 Msolar. This value, according to the assumptions made in our model, is overestimated. However, we have calculated that the effect is well within the errors. For the remaining galaxy, NGC 5064, an upper limit of 5×107 Msolar is estimated. Based on observations carried out at ESO, La Silla, (Chile) (ESO N. 58, A-0564) and at the Mount Graham International Observatory (AZ) with the VATT: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  8. Turbulent Mixing Chemistry in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D.

    2006-11-01

    A gas-grain chemical model with surface reaction and 1D/2D turbulent mixing is available for protoplanetary disks and molecular clouds. Current version is based on the updated UMIST'95 database with gas-grain interactions (accretion, desorption, photoevaporation, etc.) and modified rate equation approach to surface chemistry (see also abstract for the static chemistry code).

  9. Spaceflight optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurczyk, Stephen G.; Hines, Glenn D.; Shull, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Mass memory systems based on rewriteable optical disk media are expected to play an important role in meeting the data system requirements for future NASA spaceflight missions. NASA has established a program to develop a high performance (high rate, large capacity) optical disk recorder focused on use aboard unmanned Earth orbiting platforms. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk drive modules and a modular controller. Drive performance goals are 10 gigabyte capacity, 300 megabit/s transfer rate, 10 exp -12 corrected bit error rate, and 150 millisec access time. This performance is achieved by writing eight data tracks in parallel on both sides of a 14 in. optical disk using two independent heads. System goals are 160 gigabyte capacity, 1.2 gigabits/s data rate with concurrent I/O, 250 millisec access time, and two to five year operating life on orbit. The system can be configured to meet various applications. This versatility is provided by the controller. The controller provides command processing, multiple drive synchronization, data buffering, basic file management, error processing, and status reporting. Technology developments, design concepts, current status including a computer model of the system and a Controller breadboard, and future plans for the Drive and Controller are presented.

  10. Accretion disks around black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramowicz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of accretion flow very close to a black hole is dominated by several general relativistic effects. It cannot be described by the standard Shakura Sunyaev model or by its relativistic version developed by Novikov and Thome. The most important of these effects is a dynamical mass loss from the inner edge of the disk (Roche lobe overflow). The relativistic Roche lobe overflow induces a strong advective cooling, which is sufficient to stabilize local, axially symmetric thermal and viscous modes. It also stabilizes the non-axially-symmetric global modes discovered by Papaloizou and Pringle. The Roche lobe overflow, however, destabilizes sufficiently self-gravitating accretion disks with respect to a catastrophic runaway of mass due to minute changes of the gravitational field induced by the changes in the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. One of the two acoustic modes may become trapped near the inner edge of the disk. All these effects, absent in the standard model, have dramatic implications for time-dependent behavior of the accretion disks around black holes.

  11. Vortices in stratified protoplanetary disks. From baroclinic instability to vortex layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barge, P.; Richard, S.; Le Dizès, S.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Large-scale vortices could play a key role in the evolution of protoplanetary disks, particularly in the dead-zone where no turbulence associated with magnetic field is expected. Their possible formation by the subcritical baroclinic instability is a complex issue because of the vertical structure of the disk and the elliptical instability. Aims: In 2D disks the baroclinic instability is studied as a function of the thermal transfer efficiency. In 3D disks we explore the importance of radial and vertical stratification on the processes of vortex formation and amplification. Methods: Numerical simulations are performed using a fully compressible hydrodynamical code based on a second-order finite volume method. We assume a perfect gas law in inviscid disk models in which heat transfer is due to either relaxation or diffusion. Results: In 2D, the baroclinic instability with thermal relaxation leads to the formation of large-scale vortices, which are unstable with respect to the elliptic instability. In the presence of heat diffusion, hollow vortices are formed which evolve into vortical structures with a turbulent core. In 3D, the disk stratification is found to be unstable in a finite layer which can include the mid-plane or not. When the unstable layer contains the mid-plane, the 3D baroclinic instability with thermal relaxation is found to develop first in the unstable layer as in 2D, producing large-scale vortices. These vortices are then stretched out in the stable layer, creating long-lived columnar vortical structures extending through the width of the disk. They are also found to be the source of internal vortex layers that develop across the whole disk along baroclinic critical layer surfaces, and form new vortices in the upper region of the disk. Conclusions: In 3D disks, vortices can survive for a very long time if the production of vorticity by the baroclinic amplification balances the destruction of vorticity by the elliptical instability

  12. Magnetic Coupling in the Disks around Young Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, T.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the conditions under which the disks of gas and dust orbiting young gas giant planets are sufficiently conducting to experience turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. By modeling the ionization and conductivity in the disk around proto-Jupiter, we find that turbulence is possible if the X-rays emitted near the Sun reach the planet's vicinity and either (1) the gas surface densities are in the range of the minimum-mass models constructed by augmenting Jupiter's satellites to solar composition, while dust is depleted from the disk atmosphere, or (2) the surface densities are much less, and in the range of gas-starved models fed with material from the solar nebula, but not so low that ambipolar diffusion decouples the neutral gas from the plasma. The results lend support to both minimum-mass and gas-starved models of the protojovian disk. (1) The dusty minimum-mass models have internal conductivities low enough to prevent angular momentum transfer by magnetic forces, as required for the material to remain in place while the satellites form. (2) The gas-starved models have magnetically active surface layers and a decoupled interior "dead zone." Similar active layers in the solar nebula yield accretion stresses in the range assumed in constructing the circumjovian gas-starved models. Our results also point to aspects of both classes of models that can be further developed. Non-turbulent minimum-mass models will lose dust from their atmospheres by settling, enabling gas to accrete through a thin surface layer. For the gas-starved models it is crucial to learn whether enough stellar X-ray and ultraviolet photons reach the circumjovian disk. Additionally, the stress-to-pressure ratio ought to increase with distance from the planet, likely leading to episodic accretion outbursts.

  13. Magnetic coupling in the disks around young gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, T. E-mail: mhlee@hku.hk

    2014-03-01

    We examine the conditions under which the disks of gas and dust orbiting young gas giant planets are sufficiently conducting to experience turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. By modeling the ionization and conductivity in the disk around proto-Jupiter, we find that turbulence is possible if the X-rays emitted near the Sun reach the planet's vicinity and either (1) the gas surface densities are in the range of the minimum-mass models constructed by augmenting Jupiter's satellites to solar composition, while dust is depleted from the disk atmosphere, or (2) the surface densities are much less, and in the range of gas-starved models fed with material from the solar nebula, but not so low that ambipolar diffusion decouples the neutral gas from the plasma. The results lend support to both minimum-mass and gas-starved models of the protojovian disk. (1) The dusty minimum-mass models have internal conductivities low enough to prevent angular momentum transfer by magnetic forces, as required for the material to remain in place while the satellites form. (2) The gas-starved models have magnetically active surface layers and a decoupled interior 'dead zone'. Similar active layers in the solar nebula yield accretion stresses in the range assumed in constructing the circumjovian gas-starved models. Our results also point to aspects of both classes of models that can be further developed. Non-turbulent minimum-mass models will lose dust from their atmospheres by settling, enabling gas to accrete through a thin surface layer. For the gas-starved models it is crucial to learn whether enough stellar X-ray and ultraviolet photons reach the circumjovian disk. Additionally, the stress-to-pressure ratio ought to increase with distance from the planet, likely leading to episodic accretion outbursts.

  14. Magnetized Accretion and Dead Zones in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Turner, Neal J.; Henning, Thomas; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-01

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M ⊙, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  15. MAGNETIZED ACCRETION AND DEAD ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Henning, Thomas; Turner, Neal J.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-10

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M{sub Sun }, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  16. Fabrication of Large YBCO Superconducting Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczor, Ronald J.; Noever, David A.; Robertson, Glen A.

    1999-01-01

    We have undertaken fabrication of large bulk items to develop a repeatable process and to provide test articles in laboratory experiments investigating reported coupling of electromagnetic fields with the local gravity field in the presence of rotating superconducting disks. A successful process was developed which resulted in fabrication of 30 cm diameter annular disks. The disks were fabricated of the superconductor YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Various material parameters of the disks were measured.

