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Sample records for agar layer method

  1. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  2. Simplified 48-hour IMVic test: an agar plate method.

    PubMed

    Powers, E M; Latt, T G

    1977-09-01

    An agar plate method was developed for the performance of the IMVic (indole, methyl red, Voges-Proskauer, and citrate) tests in lieu of the conventional tubed liquid media. By modifying the composition of the media and adding agar, a single "X"-compartmented petri dish was prepared containing all four IMVic test media. Ease of performance and simplification of the test were achieved by inoculating all four media simultaneously from a single colony (single inoculum) on eosin-methylene blue agar. Tests with 87 cultures, representing 7 genera in the family Enterobacteriaceae, were completed with typical (correct) IMVic patterns for all cultures within 48 h. Parallel tests with conventional media showed that the agar plate method was superior, more sensitive, faster, and simpler to perform, and less time was required to identify Escherichia coli by 72 h. PMID:334074

  3. A modified agar plate method for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Kasuya, S; Khamboonruang, C; Sukhavat, K; Ieda, M; Takatsuka, N; Kita, K; Ohtomo, H

    1991-10-01

    The agar plate method is a new technique with high detection rates for coprological diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. This report details modifications of the technique and establishes a standardized procedure. We recommend that all plates should be carefully observed using a microscope because macroscopic observation can lead to false negative results. It is also advisable to pour formalin solution directly into microscopically positive dishes to collect worms by sedimentation. This procedure enables one to observe worms otherwise hidden. Sealing dishes with adhesive tape prevents larvae from crawling out of the dishes, eliminating any possibility in the reduction of detection rates, and greatly improves the safety conditions for the technician performing the procedure. We consider the agar plate method to be superior to the filter paper method in detecting Strongyloides, and we believe that it will eventually become the technique of choice. PMID:1951861

  4. Total Antioxidant Capacity of Serum Determined Using the Potassium Permanganate Agar Method Based on Serum Diffusion in Agar.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Meijuan; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a new method for determining total antioxidants in serum and to evaluate the total antioxidant capacity of organisms. Design and Methods. Sodium hyposulfite (Na2S2O3) and serum were used to evaluate the linearity and precision of the potassium permanganate agar method. The area of serum diffusion in samples from 30 intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with 44 healthy subjects was determined by the potassium permanganate agar method. Results. The linearity (R (2) in the linear experiment of Na2S2O3 was 0.994; R (2) in the linear experiment of serum was 0.987) and precision (coefficient of variation of area of high level serum diffusion within-run, between-run, and between-day and coefficient of variation of area of low serum diffusion within-run, between-run, and between-day were all less than 10%) were acceptable using the potassium permanganate agar method. Total antioxidants of serum between the ICU group and the healthy group were different (p = 0.002, two tailed). Conclusions. Total antioxidants in serum can be determined by the potassium permanganate agar method. The total antioxidant capacity of an organism can be evaluated by the amount of total antioxidants in serum. PMID:26347595

  5. Total Antioxidant Capacity of Serum Determined Using the Potassium Permanganate Agar Method Based on Serum Diffusion in Agar

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Meijuan; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a new method for determining total antioxidants in serum and to evaluate the total antioxidant capacity of organisms. Design and Methods. Sodium hyposulfite (Na2S2O3) and serum were used to evaluate the linearity and precision of the potassium permanganate agar method. The area of serum diffusion in samples from 30 intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with 44 healthy subjects was determined by the potassium permanganate agar method. Results. The linearity (R2 in the linear experiment of Na2S2O3 was 0.994; R2 in the linear experiment of serum was 0.987) and precision (coefficient of variation of area of high level serum diffusion within-run, between-run, and between-day and coefficient of variation of area of low serum diffusion within-run, between-run, and between-day were all less than 10%) were acceptable using the potassium permanganate agar method. Total antioxidants of serum between the ICU group and the healthy group were different (p = 0.002, two tailed). Conclusions. Total antioxidants in serum can be determined by the potassium permanganate agar method. The total antioxidant capacity of an organism can be evaluated by the amount of total antioxidants in serum. PMID:26347595

  6. Improved agar diffusion method for detecting residual antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C E; Kondo, F

    2001-03-01

    The improved agar diffusion method for determination of residual antimicrobial agents was investigated, and the sensitivities of various combinations of test organisms and assay media were determined using 7 organisms, 5 media, and 31 antimicrobial agents. Bacillus stearothermophilus and synthetic assay medium (SAM) showed the greatest sensitivity for screening penicillins (penicillin G and ampicillin). The combination of Bacillus subtilis and minimum medium (MM) was the most sensitive for tetracyclines (oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline), B. stearothermophilus and SAM or Micrococcus luteus and Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA) for detecting tylosin and erythromycin, B. subtilis and MHA for aminoglycosides (streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and dihydrostreptomycin), B. stearothermophilus and SAM for polyethers (salinomycin and lasalocid), and B. subtilis and MM or Clostridium perfringens and GAM for polypeptides (thiopeptin, enramycin, virginiamycin, and bacitracin). However, gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli ATCC 27166 and MM were better for screening for colistin and polymixin-B. For detecting the synthetic drugs tested, the best combination was B. subtilis and MM for sulfonamides, E. coli 27166 and MM for quinolones (oxolinic acid and nalidixic acid), B. subtilis and MM for furans (furazolidone), and the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum and luminescence assay medium for chloramphenicol and oxolinic acid. The results showed that the use of four assay plates, B. stearothermophilus and SAM, B. subtilis and MM, M. luteus and MHA, and E. coli 27166 and MM, was superior to the currently available techniques for screening for residual antimicrobial agents in edible animal tissues. PMID:11252480

  7. The Resazurin-Agar Method - a Quick Test to Determine Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckfeldt, J.; Westphal, B.; Claußen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Rezasurin has been used as a smart tracer in stream ecosystems to indicate metabolic activity, specifically aerobic respiration by heterotrophic bacteria. Resazurin is a blue compound which is irreversibly reduced to the pink resorufin in the presence of aerobic bacteria. The degree and speed of colour change from blue to pink is a measure of the degree of oxygen consumption and thus an indirect indication of the concentration of aerobic bacteria in a given medium. A high concentration of bacteria in water indicates a bad water quality. In our work a method was developed using resazurin agar plates to find a quick and easy way for testing water quality and comparing concentrations of bacteria in freshwater and seawater samples. The theory was to concentrate bacteria from a defined volume of water sample onto polycarbonate filters (0.2 μm), which are then placed onto the resazurin agar plate. The presence of aerobic bacteria on the filter will reduce the resazurin in the agar and the compound changes its colour. First tests conducted with different dilutions of a pure culture of yoghurt bacteria showed promising results and confirmed the feasibility of the method. In a further assay, we used water samples from different water layers and different temperatures and were also able to observe differences in the concentration of bacteria, depending on these different environmental conditions.The assay was also successfully used with seawater samples, collected from 2 different stations at 3 different depths in the Baltic Sea (salinity=15). The discolouration of the plates showed good correlation with the oxygen concentrations in the water. The resazurin-agar plate method is economical and fast. Several samples could be investigated at the same time without sacrificing the reliability of the results. Thus it is a good pre-screening test for a quantitative evaluation of bacteria in a water sample.

  8. Comparative performance of Thin Layer Agar and Löwenstein-Jensen culture for diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Battaglioli, T; Rintiswati, N; Martin, A; Palupi, K R; Bernaerts, G; Dwihardiani, B; Ahmad, R A; Matthys, F; Mahendradhata, Y; Van der Stuyft, P

    2013-11-01

    Sputum smear microscopy for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is cheap and simple but its sensitivity is low. Culture on Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) is more sensitive but it takes a long time to yield results. Thin-Layer Agar (TLA) culture was suggested as an equally sensitive and faster alternative. We evaluated the performance of TLA for diagnosing TB in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. People with suspected TB presenting from July 2010 to July 2011 to two chest clinics of the National TB Control Programme network of Jogjakarta were eligible for inclusion. A sputum sample was sent to the Gadjah Mada University microbiology laboratory for concentration, smearing, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture on LJ and TLA. Sensitivity of cultures was evaluated against a composite reference standard (any positive culture). Time to detection of Mycobacteria was recorded. Out of 1414 samples, 164 (12%) were smear positive, 99 (7%) were scanty and 1151 (81%) were negative. On TLA and LJ respectively, 168 (12%) and 149 (11%) samples were positive, 72 (5%) and 32 (2%) were contaminated (κ = 0.64; 95% CI 0.59-0.69, p <0.01). Using the reference standard, 196 (14%) TB cases were identified. The sensitivity of TLA was 0.86 (95% CI 0.80-0.90), significantly higher (p 0.03) than for LJ (0.76; 95% CI 0.69-0.81). The median time to detection in days was significantly shorter (p <0.01) for TLA (12; 95% CI 11-13) than for LJ (44; 95% CI 43-45). TLA is a rapid and sensitive method for the diagnosis of TB. Implementation studies to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and impact of its introduction into programmatic settings are urgently needed. PMID:23738759

  9. Serogroup identification of Neisseria meningitidis: comparison of an antiserum agar method with bacterial slide agglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, D E; Frasch, C E; Robbins, J B; Feldman, H A

    1978-01-01

    A serum agar method for serogrouping Neisseria meningitidis is described and compared with conventional bacterial slide agglutination. There was 93% agreement for 300 strains examined individually by each method. Among strains from serogroups A, B, C, Y, and W135, there was 100% correlation, whereas strains from serogroup 29E (Z') had only 67% correlation. The serum agar method was rapid, as well as easy to perform and interpret. The potential benefits of this method for epidemiological studies and reference laboratories processing large numbers of meningococcal isolates are emphasized. Images PMID:96123

  10. Preparation and characterization of bio-nanocomposite films of agar and silver nanoparticles: laser ablation method.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Jong-Whan; Wang, Long-Feng; Lee, Yonghoon; Hong, Seok-In

    2014-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by a laser ablation method and composite films with the AgNPs and agar were prepared by solvent casting method. UV-vis absorbance test and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis results revealed that non-agglomerated spherical AgNPs were formed by the laser ablation method. The surface color of the resulting agar/AgNPs films exhibited the characteristic plasmonic effect of the AgNPs with the maximum absorption peaks of 400-407 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) test results also exhibited characteristic AgNPs crystals with diffraction peaks observed at 2θ values of 38.39°, 44.49°, and 64.45°, which were corresponding to (111), (200), and (220) crystallographic planes of face-centered cubic (fcc) silver crystals, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results showed that thermal stability of the agar/AgNPs composite films was increased by the inclusion of metallic silver. Water vapor barrier properties and surface hydrophobicity of the agar/AgNPs films increased slightly with the increase in AgNPs content but they were not statistically significant (p>0.05), while mechanical strength and stiffness of the composite films decreased slightly (p<0.05). The agar/AgNPs films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli O157:H7) bacterial pathogens. PMID:24528754

  11. MODIFIED AGAR MEDIUM FOR DETECTING ENVIRONMENTAL SALMONELLAE BY THE MOST-PROBABLE-NUMBER METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonellae in the environment remain a potential source of disease. Low numbers of salmonellae have been detected and enumerated from environmental samples by most probable number methods that require careful colony selection from plated agar medium. A modified xylose lysine bri...

  12. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Shim, In-Bo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2005-05-01

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe 3O 4 and SrFe 12O 19 ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic.

  13. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus

    PubMed Central

    Cold, Emma R.; Freyria, Nastasia J.; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS– 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS– 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications. PMID:27149378

  14. Agar Plate Method for Detection and Enumeration of Alkylbenzenesulfonate-Degrading Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Ohwada, Kouichi

    1975-01-01

    A simple method for detection and enumeration of alkylbenzenesulfonate (ABS)-degrading microorganisms by using agar plates was developed and used in microbiological studies of coastal marine and polluted river waters. The method depends upon the color responses of neutral red in alkaline medium. Neutral red changes from pink, when it enters into ABS micelles, to yellow, when the ABS is degraded, and does not form micelles. When neutral red-tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane buffer solution and then cationic surfactant solution were sprayed onto the agar surface of ABS-nutrient agar cultures, transparent haloes appeared around the colonies of ABS-degrading microorganisms against a pink background. Viable counts of ABS-degrading bacteria isolated from both seawater and freshwater environments were considerably higher in polluted waters than in less polluted areas. Viable counts of ABS-degrading bacteria averaged 1.5 × 105/ml in samples from the surface water of polluted Tokyo Bay and 3.0 × 104/ml in samples from the surface water of polluted Tamagawa River but were fewer in number in samples from less polluted waters. Images PMID:234155

  15. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus.

    PubMed

    Cold, Emma R; Freyria, Nastasia J; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications. PMID:27149378

  16. Agar disk elution method for susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium fortuitum complex to sulfonamides and antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, M S; Wallace, R J; Swenson, J M; Thornsberry, C; Christensen, L A

    1983-01-01

    An agar disk elution method using round well plates, supplemented Mueller-Hinton agar, and commercial drug disks is described for susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium marinum and the rapidly growing mycobacteria to antibiotics and sulfonamides. By this method, 14 of 14 strains of M. marinum were susceptible to rifampin, doxycycline, minocycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Identical results were obtained with Middlebrook 7H10 agar and drugs prepared from standard powders. With 58 isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonei, this method had a 92% correlation with broth minimal inhibitory concentration determinations for cefoxitin and greater than 98% for doxycycline, kanamycin, amikacin, and the sulfonamides. Sixty-nine percent of isolates of M. chelonei susceptible to amikacin on supplemented Mueller-Hinton agar were resistant on 7H10 agar, and 15 of 16 M. chelonei isolates susceptible to erythromycin in broth were resistant by disk elution when an endpoint of no growth was used with either agar. The agar disk elution method offers a practical method for testing of most antibacterial agents against these mycobacterial species. Images PMID:6651277

  17. Evaluation of agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to determine the disinfectant susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyan; Yang, Qianru; Long, Mei; Guo, Lijuan; Li, Bei; Meng, Yue; Zhang, Anyun; Wang, Hongning; Liu, Shuliang; Zou, Likou

    2015-11-01

    A variety of disinfectants have been widely used in veterinary hygiene, food industries and environments, which could induce the development of bacterial resistance to disinfectants. The methods used to investigate antimicrobial effects of disinfectant vary considerably among studies, making comparisons difficult. In this study, agar dilution and broth microdilution methods were used to compare the antimicrobial activities of four quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) against foodborne and zoonotic pathogens. The potential relationship between the presence of QACs resistance genes and phenotypic resistance to QACs was also investigated. Our results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by two methods might be different depended upon different QACs and bacteria applied. Regardless of the testing methods, Klebsiella pneumoniae was more tolerant among Gram-negative strains to four QACs, followed by Salmonella and Escherichia coli. The agreement between MICs obtained by the two methods was good, for benzalkonium chloride (78.15%), didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) (82.35%), cetylpyridinium chloride (CTPC) (97.48%) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) (99.16%), respectively. Among all Gram-negative bacteria, 94.55% (n=52) of qacEΔ1-positive strains showed higher MICs (512 mg l(-1)) to CTAB. The qacEΔ1 gene was highly associated (P<0.05) with the high MICs of QACs (⩾512 mg l(-1)). In addition, DDAC remained as the most effective disinfectant against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This is the first study that compared the agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to assess the antimicrobial activity of QACs. The study demonstrated the need to standardize method that would be used in evaluating QACs antimicrobial properties in the future. PMID:25944532

  18. Modified agar dilution susceptibility testing method for determining in vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Jono, K; Okonogi, K

    1997-01-01

    In vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds, against yeasts were easily determined by using RPMI-1640 agar medium and by incubating the plates in the presence of 20% CO2. The end point of inhibition was clear by this method, even in the case of azole compounds, because of the almost complete inhibition of yeast growth at high concentrations which permitted weak growth of some Candida strains by traditional methods. MICs obtained by the agar dilution method were similar to those obtained by the broth dilution method proposed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. PMID:9174197

  19. Inaccuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method Compared with the Agar Dilution Method for Susceptibility Testing of Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kotilainen, Pirkko; Puukka, Pauli; Nakari, Ulla-Maija; Siitonen, Anja; Eerola, Erkki; Huovinen, Pentti; Hakanen, Antti J.

    2012-01-01

    The agar dilution method has been standardized by the CLSI for the susceptibility testing of Campylobacter species, and according to these standards, the disk diffusion method should be used only in screening for macrolide and ciprofloxacin resistance. Nevertheless, the disk diffusion test is currently widely used, since it is easy to perform in clinical microbiology laboratories. In this study, the disk diffusion method was compared to the agar dilution method by analyzing the in vitro activities of seven antimicrobial agents against 174 Campylobacter strains collected in Finland between 2003 and 2008. Recommendations of the CLSI were followed using Mueller-Hinton agar plates with 5% of sheep blood. For each strain, the disk diffusion tests were performed two to four times. Of the 33 erythromycin-resistant strains (MIC, ≥16 μg/ml), 24 (73%) constantly showed a 6-mm erythromycin inhibition zone (i.e., no inhibition), while for seven strains the inhibition zone varied from 6 to 44 mm in repeated measurements. Among the 141 erythromycin-susceptible strains (MIC, <16 μg/ml), erythromycin inhibition zones varied between 6 and 61 mm. Of the 87 ciprofloxacin-resistant strains, 47 (54%) showed 6-mm inhibition zones, while 40 strains showed inhibition zones between 6 and 60 mm. Significant differences between the repetitions were observed in the disk diffusion for all antimicrobial agents and all strains except for the macrolide-resistant strains regarding the macrolides. For 17 (10%) strains, the variation in repeated measurements was substantial. These results show that the disk diffusion method may not be a reliable tool for the susceptibility testing of Campylobacter spp. Further studies are needed to assess whether the disk diffusion test could be improved or whether all susceptibilities of campylobacters should be tested using an MIC-based method. PMID:22075583

  20. Susceptibilities of genital mycoplasmas to the newer quinolones as determined by the agar dilution method.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, G E; Hooton, T M; Roberts, M C; Cartwright, F D; Hoyt, J

    1989-01-01

    The increasing resistance of genital mycoplasmas to tetracycline poses a problem because tetracycline is one of the few antimicrobial agents active against Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, chlamydiae, gonococci, and other agents of genitourinary-tract disease. Since the quinolones are a promising group of antimicrobial agents, the susceptibilities of M. hominis and U. urealyticum to the newer 6-fluoroquinolones were determined by the agar dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, and ofloxacin had good activity against M. hominis, with the MIC for 50% of isolates tested (MIC50) being 1 microgram/ml. Fleroxacin, lomefloxacin, pefloxacin, and rosoxacin had MIC50s of 2 micrograms/ml. Enoxacin, norfloxacin, and amifloxacin had MIC50s of 8 to 16 micrograms/ml, and cinoxacin and nalidixic acid were inactive (MIC50, greater than or equal to 256 micrograms/ml). Overall, the activities of 6-fluoroquinolones for ureaplasmas were similar to those for M. hominis, with MICs being the same or twofold greater. The most active 6-fluoroquinolones against ureaplasmas were difloxacin, ofloxacin, and pefloxacin, with MIC50s of 1 to 2 micrograms/ml. Ciprofloxacin was unusual in that the MIC50 for M. hominis was 1 microgram/ml, whereas the MIC50 for ureaplasmas was 8 micrograms/ml. Since the MIC50s for the most active quinolones approximate achievable concentrations in blood and urine, quinolones have promise in treating mycoplasmal infections. PMID:2712541

  1. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of chelating agents using the agar diffusion method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of 2 metal chelators. Concentrations of 0 to 40 mM of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediamine-N,N’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) were prepared in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The pH of the solutions was adjusted to 1...

  2. A Method for Cell Culture and Maintenance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Agar Stab.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yeon-Jin; Lee, Jin-Young; Shin, So-Ra; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) are predominantly found and closely linked with geochemical cycling of nitrogen in non-extreme habitats. However, these strains have mainly been investigated using liquid cultures of enriched cells. Here, we provide an agar stab as a simple and reliable means of cultivating and maintaining AOA. PMID:26543273

  3. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strains using agar diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna B

    2011-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis is a common soil saprotroph and has been isolated from air, organic waste and also from plant, animal and human tissues. Scopulariopsis has mainly been associated in humans with superficial mycoses, but it has also been described as the cause of subcutaneous and invasive infections. The most common aetiological agent of infections in humans is Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. This species has been reported to be resistant in vitro to broad-spectrum antifungal agents available today. The aim of the study was to establish in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 35 S. brevicaulis strains against amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (FC), caspofungin (CAS), terbinafine (TER), ciclopirox (CIC), voriconazole (VOR), clotrimazole (CTR), miconazole (MCZ), econazole (ECO), ketoconazole (KET), itraconazole (ITR), and fluconazole (FLU). Antifungal susceptibility tests were evaluated by an agar diffusion method (Neo-Sensitabs, Rosco, Denmark). AMB, FC, CAS, ITR and FLU showed no antifungal activity against S. brevicaulis. TER, CIC, CTR, KET, VOR, ECO, and MCZ revealed inhibitory activity for S. brevicaulis, but it varied for each of the drugs. The best antifungal effect was observed for TER and CIC. All isolates had large inhibition zones for TER and CIC. CTR was also inhibitory for all tested S. brevicaulis isolates, but the diameters of inhibition zones were smaller than for TER and CIC. Nearly 89% isolates showed inhibition zones for KET and the mean diameter of the inhibition zone was comparable to CTR. The least antifungal activity exhibited VQR, ECO and MCZ. Because of the multiresistance of S. brevicaulis, infections due to this species may not respond to particular antifungal treatment and other therapeutic approaches should be considered, e.g., combined therapy and/or surgery. PMID:21682097

  4. [Comparison of ertapenem-EMB Agar with traditional methods for screening carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from rectal swabs].

    PubMed

    Perçin, Duygu; Colakoğlu, Selcan; Durmaz, Süleyman; Ekincioğlu, Pınar

    2012-10-01

    Detection of rectal colonization with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is the most important step in the infection control protocols in order to prevent infections caused by CRKP which has an increasing incidence all over the world. In this study, it was aimed to compare the detection rate of 2 mg/L ertapenem EMB agar medium with the other methods recommended by various international guidelines. These methods include direct plate method using ertapenem disc, enrichment method in tryptic soy broth containing 2 mg/L ertapenem and the investigation of the predominant betalactamases in the colonized patients. The lowest inoculum detected by different methods was determined by using simulative challenge test prepared for this purpose. The ability to detect CRKP from rectal swabs was evaluated by using the clinical specimens of 801 patients. For all bacteria isolated, carbapenem susceptibility was evaluated by using E-test method, the presence of beta-lactamases was determined by using modified Hodge test (MHT), and the carbapenemase genes were investigated by using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lowest inoculum detected by ertapenem-EMB agar was 50 CFU/mL whereas the lowest inocula were 1 x 105 and 1 x 103, respectively by tryptic soy broth with ertapenem and direct plate method. No resistance gene were identified by PCR in 13 (39.4%) of 33 isolates, whereas blaOXA-48 was detected in 19 (95%) and blaIMP in 1 (5%) of 20 positive isolates. All of the positive strains were resistant to imipenem and ertapenem, while 2 (10%) strains were found to be susceptible to doripenem and meropenem. While MHT was negative in all strains which were negative for resistance genes, all resistance gene positive strains except one blaOXA-48 strain that was also sensitive to doripenem and meropenem, were found to be positive with MHT. According to the results of PCR, the sensitivities of the three methods were found to be 80%. The specificities, positive and

  5. Comparison of E-test with agar dilution methods in testing susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to azithromycin.

    PubMed

    Yasin, R M; Suan, K A; Meng, C Y

    1997-05-01

    A single dose of a new antibiotic, azithromycin, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of uncomplicated Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A clinical study was conducted to assess the in vitro susceptibility of N gonorrhoeae to azithromycin and compare the reliability of results obtained using the new E-test methodology for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antibiotic with those obtained through the standard agar dilution method. 135 clinical isolates of N gonorrhoeae were obtained from patients attending hospital-based sexually transmitted disease clinics in five geographic locations in Malaysia. 76 of the isolates were penicillinase-producing N gonorrhoeae and 69 were high-level tetracycline-resistant N gonorrhoeae. All isolates were susceptible to azithromycin based on the susceptible MIC breakpoint of 2.0 mcg/ml. The MICs ranged from 0.0078-0.25 mcg/ml by agar dilution method and from 0.016-0.50 mcg/ml by E-test. Agreement between these two methods was 97.8%. The single-dose regime and good antigonococcal and antichlamydial activity of azithromycin make this antibiotic a suitable treatment choice. Moreover, the findings of this study suggest that the simpler, faster E-test is as reliable as the agar dilution method. Given the tendency of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of N gonorrhoeae to change rapidly, it is important to monitor MICs to detect the emergence of resistance. PMID:9153733

  6. Final report from the Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, on the agar dilution method (2007).

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Ariaki; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Nagasawa, Zenzo

    2008-10-01

    In 1968, the agar dilution method was developed as an independent Japanese method for measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobial agents. As this method differed in a few respects from the MIC measurement methods used in other countries, it was revised in 1981, by a committee headed by Susumu Mitsuhashi, and the revised method (Chemotherapy 29:76-79, 1981) has been used since then. In 1979, an agar dilution method for measuring the MIC of anaerobes was developed by a committee chaired by Nozomu Kosakai (Chemotherapy 27:559-561, 1979). In 1990, a committee headed by Sachiko Goto approved a broth microdilution method for nonfastidious bacteria (Chemotherapy 38:102-105, 1990). Later, a committee headed by Atsushi Saito examined media that would be suitable for nonfastidious bacteria and fastidious bacteria, and they endeavored to prepare a broth microdilution method for anaerobic bacteria. In this context, a new broth microdilution method was proposed at the 40th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC) in Nagoya in 1992, and the proposal was adopted as the standard JSC method after some modification (Chemotherapy 41: 183-189, 1993). The agar dilution method has remained unrevised for approximately 20 years. A proposal to review this method was recently made, and the 2007 Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing was formed, comprising the JSC members listed below. Under the auspices of this committee, the method revised in 1981 was reviewed in comparison to the international standard method (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute [CLSI] method). PMID:18936894

  7. Use of urease-bromothymol blue-agar method for large-scale testing of urine on grain and seeds.

    PubMed

    Valdes, P A; Ziobro, G C; Ferrera, R S

    1996-01-01

    The current AOAC method (963.28) for large-scale (50 g) testing of urine on grain is based on the reaction of sodium in urine with magnesium uranyl acetate. Detection of sodium suggests that urine is present and that a test for urea is appropriate. Urea is detected with urease-bromothymol blue-paper and is confirmed through its reaction with xanthydrol to form dixanthylurea crystals, which are detected microscopically. The initial nonspecific test for sodium can be influenced by the presence of salt or other sodium compounds. Furthermore, the magnesium uranyl acetate spray used in Method 963.28 potentially exposes the analyst to the aerosol of a volatile, toxic uranium compound. Excess reagents and analyzed test portions must be disposed of as radioactive waste. In addition, Method 963.28 requires several steps to determine the presence of urea. The alternative AOAC method (972.41) tests for the presence of urea from urine on individual seeds. Urea is enzymatically decomposed to ammonia and carbon dioxide by urease. Liberated ammonia shifts the pH, changing the color of the indicator in the agar from yellow to blue. This study adapts Method 972.41 to larger test samples. Up to 25 g grains and seeds are sprayed with urease test agar instead of being individually immersed in the urease test agar. The modified method was used to analyze urea on seeds and grains of 24 plants from 4 families. The method has a limit of detection of one seed contaminated with 1 microgram urea. PMID:8757445

  8. Electro-osmosis in gels: Application to Agar-Agar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, Fabien; Boscus, Jérôme; Bénet, Jean-Claude

    2008-10-01

    Widely used in food- and bio-engineering as a reference material, Agar-Agar gel is the focus of an experimental investigation concerning the electro-osmosis phenomenon. After presenting the experimental methods, one trial is discussed in detail. A fair reproducibility of results is obtained, and the averaged electro-osmotic permeability is provided. This value lies in the range generally measured on various kind of soils, even if Agar-Agar gel does not share any micro-structural characteristics with soils. To cite this article: F. Cherblanc et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  9. Agar Block Smear Preparation: a Novel Method of Slide Preparation for Preservation of Native Fungal Structures for Microscopic Examination and Long-Term Storage▿

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Chui, Hon-Kit; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel method of fungal slide preparation named “agar block smear preparation.” A total of 510 agar block smears of 25 fungal strains obtained from culture collections, 90 QC fungal strains, and 82 clinical fungal strains from our clinical microbiology laboratory, which included a total of 137 species of yeasts, molds, and thermal dimorphic fungi, were prepared and examined. In contrast to adhesive tape preparation, agar block smears preserved the native fungal structures, such as intact conidiophores of Aspergillus species and arrangements of conidia in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. Furthermore, agar block smears allowed examination of fungal structures embedded in the agar, such as the ascomata with ascomal hairs in Chaetomium funicola; pycnidium of Phoma glomerata; the intercalary ovoidal chlamydospores arranged in chains of Fusarium dimerum; and the lateral, spherical chlamydospores arranged in pairs of Fusarium solani. After 1 year of storage, morphological integrity was found to have been maintained in 459 (90%) of the 510 agar block smears. After 3 years of storage, morphological integrity was found to have been maintained in 72 (71%) of the 102 smears prepared in 2006. Agar block smear preparation preserves the native fungal structures and allows long-term storage and examination of fungal structures embedded in the agar, hence overcoming the major drawbacks of adhesive tape preparation. The major roles of agar block smear should be diagnosis for difficult cases, accurate identification of fungal species for clinical management of patients and epidemiological studies, and long-term storage for transportation of slides and education purposes. PMID:20660221

  10. The agar diffusion scratch assay - A novel method to assess the bioactive and cytotoxic potential of new materials and compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pusnik, Mascha; Imeri, Minire; Deppierraz, Grégoire; Bruinink, Arie; Zinn, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    A profound in vitro evaluation not only of the cytotoxic but also of bioactive potential of a given compound or material is crucial for predicting potential effects in the in vivo situation. However, most of the current methods have weaknesses in either the quantitative or qualitative assessment of cytotoxicity and/or bioactivity of the test compound. Here we describe a novel assay combining the ISO 10993-5 agar diffusion test and the scratch also termed wound healing assay. In contrast to these original tests this assay is able to detect and distinguish between cytotoxic, cell migration modifying and cytotoxic plus cell migration modifying compounds, and this at higher sensitivity and in a quantitative way. PMID:26861591

  11. Comparison of different agar diffusion methods for the detection of residues in the kidneys of pigs treated with antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Korkeala, H; Sorvettula, O; Mäki-Petäys, O; Hirn, J

    1983-01-01

    Residue analyses of the kidneys of twenty-six pigs treated with various antimicrobial drugs 20 h before slaughter and of eleven untreated pigs were performed. The effects of storage temperature of the kidneys, and of sampling location, on the residue analysis were also studied. No method alone was sufficient for the detection of residues. Oxytetracycline residues could be detected at pH 6, dihydrostreptomycin residues at pH 8, and sulphonamide residues if trimethoprim was present in the medium. Chloramphenicol, penicillin G procaine, tylosin and lincomycin residues were not detectable with the methods used. The concentration of ampicillin decreased during the storage of samples at +4°C. Most methods also yielded zones of inhibition for the frozen kidneys from untreated pigs. It seems necessary to use agar media of two different pH values: the addition of trimethoprim to the medium is also needed. The use of fresh pig kidneys, and samples containing both kidney medulla and kidney cortex, is recommended in residue analysis. PMID:22055926

  12. A simple method for classification of antibiotics using ion exchange resins added to agar plates.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kondo, F

    1994-01-01

    Using two different ion-exchange resins (Dowex 50W-X4 as cation and Dowex 1-X4 as anion) added directly to assay plates seeded with Bacillus subtilis or Micrococcus luteus, the size of the inhibitory zone produced by 36 antimicrobial agents around a disc or cup was characterized into various types, such as acidic, basic or amphoteric. An increase of the inhibition zone following addition of 15% Dowex 50W-X4 was evident in penicillins except for ampicillin and penicillin-G, and polyethers. Aminoglycosides, macrolides and colistin, lincomycin, and sulphonamides on assay medium treated with Dowex 1-X4 showed a similar effect on the inhibition zone. Tetracyclines, virginiamycin, oxolinic acid and furazoridone revealed no effects on the inhibition zone with either of the resins. These antibiotics could be divided into various groups on the basis of their chemical structure. This simple and rapid method may be useful for routine laboratory testing of residual antibiotics in meat. PMID:8152391

  13. [Assessment of 2 automated microdilution techniques compared to an agar dilution method in determining sensitivity to fosfomycin in strains of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Gil-Romero, Yolanda; Regodón-Domínguez, Marta; Wilhelmi de Cal, Isabel; López-Fabal, Fátima; Gómez-Garcés, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems-resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates has been widely reported. Fosfomycin has been shown to act synergistically with other antimicrobials. The agar dilution method was approved for susceptibility testing for fosfomycin and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, broth microdilution methods are the basis of systems currently used in clinical microbiology laboratories. The results of this study indicate that these methods are acceptable as susceptibility testing methods for fosfomycin against these organisms. PMID:26620604

  14. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  15. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  16. Thin agar layer- versus most probable number-PCR to enumerate viable and stressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 and application in a traditional raw milk pasta filata cheese.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Vincenzina; Riccardi, Maria; Quero, Grazia Marina

    2012-09-17

    A mid-log phase broth culture of Escherichia (E.) coli O157:H7 381 (final concentration 10(4) cfu/mL) was monitored by conventional liquid- and solid-based enumeration techniques combined with PCR while it was subjected to thermal stress in gradually more complex systems (i.e., Tryptone Soya Broth, pasteurized milk and during lab-scale productions of a pasta filata fior di latte cheese obtained from raw or pasteurized milk). Our results highlighted: i) the incapability of the selective medium, ii) the effectiveness of the thin agar layer-PCR method, and iii) the effectiveness of the most probable number (MPN)-PCR method (in comparison with both plating-based methods) in recovering and selectively counting viable and stressed or injured E. coli O157:H7. Moreover, MPN-PCR was superior to both plating-based methods in terms of speed and easiness to get results. The thermal stresses herein applied (heating at 55 °C for 5 and 8 min) were less effective on the pasteurized milk than on the Tryptone Soya Broth and the pathogen was more protected in the raw milk-based matrices than in the pasteurized ones. Moreover, given the contamination level (10(4) cfu/mL of milk) of the strain, the temperature/time of stretching and the hardening and brining conditions herein used, the complete inactivation of the pathogen is not achievable. PMID:22906600

  17. Comparison of Sorbitol MacConkey Agar and a Two-Step Method Which Utilizes Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Toxin Testing and a Chromogenic Agar To Detect and Isolate Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Novicki, Thomas J.; Daly, Judy A.; Mottice, Susan L.; Carroll, Karen C.

    2000-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and specifically serotype O157:H7 are a significant cause of hemorrhagic gastrointestinal disease and the hemolytic uremic syndrome. Methods currently used in clinical microbiology labs, such as sorbitol-MacConkey (SMAC) agar, reliably detect only O157:H7. We have evaluated a two-step method that has the potential to identify and isolate all EHEC serotypes, including serotype O157:H7. This method utilizes a chromogenic selective-differential medium for the isolation of E. coli together with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects the Shiga-like toxins Stx1 and Stx2. Both are commercially available and usable in a wide range of clinical microbiology laboratories. Compared to a Vero cell cytotoxic assay, SMAC had sensitivities of 23.5% for the identification of all EHEC serotypes and of 50.0% for the identification of O157:H7 alone. The two-step method had sensitivities of 76.5 and 100%, respectively. The ELISA alone had a sensitivity of 82.4% in the detection of Stx1 and Stx2. The specificity was 100% in all cases. Overall, 14 EHEC isolates were obtained: 8 (58%) O157:H7, 2 (14%) O26, 2 (14%) O111:NM, 1 (7%) O103:H2, and 1 (7%) O121:H19. All but one were isolated during the months of May to September. The two-step method was found to be considerably more expensive than SMAC for both positive and negative samples. PMID:10655343

  18. Thin agar film for enhanced fungal growth and microscopic viewing in a new sealable fungal culture case.

    PubMed

    Hill, D R

    1996-09-01

    This project was undertaken to find ways to enhance fungus colony maturation, to make viewing of fungal cultures easier, and to reduce disruption of the fungal structures to be observed for identification. Accordingly, a technique using a thin (0.2-mm) agar film that avoids problems inherent in traditional methods of fungal culture and identification was developed. In addition, to accommodate the 0.2-mm layer of agar film and a contiguous thicker 4-mm section of agar, a sealable fungal culture case that fits within microscope stage calipers and under the objective lenses was invented. The growth and identification of 28 organisms were evaluated in the sealable fungal culture cases and on double-pour agar plates by using potato dextrose agar in both. Compared with results obtained with the double-pour agar plates (rated as "good"), fungal growth and identification with the sealable fungal culture case were superior (rated as "excellent") (P < 0.05, chi-square test). The thin agar film limits excessive mycelial growth, while it often promotes complete sporulation or other forms of maturation of the fungal colony. More importantly, the thin agar film allows direct microscopic viewing of the developing fungal colonies. The portion of the sealable fungal culture case with the 4-mm layer of agar can be used for evaluation of colony pigment and texture. In conclusion, this new sealable fungal culture case allows direct viewing and earlier fungal species identification with greater intrinsic safety. PMID:8862573

  19. Bacteria holding times for fecal coliform by mFC agar method and total coliform and Escherichia coli by Colilert®-18 Quanti-Tray® method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria holding-time experiments of up to 62 h were performed on five surface-water samples from four urban stream sites in the vicinity of Atlanta, GA, USA that had relatively high densities of coliform bacteria (Escherichia coli densities were all well above the US Environmental Protection Agency criterion of 126 colonies (100 ml) − 1 for recreational waters). Holding-time experiments were done for fecal coliform using the membrane filtration modified fecal coliform (mFC) agar method and for total coliform and E. coli using the Colilert®-18 Quanti-Tray® method. The precisions of these analytical methods were quantified. Precisions determined for fecal coliform indicated that the upper bound of the ideal range of counts could reasonably be extended upward and would improve precision. For the Colilert®-18 method, analytical precisions were similar to the theoretical precisions for this method. Fecal and total coliform densities did not change significantly with holding times up to about 27 h. Limited information indicated that fecal coliform densities might be stable for holding times of up to 62 h, whereas total coliform densities might not be stable for holding times greater than about 27 h. E. coli densities were stable for holding times of up to 18 h—a shorter period than indicated from a previous studies. These results should be applicable to non-regulatory monitoring sampling designs for similar urban surface-water sample types.

  20. Two-day hydrophobic grid membrane filter method for yeast and mold enumeration in foods using YM-11 agar: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Entis, P

    1996-01-01

    Twenty laboratories participated in a collaborative study to validate a 2-day hydrophobic grid membrane filter method using YM-11 agar for enumeration of yeast and mold in foods. Six naturally contaminated food products were included in the study: garlic powder, raw ground beef, walnuts, flour/meal, orange juice, and yogurt. The test method produced significantly higher results than the 5-day pour plate reference method for orange juice and significantly lower, though numerically similar, results for walnuts and yogurt. Differences between the test and reference methods were not significant for garlic powder, raw ground beef, or flour/meal. Repeatability and reproducibility were similar for both the test and reference methods in all cases. The hydrophobic grid membrane filter method for enumeration of yeast and mold in foods has been adopted by AOAC INTERNATIONAL. PMID:8823916

  1. Twenty-four-hour direct presumptive enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes in food and environmental samples using the ISO-GRID method with LM-137 agar.

    PubMed

    Entis, P; Lerner, I

    2000-03-01

    A new culture medium, LM-137 agar, was developed for use with the ISO-GRID hydrophobic grid membrane filter system for direct presumptive enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes in 24 h. The method was validated against three-replicate, three-dilution most probable number procedures based on enrichment methods specified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Association of Official Analytical Chemists International and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The study encompassed meats, dairy products, egg, produce, seafood, and environmental samples. The ISO-GRID filter method produced significantly higher recovery of L. monocytogenes from fermented sausage, hot dogs, pasteurized and raw milk, raw shrimp, and environmental swab samples (P < 0.05). The reference methods yielded significantly higher counts from frozen raw pork and cole slaw (P < 0.05). Confirmation rates of presumptive positive isolates from the filter method ranged from a low of 92% (frozen raw pork) to 100% (most other products). Neither the recovery efficiency nor the confirmation rate were affected by the presence of competing aerobic flora. PMID:10716565

  2. Optimal inoculation methods and quality control for the NCCLS oxacillin agar screen test for detection of oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Swenson, J M; Spargo, J; Tenover, F C; Ferraro, M J

    2001-10-01

    To define more precisely the inoculation methods to be used in the oxacillin screen test for Staphylococcus aureus, we tested agar screen plates prepared in house with 6 microg of oxacillin/ml and 4% NaCl using the four different inoculation methods that would most likely be used by clinical laboratories. The organisms selected for testing were 19 heteroresistant mecA-producing strains and 41 non-mecA-producing strains for which oxacillin MICs were near the susceptible breakpoint. The inoculation method that was preferred by all four readers and that resulted in the best combination of sensitivity and specificity was a 1-microl loopful of a 0.5 McFarland suspension. A second objective of the study was to then use this method to inoculate plates from five different manufacturers of commercially prepared media. Although all commercial media performed with acceptable sensitivity compared to the reference lot, one of the commercial lots demonstrated a lack of specificity. Those lots of oxacillin screen medium that fail to grow heteroresistant strains can be detected by using S. aureus ATCC 43300 as a positive control in the test and by using transmitted light to carefully examine the plates for any growth. However, lack of specificity with commercial lots may be difficult to detect using any of the current quality control organisms. PMID:11574618

  3. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  4. Disk Agar Diffusion Susceptibility Testing of Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Saubolle, Michael A.; Hoeprich, Paul D.

    1978-01-01

    A disk agar diffusion method was developed for testing the susceptibility of rapidly growing yeasts in vitro. A totally defined, completely synthetic agar culture medium (synthetic amino acid medium, fungal) and clinical isolates of Candida spp. and Torulopsis glabrata were used. Turbidimetric adjustment of cell suspensions resulted in standard, reproducible inocula, which gave sharp, clear zones of inhibition when applied by an agar overlay method. Optimal disk loads were determined for amphotericin B, amphotericin B methyl ester, 5-fluorocytosine, clotrimazole, and miconazole. Disk potencies were stable over a 2-month period when stored in a vacuum desiccator at −30°C. Using an error ratebounded classification, the zones of inhibition were correlated with both broth dilution and agar dilution minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). With amphotericin B and amphotericin B methyl ester, all isolates were susceptible, yielding zone diameters which clustered within 5 mm. Overall correlations between zone diameters and broth dilution MICs with 5-fluorocytosine, miconazole, and clotrimazole were 97, 96, and 82% (excluding T. glabrata), respectively; correlations of zone diameters with agar dilution MICs were 96, 92, and 88%, respectively. Disk diffusion susceptibility testing of yeasts appears to be generally applicable. However, when results are equivocal, quantitative test methods should be used. PMID:568910

  5. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1115...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD... ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), p. 11, which...

  10. Comparison of the Baird-Parker agar and 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate methods for enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in naturally and artificially contaminated foods.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Steven C; Becker, Katie L; Fanslau, Melody A

    2003-11-01

    The recently developed 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate (PFSE) method was compared with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual's Baird-Parker agar spread plate (B-P) method for enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in naturally contaminated, mechanically separated poultry (MSP; n = 92) and raw milk (n = 12). In addition, mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses and hot-smoked rainbow trout and chub were surface inoculated with a three-strain mixture of S. aureus, stored at 5 degrees C, and periodically analyzed with both methods for numbers of S. aureus. For naturally contaminated raw milk and MSP samples, the PFSE method yielded counts that were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from counts obtained using the B-P method. From raw milk and MSP samples, 60% (21 of 35) and 55% (124 of 226), respectively, of confirmed (DNAse-positive) isolates from PFSE plates were identified by further testing as S. aureus. Corresponding S. aureus identification rates for isolates forming typical colonies on B-P plates were 53% (19 of 36) and 50% (125 of 248). For both methods, other staphylococci composed the vast majority of tested isolates that were not identified as S. aureus. For inoculated hot-smoked fish, S. aureus counts from the PFSE method were not significantly different from counts from the B-P method. Compared to the B-P method, significantly lower numbers of inoculated S. aureus were recovered using the PFSE method in analyses of mozzarella cheese stored 28 and 42 days at 4 degrees C. The PFSE and B-P methods were not significantly different for inoculated cheeses at all other sampling times. DNAse-positive isolates from PFSE analyses of inoculated cheeses and smoked fish were identified as S. aureus 98% (51 of 52) and 86% (36 of 42) of the time, respectively, as compared with 100% (58 of 58) and 95% (40 of 42) of the time for typical B-P isolates. Overall, the PFSE and B-P methods appeared to perform similarly in enumeration of S

  11. Automatic agar tray inoculation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic agar tray inoculation device is simple in design and foolproof in operation. It employs either conventional inoculating loop or cotton swab for uniform inoculation of agar media, and it allows technician to carry on with other activities while tray is being inoculated.

  12. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  13. A comparison of a new centrifuge sugar flotation technique with the agar method for the extraction of immature Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) life stages from salt marsh soils.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two sampling techniques, agar extraction (AE) and centrifuge sugar flotation extraction (CSFE) were compared to determine their relative efficacy to recover immature stages of Culicoides spp from salt marsh substrates. Three types of samples (seeded with known numbers of larvae, homogenized field s...

  14. Fastidious anaerobe agar compared with Wilkins-Chalgren agar, brain heart infusion agar, and brucella agar for susceptibility testing of Fusobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S; Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Ostovari, M I

    1990-11-01

    Fastidious anaerobe agar supported the growth of 82 strains of fusobacteria better than brain heart infusion agar, brucella agar, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Fastidious anaerobe agar showed less hazing and fewer tailing endpoints with beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-blood supplementation improved the performance of all media. Wilkins-Chalgren agar without blood failed to support the growth of 17% of the strains. All Fusobacterium ulcerans strains were resistant to clindamycin. PMID:2073122

  15. Development of a selective agar plate for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Jung-Su; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-17

    This study was conducted to develop a selective medium for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Campylobacter spp. (n=4), non-Campylobacter (showing positive results on Campylobacter selective agar) strains (n=49) isolated from fresh produce, indicator bacteria (n=13), and spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce (n=15) were plated on four Campylobacter selective media. Bolton agar and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) exhibited higher sensitivity for Campylobacter spp. than did Preston agar and Hunt agar, although certain non-Campylobacter strains isolated from fresh produce by using a selective agar isolation method, were still able to grow on Bolton agar and mCCDA. To inhibit the growth of non-Campylobacter strains, Bolton agar and mCCDA were supplemented with 5 antibiotics (rifampicin, polymyxin B, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyruvate, ferrous sulfate) and the growth of Campylobacter spp. (n=7) and non-Campylobacter strains (n=44) was evaluated. Although Bolton agar supplemented with rifampicin (BR agar) exhibited a higher selectivity for Campylobacter spp. than did mCCDA supplemented with antibiotics, certain non-Campylobacter strains were still able to grow on BR agar (18.8%). When BR agar with various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were tested with Campylobacter spp. (n=8) and non-Campylobacter (n=7), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was inhibitory against 3 of 7 non-Campylobacter strains. Finally, we validated the use of BR agar containing 50mg/L sulfamethoxazole (BRS agar) or 0.5mg/L ciprofloxacin (BRCS agar) and other selective agars for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and fresh produce. All chicken samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. when tested on mCCDA, BR agar, and BRS agar. In fresh produce samples, BRS agar exhibited the highest selectivity for Campylobacter spp., demonstrating its suitability for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. PMID:25126968

  16. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a)...

  17. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a)...

  18. Method of depositing epitaxial layers on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2003-12-30

    An epitaxial article and method for forming the same includes a substrate having a textured surface, and an electrochemically deposited substantially single orientation epitaxial layer disposed on and in contact with the textured surface. The epitaxial article can include an electromagnetically active layer and an epitaxial buffer layer. The electromagnetically active layer and epitaxial buffer layer can also be deposited electrochemically.

  19. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  20. [Tryptose sulphite cycloserine agar for the recovery of Clostridium perfringens in surface waters: a study of different modes of utilization].

    PubMed

    Nusca, A; Orefice, L; Paradiso, R

    2007-01-01

    In the recent European Drinking Water Directive, Clostridium perfringens has assumed increasing importance so as to be considered a primary contamination indicator. Therefore it emerged the necessity to make culture methods, aimed at its recovery, more specific and sensitive. In this study we have verified the ability of Tryptose Sulphite Cycloserine Agar plates (TSC Agar), prepared and stored before the use at refrigeration temperature (+4 degrees) for different times, to show typical colonies, using both, the single layer and double layer techniques. Results show that storage of the prepared medium, even for a few days, decrease the recovery of typical colonies although such negative effect is minimized by using the double layer technique. PMID:17405507

  1. Method for forming a barrier layer

    DOEpatents

    Weihs, Timothy P.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  2. Crystal formation in furunculosis agar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullock, G.L.; Ross, A.J.

    1964-01-01

    SINCE ITS INTRODUCTION SOME MONTHS AGO, FURUNCULOSIS AGAR has been employed in the diagnosis of suspect furunculosis and also as a general purpose medium. During our work with this medium we have noticed discrete "colonies," of crystalline material, which very closely resemble microbial colonies. These crystal colonies are compact and appear on both the surface and subsurface; they occur in inoculated slants and plates incubated for long periods (2 to 3 weeks), as well as in uninoculated stored medium. As the crystal colonies could be confusing to workers using this medium, we decided to attempt to identify them and also to determine whether storage conditions and different lots of medium affect crystal formation.

  3. Thermoelectric material including conformal oxide layers and method of making the same using atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Jung Young; Ahn, Dongjoon; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2016-06-07

    A thermoelectric material includes a substrate particle and a plurality of conformal oxide layers formed on the substrate particle. The plurality of conformal oxide layers has a total oxide layer thickness ranging from about 2 nm to about 20 nm. The thermoelectric material excludes oxide nanoparticles. A method of making the thermoelectric material is also disclosed herein.

  4. Cost-effective nanoporous Agar-Agar polymer/Nickel powder composite particle for effective bio-products adsorption by expanded bed chromatography.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Setareh; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rahimpour, Ahmad

    2014-09-26

    In the present work a novel kind of dense nanoporous composite matrix for expanded bed application has been successfully first prepared with Nickel powder as a densifier and was covered with Agar-Agar layer as a skeleton, through the method of water-in-oil emulsification. Agar-Agar is a porous and inexpensive polymer. In order to fabricate cost-effective adsorbent with favorable qualities Agar-Agar polymer was used. Thereafter, the customized composite particle was modified by pseudo-affinity dye-ligand, Reactive Blue 4 (RB4), aimed at preparing a pseudo-affinity adsorbent (RB4-Agar-Ni) for bioprodut adsorption from aqueous solution. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was selected as a model protein to investigate the adsorption behavior in batchwise and expanded bed chromatography, and the obtained results were evaluated with that of Streamline™ (Amersham-Pharmacia Biotech, Sweden). Spherical appearance and porous structure of composite particles were observed by the optical microscope (OM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results suggested that the matrices followed the logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 65-300 μm and average diameter of 126.81-151.47 μm, proper wet density of 1.64-2.78 g/ml, water content of 62.74-34%, porosity of 98-90% and pore size of about 38-130 nm. For better comprehension of the impact of solid phase properties on the performance of the expanded bed, the expansion and hydrodynamic properties of a composite matrix with a series of densities was evaluated and estimated by the retention time distribution method (RTD) in an expanded bed and was compared with that of other matrices. According to obtained results the expansion factors under the same fluid velocity decreased by increasing the matrix density. Moreover, the axial dispersion coefficient (Dax) is the most appropriate parameter for evaluating the stability of expanded bed, on various operating conditions, such as different flow velocity, bed expansion

  5. Method of transferring a thin crystalline semiconductor layer

    DOEpatents

    Nastasi, Michael A.; Shao, Lin; Theodore, N. David

    2006-12-26

    A method for transferring a thin semiconductor layer from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a thin epitaxial monocrystalline semiconductor layer on a substrate having surface contaminants. An interface that includes the contaminants is formed in between the deposited layer and the substrate. Hydrogen atoms are introduced into the structure and allowed to diffuse to the interface. Afterward, the thin semiconductor layer is bonded to a second substrate and the thin layer is separated away at the interface, which results in transferring the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer from one substrate to the other substrate.

  6. Encapsulation methods and dielectric layers for organic electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Yigal D; Chu, William Siu-Keung; MacQueen, David Brent; Shi, Yijan

    2013-07-02

    The disclosure provides methods and materials suitable for use as encapsulation barriers and dielectric layers in electronic devices. In one embodiment, for example, there is provided an electroluminescent device or other electronic device with a dielectric layer comprising alternating layers of a silicon-containing bonding material and a ceramic material. The methods provide, for example, electronic devices with increased stability and shelf-life. The invention is useful, for example, in the field of microelectronic devices.

  7. Agar polysaccharides from Gracilaria species (Rhodophyta, Gracilariaceae).

    PubMed

    Marinho-Soriano, E

    2001-07-26

    Yield, physical and chemical properties of agar from three agarophytes species (Gracilaria gracilis, G. dura and G. bursa-pastoris) were determined. The agar yield from the three species varied significantly (P<0.01). The highest yields of agar (34.8%) and the lowest (30%) were obtained from G. bursa-pastoris and G. gracilis, respectively. Highest gel strength (630+/-15 g cm(-2)) was obtained from agar extracted from G. gracilis and lowest from G. bursa-pastoris (26+/-3.6 g cm(-2)). The values of 3,6-anhydrogalactose were similar for G. gracilis and G. dura and there were no significant differences among the species. The sulfate contents varied significantly (P<0.01) and the higher value was obtained from G. bursa-pastoris. Among the three species, G. gracilis showed superior agar quality than the other two species, hence it can be considered a good potential source for industrial use. PMID:11472802

  8. Layered zeolite materials and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Tsapatsis, Michael; Maheshwari, Sudeep; Bates, Frank S; Koros, William J

    2013-08-06

    A novel oxide material (MIN-I) comprising YO.sub.2; and X.sub.2O.sub.3, wherein Y is a tetravalent element and X is a trivalent element, wherein X/Y=O or Y/X=30 to 100 is provided. Surprisingly, MIN-I can be reversibly deswollen. MIN-I can further be combined with a polymer to produce a nanocomposite, depolymerized to produce predominantly fully exfoliated layers (MIN-2), and pillared to produce a pillared oxide material (MIN-3), analogous to MCM-36. The materials are useful in a wide range of applications, such as catalysts, thin films, membranes, and coatings.

  9. Multi-layer laminate structure and manufacturing method

    DOEpatents

    Keenihan, James R.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Eurich, Gerald; Graham, Andrew T.; Langmaid, Joe A.

    2012-04-24

    The present invention is premised upon a multi-layer laminate structure and method of manufacture, more particularly to a method of constructing the multi-layer laminate structure utilizing a laminate frame and at least one energy activated flowable polymer.

  10. Multi-layer laminate structure and manufacturing method

    SciTech Connect

    Keenihan, James R.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Eurich, Gerald; Graham, Andrew T.; Langmaid, Joe A.

    2013-01-29

    The present invention is premised upon a multi-layer laminate structure and method of manufacture, more particularly to a method of constructing the multi-layer laminate structure utilizing a laminate frame and at least one energy activated flowable polymer.

  11. Residual Agar Determination in Bacterial Spores by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or non-irradiated and not in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 108 spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only 3 false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.

  12. Does elevating silver content in zinc-based glass polyalkenoate cements increase their antibacterial efficacy against two common bacteria using the agar gel diffusion method?

    PubMed

    Coughlan, A; Breed, S M; Ashraf, C; Cardinale, J A; Hall, M M; Towler, M R

    2013-03-01

    The authors have previously shown that it is possible to incorporate silver into a soda-zinc-silicate glass and subsequently form a glass polyalkenoate cement from it. The objective of the research described herein is to determine if incremental increases in the silver content of these glass polyalkenoate cements will increase their antibacterial efficacy against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria using the accepted spread plate method. Four glass polyalkenoate cements were formulated; three contained increasing amounts of silver incorporated into them (cements A, B, and C, containing 0.33 mol%, 0.66 mol%, and 0.99 mol% silver, respectively) and a fourth contained no silver, which acted as a control (control cement). The handling properties of the glass polyalkenoate cements were evaluated, where working times were around 2 min and setting times ranged from 1 h 17 min to 2 h 41 min. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was employed to determine silver ion release with cement maturation for up to 14 days. The majority of silver ions were released within the first 24 h, with up to 2 mg/L cumulative ion release recorded up to 14 days. The antibacterial properties of the coatings were evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. The silver-glass polyalkenoate cements exhibited antibacterial effect against both bacterial strains. The maximum inhibition zones recorded against S. aureus was 14.8 mm (SD ± 1.11) and against P. aeruginosa was 20.6 mm (SD ± 0.81). Cement B had a greater antibacterial effect compared to cement A, however, cements B and C had comparable antibacterial effects after 14 days even though cement C contained 0.33 mol% more silver than B. This indicates that by increasing the silver content in these cements, the antibacterial efficacy increases to a point, but there is a threshold where further silver ion release does not increase the antibacterial effect

  13. Recovery of Sublethally Injured Bacteria Using Selective Agar Overlays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, John L.

    2001-01-01

    This experiment subjects bacteria in a food sample and an environmental sample to conditions of sublethal stress in order to assess the effectiveness of the agar overlay method to recover sublethally injured cells compared to direct plating onto the appropriate selective medium. (SAH)

  14. Methods for making thin layers of crystalline materials

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max G; Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Tanto, Boy

    2013-07-23

    Methods for making growth templates for the epitaxial growth of compound semiconductors and other materials are provided. The growth templates are thin layers of single-crystalline materials that are themselves grown epitaxially on a substrate that includes a thin layer of sacrificial material. The thin layer of sacrificial material, which creates a coherent strain in the single-crystalline material as it is grown thereon, includes one or more suspended sections and one or more supported sections.

  15. Growth kinetics of three species of Tetrahymena on solid agar

    SciTech Connect

    Dobra, K.W.; McArdle, E.W.; Ehret, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    A nutrient-agar method without liquid overlay has been developed for cultivation of ciliates. Three species of Tetrahymena-T. pyriformis strain W, T. rostrata strain UNI, and T. vorax strain V/sub 2/S, representing the 3 main groups of Tetrahymena species, were used; however the method should apply to other ciliates. Growth on the surface of the agar was facilitated by an optimal surface-to-volume ratio yielding a high density of ciliates and short generation times. At the highest density achieved, the cells became irregularly hexagonal and formed a monolayer tissue on the agar. Ciliates grown on agar were like those in liquid culture, typical oral ciliature, food-vacuole formation, and typical cortical patterns being retained. Advantages of this method include high cell density, easy recovery, and optimal O/sub 2/ supply. The organisms can also be cultivated on the surface of sterile cellulose-nitrate filters, facilitating in situ fixation and staining as well as transfer into different media by transfer of filters with cells, without prior centrifugation and resuspension.

  16. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  17. Polymer film deposition on agar using a dielectric barrier discharge jet and its bacterial growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T.-C.; Cho, J.; Mcintyre, K.; Jo, Y.-K.; Staack, D.

    2012-08-01

    Polymer film deposition on agar in ambient air was achieved using the helium dielectric barrier discharge jet (DBD jet) fed with polymer precursors, and the bacterial growth inhibition due to the deposited film was observed. The DBD jet with precursor addition was more efficient at sterilization than a helium-only DBD jet. On the areas where polymer films cover the agar the bacterial growth was significantly inhibited. The inhibition efficacy showed dependence on the film thickness. The DBD jet without precursor also created a modified agar layer, which may slow the growth of some bacterial strains.

  18. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, L; De Bruijn, I; De Mot, R; Rediers, H; Lievens, B

    2016-08-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens. We showed that when using the same medium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacterium was strongly affected. Consequently, results from in vitro screenings should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:27166668

  19. Method of making a ceramic with preferential oxygen reactive layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming an article. The method comprises forming a silicon-based substrate that is oxidizable by reaction with an oxidant to form at least one gaseous product and applying an intermediate layer/coating onto the substrate, wherein the intermediate layer/coating is oxidizable to a nongaseous product by reaction with the oxidant in preference to reaction of the silicon-containing substrate with the oxidant.

  20. Multi-layer articles and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Zhang, Wei; Palm, Walter C.; Rupich, Martin W.

    2005-05-17

    The invention relates to superconductor articles, and compositions and methods for making superconductor articles. The methods can include using a precursor solution having a relatively small concentration of total free acid. The articles can include more than one layer of superconductor material in which at least one layer of superconductor material can be formed by a solution process, such as a solution process involving the use of metalorganic precursors.

  1. Method of depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2002-08-27

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0layer can be deposited using sol-gel or metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  2. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detection: Comparison of Two Molecular Methods (IDI-MRSA PCR Assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR Assay) with Three Selective MRSA Agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA) for Use with Infection-Control Swabs▿

    PubMed Central

    van Hal, S. J.; Stark, D.; Lockwood, B.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasing problem. Rapid detection of MRSA-colonized patients has the potential to limit spread of the organism. We evaluated the sensitivities and specificities of MRSA detection by two molecular methods (IDI-MRSA PCR assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR assay) and three selective MRSA agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA), using 205 (101 nasal, 52 groin, and 52 axillary samples) samples from consecutive known MRSA-infected and/or -colonized patients. All detection methods had higher MRSA detection rates for nasal swabs than for axillary and groin swabs. Detection of MRSA by IDI-MRSA was the most sensitive method, independent of the site (94% for nasal samples, 80% for nonnasal samples, and 90% overall). The sensitivities of the GenoType MRSA Direct assay and the MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA agars with nasal swabs were 70%, 72%, 68%, and 75%, respectively. All detection methods had high specificities (95 to 99%), independent of the swab site. Extended incubation for a further 24 h with selective MRSA agars increased the detection of MRSA, with a corresponding decline in specificity secondary to a significant increase in false-positive results. There was a noticeable difference in test performance of the GenoType MRSA Direct assay in detection of MRSA (28/38 samples [74%]) compared with detection of nonmultiresistant MRSA (17/31 samples [55%]) (susceptible to two or more non-β-lactam antibiotics). This was not observed with selective MRSA agar plates or IDI-MRSA. Although it is more expensive, in addition to rapid turnaround times of 2 to 4 h, IDI-MRSA offers greater detection of MRSA colonization, independent of the swab site, than do conventional selective agars and GenoType MRSA Direct. PMID:17537949

  3. Calcium-doped ceria/titanate tabular functional nanocomposite by layer-by-layer coating method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang W.; Devaraju, M.K.; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2010-07-15

    Ca-doped ceria (CDC)/tabular titanate (K{sub 0.8}Li{sub 0.27}Ti{sub 1.73}O{sub 4}, TT) UV-shielding functional nanocomposite with fairly uniform CDC coating layers was prepared through a polyelectrolyte-associated layer-by-layer (LbL) coating method. TT with lepidocrocite-like layered structure was used as the substrate, poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was used as a coupling agent, CDC nanoparticles were used as the main UV-shielding component. CDC/TT nanocomposites with various coating layers of CDC were obtained through a multistep coating process. The phases were studied by X-ray diffraction. The morphology and coating quality were studied by scanning electron microscopy and element mapping of energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The oxidation catalytic activity, UV-shielding ability and using comfort were characterized by Rancimat test, UV-vis spectra and dynamic friction test, respectively. CDC/TT nanocomposites with low oxidation catalytic activity, high UV-shielding ability and good using comfort were finally obtained. - Graphical abstract: Through the control of surface charge of particles calcium-doped ceria/titanate composites with low oxidation catalytic activity, higher UV-shielding ability and excellent comfort was obtained by a facile layer-by-layer coating method.

  4. Layer-by-layer design method for soft-X-ray multilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Namioka, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    A new design method effective for a nontransparent system has been developed for soft-X-ray multilayers with the aid of graphic representation of the complex amplitude reflectance in a Gaussian plane. The method provides an effective means of attaining the absolute maximum reflectance on a layer-by-layer basis and also gives clear insight into the evolution of the amplitude reflectance on a multilayer as it builds up. An optical criterion is derived for the selection of a proper pair of materials needed for designing a high-reflectance multilayer. Some examples are given to illustrate the usefulness of this design method.

  5. A method to estimate groundwater depletion from confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Neuzil, C.E.

    2007-01-01

    Although depletion of storage in low-permeability confining layers is the source of much of the groundwater produced from many confined aquifer systems, it is all too frequently overlooked or ignored. This makes effective management of groundwater resources difficult by masking how much water has been derived from storage and, in some cases, the total amount of water that has been extracted from an aquifer system. Analyzing confining layer storage is viewed as troublesome because of the additional computational burden and because the hydraulic properties of confining layers are poorly known. In this paper we propose a simplified method for computing estimates of confining layer depletion, as well as procedures for approximating confining layer hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss) using geologic information. The latter makes the technique useful in developing countries and other settings where minimal data are available or when scoping calculations are needed. As such, our approach may be helpful for estimating the global transfer of groundwater to surface water. A test of the method on a synthetic system suggests that the computational errors will generally be small. Larger errors will probably result from inaccuracy in confining layer property estimates, but these may be no greater than errors in more sophisticated analyses. The technique is demonstrated by application to two aquifer systems: the Dakota artesian aquifer system in South Dakota and the coastal plain aquifer system in Virginia. In both cases, depletion from confining layers was substantially larger than depletion from the aquifers.

  6. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  7. Effect of layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte method on encapsulation of vanillin.

    PubMed

    Noshad, Mohammad; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Shahidi, Fakhri; Koocheki, Arash

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work was to microencapsulate vanillin by multilayer emulsion followed by spray drying, aiming to protect it and control its release. An electrostatic layer-by-layer deposition method was used to create the multilayered interfacial membranes around microcapsules with different compositions: (i) one-layer (soy protein isolate); (ii) two-layer (soy protein isolate - OSA starch); (iii) three-layer (soy protein isolate - OSA starch - Chitosan). The morphology of the microcapsules was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy. The hygroscopicity, solubility, particle size, encapsulation efficiency, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and release into water (37°C and 80°C) were also examined. FTIR confirmed the interaction between the wall materials. All microcapsules were not very water-soluble or hygroscopic while three-layer microcapsules compared to one and two layer microcapsules have lower moisture content and predominantly shriveled surfaces. The results indicated it was possible to encapsulate vanillin with the techniques employed and that these protected the vanillin even at 80°C. The reduced solubility and low release rates indicated the enormous potential of the vehicle developed in controlling the release of the vanillin into the food and pharmaceuticals. PMID:26358552

  8. Agar agar-stabilized milled zerovalent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Schmid, Doris; Wagner, Stephan; Micić, Vesna; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-09-01

    Submicron-scale milled zerovalent iron (milled ZVI) particles produced by grinding macroscopic raw materials could provide a cost-effective alternative to nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles for in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in groundwater. However, the aggregation and settling of bare milled ZVI particles from suspension presents a significant obstacle to their in situ application for groundwater remediation. In our investigations we reduced the rapid aggregation and settling rate of bare milled ZVI particles from suspension by stabilization with a "green" agar agar polymer. The transport potential of stabilized milled ZVI particle suspensions in a diverse array of natural heterogeneous porous media was evaluated in a series of well-controlled laboratory column experiments. The impact of agar agar on trichloroethene (TCE) removal by milled ZVI particles was assessed in laboratory-scale batch reactors. The use of agar agar significantly enhanced the transport of milled ZVI particles in all of the investigated porous media. Reactivity tests showed that the agar agar-stabilized milled ZVI particles were reactive towards TCE, but that their reactivity was an order of magnitude less than that of bare, non-stabilized milled ZVI particles. Our results suggest that milled ZVI particles could be used as an alternative to nZVI particles as their potential for emplacement into contaminated zone, their reactivity, and expected longevity are beneficial for in situ groundwater remediation. PMID:26596889

  9. Pigments of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian; Schliemann, Willibald

    2007-01-01

    The complex pigment pattern of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) cap skins has been studied by LC-DAD and mass spectrometry. Among the betaxanthins the corresponding derivatives of serine, threonine, ethanolamine, alanine, Dopa, phenylalanine and tryptophan are reported for the first time to contribute to the pigment pattern of fly agarics. Betalamic acid, the chromophoric precursor of betaxanthins and betacyanins, muscaflavin and seco-dopas were also detected. Furthermore, the red-purple muscapurpurin and the red muscarubrin were tentatively assigned while further six betacyanin-like components could not be structurally allocated. Stability studies indicated a high susceptibility of pigment extracts to degradation which led to rapid colour loss thus rendering a complete characterization of betacyanin-like compounds impossible at present. Taking into account these difficulties the presented results may be a starting point for a comprehensive characterization of the pigment composition of fly agarics. PMID:18274277

  10. Method of adhesion between an oxide layer and a metal layer

    DOEpatents

    Jennison, Dwight R.; Bogicevic, Alexander; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2004-09-14

    A method of controlling the wetting characteristics and increasing the adhesion between a metal and an oxide layer. By introducing a negatively-charged species to the surface of an oxide layer, layer-by-layer growth of metal deposited onto the oxide surface is promoted, increasing the adhesion strength of the metal-oxide interface. The negatively-charged species can either be deposited onto the oxide surface or a compound can be deposited that dissociates on, or reacts with, the surface to form the negatively-charged species. The deposited metal adatoms can thereby bond laterally to the negatively-charged species as well as vertically to the oxide surface as well as react with the negatively charged species, be oxidized, and incorporated on or into the surface of the oxide.

  11. Physicochemical and morphological properties of plasticized poly(vinyl alcohol)-agar biodegradable films.

    PubMed

    Madera-Santana, T J; Freile-Pelegrín, Y; Azamar-Barrios, J A

    2014-08-01

    The effects of the addition of glycerol (GLY) on the physicochemical and morphological properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-agar films were reported. PVA-agar films were prepared by solution cast method, and the addition of GLY in PVA-agar films altered the optical properties, resulting in a decrease in opacity values and in the color difference (ΔE) of the films. Structural characterization using Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the presence of GLY altered the intensity of the bands (from 1200 to 800cm(-1)) and crystallinity. The characterization of the thermal properties indicated that an increase in the agar content produces a decrease in the melting temperature and augments the heat of fusion. Similar tendencies were observed in plasticized films, but at different magnification. The formulation that demonstrated the lowest mechanical properties contained 25wt.% agar, whereas the formulation that contained 75wt.% agar demonstrated a significant improvement. The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) and surface morphology analysis demonstrated that the structure of PVA-agar films is reorganized upon GLY addition. The physicochemical properties of PVA-agar films using GLY as a plasticizer provide information for the application of this formulation as packaging material for specific food applications. PMID:24875313

  12. Standard operating procedure to prepare agar phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, R. M.; Santos, T. Q.; Oliveira, D. P.; Souza, R. M.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Agar phantoms are widely used as soft tissue mimics and some preparation techniques are described in the literature. There are also standards that describe the recipe of a soft tissue mimicking material (TMM). However some details of manufacture process are not clearly defined. The standardization of the phantom's preparation can produce a metrological impact on the results of the acoustic properties measured. In this direction, this paper presents a standard operating procedure (SOP) to prepare the agar TMM described on the IEC 60601-237.

  13. A robust absorbing layer method for anisotropic seismic wave modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Labbé, S.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-15

    When applied to wave propagation modeling in anisotropic media, Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) exhibit instabilities. Incoming waves are amplified instead of being absorbed. Overcoming this difficulty is crucial as in many seismic imaging applications, accounting accurately for the subsurface anisotropy is mandatory. In this study, we present the SMART layer method as an alternative to PML approach. This method is based on the decomposition of the wavefield into components propagating inward and outward the domain of interest. Only outgoing components are damped. We show that for elastic and acoustic wave propagation in Transverse Isotropic media, the SMART layer is unconditionally dissipative: no amplification of the wavefield is possible. The SMART layers are not perfectly matched, therefore less accurate than conventional PML. However, a reasonable increase of the layer size yields an accuracy similar to PML. Finally, we illustrate that the selective damping strategy on which is based the SMART method can prevent the generation of spurious S-waves by embedding the source in a small zone where only S-waves are damped.

  14. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes using agar-agar water solution and femtosecond pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida de Matos, Ricardo; da Silva Cordeiro, Thiago; Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Dias Vieira, Nilson; Coronato Courrol, Lilia

    2012-11-01

    We report a method to create gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes using agar-agar water solution and irradiation with light from a xenon lamp, followed by ultrashort laser pulses. No additives, such as solvents, surfactants or reducing agents, were used in the procedure. Laser irradiation (laser ablation) was important to the reduction of the nanoparticles diameter and formation of another shapes. Distilled water was used as solvent and agar-agar (hydrophilic colloid extracted from certain seaweeds) was important for the stabilization of gold nanoparticles, avoiding their agglomeration. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed with ultraviolet-visible absorption and TEM microscopy. The gold nanoparticles acquired spherical, prism, and rod shapes depending on the laser parameters. Variation of laser irradiation parameters as pulse energy, irradiation time and repetition rate was assessed. The relevant mechanisms contributing for the gold nanoparticles production are discussed.

  15. Use of agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Velimirović, Milica; Wagner, Stephan; Micić Batka, Vesna; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    A major obstacle for use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles as a nontoxic material for effective in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) is the high production cost. For that reason, submicro-scale milled zero-valent iron particles were recently developed (milled ZVI, UVR-FIA, Germany) by grinding macroscopic raw materials of elementary iron as a cheaper alternative to products produced by solid-state reduction. However, milled ZVI particles tend to aggregate and due to the rather large particle size (d50= 11.9 µm) also rapidly sediment. To prevent aggregation and consequently sedimentation of milled ZVI particles and therefore improve the mobility after in situ application, the use of a stabilizer is considered in literature as a most promising option. In this study, milled ZVI particles (1 g L-1 of particle concentration) were stabilized by environmentally friendly polymer agar agar (>0.5 g L-1), which had a positive impact on the milled ZVI stability. Sedimentation rate was significantly decreased by increasing the suspension viscosity. Column transport experiments were performed for bare and agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles in commercially available fine grained quartz sand (DORSILIT® Nr.8, Gebrüder Dorfner GmbH Co, Germany) and different porous media collected from brownfields. The experiments were carried out under field relevant injection conditions of 100 m d-1. The maximal travel distance (LT) of less than 10 cm was determined for non-stabilized suspension in fine grained quartz sand, while agar agar (1 g L-1) stabilized milled ZVI suspension revealed LT of 12 m. Similar results were observed for porous media from brownfields showing that mobility of agar agar stabilized particle suspensions was significantly improved compared to bare particles. Based on the mobility data, agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles could be used for in situ application. Finally, lab-scale batch degradation

  16. Comparison of dosimetry gels prepared by agar and bovine gelatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sağsöz, M. E.; Korkut, Ö.; Alemdar, N.; Aktaş, S.; Çalı, E. B.; Kantarcı, M.

    2016-04-01

    Gel dosimeters are unique materials capable of showing three dimensional (3D) dose distributions of therapeutic or diagnostic exposures. Fricke gel dosimeters can be considered as chemical dosimeters that rely on a radiation-induced chemical reaction. Dose distribution of Fricke solutions containing Fe+2 ions determines the transformation of acidic, oxygen saturated Fe+2 ions to Fe+3 ions by the ionizing radiation in aqueous solutions. In this study we produced two different types of gel dosimeters using agar and bovine gelatin with similar fabrication methods. We compared the magnetic resonance (MR) T1 imaging responses of these two gel dosimeters to acquire a dose dependency of MR intensities. In conclusion agar gel dosimeters found to be produced easily and more consistent.

  17. Visualization of Biosurfactant Film Flow in a Bacillus subtilis Swarm Colony on an Agar Plate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Kim, Jung Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Collective bacterial dynamics plays a crucial role in colony development. Although many research groups have studied the behavior of fluidic swarm colonies, the detailed mechanics of its motion remains elusive. Here, we developed a visualization method using submicron fluorescent beads for investigating the flow field in a thin layer of fluid that covers a Bacillus subtilis swarm colony growing on an agar plate. The beads were initially embedded in the agar plate and subsequently distributed spontaneously at the upper surface of the expanding colony. We conducted long-term live cell imaging of the B. subtilis colony using the fluorescent tracers, and obtained high-resolution velocity maps of microscale vortices in the swarm colony using particle image velocimetry. A distinct periodic fluctuation in the average speed and vorticity of flow in swarm colony was observed at the inner region of the colony, and correlated with the switch between bacterial swarming and growth phases. At the advancing edge of the colony, both the magnitudes of velocity and vorticity of flow in swarm colony were inversely correlated with the spreading speed of the swarm edge. The advanced imaging tool developed in this study would facilitate further understanding of the effect of micro vortices in swarm colony on the collective dynamics of bacteria. PMID:26343634

  18. Visualization of Biosurfactant Film Flow in a Bacillus subtilis Swarm Colony on an Agar Plate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Kim, Jung Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Collective bacterial dynamics plays a crucial role in colony development. Although many research groups have studied the behavior of fluidic swarm colonies, the detailed mechanics of its motion remains elusive. Here, we developed a visualization method using submicron fluorescent beads for investigating the flow field in a thin layer of fluid that covers a Bacillus subtilis swarm colony growing on an agar plate. The beads were initially embedded in the agar plate and subsequently distributed spontaneously at the upper surface of the expanding colony. We conducted long-term live cell imaging of the B. subtilis colony using the fluorescent tracers, and obtained high-resolution velocity maps of microscale vortices in the swarm colony using particle image velocimetry. A distinct periodic fluctuation in the average speed and vorticity of flow in swarm colony was observed at the inner region of the colony, and correlated with the switch between bacterial swarming and growth phases. At the advancing edge of the colony, both the magnitudes of velocity and vorticity of flow in swarm colony were inversely correlated with the spreading speed of the swarm edge. The advanced imaging tool developed in this study would facilitate further understanding of the effect of micro vortices in swarm colony on the collective dynamics of bacteria. PMID:26343634

  19. Advancing-layers method for generation of unstructured viscous grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    1993-01-01

    A novel approach for generating highly stretched grids which is based on a modified advancing-front technique and benefits from the generality, flexibility, and grid quality of the conventional advancing-front-based Euler grid generators is presented. The method is self-sufficient for the insertion of grid points in the boundary layer and beyond. Since it is based on a totally unstructured grid strategy, the method alleviates the difficulties stemming from the structural limitations of the prismatic techniques.

  20. Method of making gas diffusion layers for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Frisk, Joseph William; Boand, Wayne Meredith; Larson, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for making a gas diffusion layer for an electrochemical cell comprising the steps of: a) combining carbon particles and one or more surfactants in a typically aqueous vehicle to make a preliminary composition, typically by high shear mixing; b) adding one or more highly fluorinated polymers to said preliminary composition by low shear mixing to make a coating composition; and c) applying the coating composition to an electrically conductive porous substrate, typically by a low shear coating method.

  1. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, M.; Ruckman, M.; Strongin, D.

    1994-04-26

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate. 4 figures.

  2. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Ruckman, Mark; Strongin, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate.

  3. Method for removing semiconductor layers from salt substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shuskus, Alexander J.; Cowher, Melvyn E.

    1985-08-27

    A method is described for removing a CVD semiconductor layer from an alkali halide salt substrate following the deposition of the semiconductor layer. The semiconductor-substrate combination is supported on a material such as tungsten which is readily wet by the molten alkali halide. The temperature of the semiconductor-substrate combination is raised to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the substrate but less than the temperature of the semiconductor and the substrate is melted and removed from the semiconductor by capillary action of the wettable support.

  4. Detection of Agar, by Analysis of Sugar Markers, Associated with Bacillus Anthracis Spores, After Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Colburn, Heather A.; Fox, Alvin; Fox, Karen F.; Harley, William M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-08-01

    Detection of small quantities of agar associated with spores of Bacillus anthracis could provide key information regarding its source or growth characteristics. Agar, widely used in growth of bacteria on solid surfaces, consists primarily of repeating polysaccharide units of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (AGal) and galactose (Gal) with sulfated and O-methylated galactoses present as minor constituents. Two variants of the alditol acetate procedure were evaluated for detection of potential agar markers associated with spores. The first method employed a reductive hydrolysis step, to stabilize labile anhydrogalactose, by converting to anhydrogalactitol. The second eliminated the reductive hydrolysis step simplifying the procedure. Anhydrogalactitol, derived from agar, was detected using both derivatization methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. However, challenges with artefactual background (reductive hydrolysis) or marker destruction (hydrolysis) lead to the search for alternative sugar markers. A minor agar component, 6-O-methyl galactose (6-O-M gal), was readily detected in agar-grown but not broth-grown bacteria. Detection was optimized by the use of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). With appropriate choice of sugar marker and analytical procedure, detection of sugar markers for agar has considerable potential in microbial forensics.

  5. Pulsed photothermal temperature profiling of agar tissue phantoms.

    PubMed

    Milanic, Matija; Majaron, Boris; Nelson, J Stuart

    2007-11-01

    We determine experimentally the accuracy of pulsed photothermal radiometric (PPTR) temperature depth profiling in water-based samples. We use custom tissue phantoms composed of agar gel layers separated by very thin absorbing layers. Two configurations of the acquisition system are compared, one using the customary spectral band of the InSb radiation detector (3.0-5.5 microm) and the other with a spectrally narrowed acquisition band (4.5-5.5 microm). The laser-induced temperature depth profiles are reconstructed from measured radiometric signals using a custom minimization algorithm. The results correlate very well with phantom geometry as determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histology in all evaluated samples. Determination of the absorbing layer depth shows good repeatability with spatial resolution decreasing with depth. Spectral filtering improves the accuracy and resolution, especially for shallow absorption layers (~120 microm) and more complex structures (e.g., with two absorbing layers). The average full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the temperature peaks equals 23% of the layer depth. PMID:17522951

  6. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Mudong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick's first law, and Monod's kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates. PMID:26355542

  7. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Mudong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick's first law, and Monod's kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates. PMID:26355542

  8. Improved method for solving the viscous shock layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Rachel; Davis, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    An improved method for solving the viscous shock layer equations for supersonic/hypersonic flows past blunt-nosed bodies is presented. The method is capable of handling slender to thick bodies. The solution is obtained by solving a coupled set of five equations, built of the four basic viscous shock layer equations and an additional equation for the standoff distance. The coupling of the equations prevents the local iterations divergence problems encountered by previous methods of solution far downstream on slender bodies. It also eliminates the need for local iterations, which were required by previous methods of solution, for a first-order scheme in the streamwise direction. A new global iteration procedure is employed to impose the shock boundary conditions. The procedure prevents the global iteration instability encountered by the basic method of solution and improves the convergence rate of the global iteration procedure of later methods devised to overcome this difficulty. The new technique reduces the computation time by 65-95 percent as compared to previous methods of solution. The method can efficiently be implemented in vector/parallel computers.

  9. Advanced boundary layer transition measurement methods for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Croom, C. C.; Gail, P. D.; Manuel, G. S.; Carraway, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    In modern laminar flow flight research, it is important to understand the specific cause(s) of laminar to turbulent boundary-layer transition. Such information is crucial to the exploration of the limits of practical application of laminar flow for drag reduction on aircraft. The transition modes of interest in current flight investigations include the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting instability, the inflectional instability at laminar separation, and the crossflow inflectional instability, as well as others. This paper presents the results to date of research on advanced devices and methods used for the study of laminar boundary-layer transition phenomena in the flight environment. Recent advancements in the development of arrayed hot-film devices and of a new flow visualization method are discussed. Arrayed hot-film devices have been designed to detect the presence of laminar separation, and of crossflow vorticity. The advanced flow visualization method utilizes color changes in liquid-crystal coatings to detect boundary-layer transition at high altitude flight conditions. Flight and wind tunnel data are presented to illustrate the design and operation of these advanced methods. These new research tools provide information on disturbance growth and transition mode which is essential to furthering our understanding of practical design limits for applications of laminar flow technology.

  10. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample. PMID:25924317

  11. Method for making oxygen-reducing catalyst layers

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; O'Neill, David G.

    2010-06-22

    Methods are provided for making oxygen-reducing catalyst layers, which include simultaneous or sequential stops of physical vapor depositing an oxygen-reducing catalytic material onto a substrate, the catalytic material comprising a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum; and thermally treating the catalytic material. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  12. A multidisciplinary optimization method for designing boundary layer ingesting inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David Leonard

    2001-07-01

    The Blended-Wing-Body is a conceptual aircraft design with rear-mounted, over-wing engines. Two types of engine installations have been considered for this aircraft. One installation is quite conventional with podded engines mounted on pylons. The other installation has partially buried engines with boundary layer ingesting inlets. Although ingesting the low-momentum flow in a boundary layer can improve propulsive efficiency, poor inlet performance can offset and even overwhelm this potential advantage. For both designs, the tight coupling between the aircraft aerodynamics and the propulsion system poses a difficult design integration problem. This dissertation presents a design method that solves the problem using multidisciplinary optimization. A Navier-Stokes flow solver, an engine analysis method, and a nonlinear optimizer are combined into a design tool that correctly addresses the tight coupling of the problem. The method is first applied to a model 2D problem to expedite development and thoroughly test the scheme. The low computational cost of the 2D method allows for several inlet installations to be optimized and analyzed. The method is then upgraded by using a validated 3D Navier-Stokes solver. The two candidate engine installations are analyzed and optimized using this inlet design method. The method is shown to be quite effective at integrating the propulsion and aerodynamic systems of the Blend-Wing-Body for both engine installations by improving overall performance and satisfying any specified design constraints. By comparing the two optimized designs, the potential advantages of ingesting boundary layer flow for this aircraft are demonstrated.

  13. One directional polarized neutron reflectometry with optimized reference layer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Jahromi, Saeed S.

    2012-09-01

    In the past decade, several neutron reflectometry methods for determining the modulus and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of an unknown multilayer thin film have been worked out among which the method of variation of surroundings and reference layers are of highest interest. These methods were later modified for measurement of the polarization of the reflected beam instead of the measurement of the intensities. In their new architecture, these methods not only suffered from the necessity of change of experimental setup but also another difficulty was added to their experimental implementations. This deficiency was related to the limitations of the technology of the neutron reflectometers that could only measure the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam. As the instruments are limited, the theory has to be optimized so that the experiment could be performed. In a recent work, we developed the method of variation of surroundings for one directional polarization analysis. In this new work, the method of reference layer with polarization analysis has been optimized to determine the phase and modulus of the unknown film with measurement of the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam.

  14. Low density, microcellular, dopable, agar/gelatin foams for pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, W.F.; Aubert, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    Low-density, microcellular foams prepared from the natural polymers agar and gelatin have been developed for pulsed-power physics experiments. Numerous experiments were supported with foams having densities at or below 10 mg/cm{sup 3}. For some of the experiments, the agar/gelatin foam was uniformly doped with metallic elements using soluble salts. Depending on the method of preparation, cell sizes were typically below 10 microns and for one process were below 1.0 micron.

  15. Applications of the layer-KKR method to photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Modinos, A; Stefanou, N; Yannopapas, V

    2001-01-29

    A brief introduction of the layer-Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method for calculations of the frequency band structure of photonic crystals and of the transmission and reflection coefficients of light incident on slabs of such crystals is followed by two applications of the method. The first relates to the frequency band structure of metallodielectric composites and demonstrates the essential difference between cermet and network topology of such composites at low frequencies. The second application is an analysis of recent measurements of the reflection of light from a slab of a colloidal system consisting of latex spheres in air. PMID:19417804

  16. Method for making photovoltaic devices using oxygenated semiconductor thin film layers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, James Neil; Albin, David Scott; Feldman-Peabody, Scott; Pavol, Mark Jeffrey; Gossman, Robert Dwayne

    2014-12-16

    A method for making a photovoltaic device is presented. The method includes steps of disposing a window layer on a substrate and disposing an absorber layer on the window layer. Disposing the window layer, the absorber layer, or both layers includes introducing a source material into a deposition zone, wherein the source material comprises oxygen and a constituent of the window layer, of the absorber layer or of both layers. The method further includes step of depositing a film that comprises the constituent and oxygen.

  17. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates.

    PubMed

    Divoux, Thibaut; Mao, Bosi; Snabre, Patrick

    2015-05-14

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amounts of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis, which consists of the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often loses contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is difficult to anticipate a priori, since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on syneresis phenomena in agar plates, which consist of Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time t* is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, t* is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness emin measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of emin, independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels. PMID:25812667

  18. Agar-Gel Precipitin Technique in Anthrax Antibody Determinations1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, John G.; Kadull, Paul J.

    1964-01-01

    A modification of the agar-gel precipitation inhibition technique of Thorne and Belton for detecting anthrax antibodies reduces inconsistency of visually determined end points on the same sera observed by different technicians. Determination of the minimal reacting concentrations of the anthrax antigen and antibody reagents, modifications of the visualization apparatus, methods for combining reagents, and length of incubation periods contribute to the ease of the end-point determinations and the uniformity of results. When compared with the previous technique, the modified procedure is less time-consuming while retaining satisfactory reproducibility, simplicity, specificity, and sensitivity. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:14201088

  19. Characteristic features and dye degrading capability of agar-agar gel immobilized manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz

    2016-05-01

    Immobilization of enzymes has been regarded as an efficient approach to develop biocatalyst with improved activity and stability characteristics under reaction conditions. In the present study, purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 was immobilized in agar-agar support using entrapment technique. Maximum immobilization yield was accomplished at 4.0% agar-agar gel. The immobilized MnP exhibited better resistance to changes in pH and temperature than the free enzyme, with optimal conditions being pH 6.0 and 50 °C. The kinetic parameters Km and Kcat/Km for free and entrapped MnP were calculated to be 65.6 mM and 6.99 M(-1) s(-1), and 82 mM and 8.15 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Thermo-stability was significantly improved after immobilization. After 120 h, the insolubilized MnP retained its activity up to 71.9% and 60.3% at 30 °C and 40 °C, respectively. It showed activity until 10th cycle and retained 74.3% residual activity after 3th cycle. The effects of H2O2, ionic strength and potential inhibitors on activity of free and immobilized enzyme were investigated. Moreover, the decolorization of three structurally different dyes was monitored in order to assess the degrading capability of the entrapped MnP. The decolorization efficiencies for all the tested dyes were 78.6-84.7% after 12h. The studies concluded that the toxicity of dyes aqueous solutions was significantly reduced after treatment. The remarkable catalytic, thermo-stability and re-cycling features of the agar-agar immobilized MnP display a high potential for biotechnological applications. PMID:26854887

  20. Rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens: comparison of lactose sulfite broth with tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar.

    PubMed

    Neut, C; Pathak, J; Romond, C; Beerens, H

    1985-01-01

    The lactose sulfite (LS) medium recommended for the detection and identification of Clostridium perfringens in foods was compared with a reference method using tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC) agar for the enumeration of this organism in a variety of foods and food ingredients. C. perfringens was detected and enumerated in 17 of the 54 samples examined with LS broth, but its presence could be confirmed in only 9 of the samples with TSC agar. In only 2 instances, C. perfringens was detected on TSC agar but not in LS broth. A positive response (FeS + and gas +) in LS broth incubated at 46 degrees C always corresponded to the presence of C. perfringens; whereas the black colonies formed on TSC agar incubated at 37 degrees C were frequently found to be Clostridium species other than C. perfringens. Thus, because of its highly selective nature, LS broth was superior to TSC agar for enumerating and confirming the small numbers of C. perfringens that were present in a majority of the samples. This was especially true when other clostridia were also present. Besides its greater selectivity and sensitivity, LS broth had the additional advantages of requiring less work and giving confirmed results within 24-48 h compared with 3 days for the TSC agar method. PMID:2865247

  1. Application of Arnoldi method to boundary layer instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Ming; Luo, Ji-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    The Arnoldi method is applied to boundary layer instability, and a finite difference method is employed to avoid the limit of the finite element method. This modus operandi is verified by three comparison cases, i.e., comparison with linear stability theory (LST) for two-dimensional (2D) disturbance on one-dimensional (1D) basic flow, comparison with LST for three-dimensional (3D) disturbance on 1D basic flow, and comparison with Floquet theory for 3D disturbance on 2D basic flow. Then it is applied to secondary instability analysis on the streaky boundary layer under spanwise-localized free-stream turbulence (FST). Three unstable modes are found, i.e., an inner mode at a high-speed center streak, a sinuous type outer mode at a low-speed center streak, and a sinuous type outer mode at low-speed side streaks. All these modes are much more unstable than Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves, implying the dominant contribution of secondary instability in bypass transition. The modes at strong center streak are more unstable than those at weak side streaks, so the center streak is ‘dangerous’ in secondary instability. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11202147, 11332007, 11172203, and 91216111) and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120032120007).

  2. Method of depositing a high-emissivity layer

    DOEpatents

    Wickersham, Charles E.; Foster, Ellis L.

    1983-01-01

    A method of depositing a high-emissivity layer on a substrate comprising RF sputter deposition of a carbide-containing target in an atmosphere of a hydrocarbon gas and a noble gas. As the carbide is deposited on the substrate the hydrocarbon gas decomposes to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon deposits on the target and substrate causing a carbide/carbon composition gradient to form on the substrate. At a sufficiently high partial pressure of hydrocarbon gas, a film of high-emissivity pure carbon will eventually form over the substrate.

  3. COMPARISON OF THE RECOVERIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND TOTAL COLIFORMS FROM DRINKING WATER BY THE MI AGAR METHOD AND THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY-APPROVED MEMBRANE FILTER METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water regulations under the Final Coliform Rule require that total coliform-positive drinking water samples be examined for the presence of Escherichia coli or fecal coliforms. The current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved membrane filter (MF) method for E. c...

  4. Three-dimensional boundary layer calculation by a characteristic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houdeville, R.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the three-dimensional boundary layer equations for bodies of arbitrary shape is presented. In laminar flows, the application domain extends from incompressible to hypersonic flows with the assumption of chemical equilibrium. For turbulent boundary layers, the application domain is limited by the validity of the mixing length model used. In order to respect the hyperbolic nature of the equations reduced to first order partial derivative terms, the momentum equations are discretized along the local streamlines using of the osculator tangent plane at each node of the body fitted coordinate system. With this original approach, it is possible to overcome the use of the generalized coordinates, and therefore, it is not necessary to impose an extra hypothesis about the regularity of the mesh in which the boundary conditions are given. By doing so, it is possible to limit, and sometimes to suppress, the pre-treatment of the data coming from an inviscid calculation. Although the proposed scheme is only semi-implicit, the method remains numerically very efficient.

  5. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium. PMID:25842535

  6. Methods for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John S.

    1999-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency response program which provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. This report reviews methodologies for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), which were investigated for use in the next generation of ARAC diagnostic and dispersion models. The ABL height, hABL, is an essential parameter in atmospheric dispersion modeling, controlling the extent of the vertical mixing of pollutants near the surface. Although eventually instrumentation (radiosonde, lidar, sodar, etc.) may provide accurate means for determining hABL, at present the availability of such data is too limited to provide a general capability for ARAC. The current operational ARAC diagnostic models use a fixed value of hABL for any given time. ARAC's new models support a horizontally-varying atmospheric boundary layer height, which is used to generate meteorological (mean wind, temperature, etc.) and turbulence fields. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods to derive the ABL height for all atmospheric stability regimes. One of our key requirements is to provide approaches which are applicable to routinely available data, which may be of limited temporal and spatial resolution. The final objective is to generate a consistent set of meteorological and turbulence or eddy diffusivity fields to drive the new ARAC dispersion model. A number of alternative definitions of the atmospheric boundary layer exist, leading to different approaches to deriving hABL. The definitions are based on either the turbulence characteristics of the atmosphere or the vertical structure of one or more meteorological variables. Most diagnostic analyses determine hABL from profiles of temperature or occasionally wind. A class of methods of considerable current interest are based on Richardson number criteria. Prognostic methods calculate the

  7. Recovery of spores of Clostridium botulinum in yeast extract agar and pork infusion agar after heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Odlaug, T E; Pflug, I J

    1977-10-01

    Yeast extract agar, pork infusion agar, and modifications of these media were used to recover heated Clostridium botulinum spores. The D- and z-values were determined. Two type A strains and one type B strain of C. botulinum were studied. In all cases the D-values were largest when the spores were recovered in yeast extract agar, compared to the D-values for spores recovered in pork infusion agar. The z-values for strains 62A and A16037 were largest when the spores were recovered in pork infusion agar. The addition of sodium bicarbonate and sodium thioglycolate to pork infusion agar resulted in D-values for C. botulinum 62A spores similar to those for the same spores recovered in yeast extract agar. The results suggest that sodium bicarbonate and sodium thioglycolate should be added to recovery media for heated C. botulinum spores to obtain maximum plate counts. PMID:335970

  8. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (∼80 °C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials. PMID:26116384

  9. Automatic Surface Inoculation of Agar Trays1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Judd R.; Mills, Stacey M.; Boykin, Elizabeth H.

    1972-01-01

    A machine is described which automatically inoculates a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture by use of either a conventional inoculating loop or a cotton swab. Isolated colonies were obtained with an inoculating loop when a heavy inoculum (109 cells/ml) was used or with a cotton swab when a light inoculum (ca. 104 cells/ml) was used. Trays containing combinations of differential or selective media were used to (i) separate mixtures of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, (ii) facilitate isolation of organisms from clinical specimens, and (iii) compare colony growth characteristics of pure cultures. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. Images PMID:16349943

  10. Poisoning with brown fly agaric, Amanita regalis.

    PubMed

    Elonen, E; Tarssanen, L; Härkönen, M

    1979-01-01

    Three patients ate different amounts of a common northern mushroom, brown fly agaric, Amanita regalis. All of them believed they had eaten delicious parasol mushrooms, Macrolepiota procera. The symptoms of poisoning began 1--2 hours after ingestion of the mushrooms. All the patients had marked gastrointestinal symptoms: nausea and heavy vomiting. Two had central nervous system manifestations and cholinergic symptoms: hallucinations, confusion, or loss of consciousness as well as copious salivation, or sweating. All patients recovered within 4--24 hours without any damage to liver, kidneys or central nervous system. It seems that cooking the mushrooms does not completely neutralize the toxic agents of Amanita regalis. The analysis of fried mushrooms shows that it may be possible to identify mushrooms reliably from the remains of a meal. PMID:760400

  11. Layered method of electrode for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Russell R.

    1991-07-30

    A process for fabricating a fuel electrode comprising: slurry dipping to form layers which are structurally graded from all or mostly all stabilized zirconia at a first layer, to an outer most layer of substantially all metal powder, such an nickel. Higher performaance fuel electrodes may be achieved if sinter active stabilized zirconia doped for electronic conductivity is used.

  12. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H J H; Temmink, H; Buisman, C J N

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates. PMID:26937632

  13. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H. J. H.; Temmink, H.; Buisman, C. J. N.

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates. PMID:26937632

  14. Evaluation of CP Chromo Select Agar for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Mammad; Waldherr, Kerstin; Kundi, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The European Directive on drinking water quality has included mCP agar as the reference method for recovering Clostridium perfringens from drinking waters. In the present study, three media (mCP, TSCF and CP Chromo Select Agar) were evaluated for recovery of C. perfringens in different surface water samples. Out of 139 water samples, using a membrane filtration technique, 131 samples (94.2%) were found to be presumptively positive for C. perfringens in at least one of the culture media. Green colored colonies on CP Chromo Select Agar (CCP agar) were counted as presumptive C. perfringens isolates. Out of 483 green colonies on CCP agar, 96.3% (465 strains, indole negative) were identified as C. perfringens, and 15 strains (3.1%) were indole positive and were identified as Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium bifermentans or Clostridium tetani. Only 3 strains (0.6%) gave false positive results and were identified as Clostridium fallax, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tertium. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically no significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The mCP method is very onerous for routine screening and bacterial colonies could not be used for further biochemical testing. The colonies on CCP and TSCF were easy to count and subculture for confirmation tests. TSCF detects sulfite-reducing clostridia, including species other than C. perfringens, and in some cases excessive blackening of the agar frustrated counting of the colonies. If the contamination was too high, TSCF did not consistently produce black colonies and as a consequence, the colonies were white and gave false negative results. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that CCP agar was the most useful medium for C. perfringens recovery in water samples. PMID:23816139

  15. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-01-01

    Background The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. Methods A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar. PMID:14613587

  16. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  17. Methods of Fabricating a Layer of Metallic Glass-Based Material Using Immersion and Pouring Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement layers of metallic glass-based materials. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a layer of metallic glass includes: applying a coating layer of liquid phase metallic glass to an object, the coating layer being applied in a sufficient quantity such that the surface tension of the liquid phase metallic glass causes the coating layer to have a smooth surface; where the metallic glass has a critical cooling rate less than 1000 K/s; and cooling the coating layer of liquid phase metallic glass to form a layer of solid phase metallic glass.