  17. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tkac, Peter; Rotsch, David A.; Stepinski, Dominique; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Harvey, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  18. Strongly Magnetized Accretion Disks Around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2017-01-01

    Recent observations are suggestive of strongly magnetized accretion disks around black holes. Performing local (shearing box) simulations of accretion disks, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. We demonstrate that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion disks. We also show that black hole spin measurements can become unconstrained if magnetic fields provide a significant contribution to the vertical pressure support of the accretion disk atmosphere.

  19. Diskoseismology: Probing relativistic accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Michael Allen

    1992-08-01

    Helioseismology has provided a wealth of information about the structure of the solar atmosphere. Little is known, however, about the structure of accretion disks that are thought to exist around black holes and neutron stars. In this thesis we present calculations of modes that are trapped in thin Keplerian accretion disks. We hope to use observations of thes modes to elucidate the structure of the inner relativistic regions of accretion disks. Our calculations assume that the thin disk is terminated by an innermost stable orbit, as would occur around a slowly rotating black hole or weakly magnetized compact neutron star. The dominant relativistic effects, which allow modes to be trapped within the inner region of the disk, are approximated via a modified Newtonian potential. Using the Lagrangian formulation of Friedman and Schutz, we develop a general formalism for investigating the adiabatic oscillations of arbitrary unperturbed disk models. First we consider the special case of acoustic waves in disks with isothermal atmospheres. Next we describe the Lagrangian perturbation vectors in terms of the derivatives of a scalar potential, as has been done by Ipser and Lindblom. Using this potential, we derive a single partial differential equation governing the oscillations of a disk. The eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies of a variety of disk models are found to fall into two main classes which are analogous to the p-modes and g-modes in the sun. Specifically we use the potential formalism to compute the g-modes for disks with isothermal atmospheres. Physical arguments show that both the p-modes and g-modes belong to the same family of modes as the p-modes and g-modes in the sun, just viewed in a different parameter regime. With the aid of the Lagrangian formalism we consider possible growth or damping mechanisms and compute the (assumed) relatively small rates of growth or damping of the modes. Specifically, we consider gravitational radiation reaction and

  20. Agar plate freezing assay for the in situ selection of transformed ice nucleating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anastassopoulos, Elias

    2006-10-01

    An agar plate freezing assay is described based on the incorporation of fluorescein dye in agar medium. Upon addition of fluorescein the medium becomes transparent. This facilitates the monitoring of the ice nucleation event in vivo and the subsequent in situ selection of transformed ice nucleating bacteria. In comparison with known assays for the screening of transformants, the proposed assay is very accurate and reproducible. It may be applied in environmental samples screening for ice nucleating organisms, or in cDNA or genomic libraries for identifying novel ice nucleation genes. It may also prove useful in comparative studies of the ice nucleation activity, e.g. in directed evolution experiments involving ice nucleation genes.

  1. Crystallization of brushite from EDTA-chelated calcium in agar gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plovnick, Ross H.

    1991-10-01

    Brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, CaHPO 4·2H 2O, DCPD) has been crystallized from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-chelated calcium in agar gels at initial pH 4.5-6.4 and Ca/P molar ratio above about 0.8. White, spherular crystalline DCPD aggregates up to 1 mm in diameter grew in 8-10 weeks. Liesegang ring were occassionally observed at initial gel pH 5 and Ca/P molar ratio near 1. Crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. Brushite crystals were also grown in agar gels with either unchelated Ca initially present in the gels and EDTA in overlying solutions, or EDTA initially present in the gels and unchelated Ca in overlying solutions. These crystals grew as 2-3 mm aggregates mainly within 1-3 cm of the gel-solution interface.

  2. [Physical properties of the agar of Gracilariopsis tenuifrons (Gracilariacea) from Sucre, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Zecchinel, E; Brito, L; Lárez, G

    2000-12-01

    The yield, gel strength, gelling and melting temperatures of Gracilariopsis tenuifrons agar from Guayacán, Araya Peninsula, Sucre State, Venezuela were determined. Yield values with and without alkali treatment ranged from 23.22 to 39.57% and from 16.29 to 22.42% respectively, while gel strength with alkali treatment fluctuated betwen 699.31 and 1231.69 g/cm2 and without treatment varied from 278.0 to 691.06 g/cm2. Gelling and melting temperatures were in the range reported for other agarophytes. Considering gel strength, the agar quality of G. tenuifrons was higher than in other species and its exploitation in economically feasible.

  3. Modification of the Congo red agar method to detect biofilm production by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Thaís Dias Lemos; Pereira, Eliezer Menezes; Dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; Schuenck, Ricardo Pinto; Nunes, Ana Paula Ferreira

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis in immunocompromised patients can cause bacteremia related to the use of catheter due to biofilm production. There are different phenotypic methods to detect biofilm formation. One method is based on culture in brain heart infusion agar (BHIA) containing sucrose and red Congo dye (original Congo red agar). Our group created a new CRA formula and we have confirmed its capacity to detect biofilm production in 210 S. epidermidis strains, including 76 (36.2%) icaAB gene-positive strains. Other parameters were also evaluated. The new CRA formula that gave the best results was BHIA with sucrose (5%), Congo red (0.08%), NaCl (1.5%), glucose (2%), and vancomycin (0.5 mg/mL) (vancomycin-modified CRA-CRAmod). The CRAmod plus vancomycin may be a promising tool and can help to determine the real participation of S. epidermidis in the infectious process.

  4. Air-lubrication of magnetic disk sliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreßler, B.; Graichen, K.; Bärwolff, G.; Jehring, L.; Seifert, G.

    1993-03-01

    Steady-state and dynamic flying of a self-acting magnetic disk slider over a hard disk are considered. Some tasks for computations are formulated and the possibilities of developed numerical codes are illustrated. Numerical results of dynamic flying over a disk surface with an obstacle are in agreement with experimental data.

  5. Microporous Carbon Disks For Sorption Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munukutla, Lakshmi V.; Moore, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Slow, carefully controlled pyrolysis found to turn polyvinylidene chloride disks into carbon disks having small pores and large surface areas. Disks exhibit high adsorptivities making them useful in krypton-sorption refrigerators. Carbons made from polyvinylidene chloride have greater adsorptive capacities. Thermal instability controlled and variability of product reduced by careful control of rates of heating, heating times, and rate of final cooling.

  6. Accretion Disks in Algols: Progenitors and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rensbergen, W.; de Greve, J. P.

    2017-02-01

    There are only a few Algols with derived accretion disk parameters. These measurements provide additional constraints for tracing the origin of individual systems. With a modified binary evolution code, series of close binary evolution were calculated. For six Algols with accretion disks we found initial systems that evolve closely into the presently observed system parameters and disk characteristics.

  7. Basics of Videodisc and Optical Disk Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Judith

    1983-01-01

    Outlines basic videodisc and optical disk technology describing both optical and capacitance videodisc technology. Optical disk technology is defined as a mass digital image and data storage device and briefly compared with other information storage media including magnetic tape and microforms. The future of videodisc and optical disk is…

  8. A Complete Guide to the Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Char, Carlene

    1983-01-01

    Focusing on the 5-1/4" floppy disk commonly used with microcomputers, this guide to magnetic disks gives a description of their physical appearance and how they function as information storage devices and provides suggestions for their care and maintenance. A glossary of disk-related terms is included. (EAO)

  9. Methods of Stress Calculation in Rotating Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumarkin, S.

    1944-01-01

    The paper describes nethods of computing the stresses in disks of a given profile as well as methods of choosing the disk profiles for a given stress distribution for turhines, turbo blowers, and so forth. A new method of in tegrating the differential equations of Stodola leads to a simplification of the computation for disks of hyperbolic profile.

  10. PROTOPLANETARY DISK RESONANCES AND TYPE I MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, David

    2011-11-10

    Waves reflected by the inner edge of a protoplanetary disk are shown to significantly modify Type I migration, even allowing the trapping of planets near the inner disk edge for small planets in a range of disk parameters. This may inform the distribution of planets close to their central stars, as observed recently by the Kepler mission.