  18. Mass production of spores of lactic acid-producing Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 on agar plate.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of sporangiospores (spores) of Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 (identical to NRRL 395 and ATCC 9363) on potato-dextrose-agar medium was studied aiming at starting its L(+)-lactic acid fermentation directly from spore inoculation. Various parameters including harvest time, sowed spore density, size of agar plate, height of air space, and incubation mode of plate (agar-on-bottom or agar-on-top) were studied. Ordinarily used shallow Petri dishes were found out to be unsuitable for the full growth of R. oryzae sporangiophores. In a very wide range of the sowed spore density, the smaller it was, the greater the number of the harvested spores was. It was also interesting to find out that R. oryzae grown downward vertically with a deep air space in an agar-on-top mode gave larger amount of spores than in an agar-on-bottom mode at 30°C for 7-day cultivation. Scale-up of the agar plate culture from 26.4 to 292 cm(2) was studied, resulting in the proportional relationship between the number of the harvested spores/plate and the plate area in the deep Petri dishes. The number of plates of 50 cm in diameter needed for 100 m(3) industrial submerged fermentation started directly from 2 × 10(5) spores/mL inoculum size was estimated as about 6, from which it was inferred that such a fermentation would be feasible. Designing a 50 cm plate and a method of spreading and collecting the spores were suggested. Bioprocess technological significance of the "full-scale industrial submerged fermentation started directly from spore inoculation omitting pre-culture" has been discussed. PMID:23658025

  19. Organic photovoltaic device with interfacial layer and method of fabricating same

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Tobin J.; Hains, Alexander W.

    2013-03-19

    An organic photovoltaic device and method of forming same. In one embodiment, the organic photovoltaic device has an anode, a cathode, an active layer disposed between the anode and the cathode; and an interfacial layer disposed between the anode and the active layer, the interfacial layer comprising 5,5'-bis[(p-trichlorosilylpropylphenyl)phenylamino]-2,2'-bithiophene (PABTSi.sub.2).

  20. A facile method for the construction of covalently cross-linked layered double hydroxides layer-by-layer films: Enhanced stability and delayed release of guests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; An, Qi; Hu, Yingmo; Luan, Xinglong; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Tianhang; Zhang, Yihe

    2015-07-01

    Stable composite films that contain layered double hydroxide (LDH) are appealing materials but are also difficult to prepare. We report here a facile strategy for the fabrication of covalently cross-linked layer-by-layer multilayers that incorporate LDH. The films were first prepared using the traditional LbL method based on non-covalent interactions, followed by infiltration of a photoactive small molecule DAS. UV light was then used to cross-link the multilayers. The stability of the cross-linked film was remarkably enhanced. Furthermore, the release profile of incorporated molecules from layered double hydroxide was significantly delayed.

  1. Characterization of bionanocomposite films prepared with agar and paper-mulberry pulp nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-09-22

    Crystallized nanocellulose (CNC) was separated from paper-mulberry (Broussonetia kazinoki Siebold) bast pulp by sulfuric acid hydrolysis method and they were blended with agar to prepare bionanocomposite films. The effect of CNC content (1, 3, 5 and 10 wt% based on agar) on the mechanical, water vapor permeability (WVP), and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were studied. Changes of the cellulose fibers in structure, morphology, crystallinity, and thermal properties of the films were evaluated using FT-IR, TEM, SEM, XRD, and TGA analysis methods. The CNC was composed of fibrous and spherical or elliptic granules of nano-cellulose with sizes of 50-60 nm. Properties of agar film such as mechanical and water vapor barrier properties were improved significantly (p<0.05) by blending with the CNC. The tensile modulus and tensile strength of agar film increased by 40% and 25%, respectively, in the composite film with 5 wt% of CNC, and the WVP of agar film decreased by 25% after formation of nanocomposite with 3 wt% of CNC. The CNC obtained from the paper-mulberry bast pulp can be used as a reinforcing agent for the preparation of bio-nanocomposites, and they have a high potential for the development of completely biodegradable food packaging materials. PMID:24906782

  2. Evaluation of methods for application of epitaxial layers of superconductor and buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The recent achievements in a number of laboratories of critical currents in excess of 1.0x10{sup 6} amp/cm{sup 2} at 77K in YBCO deposited over suitably textured buffer/substrate composites have stimulated interest in the potential applications of coated conductors at high temperatures and high magnetic fields. As of today, two different approaches for obtaining the textured substrates have been identified. These are: Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL) ion-beam assisted deposition called IBAD, to obtain a highly textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer on nickel alloy strips, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) rolling assisted, bi-axial texturized substrate option called RABiTS. Similarly, based on the published literature, the available options to form High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) films on metallic, semi-metallic or ceramic substrates can be divided into: physical methods, and non-physical or chemical methods. Under these two major groups, the schemes being proposed consist of: - Sputtering - Electron-Beam Evaporation - Flash Evaporation - Molecular Beam Epitaxy - Laser Ablation - Electrophoresis - Chemical Vapor Deposition (Including Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) - Sol-Gel - Metal-Organic Decomposition - Electrodeposition, and - Aerosol/Spray Pyrolysis. In general, a spool- to-spool or reel-to-reel type of continuous manufacturing scheme developed out of any of the above techniques, would consist of: - Preparation of Substrate Material - Preparation and Application of the Buffer Layer(s) - Preparation and Application of the HTS Material and Required Post-Annealing, and - Preparation and Application of the External Protective Layer. These operations would be affected by various process parameters which can be classified into: Chemistry and Material Related Parameters; and Engineering and Environmental Based Parameters. Thus, one can see that for successful development of the coated conductors manufacturing process, an

  3. Methods and results of boundary layer measurements on a glider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nes, W. V.

    1978-01-01

    Boundary layer measurements were carried out on a glider under natural conditions. Two effects are investigated: the effect of inconstancy of the development of static pressure within the boundary layer and the effect of the negative pressure difference in a sublaminar boundary layer. The results obtained by means of an ion probe in parallel connection confirm those results obtained by means of a pressure probe. Additional effects which have occurred during these measurements are briefly dealt with.

  4. Method for depositing layers of high quality semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Chi C.

    2001-08-14

    Plasma deposition of substantially amorphous semiconductor materials is carried out under a set of deposition parameters which are selected so that the process operates near the amorphous/microcrystalline threshold. This threshold varies as a function of the thickness of the depositing semiconductor layer; and, deposition parameters, such as diluent gas concentrations, must be adjusted as a function of layer thickness. Also, this threshold varies as a function of the composition of the depositing layer, and in those instances where the layer composition is profiled throughout its thickness, deposition parameters must be adjusted accordingly so as to maintain the amorphous/microcrystalline threshold.

  5. AgarTrap-mediated genetic transformation using intact gemmae/gemmalings of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed

    Tsuboyama-Tanaka, Shoko; Kodama, Yutaka

    2015-03-01

    The dioecious liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha L., is an emerging model plant. Various molecular biological techniques have been optimized for M. polymorpha for the past several years, and recently we reported a simplified Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method using sporelings (immature thalli from spores) of M. polymorpha. This method, termed AgarTrap (Agar-utilized Transformation with Pouring Solutions), completed by exchanging appropriate solutions on a single Petri dish to produce a sufficient number of independent transgenic sporelings. However, because spores are produced by crosses between males and females, the genetic backgrounds of resulting transgenic sporelings are not uniform. To easily produce transgenic liverworts with a uniform genetic background using AgarTrap, we developed an AgarTrap-mediated transformation method using intact gemmae/gemmalings produced by asexual reproduction. Using AgarTrap with male and female gemmae/gemmalings produced a sufficient number of independent transgenic gemmalings with uniform genetic backgrounds. The optimized transformation efficiencies were approximately 30 and 50 % in males and females, respectively. As with AgarTrap using sporelings, AgarTrap using intact gemmae/gemmalings will be useful in promoting studies of the molecular biology of M. polymorpha. PMID:25663453

  6. A study of methods to investigate nozzle boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, Laura L.

    1991-01-01

    To further investigate nozzle flow, numerical computations are employed. The computations produce complete flow velocity and temperature fields within the nozzle. As a check, these results can be compared with experimental data at the wall. Once an accurate numerical scheme has been validated, it can be used as a design tool to predict the performance of other nozzle designs without the cost of experimental testing. Typically, the numerical analysis assumes either a laminar boundary layer or a fully turbulent boundary layer which is steady and two-dimensional. Boundary layer transition is not considered. Computing both the completely laminar boundary layer and the completely turbulent boundary layer conditions gives the minimum and maximum wall heat flux possible for a specified geometry. When the experimental heat flux measurements lie between these two values, the nature of the boundary layer is unknown. The boundary layer may have transitioned from laminar to turbulent; three-dimensional structures may be present in the boundary layer, or the inlet flow conditions may not be correctly specified in the computation.

  7. Lubrication approximation in completed double layer boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S.; Phan-Thien, N.; Fan, X.-J.

    This paper reports on the results of the numerical simulation of the motion of solid spherical particles in shear Stokes flows. Using the completed double layer boundary element method (CDLBEM) via distributed computing under Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM), the effective viscosity of suspension has been calculated for a finite number of spheres in a cubic array, or in a random configuration. In the simulation presented here, the short range interactions via lubrication forces are also taken into account, via the range completer in the formulation, whenever the gap between two neighbouring particles is closer than a critical gap. The results for particles in a simple cubic array agree with the results of Nunan and Keller (1984) and Stoksian Dynamics of Brady etal. (1988). To evaluate the lubrication forces between particles in a random configuration, a critical gap of 0.2 of particle's radius is suggested and the results are tested against the experimental data of Thomas (1965) and empirical equation of Krieger-Dougherty (Krieger, 1972). Finally, the quasi-steady trajectories are obtained for time-varying configuration of 125 particles.

  8. Antimicrobial and physical-mechanical properties of agar-based films incorporated with grapefruit seed extract.

    PubMed

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-02-15

    The use of synthetic petroleum based packaging films caused serious environmental problems due to their difficulty in recycling and poor biodegradability. Therefore, present study was aimed to develop natural biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging films as an alternative for the synthetic packaging films. As a natural antimicrobial agent, grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been incorporated into agar to prepare antimicrobial packaging film. The films with different concentrations of GSE were prepared by a solvent casting method and the resulting composite films were examined physically and mechanically. In addition, the films were characterized by FE-SEM, XRD, FT-IR and TGA. The incorporation of GSE caused increase in color, UV barrier, moisture content, water solubility and water vapor permeability, while decrease in surface hydrophobicity, tensile strength and elastic modulus of the films. As the concentration of GSE increased from 0.6 to 13.3 μg/mL, the physical and mechanical properties of the films were affected significantly. The addition of GSE changed film microstructure of the film, but did not influence the crystallinity of agar and thermal stability of the agar-based films. The agar/GSE films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against three test food pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. These results suggest that agar/GSE films have potential to be used in an active food packaging systems for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food. PMID:24507339

  9. Formation of magnetoconvection by photoabsorptive methods in ferrofluid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotsky, Dmitry; Mezulis, Ansis; Blums, Elmars

    2013-04-01

    A periodic concentration grating was induced in a layer of ferrofluid by photoabsorption and thermophoresis under the action of the applied uniform magnetic field. The application of the external field causes the appearance of an internal demagnetizing field within the layer and of magnetic forces due to the non-uniform distribution of concentration. The induced magnetic forces cause the appearance of parasitic microconvection within the layer. The experimental observations of the formation stage of the grating are interpreted to explain magnetoconvection, making use of numerical simulations.

  10. Comparison of several methods for predicting separation in a compressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhart, P. M.; Bober, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Several methods for predicting the separation point for a compressible turbulent boundary layer were applied to the flow over a bump on a wind-tunnel wall. Measured pressure distributions were used as input. Two integral boundary-layer methods, three finite-difference boundary-layer methods, and three simple methods were applied at five free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.354 to 0.7325. Each of the boundary-layer methods failed to explicitly predict separation. However, by relaxing the theoretical separation criteria, several boundary-layer methods were made to yield reasonable separation predictions, but none of the methods accurately predicted the important boundary-layer parameters at separation. Only one of the simple methods consistently predicted separation with reasonable accuracy in a manner consistent with the theory. The other methods either indicated several possible separation locations or only sometimes predicted separation.

  11. Selected elements in fly agaric Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Kunito, T; Kubota, R; Lipka, K; Mazur, A; Falandysz, Justyna J; Tanabe, S

    2007-09-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb, Rb, Se, Sb, Sr, V, Tl and Zn have been determined in the whole fruiting bodies, as well as separately in caps and stalks, of fly agaric collected from three geographically distant sites in northern part of Poland. The elements were determined using ICP-MS, ICP-OES, HG-AAS and CV-AAS, respectively. For elements such as Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Ga, Mo, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, Tl, and V concentrations were similar in the caps and stalks, respectively, and for K, Zn, Ag, Ca, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Rb and Se were greater in the caps, while for Co, Cs and Na in the stalks. For Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sr, Tl and V concentration in the caps showed spatial variations (P<0.05), while for Cu, K, Mg, Na, Se and Zn was independent of the site. The elements such as K with median or mean in the caps between 37,000 and 43,000 microg/g.dm and Mg with 920 and 1,100 microg/g dm were most abundant. Next, within median values range from approximately 100 to 500 microg/g dm were such as Ca, Fe and Al, and in descending order they followed by Rb (100-400 microg/g dm); V, Na, Zn (50-200 microg/g dm); Cu, Mn (10-50 microg/g dm); Cd (10-20 microg/g dm); Se (5 microg/g dm); Ba (<1-3); Cr, Ag, Pb, Sr (<1-2 microg/g dm); Cs, Co, Hg (<1-1 microg/g dm); Ga (<0.5), Sb, Mo and Tl (<0.1 microg/g dm). PMID:17849303

  12. Growth kinetics of Salmonella enterica in Hajna tetrathionate broth, Rappaport broth and modified semisolid Rappaport agar

    PubMed Central

    FUJIHARA, Masatoshi; TABUCHI, Hiroyuki; UEGAKI, Kaho

    2015-01-01

    To determine the appropriate method for isolating Salmonella enterica, we compared the growth of S. enterica serovars using three selective enrichment media. S. enterica was more successfully isolated from artificially contaminated fecal samples after enrichment in Hajna tetrathionate broth or modified semisolid Rappaport agar than in Rappaport broth. Since most bacteria (other than motile S. enterica) do not migrate on modified semisolid Rappaport agar, the growth characteristics of S. enterica can be interpreted easily and quickly. Two S. enterica isolates did not migrate on modified semisolid Rappaport agar, but did grow in Hajna tetrathionate broth, which suggests that the combined use of these selective enrichment media is appropriate for isolating S. enterica. PMID:26498402

  13. Feasibility study of optical boundary layer transition detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzazy, M.; Modarress, D.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    A high sensitivity differential interferometer was developed to locate the region where the boundary layer flow undergoes transition from laminar to turbulent. Two laboratory experimental configurations were used to evaluate the performance of the interferometer: open shear layer, and low speed wind tunnel turbulent spot configuration. In each experiment, small temperature fluctuations were introduced as the signal source. Simultaneous cold wire measurements were compared with the interferometer data. The comparison shows that the interferometer is sensitive to very weak phase variations in the order of 0.001 the laser wavelength. An attempt to detect boundary layer transition over a flat plate at NASA-Langley Unitary Supersonic Wind Tunnel using the interferometer system was performed. The phase variations during boundary layer transition in the supersonic wind tunnel were beyond the minimum signal-to-noise level of the instrument.

  14. Assessment of Etest as an alternative to agar dilution for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsi; Taylor, Thomas H; Pettus, Kevin; Trees, David

    2014-05-01

    We studied whether the Etest can be used as an alternative to agar dilution to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities of ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime in Neisseria gonorrhoeae surveillance. One hundred fifteen clinical and laboratory isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were tested following the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-approved CLSI standard agar dilution method and, separately, by the Etest according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The MICs were determined and compared. Ten laboratory-generated mutants were used to simulate substantially nonsusceptible specimens. The Etest and agar dilution methods were well correlated. Statistical tests produced regression R2 values of 88%, 82%, and 85% and Pearson correlation coefficients of 92%, 91%, and 92% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. When paired comparisons were made, the two tests were 88.7%, 80%, and 87% within 1 log2 dilution from each other for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. The within-2-log2 agreements were 99.1%, 98.3%, and 94.8% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. Notwithstanding the good correlations and the within-2-log2 general agreement, the Etest results produced slightly lower MICs than the agar dilution results. In conclusion, we found that the Etest can be effectively used as an alternative to agar dilution testing to determine the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, although we recommend further research into extremely resistant isolates. For isolates within the typical range of clinical MICs, reexamination of the Etest interpretation of susceptible and nonsusceptible categories would likely allow for successful transition from agar dilution to the Etest. PMID:24554750

  15. Assessment of Etest as an Alternative to Agar Dilution for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Thomas H.; Pettus, Kevin; Trees, David

    2014-01-01

    We studied whether the Etest can be used as an alternative to agar dilution to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities of ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime in Neisseria gonorrhoeae surveillance. One hundred fifteen clinical and laboratory isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were tested following the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-approved CLSI standard agar dilution method and, separately, by the Etest according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The MICs were determined and compared. Ten laboratory-generated mutants were used to simulate substantially nonsusceptible specimens. The Etest and agar dilution methods were well correlated. Statistical tests produced regression R2 values of 88%, 82%, and 85% and Pearson correlation coefficients of 92%, 91%, and 92% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. When paired comparisons were made, the two tests were 88.7%, 80%, and 87% within 1 log2 dilution from each other for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. The within-2-log2 agreements were 99.1%, 98.3%, and 94.8% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. Notwithstanding the good correlations and the within-2-log2 general agreement, the Etest results produced slightly lower MICs than the agar dilution results. In conclusion, we found that the Etest can be effectively used as an alternative to agar dilution testing to determine the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, although we recommend further research into extremely resistant isolates. For isolates within the typical range of clinical MICs, reexamination of the Etest interpretation of susceptible and nonsusceptible categories would likely allow for successful transition from agar dilution to the Etest. PMID:24554750

  16. Development of hyperspectral imaging technique for salmonella enteritidis and typhimurium on agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a common cause of foodborne disease resulting from the consumption of contaminated food products. Although a direct plating method is widely used for presumptive positive screening of pathogenic Salmonella colonies on agar plates, it is labor-intensive, time-consuming and also prone to...

  17. Fabrication of biofuel cell containing enzyme catalyst immobilized by layer-by-layer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Kyu Hwan; Han, Sang Won; Koh, Won-Gun; Kwon, Yongchai

    2015-07-01

    Enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) employing a layer-by-layer (LbL) structure consisting of multiple layers of glucose oxidase (GOx) and poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) at carbon nanotube (CNT) ([GOx/PEI]n/CNT) is fabricated. The [GOx/PEI]n/CNT serves as anode catalyst for promoting glucose reaction, while Pt is employed as cathode catalyst. To evaluate effect of [GOx/PEI]n/CNT on EBC performance and stability, several characterizations are conducted. The optimal GOx/PEI layer is determined electrochemically, and it turns out that [GOx/PEI]2/CNT is the best. Electron transfer rate constant of the optimal layer is 11.3 s-1, its glucose sensitivity is 83 μAmM-1cm-2, and maximum power density of EBC adopting [GOx/PEI]2/CNT is 1.34 mWcm-2. The values are superior to those of other reference structures, indicating that the [GOx/PEI]2/CNT can produce excellent reactivity, followed by improved EBC performance. In terms of redox reaction mechanism of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) within [GOx/PEI]2/CNT, glucose does not affect the redox reaction of FAD, while oxygen serves as mediator in transferring electrons and protons produced by glucose oxidation into those for reduction reaction of FAD. It is also found that the [GOx/PEI]2/CNT is confined by surface reaction and the reaction is quasi-reversible. Regarding long-term stability, [GOx/PEI]2/CNT maintains ∼83% of initial activity even after two weeks.

  18. Modifying of Cotton Fabric Surface with Nano-ZnO Multilayer Films by Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Uğur, Sule S; Sarıışık, Merih; Aktaş, A Hakan; Uçar, M Ciğdem; Erden, Emre

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticle-based multilayer nanocomposite films were fabricated on cationized woven cotton fabrics via layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pretreated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC) by pad-batch method. XPS and SEM were used to examine the deposited nano-ZnO multilayer films on the cotton fabrics. The nano-ZnO films deposited on cotton fabrics exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The results also showed that the coated fabrics with nano-ZnO multilayer films enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics from UV radiation. Physical tests (tensile strength of weft and warp yarns, air permeability and whiteness values) were performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with ZnO nanoparticles to evaluate the effect of layer-by-layer (LbL) process on cotton fabrics properties. PMID:20596450

  19. Modifying of Cotton Fabric Surface with Nano-ZnO Multilayer Films by Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticle–based multilayer nanocomposite films were fabricated on cationized woven cotton fabrics via layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pretreated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC) by pad-batch method. XPS and SEM were used to examine the deposited nano-ZnO multilayer films on the cotton fabrics. The nano-ZnO films deposited on cotton fabrics exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The results also showed that the coated fabrics with nano-ZnO multilayer films enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics from UV radiation. Physical tests (tensile strength of weft and warp yarns, air permeability and whiteness values) were performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with ZnO nanoparticles to evaluate the effect of layer-by-layer (LbL) process on cotton fabrics properties. PMID:20596450

  20. Comparison of ChromID Agar and Clostridium difficile Selective Agar for Effective Isolation of C. difficile from Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Joo

    2014-01-01

    Background ChromID Clostridium difficile agar (IDCd; bioMérieux SA, France) is a recently developed chromogenic medium for rapid and specific isolation of C. difficile. We compared the performance of IDCd with that of Clostridium difficile Selective Agar (CDSA). Methods A total of 530 fresh stool specimens were collected from patients with clinical signs compatible with C. difficile infection, and cultures for C. difficile were performed on IDCd and CDSA. C. difficile colonies were identified by spore staining, odor, use of an ANI identification test kit (bioMérieux SA), and multiplex PCR for tcdA, tcdB, and tpi. Results The concordance rate between IDCd and CDSA was 90.6% (480/530). The positivity rates on IDCd on days 1 and 2 (55.6% and 85.0%, respectively) were significantly higher than those on CDSA (19.4% and 75.6%, respectively) (P<0.001 for day 1 and P=0.02 for day 2), but the detection rates on IDCd and CDSA on day 3 were not different (89.4% vs. 82.8%, P=0.0914). On day 3, the recovery rates for non-C. difficile isolates on IDCd and CDSA were 30.2% (160/530) and 22.1% (117/530), respectively (P=0.0075). Clostridium spp. other than C. difficile were the most prevalent non-C. difficile isolates on both media. Conclusions The culture positivity rates on IDCd and CDSA were not different on day 3 but IDCd may allow for rapid and sensitive detection of C. difficile within 2 days of cultivation. PMID:24422190

  1. Method for removing surface-damaged layers from nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fawley, R. W.

    1968-01-01

    Electrical discharge machining /EDM/ damaged layer can be effectively removed from Rene 41, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, and Monel K-500 by abrasive-grit blasting or electropolishing /at room temperature/ at a current density of 5A/inches squared in a water solution of phosphoric and sulfuric acids.

  2. Shooting method for solution of boundary-layer flows with massive blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, T.-M.; Nachtsheim, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A modified, bidirectional shooting method is presented for solving boundary-layer equations under conditions of massive blowing. Unlike the conventional shooting method, which is unstable when the blowing rate increases, the proposed method avoids the unstable direction and is capable of solving complex boundary-layer problems involving mass and energy balance on the surface.

  3. Comparative evaluation of chromogenic agar medium and conventional culture system for isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Laila; Haque, Rezwana; Salam, Md. Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Urine is the most frequent specimen received for culture/sensitivity by clinical laboratories. The microbiological performance of HiCrome UTI agar medium was compared with Blood agar and MacConkey agar for isolation and presumptive identification of bacteria from urine culture. Methods: A total of 443 consecutively collected midstream and/or catheter-catch urine samples from patients attending the Islami Bank Medical College Hospital, Rajshahi, Bangladesh during January to December, 2012 were cultured. Urine samples showing pus cells ≥ 5/HPF were inoculated on to Blood agar (BA), MacConkey agar (MAC) and HiCrome UTI agar (CA) media simultaneously and incubated overnight aerobically at 370C. Rate of isolation and presumptive identification of bacterial species were compared for different media. Results: Culture yielded a total of 199 bacterial isolates from 189 (42.67%) positive plates including 179 (40.40%) unimicrobial and 10 (2.26%) polymicrobial (mixed growth of pair of bacteria) growths. Both HiCrome UTI agar and Blood agar media supported 100% growths while 151 (75.88%) growths were observed on MacConkey agar. The rate of presumptive identification was found significantly higher on HiCrome UTI agar (97.49%) than MAC agar (67.34%) (P<0.001) as primary urine culture medium. Of 199 isolates, E. coli was found to be the leading uropathogen isolated from 118 (59.30%) samples with its presumptive identification rate of 95.76%, 93.22% and 5.93% on CA, MAC and BA respectively. All 10 (100%) polymicrobial growths were demonstrated distinctly on CA against only 01(10%) on each BA and MAC. Conclusion: HiCrome UTI agar was found to be more useful as primary urine culture medium in both higher rate of isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens in comparison to conventional media. Its inherent characteristics in demonstrating polymicrobial growth and ease of rapid identification by distinct colony colour are unique. PMID:25225521

  4. Preparation of an agar-silver nanoparticles (A-AgNp) film for increasing the shelf-life of fruits.

    PubMed

    Gudadhe, Janhavi A; Yadav, Alka; Gade, Aniket; Marcato, Priscyla D; Durán, Nelson; Rai, Mahendra

    2014-12-01

    Preparation of protective coating possessing antimicrobial properties is present day need as they increase the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. In the present study, preparation of agar-silver nanoparticle film for increasing the shelf life of fruits is reported. Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) biosynthesised using an extract of Ocimum sanctum leaves, were mixed with agar-agar to prepare an agar-silver nanoparticles (A-AgNp) film. This film was surface-coated over the fruits, Citrus aurantifolium (Thornless lime) and Pyrus malus (Apple), and evaluated for the determination of antimicrobial activity of A-AgNp films using disc diffusion method, weight loss and shelf life of fruits. This study demonstrates that these A-AgNp films possess antimicrobial activity and also increase the shelf life of fruits. PMID:25429496

  5. Apparatus and method of manufacture for depositing a composite anti-reflection layer on a silicon surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and associated method are provided. A first silicon layer having at least one of an associated passivation layer and barrier is included. Also included is a composite anti-reflection layer including a stack of layers each with a different thickness and refractive index. Such composite anti-reflection layer is disposed adjacent to the first silicon layer.

  6. Thermal characterization of magnetically aligned carbonyl iron/agar composites.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Bleis, D; Vales-Pinzón, C; Freile-Pelegrín, Y; Alvarado-Gil, J J

    2014-01-01

    Composites of magnetic particles into polymeric matrices have received increasing research interest due to their capacity to respond to external magnetic or electromagnetic fields. In this study, agar from Gelidium robustum has been chosen as natural biocompatible polymer to build the matrix of the magnetic carbonyl iron particles (CIP) for their uses in biomedical fields. Heat transfer behavior of the CIP-agar composites containing different concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% w/w) of magnetically aligned and non-aligned CIP in the agar matrix was studied using photothermal radiometry (PTR) in the back-propagation emission configuration. The morphology of the CIP-agar composites with aligned and non-aligned CIP under magnetic field was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed a dominant effect of CIP concentration over the alignment patterns induced by the magnetic field, which agrees with the behavior of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. Agar served as a perfect matrix to be used with CIP, and CIP-agar composites magnetically aligned at 20% CIP concentration can be considered as promising 'smart' material for hyperthermia treatments in the biomedical field. PMID:24274482

  7. Simple protocol for secondary school hands-on activity: Electrophoresis of pre-stained nucleic acids on agar-agar borate gels.

    PubMed

    Britos, Leticia; Goyenola, Guillermo; Oroño, Silvia Umpiérrez

    2004-09-01

    An extremely simple, inexpensive, and safe method is presented, which emulates nucleic acids isolation and electrophoretic analysis as performed in a research environment, in the context of a secondary school hands-on activity. The protocol is amenable to an interdisciplinary approach, taking into consideration the electrical and chemical parameters of the electrophoretic system. Furthermore, the laboratory is framed in a more comprehensive pedagogical setting, which addresses the methodological aspects of a pivotal scientific enterprise such as the Human Genome Project. In this setting, the hands-on activity is complemented with animations, paper models, and discussions. Additionally, our results indicate that the use of borate buffer and agar-agar gels suits many of the experiments included in college-level laboratory activities, which currently make use of more expensive agarose gels and TBE or TAE buffers. PMID:21706751

  8. Gold nanorod-photosensitizer complex obtained by layer-by-layer method for photodynamic/photothermal therapy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Beom; Lee, Tae Heon; Yoon, Il; Shim, Young Key; Lee, Woo Kyoung

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanorod (GNR)-photosensitizer (PS) complex was prepared using anionic PS (sodium salt of purpurin-18) and cationic poly(allylamine hydrochloride) by layer-by-layer method, and was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and zeta potential. The GNR-PS complex is a promising agent for synergistic (photothermal and photodynamic) therapy (PTT/PDT), in which PTT generates heat as well as operates the PS release which maximize the following PDT activity. The combined dual therapy, PTT followed by PDT, exhibits a significantly higher photocytotoxicity result based on synergistic effect of hyperthermia from PTT as well as singlet oxygen photogeneration from PDT. PMID:25630881

  9. Characterization of agar/soy protein biocomposite films: Effect of agar on the extruded pellets and compression moulded films.

    PubMed

    Garrido, T; Etxabide, A; Guerrero, P; de la Caba, K

    2016-10-20

    Agar/soy protein biocomposite films were successfully processed by extrusion and compression moulding, obtaining transparent and homogeneous films. The conformational changes occurred during the extrusion process and the effect of agar on the final properties were analyzed. As shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and specific mechanical energy (SME) values, during the extrusion process protein denatured and unfolded protein chains could interact with agar. These interactions were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the secondary structure was determined from the amide I band. Those interactions were supported by the decrease of film solubility. Furthermore, the good compatibility between agar and soy protein was confirmed by the images from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:27474583

  10. Method for applying a photoresist layer to a substrate having a preexisting topology

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela

    2004-01-20

    The present invention describes a method for preventing a photoresist layer from delaminating, peeling, away from the surface of a substrate that already contains an etched three dimensional structure such as a hole or a trench. The process comprises establishing a saturated vapor phase of the solvent media used to formulate the photoresist layer, above the surface of the coated substrate as the applied photoresist is heated in order to "cure" or drive off the retained solvent constituent within the layer. By controlling the rate and manner in which solvent is removed from the photoresist layer the layer is stabilized and kept from differentially shrinking and peeling away from the substrate.

  11. Radiation survival of murine and human melanoma cells utilizing two assay systems: monolayer and soft agar.

    PubMed Central

    Yohem, K. H.; Slymen, D. J.; Bregman, M. D.; Meyskens, F. L.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation response of murine and human melanoma cells assayed in bilayer soft agar and monolayer was examined. Cells from the murine melanoma Cloudman S91 CCL 53.1 cell line and three human melanoma cell strains (C8146C, C8161, and R83-4) developed in our laboratory were irradiated by single dose X-rays and plated either in agar or on plastic. D0 values were the same within 95% confidence intervals for cells from the human melanoma cell strains C8146C, C8161, and R83-4 but were dissimilar for the murine cell line CCL 53.1 Dq values were different for all cells studied. The shape of the survival curve for all four melanomas was not identical for cells assayed in soft agar versus cells grown on plastic. This would indicate that apparent radiosensitivity was influenced by the method of assay although there were no apparent consistent differences between the curves generated by monolayer or bilayer soft agar assays. PMID:3348949

  12. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Shin, Tae-Sung; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance spectra measured in the visible and near-infrared spectral range from 400 and 1,000 nm (473 narrow spectral bands). Multivariate regression methods were used to estimate and predict hyperspectral data from RGB color values. The six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Eschetichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) were grown on Rainbow agar plates. A line-scan pushbroom hyperspectral image sensor was used to scan 36 agar plates grown with pure STEC colonies at each plate. The 36 hyperspectral images of the agar plates were divided in half to create training and test sets. The mean Rsquared value for hyperspectral image estimation was about 0.98 in the spectral range between 400 and 700 nm for linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial regression models and the detection accuracy of the hyperspectral image classification model with the principal component analysis and k-nearest neighbors for the test set was up to 92% (99% with the original hyperspectral images). Thus, the results of the study suggested that color-based detection may be viable as a multispectral imaging solution without much loss of prediction accuracy compared to hyperspectral imaging.

  13. Integral method for the calculation of three-dimensional, laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    The method for turbulent flows is a further development of an existing method; profile families with two parameters and a lag entrainment method replace the simple entrainment method and power profiles with one parameter. The method for laminar flows is a new development. Moment of momentum equations were used for the solution of the problem, the profile families were derived from similar solutions of boundary layer equations. Laminar and turbulent flows at the wings were calculated. The influence of wing tapering on the boundary layer development was shown. The turbulent boundary layer for a revolution ellipsoid is calculated for 0 deg and 10 deg incidence angles.

  14. Method of making dense, conformal, ultra-thin cap layers for nanoporous low-k ILD by plasma assisted atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-05-24

    Barrier layers and methods for forming barrier layers on a porous layer are provided. The methods can include chemically adsorbing a plurality of first molecules on a surface of the porous layer in a chamber and forming a first layer of the first molecules on the surface of the porous layer. A plasma can then be used to react a plurality of second molecules with the first layer of first molecules to form a first layer of a barrier layer. The barrier layers can seal the pores of the porous material, function as a diffusion barrier, be conformal, and/or have a negligible impact on the overall ILD k value of the porous material.

  15. Use of Dehydrated Agar to Estimate Microbial Water Quality for Horticulture Irrigation.

    PubMed

    Meador, Dustin P; Fisher, Paul R; Guy, Charles L; Harmon, Philip F; Peres, Natalia A; Teplitski, Max

    2016-07-01

    Petrifilms are dehydrated agar culture plates that have been used to quantify colony forming units (CFU) mL of either aerobic bacteria (Petrifilm-AC) or fungus (Petrifilm-YM), depending on substrate composition. Microbes in irrigation systems can indicate biofilm risk and potential clogging of irrigation emitters. The research objective was to compare counts on Petrifilms versus traditional, hydrated-agar plates using samples collected from recirculated irrigation waters and cultures of isolated known species. The estimated count (in CFU mL) from a recirculated irrigation sample after 7 d of incubation on Petrifilm-YM was only 5.5% of the count quantified using sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) with chloramphenicol after 14 d. In a separate experiment with a known species, Petrifilm-YM did not successfully culture zoospores of . Isolates of viable zoospores were cultured successfully on potato-dextrose agar (PDA), with comparable counts with a vegetable juice medium supplemented with the antibiotics pimaricin, ampicillin, rifamycin, pentochloronitrobenzene and hymexazol (PARP-H). The quantification of pv. Begoniaceae on Petrifilm-AC was not significantly different ( < 0.05) than on PDA, but was lower than on Reasoner and Goldrich agar (R2A) or with a hemocytometer. The current formulation of Petrifilm-YM is unlikely to be a useful monitoring method for plant pathogens in irrigation water because of the inability to successfully culture oomycetes. However, Petrifilm-AC was an effective method to quantify bacteria and can provide an easy-to-use on-farm tool to monitor biofilm risk and microbial density. PMID:27380096

  16. Method for producing functionally graded nanocrystalline layer on metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Hershberger, Jeffrey G.

    2010-03-23

    An improved process for the creation or formation of nanocrystalline layers on substrates' surfaces is provided. The process involves "prescuffing" the surface of a substrate such as a metal by allowing friction to occur on the surface by a load-bearing entity making rubbing contact and moving along and on the substrate's surface. The "prescuffing" action is terminated when the coefficient of friction between the surface and the noise is rising significantly. Often, the significant rise in the coefficient of friction is signaled by a change in pitch of the scuffing action sound emanating from the buffeted surface. The "prescuffing" gives rise to a harder and smoother surface which withstands better any inadequate lubrication that may take place when the "prescuffed" surface is contacted by other surfaces.

  17. Shape integral method for magnetospheric shapes. [boundary layer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method is developed for calculating the shape of any magnetopause to arbitrarily high precision. The method uses an integral equation which is evaluated for a trial shape. The resulting values of the integral equation as a function of auxiliary variables indicate how close one is to the desired solution. A variational method can then be used to improve the trial shape. Some potential applications are briefly mentioned.

  18. Method for growing low defect, high purity crystalline layers utilizing lateral overgrowth of a patterned mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor); Daud, Taher (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method for growing a high purity, low defect layer of semiconductor is described. This method involves depositing a patterned mask of a material impervious to impurities of the semiconductor on a surface of a blank. When a layer of semiconductor is grown on the mask, the semiconductor will first grow from the surface portions exposed by the openings in the mask and will bridge the connecting portions of the mask to form a continuous layer having improved purity, since only the portions overlying the openings are exposed to defects and impurities. The process can be iterated and the mask translated to further improve the quality of grown layers.

  19. Formation of Hard Surfacing Layers of WC-Co with Electron Beam Cladding Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Nobuyuki; Morimoto, Junji

    Hard surfacing layers of WC-Co/Ni-base self-fluxing alloy were successfully formed on a steel substrate using an electron beam cladding method. The WC particles were densely and homogenously dispersed within the Ni-base self-fluxing alloy without porosity. The effect of the electron beam conditions on layer formation was investigated, and the cladding layer properties were examined by hardness tests, abrasive wear tests and immersion corrosion tests. It was found that the cladding layers showed higher hardness and abrasion resistance with increasing WC-Co mixing ratio, however, corrosion resistance decreased with WC-Co mixing ratio. A coating layer having high abrasive and corrosion resistance simultaneously was achieved by multiple cladding of high WC-Co mixing ratio layers after low WC-Co mixing ratio layers.

  20. Method of forming a multiple layer dielectric and a hot film sensor therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopson, Purnell, Jr. (Inventor); Tran, Sang Q. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is a method of forming a multiple layer dielectric for use in a hot-film laminar separation sensor. The multiple layer dielectric substrate is formed by depositing a first layer of a thermoelastic polymer such as on an electrically conductive substrate such as the metal surface of a model to be tested under cryogenic conditions and high Reynolds numbers. Next, a second dielectric layer of fused silica is formed on the first dielectric layer of thermoplastic polymer. A resistive metal film is deposited on selected areas of the multiple layer dielectric substrate to form one or more hot-film sensor elements to which aluminum electrical circuits deposited upon the multiple layered dielectric substrate are connected.

  1. Production of microbial medium from defatted brebra (Milletia ferruginea) seed flour to substitute commercial peptone agar

    PubMed Central

    Andualem, Berhanu; Gessesse, Amare

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate and optimize microbial media that substitute peptone agar using brebra seed defatted flour. Methods 'Defatted process, inoculums preparation, evaluation of bacterial growth, preparation of cooked and hydrolyzed media and growth turbidity of tested bacteria were determined. Results Two percent defatted flour was found to be suitable concentration for the growth of pathogenic bacteria: Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Salmonella (NCTC 8385) and Shigella flexneri (ATCC 12022) (S. flexneri), while 3% defatted flour was suitable for Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) (S. aureus). E. coli (93±1) and S. flexneri (524±1) colony count were significantly (P≤0.05) greater in defatted flour without supplement than in supplemented medium. E. coli [(3.72×109±2) CFU/mL], S. aureus [(7.4×109±2) CFU/mL], S. flexneri [(4.03×109±2) CFU/mL] and Salmonella [(2.37×109±1) CFU/mL] in non-hydrolyzed sample were statistically (P≤0.05) greater than hydrolyzed one and commercial peptone agar. Colony count of Salmonella [(4.55×109±3) CFU/mL], S. flexneri [(5.40×109±3) CFU/mL] and Lyesria moncytogenes (ATCC 19116) [(5.4×109±3) CFU/mL] on raw defatted flour agar was significantly (P≤0.05) greater than cooked defatted flour and commercial peptone agar. Biomass of E. coli, S. aureus, Salmonella and Enterococcus faecalis in non-hydrolyzed defatted flour is highly increased over hydrolyzed defatted flour and commercial peptone broth. Conclusions The defatted flour agar was found to be better microbial media or comparable with peptone agar. The substances in it can serve as sources of carbon, nitrogen, vitamins and minerals that are essential to support the growth of microorganisms without any supplements. Currently, all supplements of peptone agar are very expensive in the market. PMID:24075344

  2. Hyperspectral imaging for detecting pathogens grown on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Line, John E.; Park, Bosoon; Windham, William R.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth pattern, color, etc.) of colonies grown on agar plates has been widely used to tentatively differentiate organisms. However, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate target organisms like Campylobacters from other contaminants grown together on the same agar plates. A hyperspectral imaging system operating at the visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectral region from 400 nm to 900 nm was set up to measure spectral signatures of 17 different Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter subspecies. Protocols for culturing, imaging samples and for calibrating measured data were developed. The VNIR spectral library of all 17 organisms commonly encountered in poultry was established from calibrated hyperspectral images. A classification algorithm was developed to locate and identify Campylobacters, non-Campylobacter contaminants, and background agars with 99.29% accuracy. This research has a potential to be expanded to detect other pathogens grown on agar media.

  3. Layered devices having surface curvature and method of constructing same

    DOEpatents

    Woodbury, Richard C.; Perkins, Raymond T.; Thorne, James M.

    1989-01-01

    A method of treating a substrate having first and second sides with corresponding oppositely facing first and second surfaces, to produce curvature in the first surface. The method includes the steps of removing material, according to a predetermined pattern, from the second side of the substrate, and applying a stress-producing film of material to at least one surface of the substrate to thereby cause the substrate to bend to produce the desired curvature in the first surface.

  4. Methods for making a multi-layer seal for electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2007-05-29

    Multi-layer seals are provided that find advantageous use for reducing leakage of gases between adjacent components of electrochemical devices. Multi-layer seals of the invention include a gasket body defining first and second opposing surfaces and a compliant interlayer positioned adjacent each of the first and second surfaces. Also provided are methods for making and using the multi-layer seals, and electrochemical devices including said seals.

  5. Comparison of Methods for Determining Boundary Layer Edge Conditions for Transition Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Data previously obtained for the X-33 in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel have been reanalyzed to compare methods for determining boundary layer edge conditions for use in transition correlations. The experimental results were previously obtained utilizing the phosphor thermography technique to monitor the status of the boundary layer downstream of discrete roughness elements via global heat transfer images of the X-33 windward surface. A boundary layer transition correlation was previously developed for this data set using boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach. An algorithm was written in the present study to extract boundary layer edge quantities from higher fidelity viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions to develop transition correlations that account for viscous effects on vehicles of arbitrary complexity. The boundary layer transition correlation developed for the X-33 from the viscous solutions are compared to the previous boundary layer transition correlations. It is shown that the boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach are significantly different than those extracted from viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions. The present results demonstrate the differences obtained in correlating transition data using different computational methods.

  6. The layer-flame method of bark burning

    SciTech Connect

    Fincker, F.Z.; Rundygin, Y.A.; Kubyshkin, I.B.

    1995-11-01

    At the present time many countries including Russia have at their disposal a considerable number of abled boiler installations designed for an utilization of different biomasses and wastes of the timber industry (such as peat, bark, sawdust, chips and so on). The traditional technology of burning with the application of layer or flame processes, especially in case of unstable heat-technical characteristics of a fuel to be used does not guarantee a reliable and economical performance of a boiler installation. For example, dampness of bark used in enterprises of the pulp and paper industry as an energetic fuel may vary from 50 till 70 per cent during a short period of time. Operation of the boiler installation is also complicated by variable composition of a fuel. Fuel particles may be either very small or very coarse, that is, they may differ from one another, according to their sizes, by thousand times. To flatten the heat-technical and fractional characteristics of a fuel there is used a difficult and cumbersome equipment the performance of which is complicated by the possibility that some of coarse metallic or mineral fractions can penetrate together with a fuel into the process. There is needed a search for new ways of updating the efficiency of energetic application of such fuels. Investigations of this problem are being carried out in a few directions including different variations of thermal treatment of the described material (pyrolysis, gasification and so on). A lot of works is connected with the exploration of boiler installations equipped with diverse modifications of the fluid bed furnaces. However, as a result of their having proven to be too expensive, difficult to create, unreliable and for they also take too much electricity on their own needs, these furnaces have not yet found wider spreading as for the burning of such hard-combustible fuels as bark and other highly damp wastes of timber industry.

  7. Susceptibility testing of Propionibacterium acnes comparing agar dilution with E test.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M A; Alperstein, P; France, K; Vellozzi, E M; Isenberg, H D

    1996-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has been identified as a significant agent of nosocomial infections, including endophthalmitis. Data concerning susceptibility of P. acnes to newer beta-lactam antibiotics and fluoroquinolones are limited. Recent reports suggest that quinolones have activity against these organisms sufficient to warrant further study. We undertook a study to select appropriate antimicrobial agents for use in a rabbit model of P. acnes endophthalmitis. We compared the antibiotic susceptibilities of P. acnes by using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards method of agar dilution with the E test. Thirteen clinical isolates obtained from eye specimens and three American Type Culture Collection control strains were tested against 14 antibiotics. All the clinical isolates were susceptible by both methods to piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ampicillin-sulbactam, ticarcillin-clavulanate, cefotaxime, cefotetan, ceftriaxone, cefoxitin, and imipenem in addition to clindamycin but were resistant to metronidazole. The clinical P. acnes isolates also displayed high-level susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and ofloxacin. Almost all the P. acnes strains demonstrated E-test MICs within 2 dilutions of the MICs observed by the agar dilution method. Those few strains for which discrepancies were noted exhibited E-test susceptibilities three- to fivefold dilutions lower than the agar dilution method susceptibilities but only with ampicillin-sulbactam, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and/or clindamycin. On the basis of our study, all of clinical eye isolates were susceptible to these newer antimicrobial agents and the two methods demonstrated similar susceptibility patterns. PMID:8815076

  8. [Image processing method based on prime number factor layer].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yifang; Yuan, Zhirun

    2004-10-01

    In sport games, since the human body movement data are mainly drawn from the sports field with the hues or even interruptions of commercial environment, some difficulties must be surmounted in order to analyze the images. It is obviously not enough just to use the method of grey-image treatment. We have applied the characteristics of the prime number function to the human body movement images and thus introduce a new method of image processing in this article. When trying to deal with certain moving images, we can get a better result. PMID:15553856

  9. Versatile alignment layer method for new types of liquid crystal photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemeyer, V.; Bryant, D.; Lu, L.; Bos, P.; Reich, R.; Clark, H.; Berry, S.; Bozler, C.; Yaroshchuk, O.

    2015-07-21

    Liquid crystal photonic devices are becoming increasingly popular. These devices often present a challenge when it comes to creating a robust alignment layer in pre-assembled cells. In this paper, we describe a method of infusing a dye into a microcavity to produce an effective photo-definable alignment layer. However, previous research on such alignment layers has shown that they have limited stability, particularly against subsequent light exposure. As such, we further describe a method of utilizing a pre-polymer, infused into the microcavity along with the liquid crystal, to provide photostability. We demonstrate that the polymer layer, formed under ultraviolet irradiation of liquid crystal cells, has been effectively localized to a thin region near the substrate surface and provides a significant improvement in the photostability of the liquid crystal alignment. This versatile alignment layer method, capable of being utilized in devices from the described microcavities to displays, offers significant promise for new photonics applications.

  10. Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) poisoning, case report and review.

    PubMed

    Satora, Leszek; Pach, Dorota; Butryn, Beata; Hydzik, Piotr; Balicka-Slusarczyk, Barbara

    2005-06-01

    Gathering and eating mushrooms and other plants containing psychoactive substances has become increasingly popular among young people experimenting with drugs. Dried fly agaric Amanita muscaria fruiting bodies were eaten by five young persons (18-21 years of age) at a party in order to evoke hallucinations. Visual and auditory hallucinations occurred in four of them, whereas a 18-year-old girl lost consciousness. The following morning, she went to the Clinic of Toxicology. Due to the fact that not all the active substances present in the fly agaric have been identified, and some of them have an effect after a period of latency, the patient was admitted for several days of observation during which check-up examinations were performed. After four days without any problems, she was discharged. The poisoning regressed with no organ complications. The remaining persons who had eaten the fly agaric were free from any complaints. PMID:15904689

  11. Method for producing sintered ceramic, layered, circular fuel pellets

    DOEpatents

    Harlow, John L.

    1983-01-01

    A compacting die wherein the improvement comprises providing a screen in the die cavity, the screen being positioned parallel to the side walls of said die and dividing the die cavity into center and annular compartments. In addition, the use of this die in a method for producing an annular clad ceramic fuel material is disclosed.

  12. Method of depositing an electrically conductive oxide buffer layer on a textured substrate and articles formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, M. Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.

    2003-09-09

    An article with an improved buffer layer architecture includes a substrate having a textured metal surface, and an electrically conductive lanthanum metal oxide epitaxial buffer layer on the surface of the substrate. The article can also include an epitaxial superconducting layer deposited on the epitaxial buffer layer. An epitaxial capping layer can be placed between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer. A method for preparing an epitaxial article includes providing a substrate with a metal surface and depositing on the metal surface a lanthanum metal oxide epitaxial buffer layer. The method can further include depositing a superconducting layer on the epitaxial buffer layer, and depositing an epitaxial capping layer between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer.

  13. Method of depositing an electrically conductive oxide buffer layer on a textured substrate and articles formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, M. Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.

    2005-10-18

    An article with an improved buffer layer architecture includes a substrate having a textured metal surface, and an electrically conductive lanthanum metal oxide epitaxial buffer layer on the surface of the substrate. The article can also include an epitaxial superconducting layer deposited on the epitaxial buffer layer. An epitaxial capping layer can be placed between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer. A method for preparing an epitaxial article includes providing a substrate with a metal surface and depositing on the metal surface a lanthanum metal oxide epitaxial buffer layer. The method can further include depositing a superconducting layer on the epitaxial buffer layer, and depositing an epitaxial capping layer between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer.

  14. Effect of BiTek agar on lysostaphin susceptibility of staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, B E; Dawson, K; Akers, K

    1990-01-01

    Staphylococci which were considered to be lysostaphin susceptible on P agar containing Bacto-Agar showed different degrees of resistance to lysostaphin when tested on P agar made with BiTek agar. As a result, lysostaphin-susceptible strains were misidentified as lysostaphin-resistant strains. Images PMID:2254432

  15. Digital image quantification of siderophores on agar plates

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Megan Y.; Santelli, Cara M.; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents visual image data and detailed methodology for the use of a new method for quantifying the exudation of siderophores during fungal growth. The data include images showing time series for calibration, fungal exudation, and negative controls, as well as replication accuracy information. In addition, we provide detailed protocols for making CAS assay layer plates, the digital analysis protocol for determining area of color change, and discuss growth media that do and do not work with the layer plate method. The results of these data, their interpretation, and further discussion can be found in Andrews et al., 2016 [1]. PMID:26937467

  16. Digital image quantification of siderophores on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-03-01

    This article presents visual image data and detailed methodology for the use of a new method for quantifying the exudation of siderophores during fungal growth. The data include images showing time series for calibration, fungal exudation, and negative controls, as well as replication accuracy information. In addition, we provide detailed protocols for making CAS assay layer plates, the digital analysis protocol for determining area of color change, and discuss growth media that do and do not work with the layer plate method. The results of these data, their interpretation, and further discussion can be found in Andrews et al., 2016 [1]. PMID:26937467

  17. Photovoltaic structures having a light scattering interface layer and methods of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiangxin; Compaan, Alvin D.; Paudel, Naba Raj

    2015-10-13

    Photovoltaic (PV) cell structures having an integral light scattering interface layer configured to diffuse or scatter light prior to entering a semiconductor material and methods of making the same are described.

  18. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  19. Susceptibility of a polycaprolactone-based root canal filling material to degradation using an agar-well diffusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Hiraishi, Noriko; Sadek, Fernanda T.; King, Nigel M.; Ferrari, Marco; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cholesterol esterase is both a component of salivary hydrolases as well as an inflammatory cell-derived enzyme and has been shown to cause biodegradation of methacrylate-based resin composites. This study examined whether Resilon, a polycaprolactone-based thermoplastic root filling material is susceptible to biodegradation by cholesterol esterase using agar-well diffusion assay of serially-diluted aqueous Resilon emulsions that were dispersed in agar. Materials and methods Emulsions of Resilon and polycaprolactone were prepared and dispersed in agar on culture plates. Two different concentrations of a cholesterol esterase (0.3 and 1.2 U/mL) were prepared and fed to wells prepared in the agar plates using an agar-well diffusion assay for examination the degradation of polymeric materials. Results Degradation of the emulsified Resilon was manifested as the formation of clear zones of different sizes around the agar wells. No clear zones were observed in agar wells that contain sterile distilled water as the negative control. Clinical significance Although dispersion Resilon into an emulsion is not the way in which this material is employed as a root filling material, the potential for Resilon to be degraded by cholesterol esterase is of potential concern as one cannot limit the degradation of extruded Resilon from a root apex by monocyte-derived macrophages to just the anatomical root apex. As the present study employed a high concentration of cholesterol esterase, further studies should be directed to examining the degradation of Resilon using macrophage cell cultures. PMID:18578181

  20. Method of producing strained-layer semiconductor devices via subsurface-patterning

    DOEpatents

    Dodson, Brian W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for patterning subsurface features in a semiconductor device, wherein the semiconductor device includes an internal strained layer. The method comprises creating a pattern of semiconductor material over the semiconductor device, the semiconductor material having a predetermined thickness which stabilizes areas of the strained semiconductor layer that lie beneath the pattern. Subsequently, a heating step is applied to the semiconductor device to cause a relaxation in areas of the strained layer which do not lie beneath the semiconductor material pattern, whereby dislocations result in the relaxed areas and impair electrical transport therethrough.

  1. Double-layered target and identification method of individual target correlated with evaporation residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, D.; Morimoto, K.

    2015-08-01

    A double-layered target system and an identification method (target ID) for individual targets mounted on a rotating wheel using correlation with evaporation residues were newly developed for the study of superheavy elements (SHE). The target system can be used in three modes: conventional single-layered mode, double-layered mode, and energy-degrader mode. The target ID method can be utilized for masking a target, measuring an excitation function without changing the beam energy from the accelerator, and searching for SHE nuclides using multiple targets during a single irradiation.

  2. Hyperspectral Imaging for Detecting Pathogens Grown on Agar Plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth...

  3. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  8. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  9. Thickness Mapping of Eleven Retinal Layers Segmented Using the Diffusion Maps Method in Normal Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Kafieh, Raheleh; Rabbani, Hossein; Abramoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the thickness map of eleven retinal layers in normal subjects by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and evaluate their association with sex and age. Mean regional retinal thickness of 11 retinal layers was obtained by automatic three-dimensional diffusion map based method in 112 normal eyes of 76 Iranian subjects. We applied our previously reported 3D intraretinal fast layer segmentation which does not require edge-based image information but rather relies on regional image texture. The thickness maps are compared among 9 macular sectors within 3 concentric circles as defined by ETDRS. The thickness map of central foveal area in layers 1, 3, and 4 displayed the minimum thickness. Maximum thickness was observed in nasal to the fovea of layer 1 and in a circular pattern in the parafoveal retinal area of layers 2, 3, and 4 and in central foveal area of layer 6. Temporal and inferior quadrants of the total retinal thickness and most of other quadrants of layer 1 were significantly greater in the men than in the women. Surrounding eight sectors of total retinal thickness and a limited number of sectors in layers 1 and 4 significantly correlated with age. PMID:25960888

  10. A two-layer approach to the coupled coherent states method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Grigolo, Adriano; Ronto, Miklos; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a two-layer scheme is outlined for the coupled coherent states (CCS) method, dubbed two-layer CCS (2L-CCS). The theoretical framework is motivated by that of the multiconfigurational Ehrenfest method, where different dynamical descriptions are used for different subsystems of a quantum mechanical system. This leads to a flexible representation of the wavefunction, making the method particularly suited to the study of composite systems. It was tested on a 20-dimensional asymmetric system-bath tunnelling problem, with results compared to a benchmark calculation, as well as existing CCS, matching-pursuit/split-operator Fourier transform, and configuration interaction expansion methods. The two-layer method was found to lead to improved short and long term propagation over standard CCS, alongside improved numerical efficiency and parallel scalability. These promising results provide impetus for future development of the method for on-the-fly direct dynamics calculations.

  11. Accurate calculation of computer-generated holograms using angular-spectrum layer-oriented method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Liangcai; Zhang, Hao; Kong, Dezhao; Jin, Guofan

    2015-10-01

    Fast calculation and correct depth cue are crucial issues in the calculation of computer-generated hologram (CGH) for high quality three-dimensional (3-D) display. An angular-spectrum based algorithm for layer-oriented CGH is proposed. Angular spectra from each layer are synthesized as a layer-corresponded sub-hologram based on the fast Fourier transform without paraxial approximation. The proposed method can avoid the huge computational cost of the point-oriented method and yield accurate predictions of the whole diffracted field compared with other layer-oriented methods. CGHs of versatile formats of 3-D digital scenes, including computed tomography and 3-D digital models, are demonstrated with precise depth performance and advanced image quality. PMID:26480062

  12. Application of magnetic printing method to hard-disk media with double recording layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takuya; Kuboki, Yoshiyuki; Ajishi, Yoshifumi; Saito, Akira

    2003-05-01

    The magnetic printing method, which can duplicate soft magnetic patterns containing digital information such as servosignals formed on a master disk onto recording media, enables signals to be written to hard-disk media having high coercivities above 6000 Oe. We propose the application of the magnetic printing method to a hard-disk medium having double recording layers, one layer of which has high coercivity and is to be printed with digital information. This double recording layer medium is a hard-disk medium that has a magnetic read-only-memory (MROM) layer. In this study, we demonstrated a method for printing to this medium, which has MROM, and discussed the magnetic properties and recording performances of this medium.

  13. Simulation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate by diffusion–reaction based continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaoling; Nie, Kai; Li, Mingpeng; Sun, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Various species of bacteria form highly organized spatially-structured aggregates known as biofilms. To understand how microenvironments impact biofilm growth dynamics, we propose a diffusion–reaction continuum model to simulate the formation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar plate. The extended finite element method combined with level set method are employed to perform the simulation, numerical results show the quantitative relationship between colony morphologies and nutrient depletion over time. Considering that the production of polysaccharide in wild-type cells may enhance biofilm spreading on the agar plate, we inoculate mutant colony incapable of producing polysaccharide to verify our results. Predictions of the glutamate source biofilm’s shape parameters agree with the experimental mutant colony better than that of glycerol source biofilm, suggesting that glutamate is rate limiting nutrient for Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate, and the diffusion-limited is a better description to the experiment. In addition, we find that the diffusion time scale is of the same magnitude as growth process, and the common-employed quasi-steady approximation is not applicable here.

  14. Simulation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate by diffusion-reaction based continuum model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaoling; Nie, Kai; Li, Mingpeng; Sun, Qingping

    2016-01-01

    Various species of bacteria form highly organized spatially-structured aggregates known as biofilms. To understand how microenvironments impact biofilm growth dynamics, we propose a diffusion-reaction continuum model to simulate the formation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar plate. The extended finite element method combined with level set method are employed to perform the simulation, numerical results show the quantitative relationship between colony morphologies and nutrient depletion over time. Considering that the production of polysaccharide in wild-type cells may enhance biofilm spreading on the agar plate, we inoculate mutant colony incapable of producing polysaccharide to verify our results. Predictions of the glutamate source biofilm's shape parameters agree with the experimental mutant colony better than that of glycerol source biofilm, suggesting that glutamate is rate limiting nutrient for Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate, and the diffusion-limited is a better description to the experiment. In addition, we find that the diffusion time scale is of the same magnitude as growth process, and the common-employed quasi-steady approximation is not applicable here. PMID:27434099

  15. Approximate two layer (inviscid/viscous) methods to model aerothermodynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    Approximate inviscid and boundary layer techniques for aerodynamic heating calculations are discussed. An inviscid flowfield solution is needed to provide surface pressures and boundary-layer edge properties. Modified Newtonian pressures coupled with an approximate shock shape will suffice for relatively simple shapes like sphere-cones with cone half-angles between 15 and 45 deg. More accurate approximate methods have been developed which make use of modified Maslen techniques. Slender and large angle sphere-cones and more complex shapes generally require an Euler code, like HALIS, to provide that information. The boundary-layer solution is reduced significantly by using the axisymmetric analog and approximate heating relations developed by Zoby, et al. (1981). Analysis is presented for the calculation of inviscid surface streamlines and metrics. Entropy-layer swallowing effects require coupling the inviscid and boundary-layer solutions.

  16. Method of deforming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a textured metallic substrate and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Dominic F.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and biaxially textured articles having a deformed epitaxial layer formed therefrom for use with high temperature superconductors, photovoltaic, ferroelectric, or optical devices. A buffer layer is epitaxially deposited onto biaxially-textured substrates and then mechanically deformed. The deformation process minimizes or eliminates grooves, or other irregularities, formed on the buffer layer while maintaining the biaxial texture of the buffer layer. Advantageously, the biaxial texture of the buffer layer is not altered during subsequent heat treatments of the deformed buffer. The present invention provides mechanical densification procedures which can be incorporated into the processing of superconducting films through the powder deposit or precursor approaches without incurring unfavorable high-angle grain boundaries.

  17. An efficient and positivity-preserving layer method for modeling radiation belt diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Zhang, L.; Wang, C.; Li, X.; Albert, J. M.; Chan, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    An efficient and positivity-preserving layer method is introduced to solve the radiation belt diffusion equation and is applied to study the bounce resonance interaction between relativistic electrons and magnetosonic waves. The layer method with linear interpolation, denoted by LM-L (layer method-linear), requires the use of a large number of grid points to ensure accurate solutions. We introduce a monotonicity- and positivity-preserving cubic interpolation method to be used with the Milstein-Tretyakov layer method. The resulting method, called LM-MC (layer method-monotone cubic), can be used to solve the radiation belt diffusion equation with a much smaller number of grid points than LM-L while still being able to preserve the positivity of the solution. We suggest that LM-MC can be used to study long-term dynamics of radiation belts. We then develop a 2-D LM-MC code and use it to investigate the bounce resonance diffusion of radiation belt electrons by magnetosonic waves. Using a previously published magnetosonic wave model, we demonstrate that bounce resonance with magnetosonic waves is as important as gyroresonance; both can cause several orders of magnitude increase of MeV electron fluxes within 1 day. We conclude that bounce resonance with magnetosonic waves should be taken into consideration together with gyroresonance.

  18. Thermal-induced ageing of agar solutions: impact on the structural and mechanical properties of agar gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bosi; Bentaleb, Ahmed; Louerat, Frédéric; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    Numerous hydrogels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature, aqueous polymer solutions brought to a boil. Although the incubation time of the polymer solution at such a high temperature could be used as a tuning parameter, its impact on the subsequent gelation has been poorly investigated. Here we study the effect of prolonged heating at 80°C on a 1.5% wt solution of agar, a natural polysaccharide. The incubation time is varied from a few hours up to five days. We show that the agar sol. continuously degrades as the result of both the hydrolysis and the intermolecular oxidation of the polymer chains. Furthermore, electronic microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments reveal that gels formed from older agar sols display an increasingly coarser microstructure composed of micron-sized aggregated pieces of polysaccharides, in contrast with the fibrous-like structure of gels made from fresh sols. Along with structural changes prolonged incubation time leads to weaker gels of lower shear elastic modulus. Finally, macro-indentation experiments coupled to direct visualization show that increasing the incubation time of the agar sol. decreases the yield strain of the gel by a factor of three, while the rupture scenario turns continuously from brittle to ductile-like. Acknowledging funding from BioMérieux & CNRS.

  19. Agar-agar entrapment increases the stability of endo-β-1,4-xylanase for repeated biodegradation of xylan.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Zainab; Shahid, Faiza; Ul Qader, Shah Ali; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-04-01

    Microbial xylanases, specially endo-β-1,4-xylanase catalyzes the hydrolysis of xylan, is considered one of the most significant hydrolases. It has numerous applications but most extensively is utilized in paper and pulp industry as a bio-bleaching agent. Immobilization technique is comprehensively studied with the expectation of modifying and improving enzyme stability and characteristics for commercial purposes. Currently, matrix entrapment technique is applied to immobilize endo-β-1,4-xylanase within agar-agar gel beads produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29. Maximal enzyme immobilization yield was achieved at 2.5% of agar-agar concentration. Optimized conditions demonstrated an increase in the optimal reaction time from 05 min to 30 min and incubation temperature from 50 °C to 60 °C with reference to free enzyme whereas; no effect was observed for optimum pH. Entrapment technique uniquely changed the kinetic parameters of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase (Km: 0.5074 mg min(-1) to 0.5230 mg min(-1) and Vmax: 4773 U min(-1) to 968 U min(-1)) as compared to free enzyme. However, immobilized enzyme displayed broad thermal stability and retained 79.0% of its initial activity at 80 °C up to 30 min whereas; free enzyme completely lost its activity at this temperature. With respect to economic feasibility, the immobilized enzyme showed impressive recycling efficiency up to six reaction cycles. PMID:25603143

  20. Infrared thermography analysis of thermal diffusion induced by RF magnetic field on agar phantoms loaded with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, Jose; Macías, J. D.; Caballero-Aguilar, L.; Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several treatments for fighting malignant tumors have been designed. However these procedures have well known inconveniences, depending on their applicability, tumor size and side effects, among others. Magnetic hyperthermia is a safe, non-invasive method for cancer therapy. This treatment is applied via elevation of target tissue temperature by dissipation of heat from Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs), previously located within the tumor. The induction of heat causes cell death and therefore the removal of the tumor. In this work the thermal diffusion in phantoms of agar loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied using the infrared thermography technique, which is widely used in biology/medicine (e.g. skin temperature mapping). Agar is one of the materials used to simulate different types of body tissues, these samples are known as "phantoms". Agar is of natural origin, low cost and high degree of biocompatibility. In this work the agar gel was embedded with MNPs by coprecipitation and placed in an alternating magnetic field radiation. As a consequence, the energy from the radiation source is dissipated as heat and then transferred from the MNP to the gel, increasing its temperature. For the temperature analysis, the samples of agar gel were stimulated by RF magnetic field generated by coils. Heating was measured with infrared thermography using a Thermovision A20M infrared camera. Thermographic images allowed obtaining the dependence of thermal diffusion in the phantom as a function of the magnitude of the applied RF magnetic field and the load of magnetic particles.

  1. Compressible Boundary Layer Predictions at High Reynolds Number using Hybrid LES/RANS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of compressible boundary layer flow at three different Reynolds numbers (Re(sub delta) = 5.59x10(exp 4), 1.78x10(exp 5), and 1.58x10(exp 6) are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. Variations in the recycling/rescaling method, the higher-order extension, the choice of primitive variables, the RANS/LES transition parameters, and the mesh resolution are considered in order to assess the model. The results indicate that the present model can provide good predictions of the mean flow properties and second-moment statistics of the boundary layers considered. Normalized Reynolds stresses in the outer layer are found to be independent of Reynolds number, similar to incompressible turbulent boundary layers.

  2. Investigation of supersonic turbulent boundary-layer separation on a compression ramp by an integral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, D. K.; Czarnecki, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the feasibility of using a boundary layer integral method to study the separation of a turbulent boundary layer on a two dimensional ramp at supersonic speeds. The numerical calculations were made for a free stream Mach number of 3, a Reynolds number of 10 million, and over a ramp angle range from 0 deg to 30 deg. For ramp angles where no flow separation was indicated, theoretical calculations were in reasonable agreement with experimental data except for a somewhat belated rise in pressure. For larger ramp angles, where separation was present, the investigation produced results that were not in agreement with experiment or with results calculated by time dependent Navier-Stokes methods. This apparently was true because no provision had been made for a proper shock boundary layer interaction where strong normal pressure gradients are induced within the boundary layer under the shock independent of surface curvature effects.

  3. Co-precipitation with PVP and Agar to Improve Physicomechanical Properties of Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam; Kiafar, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Ibuprofen is a problematic drug in tableting due to its viscoelastic properties. Additionally its high cohesivity results in low flowability. In this study, co-precipitation of ibuprofen with varying concentration of agar and PVP to optimize properties of Ibuprofen was carried out. Materials and Methods: Co-precipitates of ibuprofen- PVP or agar were prepared by solvent evaporation technique under vacuum condition. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X -ray diffraction of powder (XRDP) and FT-IR spectroscopy were used to investigate the solid state characteristics of the co-precipitates. The dissolution behavior, flowability, particle size and compaction properties of various batches were also studied. Results: Co-precipitation of drug with agar led to a change in habit from needle to plate shape crystals, while drug –PVP co-precipitates had agglomerated structure and consisted of numerous crystals which had been aggregated together. The co-precipitates showed improved flow properties compared with ibuprofen alone. Precipitation of ibuprofen with these additives led to modification in the dissolution of the drug. Agar in 1% w/w improved slightly the dissolution rate of drug while PVP had a negative impact and led to reduction in the dissolution rate of drug to less than that of pure drug. The all obtained co-precipitates exhibited significantly improved tableting behavior compared with drug crystals alone. This may be due to this fact that, the polymer covering the drug particles increases and changes the nature of the surface area available for interparticulate bonds between particles. DSC, XRDP and FT-IR experiments showed that drug particles, in co-precipitates samples, did not undergo polymorphic modifications. Conclusion: The study highlights the influence of polymeric additives on crystallization process leading to modified performance. PMID:24250942

  4. Co-precipitation with PVP and Agar to Improve Physicomechanical Properties of Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam; Kiafar, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Ibuprofen is a problematic drug in tableting due to its viscoelastic properties. Additionally its high cohesivity results in low flowability. In this study, co-precipitation of ibuprofen with varying concentration of agar and PVP to optimize properties of Ibuprofen was carried out. Materials and Methods: Co-precipitates of ibuprofen- PVP or agar were prepared by solvent evaporation technique under vacuum condition. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X -ray diffraction of powder (XRDP) and FT-IR spectroscopy were used to investigate the solid state characteristics of the co-precipitates. The dissolution behavior, flowability, particle size and compaction properties of various batches were also studied. Results: Co-precipitation of drug with agar led to a change in habit from needle to plate shape crystals, while drug –PVP co-precipitates had agglomerated structure and consisted of numerous crystals which had been aggregated together. The co-precipitates showed improved flow properties compared with ibuprofen alone. Precipitation of ibuprofen with these additives led to modification in the dissolution of the drug. Agar in 1% w/w improved slightly the dissolution rate of drug while PVP had a negative impact and led to reduction in the dissolution rate of drug to less than that of pure drug. The all obtained co-precipitates exhibited significantly improved tableting behavior compared with drug crystals alone. This may be due to this fact that, the polymer covering the drug particles increases and changes the nature of the surface area available for interparticulate bonds between particles. DSC, XRDP and FT-IR experiments showed that drug particles, in co-precipitates samples, did not undergo polymorphic modifications. Conclusion: The study highlights the influence of polymeric additives on crystallization process leading to modified performance. PMID:24250936

  5. [Cryofractographic study of intercellular junctions in the populations of agar-cultivated Bordetella pertussis].

    PubMed

    Vysotskiĭ, V V; Vaisman, I Sh; Efimova, O G; Chemurzieva, N V

    1985-09-01

    The characteristic feature of replicas obtained from the freeze-fractures of B. pertussis unfixed cultures developing on casein charcoal agar for 1-7 days is the associative growth of highly polymorphic cells, ensured by the ramified system of intercellular connections (IC) formed by the derivatives of the outer layers of the cell wall. This proves that the associative location of bacterial cells, linked by numerous IC, in the preparation is not the artefact appearing in the process of their chemical fixation. In replicas obtained from the freeze-fractures of B. pertussis cultures, previously fixed with glutaraldehyde, osmic acid and uranyl acetate, oval cells with the cytoplasm having a relatively homogeneous structure and with the smoothed-out three-layer cell wall prevail. As a rule, IC are limited to the sites of direct contacts between individual cells. PMID:2866645

  6. Comparison of chromogenic Biolog Rainbow agar Shigella/Aeromonas with xylose lysine desoxycholate agar for isolation and detection of Shigella spp. from foods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Lampel, Keith A

    2010-08-01

    Shigella outbreaks are widely reported throughout the world. However, it remains a challenge to isolate Shigella spp. from foods by using conventional microbiological media. The main objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a novel chromogenic medium, Rainbow agar Shigella/Aeromonas (Rainbow agar), for the isolation and detection of Shigella spp. in foods. All four Shigella species, S. sonnei, S. flexneri, S. dysenteriae, and S. boydii, were studied. Rainbow agar was compared with tryptic soy agar, xylose lysine desoxycholate agar (XLD), and Salmonella Shigella agar (SSA) for enumeration of Shigella spp. in pure culture. This chromogenic agar and XLD were also used to isolate Shigella spp. in artificially contaminated foods (4.8 log CFU/g of food), including lettuce, parsley, cilantro, spinach, potato salad, and shrimp. The inhibitory effect on Shigella growth by Rainbow agar was between that of XLD and SSA. All vegetables studied showed a moderately high background microflora on XLD and Rainbow agar. With artificially inoculated produce, Rainbow agar recovered about 1 to 2 log CFU more S. sonnei, S. dysenteriae, and S. boydii per g of food than did XLD. For potato salad and shrimp, which had low background microflora on Rainbow agar, Rainbow agar was slightly better in recovering Shigella spp. than XLD was in most cases. However, we found that the addition of streptomycin (6.25 mg/liter) to Rainbow agar could facilitate the isolation of Shigella in vegetables tested. In conclusion, Rainbow agar was a much more effective medium than was XLD for the isolation of Shigella spp. from foods. PMID:20819355

  7. PHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Multiple reflection method for electromagnetic waves in layered dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, G. V.; Maev, R. G.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2001-09-01

    Reflection and transmission of a plane electromagnetic wave propagating in a layered dielectric structure with an arbitrary number of layers of various thicknesses are investigated. For the general case of oblique incidence of the wave on this structure, the reflection and transmission coefficients are calculated for both TE and TM waves using a multiple reflection method. An algorithm to apply the obtained formulas for numerical and analytical calculations is suggested.

  8. A simple method to determine evaporation duct height in the sea surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson-Genon, Luc; Gauthier, Sylvie; Bruth, Eric

    1992-09-01

    A formulation to determine the evaporation duct height in the sea surface boundary layer is presented. This formulation is based upon the theory of similarity of Monin Obukhov by using analytical solutions currently used in the field of numerical weather prediction. The proposed solution is simple, coherent with the surface boundary layer parameterization used in the Meteo France and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts weather prediction models and gives good results when compared to more traditional methods.

  9. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Compressible Mixing Layer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modem day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS/LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. The hybrid RANS/LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two-dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, indicated an initial vortex shedding followed by rapid transition to turbulence, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  10. Approximate Solution Methods for Spectral Radiative Transfer in High Refractive Index Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Some ceramic materials for high temperature applications are partially transparent for radiative transfer. The refractive indices of these materials can be substantially greater than one which influences internal radiative emission and reflections. Heat transfer behavior of single and laminated layers has been obtained in the literature by numerical solutions of the radiative transfer equations coupled with heat conduction and heating at the boundaries by convection and radiation. Two-flux and diffusion methods are investigated here to obtain approximate solutions using a simpler formulation than required for exact numerical solutions. Isotropic scattering is included. The two-flux method for a single layer yields excellent results for gray and two band spectral calculations. The diffusion method yields a good approximation for spectral behavior in laminated multiple layers if the overall optical thickness is larger than about ten. A hybrid spectral model is developed using the two-flux method in the optically thin bands, and radiative diffusion in bands that are optically thick.

  11. A fourth-order box method for solving the boundary layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, S. F.

    1977-01-01

    A fourth order box method for calculating high accuracy numerical solutions to parabolic, partial differential equations in two variables or ordinary differential equations is presented. The method is the natural extension of the second order Keller Box scheme to fourth order and is demonstrated with application to the incompressible, laminar and turbulent boundary layer equations. Numerical results for high accuracy test cases show the method to be significantly faster than other higher order and second order methods.

  12. How do microorganisms influence trace element uptake by plants? Screening in an agar model rhizosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M.; Robinson, B. H.; Evangelou, M. W. H.; Vachey, A.; Schwitzguebel, J. P.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Schulin, R.

    2009-04-01

    Trace elements (TE) are essential for humans and plants, but they may be toxic if their concentration is too high. For this reason, the management of TE in soils is very important. In some cases it may be necessary to increase the uptake of nutrients or TE by plants, for example in a biofortification perspective. Conversely, in some other cases TE uptake by plants should be decreased, for instance to avoid heavy metals entering the food chain via edible crops. Microorganisms living in the rhizosphere affect trace element (TE) uptake by plants. However, due to the complexity of this space and the variety of microorganisms that occur there, it is difficult to isolate the effect of any particular strain. To overcome this hurdle, we developed a system in which we grew plants under sterile conditions in agar and inoculated their rhizosphere with a single, well-defined microbial strain. For many years, agar has been used as a growth substrate for microorganisms and plant tissues. It is cheap, easy to use, and can be autoclaved to ensure its sterility. Because of its widespread use, an experiment conducted using this substrate can be reproduced under the same conditions in any laboratory. In contrast to soil, there is little interaction between the trace elements and the agar matrix. There are many studies investigating the influence of microorganisms on TE uptake by plants. However, so far only a small variety of microorganisms has been tested on few plant species. Therefore, the first objective of our research was to develop a method to rapidly screen a large variety of microorganisms on various plant species. Once this goal was achieved, we sought to study the effect of single, well-defined microbial strains on TE uptake by sunflower and wheat. The substrate for plants growth was a 10% agar solution prepared with modified Hoagland's solution and a TE solution containing 1 mg/kg Pb and molar equivalents of Cu, Ni and Zn. The agar solution was autoclaved and poured into

  13. Generalized transfer matrix method for propagation of surface waves in layered azimuthally anisotropic half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyun; Zhao, Chongbin; Duan, Yunling

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic and efficient method, namely the generalized transfer matrix method, for evaluating the dispersion curves and eigenfunctions of surface waves in multilayered azimuthally anisotropic half-space. Apart from avoiding the well-known numerical difficulties associated with the existing Thomson-Haskell method, the generalized transfer matrix method possesses the robust determination of independent polarization vectors by using the singular value decomposition (SVD) approach, the explicit inversion of the 6 × 6 eigencolumn matrix without any resort to numerical inversion and the efficient computation of eigenfunctions for layered azimuthally anisotropic media. By means of straightforward transformations, the generalized transfer matrix method leads to a twofold recursive algorithm: (1) for the recursive computation of phase velocities it starts from the bottom half-space to the top layer and (2) for the recursive solution of eigenfunctions it starts from the top layer to the bottom half-space. While keeping the simplicity of the Thomson-Haskell transfer matrix method, the generalized transfer matrix method is of unconditional stability and computational efficiency. The related numerical examples demonstrate that the generalized transfer matrix method is a powerful and robust tool for simulating the propagation of elastic surface waves in the layered azimuthally anisotropic half-space.

  14. A sampling method for the reconstruction of a periodic interface in a layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanying; Zhang, Ruming

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the inverse problem of reconstructing periodic interfaces in a two-layered medium with TM-mode. We propose a sampling-type method to recover the top periodic interface from the near-field data measured on a straight line above the total structure. Finally, numerical experiments are illustrated to show the effectiveness of the method.

  15. Interfacial Adhesion Study for Multi-Layer Structures with m-ELT Method and FEM Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasunuma, Masahiko; Ito, Sachiyo; Kittaka, Hideyoshi

    2004-12-01

    The m-ELT method is widely used because of the simplicity. And the fracture mode of this method is similar to that of the actual TCT (Temperature Cycling Test) that is used for the reliability test of an LSI package. In this method, only the thermal stress that is stored in epoxy has been taken into consideration and the effects of very thin ILD layers have been ignored. In this study, we have considered a crack initiation state, so we have paid our attention to the thermal stress singularity field generated in the free edge of ILD in m-ELT measurement. We have evaluated the fracture toughness with two stress singularity parameters, lambda and Kf, in the tensile singular stress produced in ILDs' interface near the slit tip. And we have elucidated the effect of low-k film thickness and the effect of multiple-layer stacking modules that have plural identical interfaces by the m-ELT and FEM (finite element method) for the stress simulation. Especially the free-edge interface between SiOC and SiCN has been discussed, because this interface has lowest adhesion strength in this study. As a result, it has been derived that the low-k layer thickness has not affect stress singularity field. Moreover the Kapp estimated by the m-ELT has been affected by global layer (upper thick SiO2 layer) thickness. The stress relaxation caused by upper rigid layers makes the apparent value of Kapp increase. The stress concentration at the tip of a slit will change with ILD properties and detailed multi-layer structure. Therefore, in order to derive fracture toughness from the peeling temperature of the m-ELT method, it is the necessity of taking this change into consideration. Singularity parameters derived by a FEM simulation has been confirmed to be effective for deducing a fracture toughness criterion of an interface that has a stress singularity field.

  16. A rescaling method for correcting log-layer mismatch in detached eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ning

    2013-06-01

    In order to correct the unphysical log-layer mismatch commonly encountered in detached eddy simulation (DES) of flows with attached boundary layers, a function ℓM,ML, which has a multi-layer structure with scaling laws in each layer and a plateau related to the Kármán constant, is defined. The height of this plateau is found to be crucial for obtaining the correct log-layer. A target scaling function is designed which equals ℓM,ML in the near-wall region, but with the height of plateau determined analytically from the classical log-law. This scaling function is used as a target function according to which the resolved turbulent fluctuations are renormalized, in order to recover the height of plateau prescribed by the log-law. The renormalization procedure guarantees the height of ℓM,ML required by log-law, resulting in correct log layer slope. The method is also shown to maintain similar turbulent properties in the large eddy simulation (LES) region of DES method. Hence it predicts the turbulent intensity correctly. The results demonstrate the relationship between constant ℓM,ML and log-law profile of mean velocity, and relate the Kármán constant to turbulent fluctuations, implying a complete description of turbulent structural ensemble dynamics. The proposed method can be extended to more general flows with log layers since it uses only the log-law with Kármán constant as the input, while the intercept of log layer depends on the solution of Spalart-Allmaras (SA) model in the near-wall field, where Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions are accurate.

  17. Calculation of three-dimensional boundary layers on rotor blades using integral methods

    SciTech Connect

    Karimipanah, M.T.; Olsson, E. )

    1993-04-01

    The important effects of rotation and compressibility on rotor blade boundary layers are theoretically investigated. The calculations are based on the momentum integral method and results from calculations of a transonic compressor rotor are presented. Influence of rotation is shown by comparing the incompressible rotating flow with the stationary one. Influence of compressibility is shown by comparing the compressible rotating flow with the incompressible rotating one. Two computer codes for three-dimensional laminar and turbulent boundary layers, originally developed by SSPA Maritime Consulting AB, have been further developed by introducing rotation and compressibility terms into the boundary layer equations. The effect of rotation and compressibility on the transition have been studied. The Coriolis and centrifugal forces that contribute to the development of the boundary layers and influence its behavior generate crosswise flow inside the blade boundary layers, the magnitude of which depends upon the angular velocity of the rotor and the rotor geometry. The calculations show the influence of rotation and compressibility on the boundary layer parameters. Momentum thickness and shape factor increase with increasing rotation and decrease when compressible flow is taken into account. For skin friction such effects have inverse influences. The different boundary layer parameters behave similarly on the suction and pressure sides with the exception of the crossflow angle, the crosswise momentum thickness, and the skin friction factor. The codes use a nearly orthogonal streamline coordinate system, which is fixed to the blade surface and rotates with the blade.

  18. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    PubMed

    Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech; Parafati, Lucia; Musilova, Sarka; Bunesova, Vera; Vlkova, Eva; Killer, Jiri; Mrazek, Jakub; Kmet, Vladimir; Svejstil, Roman

    2014-11-17

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is a bacterial species exclusively found in the human intestinal tract. This species is becoming increasingly popular as a probiotic organism added to lyophilized products. In this study, porcine mucin was used as the sole carbon source for the selective enumeration of B. bifidum in probiotic food additives. Thirty-six bifidobacterial strains were cultivated in broth with mucin. Only 13 strains of B. bifidum utilized the mucin to produce acids. B. bifidum was selectively enumerated in eight probiotic food supplements using agar (MM agar) containing mupirocin (100 mg/L) and mucin (20 g/L) as the sole carbon source. MM agar was fully selective if the B. bifidum species was presented together with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum species and with lactic acid bacteria (lactobacilli, streptococci). Isolated strains of B. bifidum were identified using biochemical, PCR, MALDI-TOF procedures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The novel selective medium was also suitable for the isolation of B. bifidum strains from human fecal samples. PMID:25217723

  19. Individual based simulations of bacterial growth on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginovart, M.; López, D.; Valls, J.; Silbert, M.

    2002-03-01

    The individual based simulator, INDividual DIScrete SIMulations (INDISIM) has been used to study the behaviour of the growth of bacterial colonies on a finite dish. The simulations reproduce the qualitative trends of pattern formation that appear during the growth of Bacillus subtilis on an agar plate under different initial conditions of nutrient peptone concentration, the amount of agar on the plate, and the temperature. The simulations are carried out by imposing closed boundary conditions on a square lattice divided into square spatial cells. The simulator studies the temporal evolution of the bacterial population possible by setting rules of behaviour for each bacterium, such as its uptake, metabolism and reproduction, as well as rules for the medium in which the bacterial cells grow, such as concentration of nutrient particles and their diffusion. The determining factors that characterize the structure of the bacterial colony patterns in the presents simulations, are the initial concentrations of nutrient particles, that mimic the amount of peptone in the experiments, and the set of values for the microscopic diffusion parameter related, in the experiments, to the amount of the agar medium.

  20. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-09-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (T c) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at T c was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL(-1), and T c was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R (2) = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii. PMID:26405525

  1. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-01-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (Tc) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at Tc was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL−1, and Tc was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R2 = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii. PMID:26405525

  2. Quasi-simultaneous interaction method for solving 2D boundary layer flows over plates and airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies unsteady 2D boundary layer flows over dented plates and a NACA 0012 airfoil. An inviscid flow is assumed to exist outside the boundary layer and is solved iteratively with the boundary layer flow together with the interaction method until a matching solution is achieved. Hereto a quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied, in which the integral boundary layer equations are solved together with an interaction-law equation. The interaction-law equation is an approximation of the external flow and based on thin-airfoil theory. It is an algebraic relation between the velocity and displacement thickness. The interaction-law equation ensures that the eigenvalues of the system of equations do not have a sign change and that no singularities occur. Three numerical schemes are used to solve the boundary layer flow with the interaction method. These are: a standard scheme, a splitting method and a characteristics solver. All schemes use a finite difference discretization. The three schemes yield comparable results for the simulations carried out. The standard scheme is deviating most from the splitting and characteristics solvers. The results show that the eigenvalues remain positive, even in separation. As expected, the addition of the interaction-law equation prevents a sign change of the eigenvalues. The quasi-simultaneous interaction scheme is applicable to the three numerical schemes tested.

  3. A numerical method for computing unsteady 2-D boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainer, Andreas

    1988-01-01

    A numerical method for computing unsteady two-dimensional boundary layers in incompressible laminar and turbulent flows is described and applied to a single airfoil changing its incidence angle in time. The solution procedure adopts a first order panel method with a simple wake model to solve for the inviscid part of the flow, and an implicit finite difference method for the viscous part of the flow. Both procedures integrate in time in a step-by-step fashion, in the course of which each step involves the solution of the elliptic Laplace equation and the solution of the parabolic boundary layer equations. The Reynolds shear stress term of the boundary layer equations is modeled by an algebraic eddy viscosity closure. The location of transition is predicted by an empirical data correlation originating from Michel. Since transition and turbulence modeling are key factors in the prediction of viscous flows, their accuracy will be of dominant influence to the overall results.

  4. Numerical computation of unsteady laminar boundary layers with separation using two-parameter integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, T.; Matsushita, M.; Murata, S.

    1985-11-01

    A two-parameter integral method is presented which is applicable even to separated boundary layers. The governing equation system, which consists of three moment equations of the boundary layer equation, is shown to be classifiable as a quasi-linear hyperbolic system under the assumed velocity profile function. The governing system is numerically solved by a dissipative finite difference scheme in order to capture a discontinuous solution associated with the singularity of unsteady separation. The spontaneous generation of singularity associated with unsteady separation is confirmed as the focusing of characteristics. The starting flows of a circular and an elliptic cylinder are considered as definite examples. This method is found to give excellent results in comparison with exact methods, not only for practically important boundary layer quantities such as displacement thickness or skin friction coefficient, but also for generation of separation singularity.

  5. Two-Flux Method for Transient Radiative Transfer in a Semitransparent Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The two-flux method was used to obtain transient solutions for a plane layer including internal reflections and scattering. The layer was initially at uniform temperature, and was heated or cooled by external radiation and convection. The two-flux equations were examined as a means for evaluating the radiative flux gradient in the transient energy equation. Comparisons of transient temperature distributions using the two-flux method were made with results where the radiative flux gradient was evaluated from the exact radiative transfer equations. Good agreement was obtained for optical thicknesses from 0.5 to 5 and for refractive indices of 1 and 2. Illustrative results obtained with the two-flux method demonstrate the effect of isotropic scattering coupled with changing the refractive index. For small absorption with large scattering the maximum layer temperature is increased when the refractive index is increased. For larger absorption the effect is opposite, and the maximum temperature decreases with increased refractive index .

  6. Screening method for selecting semiconductor substrates having defects below a predetermined level in an oxide layer

    DOEpatents

    Warren, W.L.; Vanheusden, K.J.R.; Schwank, J.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Winokur, P.S.; Devine, R.A.B.

    1998-07-28

    A method is disclosed for screening or qualifying semiconductor substrates for integrated circuit fabrication. The method comprises the steps of annealing at least one semiconductor substrate at a first temperature in a defect-activating ambient (e.g. hydrogen, forming gas, or ammonia) for sufficient time for activating any defects within on oxide layer of the substrate; measuring a defect-revealing electrical characteristic of at least a portion of the oxide layer for determining a quantity of activated defects therein; and selecting substrates for which the quantity of activated defects is below a predetermined level. The defect-revealing electrical characteristic may be a capacitance-versus voltage (C-V) characteristic or a current-versus-voltage (I-V) characteristic that is dependent on an electrical charge in the oxide layer generated by the activated defects. Embodiments of the present invention may be applied for screening any type of semiconductor substrate or wafer having an oxide layer formed thereon or therein. This includes silicon-on-insulator substrates formed by a separation by the implantation of oxygen (SIMOX) process or the bond and etch back silicon-on-insulator (BESOI) process, as well as silicon substrates having a thermal oxide layer or a deposited oxide layer. 5 figs.

  7. Screening method for selecting semiconductor substrates having defects below a predetermined level in an oxide layer

    DOEpatents

    Warren, William L.; Vanheusden, Karel J. R.; Schwank, James R.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Winokur, Peter S.; Devine, Roderick A. B.

    1998-01-01

    A method for screening or qualifying semiconductor substrates for integrated circuit fabrication. The method comprises the steps of annealing at least one semiconductor substrate at a first temperature in a defect-activating ambient (e.g. hydrogen, forming gas, or ammonia) for sufficient time for activating any defects within on oxide layer of the substrate; measuring a defect-revealing electrical characteristic of at least a portion of the oxide layer for determining a quantity of activated defects therein; and selecting substrates for which the quantity of activated defects is below a predetermined level. The defect-revealing electrical characteristic may be a capacitance-versus-voltage (C-V) characteristic or a current-versus-voltage (I-V) characteristic that is dependent on an electrical charge in the oxide layer generated by the activated defects. Embodiments of the present invention may be applied for screening any type of semiconductor substrate or wafer having an oxide layer formed thereon or therein. This includes silicon-on-insulator substrates formed by a separation by the implantation of oxygen (SIMOX) process or the bond and etch back silicon-on-insulator (BESOI) process, as well as silicon substrates having a thermal oxide layer or a deposited oxide layer.

  8. A polarization measurement method for the quantification of retardation in optic nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Yasufumi; Okazaki, Yoshio; Shioiri, Takashi; Iida, Yukio; Kikuta, Hisao; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    The thickness measurement of the optic nerve fiber layer is one of the most important evaluations for carrying out glaucoma diagnosis. Because the optic nerve fiber layer has birefringence, the thickness can be measured by illuminating eye optics with circular polarized light and analyzing the elliptical rate of the detected polarized light reflected from the optic nerve fiber layer. In this method, the scattering light from the background and the retardation caused by the cornea disturbs the precise measurement. If the Stokes vector expressing the whole state of polarization can be detected, we can eliminate numerically the influence of the background scattering and of the retardation caused by the cornea. Because the retardation process of the eye optics can be represented by a numerical equation using the retardation matrix of each component and also the nonpolarized background scattering light, it can be calculated by using the Stokes vector. We applied a polarization analysis system that can detect the Stokes vector onto the fundus camera. The polarization analysis system is constructed with a CCD area image sensor, a linear polarizing plate, a micro phase plate array, and a circularly polarized light illumination unit. With this simply constructed system, we can calculate the retardation caused only by the optic nerve fiber layer and it can predict the thickness of the optic nerve fiber layer. We report the method and the results graphically showing the retardation of the optic nerve fiber layer without the retardation of the cornea.

  9. Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Tantalum Carbide Ceramic Layer: A Vickers Indentation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ke; Xu, Yunhua; Zhao, Nana; Zhong, Lisheng; Shang, Zhao; Shen, Liuliu; Wang, Juan

    2016-06-01

    A tantalum carbide (TaC) ceramic layer was produced on gray cast iron matrix by in situ technique comprising a casting process and a subsequent heat treatment at 1135 °C for 45 min. Indentation fracture toughness in TaC ceramic layer was determined by the Vickers indentation test for various loads. A Niihara approach was chosen to assess the fracture toughness of TaC ceramic layer under condition of the Palmqvist mode in the experiment. The results reveal that K IC evaluation of TaC ceramic layer by the Vickers indentation method strongly depends on the selection of crack system and K IC equations. The critical indentation load for Vickers crack initiation in TaC ceramic layer lies between 1 and 2 N and the cracks show typical intergranular fracture characteristics. Indentation fracture toughness calculated by the indentation method is independent of the indentation load on the specimen. The fracture toughness of TaC ceramic layer is 6.63 ± 0.34 MPa m1/2, and the toughening mechanism is mainly crack deflection.

  10. System and method of designing a load bearing layer of an inflatable vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A computer-implemented method is provided for designing a restraint layer of an inflatable vessel. The restraint layer is inflatable from an initial uninflated configuration to an inflated configuration and is constructed from a plurality of interfacing longitudinal straps and hoop straps. The method involves providing computer processing means (e.g., to receive user inputs, perform calculations, and output results) and utilizing this computer processing means to implement a plurality of subsequent design steps. The computer processing means is utilized to input the load requirements of the inflated restraint layer and to specify an inflated configuration of the restraint layer. This includes specifying a desired design gap between pairs of adjacent longitudinal or hoop straps, whereby the adjacent straps interface with a plurality of transversely extending hoop or longitudinal straps at a plurality of intersections. Furthermore, an initial uninflated configuration of the restraint layer that is inflatable to achieve the specified inflated configuration is determined. This includes calculating a manufacturing gap between pairs of adjacent longitudinal or hoop straps that correspond to the specified desired gap in the inflated configuration of the restraint layer.

  11. Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Tantalum Carbide Ceramic Layer: A Vickers Indentation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ke; Xu, Yunhua; Zhao, Nana; Zhong, Lisheng; Shang, Zhao; Shen, Liuliu; Wang, Juan

    2016-07-01

    A tantalum carbide (TaC) ceramic layer was produced on gray cast iron matrix by in situ technique comprising a casting process and a subsequent heat treatment at 1135 °C for 45 min. Indentation fracture toughness in TaC ceramic layer was determined by the Vickers indentation test for various loads. A Niihara approach was chosen to assess the fracture toughness of TaC ceramic layer under condition of the Palmqvist mode in the experiment. The results reveal that K IC evaluation of TaC ceramic layer by the Vickers indentation method strongly depends on the selection of crack system and K IC equations. The critical indentation load for Vickers crack initiation in TaC ceramic layer lies between 1 and 2 N and the cracks show typical intergranular fracture characteristics. Indentation fracture toughness calculated by the indentation method is independent of the indentation load on the specimen. The fracture toughness of TaC ceramic layer is 6.63 ± 0.34 MPa m1/2, and the toughening mechanism is mainly crack deflection.

  12. Method and apparatus for stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon grown in silicon nitride ambient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. A.; Wheeler, R. K. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method and apparatus for thermally growing stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon is disclosed. A previously etched and baked silicon nitride tube placed in a furnace is used to grow the silicon dioxide. First, pure oxygen is allowed to flow through the tube to initially coat the inside surface of the tube with a thin layer of silicon dioxide. After the tube is coated with the thin layer of silicon dioxide, the silicon is oxidized thermally in a normal fashion. If the tube becomes contaminated, the silicon dioxide is etched off thereby exposing clean silicon nitride and then the inside of the tube is recoated with silicon dioxide. As is disclosed, the silicon nitride tube can also be used as the ambient for the pyrolytic decomposition of silane and ammonia to form thin layers of clean silicon nitride.

  13. Campylobacter in broiler slaughter samples assessed by direct count on mCCDA and Campy-Cefex agar.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Camila Cristina; Borsoi, Anderlise; Perdoncini, Gustavo; Rodrigues, Laura Beatriz; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. cause foodborne illnesses in humans primarily through the consumption of contaminated chicken. The aim of this study was to evaluate the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) recommended methodology, protocol MLG 41.02, for the isolation, identification and direct plate counting of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli samples from the broiler slaughtering process. A plating method using both mCCDA and Campy-Cefex agars is recommended to recover Campylobacter cells. It is also possible to use this method in different matrices (cloacal swabs and water samples). Cloacal swabs, samples from pre-chiller and post-chiller carcasses and samples of pre-chiller, chiller and direct supply water were collected each week for four weeks from the same flock at a slaughterhouse located in an abattoir in southern Brazil. Samples were analyzed to directly count Campylobacter spp., and the results showed a high frequency of Campylobacter spp. on Campy-Cefex agar. For the isolated species, 72% were identified as Campylobacter jejuni and 38% as Campylobacter coli. It was possible to count Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from different samples, including the water supply samples, using the two-agar method. These results suggest that slaughterhouses can use direct counting methods with both agars and different matrices as a monitoring tool to assess the presence of Campylobacter bacteria in their products. PMID:27237112

  14. Impaction onto a Glass Slide or Agar versus Impingement into a Liquid for the Collection and Recovery of Airborne Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Juozaitis, Arvydas; Willeke, Klaus; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Donnelly, Jean

    1994-01-01

    To study impaction versus impingement for the collection and recovery of viable airborne microorganisms, three new bioaerosol samplers have been designed and built. They differ from each other by the medium onto which the bioaerosol particles are collected (glass, agar, and liquid) but have the same inlet and collection geometries and the same sampling flow rate. The bioaerosol concentrations recorded by three different collection techniques have been compared with each other: impaction onto a glass slide, impaction onto an agar medium, and impingement into a liquid. It was found that the particle collection efficiency of agar slide impaction depends on the concentration of agar in the collection medium and on the sampling time, when samples are collected on a nonmoving agar slide. Impingement into a liquid showed anomalous behavior with respect to the sampling flow rate. Optimal sampling conditions in which all three new samplers exhibit the same overall sampling efficiency for nonbiological particles have been established. Inlet and collection efficiencies of about 100% have been achieved for all three devices at a sampling flow rate of 10 liters/min. The new agar slide impactor and the new impinger were then used to study the biological factors affecting the overall sampling efficiency. Laboratory experiments on the total recovery of a typical environmental microorganism, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525, showed that both sampling methods, impaction and impingement, provided essentially the same total recovery when relatively nonstressed microorganisms were sampled under optimal sampling conditions. Comparison tests of the newly developed bioaerosol samplers with those commercially available showed that the incorporation of our research findings into the design of the new samplers yields better performance data than data from currently available samplers. PMID:16349217

  15. Boundary layer separation method for recycling of sodium ions from industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Petho, Dóra; Horváth, Géza; Liszi, János; Tóth, Imre; Paor, Dávid

    2010-12-01

    The most effective technological solution for waste treatment is recycling. We have developed a new method for the treatment of industrial wastewaters and have called it the boundary layer separation method (BLSM). We have used the phenomenon that, on the surface of an electrically charged electrode, ions can be enriched in the boundary layer, as compared with the inside of the phase. The essence of the method is that, with an appropriately chosen velocity, the boundary layer can be removed from the wastewater, and the boundary layer, which is rich in ions, can be recycled. The BLSM can be executed as a cyclic procedure. The capacitance of the boundary layer was examined. The best mass transport can be achieved with the use of 1000 and 1200 mV polarization potentials in the examined system, with its value being 1200 mg/m2 per cycle. The necessary operation times were determined by the examination of the velocity of the electrochemical processes. When using 1000 mV polarization potential, the necessary adsorption time is at least 25 seconds, and the desorption time at least 300 seconds. The advantage of the procedure is that it does not use dangerous chemicals, only inert electrodes. The drawback is that it is not selective to ions, the achievable separation in one step is low, and the hydrogen that emerges during the electrolysis might be dangerous. PMID:21214032

  16. A body-force based method to generate supersonic equilibrium turbulent boundary layer profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waindim, M.; Gaitonde, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We further develop a simple counterflow body force-based approach to generate an equilibrium spatially developing turbulent boundary layer suitable for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of viscous-inviscid interactions. The force essentially induces a small separated region in an incoming specified laminar boundary layer. The resulting unstable shear layer then transitions and breaks down to yield the desired unsteady profile. The effects of wall thermal conditions are explored to demonstrate the capability of the method for both fixed wall and adiabatic wall conditions. We then describe an efficient method to select parameters that ensure transition by examining precursor signatures using generalized stability variables. These precursors are shown to be evident in a computational domain spanning only a small region around the trip and can also be detected using 2D simulations. Finally, the method is tested for different Mach numbers ranging from 1.7 to 2.9, with emphasis on flow field surveys, Reynolds stresses, and energy spectra. These results provide guidance on boundary conditions for desired boundary layer thickness at each Mach number. The consequences of using a much lower Reynolds number in computation relative to experiment are evident at the higher Mach number, where a self sustaining turbulent boundary layer is more difficult to obtain.