  11. Enhancing Bioaerosol Sampling by Andersen Impactors Using Mineral-Oil-Spread Agar Plate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Wei, Kai; Wu, Yan; Shen, Fangxia; Chen, Qi; Li, Mingzhen; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    As a bioaerosol sampling standard, Andersen type impactor is widely used since its invention in 1950s, including the investigation of the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001. However, its related problems such as impaction and desiccation stress as well as particle bounce have not been solved. Here, we improved its biological collection efficiencies by plating a mineral oil layer (100 µL) onto the agar plate. An Andersen six-stage sampler and a BioStage impactor were tested with mineral-oil-spread agar plates in collecting indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal aerosols. The effects of sampling times (5, 10 and 20 min) were also studied using the BioStage impactor when sampling environmental bioaerosols as well as aerosolized Bacillus subtilis (G+) and Escherichia coli (G-). In addition, particle bounce reduction by mineral-oil-plate was also investigated using an optical particle counter (OPC). Experimental results revealed that use of mineral-oil-spread agar plate can substantially enhance culturable bioaerosol recoveries by Andersen type impactors (p-values<0.05). The recovery enhancement was shown to depend on bioaerosol size, type, sampling time and environment. In general, more enhancements (extra 20%) were observed for last stage of the Andersen six-stage samplers compared to the BioStage impactor for 10 min sampling. When sampling aerosolized B. subtilis, E. coli and environmental aerosols, the enhancement was shown to increase with increasing sampling time, ranging from 50% increase at 5 min to ∼100% at 20 min. OPC results indicated that use of mineral oil can effectively reduce the particle bounce with an average of 66% for 10 min sampling. Our work suggests that enhancements for fungal aerosols were primarily attributed to the reduced impaction stress, while for bacterial aerosols reduced impaction, desiccation and particle bounce played major roles. The developed technology can readily enhance the agar-based techniques including those high

  12. The Resazurin-Agar Method - a Quick Test to Determine Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckfeldt, J.; Westphal, B.; Claußen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Rezasurin has been used as a smart tracer in stream ecosystems to indicate metabolic activity, specifically aerobic respiration by heterotrophic bacteria. Resazurin is a blue compound which is irreversibly reduced to the pink resorufin in the presence of aerobic bacteria. The degree and speed of colour change from blue to pink is a measure of the degree of oxygen consumption and thus an indirect indication of the concentration of aerobic bacteria in a given medium. A high concentration of bacteria in water indicates a bad water quality. In our work a method was developed using resazurin agar plates to find a quick and easy way for testing water quality and comparing concentrations of bacteria in freshwater and seawater samples. The theory was to concentrate bacteria from a defined volume of water sample onto polycarbonate filters (0.2 μm), which are then placed onto the resazurin agar plate. The presence of aerobic bacteria on the filter will reduce the resazurin in the agar and the compound changes its colour. First tests conducted with different dilutions of a pure culture of yoghurt bacteria showed promising results and confirmed the feasibility of the method. In a further assay, we used water samples from different water layers and different temperatures and were also able to observe differences in the concentration of bacteria, depending on these different environmental conditions.The assay was also successfully used with seawater samples, collected from 2 different stations at 3 different depths in the Baltic Sea (salinity=15). The discolouration of the plates showed good correlation with the oxygen concentrations in the water. The resazurin-agar plate method is economical and fast. Several samples could be investigated at the same time without sacrificing the reliability of the results. Thus it is a good pre-screening test for a quantitative evaluation of bacteria in a water sample.

  13. Rapid Isolation and Susceptibility Testing of Leptospira spp. Using a New Solid Medium, LVW Agar

    PubMed Central

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Paris, Daniel H.; Langla, Sayan; Thaipadunpanit, Janjira; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Smythe, Lee D.; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp., the causative agents of leptospirosis, are slow-growing Gram-negative spirochetes. Isolation of Leptospira from clinical samples and testing of antimicrobial susceptibility are difficult and time-consuming. Here, we describe the development of a new solid medium that facilitates more-rapid growth of Leptospira spp. and the use of this medium to evaluate the Etest's performance in determining antimicrobial MICs to drugs in common use for leptospirosis. The medium was developed by evaluating the effects of numerous factors on the growth rate of Leptospira interrogans strain NR-20157. These included the type of base agar, the concentration of rabbit serum (RS), and the concentration and duration of CO2 incubation during the initial period of culture. The highest growth rate of NR-20157 was achieved using a Noble agar base supplemented with 10% RS (named LVW agar), with an initial incubation at 30°C in 5% CO2 for 2 days prior to continuous culture in air at 30°C. These conditions were used to develop the Etest for three species, L. interrogans (NR-20161), L. kirschnerii (NR-20327), and L. borgpetersenii (NR-20151). The MICs were read on day 7 for all samples. The Etest was then performed on 109 isolates of pathogenic Leptospira spp. The MIC90 values for penicillin G, doxycycline, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and chloramphenicol were 0.64 units/ml and 0.19, 0.047, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively. The use of LVW agar, which enables rapid growth, isolation of single colonies, and simple antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Leptospira spp., provides an opportunity for new areas of fundamental and applied research. PMID:23114772

  14. Draft genome of agar-degrading marine bacterium Gilvimarinus agarilyticus JEA5.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngdeuk; Lee, Su-Jin; Park, Gun-Hoo; Heo, Soo-Jin; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Kang, Do-Hyung; Oh, Chulhong

    2015-06-01

    Gilvimarinus agarilyticus JEA5, which effectively degrades agar, was isolated from the seawater of Jeju Island, Republic of Korea. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of G. agarilyticus JEA5 with a total genome size of 4,179,438bp from 2 scaffolds (21 contigs) with 53.15% G+C content. Various polysaccharidases including 11 predicted agarases were observed from the draft genome of G. agarilyticus JEA5.

  15. Enhancing bioaerosol sampling by Andersen impactors using mineral-oil-spread agar plate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Wei, Kai; Wu, Yan; Shen, Fangxia; Chen, Qi; Li, Mingzhen; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    As a bioaerosol sampling standard, Andersen type impactor is widely used since its invention in 1950s, including the investigation of the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001. However, its related problems such as impaction and desiccation stress as well as particle bounce have not been solved. Here, we improved its biological collection efficiencies by plating a mineral oil layer (100 µL) onto the agar plate. An Andersen six-stage sampler and a BioStage impactor were tested with mineral-oil-spread agar plates in collecting indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal aerosols. The effects of sampling times (5, 10 and 20 min) were also studied using the BioStage impactor when sampling environmental bioaerosols as well as aerosolized Bacillus subtilis (G+) and Escherichia coli (G-). In addition, particle bounce reduction by mineral-oil-plate was also investigated using an optical particle counter (OPC). Experimental results revealed that use of mineral-oil-spread agar plate can substantially enhance culturable bioaerosol recoveries by Andersen type impactors (p-values<0.05). The recovery enhancement was shown to depend on bioaerosol size, type, sampling time and environment. In general, more enhancements (extra 20%) were observed for last stage of the Andersen six-stage samplers compared to the BioStage impactor for 10 min sampling. When sampling aerosolized B. subtilis, E. coli and environmental aerosols, the enhancement was shown to increase with increasing sampling time, ranging from 50% increase at 5 min to ∼100% at 20 min. OPC results indicated that use of mineral oil can effectively reduce the particle bounce with an average of 66% for 10 min sampling. Our work suggests that enhancements for fungal aerosols were primarily attributed to the reduced impaction stress, while for bacterial aerosols reduced impaction, desiccation and particle bounce played major roles. The developed technology can readily enhance the agar-based techniques including those high

  16. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  17. Shock Response of the Clamped Disk in Small Form Factor Hard Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bin; Shu, Dongwei; Shi, Baojun; Lu, Guoxing

    As small form factor (one-inch and smaller) hard disk drives are widely used in portable consumer appliances and gadgets, their mechanical robustness is of greater concern. In the previous work, it is found that when the disk is more tightly clamped, it helps to decrease the shock response of the disk and then avoid the head slap. In this paper, the real boundary condition of the disk for a small form factor hard disk drive from Seagate is investigated numerically. The disk is clamped between the clamp and the hub. The shock response of the disk under a half-sine acceleration pulse is simulated by using the finite element method. In the finite element model, both contact between disk and clamp and contact between disk and hub are considered. According to the simulation results, how to decrease the shock response of the disk is suggested.