  17. Structure prediction of an S-layer protein by the mean force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horejs, C.; Pum, D.; Sleytr, U. B.; Tscheliessnig, R.

    2008-02-01

    S-layer proteins have a wide range of application potential due to their characteristic features concerning self-assembling, assembling on various surfaces, and forming of isoporous structures with functional groups located on the surface in an identical position and orientation. Although considerable knowledge has been experimentally accumulated on the structure, biochemistry, assemble characteristics, and genetics of S-layer proteins, no structural model at atomic resolution has been available so far. Therefore, neither the overall folding of the S-layer proteins—their tertiary structure—nor the exact amino acid or domain allocations in the lattices are known. In this paper, we describe the tertiary structure prediction for the S-layer protein SbsB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2. This calculation was based on its amino acid sequence using the mean force method (MF method) achieved by performing molecular dynamic simulations. This method includes mainly the thermodynamic aspects of protein folding as well as steric constraints of the amino acids and is therefore independent of experimental structure analysis problems resulting from biochemical properties of the S-layer proteins. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed in vacuum using the simulation software NAMD. The obtained tertiary structure of SbsB was systematically analyzed by using the mean force method, whereas the verification of the structure is based on calculating the global free energy minimum of the whole system. This corresponds to the potential of mean force, which is the thermodynamically most favorable conformation of the protein. Finally, an S-layer lattice was modeled graphically using CINEMA4D and compared with scanning force microscopy data down to a resolution of 1nm. The results show that this approach leads to a thermodynamically favorable atomic model of the tertiary structure of the protein, which could be verified by both the MF Method and the lattice model.

  18. Numerical simulation of core convection by a multi-layer semi-implicit spherical spectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tao; Chan, Kwing L.; Deng, Licai

    2011-10-01

    A semi-implicit multi-layer spherical spectral method for simulating stellar core convection is described. The fully compressible three-dimensional hydrodynamic equations with rotation and energy generation are solved. Prognostic variables are expressed as finite sums of spherical harmonics in the horizontal directions and handled by the finite difference method in the radial direction. The stratified approximation is used to simplify the nonlinearity to quadratic. A multi-layer scheme is employed to overcome the time step problem arising from shrinking grid sizes in the physical space near the center of the star. Despite of the different spectral truncations in different layers, round-off conservation of the total mass and total angular momentum of the whole domain can be maintained, and were confirmed numerically. The code is parallelized; with 12 processors the speedup factor is about 9. The solutions of model core convection with and without rotation are discussed.

  19. Method to determine the optimal layer number for the quadrupolar fiber coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Gao, Wei

    2014-08-01

    For a high precision interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) under temperature control, a short start-up time and small temperature drift are important for its applications. The start-up time and the temperature drift of IFOG with the same fiber length but with a different fiber coil layer number are investigated and compared. Simulation by finite difference time domain method is done to illustrate the existence of optimal layer number for the fiber coil wound by the quadrupolar method. Theoretical analysis is then provided and a closed-form formulation is given to calculate the optimal layer number of the fiber coil, which can effectively reduce both the start-up time and temperature drift of IFOG. Our study is meaningful in improving the thermal performance of the fiber coil.

  20. Single layer multi-color luminescent display and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, James B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a multi-color luminescent display comprising an insulator substrate and a single layer of host material, which may be a phosphor deposited thereon that hosts one or more different impurities, therein forming a pattern of selected and distinctly colored phosphors such as blue, green, and red phosphors in a single layer of host material. Transparent electrical conductor means may be provided for subjecting selected portions of the pattern of colored phosphors to an electric field, thereby forming a multi-color, single layer electroluminescent display. A method of forming a multi-color luminescent display includes the steps of depositing on an insulator substrate a single layer of host material, which itself may be a phosphor, with the properties to host varying quantities of different impurities and introducing one or more of said different impurities into selected areas of the said single layer of host material by thermal diffusion or ion implantation to form a pattern of phosphors of different colors in the said single layer of host material.

  1. Method of depositing a protective layer over a biaxially textured alloy substrate and composition therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Kroeger, Donald M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Lee, Dominic F.; Feenstra, Roeland; Norton, David P.

    2002-01-01

    A laminate article consists of a substrate and a biaxially textured protective layer over the substrate. The substrate can be biaxially textured and also have reduced magnetism over the magnetism of Ni. The substrate can be selected from the group consisting of nickel, copper, iron, aluminum, silver and alloys containing any of the foregoing. The protective layer can be selected from the group consisting of gold, silver, platinum, palladium, and nickel and alloys containing any of the foregoing. The protective layer is also non-oxidizable under conditions employed to deposit a desired, subsequent oxide buffer layer. Layers of YBCO, CeO.sub.2, YSZ, LaAlO.sub.3, SrTiO.sub.3, Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrRuO.sub.3, LaNiO.sub.3 and La.sub.2 ZrO.sub.3 can be deposited over the protective layer. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  2. An Optimal Estimation Method to Obtain Surface Layer Turbulent Fluxes from Profile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of direct turbulence measurements, the turbulence characteristics of the atmospheric surface layer are often derived from measurements of the surface layer mean properties based on Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST). This approach requires two levels of the ensemble mean wind, temperature, and water vapor, from which the fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and water vapor can be obtained. When only one measurement level is available, the roughness heights and the assumed properties of the corresponding variables at the respective roughness heights are used. In practice, the temporal mean with large number of samples are used in place of the ensemble mean. However, in many situations the samples of data are taken from multiple levels. It is thus desirable to derive the boundary layer flux properties using all measurements. In this study, we used an optimal estimation approach to derive surface layer properties based on all available measurements. This approach assumes that the samples are taken from a population whose ensemble mean profile follows the MOST. An optimized estimate is obtained when the results yield a minimum cost function defined as a weighted summation of all error variance at each sample altitude. The weights are based one sample data variance and the altitude of the measurements. This method was applied to measurements in the marine atmospheric surface layer from a small boat using radiosonde on a tethered balloon where temperature and relative humidity profiles in the lowest 50 m were made repeatedly in about 30 minutes. We will present the resultant fluxes and the derived MOST mean profiles using different sets of measurements. The advantage of this method over the 'traditional' methods will be illustrated. Some limitations of this optimization method will also be discussed. Its application to quantify the effects of marine surface layer environment on radar and communication signal propagation will be shown as well.

  3. Ruthenium (Ru) peeling and predicting robustness of the capping layer using finite element method (FEM) modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Il-Yong; John, Arun; Goodwin, Frank; Lee, Su-Young; Kim, Byung-Gook; Kim, Seong-Sue; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Kim, Jae Hyung; Jang, Yong Hoon

    2014-07-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) film used as capping layer in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask peeled off after annealing and in-situ UV (IUV) cleaning. We investigated Ru peeling and found out that the mechanical stress caused by the formation of Si oxide due to the penetration of oxygen atoms from ambient or cleaning media to top-Si of ML is the root cause for the problem. To support our experimental results, we developed a numerical model of finite element method (FEM) using commercial software (ABAQUS™) to calculate the stress and displacement forced on the capping layer. By using this model, we could observe that the displacement agrees well with the actual results measured from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image. Using the ion beam deposition (IBD) tool at SEMATECH, we developed four new types of alternative capping materials (RuA, RuB, B4C, B4C-buffered Ru). The durability of each new alternative capping layer observed by experiment was better than that of conventional Ru. The stress and displacement calculated from each new alternative capping layer, using modeling, also agreed well with the experimental results. A new EUV mask structure is proposed, inserting a layer of B4C (B4C-buffered Ru) at the interface between the capping layer (Ru) and the top-Si layer. The modeling results showed that the maximum displacement and bending stress observed from the B4C-buffered Ru are significantly lower than that of single capping layer cases. The durability investigated from the experiment also showed that the B4C-buffered structure is at least 3X stronger than that of conventional Ru.

  4. New CVD-based method for the growth of high-quality crystalline zinc oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Florian; Madel, Manfred; Reiser, Anton; Bauer, Sebastian; Thonke, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    High-quality zinc oxide (ZnO) layers were grown using a new chemical vapour deposition (CVD)-based low-cost growth method. The process is characterized by total simplicity, high growth rates, and cheap, less hazardous precursors. To produce elementary zinc vapour, methane (CH4) is used to reduce a ZnO powder. By re-oxidizing the zinc with pure oxygen, highly crystalline ZnO layers were grown on gallium nitride (GaN) layers and on sapphire substrates with an aluminum nitride (AlN) nucleation layer. Using simple CH4 as precursor has the big advantage of good controllability and the avoidance of highly toxic gases like nitrogen oxides. In photoluminescence (PL) measurements the samples show a strong near-band-edge emission and a sharp line width at 5 K. The good crystal quality has been confirmed in high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. This new growth method has great potential for industrial large-scale production of high-quality single crystal ZnO layers.

  5. Note: Non-invasive optical method for rapid determination of alignment degree of oriented nanofibrous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, M.; Klemes, J.; Rebicek, J.; Kotzianova, A.; Velebny, V.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a rapid non-destructive method that provides information on the anisotropic internal structure of nanofibrous layers. A laser beam of a wavelength of 632.8 nm is directed at and passes through a nanofibrous layer prepared by electrostatic spinning. Information about the structural arrangement of nanofibers in the layer is directly visible in the form of a diffraction image formed on a projection screen or obtained from measured intensities of the laser beam passing through the sample which are determined by the dependency of the angle of the main direction of polarization of the laser beam on the axis of alignment of nanofibers in the sample. Both optical methods were verified on Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous layers (fiber diameter of 470 nm) with random, single-axis aligned and crossed structures. The obtained results match the results of commonly used methods which apply the analysis of electron microscope images. The presented simple method not only allows samples to be analysed much more rapidly and without damaging them but it also makes possible the analysis of much larger areas, up to several square millimetres, at the same time.

  6. Note: Non-invasive optical method for rapid determination of alignment degree of oriented nanofibrous layers

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, M.; Rebicek, J.; Klemes, J.; Kotzianova, A.; Velebny, V.

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a rapid non-destructive method that provides information on the anisotropic internal structure of nanofibrous layers. A laser beam of a wavelength of 632.8 nm is directed at and passes through a nanofibrous layer prepared by electrostatic spinning. Information about the structural arrangement of nanofibers in the layer is directly visible in the form of a diffraction image formed on a projection screen or obtained from measured intensities of the laser beam passing through the sample which are determined by the dependency of the angle of the main direction of polarization of the laser beam on the axis of alignment of nanofibers in the sample. Both optical methods were verified on Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous layers (fiber diameter of 470 nm) with random, single-axis aligned and crossed structures. The obtained results match the results of commonly used methods which apply the analysis of electron microscope images. The presented simple method not only allows samples to be analysed much more rapidly and without damaging them but it also makes possible the analysis of much larger areas, up to several square millimetres, at the same time.

  7. Efficiency improvement in the cantilever photothermal excitation method using a photothermal conversion layer.

    PubMed

    Inada, Natsumi; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Taiki; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal excitation is a cantilever excitation method that enables stable and accurate operation for dynamic-mode AFM measurements. However, the low excitation efficiency of the method has often limited its application in practical studies. In this study, we propose a method for improving the photothermal excitation efficiency by coating cantilever backside surface near its fixed end with colloidal graphite as a photothermal conversion (PTC) layer. The excitation efficiency for a standard cantilever of PPP-NCHAuD with a spring constant of ≈40 N/m and a relatively stiff cantilever of AC55 with a spring constant of ≈140 N/m were improved by 6.1 times and 2.5 times, respectively, by coating with a PTC layer. We experimentally demonstrate high stability of the PTC layer in liquid by AFM imaging of a mica surface with atomic resolution in phosphate buffer saline solution for more than 2 h without any indication of possible contamination from the coating. The proposed method, using a PTC layer made of colloidal graphite, greatly enhances photothermal excitation efficiency even for a relatively stiff cantilever in liquid. PMID:27335733

  8. Efficiency improvement in the cantilever photothermal excitation method using a photothermal conversion layer

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Natsumi; Kobayashi, Taiki; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Photothermal excitation is a cantilever excitation method that enables stable and accurate operation for dynamic-mode AFM measurements. However, the low excitation efficiency of the method has often limited its application in practical studies. In this study, we propose a method for improving the photothermal excitation efficiency by coating cantilever backside surface near its fixed end with colloidal graphite as a photothermal conversion (PTC) layer. The excitation efficiency for a standard cantilever of PPP-NCHAuD with a spring constant of ≈40 N/m and a relatively stiff cantilever of AC55 with a spring constant of ≈140 N/m were improved by 6.1 times and 2.5 times, respectively, by coating with a PTC layer. We experimentally demonstrate high stability of the PTC layer in liquid by AFM imaging of a mica surface with atomic resolution in phosphate buffer saline solution for more than 2 h without any indication of possible contamination from the coating. The proposed method, using a PTC layer made of colloidal graphite, greatly enhances photothermal excitation efficiency even for a relatively stiff cantilever in liquid. PMID:27335733

  9. Note: Non-invasive optical method for rapid determination of alignment degree of oriented nanofibrous layers.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, M; Klemes, J; Rebicek, J; Kotzianova, A; Velebny, V

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a rapid non-destructive method that provides information on the anisotropic internal structure of nanofibrous layers. A laser beam of a wavelength of 632.8 nm is directed at and passes through a nanofibrous layer prepared by electrostatic spinning. Information about the structural arrangement of nanofibers in the layer is directly visible in the form of a diffraction image formed on a projection screen or obtained from measured intensities of the laser beam passing through the sample which are determined by the dependency of the angle of the main direction of polarization of the laser beam on the axis of alignment of nanofibers in the sample. Both optical methods were verified on Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous layers (fiber diameter of 470 nm) with random, single-axis aligned and crossed structures. The obtained results match the results of commonly used methods which apply the analysis of electron microscope images. The presented simple method not only allows samples to be analysed much more rapidly and without damaging them but it also makes possible the analysis of much larger areas, up to several square millimetres, at the same time. PMID:26521008

  10. Productivity of a coral reef using boundary layer and enclosure methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGillis, W.R.; Langdon, C.; Loose, B.; Yates, K.K.; Corredor, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The metabolism of Cayo Enrique Reef, Puerto Rico, was studied using in situ methods during March 2009. Benthic O2 fluxes were used to calculate net community production using both the boundary layer gradient and enclosure techniques. The boundary layer O2 gradient and the drag coefficients were used to calculate productivity ranging from -12.3 to 13.7 mmol O2 m-2 h-1. Productivity measurements from the enclosure method ranged from -11.0 to 12.9 mmol O2 m-2 h-1. During the study, the mean hourly difference between the methods was 0.65 mmol O2 m-2 h-1 (r2 = 0.92), resulting in well-reconciled estimates of net community production between the boundary layer (-33.1 mmol m-2 d-1) and enclosure (-46.3 mmol m-2 d-1) techniques. The results of these independent approaches corroborate quantified rates of metabolism at Cayo Enrique Reef. Close agreement between methods demonstrates that boundary layer measurements can provide near real-time assessments of coral reef health.

  11. Differential recovery of Streptococcus mutans from various mitis-salivarius agar preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Liljemark, W F; Okrent, D H; Bloomquist, C G

    1976-01-01

    Recoveries of Streptococcus mutans from human dental plaque were lower when plated on mitis-salivarius agar obtained from Baltimore Biological Laboratories as compared with mitis-salivarius agar obtained from Difco Laboratories. However, no difference in recoveries of established laboratory strains of S. mutans was observed between these two agar preparations. PMID:956358

  12. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by an electrospinning technique using water as the solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operated at 50 deg C, to avoid agar gelation. Pure agar solution 1% (w/w) showed inadequ...

  13. Application of an Engineering Inviscid-Boundary Layer Method to Slender Three-Dimensional Vehicle Forebodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    An engineering inviscid-boundary layer method has been modified for application to slender three-dimensional (3-D) forebodies which are characteristic of transatmospheric vehicles. An improved shock description in the nose region has been added to the inviscid technique which allows the calculation of a wider range of body geometries. The modified engineering method is applied to the perfect gas solution over a slender 3-D configuration at angle of attack. The method predicts surface pressures and laminar heating rates on the windward side of the vehicle that compare favorably with numerical solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. These improvements extend the 3-D capabilities of the engineering method and significantly increase its design applications.

  14. Application of an engineering inviscid-boundary layer method to slender three-dimensional vehicle forebodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    An engineering inviscid-boundary layer method has been modified for application to slender three-dimensional (3-D) forebodies which are characteristic of transatmospheric vehicles. An improved shock description in the nose region has been added to the inviscid technique which allows the calculation of a wider range of body geometries. The modified engineering method is applied to the perfect gas solution over a slender 3-D configuration at angle of attack. The method predicts surface pressures and laminar heating rates on the windward side of the vehicle that compare favorably with numerical solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. These improvements extend the 3-D capabilities of the engineering method and significantly increase its design applications.

  15. Multi-chamber electroosmosis using textile reinforced agar membranes--A promising concept for the future of hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Markus; Lenninger, Margit; Mayer, Gert; Neuwirt, Hannes; Grimm, Michael; Bechtold, Thomas

    2016-01-20

    Renal replacement therapy options are limited to hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis (70% of US patients) or renal transplantation. Diffusion processes are the main physico-chemical principle behind hemodialysis. An alternative way to achieve liquid flow through membranes bases on the electroosmotic flow which is observed as electrokinetic phenomenon in porous membranes which bear surface charges. Agar consists of the non-ionic agarose and the negatively charged agaropectine thus an electroosmotic flux is observed in analytical electrophoresis. In this study the potential electroosmosis on textile reinforced agar membranes as separation method was investigated. Using a five-chamber electrolysis cell and an agar membrane/cellulose fabric composite an intensive electroosmotic flow of 1-2 ml cm(2) h(-1) at 100 mA cell current could be observed. The movement of cations in the negatively charged agar structure led to an intensive electroosmotic flux, which also transported uncharged molecules such as urea, glucose through the membrane. Separation of uncharged low molecular weight molecules is determined by the membrane characteristic. The transport of ions (K(+), PO4(3-), creatinine) and uncharged molecules (urea, glucose) in electroosmotic separation experiments was monitored using a pH 5.5 phosphate electrolyte with the aim to assess the overall transport processes in the electrochemical cell. The results demonstrate the potential of the method for filtration of biological fluids in the absence of external pressure or high shear rates. PMID:26572331

  16. Cell-on-hydrogel platform made of agar and alginate for rapid, low-cost, multidimensional test of antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sun, Han; Liu, Zhengzhi; Hu, Chong; Ren, Kangning

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a rapidly increasing threat to the effective treatment of infectious diseases worldwide. The two major remedies include: (1) using narrow-spectrum antibiotics based on rapid diagnosis; and (2) developing new antibiotics. A key part of both remedies is the antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST). However, the current standard ASTs that monitor colony formation are costly and time-consuming and the new strategies proposed are not yet practical to be implemented. Herein, we report a strategy to fabricate whole-hydrogel microfluidic chips using alginate-doped agar. This agar-based microfabrication makes it possible to prepare inexpensive hydrogel devices, and allows a seamless link between microfluidics and conventional agar-based cell culture. Different from common microfluidic systems, in our system the cells are cultured on top of the device, similar to normal agar plate culture; on the other hand, the microfluidic channels inside the hydrogel allow precise generation of linear gradient of drugs, thus giving a better performance than the conventional disk diffusion method. Cells in this system are not exposed to any shear flow, which allows the reliable tracking of individual cells and AST results to be obtained within 2-3 hours. Furthermore, our system could test the synergistic effect of drugs through two-dimensional gradient generation. Finally, the platform could be directly implemented to new drug discovery and other applications wherein a fast, cost-efficient method for studying the response of microorganisms upon drug administration is desirable. PMID:27452345

  17. Critical study of higher order numerical methods for solving the boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    A fourth order box method is presented for calculating numerical solutions to parabolic, partial differential equations in two variables or ordinary differential equations. The method, which is the natural extension of the second order box scheme to fourth order, was demonstrated with application to the incompressible, laminar and turbulent, boundary layer equations. The efficiency of the present method is compared with two point and three point higher order methods, namely, the Keller box scheme with Richardson extrapolation, the method of deferred corrections, a three point spline method, and a modified finite element method. For equivalent accuracy, numerical results show the present method to be more efficient than higher order methods for both laminar and turbulent flows.

  18. Application of higher-order numerical methods to the boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    A fourth-order method is presented for calculating numerical solutions to parabolic, partial differential equations in two variables or ordinary differential equations. The method is the natural extension of the second-order Keller Box Scheme to fourth order and is demonstrated with application to the incompressible, laminar and turbulent boundary-layer equations for both attached and separated flows. The efficiency of the present method is compared with other higher-order methods; namely, the Keller Box Scheme with Richardson extrapolation, the method of deferred corrections, the three-point spline methods, and a modified finite-element method. For equivalent accuracy, numerical results show the present method to be more efficient than the other higher-order methods for both laminar and turbulent flows.

  19. Growth and behavior of chondrocytes on nano engineered surfaces and construction of micropatterned co-culture platforms using layer-by-layer platforms using layer-by-layer assembly lift-off method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaik, Jameel

    -, and 20-bilayer nanofilm beds revealed increasing cell metabolic activity for BSA with increasing bilayers. Micropatterned multilayer beds having poly-L-lysine, poly-D-lysine, laminin poly(dimethyldiallyl-ammonium chloride) and poly(ethyleneimine) as the terminating layers were fabricated using the Layer-by-layer Lift-off (LbL-LO) method that combines photolithography and LbL self-assembly. Most importantly, micropatterned co-culture platforms consisting of anti-CD 44 rat monoclonal and anti-rat osteopontin (MPIIIB101) antibodies were constructed using the LbL-LO method for the first time. These co-culture platforms have several applications especially for studies of stem and progenitor cells. Co-culture platforms exhibiting spatiotempora-based differentiation can be built with LbL-LO for the differentiation of stem cells into the desired cell lineage.

  20. Numerical study of boundary layer interaction with shocks: Method and code validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Nikolaus A.

    1994-01-01

    A major problem in modeling of turbulent supersonic flows is the correct assessment of viscous-inviscid interaction problems. Of particular interest is the interaction of boundary layers with shocks. Present turbulence models give in most cases unsatisfactory results in the region of rapid distortion and in the separation region (if one is present) in particular with regard to mean flow profiles and turbulence quantities. The objective of the present work is the direct numerical simulation of shock boundary layer interaction. This report summarizes the first phase during which a numerical method suitable for this problem has been developed and a computer code has been written and tested.

  1. Thermal conductivity tensor of semiconductor layers using two-wire 3-omega method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanle; Koblmüller, G.; Bichler, M.; Abstreiter, G.; Grayson, M.

    2013-01-01

    We used the two-wire 3ω method to measure the in-plane and out-of-plane thermal conductivity of thin films and analyzed the error for all fitting parameters. We find the heater half-width, the insulating layer thickness and the out-of-plane thermal conductivity of the insulating layer the most sensitive parameters in an accurate fitting. The data of a 2.5 μm GaAs thin film suggests that the phonon mean free path in the film is limited to the film thickness, far shorter than that in the bulk material at low temperatures.

  2. Development of a Perfectly Matched Layer Technique for a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garai, Anirban; Diosady, Laslo T.; Murman, Scott M.; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2016-01-01

    The perfectly matched layer (PML) technique is developed in the context of a high- order spectral-element Discontinuous-Galerkin (DG) method. The technique is applied to a range of test cases and is shown to be superior compared to other approaches, such as those based on using characteristic boundary conditions and sponge layers, for treating the inflow and outflow boundaries of computational domains. In general, the PML technique improves the quality of the numerical results for simulations of practical flow configurations, but it also exhibits some instabilities for large perturbations. A preliminary analysis that attempts to understand the source of these instabilities is discussed.

  3. Culture of Piscirickettsia salmonis on enriched blood agar.

    PubMed

    Mauel, Michael J; Ware, Cynthia; Smith, Pedro A

    2008-03-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the etiologic agent of piscirickettsiosis, an economically significant disease of fish. Isolation of P. salmonis by culturing on fish cell lines has been the standard technique since the initial isolation of the organism. The ability to grow P. salmonis on artificial media would relieve facilities of the cost of maintaining cell lines, permit isolation at fish culture sites with fewer contamination problems, and allow easier transport of isolates to diagnostic facilities for confirmation assays. This report describes the successful culture of P. salmonis on enriched blood agar. PMID:18319435

  4. Developing a Standard Method for Link-Layer Security of CCSDS Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggerstaff, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Communications security for space systems has been a specialized field generally far removed from considerations of mission interoperability and cross-support in fact, these considerations often have been viewed as intrinsically opposed to security objectives. The space communications protocols defined by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) have a twenty-five year history of successful use in over 400 missions. While the CCSDS Telemetry, Telecommand, and Advancing Orbiting Systems protocols for use at OSI Layer 2 are operationally mature, there has been no direct support within these protocols for communications security techniques. Link-layer communications security has been successfully implemented in the past using mission-unique methods, but never before with an objective of facilitating cross-support and interoperability. This paper discusses the design of a standard method for cryptographic authentication, encryption, and replay protection at the data link layer that can be integrated into existing CCSDS protocols without disruption to legacy communications services. Integrating cryptographic operations into existing data structures and processing sequences requires a careful assessment of the potential impediments within spacecraft, ground stations, and operations centers. The objective of this work is to provide a sound method for cryptographic encapsulation of frame data that also facilitates Layer 2 virtual channel switching, such that a mission may procure data transport services as needed without involving third parties in the cryptographic processing, or split independent data streams for separate cryptographic processing.

  5. A novel method of fabricating laminated silicone stack actuators with pre-strained dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinitt, Andrew D.; Conn, Andrew T.

    2014-03-01

    In recent studies, stack based Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) have been successfully used in haptic feedback and sensing applications. However, limitations in the fabrication method, and materials used to con- struct stack actuators constrain their force and displacement output per unit volume. This paper focuses on a fabrication process enabling a stacked elastomer actuator to withstand the high tensile forces needed for high power applications, such as mimetics for mammalian muscle contraction (i.e prostheses), whilst requiring low voltage for thickness-mode contractile actuation. Spun elastomer layers are bonded together in a pre-strained state using a conductive adhesive filler, forming a Laminated Inter-Penetrating Network (L-IPN) with repeatable and uniform electrode thickness. The resulting structure utilises the stored strain energy of the dielectric elas- tomer to compress the cured electrode composite material. The method is used to fabricate an L-IPN example, which demonstrated that the bonded L-IPN has high tensile strength normal to the lamination. Additionally, the uniformity and retained dielectric layer pre-strain of the L-IPN are confirmed. The described method is envisaged to be used in a semi-automated assembly of large-scale multi-layer stacks of pre-strained dielectric layers possessing a tensile strength in the range generated by mammalian muscle.

  6. Few-layer graphene growth from polystyrene as solid carbon source utilizing simple APCVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Shahrokh; Afzalzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research article presents development of an economical, simple, immune and environment friendly process to grow few-layer graphene by controlling evaporation rate of polystyrene on copper foil as catalyst and substrate utilizing atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Evaporation rate of polystyrene depends on molecular structure, amount of used material and temperature. We have found controlling rate of evaporation of polystyrene by controlling the source temperature is easier than controlling the material weight. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as Raman Spectroscopy has been used for characterization of the layers. The frequency of G‧ to G band ratio intensity in some samples varied between 0.8 and 1.6 corresponding to few-layer graphene. Topography characterization by atomic force microscopy confirmed Raman results.

  7. Microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatment, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatments, and the method and apparatus for its preparation are disclosed. The structure is prepared by sequentially subjecting a uniformly surface treated structure to atomic oxygen treatment to remove an outer layer of surface treatment to a generally uniform depth, and then surface treating the so exposed layer with another surface treating agent. The atomic oxygen/surface treatment steps may optionally be repeated, each successive time to a lesser depth, to produce a microporous structure having multilayered surface treatments. The apparatus employs at least one side arm from a main oxygen-containing chamber. The side arm has characteristic relaxation times such that a uniform atomic oxygen dose rate is delivered to a specimen positioned transversely in the side arm spaced from the main gas chamber.

  8. Microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatment, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatments, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof is presented. The structure is prepared by sequentially subjecting a uniformly surface-treated structure to atomic oxygen treatment to remove an outer layer of surface treatment to a generally uniform depth, and then surface treating the so exposed layer with another surface treating agent. The atomic oxygen/surface treatment steps may optionally be repeated, each successive time to a lesser depth, to produce a microporous structure having multilayered surface treatments. The apparatus employs at least one side arm from a main atomic oxygen-containing chamber. The side arm has characteristic relaxation times such that a uniform atomic oxygen dose rate is delivered to a specimen positioned transversely in the side arm spaced from the main gas chamber.

  9. A critical study of higher-order numerical methods for solving the boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, S. F.

    1977-01-01

    A fourth-order box method is presented for calculating numerical solutions to parabolic, partial differential equations in two variables or ordinary differential equations. The method is the natural extension of the second-order Keller Box Scheme to fourth order and is demonstrated with application to the incompressible, laminar and turbulent boundary-layer equations. The efficiency of the present method is compared with other two-point and three-point higher-order methods; namely, the Keller Box Scheme with Richardson extrapolation, the method of deferred corrections, and the three-point spline methods. For equivalent accuracy, numerical results show the present method to be more efficient than the other higher-order methods for both laminar and turbulent flows.

  10. How do microorganisms influence trace element uptake by plants? Screening in an agar model rhizosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M.; Robinson, B. H.; Evangelou, M. W. H.; Vachey, A.; Schwitzguebel, J. P.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Schulin, R.

    2009-04-01

    Trace elements (TE) are essential for humans and plants, but they may be toxic if their concentration is too high. For this reason, the management of TE in soils is very important. In some cases it may be necessary to increase the uptake of nutrients or TE by plants, for example in a biofortification perspective. Conversely, in some other cases TE uptake by plants should be decreased, for instance to avoid heavy metals entering the food chain via edible crops. Microorganisms living in the rhizosphere affect trace element (TE) uptake by plants. However, due to the complexity of this space and the variety of microorganisms that occur there, it is difficult to isolate the effect of any particular strain. To overcome this hurdle, we developed a system in which we grew plants under sterile conditions in agar and inoculated their rhizosphere with a single, well-defined microbial strain. For many years, agar has been used as a growth substrate for microorganisms and plant tissues. It is cheap, easy to use, and can be autoclaved to ensure its sterility. Because of its widespread use, an experiment conducted using this substrate can be reproduced under the same conditions in any laboratory. In contrast to soil, there is little interaction between the trace elements and the agar matrix. There are many studies investigating the influence of microorganisms on TE uptake by plants. However, so far only a small variety of microorganisms has been tested on few plant species. Therefore, the first objective of our research was to develop a method to rapidly screen a large variety of microorganisms on various plant species. Once this goal was achieved, we sought to study the effect of single, well-defined microbial strains on TE uptake by sunflower and wheat. The substrate for plants growth was a 10% agar solution prepared with modified Hoagland's solution and a TE solution containing 1 mg/kg Pb and molar equivalents of Cu, Ni and Zn. The agar solution was autoclaved and poured into

  11. A Simple Method to Assess Surface Roughness by Photothermal Investigation (PTR) Using an Effective Semitransparent Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniow, J. S.; Chirtoc, M.; Drevet, R.; Jensen, C.; Benhayoune, H.

    2012-11-01

    Samples of a titanium-aluminum-vanadium alloy (Ti6Al4V) having different values of roughness are studied by photothermal radiometry. Among the numerous studies carried out on the influence of surface roughness on the photothermal signal, those that relate the air/substrate interfacial volume to an apparent homogeneous layer with effective thermal properties are considered. For such a system, a one-dimensional heat transfer model can successfully be used to describe the response to harmonic excitation up to high frequencies where the thermal diffusion length is of the order of magnitude as the roughness. The breakdown of the effective layer model at high frequencies has prompted some authors to develop more sophisticated methods to describe the complex phenomena encountered. In this study, it is proposed to keep the simple, effective layer model, but also to modify it by including an effective optical absorption coefficient and a reflection coefficient closely related to the surface characteristics. The effective layer becomes semitransparent to the excitation as it turns thermally thick (thickness/thermal diffusion length >1). The apparent thickness of the layer is shown to be directly related to the average difference between the maximum peak and the minimum trough of the surface profile and linearly correlated with the average roughness. This model can be used over a wide range of roughnesses.

  12. Substrate surface treatment and YSZ buffer layers by IBAD method for coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, F.; Liu, R.; Chen, H.; Shi, K.; Wang, Z.; Wu, W.; Han, Z.

    2009-10-01

    In this work, an Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD) system was utilized to fabricate Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) template films for coated conductors. The surface of the Hastelloy C276 substrate was modified by rolling and electropolishing. The effect of the electropolishing parameters of the substrate on the texture of the YSZ buffer layers was studied. The electropolishing current and time were optimized for short samples of 1 cm×1 cm square shape as 1 A and 60 s, respectively. And the relationship between the roughness of the substrate surface and the texture of the YSZ layer is discussed. Reel-to-reel metal tape moving apparatus was installed and used to produce meter-long buffer layer for coated conductors. The YSZ template film was deposited by IBAD method on meter-long Hastelloy tape with tape shifting speed of 15-20 m/h, and the thickness of the buffer layer was up to about 1.7 μm. The Hastelloy substrate surface was measured by Atomic Force Microscope. The thickness of the YSZ films over length was measured by Thermal Field Emission Scan Electronic Microscopy. X Ray Diffraction Ω-scan and ϕ-scan measurements were performed in order to examine the out-of-plane and in-plane texture of the YSZ buffer layers, respectively.

  13. Methods of producing free-standing semiconductors using sacrificial buffer layers and recyclable substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ptak, Aaron Joseph; Lin, Yong; Norman, Andrew; Alberi, Kirstin

    2015-05-26

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a spinel substrate using a sacrificial buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The sacrificial buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using lattice-matching epitaxy or coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The sacrificial buffer layer may be dissolved using an epitaxial liftoff technique in order to separate the semiconductor device from the spinel substrate, and the spinel substrate may be reused in the subsequent fabrication of other semiconductor devices. The low-defect density semiconductor materials produced using this method result in the enhanced performance of the semiconductor devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials.

  14. Application of the method of integral relations to boundary layer flows over blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modarress, D.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations of boundary layer flows past blunt bodies at angles of incidence are presented. Using the method of integral relations together with the method of lines, the full three-dimensional boundary layer equations are reduced to a system of first-order ordinary differential equations. The streamwise shear stress function and the cross-flow velocity component are represented as suitable functions of the streamwise velocity component. The role of the zone of dependence is automatically satisfied by the choice of differencing in the method of lines. Solutions correct to the second order are obtained in the positive shear region for flow over an ellipsoid at 30-deg incidence. The results are compared with corresponding finite difference solutions.

  15. Nonsimilar solution of compressible laminar boundary layer flows by a semi-discretization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C.-C.; Liakopoulos, A.

    The finite-element-differential method of Hsu (1980) for steady 2D incompressible laminar boundary-layer flows is applied to more complex boundary-layer flows of ideal gases past submerged bodies. The governing equations are derived and subjected to Illingworth-Stewartson, Falkner-Skan, von Mises, and undimensionalizing transformations; the resulting initial-value problem is solved by the Hsu method and integrated numerically using the technique of Gear (1969) for stiff equations. The method is applied to supersonic flow past a circular cylinder, and the results of heat-transfer-coefficient calculations at various values of the Mach and Prandtl numbers are compared to the experimental data of Beckwith and Cohen (1961) in a graph.

  16. Application of the method of integral relations to laminar boundary layers in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, M.; Modarress, D.

    1977-01-01

    The method of integral relations is extended to general three-dimensional compressible laminar boundary layer flows. The transformation employed to transform the basic three-dimensional compressible boundary layer equations into quasi-incompressible form is an extension of the Howarth transformation. The resulting system of differential equations is integrated numerically by the method of integral relations as proposed by Dorodnitsyn. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method, it is applied to calculation of the parabolic flow over a flat plate and the boundary flow over an infinite yawed cylinder, for which solutions are known. It is then applied to the flow over a flat plate disturbed by a cylinder normal to the plate, for which a finite-difference solution is available for comparison. It is finally applied to calculating the crossflow velocity variation for supersonic flow over a swept wedge.

  17. Enhancing the adhesion strength of micro electroforming layer by ultrasonic agitation method and the application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Tao, Yousheng; Li, Qingfeng; Luo, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Micro electroforming is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in Micro Electro Mechanism System (MEMS). However, there is the problem of poor adhesion strength between micro electroforming layer and substrate. This dramatically influences the dimensional accuracy of the device. To solve this problem, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation on the adhesion strength, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under different ultrasonic power (0W, 100W, 150W, 200W, 250W) and different ultrasonic frequencies (0kHz, 40kHz, 80kHz, 120kHz, 200kHz). The effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization method and alternating current (a.c.) impedance method. The adhesion strength between the electroforming layer and the substrate was measured by scratch test. The compressive stress of the electroforming layer was measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The crystallite size of the electroforming layer was measured by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) method. The internal contact surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) method. The experimental results indicate that the ultrasonic agitation can decrease the polarization overpotential and increase the charge transfer process. Generally, the internal contact surface area is increased and the compressive stress is reduced. And then the adhesion strength is enhanced. Due to the different depolarization effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency, the effects on strengthening the adhesion strength are different. When the ultrasonic agitation is 200W and 40kHz, the effect on strengthening the adhesion strength is the best. In order to prove the effect which the ultrasonic agitation can improve the adhesion strength of the micro devices, micro pillar arrays were fabricated under

  18. Systems having optical absorption layer for mid and long wave infrared and methods for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmenko, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    An optical system according to one embodiment includes a substrate; and an optical absorption layer coupled to the substrate, wherein the optical absorption layer comprises a layer of diamond-like carbon, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). A method for applying an optical absorption layer to an optical system according to another embodiment includes depositing a layer of diamond-like carbon of an optical absorption layer above a substrate using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  19. Borelli's lactritmel agar induces conidiation in rare-macroconidia producing dermatophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ilkit, Macit; Gümral, Ramazan; Döğen, Aylin

    2012-10-01

    Macroconidia are among the most important indicators used to identify dermatophytic fungi, but several do not usually sporulate and/or produce macroconidia on Sabouraud glucose agar. Specifically, Microsporum audouinii, M. ferrugineum, Trichophyton concentricum, T. schoenleinii, T. verrucosum, and T. violaceum (including T. soudanense and T. yaoundei) rarely form macroconidia and, therefore, cannot be easily identified. In this study, we investigated the production of macroconidia on nine common laboratory media, including Borelli's lactritmel agar (BLA), modified Borelli's lactritmel agar (MBLA), brain heart infusion agar (BHIA), Christensen's urease agar in Petri dishes (UPA), cornmeal dextrose agar (CMDA), Lowenstein-Jensen agar (LJA), malt extract agar (MEA), oatmeal agar (OA), and potato dextrose agar (PDA). The performance of these media was evaluated using 18 rare-macroconidia producing isolates, including representative of the six species mentioned above. All cultures in this study were incubated at 26°C on the bench, and conidia formation on each was investigated at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 days of incubation. BLA apparently improved macroconidia production after 15 days and was the most useful nutrient agar medium to induce these phenotypic characters in daily practice, closely followed by OA, PDA, and MBLA. PMID:22563856

  20. Physicochemical properties of biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol-agar films from the red algae Hydropuntia cornea.

    PubMed

    Madera-Santana, Tomás J; Robledo, Daniel; Freile-Pelegrín, Yolanda

    2011-08-01

    Agar obtained from the red alga Hydropuntia cornea was blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) in order to produce biodegradable films. In this study, we compare the properties of biopolymeric films formulated with agars extracted from H. cornea collected at different seasons (rainy and dry) in the Gulf of Mexico coast and PVOH as synthetic matrix. The films were prepared at different agar contents (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) and their optical, mechanical, thermal, and morphological properties analyzed. The tensile strength of PVOH-agar films increased when agar content was augmented. The formulation with 50% agar from rainy season (RS) had a significant higher tensile strength when compared to those from dry season (DS; p < 0.05). Tensile modulus also displayed an increasing trend and likewise, for 50% and 75% agar blends from RS showed higher values than those from DS (p < 0.05). In contrast, elongation at break decreased as the agar content increased, independently of the season. Environmental scanning electron microscopy images of PVOH-agar 75% biofilms from RS showed a homogeneous structure with good interfacial adhesion between the two components. The changes evidenced in the FTIR spectrum of this blend suggest that hydrogen bonding is taking place between the agar ether linkages (C-O-C) and the hydroxyl groups (OH) of the PVOH. Based on the above mentioned results, blends of PVOH and 75% agar from H. cornea collected in rainy season showed good properties for applications in the biodegradable packaging industry. PMID:21207092

  1. Method of evaluating the integrity of the outer carbon layer of triso-coated reactor fuel particles

    DOEpatents

    Caputo, Anthony J.; Costanzo, Dante A.; Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Layton, Frank L.; Stinton, David P.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for determining defective final layers of carbon on triso-coated fuel particles and the like. Samples of the particles are subjected to a high temperature treatment with gaseous chlorine and thereafter radiographed. The chlorine penetrates through any defective carbon layer and reacts with the underlying silicon carbide resulting in the volatilization of the silicon as SiCl.sub.4 leaving carbon as a porous layer. This porous carbon layer is easily detected by the radiography.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined.

  3. A Hybrid Numerical Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modern day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The method configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. Closure for the RANS equations was obtained using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The wall-function approach enabled a continuous computational grid from the RANS regions to the LES region. The LES equations were closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. The hybrid RANS-LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Vortex shedding from the base region of a splitter plate separating the upstream flows was observed to eventually transition to turbulence. The location of the transition, however, was much further downstream than indicated by experiments. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, also indicated vortex shedding, but the transition to turbulence was found to occur much closer to the beginning of the mixing section. which is in agreement with experimental observations. These calculations demonstrated that LES simulations must be performed in three dimensions. Comparisons of time-averaged axial velocities and turbulence intensities indicated reasonable agreement with experimental

  4. Composite titanium nitride layers produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by a hybrid method including hydrothermal modification of the layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacikowski, M.; Grzonka, J.; Płociński, T.; Jakieła, R.; Pisarek, M.; Wierzchoń, T.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructure and properties of the composite TiN-Ti-Al type titanium nitride surface layer with a sub-layer of titanium and aluminium produced on AZ91D magnesium alloy using a hybrid PVD method including final sealing by hydrothermal treatment were investigated. The results were analysed in terms of the microstructure-properties correlation, to approach the role of the sub-layers and the mechanisms involved in the properties improvement. The microstructure investigations indicate that the composite titanium nitride layers are tight and have nano-crystalline, diffusive character and multi zone microstructure of the type TixOy-TiN-Ti-Al-Al3Mg2-Al12Mg17. The significant corrosion resistance improvement of the AZ91D alloy obtained using the sealed composite titanium nitride layers was found to be the result of a synergistic mechanism which combined hydrothermal treatment of the layer with an action of aluminium sub-layer which is critical to make the sealing effective. The diffusive bonding via Mg-Al zone improves adhesion and the load bearing capacity of titanium nitride layers in wear conditions.

  5. An Absorbing Boundary Condition for the Lattice Boltzmann Method Based on the Perfectly Matched Layer.

    PubMed

    Najafi-Yazdi, A; Mongeau, L

    2012-09-15

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a well established computational tool for fluid flow simulations. This method has been recently utilized for low Mach number computational aeroacoustics. Robust and nonreflective boundary conditions, similar to those used in Navier-Stokes solvers, are needed for LBM-based aeroacoustics simulations. The goal of the present study was to develop an absorbing boundary condition based on the perfectly matched layer (PML) concept for LBM. The derivation of formulations for both two and three dimensional problems are presented. The macroscopic behavior of the new formulation is discussed. The new formulation was tested using benchmark acoustic problems. The perfectly matched layer concept appears to be very well suited for LBM, and yielded very low acoustic reflection factor. PMID:23526050

  6. An Absorbing Boundary Condition for the Lattice Boltzmann Method Based on the Perfectly Matched Layer

    PubMed Central

    Najafi-Yazdi, A.; Mongeau, L.

    2012-01-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a well established computational tool for fluid flow simulations. This method has been recently utilized for low Mach number computational aeroacoustics. Robust and nonreflective boundary conditions, similar to those used in Navier-Stokes solvers, are needed for LBM-based aeroacoustics simulations. The goal of the present study was to develop an absorbing boundary condition based on the perfectly matched layer (PML) concept for LBM. The derivation of formulations for both two and three dimensional problems are presented. The macroscopic behavior of the new formulation is discussed. The new formulation was tested using benchmark acoustic problems. The perfectly matched layer concept appears to be very well suited for LBM, and yielded very low acoustic reflection factor. PMID:23526050

  7. Investigation of layered systems and temperature-dependent thermophysical characterization by photothermal methods with periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirtoc, M.

    2010-03-01

    The salient features of periodically modulated photoacoustic (PA), photothermal radiometry (PTR) and photopyroelectric (PPE) methods are reviewed with emphasis on their use for characterization of layered samples. Using a general one-dimensional (1-D) heat diffusion model, explicit solutions for up to six layers are given in terms of thermal impedances. Two typical model configurations can be transformed and combined using symmetry properties in order to match a particular excitation/cell configuration couple. Different special cases allow for simultaneous measurement of two thermal parameters. For temperature-dependent investigations the direct temperature-conversion feature of the PPE method is advantageous. We show results on the temperature calibration of LiTaO3 and PVDF pyroelectric sensors.

  8. Coherent Vortex Simulation of weakly compressible turbulent mixing layers using adaptive multiresolution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Olivier; Schneider, Kai

    2010-03-01

    An adaptive mulitresolution method based on a second-order finite volume discretization is presented for solving the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian geometry. The explicit time discretization is of second-order and for flux evaluation a 2-4 Mac Cormack scheme is used. Coherent Vortex Simulations (CVS) are performed by decomposing the flow variables into coherent and incoherent contributions. The coherent part is computed deterministically on a locally refined grid using the adaptive multiresolution method while the influence of the incoherent part is neglected to model turbulent dissipation. The computational efficiency of this approach in terms of memory and CPU time compression is illustrated for turbulent mixing layers in the weakly compressible regime and for Reynolds numbers based on the mixing layer thickness between 50 and 200. Comparisons with direct numerical simulations allow to assess the precision and efficiency of CVS.

  9. Aeroheating Predictions for X-34 Using an Inviscid-Boundary Layer Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christropher J.; Kleb, William L.

    1998-01-01

    Radiative equilibrium surface temperatures and surface heating rates from a combined inviscid-boundary layer method are presented for the X-34 Reusable Launch Vehicle for several points along the hypersonic descent portion of its trajectory. Inviscid, perfect-gas solutions are generated with the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and the Data-Parallel Lower-Upper Relaxation (DPLUR) code. Surface temperatures and heating rates are then computed using the Langley Approximate Three-Dimensional Convective Heating (LATCH) engineering code employing both laminar and turbulent flow models. The combined inviscid-boundary layer method provides accurate predictions of surface temperatures over most of the vehicle and requires much less computational effort than a Navier-Stokes code. This enables the generation of a more thorough aerothermal database which is necessary to design the thermal protection system and specify the vehicle's flight limits.

  10. The Fluorescent-Oil Film Method and Other Techniques for Boundary-Layer Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loving, Donald L.; Katzoff, S.

    1959-01-01

    A flow-visualization technique, known as the fluorescent-oil film method, has been developed which appears to be generally simpler and to require less experience and development of technique than previously published methods. The method is especially adapted to use in the large high-powered wind tunnels which require considerable time to reach the desired test conditions. The method consists of smearing a film of fluorescent oil over a surface and observing where the thickness is affected by the shearing action of the boundary layer. These films are detected and identified, and their relative thicknesses are determined by use of ultraviolet light. Examples are given of the use of this technique. Other methods that show promise in the study of boundary-layer conditions are described. These methods include the use of a temperature-sensitive fluorescent paint and the use of a radiometer that is sensitive to the heat radiation from a surface. Some attention is also given to methods that can be used with a spray apparatus in front of the test model.