  18. How do microorganisms influence trace element uptake by plants? Screening in an agar model rhizosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M.; Robinson, B. H.; Evangelou, M. W. H.; Vachey, A.; Schwitzguebel, J. P.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Schulin, R.

    2009-04-01

    Trace elements (TE) are essential for humans and plants, but they may be toxic if their concentration is too high. For this reason, the management of TE in soils is very important. In some cases it may be necessary to increase the uptake of nutrients or TE by plants, for example in a biofortification perspective. Conversely, in some other cases TE uptake by plants should be decreased, for instance to avoid heavy metals entering the food chain via edible crops. Microorganisms living in the rhizosphere affect trace element (TE) uptake by plants. However, due to the complexity of this space and the variety of microorganisms that occur there, it is difficult to isolate the effect of any particular strain. To overcome this hurdle, we developed a system in which we grew plants under sterile conditions in agar and inoculated their rhizosphere with a single, well-defined microbial strain. For many years, agar has been used as a growth substrate for microorganisms and plant tissues. It is cheap, easy to use, and can be autoclaved to ensure its sterility. Because of its widespread use, an experiment conducted using this substrate can be reproduced under the same conditions in any laboratory. In contrast to soil, there is little interaction between the trace elements and the agar matrix. There are many studies investigating the influence of microorganisms on TE uptake by plants. However, so far only a small variety of microorganisms has been tested on few plant species. Therefore, the first objective of our research was to develop a method to rapidly screen a large variety of microorganisms on various plant species. Once this goal was achieved, we sought to study the effect of single, well-defined microbial strains on TE uptake by sunflower and wheat. The substrate for plants growth was a 10% agar solution prepared with modified Hoagland's solution and a TE solution containing 1 mg/kg Pb and molar equivalents of Cu, Ni and Zn. The agar solution was autoclaved and poured into

  19. Selection of brain metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells determined by growth on hard agar.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J; Langley, Robert R

    2011-05-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44(+) and CD133(+) and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice.

  20. Ultrasound induced bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2016-11-01

    Soft tissue fractionation induced by acoustic cavitation is desired for non-invasive tissue removal in histotripsy, while being a potential injury mechanism in other therapeutic ultrasound treatments such as lithotripsy. In this work, we investigate the formation of bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts to inform a class of damage models. Agar phantoms of different stiffness were subjected to a series of multi-cycle ultrasound bursts, using a burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) protocol, and simultaneously imaged at 200 frames per second (1 image per ultrasound burst). Some bubbles become visible in images ( 200 microns) due to the negative pressure ( 7.5 MPa) in the initial bursts, and the number of visible bubbles increases continuously during the subsequent bursts. A Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics model, which accounts for viscoelastic confinement of agar gels, is developed. Material fatigue leading to eventual irreversible fracture-like failure in this model is proposed to explain the key observations. In addition to isolated, approximately spherical bubbles, long tunnel-like features are observed, which are seemingly lines of joined bubbles along a possible fracture or defect. The geometry of these tunnel-like features is quantified, and a physical explanation for tunnel formation is proposed in terms of bubble expansion and unstable collapse. This work was supported by NIH NIDDK Grant P01-DK043881.

  1. A supplemented soft agar chemotaxis assay demonstrates the Helicobacter pylori chemotactic response to zinc and nickel

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Lisa; Andermann, Tessa M.

    2013-01-01

    Directed motility, or chemotaxis, is required for Helicobacter pylori to establish infection in the stomach, although the full repertoire of this bacterium’s chemotactic responses is not yet known. Here we report that H. pylori responds to zinc as an attractant and nickel as a repellent. To reach this conclusion, we employed both a temporal chemotaxis assay based on bacterial reversals and a supplemented soft agar spatial assay. We refined the temporal assay using a previously described chemorepellent, acid, and found that H. pylori requires rich media with serum to maintain optimal swimming motility. Surprisingly, we found that some strains respond to acid as an attractant, and that the TlpC chemoreceptor correlated with whether acid was sensed as an attractant or repellent. Using this same assay, we detected weak repellent responses to nickel and copper, and a varied response to zinc. We thus developed an alternative spatial chemotactic assay called the supplemented soft agar assay, which utilizes soft agar medium supplemented with the test compound. With Escherichia coli, the attractant serine slowed overall bacterial migration, while the repellent nickel increased the speed of overall migration. In H. pylori we detected slowed migration with doubled tryptone media, as well as zinc, consistent with an attractant response. In contrast, nickel increased migration, consistent with repulsion. PMID:23139399

  2. Pig and Goat Blood as Substitutes for Sheep Blood in Blood-Supplemented Agar Media

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Chandar; Gordon, Rhonda; Shaw, Helene; Fonseca, Kevin; Olsen, Merle

    2000-01-01

    In many developing countries sheep and horse blood, the recommended blood supplements in bacteriological media, are not readily available, whereas pig and goat blood are. Therefore, this study examined the use of pig and goat blood as potential substitutes for sheep blood in blood-supplemented bacteriologic media commonly used in clinical microbiology laboratories. In general, the growth characteristics and colony morphologies of a wide range of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and Candida albicans were similar on media containing pig, goat, and sheep blood, although differences were found. Enterococcus sp. uniformly produced alpha-hemolysis when incubated in CO2, but in anaerobic conditions the hemolysis varied. In contrast, beta-hemolytic streptococci produced identical hemolytic reactions on all three media. Synergistic hemolysis was not observed on pig blood agar in the CAMP test nor on goat blood agar in the reverse CAMP test. The preparation of chocolate agar (heated) with pig blood required heating to a higher temperature than with sheep or goat blood to yield suitable growth of Haemophilus species. In general, we conclude that pig and goat blood are suitable alternatives to sheep blood for use in bacteriological media in settings where sheep and horse blood are not readily available. PMID:10655351

  3. Predicting the growth situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs using gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinzhe; Sun, Ye; Tu, Kang; Dong, Qingli; Pan, Leiqing

    2016-12-01

    A rapid method of predicting the growing situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is presented. Gas sensors were used to acquire volatile compounds generated by P. aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs. Then, optimal sensors were selected to simulate P. aeruginosa growth using modified Logistic and Gompertz equations by odor changes. The results showed that the responses of S8 or S10 yielded high coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.89–0.99 and low root mean square errors (RMSE) of 0.06–0.17 for P. aeruginosa growth, fitting the models on the agar plate. The responses of S9, S4 and the first principal component of 10 sensors fit well with the growth of P. aeruginosa inoculated in meat stored at 4 °C and 20 °C, with R2 of 0.73–0.96 and RMSE of 0.25–1.38. The correlation coefficients between the fitting models, as measured by electronic nose responses, and the colony counts of P. aeruginosa were high, ranging from 0.882 to 0.996 for both plate and meat samples. Also, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry results indicated the presence of specific volatiles of P. aeruginosa on agar plates. This work demonstrated an acceptable feasibility of using gas sensors—a rapid, easy and nondestructive method for predicting P. aeruginosa growth.

  4. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus

    PubMed Central

    Cold, Emma R.; Freyria, Nastasia J.; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS– 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS– 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications. PMID:27149378

  5. The use of agar as a novel filler for monolithic matrices produced using hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Lyons, John G; Devine, Declan M; Kennedy, James E; Geever, Luke M; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2006-08-01

    The use of filler materials in an extended release monolithic polymer matrix can lead to a vastly altered release profile for the active pharmaceutical ingredient. A range of excipients for use in monolithic matrices have been discussed in the literature. The body of work described in this research paper outlines the use of agar as a novel filler material in a hot melt extruded polymer matrix. Several batches of matrix material were prepared with Diclofenac sodium used as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Agar and microcrystalline cellulose were used as the filler materials in varying ratios, to examine the effect of % filler content as well as filler type on the properties of the hot melt extruded matrix. The resultant extrudates were characterised using steady state parallel plate rheometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dissolution testing. The rheometry analysis concluded that the fillers used resulted in an increase in the matrix viscosity. The DSC scans obtained showed negligible effects on the melting behavior of the matrix as a result of the filler inclusion. Dissolution analysis showed that the presence of the fillers resulted in a slower release rate of API than for the matrix alone. The results detailed within this paper indicate that agar is a viable filler for extended release hot melt produced dosage forms.