  11. A soft agar colony assay for Lewis lung tumour and B16 melanoma taken directly from the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Courtenay, V. D.

    1976-01-01

    A soft agar colony assay has been developed for the B16 mouse melanoma and the Lewis lung tumour. The special features of the technique are the use of a gas phase with 5% O2 instead of air and the addition of rat red blood cells. Single cell suspensions are prepared by trypsinization from the solid tumour and the cells are plated out in 0-3% agar over a layer of 0-5% agar in 30-mm Petri dishes. After 8 to 15 days' incubation in 5% O2, colonies of more than 50 cells are produced. Plating efficiencies of between 30 and 50% are usually obtained. The addition of up to 10(4) heavily irradiated tumour cells gives some further improvement in plating efficiency for the B16 melanoma but not for the Lewis lung tumour. Applications of the technique to measure cell survival in the two tumours after treatment with cytotoxic drugs and radiation are reported. The scatter of experimental points is relatively small, and in comparative experiments good agreement has been obtained with results using in vivo assay techniques. PMID:782495

  12. Three-dimensional characterization of bacterial microcolonies on solid agar-based culture media.

    PubMed

    Drazek, Laurent; Tournoud, Maud; Derepas, Frédéric; Guicherd, Maryse; Mahé, Pierre; Pinston, Frédéric; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Chatellier, Sonia

    2015-02-01

    For the last century, in vitro diagnostic process in microbiology has mainly relied on the growth of bacteria on the surface of a solid agar medium. Nevertheless, few studies focused in the past on the dynamics of microcolonies growth on agar surface before 8 to 10h of incubation. In this article, chromatic confocal microscopy has been applied to characterize the early development of a bacterial colony. This technology relies on a differential focusing depth of the white light. It allows one to fully measure the tridimensional shape of microcolonies more quickly than classical confocal microscopy but with the same spatial resolution. Placing the device in an incubator, the method was able to individually track colonies growing on an agar plate, and to follow the evolution of their surface or volume. Using an appropriate statistical modeling framework, for a given microorganism, the doubling time has been estimated for each individual colony, as well as its variability between colonies, both within and between agar plates. A proof of concept led on four bacterial strains of four distinct species demonstrated the feasibility and the interest of the approach. It showed in particular that doubling times derived from early tri-dimensional measurements on microcolonies differed from classical measurements in micro-dilutions based on optical diffusion. Such a precise characterization of the tri-dimensional shape of microcolonies in their late-lag to early-exponential phase could be beneficial in terms of in vitro diagnostics. Indeed, real-time monitoring of the biomass available in a colony could allow to run well established microbial identification workflows like, for instance, MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry, as soon as a sufficient quantity of material is available, thereby reducing the time needed to provide a diagnostic. Moreover, as done for pre-identification of macro-colonies, morphological indicators such as three-dimensional growth profiles derived from

  13. The moment method for boundary layer problems in Brownian motion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, M.E.; Titulaer, U.M. )

    1989-08-01

    The authors apply Grad's moment method, with Hermite moments and Marshak-type boundary conditions, to several boundary layer problems for the Klein-Kramers equation, the kinetic equation for noninteracting Brownian particles, and study its convergence properties as the number of moments is increased. The errors in various quantities of physical interest decrease asymptotically as inverse powers of this number; the exponent is roughly three times as large as in an earlier variational method, based on an expansion in the exact boundary layer eigenfunctions. For the case of a fully absorbing wall (the Milne problem) they obtain full agreement with the recent exact solution of Marshall and Watson; the relevant slip coefficient, the Milne length, is reproduced with an accuracy better than 10{sup {minus}6}. They also consider partially absorbing walls, with specular or diffuse reflection of nonabsorbed particles. In the latter case they allow for a temperature difference between the wall and the medium in which the particles move. There is no a priori reason why their method should work only for Brownian dynamics; one may hope to extend it to a broad class of linear transport equations. As a first test, they looked at the Milne problem for the BGK equation. In spite of the completely different analytic structure of the boundary layer eigenfunctions, the agreement with the exact solution is almost as good as for the Klein-Kramers equation.

  14. Measurement of transitional boundary layer on a flat plate using a computational Preston tube method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, W. P.; Kang, S. H.

    1995-11-01

    The development of the transitional boundary layers on a flat plate in uniform and non-uniform incoming flows was experimentally investigated. The mean velocity profiles and the wall shear stresses on a flat plate were measured in the wakes which were generated by circular cylinders and a flat plate ahead of the test plate. A computational Preston tube method (CPM) originally proposed by Nitsche et al. (1983) was adopted and refined to measure the skin friction coefficients in the transitional boundary layer. The CPM was verified as a useful tool to measure the skin-friction over the transitional boundary layer with reasonable accuracy. As the turbulence level in the wakes increased, the starting and ending points of the transition moved progressively upstream. For the same turbulence intensities, the transition was delayed with increase of the length scale. The skin-friction coefficients at the downstream stations in the wake flow were considerably and consistently smaller than the values in the equilibrium turbulent boundary layer of the uniform flow. The transition length for the cases of the plate-wake were shorter than those for the cases of the cylinder-wake as well as the uniform flow.

  15. A method of making a single layer multi-color luminescent display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, James B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a method of forming a multi-color luminescent display including the steps of depositing on an insulator substrate a smooth single layer of host material which itself may be a phosphor with the properties to host varying quantities of different impurities and introducing one or more of said different impurities into selected areas of the single layer of host material via an appropriately positioned mask as by thermal diffusion or ion-implantation to form a pattern of phosphors of different colors in the single layer of host material such that the top surface of the host layer remains smooth. Red phosphors are formed by adding impurities selected from the group consisting of Sm, SmF3, Eu, EuF3, and ZnS:MnTbF3 to a ZnS host; green phosphors by adding impurities selected from the group consisting of Tb and TbF3 to a ZnS host; and blue phosphors by adding impurities selected from the group consisting of Tm, Al, Ag, and Mg to a ZnS host.

  16. Hypersingular meshless method using double-layer potentials for three-dimensional exterior acoustic problems.

    PubMed

    Young, D L; Chen, K H; Liu, T Y; Wu, C S

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional exterior acoustic problems with irregular domains are solved using a hypersingular meshless method. In particular, the method of fundamental solutions (MFS) is used to formulate and analyze such acoustic problems. It is well known that source points for MFS cannot be located on the real boundary due to the singularity of the kernel functions. Thus, the diagonal terms of the influence matrices are unobtainable when source points are located on the boundary. An efficient approach is proposed to overcome such difficulties, when the MFS is used for three-dimensional exterior acoustic problems. This work is an extension of previous research on two-dimensional problems. The solution of the problem is expressed in terms of a double-layer potential representation on the physical boundary. Three examples are presented in which the proposed method is compared to the MFS and boundary element method. Good numerical performance is demonstrated by the proposed hypersingular meshless method. PMID:26827046

  17. A direct and inverse boundary layer method for subsonic flow over delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodson, S. H.; Dejarnette, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new inverse boundary layer method is developed and applied to incompressible flows with laminar separation and reattachment. Test cases for two dimensional flows are computed and the results are compared with those of other inverse methods. One advantage of the present method is that the calculation of the inviscid velocities may be determined at each marching step without having to iterate. The inverse method was incorporated with the direct method to calculate the incompressible, conical flow over a slender delta wing at incidence. The location of the secondary separation line on the leeward surface of the wing is determined and compared with experiment for a unit aspect ratio wing at 20.5 deg incidence. The viscous flow in the separated region was calculated using prescribed skin friction coefficients.

  18. A Comparison of Active and Passive Methods for Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers on Airbreathing Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Active and passive methods for control of hypersonic boundary layers have been experimentally examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels on a Hyper-X model. Several configurations for forcing transition using passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition, or blowing, methods were compared in two hypersonic facilities, the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air tunnels. Heat transfer distributions, obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the nominal Mach 7 flight trajectory of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For the passive roughness examination, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The prior passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle that was scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness. For the active jet blowing study, the blowing manifold pressure was systematically varied for each configuration, while monitoring the mass flow, to determine the jet penetration height with schlieren and transition movement with the phosphor system for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested were adequate for providing transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model static pressure or higher.

  19. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media. PMID:27389659

  20. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  1. Evaluation of eight agar media for the isolation of shiga toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gill, Alexander; Huszczynski, George; Gauthier, Martine; Blais, Burton

    2014-01-01

    The growth characteristics of 96 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains representing 36 different O-types (including priority O types O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O157) on commercial and in-house agar media were studied. The ability of the strains to grow on agar media with varying selective supplement formulations was evaluated using MacConkey Agar (MAC); Rainbow® Agar O157 (RBA); Rainbow® Agar O157 with manufacturer-recommended selective supplements (RBA-NT); Rainbow® Agar O157 with USDA-recommended selective supplements (RBA-USDA); CHROMagar STEC™ (CH STEC); Tryptone Bile agar containing cefixime and tellurite (TBA-CT); Tryptone Bile agar containing cefixime, tellurite, eosin and methylene blue (TBA-EM); and VTEC agar. All of the strains were able to grow on MAC, RBA and VTEC agar, whereas a number of strains (including some non-O157 priority O types) were unable to grow on the highly selective media CH STEC, RBA-NT, RBA-USDA, TBA-EM and TBA-CT. Only RBA-NT and CH STEC exhibited significant inhibition of background flora from ground beef enrichment. Significant inhibition of background flora from beef trim enrichment was observed with RBA-NT, RBA-USDA, CH STEC, TBA-EM and VTEC agar. With exception of E. coli O157, several different colony morphologies were observed on the differential plating media among strains of the same O type, indicating that this colony morphology is not a reliable means of identifying target STEC. These results suggest that an approach to maximize the recovery of target STEC from beef enrichment cultures is dual plating on lesser (RBA, MAC, VTEC agar) and more highly (RBA-NT, CH STEC) selective agars. PMID:24211606

  2. Lecithin-agar assay for lecithinase antibodies in serum.

    PubMed

    Sibinovic, K H; Brown, F A; Pettigrew, K D; Vought, R L

    1971-01-01

    A technique for assay of lecithinase antibodies in serum was developed in this laboratory by using a lecithin-agar plate diffusion procedure based on a combination of described plate assays. Egg yolk lipoprotein composed primarily of lecithin was used as a substrate for reaction with free or non-neutralized lecithinase C after incubation of known amounts of lecithinase C with various dilutions of control and test sera. It was found that the size of the reaction zone was a function of enzyme concentration and inversely proportional to the antibody concentration. Accuracy and precision of the assay were determined. In addition, lecithinase antibody levels in sera from experimentally inoculated rats and rabbits and sera from randomly selected human patients were studied. PMID:4322282

  3. Lecithin-Agar Assay for Lecithinase Antibodies in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Sibinovic, Kyle H.; Brown, Freddie A.; Pettigrew, Karen D.; Vought, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    A technique for assay of lecithinase antibodies in serum was developed in this laboratory by using a lecithin-agar plate diffusion procedure based on a combination of described plate assays. Egg yolk lipoprotein composed primarily of lecithin was used as a substrate for reaction with free or non-neutralized lecithinase C after incubation of known amounts of lecithinase C with various dilutions of control and test sera. It was found that the size of the reaction zone was a function of enzyme concentration and inversely proportional to the antibody concentration. Accuracy and precision of the assay were determined. In addition, lecithinase antibody levels in sera from experimentally inoculated rats and rabbits and sera from randomly selected human patients were studied. Images PMID:4322282

  4. Characterization of Leptospiral Chemoreceptors Using a Microscopic Agar Drop Assay.

    PubMed

    Affroze, Samia; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Takabe, Kyosuke; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is induced by sensing chemical stimuli via chemoreceptors embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, enabling the cells to migrate toward nutrients or away from toxins. The chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. have been well studied and are functionally classified on the basis of detectable substrates. The spirochete Leptospira possesses more than ten chemoreceptors and shows attractive or repellent responses against some sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids. However, the roles of these chemoreceptors have not been investigated. In this study, we conducted a chemotaxis assay called microscopic agar drop assay in combination with competition experiments, determining whether two kinds of attractants are recognized by the same type of chemoreceptor in the saprophytic Leptospira strain, Leptospira biflexa. Analyzing the competition effect observed between several pairs of chemicals, we found that L. biflexa senses sugars via chemoreceptors different from those that sense amino acids and fatty acids. PMID:27109059

  5. Prediction of local and integrated heat transfer in nozzles using an integral turbulent boundary layer method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Schmidt, J. F.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    An empirical modification of an existing integral energy turbulent boundary layer method is proposed in order to improve the estimates of local heat transfer in converging-diverging nozzles and consequently, provide better assessments of the total or integrated heat transfer. The method involves the use of a modified momentum-heat analogy which includes an acceleration term comprising the nozzle geometry and free stream velocity. The original and modified theories are applied to heat transfer data from previous studies which used heated air in 30 deg - 15 deg, 45 deg - 15 deg, and 60 deg - 15 deg water-cooled nozzles.

  6. Apparatus and method supporting wireless access to multiple security layers in an industrial control and automation system or other system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Yu-Gene T.

    2013-04-16

    A method includes receiving a message at a first wireless node. The first wireless node is associated with a first wired network, and the first wired network is associated with a first security layer. The method also includes transmitting the message over the first wired network when at least one destination of the message is located in the first security layer. The method further includes wirelessly transmitting the message for delivery to a second wireless node when at least one destination of the message is located in a second security layer. The second wireless node is associated with a second wired network, and the second wired network is associated with the second security layer. The first and second security layers may be associated with different security paradigms and/or different security domains. Also, the message could be associated with destinations in the first and second security layers.

  7. A novel method for visualising and quantifying through-plane skin layer deformations.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, L-C; Schmidt, J; Sanz-Herrera, J A; Baaijens, F P T; Ansari, T; Peters, G W M; Oomens, C W J

    2012-10-01

    Skin is a multilayer composite and exhibits highly non-linear, viscoelastic, anisotropic material properties. In many consumer product and medical applications (e.g. during shaving, needle insertion, patient re-positioning), large tissue displacements and deformations are involved; consequently large local strains in the skin tissue can occur. Here, we present a novel imaging-based method to study skin deformations and the mechanics of interacting skin layers of full-thickness skin. Shear experiments and real-time video recording were combined with digital image correlation and strain field analysis to visualise and quantify skin layer deformations during dynamic mechanical testing. A global shear strain of 10% was applied to airbrush-patterned porcine skin (thickness: 1.2-1.6mm) using a rotational rheometer. The recordings were analysed with ARAMIS image correlation software, and local skin displacement, strain and stiffness profiles through the skin layers determined. The results of this pilot study revealed inhomogeneous skin deformation, characterised by a gradual transition from a low (2.0-5.0%; epidermis) to high (10-22%; dermis) shear strain regime. Shear moduli ranged from 20 to 130kPa. The herein presented method will be used for more extended studies on viable human skin, and is considered a valuable foundation for further development of constitutive models which can be used in advanced finite element analyses of skin. PMID:23032327

  8. A method to measure mechanical properties of pulmonary epithelial cell layers.

    PubMed

    Dassow, Constanze; Armbruster, Caroline; Friedrich, Christian; Smudde, Eva; Guttmann, Josef; Schumann, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    The lung has a huge inner alveolar surface composed of epithelial cell layers. The knowledge about mechanical properties of lung epithelia is helpful to understand the complex lung mechanics and biomechanical interactions. Methods have been developed to determine mechanical indices (e.g., tissue elasticity) which are both very complex and in need of costly equipment. Therefore, in this study, a mechanostimulator is presented to dynamically stimulate lung epithelial cell monolayers in order to determine their mechanical properties based on a simple mathematical model. First, the method was evaluated by comparison to classical tensile testing using silicone membranes as substitute for biological tissue. Second, human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549 cell line) were grown on flexible silicone membranes and stretched at a defined magnitude. Equal secant moduli were determined in the mechanostimulator and in a conventional tension testing machine (0.49 ± 0.05 MPa and 0.51 ± 0.03 MPa, respectively). The elasticity of the cell monolayer could be calculated by the volume-pressure relationship resulting from inflation of the membrane-cell construct. The secant modulus of the A549 cell layer was calculated as 0.04 ± 0.008 MPa. These findings suggest that the mechanostimulator may represent an adequate device to determine mechanical properties of cell layers. PMID:23564730

  9. Optical methods for measuring plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinas, Javier Anibal

    Optical methods were developed to measure water permeability in cell layers and used to characterize water channel transfected cells and measure individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells. The general approach was to measure the rate of change of cell volume in response to osmotic gradients. Changes in solute concentration resulting from cell volume changes were used to generate optical signals. Because of the high data acquisition rates obtainable with optical instruments, very high water permeabilities found in cells containing water channels can be measured. Total internal reflection microfluorimetry was used to measure water permeability in cells grown on transparent, solid supports. The fluorescence measured from cells containing a cytosolic fluorophore was inversely proportional to cell volume. The method was applied to transfected cells which expressed water channels and to investigate a cell model of the vasopressin-regulated shuttling of AQP2. Interferometry was used to measure cell volume and water permeability in adherent or non-adherent epithelial cell layers. Volume changes were shown to alter the optical path length of light passing through a cell layer. An interferometer was used to convert the small changes in optical path length to measurable changes in intensity. Cell membrane osmotic water permeability was determined from the time course of interference signal in response to osmotic gradients. Individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells were measured. To overcome the difficulties associated with interferometry, a spatial filtering microscopy method was developed based on changes in transmitted light intensity in a phase contrast microscope occurring after volume changes induced by osmotic gradients. A theory based on the refractive index changes observed in cells by interferometry was developed to explain the dependence of transmitted light intensity on cell volume. The method was applied to

  10. The stationary phase method for a wave packet in a semiconductor layered system. The applicability of the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Coppola, H.; Diago-Cisneros, L.; Pérez-Álvarez, R.

    2007-11-01

    Using the formal analysis made by Bohm [D. Bohm, Quantum Theory (Dover, New York, 1979)] to calculate approximately the phase time for a transmitted and the reflected wave packets through a potential barrier, we calculate the phase time for a semiconductor system formed by different mesoscopic layers. The transmitted and the reflected wave packets are analyzed and the applicability of this procedure, based on the stationary phase of a wave packet, is considered in different conditions. For the applicability of the stationary phase method an expression is obtained in the case of the transmitted wave depending only on the derivatives of the phase, up to third order. This condition indicates whether the parameters of the system allow us to define the wave packet by its leading term. The case of a multiple barrier systems is shown as an illustration of the results. This formalism includes the use of the transfer matrix to describe the central stratum, whether it is formed by one layer (the single barrier case), or two barriers and an inner well (the double barrier resonant tunneling semiconductor structure system), but one can assume that this stratum can be comprise of any number or any kind of semiconductor layers.

  11. Surface photovoltage method for the quality control of silicon epitaxial layers on sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Yaremchuk, A. F.; Starkov, A. V.; Zaikin, A. V.; Alekseev, A. V.; Sokolov, E. M.

    2014-12-15

    The surface photovoltage method is used to study “silicon-on-sapphire” epitaxial layers with a thickness of 0.3–0.6 μm, which are used to fabricate p-channel MOS (metal—oxide-semiconductor) transistors with improved radiation hardness. It is shown that the manner in which the photoconductivity of the epitaxial layer decays after the end of a light pulse generated by a light-emitting diode (wavelength ∼400 nm) strongly depends on the density of structural defects in the bulk of the structure. This enables control over how a “silicon-on-sapphire” structure is formed to provide the manufacturing of MOS structures with optimal operating characteristics.

  12. Structural and optical properties of WO3 electrochromic layers prepared by the sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinrooz, Abdoljavad; Sharbatdaran, Masoomeh; Noorkojouri, Hassan

    2005-09-01

    Thin layers of tungsten trioxide have been prepared from an aqueous solution of peroxotungstic acid (PTA) using the sol-gel method. Compositional, structural and optical characteristics of WO3 coated on indium tin oxide (ITO) conductive glass substrates were studied using X-ray diffractometery (XRD), cyclic voltammetery (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Monoclinic and triclinic crystalline structures for thin film and powdered WO3 were confirmed by XRD analysis. SEM micrograph of annealed samples revealed micro cracks due to a decrease in density and a contraction of layers. EDX analysis showed that 1∶2 ratio of oxygen and tungsten atoms in the prepared films is obtained at heat treatment temperatures higher than 200 °C. Furthermore, the annealed samples showed very good electrochromic behavior in cyclic voltammetery studies. Refractive index "n" and extinction coefficient "k" values were found to be reduced by increasing the wavelength and decreasing the temperature.

  13. A Metal Bump Bonding Method Using Ag Nanoparticles as Intermediate Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Weixin; Nimura, Masatsugu; Kasahara, Takashi; Mimatsu, Hayata; Okada, Akiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Ishizuka, Shugo; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The future development of low-temperature and low-pressure bonding technology is necessary for fine-pitch bump application. We propose a bump structure using Ag nanoparticles as an intermediate layer coated on a fine-pitch Cu pillar bump. The intermediate layer is prepared using an efficient and cost-saving squeegee-coating method followed by a 100°C baking process. This bump structure can be easily flattened before the bonding process, and the low-temperature sinterability of the nanoparticles is retained. The bonding experiment was successfully performed at 250°C and 39.8 MPa and the bonding strength was comparable to that achieved via other bonding technology utilizing metal particles or porous material as bump materials.

  14. Isolation of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from Ground Beef Using Multiple Combinations of Enrichment Broths and Selective Agars.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Piñeyro, Pablo E; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Padola, Nora L; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2016-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are foodborne pathogens, and beef cattle are recognized as the principal reservoir. The aims of this study were (1) to identify the most sensitive combination of selective enrichment broths and agars for STEC isolation in artificially inoculated ground beef samples, and (2) to evaluate the most efficient combination(s) of methods for naturally contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 192 ground beef samples were artificially inoculated with STEC and non-stx bacterial strains. A combination of four enrichment broths and three agars were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for STEC isolation from experimentally inoculated samples. Enrichments with either modified tryptic soy broth (mTSB) containing 8 mg/L novobiocin (mTSB-8) or modified Escherichia coli (mEC) broth followed by isolation in MacConkey agar were the most sensitive combinations for STEC isolation of artificially inoculated samples. Independently, both enrichments media followed by isolation in MacConkey were used to evaluate ground beef samples from 43 retail stores, yielding 65.1% and 58.1% stx-positive samples by RT-PCR, respectively. No difference was observed in the isolate proportions between these two methods (8/25 [32%] and 8/28 [28.6%]). Identical serotypes and stx genotypes were observed in STEC strains isolated from the same samples by either method. In this study, no single enrichment protocol was sufficient to detect all STEC in artificially inoculated samples and had considerable variation in detection ability with naturally contaminated samples. Moreover, none of the single or combinations of multiple isolation agars used were capable of identifying all STEC serogroups in either artificially inoculated or naturally occurring STEC-contaminated ground beef. Therefore, it may be prudent to conclude that there is no single method or combination of isolation methods capable of identifying all STEC serogroups

  15. Automated Discrimination Method of Muscular and Subcutaneous Fat Layers Based on Tissue Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masahiro; Fukuda, Osamu; Tsubai, Masayoshi; Muraki, Satoshi; Okumura, Hiroshi; Arai, Kohei

    Balance between human body composition, e.g. bones, muscles, and fat, is a major and basic indicator of personal health. Body composition analysis using ultrasound has been developed rapidly. However, interpretation of echo signal is conducted manually, and accuracy and confidence in interpretation requires experience. This paper proposes an automated discrimination method of tissue boundaries for measuring the thickness of subcutaneous fat and muscular layers. A portable one-dimensional ultrasound device was used in this study. The proposed method discriminated tissue boundaries based on tissue elasticity. Validity of the proposed method was evaluated in twenty-one subjects (twelve women, nine men; aged 20-70 yr) at three anatomical sites. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve considerably high discrimination performance.

  16. The mathematical model of method for measuring the thermophysical properties of the bulk layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabanov, Pavel; Liubimova, Daria; Savenkov, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The mathematical model of method for measuring the thermophysical properties of the bulk layer is described. The method is based on two experiments with one sample of the investigated material. The sample is cooled in the environment at the constant temperature. Moreover, in the first experiment the intensity of the heat transfer is characterized by the value of Biot number Bi → ∞ and in the second experiment Bi =const. After determining from the experimental data the rate of cooling at the first regular mode stage, the thermal conductivity and the thermal diffusivity are determined from the equations of the proposed method. The proposed method is quite cheap and simple in realization and, in practice; it is quite accurate in using for bulk materials.

  17. Rayleigh wave propagation method for the characterization of a thin layer of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kazemirad, Siavash; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    An experimental method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was developed for quantifying the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of a small volume of expensive biomaterials over a broad frequency range. Synthetic silicone rubber and gelatin materials were fabricated and tested to evaluate the proposed method. Planar harmonic Rayleigh waves at different frequencies, from 80 to 4000 Hz, were launched on the surface of a sample composed of a substrate with known material properties coated with a thin layer of the soft material to be characterized. A transfer function method was used to obtain the complex Rayleigh wavenumber. An inverse wave propagation problem was solved and a complex nonlinear dispersion equation was obtained. The complex shear and elastic moduli of the sample materials were then calculated through the numerical solution of the obtained dispersion equation using the measured wavenumbers. The results were in good agreement with those of a previous independent study. The proposed method was found to be reliable and cost effective for the measurement of viscoelastic properties of a thin layer of expensive biomaterials, such as phonosurgical biomaterials, over a wide frequency range. PMID:23742382

  18. Design method of the layered active magnetic regenerator (AMR) for hydrogen liquefaction by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Inmyong; Kim, Youngkwon; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2015-09-01

    The design procedure of an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) operating between liquid nitrogen temperature and liquid hydrogen temperature is discussed with the selected magnetic refrigerants. Selected magnetic refrigerants (GdNi2, Dy0.85Er0.15Al2, Dy0.5Er0.5Al2, and Gd0.1Dy0.9Ni2) that have different transition temperatures are layered in an AMR to widen the temperature span. The optimum volume fraction of the layered refrigerants for the maximum COP with minimum volume is designed in a two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) using one dimensional numerical simulation. The entropy generation in each stage of the AMR is calculated by the numerical simulation to optimize the proposed design. The main sources of the entropy generation in the AMR are pressure drop, convection and conduction heat transfers in the AMR. However, the entropy generation by the convective heat transfer is mostly dominant in the optimized cases. In this paper, the design parameters and the operating conditions such as the distribution of the selected refrigerants in the layered AMR, the intermediate temperature between two stages and the mass flow rate of heat transfer fluid are specifically determined to maximize the performance of the AMR. The proposed design method will facilitate the construction of AMR systems with various magnetic refrigerants and conditions such as AMR size, operating temperature range, and magnetic field variation.

  19. Superheating Suppresses Structural Disorder in Layered BiI3 Semiconductors Grown by the Bridgman Method

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Paul M.; Sulekar, Soumitra; Yeo, Shinyoung; Baciak, James E.; Bliss, Mary; Nino, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The susceptibility of layered structures to stacking faults is a problem in some of the more attractive semiconductor materials for ambient-temperature radiation detectors. In the work presented here, Bridgman-grown BiI3 layered single crystals are investigated to understand and eliminate this structural disorder, which reduces radiation detector performance. The use of superheating gradients has been shown to improve crystal quality in non-layered semiconductor crystals; thus the technique was here explored to improve the growth of BiI3. When investigating the homogeneity of non-superheated crystals, highly geometric void defects were found to populate the bulk of the crystals. Applying a superheating gradient to the melt prior to crystal growth improved structural quality and decreased defect density from the order of 4600 voids per cm3 to 300 voids per cm3. Corresponding moderate improvements to electronic properties also resulted from the superheat gradient method of crystal growth. Comparative measurements through infrared microscopy, etch-pit density, x-ray rocking curves, and sheet resistivity readings show that superheat gradients in BiI3 growth led to higher quality crystals.

  20. Layered Yb:YAG ceramics produced by two different methods: processing, characterization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostaša, Jan; Esposito, Laura; Biasini, Valentina; Piancastelli, Andreana; Vannini, Matteo; Toci, Guido

    2016-03-01

    The use of Yb:YAG ceramic gain media in solid state lasers has been of growing interest for high repetition rate and high power lasers. Probably the most important advantage of ceramic production technology in comparison with that of single crystals is the flexibility of shaping methods that allow the production of near-net-shape components with a welldefined internal structure. In the case of Yb:YAG with dopant distribution designed accordingly to the pumping and cooling geometry the efficiency of the laser device can be enhanced by mitigating thermal lensing effects. The presented work reports on Yb:YAG transparent ceramics composed of layers with different Yb doping produced by two different shaping methods: dry pressing of spray-dried powders and tape casting, all sintered under high vacuum. The selected geometry of materials was based on numerical simulations. Microstructure of the produced materials was characterized by SEM and EDX with a particular attention to the dopant content across the layers. The optical quality of produced ceramics was characterized and discussed in connection with the microstructure and laser emission results. Output power of nearly 7 W and slope efficiency 58.1 % were obtained in QCW regime from bilayered 0-10 %Yb:YAG. In the case of multilayered materials higher scattering losses were observed. The comparison between the two processing methods highlighted that the tape-cast materials provided higher optical uniformity and the diffusion zone between the single layers with different dopant content was about 150 nm compared to about 250 nm in samples produced by pressing of powders.

  1. Spectral filtering for improved pulsed photothermal temperature profiling in agar tissue phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2009-01-01

    We present a systematic experimental comparison of pulsed photothermal temperature profiling utilizing the customary spectral band of the InSb radiation detector (λ=3.0 to 5.6 μm) and a narrowed acquisition band (4.5 to 5.6 μm). We use custom tissue phantoms composed of agar gel layers separated by thin absorbing layers. The laser-induced temperature profiles are reconstructed within the customary monochromatic approximation, using a custom minimization algorithm. In a detailed numerical simulation of the experimental procedure, we consider several acquisition spectral bands with the lower wavelength limit varied between 3.0 and 5.0 μm (imitating application of different long-pass filters). The simulated PPTR signals contain noise with amplitude and spectral characteristics consistent with our experimental system. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that spectral filtering reduces reconstruction error and broadening of temperature peaks, especially for shallower and more complex absorbing structures. For the simulated PPTR system and watery tissues, numerical results indicate an optimal lower wavelength limit of 3.8 to 4.2 μm. PMID:19123649

  2. A method of recognition based on the feature layer fusion of palmprint and hand vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hua; Yang, Xiaoping; Shi, Guangyuan

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a method of recognition of multi-modal biometrics for palmprint and hand vein based on the feature layer fusion is proposed, combined with the characteristics of an improved canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and two dimensional principal component analysis (2DPCA). After pretreatment respectively, feature vectors of palmprint and hand vein images are extracted using two dimensional principal component analysis (2DPCA),then fused in the feature level using the improved canonical correlation analysis(CCA), so identification can be done by a adjacent classifier finally. Using this method, two biometric information can be fused and the redundancy of information between features can effectively eliminated, the problem of the high-dimensional and small sample size can be overcome too. Simulation experimental results show that the proposed method in this paper can effectively improve the recognition rate of identification.

  3. Methods of editing cloud and atmospheric layer affected pixels from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, P. R. (Principal Investigator); Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J.; Johnson, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    Practical methods of computer screening cloud-contaminated pixels from data of various satellite systems are proposed. Examples are given of the location of clouds and representative landscape features in HCMM spectral space of reflectance (VIS) vs emission (IR). Methods of screening out cloud affected HCMM are discussed. The character of subvisible absorbing-emitting atmospheric layers (subvisible cirrus or SCi) in HCMM data is considered and radiosonde soundings are examined in relation to the presence of SCi. The statistical characteristics of multispectral meteorological satellite data in clear and SCi affected areas are discussed. Examples in TIROS-N and NOAA-7 data from several states and Mexico are presented. The VIS-IR cluster screening method for removing clouds is applied to a 262, 144 pixel HCMM scene from south Texas and northeast Mexico. The SCi that remain after cluster screening are sited out by applying a statistically determined IR limit.

  4. Two-Layer Fragile Watermarking Method Secured with Chaotic Map for Authentication of Digital Holy Quran

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mohammed S.; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Alginahi, Yasser M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel watermarking method to facilitate the authentication and detection of the image forgery on the Quran images. Two layers of embedding scheme on wavelet and spatial domain are introduced to enhance the sensitivity of fragile watermarking and defend the attacks. Discrete wavelet transforms are applied to decompose the host image into wavelet prior to embedding the watermark in the wavelet domain. The watermarked wavelet coefficient is inverted back to spatial domain then the least significant bits is utilized to hide another watermark. A chaotic map is utilized to blur the watermark to make it secure against the local attack. The proposed method allows high watermark payloads, while preserving good image quality. Experiment results confirm that the proposed methods are fragile and have superior tampering detection even though the tampered area is very small. PMID:25028681

  5. Two-layer fragile watermarking method secured with chaotic map for authentication of digital Holy Quran.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohammed S; Kurniawan, Fajri; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Alginahi, Yasser M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel watermarking method to facilitate the authentication and detection of the image forgery on the Quran images. Two layers of embedding scheme on wavelet and spatial domain are introduced to enhance the sensitivity of fragile watermarking and defend the attacks. Discrete wavelet transforms are applied to decompose the host image into wavelet prior to embedding the watermark in the wavelet domain. The watermarked wavelet coefficient is inverted back to spatial domain then the least significant bits is utilized to hide another watermark. A chaotic map is utilized to blur the watermark to make it secure against the local attack. The proposed method allows high watermark payloads, while preserving good image quality. Experiment results confirm that the proposed methods are fragile and have superior tampering detection even though the tampered area is very small. PMID:25028681

  6. Method for forming a layer of synthetic corrosion products on tubing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Lane, Michael H.; Salamon, Eugene J. M.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for forming a synthetic corrosion product layer on tube surfaces. The method utilizes two dissimilar materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion. An object tube and sacrificial tube are positioned one inside the other such that an annular region is created between the two tubes' surfaces. A slurry of synthetic corrosion products is injected into this annular region and the assembly is heat treated. This heat causes the tubes to expand, the inner tube with the higher coefficient of expansion expanding more than the outer tube, thereby creating internal pressures which consolidate the corrosion products and adhere the corrosion products to the tubing surfaces. The sacrificial tube may then be removed by conventional chemical etching or mechanical methods.

  7. Method for fabricating an ultra-low expansion mask blank having a crystalline silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) using Ultra-Low Expansion (ULE) substrates and crystalline silicon. ULE substrates are required for the necessary thermal management in EUVL mask blanks, and defect detection and classification have been obtained using crystalline silicon substrate materials. Thus, this method provides the advantages for both the ULE substrate and the crystalline silicon in an Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) mask blank. The method is carried out by bonding a crystalline silicon wafer or member to a ULE wafer or substrate and thinning the silicon to produce a 5-10 .mu.m thick crystalline silicon layer on the surface of the ULE substrate. The thinning of the crystalline silicon may be carried out, for example, by chemical mechanical polishing and if necessary or desired, oxidizing the silicon followed by etching to the desired thickness of the silicon.

  8. Radiophysical methods of modeling the electromagnetic waves propagation through a flat plasma layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, V. G.; Bityurin, V. A.; Balakirev, B. A.; Bocharov, A. N.; Vedenin, P. V.; Korneev, V. N.; Pashchina, A. S.; Pervov, A. Yu; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Ryazanskiy, N. M.; Shkatov, O. Yu

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the model variants of plasma layer creating by microwave discharges and plasma jet sources. Methods of creation a model quasi-dynamic plasma antenna on the basis of plasma jet and antenna type plasma structures of microwave range are also considered. Pulsed discharge in a capillary with ablative wall can be used as a method of creating plasma antenna. A microwave discharge is another perspective method for plasma antennas creation in centimeter-decimeter wavelengths range that allows us to apply this approach for modeling different types of plasma antennas (dipole, traveling wave antenna, spiral antenna, and others). Numerical modeling was initiated to analyze the interaction of microwave radiation with plasma layer. It is assumed that 2D consideration will allow investigating the influence of various types of regular spatial plasma structures on the characteristics of the transmission and scattering of EM waves beams. The model allows investigating also the development of MW plasma structures (it is virtually impossible to implement in the framework of 3D modeling).

  9. Multigrid methods for flow transition in three-dimensional boundary layers with surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Zhining; Mccormick, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The efficient multilevel adaptive method has been successfully applied to perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow transition in 3-D channels and 3-D boundary layers with 2-D and 3-D isolated and distributed roughness in a curvilinear coordinate system. A fourth-order finite difference technique on stretched and staggered grids, a fully-implicit time marching scheme, a semi-coarsening multigrid method associated with line distributive relaxation scheme, and an improved outflow boundary-condition treatment, which needs only a very short buffer domain to damp all order-one wave reflections, are developed. These approaches make the multigrid DNS code very accurate and efficient. This allows us not only to be able to do spatial DNS for the 3-D channel and flat plate at low computational costs, but also to do spatial DNS for transition in the 3-D boundary layer with 3-D single and multiple roughness elements, which would have extremely high computational costs with conventional methods. Numerical results show good agreement with the linear stability theory, the secondary instability theory, and a number of laboratory experiments. The contribution of isolated and distributed roughness to transition is analyzed.

  10. NMR as a method to determine water content changes in the upper soil layer during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Steffen; Pohlmeier, Andreas; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Water exchange between bare soil and atmosphere is controlled by evaporation. In the topmost soil layer moisture content and hydraulic conductivity may change strongly and capillary film flow (stage I) from saturated regions to the surface discontinues. Evaporation is now mainly driven by vapor diffusion through a dry layer (stage II). Water vaporizes in the unsaturated zone inside the soil what strongly reduces the evaporation rate and also soil surface temperature to a considerable amount. The dynamics of the transition from stage I to stage II as well as film flow and vapor diffusion at low water contents have received little attention. In this study we investigated water content changes in the uppermost soil layer with high spatial resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). NMR is a feasible noninvasive method where the received signal of hydrogen protons allows conclusions on moisture and pore size distribution. The overall aim is to apply a mobile nuclear magnetic resonance surface sensor (NMR-MOUSE) directly for field measurements. This sensor has a max. measurement depth of 25 mm and operates at a Larmor frequency of 13.4 MHz. The general challenges of NMR in soils are the inherent fast transversal relaxation times of the soil matrix especially next to the residual moisture content. Therefore, as a first step of validation we applied and compared NMR-MOUSE measurements with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an initially saturated sand column. The column was evaporated over 67 days and water content profiles were recorded by 1D-T2 relaxation measurements using the NMR-MOUSE as well as different 3D-MRI sequences during drying. Firstly, we report on the sensitivities and limits of the different devices and measurement sequences. Considering these data, we could monitor that over a period of 58 days the moisture decreased rather uniform until the onset of stage II. Thereafter, a dry surface layer developed and a retreating drying front was observed.

  11. Modeling of crack propagation in weak snowpack layers using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, J.; van Herwijnen, A.; Chambon, G.; Schweizer, J.; Birkeland, K. W.

    2015-01-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including (1) failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab, (2) crack propagation within the weak layer and (3) tensile fracture through the slab which leads to its detachment. During the past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually led to a better understanding of the fracture process in snow involving the collapse of the structure in the weak layer during fracture. This now allows us to better model failure initiation and the onset of crack propagation, i.e. to estimate the critical length required for crack propagation. On the other hand, our understanding of dynamic crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity is still very limited. For instance, it is not uncommon to perform field measurements with widespread crack propagation on one day, while a few days later, with very little changes to the snowpack, crack propagation does not occur anymore. Thus far, there is no clear theoretical framework to interpret such observations, and it is not clear how and which snowpack properties affect dynamic crack propagation. To shed more light on this issue, we performed numerical propagation saw test (PST) experiments applying the discrete element (DE) method and compared the numerical results with field measurements based on particle tracking. The goal is to investigate the influence of weak layer failure and the mechanical properties of the slab on crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity. Crack propagation speeds and distances before fracture arrest were derived from the DE simulations for different snowpack configurations and mechanical properties. Then, the relation between mechanical parameters of the snowpack was taken into account so as to compare numerical and experimental results, which were in good agreement, suggesting that the simulations can reproduce crack propagation in PSTs. Finally, an in-depth analysis of the mechanical

  12. Modeling of crack propagation in weak snowpack layers using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, J.; van Herwijnen, A.; Chambon, G.; Birkeland, K. W.; Schweizer, J.

    2015-10-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including (1) failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab, (2) crack propagation within the weak layer and (3) tensile fracture through the slab which leads to its detachment. During the past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually led to a better understanding of the fracture process in snow involving the collapse of the structure in the weak layer during fracture. This now allows us to better model failure initiation and the onset of crack propagation, i.e., to estimate the critical length required for crack propagation. On the other hand, our understanding of dynamic crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity is still very limited. To shed more light on this issue, we performed numerical propagation saw test (PST) experiments applying the discrete element (DE) method and compared the numerical results with field measurements based on particle tracking. The goal is to investigate the influence of weak layer failure and the mechanical properties of the slab on crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity. Crack propagation speeds and distances before fracture arrest were derived from the DE simulations for different snowpack configurations and mechanical properties. Then, in order to compare the numerical and experimental results, the slab mechanical properties (Young's modulus and strength) which are not measured in the field were derived from density. The simulations nicely reproduced the process of crack propagation observed in field PSTs. Finally, the mechanical processes at play were analyzed in depth which led to suggestions for minimum column length in field PSTs.

  13. Nanostructured and layered lithium manganese oxide and method of manufacturing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Skandan, Ganesh (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured and layered lithium manganese oxide powders and methods of producing same. The powders are represented by the chemical formula, LixMn1-yMyO2, where 0.5

  14. Vortex model for airfoil stall prediction using an interactive boundary-layer method

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, P.; Coiro, D.P.; Bertolucci, S.

    1995-09-01

    An interactive boundary-layer method is developed that is able to predict the aerodynamic performance of airfoils throughout the stall region. This has been achieved by taking into account the net vorticity of the flow in the turbulent separated region on the suction surface. This vorticity is modelled as an inviscid counterclockwise vortex located above the trailing edge, whose direction of rotation is justified by global conservation of angular momentum. An empirical law for the intensity of the vortex as a function of a dimensionless parameter based on flow conditions is presented. Excellent comparisons with measured lift and moment curves and pressure distributions are then presented and discussed.

  15. Method of forming fluorine-bearing diamond layer on substrates, including tool substrates

    DOEpatents

    Chang, R. P. H.; Grannen, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of forming a fluorine-bearing diamond layer on non-diamond substrates, especially on tool substrates comprising a metal matrix and hard particles, such as tungsten carbide particles, in the metal matrix. The substrate and a fluorine-bearing plasma or other gas are then contacted under temperature and pressure conditions effective to nucleate fluorine-bearing diamond on the substrate. A tool insert substrate is treated prior to the diamond nucleation and growth operation by etching both the metal matrix and the hard particles using suitable etchants.

  16. Flexible polymer optical layer for board-level optical interconnects by highly durable metal imprinting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Dou, Xinyuan; Lin, Xiaohui; Chen, Ray T.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we presented fabrication of nickel based metal mold with 45° tilted surfaces on both ends of the channel waveguide through electroplating process. To obtain a precise 45° tilted angle, a 50μm thick SU-8 layer was UV exposed under de-ionized water, with repeatable error control of 0.5°. The polymeric waveguide array with 45° micromirrors, which is formed by a UV imprinting method with the fabricated metallic mold, shows total insertion losses around 4dB, propagation loss around 0.18dB/cm and 75% coupling efficiency.

  17. Analyzing and modeling methods for warpages of thin and large dies with redistribution layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dote, Aki; Kitada, Hideki; Mizushima, Yoriko; Nakamura, Tomoji; Sakuyama, Seiki

    2016-06-01

    Analyzing and modeling methods for warpages including cylindrical deformations are discussed in large-area dies with redistribution layers (RDLs) and thin 50-µm-thick Si substrates. The buckling behavior of warpage, a deformation transition from spherical to cylindrical, strongly depends on the lateral sizes of the dies and the RDL structures, and can be calculated using the analytical model of the nonlinear plate theory. The equivalent stress values are introduced to simplify RDL structures by applying the model to measured curvatures of homogeneous patterned samples. Area densities of Cu are a good index for evaluating die warpage even for inhomogeneous patterned RDLs.

  18. Appraisal of an Array TEM Method in Detecting a Mined-Out Area Beneath a Conductive Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Xue, Guo-qiang; Zhou, Nan-nan; Chen, Wei-ying

    2015-10-01

    The transient electromagnetic method has been extensively used for the detection of mined-out area in China for the past few years. In the cases that the mined-out area is overlain by a conductive layer, the detection of the target layer is difficult with a traditional loop source TEM method. In order to detect the target layer in this condition, this paper presents a newly developed array TEM method, which uses a grounded wire source. The underground current density distribution and the responses of the grounded wire source TEM configuration are modeled to demonstrate that the target layer is detectable in this condition. The 1D OCCAM inversion routine is applied to the synthetic single station data and common middle point gather. The result reveals that the electric source TEM method is capable of recovering the resistive target layer beneath the conductive overburden. By contrast, the conductive target layer cannot be recovered unless the distance between the target layer and the conductive overburden is large. Compared with inversion result of the single station data, the inversion of common middle point gather can better recover the resistivity of the target layer. Finally, a case study illustrates that the array TEM method is successfully applied in recovering a water-filled mined-out area beneath a conductive overburden.

  19. A method of layer-by-layer gold nanoparticle hybridization in a quartz crystal microbalance DNA sensing system used to detect dengue virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sz-Hau; Chuang, Yao-Chen; Lu, Yi-Chen; Lin, Hsiu-Chao; Yang, Yun-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is nowadays the most important arthropod-spread virus affecting humans existing in more than 100 countries worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection method for the early diagnosis of infectious dengue virus urgently needs to be developed. In the present study, a circulating-flow quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensing method combining oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (i.e. AuNP probes) used to detect DENV has been established. In the DNA-QCM method, two kinds of specific AuNP probes were linked by the target sequences onto the QCM chip to amplify the detection signal, i.e. oscillatory frequency change (ΔF) of the QCM sensor. The target sequences amplified from the DENV genome act as a bridge for the layer-by-layer AuNP probes' hybridization in the method. Besides being amplifiers of the detection signal, the specific AuNP probes used in the DNA-QCM method also play the role of verifiers to specifically recognize their target sequences in the detection. The effect of four AuNP sizes on the layer-by-layer hybridization has been evaluated and it is found that 13 nm AuNPs collocated with 13 nm AuNPs showed the best hybridization efficiency. According to the nanoparticle application, the DNA-QCM biosensing method was able to detect dengue viral RNA in virus-contaminated serum as plaque titers being 2 PFU ml-1 and a linear correlation (R2 = 0.987) of ΔF versus virus titration from 2 × 100 to 2 × 106 PFU ml-1 was found. The sensitivity and specificity of the present DNA-QCM method with nanoparticle technology showed it to be comparable to the fluorescent real-time PCR methods. Moreover, the method described herein was shown to not require expensive equipment, was label-free and highly sensitive.

  20. An extended stochastic reconstruction method for catalyst layers in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jinfen; Moriyama, Koji; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an extended, stochastic reconstruction method for catalyst layers (CLs) of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs). The focus is placed on the reconstruction of customized, low platinum (Pt) loading CLs where the microstructure of CLs can substantially influence the performance. The sphere-based simulated annealing (SSA) method is extended to generate the CL microstructures with specified and controllable structural properties for agglomerates, ionomer, and Pt catalysts. In the present method, the agglomerate structures are controlled by employing a trial two-point correlation function used in the simulated annealing process. An off-set method is proposed to generate more realistic ionomer structures. The variations of ionomer structures at different humidity conditions are considered to mimic the swelling effects. A method to control Pt loading, distribution, and utilization is presented. The extension of the method to consider heterogeneity in structural properties, which can be found in manufactured CL samples, is presented. Various reconstructed CLs are generated to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. Proton transport properties of the reconstructed CLs are calculated and validated with experimental data.

  1. Glucose-sucrose-potassium tellurite-bacitracin agar, an alternative to mitis salivarius-bacitracin agar for enumeration of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, J M; Börjesson, A C; Laskowski, L; Kurasz, A B; Testa, M

    1984-01-01

    An agar medium for selective recovery and enumeration of Streptococcus mutans was developed as an alternative to mitis salivarius-bacitracin (MSB) agar. Combinations of dyes, antibiotics, and tellurite were added to a nonselective medium which, because of its sucrose content, allowed easy recognition of S. mutans colonies. Candle jar incubation for 2 days, by comparison with anaerobic incubation, reduced background flora but did not diminish S. mutans recoveries from clinical samples. Quantitative comparisons were made of the simultaneous recoveries of a number of authentic S. mutans serotype representatives and fresh clinical isolates, using various glucose-sucrose-potassium tellurite-bacitracin (GSTB) formulations and mitis salivarius, MSB, and blood agars. Mitis salivarius counts were not detectably different from blood counts, but counts on MSB were distinctly lower. A formulation of the new medium containing 5% glucose 5% sucrose, 0.001% potassium tellurite, 0.3 U of bacitracin per ml (hence GSTB), and 2% agar gave recoveries nearly equal to those on mitis salivarius agar and much greater than those on MSB. The medium yielded readily recognized S. mutans colonies and facilitated detection of intracellular polysaccharide formers upon flooding with I2 reagent. Freshly isolated serotype c, E, and f colonies could often be distinguished from serotype d and g colonies, a distinction made reliable by testing for intracellular polysaccharide. A study of 300 salivary samples revealed GSTB to give significantly higher recoveries than MSB. About 72% of all samples were substantially underestimated for S. mutans with MSB, and 6.7% of samples were falsely negative for S. mutans with MSB. Recovery of background flora on GSTB was as low or lower than on MSB, and both types of agar could be stored for at least 9 weeks without notable change of selectivity. Thus, GSTB agar appears to be simple and reliable to use and requires no anaerobic incubation. Caution is voiced about

  2. Study on the application of shear-wave elastography to thin-layered media and tubular structure: Finite-element analysis and experiment verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jun-keun; Kondo, Kengo; Namita, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Shear-wave elastography (SWE) enables the noninvasive and quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of human soft tissue. Generally, shear-wave velocity (C S) can be estimated using the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Young’s modulus is then calculated directly from the estimated C S. However, because shear waves in thin-layered media propagate as guided waves, C S cannot be accurately estimated using the conventional TOF method. Leaky Lamb dispersion analysis (LLDA) has recently been proposed to overcome this problem. In this study, we performed both experimental and finite-element (FE) analyses to evaluate the advantages of LLDA over TOF. In FE analysis, we investigated why the conventional TOF is ineffective for thin-layered media. In phantom experiments, C S results estimated using the two methods were compared for 1.5 and 2% agar plates and tube phantoms. Furthermore, it was shown that Lamb waves can be applied to tubular structures by extracting lateral waves traveling in the long axis direction of the tube using a two-dimensional window. Also, the effects of the inner radius and stiffness (or shear wavelength) of the tube on the estimation performance of LLDA were experimentally discussed. In phantom experiments, the results indicated good agreement between LLDA (plate phantoms of 2 mm thickness: 5.0 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.2 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 2 mm inner radius: 5.1 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.0 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 4 mm inner radius: 5.3 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s for 2% agar) and SWE measurements (bulk phantoms: 5.3 m/s ± 0.27 for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s ± 0.54 for 2% agar).

  3. An alternative method of gas boriding applied to the formation of borocarburized layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kulka, M. Makuch, N.; Pertek, A.; Piasecki, A.

    2012-10-15

    The borocarburized layers were produced by tandem diffusion processes: carburizing followed by boriding. An alternative method of gas boriding was proposed. Two-stage gas boronizing in N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}-BCl{sub 3} atmosphere was applied to the formation of iron borides on a carburized substrate. This process consisted in two stages, which were alternately repeated: saturation by boron and diffusion annealing. The microstructure and microhardness of produced layer were compared to those-obtained in case of continuous gas boriding in H{sub 2}-BCl{sub 3} atmosphere, earlier used. The first objective of two-stage boronizing, consisting in acceleration of boron diffusion, has been efficiently implemented. Despite the lower temperature and shorter duration of boronizing, about 1.5 times larger iron borides' zone has been formed on carburized steel. Second objective, the absolute elimination of brittle FeB phase, has failed. However, the amount of FeB phase has been considerably limited. Longer diffusion annealing should provide the boride layer with single-phase microstructure, without FeB phase. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alternative method of gas boriding in H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}-BCl{sub 3} atmosphere was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The process consisted in two stages: saturation by boron and diffusion annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These stages of short duration were alternately repeated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acceleration of boron diffusion was efficiently implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of FeB phase in the boride zone was limited.

  4. An automatic Planetary Boundary Layer height retrieval method with compact EZ backscattering Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaec, S.; Sauvage, L.; Boquet, M.; Lolli, S.; Rouget, V.

    2009-09-01

    Bigger strongly urbanized cities in the world are often exposed to atmospheric pollution events. To understand the chemical and physical processes that are taking place in these areas it is necessary to describe correctly the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) dynamics and the PBL height evolution. For these proposals, a compact and rugged eye safe UV Lidar, the EZLIDAR™, was developed together by CEA/LMD and LEOSPHERE (France) to study and investigate structural and optical properties of clouds and aerosols and PBL time evolution. EZLIDAR™ has been validated by different remote and in-situ instruments as MPL Type-4 Lidar manufactured by NASA at ARM/SGP site or the LNA (Lidar Nuage Aerosol) at the Laboratoire de Metereologie Dynamique LMD (France) and during several intercomparison campaigns. EZLIDAR™ algorithm retrieves automatically the PBL height in real-time. The method is based on the detection of the slope of the signal linked to a sharp change in concentration of the aerosols. Once detected, the different layers are filtered on a 15mn sample and classified between nocturnal, convective or residual layer, depending on the time and date. This method has been validated against those retrieved by the algorithm STRAT from data acquired at IPSL, France, showing 95% of correlation. In this paper are presented the results of the intercomparison campaign that took place in Orleans, France and Mace Head, Ireland in the framework of ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observation System) project, where the EZ Lidar™ worked under all weather conditions, clear sky, fog, low clouds, during the whole month of October 2008. Moreover, thanks to its 3D scanning capability, the EZLIDAR was able to provide the variability of the PBL height around the site, enabling the scientists to estimate the flux intensities that play a key role in the radiative transfer budget and in the atmospheric pollutants dispersion.

  5. Laboratory Methods to Remove Surface Layers from Cereal Grains Using a Seed Scarifier and comparison with a barley pearler.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution of nutrients and undesirable components within a cereal seed is heterogeneous, and many of the valuable nutrients are located in the outer layers. Efficient laboratory methods to remove these layers will allow for the experimental production of value-added products. A seed scarife...

  6. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  7. Method of producing buried porous silicon-geramanium layers in monocrystalline silicon lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si--Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are stain etched resulting in porosification of the Si--Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si--Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  8. A tracers method for studying double diffusive convection in the liquid layers of planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, M.; Labrosse, M.; Choblet, M.; Fournier, M.; Aubert, M.; Tackley, M.

    2015-10-01

    Convection in the liquid layers of planetary interiors is usually driven by a combination of thermal and compositional sources of buoyancy. The low molecular diffusivity of composition causes troubles in the description of this field on the Eulerian grids typically employed in current codes of geodynamo because numerical diffusion on these grids is potentially larger than the real diffusivity. We developed a Lagrangian description of composition based on a method of tracers. The absence of numerical diffusion inherent to this method allows modeling of thermo-chemical convection with infinite Lewis number. The validation of this new tool on benchmark cases will be presented at EPSC as well as its first applications to the ocean of Ganymede with consistently coupled boundary condi- tions for temperature and composition.

  9. Three-layer antireflection coatings - A new method for design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagendra, C. L.; Thutupalli, G. K. M.

    1983-12-01

    An algorithm offering a simpler and faster optimization procedure is developed for the design of multilayer antireflection coatings, and a closed-loop nonlinear approximation technique is used to arrive at the exact thickness of each layer. The method has been used in the design of systems with high- and low-index substrates normally used in IR regions and in visible to near-IR regions, respectively. In a comparative study with other techniques the present design was preferred over Dobrowolski's (1981, 1982) if a wider spectral bandwidth is of more importance than spectral losses. The use of this method permits optimum design with refinement in only one thickness. This non-lambda/4 system gives higher flexibility in choosing the refractive index of the materials and correcting the system in in-situ conditions.

  10. Simulation of electric double-layer capacitors: evaluation of constant potential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Laird, Brian; Yang, Yang; Olmsted, David; Asta, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Atomistic simulations can play an important role in understanding electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) at a molecular level. In such simulations, typically the electrode surface is modeled using fixed surface charges, which ignores the charge fluctuation induced by local fluctuations in the electrolyte solution. In this work we evaluate an explicit treatment of charges, namely constant potential method (CPM)[1], in which the electrode charges are dynamically updated to maintain constant electrode potential. We employ a model system with a graphite electrode and a LiClO4/acetonitrile electrolyte, examined as a function of electrode potential differences. Using various molecular and macroscopic properties as metrics, we compare CPM simulations on this system to results using fixed surface charges. Specifically, results for predicted capacity, electric potential gradient and solvent density profile are identical between the two methods; However, ion density profiles and solvation structure yield significantly different results.

  11. A new method for measuring the yield stress in thin layers of sedimenting blood.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C L; Smith, C M; Blackshear, P L

    1987-01-01

    A new method is presented to describe the low shear rate behavior of blood. We observed the response of a thin layer of sedimenting blood to a graded shear stress in a wedge-shaped chamber. The method allows quantitation of the degree of phase separation between red cells and plasma, and extracts the yield stress of the cell phase as a function of hematocrit. Our studies showed that the behavior of normal human blood underwent a transition from a solid-like gel to a Casson fluid. This transition began at the Casson predicted yield stress. The viscoelastic properties of blood were examined at shear stresses below the yield stress. The measured Young's elastic moduli were in good agreement with published data. The yield stress of blood showed a linear dependence on hematocrit up to 60%, and increased more rapidly at higher hematocrit. PMID:3663830

  12. Method for depth-resolved quantitation of optical properties in layered media using spatially modulated quantitative spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saager, Rolf B.; Truong, Alex; Cuccia, David J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated that spatially modulated quantitative spectroscopy (SMoQS) is capable of extracting absolute optical properties from homogeneous tissue simulating phantoms that span both the visible and near-infrared wavelength regimes. However, biological tissue, such as skin, is highly structured, presenting challenges to quantitative spectroscopic techniques based on homogeneous models. In order to more accurately address the challenges associated with skin, we present a method for depth-resolved optical property quantitation based on a two layer model. Layered Monte Carlo simulations and layered tissue simulating phantoms are used to determine the efficacy and accuracy of SMoQS to quantify layer specific optical properties of layered media. Initial results from both the simulation and experiment show that this empirical method is capable of determining top layer thickness within tens of microns across a physiological range for skin. Layer specific chromophore concentration can be determined to <±10% the actual values, on average, whereas bulk quantitation in either visible or near infrared spectroscopic regimes significantly underestimates the layer specific chromophore concentration and can be confounded by top layer thickness. PMID:21806282

  13. Combined bio-inspired/evolutionary computational methods in cross-layer protocol optimization for wireless ad hoc sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2011-06-01

    Published studies have focused on the application of one bio-inspired or evolutionary computational method to the functions of a single protocol layer in a wireless ad hoc sensor network (WSN). For example, swarm intelligence in the form of ant colony optimization (ACO), has been repeatedly considered for the routing of data/information among nodes, a network-layer function, while genetic algorithms (GAs) have been used to select transmission frequencies and power levels, physical-layer functions. Similarly, artificial immune systems (AISs) as well as trust models of quantized data reputation have been invoked for detection of network intrusions that cause anomalies in data and information; these act on the application and presentation layers. Most recently, a self-organizing scheduling scheme inspired by frog-calling behavior for reliable data transmission in wireless sensor networks, termed anti-phase synchronization, has been applied to realize collision-free transmissions between neighboring nodes, a function of the MAC layer. In a novel departure from previous work, the cross-layer approach to WSN protocol design suggests applying more than one evolutionary computational method to the functions of the appropriate layers to improve the QoS performance of the cross-layer design beyond that of one method applied to a single layer's functions. A baseline WSN protocol design, embedding GAs, anti-phase synchronization, ACO, and a trust model based on quantized data reputation at the physical, MAC, network, and application layers, respectively, is constructed. Simulation results demonstrate the synergies among the bioinspired/ evolutionary methods of the proposed baseline design improve the overall QoS performance of networks over that of a single computational method.

  14. Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Testing of Leptospira spp. Using Leptospira Vanaporn Wuthiekanun (LVW) Agar.

    PubMed

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Langla, Sayan; White, Nicholas J; Day, Nicholas P J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J

    2015-08-01

    Leptospira Vanaporn Wuthiekanun (LVW) agar was used to develop a disk diffusion assay for Leptospira spp. Ten pathogenic Leptospira isolates were tested, all of which were susceptible to 17 antimicrobial agents (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, amoxicillin, azithromycin, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doripenem, doxycycline, gentamicin, linezolid, nitrofurantoin, penicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, and tetracycline). All 10 isolates had no zone of growth inhibition for four antimicrobials (fosfomycin, nalidixic acid, rifampicin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole). Of the ten Leptospira, seven had a growth inhibition zone of ≤ 21 mm for aztreonam, the zone diameter susceptibility break point for Enterobacteriaceae. This assay could find utility as a simple screening method during the epidemiological surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Leptospira spp. PMID:26055750

  15. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a laminated metal composite, comprising alternating layers of low flow stress material and high flow stress material, and formed using flow constraining elements around each low flow stress layer; and a method of making same. A composite is a combination of at least two chemically distinct materials with a distinct interface separating the two materials. A metal matrix composite (MMC) is a composite material composed of a metal and a nonmetallic reinforcing agent such as silicon carbide (SiC) or graphite in continuous or discontinuous fiber, whisker, or discrete particulate form. A laminate is a material composed of several bonded layers. It is possible to have a laminate composed of multi-layers of a single type of material bonded to each other. However, such a laminate would not be considered to be a composite. The term {open_quotes}laminated metal composite{close_quotes} (LMC), as used herein, is intended to include a structural material composed of: (1) layers of metal or metal alloys interleaved with (2) a different metal, a metal alloy, or a metal matrix composite (MMC) containing strengthening agents.

  16. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-01-22

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by electrospinning technique, using water as solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operating at 50°C, to avoid agar gelation. Agar pure solution (1 wt%) showed inadequate spinnability regardless of the used electrospinning conditions. The addition of a co-blending polymer such as PVA (10 wt% starting solution) improved the solutions viscoelasticity and hence, the solutions spinnability. Agar/PVA solutions were prepared with different mass ratios (100/0, 50/50, 40/60, 30/70, 20/80 and 0/100) and electrospun at various sets of electrospinning conditions. Best nanofibers were obtained with 30/70 and 20/80 agar/PVA blends while samples with higher agar contents (50/50 and 40/60 agar/PVA) were harder to process and led to discontinuous fibrous mats. This first set of encouraging results can open a new window of opportunities for agar-based biomaterials in the form of nanofibers. PMID:25439904

  17. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans strains by different mitis-salivarius agar preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Staat, R H

    1976-01-01

    Several Streptococcus mutans strains were markedly inhibited by mitis-salivarius agar manufactured by Baltimore Biological Laboratories, but little, if any, inhibition was noted using Difco Laboratories' mitis-salivarius agar. Supplementation of the basic medium with sucrose and bacitracin for specific selection of S. mutans resulted in suppression of representative S. mutans type a strains regardless of manufacturer. PMID:1270597

  18. Effects of season on the yield and quality of agar from Gracilaria species (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Marinho-Soriano, E; Bourret, E

    2003-12-01

    The effect of season on yield and physical properties of agars extracted from Gracia gracilis and G. bursa-pastoris were determined. The agar yield from G. gracilis was maximum during spring (30%) and minimum during autumn (19%). In G. bursa-pastoris, the agar yield was greatest in summer (36%) and lowest in winter (23%). Agar yield from G. bursa-pastoris was positively correlated with temperature (r=0.94; P<0.01) and salinity (r=0.97; P<0.01) and negatively with nitrogen content (r=-0.93; P<0.01). Agar gel strengths fluctuated from 229 to 828 gcm(-2) and 23 to 168 gcm(-2) for G. gracilis and G. bursa-pastoris, respectively. The gelling temperature showed significant seasonal variation for both species. Chemical analysis of agar from the two seaweeds indicated variation in 3,6-anhydrogalactose and sulfate content (P<0.01). Furthermore, there was an inverse correlation between the two chemical variables. In general, agar extracted from G. gracilis possessed better qualities than agar extracted from G. bursa-pastoris and can be considered a candidate for industrial use. PMID:14575957

  19. Characteristics of thermoplastic sugar palm Starch/Agar blend: Thermal, tensile, and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Jumaidin, R; Sapuan, S M; Jawaid, M; Ishak, M R; Sahari, J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to study the behavior of biodegradable sugar palm starch (SPS) based thermoplastic containing agar in the range of 10-40wt%. The thermoplastics were melt-mixed and then hot pressed at 140°C for 10min. SEM investigation showed good miscibility between SPS and agar. FT-IR analysis confirmed that SPS and agar were compatible and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds existed between them. Incorporation of agar increased the thermoplastic starch tensile properties (Young's modulus and tensile strength). The thermal stability and moisture uptake increased with increasing agar content. The present work shows that starch-based thermoplastics with 30wt% agar content have the highest tensile strength. Higher content of agar (40wt%) resulted to more rough cleavage fracture and slight decrease in the tensile strength. In conclusion, the addition of agar improved the thermal and tensile properties of thermoplastic SPS which widened the potential application of this eco-friendly material. The most promising applications for this eco-friendly material are short-life products such as packaging, container, tray, etc. PMID:27177458

  20. Efficacy of agar-plate culture in detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, T; Iwanaga, M; Kinjo, F; Saito, A; Asato, R; Ikeshiro, T

    1990-06-01

    Agar-plate culture of feces using a modified petri dish proved to be highly efficient in the detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection. Furrows left by S. stercoralis on the agar plate were distinguished readily in size from those left by Necator americanus. PMID:2352073

  1. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-08-10

    A novel field emitter device is disclosed for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials. 8 figs.

  2. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials.

  3. Calculation of depth-dependent elemental concentration with X-ray fluorescence using a layered calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherase, M. R.; Fleming, D. E. B.

    2011-05-01

    Depth-dependent elemental concentration can be assessed using either multiple-angle or confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements. This work presents a different approach based on a layered calibration method. The depth-dependent elemental concentration was modeled as multiple layers of uniform elemental concentrations. The unknown elemental concentration in each layer can be calculated using a single-angle XRF measurement, layered calibration data, and a priori knowledge of the concentration behavior as a function of depth. The method was verified using a commercial portable X-ray spectrometer and four-layer stacks of polyester resin discs doped with various concentrations of arsenic. This approach is particularly suitable for quantitative in vivo measurements of arsenic and selenium concentrations in the human skin since minimal ionizing radiation exposure constrains the number of XRF measurements.

  4. [Evaluation of a new medium, eggplant (Solanum melongena) agar as a screening medium for Cryptococcus neoformans in environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Sengul, Mustafa; Ergin, Cağrı; Kartal, Tuğba

    2014-04-01

    Cryptococcus neofomans is an encapsulated yeast-like fungus that causes life-threatening infections, especially in immunosuppresive patients. C.neoformans infection is believed to be acquired via inhalation of aerosolized particles from the environment. Avian guano, decaying tree hollows and soil are the related known environmental niches. Brown pigmented yeast growth from the precursors in growth media is an important step for the identification and isolation of C.neoformans. Seeds of plants in nature are preferred owing to easy accessibility and low costs for the preparation of such media. Guizotia abysinicca (Niger seed) as Staib agar, Helianthus annus (Sunflower) as Pal's medium, Brassica nigra (Mustard) agar, tobacco agar, Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean) seed agar, Perilla frutescens (Beefsteak plant) seed agar, Rubus fruticosus (Blackberry) agar and ground red hot pepper agar are pigment-based selective media for the differentiation of C.neoformans. The aim of this study was to observe the pigment production of C.neoformans in a new medium based on eggplant (Solanum melongena) and also to compare its performance with the simplified Staib, Pal's and tobacco agar for isolation from the environment. Three different eggplant-based medium (S.melongena Melanzaza viserba, S.melongena Pinstripe F1 and S.ovigerum Ivory F1) were included in the study. Pigment-forming eggplant medium, simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and tobacco agar were used for the cultivation of the environmental swabbed samples from 19 Eucalyptus camaldulensis trunk hollows in continuous colonization region. While pigment formation were observed with S.melongena Melanzaza viserba and S.melongena Pinstripe F1 containing media, S.ovigerum Ivory F1 medium was found to be non-reactive. In colonization area (Gökova-Akyaka, Turkey), 11 (57.9%) out of 19 E.camaldulensis samples were positive with simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar while 10 (52.6%) of them are positive with tobacco agar. C

  5. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by agar: effects of NaCl and ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on agar was investigated as a function of temperature (308-328 K), different concentrations of NaCl and HCl and various weight percentages of binary mixtures of ethanol with water. It was observed that the maximum experimental adsorption capacity, qm, exp, in water is up to 50 mg g-1 and decreases with increase in weight percentage of ethanol and NaCl and HCl concentration compared to that of water. Analysis of data using ARIAN model showed that MB adsorbs as monomer and dimer on the surface of agar. Binding constants of MB to agar were calculated using the Temkin isotherm. The process is exothermic in water and other solutions. The mean adsorption energy (E) value indicated binding of MB to agar is chemical adsorption. Kinetics of this interaction obeys from the pseudo-second-order model and diffusion of the MB molecules into the agar is the main rate-controlling step. PMID:22339759

  6. Comparison of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus Agar Medium to Conventional Media for Detection of Staphylococcus aureus in Respiratory Samples

    PubMed Central

    Flayhart, Diane; Lema, Clara; Borek, Anita; Carroll, Karen C.

    2004-01-01

    Screening for Staphylococcus aureus has become routine in certain patient populations. This study is the first clinical evaluation of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus agar (CSA) medium (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, Md.) for detection of S. aureus in nasal surveillance cultures and in respiratory samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. S. aureus colonies appear mauve on CSA. Other organisms are inhibited or produce a distinctly different colony color. S. aureus was identified from all media by slide coagulase, exogenous DNase, and mannitol fermentation assays. Susceptibility testing was performed using the agar dilution method. A total of 679 samples were evaluated. All samples were inoculated onto CSA. Nasal surveillance cultures were inoculated onto sheep blood agar (SBA) (BD Diagnostics), and samples from CF patients were inoculated onto mannitol salt agar (MSA) (BD Diagnostics). Of the 679 samples cultured, 200 organisms produced a mauve color on CSA (suspicious for S. aureus) and 180 were positive for S. aureus on SBA or MSA. Of 200 CSA-positive samples 191 were identified as S. aureus. Nine mauve colonies were slide coagulase negative and were subsequently identified as Staphylococcus lugdunensis (one), Staphylococcus epidermidis (three), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one), and Corynebacterium species (four). CSA improved the ability to detect S. aureus by recovering 12 S. aureus isolates missed by conventional media. Of the 192 S. aureus isolates recovered, 122 were methicillin susceptible and 70 were methicillin resistant. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of CSA in this study were 99.5 and 98%, respectively. There was no difference in the performance of the slide coagulase test or in susceptibility testing performed on S. aureus recovered from CSA compared to SBA or MSA. Our data support the use of CSA in place of standard culture media for detection of S. aureus in heavily contaminated respiratory samples. PMID:15297498

  7. The fabrication of nanocomposite thin films with TiO2 nanoparticles by the layer-by-layer deposition method for multifunctional cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Sule S; Sariişik, Merih; Aktaş, A Hakan

    2010-08-13

    A multilayer nanocomposite film composed of anatase TiO(2) nanoparticles was fabricated on cationically modified woven cotton fabrics by the layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pre-treated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC) by a pad-batch method. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to verify the presence of deposited nanolayers. Photocatalytic activities of the nanocomposite films were evaluated through the degradation of red wine pollutant. Nano-TiO(2) deposition enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics against UV radiation in comparison with the untreated cotton fabrics. Air permeability and whiteness value analysis was performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with TiO(2) nanoparticles by the layer-by-layer deposition method. Tensile strength tests of the warp and weft yarns were performed to evaluate the effect of solution pH value changes during the alternate dipping procedures. For the first time the durability of the effect of the self-assembled multilayer films on the cotton fabric functional properties was analyzed after 10 and 20 washing cycles at 40 degrees C for 30 min. PMID:20647626

  8. The fabrication of nanocomposite thin films with TiO2 nanoparticles by the layer-by-layer deposition method for multifunctional cotton fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugur, Şule S.; Sariişik, Merih; Hakan Aktaş, A.

    2010-08-01

    A multilayer nanocomposite film composed of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles was fabricated on cationically modified woven cotton fabrics by the layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pre-treated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC) by a pad-batch method. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to verify the presence of deposited nanolayers. Photocatalytic activities of the nanocomposite films were evaluated through the degradation of red wine pollutant. Nano-TiO2 deposition enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics against UV radiation in comparison with the untreated cotton fabrics. Air permeability and whiteness value analysis was performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with TiO2 nanoparticles by the layer-by-layer deposition method. Tensile strength tests of the warp and weft yarns were performed to evaluate the effect of solution pH value changes during the alternate dipping procedures. For the first time the durability of the effect of the self-assembled multilayer films on the cotton fabric functional properties was analyzed after 10 and 20 washing cycles at 40 °C for 30 min.

  9. Prediction method for two-dimensional aerodynamic losses of cooled vanes using integral boundary-layer parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Augler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A generalized analysis to predict the two-dimensional aerodynamic losses of film-cooled vanes by using integral boundary-layer parameters is presented. Heat-transfer and trailing-edge injection effects are included in the method. An approximate solution of the generalized equations is also included to show more clearly the effect of the different boundary-layer and cooling parameters on the losses. The analytical predictions agree well with the experimental results, indicating that available boundary-layer calculations for cooled vanes are of sufficient accuracy to use in the prediction method.

  10. Comparison of Several Numerical Methods for Simulation of Compressible Shear Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation is conducted on several numerical schemes for use in the computation of two-dimensional, spatially evolving, laminar variable-density compressible shear layers. Schemes with various temporal accuracies and arbitrary spatial accuracy for both inviscid and viscous terms are presented and analyzed. All integration schemes use explicit or compact finite-difference derivative operators. Three classes of schemes are considered: an extension of MacCormack's original second-order temporally accurate method, a new third-order variant of the schemes proposed by Rusanov and by Kutier, Lomax, and Warming (RKLW), and third- and fourth-order Runge-Kutta schemes. In each scheme, stability and formal accuracy are considered for the interior operators on the convection-diffusion equation U(sub t) + aU(sub x) = alpha U(sub xx). Accuracy is also verified on the nonlinear problem, U(sub t) + F(sub x) = 0. Numerical treatments of various orders of accuracy are chosen and evaluated for asymptotic stability. Formally accurate boundary conditions are derived for several sixth- and eighth-order central-difference schemes. Damping of high wave-number data is accomplished with explicit filters of arbitrary order. Several schemes are used to compute variable-density compressible shear layers, where regions of large gradients exist.

  11. Thermal diffusivity of few-layers graphene measured by an all-optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, H.; Mendoza, D.; Benítez, J. L.; Bautista Flores, C.; Alvarado, S.; Marín, E.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the measurement of the thermal diffusivity, D, of few-layers graphene obtained by chemical vapor deposition, using a noncontact optical microscopy method based on a mode mismatched thermal lens technique in a pump-probe two-laser beams configuration. It takes advantage of the coaxial counter propagating tightly focused excitation and collimated probe beams in an improved thermal lens microscopy setup. The obtained results: D  =  (6.5  ±  0.09)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1, D  =  (1.9  ±  0.07)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1 and D  =  (1.3  ±  0.05)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1 for four (on a glass slide), eight and sixteen graphene (freestanding) layers are reasonable values, as can be concluded from reported literature data.

  12. Method for Controlling Electrical Properties of Single-Layer Graphene Nanoribbons via Adsorbed Planar Molecular Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Arima, Ryo; Fukumori, Minoru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Negishi, Ryota; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Seiya; Yamada, Toyo Kazu; Ogawa, Takuji

    2015-07-01

    A simple method for fabricating single-layer graphene nanoribbons (sGNRs) from double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) was developed. A sonication treatment was employed to unzip the DWNTs by inducing defects in them through annealing at 500 °C. The unzipped DWNTs yielded double-layered GNRs (dGNRs). Further sonication allowed each dGNR to be unpeeled into two sGNRs. Purification performed using a high-speed centrifuge ensured that more than 99% of the formed GNRs were sGNRs. The changes induced in the electrical properties of the obtained sGNR by the absorption of nanoparticles of planar molecule, naphthalenediimide (NDI), were investigated. The shape of the I-V curve of the sGNRs varied with the number of NDI nanoparticles adsorbed. This was suggestive of the existence of a band gap at the narrow-necked part near the NDI-adsorbing area of the sGNRs.

  13. Method for Controlling Electrical Properties of Single-Layer Graphene Nanoribbons via Adsorbed Planar Molecular Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Arima, Ryo; Fukumori, Minoru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Negishi, Ryota; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Seiya; Yamada, Toyo Kazu; Ogawa, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for fabricating single-layer graphene nanoribbons (sGNRs) from double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) was developed. A sonication treatment was employed to unzip the DWNTs by inducing defects in them through annealing at 500 °C. The unzipped DWNTs yielded double-layered GNRs (dGNRs). Further sonication allowed each dGNR to be unpeeled into two sGNRs. Purification performed using a high-speed centrifuge ensured that more than 99% of the formed GNRs were sGNRs. The changes induced in the electrical properties of the obtained sGNR by the absorption of nanoparticles of planar molecule, naphthalenediimide (NDI), were investigated. The shape of the I-V curve of the sGNRs varied with the number of NDI nanoparticles adsorbed. This was suggestive of the existence of a band gap at the narrow-necked part near the NDI-adsorbing area of the sGNRs. PMID:26205209

  14. Method for Controlling Electrical Properties of Single-Layer Graphene Nanoribbons via Adsorbed Planar Molecular Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Arima, Ryo; Fukumori, Minoru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Negishi, Ryota; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Seiya; Yamada, Toyo Kazu; Ogawa, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for fabricating single-layer graphene nanoribbons (sGNRs) from double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) was developed. A sonication treatment was employed to unzip the DWNTs by inducing defects in them through annealing at 500 °C. The unzipped DWNTs yielded double-layered GNRs (dGNRs). Further sonication allowed each dGNR to be unpeeled into two sGNRs. Purification performed using a high-speed centrifuge ensured that more than 99% of the formed GNRs were sGNRs. The changes induced in the electrical properties of the obtained sGNR by the absorption of nanoparticles of planar molecule, naphthalenediimide (NDI), were investigated. The shape of the I-V curve of the sGNRs varied with the number of NDI nanoparticles adsorbed. This was suggestive of the existence of a band gap at the narrow-necked part near the NDI-adsorbing area of the sGNRs. PMID:26205209

  15. Computation of turbulent boundary layers employing the defect wall-function method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Douglas L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to decrease overall computational time requirements of spatially-marching parabolized Navier-Stokes finite-difference computer code when applied to turbulent fluid flow, a wall-function methodology, originally proposed by R. Barnwell, was implemented. This numerical effort increases computational speed and calculates reasonably accurate wall shear stress spatial distributions and boundary-layer profiles. Since the wall shear stress is analytically determined from the wall-function model, the computational grid near the wall is not required to spatially resolve the laminar-viscous sublayer. Consequently, a substantially increased computational integration step size is achieved resulting in a considerable decrease in net computational time. This wall-function technique is demonstrated for adiabatic flat plate test cases from Mach 2 to Mach 8. These test cases are analytically verified employing: (1) Eckert reference method solutions, (2) experimental turbulent boundary-layer data of Mabey, and (3) finite-difference computational code solutions with fully resolved laminar-viscous sublayers. Additionally, results have been obtained for two pressure-gradient cases: (1) an adiabatic expansion corner and (2) an adiabatic compression corner.

  16. Structural and optical properties of WO3 electrochromic layers prepared by the sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinrooz, Abdoljavad; Sharbatdaran, Masoomeh; Noorkojouri, Hassan

    2005-09-01

    Thin layers of tungsten trioxide have been prepared from an aqueous solution of peroxotungstic acid (PTA) using the sol-gel method. Compositional, structural and optical characteristics of WO3 coated on indium tin oxide (ITO) conductive glass substrates were studied using X-ray diffractometery (XRD), cyclic voltammetery (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Monoclinic and triclinic crystalline structures for thin film and powdered WO3 were confirmed by XRD analysis. SEM micrograph of annealed samples revealed micro cracks due to a decrease in density and a contraction of layers. EDX analysis showed that 1∶2 ratio of oxygen and tungsten atoms in the prepared films is obtained at heat treatment temperatures higher than 200 °C. Furthermore, the annealed samples showed very good electrochromic behavior in cyclic voltammetery studies. Refractive index “n” and extinction coefficient “k” values were found to be reduced by increasing the wavelength and decreasing the temperature.

  17. Phase-separated, epitaxial composite cap layers for electronic device applications and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Polat, Ozgur

    2012-07-17

    An electronic component that includes a substrate and a phase-separated layer supported on the substrate and a method of forming the same are disclosed. The phase-separated layer includes a first phase comprising lanthanum manganate (LMO) and a second phase selected from a metal oxide (MO), metal nitride (MN), a metal (Me), and combinations thereof. The phase-separated material can be an epitaxial layer and an upper surface of the phase-separated layer can include interfaces between the first phase and the second phase. The phase-separated layer can be supported on a buffer layer comprising a composition selected from the group consisting of IBAD MgO, LMO/IBAD-MgO, homoepi-IBAD MgO and LMO/homoepi-MgO. The electronic component can also include an electronically active layer supported on the phase-separated layer. The electronically active layer can be a superconducting material, a ferroelectric material, a multiferroic material, a magnetic material, a photovoltaic material, an electrical storage material, and a semiconductor material.

  18. Effects of boron dopants of Si (001) substrates on formation of Ge layers by sputter epitaxy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki; Suda, Yoshiyuki

    2013-10-01

    The formation of Ge layers on boron-doped Si (001) substrates by our sputter epitaxy method has been investigated. The surface morphology of Ge layers grown on Si substrates depends on the substrate resistance, and flat Ge layers are obtained on Si substrates with 0.015 Ω cm resistivity. Highly boron-doped Si substrates cause a transition in the dislocation structure from complex dislocations with 60° dislocation glide planes to 90° pure-edge dislocations, resulting in the formation of flat Ge layers. Furthermore, we have found that the surface morphology of the Ge layers improves with increasing Ge layer thickness. Ge atoms migrating on the deposited Ge layers tend to position themselves at the reactive sites, where the reactivity is related to the number of bonding contacts between the Ge atom and the surface. This modifies the surface morphology, resulting in a flatter surface. Boron dopants together with the sputter epitaxy method effectively suppress the growth of Ge islands and result in the formation of flat Ge layers.

  19. Effects of boron dopants of Si (001) substrates on formation of Ge layers by sputter epitaxy method

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki

    2013-10-21

    The formation of Ge layers on boron-doped Si (001) substrates by our sputter epitaxy method has been investigated. The surface morphology of Ge layers grown on Si substrates depends on the substrate resistance, and flat Ge layers are obtained on Si substrates with 0.015 Ω cm resistivity. Highly boron-doped Si substrates cause a transition in the dislocation structure from complex dislocations with 60° dislocation glide planes to 90° pure-edge dislocations, resulting in the formation of flat Ge layers. Furthermore, we have found that the surface morphology of the Ge layers improves with increasing Ge layer thickness. Ge atoms migrating on the deposited Ge layers tend to position themselves at the reactive sites, where the reactivity is related to the number of bonding contacts between the Ge atom and the surface. This modifies the surface morphology, resulting in a flatter surface. Boron dopants together with the sputter epitaxy method effectively suppress the growth of Ge islands and result in the formation of flat Ge layers.

  20. Photovoltaic devices comprising zinc stannate buffer layer and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xuanzhi; Sheldon, Peter; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    A photovoltaic device has a buffer layer zinc stannate Zn.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 disposed between the semiconductor junction structure and the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer to prevent formation of localized junctions with the TCO through a thin window semiconductor layer, to prevent shunting through etched grain boundaries of semiconductors, and to relieve stresses and improve adhesion between these layers.

  1. Growth of polyaniline nanofibers for supercapacitor applications using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, P. R.; Pusawale, S. N.; Shinde, N. M.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2014-07-01

    We report the synthesis of polyaniline nanofibers using the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The structural study shows the amorphous nature of polyaniline. The formation of polyaniline nanofibers has been revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) whereas the confirmation of polyaniline material is obtained from Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A plausible explanation illustrating the growth mechanism is presented. A maximum specific capacitance of 1078 F.g-1 at a scan rate of 5 mV.s-1 is obtained. The charge-discharge behavior shows a maximum specific power of 1.2 kW.kg-1 and specific energy of 64 Wh.kg-1. The ease of the synthesis and the interesting electrochemical properties indicate that polyaniline nanofibers are promising materials for supercapacitor applications.

  2. Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) of compressible turbulent mixing layers using adaptive multiresolution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Kai; Roussel, Olivier; Farge, Marie

    2007-11-01

    Coherent Vortex Simulation is based on the wavelet decomposition of the flow into coherent and incoherent components. An adaptive multiresolution method using second order finite volumes with explicit time discretization, a 2-4 Mac Cormack scheme, allows an efficient computation of the coherent flow on a dynamically adapted grid. Neglecting the influence of the incoherent background models turbulent dissipation. We present CVS computation of three dimensional compressible time developing mixing layer. We show the speed up in CPU time with respect to DNS and the obtained memory reduction thanks to dynamical octree data structures. The impact of different filtering strategies is discussed and it is found that isotropic wavelet thresholding of the Favre averaged gradient of the momentum yields the most effective results.

  3. Numerical Study of Boundary Layer Interaction with Shocks: Method Improvement and Test Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is the development of a high-order and high-resolution method for the direct numerical simulation of shock turbulent-boundary-layer interaction. Details concerning the spatial discretization of the convective terms can be found in Adams and Shariff (1995). The computer code based on this method as introduced in Adams (1994) was formulated in Cartesian coordinates and thus has been limited to simple rectangular domains. For more general two-dimensional geometries, as a compression corner, an extension to generalized coordinates is necessary. To keep the requirements or limitations for grid generation low, the extended formulation should allow for non-orthogonal grids. Still, for simplicity and cost efficiency, periodicity can be assumed in one cross-flow direction. For easy vectorization, the compact-ENO coupling algorithm as used in Adams (1994) treated whole planes normal to the derivative direction with the ENO scheme whenever at least one point of this plane satisfied the detection criterion. This is apparently too restrictive for more general geometries and more complex shock patterns. Here we introduce a localized compact-ENO coupling algorithm, which is efficient as long as the overall number of grid points treated by the ENO scheme is small compared to the total number of grid points. Validation and test computations with the final code are performed to assess the efficiency and suitability of the computer code for the problems of interest. We define a set of parameters where a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent boundary layer along a compression corner with reasonably fine resolution is affordable.

  4. The Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) for Seismic Response of Topographical Irregularities in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Zazueta, M. A.; Perton, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Sánchez-Alvaro, E.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic hazard assessment of extended developments, such as a dam, a bridge or a pipeline, needs the strong ground motion simulation taking into account the effects of surface geology. In many cases the incoming wave field can be obtained from attenuation relations or simulations for layered media using Discrete Wave Number (DWN). Sometimes there is a need to include in simulations the seismic source as well. A number of methods to solve these problems have been developed. Among them the Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods (FEM and FDM) are generally preferred because of the facility of use. Nevertheless, the analysis of realistic dynamic loading induced by earthquakes requires a thinner mesh of the entire domain to consider high frequencies. Consequently this may imply a high computational cost. The Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) can also be employed. Here it is used to study the response of a site to historical seismic activity. This method is particularly suited to model wave propagation through wide areas as it requires only the meshing of boundaries. Moreover, it is well suited to represent finely the diffraction that can occur on a fault. However, the IBEM has been applied mainly to simple geometrical configurations. In this communication significant refinements of the formulation are presented. Using IBEM we can simulate wave propagation in complex geometrical configurations such as a stratified medium crossed by thin faults or having a complex topography. Two main developments are here described; one integrates the DWN method inside the IBEM in order to represent the Green's functions of stratified media with relatively low computational cost but assuming unbounded parallel flat layers, and the other is the extension of IBEM to deal with multi-regions in contact which allows more versatility with a higher computational cost compared to the first one but still minor to an equivalent FEM formulation. The two approaches are fully

  5. Evaluation of use of a new chromogenic agar in detection of urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Samra, Z; Heifetz, M; Talmor, J; Bain, E; Bahar, J

    1998-04-01

    CHROMagar Orientation, a new chromogenic medium, was evaluated for the detection and differentiation of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms in 900 urine samples from hospitalized patients. Performance characteristics of the medium were evaluated in comparison to those of 5% sheep blood and MacConkey agars by direct inoculation of the urine samples on the three media. Four gram-negative and two gram-positive strains as well as one yeast control strain from the American Type Culture Collection were used to ensure quality control. CHROMagar Orientation succeeded in detecting all the urine pathogens that were detected by the reference media, including gram-negative bacilli, staphylococci, streptococci, and yeasts. Colony color and morphology on CHROMagar Orientation accurately differentiated Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter spp. Owing to the similarity in the pigmentation produced by Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Citrobacter isolates, the medium failed to distinguish among them; however, these isolates were easily recognized as coliforms because of their metallic blue coloration. Staphylococci were clearly perceptible: S. aureus and S. epidermidis grow in regular-size colonies that range from opaque white to yellowish, and S. saprophyticus produces opaque pink colonies. All streptococcus strains, including those from groups B and C, were detected. They grow as undifferentiated flat dry diffused colonies, and additional tests were required for identification. Enterococci were easily discriminated by their strong turquoise pigmentation and their typical growth on the agar's surface. Yeast grow in typical creamy wet convex colonies. The accuracy of antibiotic susceptibility determinations according to standard methods was also tested by picking isolates directly from CHROMagar Orientation. The results showed excellent correlation with those obtained with microorganisms picked from

  6. Two-Flux and Green's Function Method for Transient Radiative Transfer in a Semi-Transparent Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1995-01-01

    A method using a Green's function is developed for computing transient temperatures in a semitransparent layer by using the two-flux method coupled with the transient energy equation. Each boundary of the layer is exposed to a hot or cold radiative environment, and is heated or cooled by convection. The layer refractive index is larger than one, and the effect of internal reflections is included with the boundaries assumed diffuse. The analysis accounts for internal emission, absorption, heat conduction, and isotropic scattering. Spectrally dependent radiative properties are included, and transient results are given to illustrate two-band spectral behavior with optically thin and thick bands. Transient results using the present Green's function method are verified for a gray layer by comparison with a finite difference solution of the exact radiative transfer equations; excellent agreement is obtained. The present method requires only moderate computing times and incorporates isotropic scattering without additional complexity. Typical temperature distributions are given to illustrate application of the method by examining the effect of strong radiative heating on one side of a layer with convective cooling on the other side, and the interaction of strong convective heating with radiative cooling from the layer interior.

  7. Mercury and its bioconcentration factors in fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) from spatially distant sites in Poland.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Lipka, K; Mazur, A

    2007-09-01

    Total mercury content has been determined in the fruiting bodies of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and topsoil layer (0-10 cm) collected from 14 spatially distant sites across Poland. Mercury was measured by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) after nitric acid (mushrooms) or nitric acid and sulfuric acid (soil) digestion of the samples. The caps, depending on the site, contained total mercury at mean concentrations from 0.24+/-0.13 to 1.4+/-0.6 microg/g dm (median 0.19-1.4 microg/g dm), and stalks from 0.18+/-0.06 to 0.71+/-0.26 microg/g dm (median 0.18-0.67 microg/g dm). An overall-mean the total mercury content for 204 caps and stalks was, respectively, 0.73+/-0.55 (0.05-3.3 microg/g dm) and 0.43+/-0.33 (0.09-2.3 microg/g dm). PMID:17849304

  8. Investigating the performance of directional boundary layer model through staged modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Moon-Gyu; Lee, Won-Chan; Yang, Seung-Hune; Jang, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Seong-Bo; Kim, Young-Chang; Suh, Chun-Suk; Choi, Seong-Woon; Kim, Young-Hee

    2011-04-01

    Generally speaking, the models used in the optical proximity effect correction (OPC) can be divided into three parts, mask part, optic part, and resist part. For the excellent quality of the OPC model, each part has to be described by the first principles. However, OPC model can't take the all of the principles since it should cover the full chip level calculation during the correction. Moreover, the calculation has to be done iteratively during the correction until the cost function we want to minimize converges. Normally the optic part in OPC model is described with the sum of coherent system (SOCS[1]) method. Thanks to this method we can calculate the aerial image so fast without the significant loss of accuracy. As for the resist part, the first principle is too complex to implement in detail, so it is normally expressed in a simple way, such as the approximation of the first principles, and the linear combinations of factors which is highly correlated with the chemistries in the resist. The quality of this kind of the resist model depends on how well we train the model through fitting to the empirical data. The most popular way of making the mask function is based on the Kirchhoff's thin mask approximation. This method works well when the feature size on the mask is sufficiently large, but as the line width of the semiconductor circuit becomes smaller, this method causes significant error due to the mask topography effect. To consider the mask topography effect accurately, we have to use rigorous methods of calculating the mask function, such as finite difference time domain (FDTD[2]) and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA[3]). But these methods are too time-consuming to be used as a part of the OPC model. Until now many alternatives have been suggested as the efficient way of considering the mask topography effect. Among them we focused on the boundary layer model (BLM) in this paper. We mainly investigated the way of optimization of the parameters for the

  9. Evaluation of the constant potential method in simulating electric double-layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenxing; Yang, Yang; Olmsted, David L; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian B

    2014-11-14

    A major challenge in the molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) is the choice of an appropriate model for the electrode. Typically, in such simulations the electrode surface is modeled using a uniform fixed charge on each of the electrode atoms, which ignores the electrode response to local charge fluctuations in the electrolyte solution. In this work, we evaluate and compare this Fixed Charge Method (FCM) with the more realistic Constant Potential Method (CPM), [S. K. Reed et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084704 (2007)], in which the electrode charges fluctuate in order to maintain constant electric potential in each electrode. For this comparison, we utilize a simplified LiClO4-acetonitrile/graphite EDLC. At low potential difference (ΔΨ ⩽ 2 V), the two methods yield essentially identical results for ion and solvent density profiles; however, significant differences appear at higher ΔΨ. At ΔΨ ⩾ 4 V, the CPM ion density profiles show significant enhancement (over FCM) of "inner-sphere adsorbed" Li(+) ions very close to the electrode surface. The ability of the CPM electrode to respond to local charge fluctuations in the electrolyte is seen to significantly lower the energy (and barrier) for the approach of Li(+) ions to the electrode surface. PMID:25399127

  10. Low-order mathematical modelling of electric double layer supercapacitors using spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Ross; Howey, David A.; Duncan, Stephen R.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates two physics-based models that simulate the non-linear partial differential algebraic equations describing an electric double layer supercapacitor. In one model the linear dependence between electrolyte concentration and conductivity is accounted for, while in the other model it is not. A spectral element method is used to discretise the model equations and it is found that the error convergence rate with respect to the number of elements is faster compared to a finite difference method. The increased accuracy of the spectral element approach means that, for a similar level of solution accuracy, the model simulation computing time is approximately 50% of that of the finite difference method. This suggests that the spectral element model could be used for control and state estimation purposes. For a typical supercapacitor charging profile, the numerical solutions from both models closely match experimental voltage and current data. However, when the electrolyte is dilute or where there is a long charging time, a noticeable difference between the numerical solutions of the two models is observed. Electrical impedance spectroscopy simulations show that the capacitance of the two models rapidly decreases when the frequency of the perturbation current exceeds an upper threshold.

  11. Turbulent boundary layer induced vibration up to high frequencies by means of local energy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Pierre; Jezequel, Louis; Ichchou, Mohammed; Jacques, Yves

    2002-11-01

    The local energy method developed in the last years revealed appropriate in medium and high frequencies and supplies an accurate description of the spread of vibration and acoustic fields up to high frequencies. Our aim in the paper is to provide a complete description of the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced vibration by means of this method, for a simply supported thin plate. The first step in the energy method proof is the characterization of energy input from a given model of the TBL pressure interspectrum. Then, is deduced the uncoherent structural response of the panel, and the uncoherent normal mean square velocity. The latter provides, using the acoustic radiation resistance, a prediction of noise radiating by the panel up to high frequencies. Accuracy of the local energy analysis versus the usual random normal modes decomposition is demonstrated. Ultimately, a numerical parametric survey is given for various internal loss level. Precisely, the link between results provided here and SEA predictions of TBL structural induced vibration is discussed.

  12. Evaluation of the constant potential method in simulating electric double-layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Yang, Yang; Olmsted, David L.; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian B.

    2014-11-01

    A major challenge in the molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) is the choice of an appropriate model for the electrode. Typically, in such simulations the electrode surface is modeled using a uniform fixed charge on each of the electrode atoms, which ignores the electrode response to local charge fluctuations in the electrolyte solution. In this work, we evaluate and compare this Fixed Charge Method (FCM) with the more realistic Constant Potential Method (CPM), [S. K. Reed et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084704 (2007)], in which the electrode charges fluctuate in order to maintain constant electric potential in each electrode. For this comparison, we utilize a simplified LiClO4-acetonitrile/graphite EDLC. At low potential difference (ΔΨ ⩽ 2 V), the two methods yield essentially identical results for ion and solvent density profiles; however, significant differences appear at higher ΔΨ. At ΔΨ ⩾ 4 V, the CPM ion density profiles show significant enhancement (over FCM) of "inner-sphere adsorbed" Li+ ions very close to the electrode surface. The ability of the CPM electrode to respond to local charge fluctuations in the electrolyte is seen to significantly lower the energy (and barrier) for the approach of Li+ ions to the electrode surface.

  13. Evaluation of the constant potential method in simulating electric double-layer capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhenxing; Laird, Brian B.; Yang, Yang; Olmsted, David L.; Asta, Mark

    2014-11-14

    A major challenge in the molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) is the choice of an appropriate model for the electrode. Typically, in such simulations the electrode surface is modeled using a uniform fixed charge on each of the electrode atoms, which ignores the electrode response to local charge fluctuations in the electrolyte solution. In this work, we evaluate and compare this Fixed Charge Method (FCM) with the more realistic Constant Potential Method (CPM), [S. K. Reed et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084704 (2007)], in which the electrode charges fluctuate in order to maintain constant electric potential in each electrode. For this comparison, we utilize a simplified LiClO{sub 4}-acetonitrile/graphite EDLC. At low potential difference (ΔΨ ⩽ 2 V), the two methods yield essentially identical results for ion and solvent density profiles; however, significant differences appear at higher ΔΨ. At ΔΨ ⩾ 4 V, the CPM ion density profiles show significant enhancement (over FCM) of “inner-sphere adsorbed” Li{sup +} ions very close to the electrode surface. The ability of the CPM electrode to respond to local charge fluctuations in the electrolyte is seen to significantly lower the energy (and barrier) for the approach of Li{sup +} ions to the electrode surface.

  14. Efficient reconstruction method for ground layer adaptive optics with mixed natural and laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Roland; Helin, Tapio; Obereder, Andreas; Ramlau, Ronny

    2016-02-20

    The imaging quality of modern ground-based telescopes such as the planned European Extremely Large Telescope is affected by atmospheric turbulence. In consequence, they heavily depend on stable and high-performance adaptive optics (AO) systems. Using measurements of incoming light from guide stars, an AO system compensates for the effects of turbulence by adjusting so-called deformable mirror(s) (DMs) in real time. In this paper, we introduce a novel reconstruction method for ground layer adaptive optics. In the literature, a common approach to this problem is to use Bayesian inference in order to model the specific noise structure appearing due to spot elongation. This approach leads to large coupled systems with high computational effort. Recently, fast solvers of linear order, i.e., with computational complexity O(n), where n is the number of DM actuators, have emerged. However, the quality of such methods typically degrades in low flux conditions. Our key contribution is to achieve the high quality of the standard Bayesian approach while at the same time maintaining the linear order speed of the recent solvers. Our method is based on performing a separate preprocessing step before applying the cumulative reconstructor (CuReD). The efficiency and performance of the new reconstructor are demonstrated using the OCTOPUS, the official end-to-end simulation environment of the ESO for extremely large telescopes. For more specific simulations we also use the MOST toolbox. PMID:26906596

  15. Development of an ab-initio calculation method for 2D layered materials-based optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Seul; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    We report on the development of a novel first-principles method for the calculation of non-equilibrium nanoscale device operation process. Based on region-dependent Δ self-consistent field method beyond the standard density functional theory (DFT), we will introduce a novel method to describe non-equilibrium situations such as external bias and simultaneous optical excitations. In particular, we will discuss the limitation of conventional method and advantage of our scheme in describing 2D layered materials-based devices operations. Then, we investigate atomistic mechanism of optoelectronic effects from 2D layered materials-based devices and suggest the optimal material and architecture for such devices.