  6. Pig and goat blood as substitutes for sheep blood in blood-supplemented agar media.

    PubMed

    Anand, C; Gordon, R; Shaw, H; Fonseca, K; Olsen, M

    2000-02-01

    In many developing countries sheep and horse blood, the recommended blood supplements in bacteriological media, are not readily available, whereas pig and goat blood are. Therefore, this study examined the use of pig and goat blood as potential substitutes for sheep blood in blood-supplemented bacteriologic media commonly used in clinical microbiology laboratories. In general, the growth characteristics and colony morphologies of a wide range of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and Candida albicans were similar on media containing pig, goat, and sheep blood, although differences were found. Enterococcus sp. uniformly produced alpha-hemolysis when incubated in CO(2), but in anaerobic conditions the hemolysis varied. In contrast, beta-hemolytic streptococci produced identical hemolytic reactions on all three media. Synergistic hemolysis was not observed on pig blood agar in the CAMP test nor on goat blood agar in the reverse CAMP test. The preparation of chocolate agar (heated) with pig blood required heating to a higher temperature than with sheep or goat blood to yield suitable growth of Haemophilus species. In general, we conclude that pig and goat blood are suitable alternatives to sheep blood for use in bacteriological media in settings where sheep and horse blood are not readily available.

  7. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus.

    PubMed

    Cold, Emma R; Freyria, Nastasia J; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications.

  8. Isolation and characterization of agar-degrading endophytic bacteria from plants.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Weijia; Wei, Congchong; Jiang, Tengfei; Xu, Hui; Cao, Yi; Cao, Yu; Qiao, Dairong

    2015-02-01

    Agar is a polysaccharide extracted from the cell walls of some macro-algaes. Among the reported agarases, most of them come from marine environment. In order to better understand different sources of agarases, it is important to search new non-marine native ones. In this study, seven agar-degrading bacteria were first isolated from the tissues of plants, belonging to three genera, i.e., Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Klebsiella sp. Among them, the genus Klebsiella was first reported to have agarolytic ability and the genus Pseudomonas was first isolated from non-marine environment with agarase activity. Besides, seven strains were characterized by investigating the growth and agarase production in the presence of various polysaccharides. The results showed that they could grow on several polysaccharides such as araban, carrageenan, chitin, starch, and xylan. Besides, they could also produce agarase in the presence of different polysaccharides other than agar. Extracellular agarases from seven strains were further analyzed by SDS-PAGE combined with activity staining and estimated to be 75 kDa which has great difference from most reported agarases.

  9. Predicting the growth situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs using gas sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinzhe; Sun, Ye; Tu, Kang; Dong, Qingli; Pan, Leiqing

    2016-01-01

    A rapid method of predicting the growing situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is presented. Gas sensors were used to acquire volatile compounds generated by P. aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs. Then, optimal sensors were selected to simulate P. aeruginosa growth using modified Logistic and Gompertz equations by odor changes. The results showed that the responses of S8 or S10 yielded high coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.89–0.99 and low root mean square errors (RMSE) of 0.06–0.17 for P. aeruginosa growth, fitting the models on the agar plate. The responses of S9, S4 and the first principal component of 10 sensors fit well with the growth of P. aeruginosa inoculated in meat stored at 4 °C and 20 °C, with R2 of 0.73–0.96 and RMSE of 0.25–1.38. The correlation coefficients between the fitting models, as measured by electronic nose responses, and the colony counts of P. aeruginosa were high, ranging from 0.882 to 0.996 for both plate and meat samples. Also, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry results indicated the presence of specific volatiles of P. aeruginosa on agar plates. This work demonstrated an acceptable feasibility of using gas sensors—a rapid, easy and nondestructive method for predicting P. aeruginosa growth. PMID:27941841

  10. Probing for exoplanets hiding in dusty debris disks: Disk imaging, characterization, and exploration with HST/STIS multi-roll coronagraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Glenn; Hinz, Phillip M.; Grady, Carol A.; Hines, Dean C.; Debes, John H.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Stark, Christopher C.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Silverstone, Murray D.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Henning, Thomas; Serabyn, Eugene; Tamura, Motohide

    2014-10-01

    Spatially resolved scattered-light images of circumstellar debris in exoplanetary systems constrain the physical properties and orbits of the dust particles in these systems. They also inform on co-orbiting (but unseen) planets, the systemic architectures, and forces perturbing the starlight-scattering circumstellar material. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) broadband optical coronagraphy, we have completed the observational phase of a program to study the spatial distribution of dust in a sample of 10 circumstellar debris systems and 1 'mature' protoplanetrary disk, all with HST pedigree, using point-spread-function-subtracted multi-roll coronagraphy. These observations probe stellocentric distances ≥5 AU for the nearest systems, and simultaneously resolve disk substructures well beyond corresponding to the giant planet and Kuiper Belt regions within our own solar system. They also disclose diffuse very low-surface-brightness dust at larger stellocentric distances. Herein we present new results inclusive of fainter disks such as HD 92945 (F {sub disk}/F {sub star} = 5 × 10{sup –5}), confirming, and better revealing, the existence of a narrow inner debris ring within a larger diffuse dust disk. Other disks with ring-like substructures and significant asymmetries and complex morphologies include HD 181327, for which we posit a spray of ejecta from a recent massive collision in an exo-Kuiper Belt; HD 61005, suggested to be interacting with the local interstellar medium; and HD 15115 and HD 32297, also discussed in the context of putative environmental interactions. These disks and HD 15745 suggest that debris system evolution cannot be treated in isolation. For AU Mic's edge-on disk, we find out-of-plane surface brightness asymmetries at ≥5 AU that may implicate the existence of one or more planetary perturbers. Time-resolved images of the MP Mus protoplanetary disk provide spatially resolved temporal variability

  11. Probing for Exoplanets Hiding in Dusty Debris Disks: Disk Imaging, Characterization, and Exploration with HST/STIS Multi-roll Coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn; Grady, Carol A.; Hines, Dean C.; Stark, Christopher C.; Debes, John H.; Carson, Joe; Kuchner, Marc J.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Silverstone, Murray D.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Henning, Thomas; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Serabyn, Eugene; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Tamura, Motohide; Hinz, Phillip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.

    2014-10-01

    Spatially resolved scattered-light images of circumstellar debris in exoplanetary systems constrain the physical properties and orbits of the dust particles in these systems. They also inform on co-orbiting (but unseen) planets, the systemic architectures, and forces perturbing the starlight-scattering circumstellar material. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) broadband optical coronagraphy, we have completed the observational phase of a program to study the spatial distribution of dust in a sample of 10 circumstellar debris systems and 1 "mature" protoplanetrary disk, all with HST pedigree, using point-spread-function-subtracted multi-roll coronagraphy. These observations probe stellocentric distances >=5 AU for the nearest systems, and simultaneously resolve disk substructures well beyond corresponding to the giant planet and Kuiper Belt regions within our own solar system. They also disclose diffuse very low-surface-brightness dust at larger stellocentric distances. Herein we present new results inclusive of fainter disks such as HD 92945 (F disk/F star = 5 × 10-5), confirming, and better revealing, the existence of a narrow inner debris ring within a larger diffuse dust disk. Other disks with ring-like substructures and significant asymmetries and complex morphologies include HD 181327, for which we posit a spray of ejecta from a recent massive collision in an exo-Kuiper Belt; HD 61005, suggested to be interacting with the local interstellar medium; and HD 15115 and HD 32297, also discussed in the context of putative environmental interactions. These disks and HD 15745 suggest that debris system evolution cannot be treated in isolation. For AU Mic's edge-on disk, we find out-of-plane surface brightness asymmetries at >=5 AU that may implicate the existence of one or more planetary perturbers. Time-resolved images of the MP Mus protoplanetary disk provide spatially resolved temporal variability in the disk

  12. Probing for Exoplanets Hiding in Dusty Debris Disks: Disk Imaging, Characterization, and Exploration with HST-STIS Multi-roll Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Glenn; Grady, Carol A.; Hines, Dean C.; Stark, Christopher C.; Debes, John; Carson, Joe; Kuchner, Marc J.; Perrin, Marshall; Weinberger, Alycia; Wisniewski, John P.; Silverstone, Murray D.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Henning, Thomas; Bruce E. Woodgate; Serabyn, Eugene; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Tamura, Motohide; Hinz, Phillip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially resolved scattered-light images of circumstellar debris in exoplanetary systems constrain the physical properties and orbits of the dust particles in these systems. They also inform on co-orbiting (but unseen) planets, the systemic architectures, and forces perturbing the starlight-scattering circumstellar material. Using HST/STIS broadband optical coronagraphy, we have completed the observational phase of a program to study the spatial distribution of dust in a sample of ten circumstellar debris systems, and one "mature" protoplanetrary disk all with HST pedigree, using PSF-subtracted multi-roll coronagraphy. These observations probe stellocentric distances greater than or equal to 5 AU for the nearest systems, and simultaneously resolve disk substructures well beyond corresponding to the giant planet and Kuiper belt regions within our own Solar System. They also disclose diffuse very low-surface brightness dust at larger stellocentric distances. Herein we present new results inclusive of fainter disks such as HD92945 (F (sub disk) /F (sub star) = 5x10 (sup -5) confirming, and better revealing, the existence of a narrow inner debris ring within a larger diffuse dust disk. Other disks with ring-like sub-structures and significant asymmetries and complex morphologies include: HD181327 for which we posit a spray of ejecta from a recent massive collision in an exo-Kuiper belt; HD61005 suggested to be interacting with the local ISM; HD15115 and HD32297, discussed also in the context of putative environmental interactions. These disks, and HD15745, suggest that debris system evolution cannot be treated in isolation. For AU Mic's edge-on disk we find out-of-plane surface brightness asymmetries at greater than or equal to 5 AU that may implicate the existence of one or more planetary perturbers. Time resolved images of the MP Mus proto-planetary disk provide spatially resolved temporal variability in the disk illumination. These and other new images from our HST

  13. The Matryoshka Disk: Keck/NIRC2 Discovery of a Solar-system-scale, Radially Segregated Residual Protoplanetary Disk around HD 141569A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Grady, Carol A.; Cloutier, Ryan; Konishi, Mihoko; Stassun, Keivan; Debes, John; van der Marel, Nienke; Muto, Takayuki; Jayawardhana, Ray; Ratzka, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    Using Keck/NIRC2 {L}\\prime (3.78 μm) data, we report the direct imaging discovery of a scattered-light-resolved, solar-system-scale residual protoplanetary disk around the young A-type star HD 141569A, interior to and concentric with the two ring-like structures at wider separations. The disk is resolved down to ∼0.″25 and appears as an arc-like rim with attached hook-like features. It is located at an angular separation intermediate between that of warm CO gas identified from spatially resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy and diffuse dust emission recently discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope. The inner disk has a radius of ∼39 au, a position angle consistent with north up, and an inclination of i ∼ 56o and has a center offset from the star. Forward modeling of the disk favors a thick torus-like emission sharply truncated at separations beyond the torus’s photocenter and heavily depleted at smaller separations. In particular, the best-fit density power law for the dust suggests that the inner disk dust and gas (as probed by CO) are radially segregated, a feature consistent with the dust trapping mechanism inferred from observations of “canonical” transitional disks. However, the inner disk component may instead be explained by radiation pressure-induced migration in optically thin conditions, in contrast to the two stellar companion/planet-influenced ring-like structures at wider separations. HD 141569A’s circumstellar environment—with three nested, gapped, concentric dust populations—is an excellent laboratory for understanding the relationship between planet formation and the evolution of both dust grains and disk architecture.

  14. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  15. Declustering databases on heterogeneous disk systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling T.; Rotem, D.; Seshadri, S.

    1995-04-01

    Declustering is a well known strategy to achieve maximum I/O parallelism in multi-disk systems. Many declustering methods have been proposed for symmetrical disk systems, i.e., multi-disk systems in which all disks have the same speed and capacity. This work deals with the problem of adapting such declustering methods to work in heterogeneous environments. In such environments these are many types of disks and servers with a large range of speeds and capacities. We deal first with the case of perfectly declustered queries, i.e., queries which retrieve a fixed proportion of the answer from each disk. We show that the fraction of the dataset which must be allocated to each disk is affected by both the relative speed and capacity of the disk. Furthermore, the hierarchical structure of most distributed systems, where groups of disks are placed in servers, imposes further complications due to variations . in server and network bandwidths which may affect the actual achievable transfer rates. We propose an algorithm which determines the fraction of the dataset which must be loaded on each disk. The algorithm may be tailored to find disk loading for minimal response time for a given database size, or to compute a system profile showing the optimal loading of the disks for all possible ranges of database sizes. Next we look at the probabilistic aspects of this problem and show how to optimize the expected retrieval time when the Proportions of the data retrieved from each disk axe random variables. We show the rather surprising result that in this case to achieve optimality, the fraction of the data loaded on each disk must not simply be proportional to its speed but rather some compensation must be made with bias towards the faster disks. The methods proposed here are general and can be used in conjunction with most known symmetric declustering methods.

  16. Flux distributions and colors of accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacharintanakul, P.; Katz, J. I.

    1980-01-01

    The disk model of Shakura and Sunyaev (1973) and Novikov and Thorne (1973) is used to calculate temperature distributions and integrated spectral fluxes for disks around a typical white dwarf and a typical neutron star, under the assumption that each element of the disk locally radiates as a blackbody. In addition, the disks' integrated UBV colors are calculated using the grid colors for real model atmospheres calculated by Buser and Kurucz (1978) and the observed colors given by Allen (1973). In all the calculations the effect of radiation from one part of the disk on all the other parts is included.

  17. The diffusion of stars through phase space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binney, James; Lacey, Cedric

    1988-01-01

    An orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation has been derived to study the secular evolution of stellar systems with regular orbits and the heating of stellar disks. It is shown that a population of stars with an initially Maxwellian peculiar-velocity distribution will remain Maxwellian as it diffuses through orbit space only if: (1) a second-order diffusion tensor is proportional to epicycle energy; and (2) the population's velocity dispersion grows as the square root of time. Scattering by ephemeral spiral waves is able to account for the observed kinematics of the solar neighborhood only if the waves have wavelengths in excess of 9 kpc and constantly drifting pattern speeds.

  18. Geometry-induced asymmetric diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Robert S.; Packard, Norman; Schröter, Matthias; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    Past work has shown that ions can pass through a membrane more readily in one direction than the other. We demonstrate here in a model and an experiment that for a mixture of small and large particles such asymmetric diffusion can arise solely from an asymmetry in the geometry of the pores of the membrane. Our deterministic simulation considers a two-dimensional gas of elastic disks of two sizes diffusing through a membrane, and our laboratory experiment examines the diffusion of glass beads of two sizes through a metal membrane. In both experiment and simulation, the membrane is permeable only to the smaller particles, and the asymmetric pores lead to an asymmetry in the diffusion rates of these particles. The presence of even a small percentage of large particles can clog a membrane, preventing passage of the small particles in one direction while permitting free flow of the small particles in the other direction. The purely geometric kinetic constraints may play a role in common biological contexts such as membrane ion channels. PMID:17522257

  19. Warped circumbinary disks in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-07-20

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10{sup –2} pc to 10{sup –4} pc for 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.

  20. Warped Circumbinary Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-07-01

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10-2 pc to 10-4 pc for 107 M ⊙ black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.

  1. Comparative evaluation of chromogenic agar medium and conventional culture system for isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Laila; Haque, Rezwana; Salam, Md. Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Urine is the most frequent specimen received for culture/sensitivity by clinical laboratories. The microbiological performance of HiCrome UTI agar medium was compared with Blood agar and MacConkey agar for isolation and presumptive identification of bacteria from urine culture. Methods: A total of 443 consecutively collected midstream and/or catheter-catch urine samples from patients attending the Islami Bank Medical College Hospital, Rajshahi, Bangladesh during January to December, 2012 were cultured. Urine samples showing pus cells ≥ 5/HPF were inoculated on to Blood agar (BA), MacConkey agar (MAC) and HiCrome UTI agar (CA) media simultaneously and incubated overnight aerobically at 370C. Rate of isolation and presumptive identification of bacterial species were compared for different media. Results: Culture yielded a total of 199 bacterial isolates from 189 (42.67%) positive plates including 179 (40.40%) unimicrobial and 10 (2.26%) polymicrobial (mixed growth of pair of bacteria) growths. Both HiCrome UTI agar and Blood agar media supported 100% growths while 151 (75.88%) growths were observed on MacConkey agar. The rate of presumptive identification was found significantly higher on HiCrome UTI agar (97.49%) than MAC agar (67.34%) (P<0.001) as primary urine culture medium. Of 199 isolates, E. coli was found to be the leading uropathogen isolated from 118 (59.30%) samples with its presumptive identification rate of 95.76%, 93.22% and 5.93% on CA, MAC and BA respectively. All 10 (100%) polymicrobial growths were demonstrated distinctly on CA against only 01(10%) on each BA and MAC. Conclusion: HiCrome UTI agar was found to be more useful as primary urine culture medium in both higher rate of isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens in comparison to conventional media. Its inherent characteristics in demonstrating polymicrobial growth and ease of rapid identification by distinct colony colour are unique. PMID:25225521

  2. Accretion disks in Algols: Progenitors and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rensbergen, W.; De Greve, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Context. There are only a few Algols with measured accretion disk parameters. These measurements provide additional constraints for tracing the origin of individual systems, narrowing down the initial parameter space. Aims: We investigate the origin and evolution of six Algol systems with accretion disks to find the initial parameters and evolutionary constraints for them. Methods: With a modified binary evolution code, series of close binary evolution are calculated to obtain the best match for observed individual systems. Results: Initial parameters for six Algol systems with accretion disks were determined matching both the present system parameters and the observed disk characteristics. Conclusions: When Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) starts during core hydrogen burning of the donor, the disk lifetime was found to be short. The disk luminosity is comparable to the luminosity of the gainer during a large fraction of the disk lifetime.

  3. The effects of nutrient chemotaxis on bacterial aggregation patterns with non-linear degenerate cross diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, J. Francisco; Málaga, Carlos; Plaza, Ramón G.

    2013-11-01

    This paper studies a reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis model for bacterial aggregation patterns on the surface of thin agar plates. It is based on the non-linear degenerate cross diffusion model proposed by Kawasaki et al. (1997) [5] and it includes a suitable nutrient chemotactic term compatible with such type of diffusion, as suggested by Ben-Jacob et al. (2000) [20]. An asymptotic estimation predicts the growth velocity of the colony envelope as a function of both the nutrient concentration and the chemotactic sensitivity. It is shown that the growth velocity is an increasing function of the chemotactic sensitivity. High resolution numerical simulations using Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), which include noise in the diffusion coefficient for the bacteria, are presented. The numerical results verify that the chemotactic term enhances the velocity of propagation of the colony envelope. In addition, the chemotaxis seems to stabilize the formation of branches in the soft-agar, low-nutrient regime.

  4. Herschel evidence for disk flattening or gas depletion in transitional disks

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J. T.; Pascucci, I.; Espaillat, C.; Woitke, P.; Andrews, S.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Meeus, G.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2014-06-01

    Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks characterized by reduced near- and mid-infrared emission, with respect to full disks. This characteristic spectral energy distribution indicates the presence of an optically thin inner cavity within the dust disk believed to mark the disappearance of the primordial massive disk. We present new Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of [O I] 63.18 μm for 21 transitional disks. Our survey complements the larger Herschel GASPS program ({sup G}as in Protoplanetary Systems{sup )} by quadrupling the number of transitional disks observed with PACS in this wavelength. [O I] 63.18 μm traces material in the outer regions of the disk, beyond the inner cavity of most transitional disks. We find that transitional disks have [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities ∼2 times fainter than their full disk counterparts. We self-consistently determine various stellar properties (e.g., bolometric luminosity, FUV excess, etc.) and disk properties (e.g., disk dust mass, etc.) that could influence the [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosity, and we find no correlations that can explain the lower [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities in transitional disks. Using a grid of thermo-chemical protoplanetary disk models, we conclude that either transitional disks are less flared than full disks or they possess lower gas-to-dust ratios due to a depletion of gas mass. This result suggests that transitional disks are more evolved than their full disk counterparts, possibly even at large radii.

  5. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  6. C2D Spitzer-IRS spectra of disks around T Tauri stars. V. Spectral decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Merín, B.; Grosso, N.; Ménard, F.; Blake, G. A.; Monin, J.-L.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Dust particles evolve in size and lattice structure in protoplanetary disks, due to coagulation, fragmentation and crystallization, and are radially and vertically mixed in disks due to turbulent diffusion and wind/radiation pressure forces. Aims: This paper aims at determining the mineralogical composition and size distribution of the dust grains in planet forming regions of disks around a statistical sample of 58 T Tauri stars observed with Spitzer/IRS as part of the Cores to Disks (c2d) Legacy Program. Methods: We present a spectral decomposition model, named “B2C”, that reproduces the IRS spectra over the full spectral range (5-35 μm). The model assumes two dust populations: a warm component responsible for the 10 μm emission arising from the disk inner regions (≲1 AU) and a colder component responsible for the 20-30 μm emission, arising from more distant regions (≲10 AU). The fitting strategy relies on a random exploration of parameter space coupled with a Bayesian inference method. Results: We show evidence for a significant size distribution flattening in the atmospheres of disks compared to the typical MRN distribution, providing an explanation for the usual flat, boxy 10 μm feature profile generally observed in T Tauri star spectra. We reexamine the crystallinity paradox, observationally identified by Olofsson et al. (2009 , A&A, 507, 327), and we find a simultaneous enrichment of the crystallinity in both the warm and cold regions, while grain sizes in both components are uncorrelated. We show that flat disks tend to have larger grains than flared disk. Finally our modeling results do not show evidence for any correlations between the crystallinity and either the star spectral type, or the X-ray luminosity (for a subset of the sample). Conclusions: The size distribution flattening may suggests that grain coagulation is a slightly more effective process than fragmentation (helped by turbulent diffusion) in disk atmospheres, and that

  7. Advanced optical disk storage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haritatos, Fred N.

    1996-01-01

    There is a growing need within the Air Force for more and better data storage solutions. Rome Laboratory, the Air Force's Center of Excellence for C3I technology, has sponsored the development of a number of operational prototypes to deal with this growing problem. This paper will briefly summarize the various prototype developments with examples of full mil-spec and best commercial practice. These prototypes have successfully operated under severe space, airborne and tactical field environments. From a technical perspective these prototypes have included rewritable optical media ranging from a 5.25-inch diameter format up to the 14-inch diameter disk format. Implementations include an airborne sensor recorder, a deployable optical jukebox and a parallel array of optical disk drives. They include stand-alone peripheral devices to centralized, hierarchical storage management systems for distributed data processing applications.

  8. Spaceflight optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Thomas A.; Rinsland, Pamela L.

    1990-01-01

    A NASA program to develop a high performance (high rate, high capacity) rewriteable optical disk recorder for spaceflight applications is presented. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk drive modules and a modular controller. Drive performance goals are 10 Gbyte capacity, 300 Mb transfer rate, 10 to the -12th corrected bit-error rate, and 150 msec access time. The preliminary design for an expandable controller is presented. System goals are up to 160 Gbyte capacity at up to 1.8 Gb/sec rate with concurrent I/O, asynchronous data transfer, and 2-5-year operating life in orbit. Projected system environment and operational scenarios based on Polar Orbiting Platform applications are discussed.

  9. Development report for dual-burst disks

    SciTech Connect

    Fusco, A.M.

    1996-11-01

    Burst disks, commonly used in pressure relief applications, were studied as single-use valves. A dual-burst disk design was chosen for primary investigation for systems involving separation of gases of two significantly different pressures. The two disks are used to seal either end of a piston cavity that has a different cross-sectional area on each side. Different piston surface areas are used to maintain hydrostatic equilibrium, P{sub 1}A{sub 1} = P{sub 2}A{sub 2}. The single-use valve functions when the downstream pressure is reduced to approximately atmospheric pressure, creating a pressure differential that causes the burst disks to fail. Several parameters were studied to determine the optimum design of the burst disk. These parameters include thickness, diameter, area/pressure ratio, scoring, and disk geometry. The disk material was limited to 304L stainless steel. Factors that were considered essential to the optimization of the design were robustness, manufacturability, and burst pressure variability. The thicknesses of the disks that were studied range from 0.003 in. to 0.010 in. A model for predicting burst pressures of the burst disks was derived. The model combines membrane stress theory with force/displacement data to predict the burst pressure of various designs to within {+-}10%. This model results from studies that characterize the behavior of individual small and large disks. Welding techniques used to join the dual-disk assembly are discussed. Laser welds are used to join and seal the disks to the bulkhead. These welds were optimized for repeatability and robustness. Resistance upset welding is suggested for joining the dual-disk assembly to the pressure vessel body. Resistance upset weld parameters were developed for this particular design so as to minimize the side effects on the burst-disk performance and to provide high-quality welds.

  10. Parallel Readout of Optical Disks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    computing , several types of neural networks including optical and optoelectronic neural networks, image classifiers, and image correlators. 14...memory with possibly a huge storage capacity. A " neural network is an example of a massively par- allel computer architecture that maps well to...image correlator and holograms stored on the disk may serve as interconnect patterns for hybrid optical/ VLSI based neural net- works. In this paper

  11. Solar disk sextant optical configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Sofia, S.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a plausible configuration for the solar disk sextant, an instrument to be used to monitor the solar diameter, is evaluated. Overall system requirements are evaluated, and tolerable uncertainties are obtained. It is concluded that by using a beam splitting wedge, a folded optics design can be used to measure the solar diameter to an accuracy of 10 to the -6th, despite the greater aberrations present in such optical systems.

  12. The WEAVE disk dynamics survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famaey, B.; Antoja, T.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Siebert, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Di Matteo, P.; Figueras, F.; Fragkoudi, F.; Garzon-Lopez, F.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C.; Martinez-Valpuesta, I.; Monari, G.; Mor-Crespo, R.; Hill, V.

    2016-12-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope. It consists of a multi-object fibre spectrograph with a 2°-diameter field of view that can obtain ˜ 1000 spectra simultaneously. The "WEAVE Galactic Archaeology survey" is the survey focused on the Milky Way, as a complement to the Gaia space mission, and will start operating in early 2018. This survey is subdivided in four sub-surveys, among which the "WEAVE disk dynamics survey". This survey plans to measure the radial velocities (and abundances as far as possible) of ˜ 10^6 stars with magnitude 15disk to unravel the detailed features of its gravitational potential. In particular, the non-axisymmetric perturbations such as the bar and spiral arms, are among the main drivers of the evolution of the Galactic disks. Questions (i) about their nature - e.g., are these features transient, quasi-stationary, or do both types co-exist? - (ii) about their detailed structure and dynamics - e.g., is the bar short or long, what is its pattern speed? -, as well as (iii) about their influence on secular processes such as stellar radial migration are essential elements for a better understanding of the chemo-dynamical evolution of our Galaxy, and of galaxies in general. This survey is designed to answer these questions.

  13. A Pulsar and a Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  14. Organic Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Erika; Horne, David; Shenoy, Sachindev; Blake, Daniel; van Brunt, Kari; Brittain, Sean; Rettig, Terrence

    2008-08-01

    We propose to use NIRSPEC to search for organic molecules in circumstellar disks toward nearly edge-on T Tauri stars. The feasibility of this study has been recently illustrated by the NIRSPEC detection of HCN toward two edge-on T Tauri stars, GV Tau (Gibb et al. 2007) and IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006), and Spitzer detections of C_2H_2, HCN, and CO_2 toward IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006) and AA Tau (Carr & Najita 2008). We have selected 10 molecules that are predicted to be abundant based on chemical models, observations of high and low mass star forming regions, and comet comae. We will investigate compositional variations among the T Tauri population and compare that to comets and chemical models of disk chemistry. Through this, we can explore the chemistry occurring in the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks and investigate the evolution of organic volatiles, which can help establish the mechanism and timescale for planet formation.

  15. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  16. High accuracy diffuse horizontal irradiance measurements without a shadowband

    SciTech Connect

    Schlemmer, J.A; Michalsky, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    The standard method for measuring diffuse horizontal irradiance uses a fixed shadowband to block direct solar radiation. This method requires a correction for the excess skylight blocked by the band, and this correction varies with sky conditions. Alternately, diffuse horizontal irradiance may be calculated from total horizontal and direct normal irradiance. This method is in error because of angular (cosine) response of the total horizontal pyranometer to direct beam irradiance. This paper describes an improved calculation of diffuse horizontal irradiance from total horizontal and direct normal irradiance using a predetermination of the angular response of the total horizontal pyranometer. We compare these diffuse horizontal irradiance calculations with measurements made with a shading-disk pyranometer that shields direct irradiance using a tracking disk. Results indicate significant improvement in most cases. Remaining disagreement most likely arises from undetected tracking errors and instrument leveling.

  17. Comparison of performance of the novel chromogenic spectra VRE agar to that of bile esculin azide and Campylobacter agars for detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S G; Raskoshina, L; Schuetz, A N

    2011-11-01

    A total of 142 stool specimens were evaluated for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE). Twenty-four-hour sensitivities and specificities, respectively, were 98% and 95% for Spectra VRE chromogenic agar (Remel, Lenexa, KS), 86% and 92% for bile esculin azide with vancomycin (BEAV; Remel), and 96.5% and 92% for Campylobacter agar (CAMPY; Remel). Spectra VRE and CAMPY are significantly more sensitive at 24 h than BEAV.

  18. Water in Protoplanetary Disks: Deuteration and Turbulent Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Nomura, Hideko; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-12-01

    We investigate water and deuterated water chemistry in turbulent protoplanetary disks. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking turbulent mixing in a vertical direction. Water near the midplane is transported to the disk atmosphere by turbulence and is destroyed by photoreactions to produce atomic oxygen, while the atomic oxygen is transported to the midplane and reforms water and/or other molecules. We find that this cycle significantly decreases column densities of water ice at r <~ 30 AU, where dust temperatures are too high to reform water ice effectively. The radial extent of such region depends on the desorption energy of atomic hydrogen. Our model indicates that water ice could be deficient even outside the sublimation radius. Outside this radius, the cycle decreases the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio of water ice from ~2 × 10-2, which is set by the collapsing core model, to 10-4-10-2 in 106 yr, without significantly decreasing the water ice column density. The resultant D/H ratios depend on the strength of mixing and the radial distance from the central star. Our finding suggests that the D/H ratio of cometary water (~10-4) could be established (i.e., cometary water could be formed) in the solar nebula, even if the D/H ratio of water ice delivered to the disk was very high (~10-2).

  19. Magnetized Accretion and Dead Zones in Protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Turner, Neal J.; Henning, Thomas; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-07-01

    The edges of magnetically-dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically-active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically-active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the parameters like dust-to-gas ratio. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish-tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freeze-out line. Here, we provide the fitting formula for the metal line and consider the cojoint impact of metal ans snow lines on the shape of the dead zone.

  20. Temperature fluctuations driven by magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Yang, Chao-Chin E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se

    2014-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.