  16. Development of a Perfectly Matched Layer Technique for a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garai, Anirban; Murman, Scott M.; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2016-01-01

    used involves modeling the pressure fluctuations as acoustic waves propagating in the far-field relative to a single noise-source inside the buffer region. This approach treats vorticity-induced pressure fluctuations the same as acoustic waves. Another popular approach, often referred to as the "sponge layer," attempts to dampen the flow perturbations by introducing artificial dissipation in the buffer region. Although the artificial dissipation removes all perturbations inside the sponge layer, incoming waves are still reflected from the interface boundary between the computational domain and the sponge layer. The effect of these refkections can be somewhat mitigated by appropriately selecting the artificial dissipation strength and the extent of the sponge layer. One of the most promising variants on the buffer region approach is the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique. The PML technique mitigates spurious reflections from boundaries and interfaces by dampening the perturbation modes inside the buffer region such that their eigenfunctions remain unchanged. The technique was first developed by Berenger for application to problems involving electromagnetic wave propagation. It was later extended to the linearized Euler, Euler and Navier-Stokes equations by Hu and his coauthors. The PML technique ensures the no-reflection property for all waves, irrespective of incidence angle, wavelength, and propagation direction. Although the technique requires the solution of a set of auxiliary equations, the computational overhead is easily justified since it allows smaller domain sizes and can provide better accuracy, stability, and convergence of the numerical solution. In this paper, the PML technique is developed in the context of a high-order spectral-element Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method. The technique is compared to other approaches to treating the in flow and out flow boundary, such as those based on using characteristic boundary conditions and sponge layers. The

  17. Effectual detection of group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS) by commercially available methicillin-resistant-Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-selective agar.

    PubMed

    Fukigai, Shinako; Morimoto, Makiko; Kimura, Kouji; Doyama, Yo; Miyazaki, Akira; Kamiya, Chitose; Banno, Hirotsugu; Morishima, Eriko; Onoda, Tomohiro; Nagano, Noriyuki; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of a commercially available methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-selective agar, chromID(™) MRSA, to detect group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS) in this study. The results showed 72.4% (21/29) sensitivity and 98.4% (60/61) specificity to detect PRGBS using this method. PMID:27198740

  18. Factors Affecting Selectivity of Brilliant Green-Phenol Red Agar for Salmonellae

    PubMed Central

    Moats, W. A.; Kinner, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Commercial brilliant green (BG)-sulfa agar was found to be nonselective toward a test series of Enterobacteriaceae. Various formulations of BG were prepared by using Trypticase soy agar (BBL) as a base. Results were more reproducible when BG dye was added after sterilization than before. Sulfonamides improved selectivity as compared with brilliant green alone. Sulfanilamide (SN) was slightly more selective for salmonellae than other sulfonamides tested. Bile salts and sodium dodecyl sulfate markedly reduced the toxicity of BG to all the test bacteria. Enterobacter strains were most difficult to inhibit. A combination of 5 mg of BG and 1 g of SN/liter prevented growth of Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli and retarded growth of Enterobacter strains. The BG-SN agars were superior in selectivity to a series of commercial agars tested, and numbers of salmonellae recovered on BG-SN agar and Trypticase soy agar (BBL) were the same. Brilliant green agars with various degrees of selectivity are described. PMID:4589120

  19. Chemosensitivity measurements of human tumour cells by soft agar assays are influenced by the culture conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Endresen, L.; Tveit, K. M.; Rugstad, H. E.; Pihl, A.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the influence of culture conditions on the in vitro responses of tumour cells to anticancer drugs, the sensitivities observed with the soft agar methods of Hamburger & Salmon (1977) (H-S) and of Courtenay & Mills (1978) (C-M) were compared. In all cases the ID50 values were determined from dose-response curves. Six human tumour cell lines exposed to 10 different agents, and 9 patients' melanomas exposed to 5 different agents, were examined. In the studies of cell lines the H-S method gave higher sensitivity values than the C-M method in 38 out of 52 cases, whereas in 14 cases the results were the same. In the patients' tumours the H-S method gave higher sensitivity in 21 of 35 cases, equal sensitivity in 11, and lower sensitivity in 3 cases. In many instances the ID50 values obtained with the two test systems differed by factors of 10 or more, both in the case of cell lines and tumour specimens. Systematic alterations in the culture conditions indicated that the presence or absence of rat erythrocytes is the most important factor responsible for the differences observed. Also, other factors, such as supplements (in the H-S method) and the use of different serum types, appeared to influence both colony growth and chemosensitivity. PMID:4005141

  20. Highly efficient silver particle layers on glass substrate synthesized by the sonochemical method for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy purposes.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Petr; Prucek, Robert; Černá, Klára; Fargašová, Ariana; Panáček, Aleš; Gedanken, Aharon; Zbořil, Radek; Kvítek, Libor

    2016-09-01

    A fast method for preparing of silver particle layers on glass substrates with high application potential for using in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is introduced. Silver particle layers deposited on glass cover slips were generated in one-step process by reduction of silver nitrate using several reducing agents (ethylene glycol, glycerol, maltose, lactose and glucose) under ultrasonic irradiation. This technique allows the formation of homogeneous layers of silver particles with sizes from 80nm up to several hundred nanometers depending on the nature of the used reducing agent. Additionally, the presented method is not susceptible to impurities on the substrate surface and it does not need any additives to capture or stabilize the silver particles on the glass surface. The characteristics of prepared silver layers on glass substrate by the above mentioned sonochemical approach was compared with chemically prepared ones. The prepared layers were tested as substrates for SERS using adenine as a model analyte. The factor of Raman signal enhancement reached up to 5·10(5). On the contrary, the chemically prepared silver layers does not exhibit almost any pronounced Raman signal enhancement. Presented sonochemical approach for preparation of silver particle layers is fast, simple, robust, and is better suited for reproducible fabrication functional SERS substrates than chemical one. PMID:27150757

  1. Application of a generalized matrix averaging method for the calculation of the effective properties of thin multiferroic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Starkov, A. S.; Starkov, I. A.

    2014-11-15

    It is proposed to use a generalized matrix averaging (GMA) method for calculating the parameters of an effective medium with physical properties equivalent to those of a set of thin multiferroic layers. This approach obviates the need to solve a complex system of magnetoelectroelasticity equations. The required effective characteristics of a system of multiferroic layers are obtained using only operations with matrices, which significantly simplifies calculations and allows multilayer systems to be described. The proposed approach is applicable to thin-layer systems, in which the total thickness is much less than the system length, radius of curvature, and wavelengths of waves that can propagate in the system (long-wave approximation). Using the GMA method, it is also possible to obtain the effective characteristics of a periodic structure with each period comprising a number of thin multiferroic layers.

  2. Comparison of Methods to Determine Tropical Tropopause Layer Cirrus Formation Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Liang, Calvin; Massie, Steven T.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Toth, Travis D.

    2012-03-30

    A new method of estimating Tropical Tropopause Layer Cirrus (TTLC) formation mechanism (object method) is compared to interpretations of formation from previous studies using back trajectory calculations matched to convection identified from satellites and statistical relationships of TTLC with temperature and water vapor. The object method groups neighboring Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) TTLC cloud profiles into cloud objects and classifies them as convective (35% of TTLC) if they are directly attached to a convective cloud along the CALIPSO track. The percentage of back trajectory calculations that intersect convection (39-95% of TTLC within 5 days) depends strongly on the spatial and temporal resolution of the convection data set, and the manner in which deep convection is identified. Using minimum brightness temperature in 3 hourly, 1{sup o} resolution grid boxes to define convection, 46% of non-convective TTLC (37% of all TTLC) did not trace back to convection within 24 h. Back trajectory calculations of thin cirrus identified by the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) gave similar results. Temperature is not a good proxy for formation mechanism as convective and non-convective TTLC frequencies both increase monotonically with decreasing temperature at approximately the same rate. Non-convective TTLC frequencies have a stronger relationship with relative humidity than convective TTLC frequencies, though are not sufficiently different to distinguish object method categories. A decrease in TTL cirrus frequency found at low temperatures in previous studies is caused by insufficient variability in reanalysis temperature data and is not indicative of TTLC formation mechanism.

  3. A new method for estimating aerosol mass flux in the urban surface layer using LAS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Renmin; Luo, Tao; Sun, Jianning; Liu, Hao; Fu, Yunfei; Wang, Zhien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol greatly influences human health and the natural environment, as well as the weather and climate system. Therefore, atmospheric aerosol has attracted significant attention from society. Despite consistent research efforts, there are still uncertainties in understanding its effects due to poor knowledge about aerosol vertical transport caused by the limited measurement capabilities of aerosol mass vertical transport flux. In this paper, a new method for measuring atmospheric aerosol vertical transport flux is developed based on the similarity theory of surface layer, the theory of light propagation in a turbulent atmosphere, and the observations and studies of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index (AERI). The results show that aerosol mass flux can be linked to the real and imaginary parts of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index structure parameter (AERISP) and the ratio of aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI. The real and imaginary parts of the AERISP can be measured based on the light-propagation theory. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI can be measured based on the measurements of aerosol mass concentration and visibility. The observational results show that aerosol vertical transport flux varies diurnally and is related to the aerosol spatial distribution. The maximum aerosol flux during the experimental period in Hefei City was 0.017 mg m-2 s-1, and the mean value was 0.004 mg m-2 s-1. The new method offers an effective way to study aerosol vertical transport in complex environments.

  4. Forward modeling of marine DC resistivity method for a layered anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Ping; Cai, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Since the ocean bottom is a sedimentary environment wherein stratification is well developed, the use of an anisotropic model is best for studying its geology. Beginning with Maxwell's equations for an anisotropic model, we introduce scalar potentials based on the divergence-free characteristic of the electric and magnetic (EM) fields. We then continue the EM fields down into the deep earth and upward into the seawater and couple them at the ocean bottom to the transmitting source. By studying both the DC apparent resistivity curves and their polar plots, we can resolve the anisotropy of the ocean bottom. Forward modeling of a high-resistivity thin layer in an anisotropic half-space demonstrates that the marine DC resistivity method in shallow water is very sensitive to the resistive reservoir but is not influenced by airwaves. As such, it is very suitable for oil and gas exploration in shallowwater areas but, to date, most modeling algorithms for studying marine DC resistivity are based on isotropic models. In this paper, we investigate one-dimensional anisotropic forward modeling for marine DC resistivity method, prove the algorithm to have high accuracy, and thus provide a theoretical basis for 2D and 3D forward modeling.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring surface density of explosive and inert dust in stratified layers

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Perlee, Henry E.

    1988-01-01

    A method for determining the surface density of coal dust on top of rock dust or rock dust on top of coal dust is disclosed which comprises directing a light source at either a coal or rock dust layer overlaying a substratum of the other, detecting the amount of light reflected from the deposit, generating a signal from the reflected light which is converted into a normalized output (V), and calculating the surface density from the normalized output. The surface density S.sub.c of coal dust on top of rock dust is calculated according to the equation: S.sub.c =1/-a.sub.c ln(V) wherein a.sub.c is a constant for the coal dust particles, and the surface density S.sub.r of rock dust on top of coal dust is determined by the equation: ##EQU1## wherein a.sub.r is a constant based on the properties of the rock dust particles. An apparatus is also disclosed for carrying out the method of the present invention.

  6. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Walton, O.; Homel, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  7. Validated high-performance thin-layer chromatography method for steviol glycosides in Stevia rebaudiana.

    PubMed

    Jaitak, Vikas; Gupta, A P; Kaul, V K; Ahuja, P S

    2008-08-01

    A high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method was developed and validated as per ICH (International Conferences on Harmonization) guidelines for simultaneous quantification of three steviol glycosides, i.e. steviolbioside, stevioside and rebaudioside-A in Stevia rebaudiana leaves. For achieving good separation, mobile phase of ethyl acetate-ethanol-water (80:20:12, v/v/v) on pre-coated silica gel 60 F254 HPTLC plates were used. The densitometric quantification of steviol glycosides was carried out at lambda=510 nm in reflection-absorption mode after spraying with acetic anhydride:sulphuric acid:ethanol reagent. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 160-960 ng/spot for steviolbioside, 1-6 microg/spot for stevioside and 0.5-3 microg/spot for rebaudioside-A with good correlation coefficients (0.998-0.999). The method was found to be reproducible for quantitative analysis of steviol glycosides in S. rebaudiana leaves collected from ten different locations and will serve as a quality control indicator to monitor the commercial production of stevioside and its allied molecules during different stages of its processing. PMID:18456448

  8. Transonic Shock Oscillations and Wing Flutter Calculated with an Interactive Boundary Layer Coupling Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.

    1996-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interactive coupling method is used for the computation of unsteady transonic flows involving separation and reattachment. A lag-entrainment integral boundary layer method is used with the transonic small disturbance potential equation in the CAP-TSDV (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code. Efficient and robust computations of steady and unsteady separated flows, including steady separation bubbles and self-excited shock-induced oscillations are presented. The buffet onset boundary for the NACA 0012 airfoil is accurately predicted and shown computationally to be a Hopf bifurcation. Shock-induced oscillations are also presented for the 18 percent circular arc airfoil. The oscillation onset boundaries and frequencies are accurately predicted, as is the experimentally observed hysteresis of the oscillations with Mach number. This latter stability boundary is identified as a jump phenomenon. Transonic wing flutter boundaries are also shown for a thin swept wing and for a typical business jet wing, illustrating viscous effects on flutter and the effect of separation onset on the wing response at flutter. Calculations for both wings show limit cycle oscillations at transonic speeds in the vicinity of minimum flutter speed indices.

  9. Method for sputtering a PIN amorphous silicon semi-conductor device having partially crystallized P and N-layers

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Maruska, H. Paul

    1985-07-09

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semiconductor device having partially crystallized (microcrystalline) P and N layers is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. The method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced electrical and optical properties, improved physical integrity, and facilitates the preparation in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  10. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    2016-05-27

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  11. Effect of heat treatment on the performance of tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar for enumeration of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, M H; Ciebin, B W

    1979-05-01

    Dissolving dehydrated tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar by only boiling or microwaving was found to inhibit Clostridium perfringens colony development in pour plates when compared with C. perfringens recovery in tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar prepared by autoclaving. PMID:225988

  12. Multi-layer assemblies with predetermined stress profile and method for producing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuer, Arthur H. (Inventor); Kahn, Harold (Inventor); Yang, Jie (Inventor); Phillips, Stephen M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Multi-layer assemblies of polysilicon thin films having predetermined stress characteristics and techniques for forming such assemblies are disclosed. In particular, a multi-layer assembly of polysilicon thin films may be produced that has a stress level of zero, or substantially so. The multi-layer assemblies comprise at least one constituent thin film having a tensile stress and at least one constituent thin film having a compressive stress. The thin films forming the multi-layer assemblies may be disposed immediately adjacent to one another without the use of intermediate layers between the thin films. Multi-layer assemblies exhibiting selectively determinable overall bending moments are also disclosed. Selective production of overall bending moments in microstructures enables manufacture of such structures with a wide array of geometrical configurations.

  13. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO.sub.3, YCrO.sub.3 or LaMnO.sub.3 particles (32), on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate (30), (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure (34) between the doped particles (32), (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles (32) as a contact.

  14. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1992-04-21

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO[sub 3], YCrO[sub 3] or LaMnO[sub 3] particles, on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate, (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure between the doped particles, (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles as a contact. 7 figs.

  15. Method to fabricate multi-level silicon-based microstructures via use of an etching delay layer

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Schubert, W. Kent; Shul, Randy J.

    2005-08-16

    New methods for fabrication of silicon microstructures have been developed. In these methods, an etching delay layer is deposited and patterned so as to provide differential control on the depth of features being etched into a substrate material. Structures having features with different depth can be formed thereby in a single etching step.

  16. A data transmission method for particle physics experiments based on Ethernet physical layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi-Ru; Cao, Ping; Zheng, Jia-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Due to its advantages of universality, flexibility and high performance, fast Ethernet is widely used in readout system design for modern particle physics experiments. However, Ethernet is usually used together with the TCP/IP protocol stack, which makes it difficult to implement readout systems because designers have to use the operating system to process this protocol. Furthermore, TCP/IP degrades the transmission efficiency and real-time performance. To maximize the performance of Ethernet in physics experiment applications, a data readout method based on the physical layer (PHY) is proposed. In this method, TCP/IP is replaced with a customized and simple protocol, which makes it easier to implement. On each readout module, data from the front-end electronics is first fed into an FPGA for protocol processing and then sent out to a PHY chip controlled by this FPGA for transmission. This kind of data path is fully implemented by hardware. From the side of the data acquisition system (DAQ), however, the absence of a standard protocol causes problems for the network related applications. To solve this problem, in the operating system kernel space, data received by the network interface card is redirected from the traditional flow to a specified memory space by a customized program. This memory space can easily be accessed by applications in user space. For the purpose of verification, a prototype system has been designed and implemented. Preliminary test results show that this method can meet the requirements of data transmission from the readout module to the DAQ with an efficient and simple manner. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11005107) and Independent Projects of State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (201301)

  17. Refinement of the nocturnal boundary layer budget method for quantifying agricultural greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittebol, Laura A.

    Measuring greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions directly at the farm scale is most relevant to the agricultural sector and has the potential to eliminate some of the uncertainty arising from scaling up from plot or field studies or down from regional or national levels. The stable nighttime atmosphere acts as a chamber within which sequentially-measured GHG concentration profiles determine the flux of GHGs. With the overall goal of refining the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) budget method to obtain reliable flux estimates at a scale representative of the typical eastern Canadian farm (approximately 1 km2), fluxes of CO2, N2O, and CH4 were measured at two agricultural farms in Eastern Canada. Field sites in 1998 and 2002 were located on an experimental farm adjacent to a suburb southwest of the city of Ottawa, ON, a relatively flat area with corn, hay, and soy as the dominant crops. The field site in 2003 was located in the rural community of Coteau-du-Lac, QC, about 20 km southwest of the island of Montreal, a fairly flat area bordered by the St. Lawrence River to the south, consisting mainly of corn and hay with a mixture of soy and vegetable crops. A good agreement was obtained between the overall mean NBL budget-measured CO2 flux at both sites, near-in-time windy night eddy covariance data and previously published results. The mean NBL-measured N2O flux from all wind directions and farming management was of the same order of magnitude as, but slightly higher than, previously published baseline N2O emissions from agroecosystems. Methane fluxes results were judged to be invalid as they were extremely sensitive to wind direction change. Spatial sampling of CO 2, N2O, and CH4 around the two sites confirmed that [CH4] distribution was particularly sensitive to the nature of the emission source, field conditions, and wind direction. Optimal NBL conditions for measuring GHG fluxes, present approximately 60% of the time in this study, consisted of a very stable boundary layer

  18. Method to grow group III-nitrides on copper using passivation layers

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qiming; Wang, George T; Figiel, Jeffrey T

    2014-06-03

    Group III-nitride epilayers can be grown directly on copper substrates using intermediate passivation layers. For example, single crystalline c-plane GaN can be grown on Cu (110) substrates with MOCVD. The growth relies on a low temperature AlN passivation layer to isolate any alloying reaction between Ga and Cu.

  19. A manufacturing method for multi-layer polysilicon surface-micromachining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    An advanced manufacturing technology which provides multi-layered polysilicon surface micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems is presented. Specifically, the addition of another design layer to a 4 levels process to create a 5 levels process allows consideration of fundamentally new architecture in designs for weapon advanced surety components.

  20. A fresh liver agar substrate for rearing small numbers of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruner, Susan V.; Slone, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Forensically important calliphorids can be reared on a mixture of beef liver and agar. Small pieces of meat, especially fresh or frozen beef liver, will desiccate in 2–6 h, but this simple-to-make feeding substrate remains moist for at least 12 h at 25 and 30°C without desiccation, even in small (5 g) amounts. We determined the survivorship of small numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (first-instar larvae to adult eclosion) raised on 5 g of liver agar and fresh beef liver. We found that all larvae raised on 5 g of liver died due to desiccation, but survivorship on 5 g of liver agar was equivalent to that on larger (50 g) pieces of either liver agar or beef liver.

  1. A general method for calculating three-dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers on arbitrary wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Kaups, K.; Ramsey, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The method described utilizes a nonorthogonal coordinate system for boundary-layer calculations. It includes a geometry program that represents the wing analytically, and a velocity program that computes the external velocity components from a given experimental pressure distribution when the external velocity distribution is not computed theoretically. The boundary layer method is general, however, and can also be used for an external velocity distribution computed theoretically. Several test cases were computed by this method and the results were checked with other numerical calculations and with experiments when available. A typical computation time (CPU) on an IBM 370/165 computer for one surface of a wing which roughly consist of 30 spanwise stations and 25 streamwise stations, with 30 points across the boundary layer is less than 30 seconds for an incompressible flow and a little more for a compressible flow.

  2. A Layered Searchable Encryption Scheme with Functional Components Independent of Encryption Methods

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guangchun; Qin, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Searchable encryption technique enables the users to securely store and search their documents over the remote semitrusted server, which is especially suitable for protecting sensitive data in the cloud. However, various settings (based on symmetric or asymmetric encryption) and functionalities (ranked keyword query, range query, phrase query, etc.) are often realized by different methods with different searchable structures that are generally not compatible with each other, which limits the scope of application and hinders the functional extensions. We prove that asymmetric searchable structure could be converted to symmetric structure, and functions could be modeled separately apart from the core searchable structure. Based on this observation, we propose a layered searchable encryption (LSE) scheme, which provides compatibility, flexibility, and security for various settings and functionalities. In this scheme, the outputs of the core searchable component based on either symmetric or asymmetric setting are converted to some uniform mappings, which are then transmitted to loosely coupled functional components to further filter the results. In such a way, all functional components could directly support both symmetric and asymmetric settings. Based on LSE, we propose two representative and novel constructions for ranked keyword query (previously only available in symmetric scheme) and range query (previously only available in asymmetric scheme). PMID:24719565

  3. [THE APPLICATION OF SELECTIVE CHROMOGENIC AGAR FOR DETECTING ENTEROBACTERIA WITH PRODUCTION OF BETA-LACTAMASES].

    PubMed

    Korobova, A G; Frolova, L N; Kliasova, G A

    2015-11-01

    The detection of enterobacteria with production of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum in selective chromogenic agar was analyzed The results ofdetection of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum was compared with "double disc" technique. The smears from mucous membrane of guttur and rectum from patients were analyzed in parallel on solid growth agar (Endo or Mac Conkey) and on selective agar CHROMagartm ESBL (CHROMagar France). The production of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum was confirmed using "double discs" technique. To exclude hyper-production of ampC beta-lactamases E-test was applied containing cefotetan and cefotetan with cloxacillin. The sampling consisted of 1552 samples from patients. The study permitted to isolate 1243 strains of enterobacteria on agar Endo or Mac Conkey and 409 strains of enterobacteria on selective agar CHROMagartm ESBL (Escherichia coli n = 226, Klebsiella pneumoniae n = 105, enterobacter spp. n = 35, Citrobacter spp. n = 21, others n = 22). The application of "double discs" technique confirmed production of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum in 386 (94%) out of 409 strains isolated on agar CHROMagartm ESBL. In 23 (6%) of strains no confirmation was established and hyper-production of ampC of beta-lactamases was established 15 out of total. Additionally, 8 were sensitive to cephalosporin of third generation. All enterobacteria isolated on agar Endo or Mac Conkey also were tested by "double discs" technique. Overall, 394 strains of enterobacteria with production of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum were obtained. On all agars (agar Endo or Mac Conkey and CHROMagartm ESBL)--263 (67%) strains; only on CHROMagartm ESBL--123 (31%) and only on agar Endo or Mac Conkey--8 (2%) (p < 0.0001). The sensitivity of selective agar CHROMagartm ESBL made up to 98% and specificity--97%. The resolution about detection of enterobacteria producing beta-lactamases of extended spectrum were submitted to clinic in 18-24 hours after arrival

  4. A Simple Method for Determining Heat Transfer, Skin Friction, and Boundary-Layer Thickness for Hypersonic Laminar Boundary-Layer Flows in a Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertram, Mitchel H.; Feller, William V.

    1959-01-01

    A procedure based on the method of similar solutions is presented by which the skin friction, heat transfer, and boundary-layer thickness in a laminar hypersonic flow with pressure gradient may be rapidly evaluated if the pressure distribution is known. This solution, which at present is. restricted to power-law variations of pressure with surface distance, is presented for a wide range of exponents in the power law corresponding to both favorable and adverse pressure gradients. This theory has been compared to results from heat-transfer experiments on blunt-nose flat plates and a hemisphere cylinder at free-stream Mach numbers of 4 and 6.8. The flat-plate experiments included tests made at a Mach number of 6.8 over a range of angle of attack of +/- 10 deg. Reasonable agreement of the experimental and theoretical heat-transfer coefficients has been obtained as well as good correlation of the experimental results over the entire range of angle of attack studied. A similar comparison of theory with experiment was not feasible for boundary-layer-thickness data; however, the hypersonic similarity theory was found to account satisfactorily for the variation in boundary-layer thickness due to local pressure distribution for several sets of measurements.

  5. Catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires on ITO seed layer/glass by thermal evaporation method: Effects of ITO seed layer laser annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsultany, Forat H.; Hassan, Z.; Ahmed, Naser M.

    2016-04-01

    Novel catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires (ZnO-NWs) on ITO seeds/glass substrate by thermal evaporation method, and effects of continuous wave CO2 laser thermal annealed seed layer on the morphology and properties of ZnO-NWs growth were investigated. The effects of sputtered ITO seed layer laser annealing temperature on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of ZnO-NWs was systematically investigated at temperatures 250, 350, and 450 °C, respectively. The surface morphology and structure of the seeds and the products of ZnO-NWs were characterized in detail by using field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Optical properties were further examined through photoluminescence, and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. A growth mechanism was proposed on the basis of obtained results. The results showed that the nanowires were strongly dependent on the seed layer annealing temperatures, which played an important role in nucleation and dissimilar growth of the nanowires with varying sizes and geometric shapes.

  6. Genome Sequence of the Agar-Degrading Marine Bacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. Strain G7

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Byung Kwon; Chi, Won-Jae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Choi, Soobeom; Chang, Yong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine gammaproteobacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7, which was isolated from coastal seawater to be utilized as a bioresource for production of agar-derived biofuels. The 3.91-Mb genome contains a number of genes encoding algal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes such as agarases and sulfatases. PMID:23209220

  7. Robust multiparameter method of evaluating the optical and thermal properties of a layered tissue structure using photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas; Abrams, Stephen

    2009-06-10

    The thermal and optical properties of multilayered dental tissue structure, the result of the surface-grown prismless layer on enamel, were evaluated simultaneously using multiparameter fits of photothermal radiometry frequency responses. The photothermal field generated in a tooth sample with near-infrared laser excitation was described using a coupled diffuse-photon-density and thermal wave model. The optical (absorption and scattering) coefficients and thermal parameters (spectrally averaged infrared emissivity, thermal diffusivity and conductivity) of each layer, as well as the thickness of the upper prismless enamel layer, were fitted using a multiparameter simplex downhill minimization algorithm. The results show that the proposed fitting approach can increase robustness of the multiparameter estimation of tissue properties in the case of ill-defined multiparameter fits, which are unavoidable in in vivo tissue evaluation. The described method can readily be used for noninvasive in vitro or in vivo characterization of a wide range of layered biological tissues. PMID:19516364

  8. Enumerating actinomycetes in compost bioaerosols at source—Use of soil compost agar to address plate 'masking'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, M. P. M.; Drew, G. H.; Tamer Vestlund, A.; Aldred, D.; Longhurst, P. J.; Pollard, S. J. T.

    Actinomycetes are the dominant bacteria isolated from bioaerosols sampled at composting facilities. Here, a novel method for the isolation of actinomycetes is reported, overcoming masking of conventional agar plates, as well as reducing analysis time and costs. Repeatable and reliable actinomycetes growth was best achieved using a soil compost media at an incubation temperature of 44 °C and 7 days' incubation. The results are of particular value to waste management operators and their advisors undertaking regulatory risk assessments that support environmental approvals for compost facilities.

  9. Entrapment of α-Amylase in Agar Beads for Biocatalysis of Macromolecular Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manu; Sharma, Vinay; Majumdar, Dipak K.

    2014-01-01

    Attempts have been made to optimize immobilization parameters, catalytic property, and stability of immobilized α-amylase in agar. The work compares natural entrapment efficiency of agar with the ionotropically cross-linked agar hydrogel, with the advantage of easy scale-up and cost and time effectiveness. Beads prepared with 3% (w/v) agar and 75 mM calcium chloride and hardened for 20 minutes were selected for further studies on the basis of entrapment efficiency (80%) and physical stability. Following entrapment, pH and temperature optima of enzyme were shifted from 6 to 6.5 and 50 to 55°C, respectively. Michaelis constant (Km) for both free and entrapped enzymes remained the same (0.83%) suggesting no change in substrate affinity. However, Vmax⁡ of entrapped enzyme decreased ~37.5-fold. The midpoint of thermal inactivation for entrapped enzyme increased by 8 ± 1°C implying its higher thermal stability. The entrapped enzyme in calcium agar bead had an Ea value of 27.49 kcal/mol compared to 17.6 kcal/mol for free enzyme indicating increased stability on entrapment. Half-life of enzyme increased ~2.2 times after entrapment in calcium agar at 60°C indicating stabilization of enzyme. The reusability of beads was size dependent. Beads with diameter <710 μm were stable and could be reused for 6 cycles with ~22% loss in activity.

  10. [GROWTH OF MICROMYCETES FROM DIFFERENT ECOLOGICAL NICHES ON AGAR NUTRIENT MEDIA].

    PubMed

    Kurchenko, I M; Yurieva, E M; Voychuk, S I

    2015-01-01

    Radial growth rate of (K(r)) 153 strains 6 species of micromycetes from different ecological niches was studied on 7 agar media: three standard (malt extract agar, potato-dextrose agar, Czapek's agar), and on agar media with plant polymers (carboxymethylcellulose, xylan, soluble starch and apple pectin). Endophytic and plant pathogenic strains (biotrophs) of all studied species did not differ significantly in their ability to grow on nutrient media of different composition--average values of K(r) for these two groups were the same (0,200 and 0,199 mm/h, respectively). Soil micromycetes (saprophytes) characterized by the lowest average growth rate (0,169 mm/h) and significantly differed from the endophytic and plant pathogenic ones. Average of the radial growth rates of studied microscopic fungi were higher on standard nutrient media than with plant polymers ones. Growth parameters of endophytes and plant pathogens of all studied species on various agar media differed from the soil strains. High growth rate of endophytic and plant pathogenic strains of Fusarium poae, Alternaria alternata and Ceratocystis sp. provides them the rapid colonization of plants. Penicillium funiculosum strains equally can exist as saprophytes in soil and as endophytic plant symbionts. A wide range of K(r) variation of endophytic dark pigmented Mycelia sterilia indicates the presence in this group of different species of micromycetes, which have no sporulation. PMID:26638483

  11. Growth of coagulase-negative staphylococci on colistin-nalidixic acid agar and susceptibility to polymyxins.

    PubMed

    Fung, J C; McKinley, G; Tyburski, M B; Berman, M; Goldstein, J

    1984-05-01

    Colistin-nalidixic acid agar, although recently recommended as a replacement for blood agar for primary plating of urine specimens ( Fung et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 16:632-636, 1982), has also been reported to suppress the growth of some strains of staphylococci that are susceptible to colistin (polymyxin E). The susceptibility of 11 species of staphylococci to polymyxins was determined, and the ability of these species to grow on colistin-nalidixic acid agar was examined. Although the MICs for most of the strains tested were 8 micrograms/ml or less, only a few coagulase-negative staphylococci grew on or were inhibited by colistin-nalidixic acid agar. This descrepancy was explained by the antagonistic effects that medium components, such as physiological concentrations of magnesium and calcium and 5% sheep blood, had on the activity of polymyxin. Colistin-nalidixic acid agar is still recommended for routine urine processing; however, the poor growth of 13% of the Staphylococcus saprophyticus strains tested suggests that blood agar should be included in the primary plating battery of urine specimens obtained from female outpatients. PMID:6330170

  12. Method and apparatus for producing tar sand deposits containing conductive layers

    SciTech Connect

    Glandt, C.A.; Vinegar, H.J.; Gardner, J.W.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes a process for recovering hydrocarbon from tar sand deposits containing high conductivity layers and a hydrocarbon rich zone. It comprises selecting a thin high conductivity target layer near the hydrocarbon rich zone; installing at least one pair of horizontal production wells that are horizontal electrodes during an electrical heating stage, and are production wells during a production stage, wherein the horizontal electrodes, when electrically excited, span the high conductivity target layer and divide the target layer into electrically heated zones and non-electrically heated zones; providing at least one injection well for hot fluid injection into the hydrocarbon rich zone; electrically exciting the horizontal electrodes during the electrical heating stage to electrically heat the high conductivity target layer to form a thin preheated hydrocarbon rich zone immediately adjacent to the target layer; injecting a hot fluid into the deposit adjacent to the high conductivity target layer and within the thin preheated hydrocarbon rich zone to displace the hydrocarbons to the production wells; and recovering hydrocarbons from the production wells.

  13. Optimization of modified Middlebrook 7H11 agar for isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from raw milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Forgrave, R; Donaghy, J A; Fisher, A; Rowe, M T

    2014-10-01

    Reports have highlighted the absence of contemporary peer reviewed publications pertaining to Mycobacterium bovis culture from raw milk and cheese. By replicating traditional methods, cheese-making methodology and equipment were devised to produce Cheddar (n = 6) and Caerphilly (n = 3) artificially contaminated with M. bovis (three genotypes) under stringent laboratory-containment guidelines for handling hazardous microbiological material. Middlebrook 7H11, modified for M. bovis isolation, was assessed for capacity to enumerate M. bovis despite changing cheese microflora and prolonged M. bovis exposure to the cheese matrix using maturing cheese test portions (n = 63; up to 16 weeks). Malachite green (MG) containing media isolated M. bovis at significantly (P < 0·05) lower levels than unmodified Middlebrook 7H11 agar despite MG being a common adjunct of Middlebrook 7H11 agar modified for M. bovis growth. Subsequently, a selective MG-free Middlebrook 7H11 agar modified using haemolysed red cells and calf serum was demonstrated as the best performing (P < 0·05) medium for recovery of M. bovis from typical UK cheese types, Cheddar and Caerphilly. Significance and impact of the study: Following increased M. bovis infection of UK cattle, the risk posed to consumers from consumption of unpasteurized milk and dairy products has changed. Furthermore, published methods for the culture and molecular detection of M. bovis in raw milk products are limited. Cheese-making protocols and M. bovis culture media reported here provide tools for further investigation of M. bovis survival during all stages of cheese manufacture and could inform future assessment of the risk to consumers from M. bovis contamination of unpasteurized dairy products. PMID:24888395

  14. Method for making MgO buffer layers on rolled nickel or copper as superconductor substrates

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan; Goyal, Amit; Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederic A.

    2002-01-01

    Buffer layer architectures are epitaxially deposited on biaxially-textured rolled-Ni and/or Cu substrates for high current conductors, and more particularly buffer layer architectures such as MgO/Ag/Pt/Ni, MgO/Ag/Pd/Ni, MgO/Ag/Ni, MgO/Ag/Pd/Cu, MgO/Ag/Pt/Cu, and MgO/Ag/Cu. Techniques used to deposit these buffer layers include electron beam evaporation, thermal evaporation, rf magnetron sputtering, pulsed laser deposition, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), combustion CVD, and spray pyrolysis.

  15. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO3 layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO3 layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO3 coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L). PMID:26046278

  16. Investigation of the spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function of sea foam layer by the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Ma, L X; Wang, F Q; Wang, C A; Wang, C C; Tan, J Y

    2015-11-20

    Spectral properties of sea foam greatly affect ocean color remote sensing and aerosol optical thickness retrieval from satellite observation. This paper presents a combined Mie theory and Monte Carlo method to investigate visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of sea foam layers. A three-layer model of the sea foam is developed in which each layer is composed of large air bubbles coated with pure water. A pseudo-continuous model and Mie theory for coated spheres is used to determine the effective radiative properties of sea foam. The one-dimensional Cox-Munk surface roughness model is used to calculate the slope density functions of the wind-blown ocean surface. A Monte Carlo method is used to solve the radiative transfer equation. Effects of foam layer thickness, bubble size, wind speed, solar zenith angle, and wavelength on the spectral reflectance and BRDF are investigated. Comparisons between previous theoretical results and experimental data demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed method. Sea foam can significantly increase the spectral reflectance and BRDF of the sea surface. The absorption coefficient of seawater near the surface is not the only parameter that influences the spectral reflectance. Meanwhile, the effects of bubble size, foam layer thickness, and solar zenith angle also cannot be obviously neglected. PMID:26836550

  17. Direct growth of single- and few-layer MoS2 on h-BN by CVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Aiming; Velasco, Jairo, Jr.; Kahn, Salman; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael; Zettl, Alex

    As a promising candidate for the next-generation electronics, large-scale single- and few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by CVD method is an important advancement towards technological implementation of this material. However, the choice of substrate can significantly affect the performance of MoS2 based devices. An attractive insulating substrate or mate for MoS2 (and related materials such as graphene) is hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Stacked heterostructures of MoS2 and h-BN have been produced by manual transfer methods, but a more efficient and scalable assembly method is needed. Here we demonstrate the direct growth of single- and few-layer MoS2 on h-BN by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The growth mechanisms for single- and few-layer samples are found to be distinct, and for single-layer samples low relative rotation angles (<5°) between the MoS2 and h-BN lattices prevail. In addition, MoS2 directly grown on h-BN maintains its intrinsic 1.89 eV bandgap. Our CVD synthesis method presents a viable path towards high-quality MoS2 based field effect transistors in a controllable and scalable fashion. Acknowledgement: the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231; NSF Grant DMR-1206512.

  18. A rapid method for predicting suction distributions to maintain attached, laminar boundary layers on bodies of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, G. H.

    1983-12-01

    An approximate method is presented for the determination of the minimum amount of suction necessary to maintain a laminar, attached boundary layer in incompressible, axisymmetric flow. The method is an extension of A.M.O Smith's procedure which calculates a general laminar boundary layer by piecewise similarity solutions. An extension has been programmed on a VAX 11/782 computer and found to the extremely fast, taking from 3 to 4 secs. in CPU time. Boundary-layer solutions for four axisymmetric bodies at a variety of Reynolds numbers have been obtained and the results are compared with finite difference solutions which use the suction distribution from the approximate theory. Agreement between the two is generally good.

  19. Preparation, Optimization, and Screening of the Effect of Processing Variables on Agar Nanospheres Loaded with Bupropion HCl by a D-Optimal Design

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Zaki, Mohammad Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Banoozadeh, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Bupropion is an atypical antidepressant drug. Fluctuating in its serum levels following oral administration of immediate release dosage forms leads to occasional seizure. The aim of the present work was designing of sustained release bupropion HCl nanospheres suited for pulmonary delivery. Agar nanospheres were prepared by transferring the w/o emulsion to solid in oil (s/o) suspension. Calcium chloride was used as cross-linking agent and hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) was used as permeability enhancer. A response surface D-optimal design was used for optimization of nanospheres. Independent factors included in the design were calcium chloride percent, speed of homogenization, agar percent, and HPβCD percent. Optimum condition was predicted to be achieved when the calcium chloride was set at 7.19%, homogenization speed at 8500 rpm, agar content at 2%, and HPβCD at 0.12%. The optimized nanoparticles showed particle size of 587 nm, zeta potential of −30.9 mV, drug loading efficiency of 38.6%, and release efficiency of 51% until 5 h. The nanospheres showed high degree of bioadhesiveness. D-optimal response surface method is a satisfactory design to optimize the fabrication of bupropion HCl loaded agar nanospheres and these nanospheres can be successively exploited to deliver bupropion in a controlled manner for a sufficiently extended period. PMID:26090423

  20. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.

    1995-02-14

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO{sub 3} layer coated with CaO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface deposit at from about 1,000 C to 1,200 C to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO{sub 3} layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power. 5 figs.

  1. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer coated with CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 surface deposit at from about 1000.degree. C. to 1200.degree. C. to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power.

  2. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  3. Selective agars for the isolation of Streptococcus iniae from Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, and its cultural environment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H T; Kanai, K

    1999-05-01

    Two kinds of selective agar were developed for the isolation of Streptococcus iniae, the causal agent of streptococcosis, from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and from culture tanks in flounder farms. The selective agars were heart infusion agar with added thallium acetate and oxlinic acid (TAOA), and colistin sulphate and oxolinic acid (CSOA). For samples containing various bacterial flora, selective agars were supplemented with defibrinated horse blood in order to distinguish beta-haemolytic colonies of Strep. iniae. Streptococcus iniae was quantitatively isolated from the brain and kidney of diseased flounders in pure culture. Two-thirds of isolates picked up from selective blood agars inoculated with intestinal samples were identified as Strep. iniae. The bacterial colony numbers of deposits and water from culture tanks on selective blood agars were about 10-10(5) times smaller than those on control heart infusion agar; Strep. iniae was isolated from few deposit and water samples. PMID:10347871

  4. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-12-15

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible Navier–Stokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This Navier–Stokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  5. The two layer method does not improve the preservation of porcine kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Hosgood, Sarah A.; Mohamed, Ismail H.; Nicholson, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The Two layer method (TLM) has been extremely successful in the preservation of the pancreas. However, this has not been thoroughly investigated in other organs or in clinically relevant large animal models. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of TLM in a large animal model of kidney preservation. Material/Methods Porcine kidneys were retrieved after 10 minutes of warm ischaemic injury and flushed with 300 ml UW solution at 4°C. Kidneys were then either placed in University of Wisconsin solution (UW) or TLM using pre-oxygenated perfluorodecalin and UW. Kidneys were stored for 18 hours at 4°C then reperfused with oxygenated autologous blood to assess renal function. Results Renal blood flow (RBF) was significantly lower and intra-renal resistance (IRR) higher in TLM compared to UW group [Area under the curve (AUC) RBF, UW; 427±168 vs TLM; 247±55 ml/min/100g.h; P=0.041, AUC IRR, UW; 7.7±2.2 vs TLM; 10.5±1.9 ml/min/mmHg; P=0.041]. Levels of creatinine clearance (CrCl) were significantly lower in TLM group [AUC CrCl, UW; 1.8±1.0 vs TLM; 0.6±0.4 ml/min/100 g.h; P=0.034]. Levels of lipid peroxidation were significantly lower in TLM group [8-isoprostane/Cr ratio 3h; UW 3338±896 vs TLM 2072±886 pg/ml/mmol/L; P=0.04]. Levels of total nitric oxide were significantly higher in TLM group (P=0.009). Conclusions TLM did not improve the preservation condition of porcine kidneys. Furthermore, there appeared to be increased inflammation, endothelial injury and reduced renal function compared to preservation with UW. Further experimental work is needed to determine the role of PFC in kidney preservation. PMID:21169904

  6. A TWO-PROBE METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER CONTENT OF THIN FOREST FLOOR LITTER LAYERS USING TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few methods exist that allow non-destructive in situ measurement of the water content of forest floor litter layers (Oa,Oe, and Oi horizons). Continuous non-destructive measurement is needed in studies of ecosystem processes because of the relationship between physical structure ...

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of a Layered Manganese Oxide: Materials Chemistry for the Inorganic or Instrumental Methods Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Stanton; Neupane, Ram P.; Gray, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    A three-week laboratory project involving synthesis and characterization of a layered manganese oxide provides an excellent vehicle for teaching important concepts of inorganic chemistry and instrumental methods related to non-molecular systems. Na-birnessite is an easily prepared manganese oxide with a 7 A interlayer spacing and Na[superscript +]…

  8. An Improved Method for the Extraction and Thin-Layer Chromatography of Chlorophyll A and B from Spinach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quach, Hao T.; Steeper, Robert L.; Griffin, William G.

    2004-01-01

    A simple and fast method, which resolves chlorophyll a and b from spinach leaves on analytical plates while minimizing the appearance of chlorophyll degradation products is shown. An improved mobile phase for the Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of spinach extract that allows for the complete resolution of the common plant pigments found in…

  9. Diffusion of Methylene Blue in Phantoms of Agar Using a Photoacoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilca-Quispe, L.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Quintana, P.; Ordonez-Miranda, J.

    2010-05-01

    In this work, the kinetics of diffusion of methylene blue in agar aqueous solution is studied using a photoacoustic technique. Two agar phantoms solutions in water with a relation of mass/volume of 0.01% and 0.05% were analyzed. The study was performed using a modified Rosencwaig photoacoustic cell that is enclosed by transparent windows, on both sides. The sample is deposited directly on top of the upper window. A red light beam, at a fixed modulation frequency, is sent through the lower window illuminating the sample and inducing the photoacoustic effect inside the closed chamber of the cell. At the beginning of the experiment, a droplet of 100μL of agar solution is deposited; afterwards, the signal stabilizes, and 10μL of methylene blue aqueous solution (0.0125 g · mL-1) is added to the surface of the agar. During the first seconds of the experiment, the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases followed by a gradual and long decay. Results for modulation frequencies in the range from 10Hz to 80Hz for both agar concentrations are presented. A simple theoretical approach is presented to analyze the experimental data. It is demonstrated that the kinetics of the process can be parameterized as a function of the changes of an effective optical absorption coefficient. From these results, the characteristic time, in which the dye diffusion process stabilizes, is obtained. It is found that this time is larger for samples with a higher agar concentration. These differences provide important results for biomedical sciences in which agar gels are used as phantoms resembling some of the properties of living organs and tissues.

  10. A new method for predicting the solar heat gain of complex fenestration systems: II, Detailed description of the matrix layer calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Klems, J.H.

    1993-10-01

    A new method of predicting the solar heat gain through complex fenestration systems involving nonspecular layers such as shades or blinds has been examined in a project jointly sponsored by ASHRAE and DOE. In this method, a scanning radiometer is used to measure the bidirectional radiative transmittance and reflectance of each layer of a fenestration system. The properties of systems containing these layers are then built up computationally from the measured layer properties using a transmission/multiple-reflection calculation. The calculation produces the total directional-hemispherical transmittance of the fenestration system and the layer-by-layer absorptances. These properties are in turn combined with layer-specific measurements of the inward-flowing fractions of absorbed solar energy to produce the overall solar heat gain coefficient. A preceding paper outlined the method and provided the physical derivation of the calculation. In this second of a series of related papers the detailed development of the matrix layer calculation is presented.

  11. Novel Single-Tube Agar-Based Test System for Motility Enhancement and Immunocapture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by H7 Flagellar Antigen-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Murinda, Shelton E.; Nguyen, Lien T.; Ivey, Susan J.; Almeida, Raul A.; Oliver, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a novel single-tube agar-based technique for motility enhancement and immunoimmobilization of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Motility indole ornithine medium and agar (0.4%, wt/vol) media containing either nutrient broth, tryptone broth, or tryptic soy broth (TSBA) were evaluated for their abilities to enhance bacterial motility. Twenty-six E. coli strains, including 19 O157:H7 strains, 1 O157:H− strain, and 6 generic E. coli strains, were evaluated. Test bacteria were stab inoculated in the center of the agar column, and tubes were incubated at 37°C for 18 to 96 h. Nineteen to 24 of the 26 test strains (73.1 to 92.3%) were motile in the different media. TSBA medium performed best and was employed in subsequent studies of motility enhancement and H7 flagellar immunocapture. H7 flagellar antiserum (30 and 60 μl) mixed with TSBA was placed as a band (1 ml) in the middle of an agar column separating the top (3-ml) and bottom (3-ml) agar layers. The top agar layer was inoculated with the test bacterial strains. The tubes were incubated at 37°C for 12 to 18 h and for 18 to 96 h. The specificity and sensitivity of the H7 flagellar immunocapture tests were 75 and 100%, respectively. The procedure described is simple and sensitive and could be adapted easily for routine use in laboratories that do not have sophisticated equipment and resources for confirming the presence of H7 flagellar antigens. Accurate and rapid identification of H7 flagellar antigen is critical for the complete characterization of E. coli O157:H7, owing to the immense clinical, public health, and economic significance of this food-borne pathogen. PMID:12454173

  12. Black carbon concentrations across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer using three methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, K.; Lohmann, R.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    . The detected EC comprised between 1-22% of the OC pool (with one possible outlier detecting >50% of the OC pool) where the highest EC/OC ratios occurred near the US coast. The PFL method complements the other two approaches by measuring the entire proposed BC continuum (soot, charcoal, char, and partially charred biomass) rather than being biased to soot, such as in the CTO-375 method. BC values ranged between 0.07-2.49μg/m3 where the highest values were found within the African plume and off the coast of the Caribbean islands. BC/TOC values were between 4.2%-74% and agreed most closely to the CTO-375 values suggesting that soot is the main form of BC. The Sunset Method predicted the lowest concentration of EC in all samples, with the highest concentration of 0.32μg/m3. This method was the only technique to not detect EC in every sample, suggesting that our samples may require a longer sampling time. Although CTO-375 and PFL methods resulted in comparable results, the PFL-based results suggested elevated BC concentrations in the African plume as we had expected. Since BC/EC is an operational definition, multiple methods offer the greatest opportunity to evaluate true concentrations which are required for proper model verification. In conclusion, BC is present in high concentration in the remote Eq-Atlantic Ocean boundary layer, suggesting a strong climate forcing capability in this study area.

  13. Inversion of lunar regolith layer thickness with CELMS data using BPNN method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhiguo; Xu, Yi; Zheng, Yongchun; Zhu, Yongchao; Jia, Yu; Chen, Shengbo

    2014-10-01

    Inversion of the lunar regolith layer thickness is one of the scientific objectives of current Moon research. In this paper, the global lunar regolith layer thickness is inversed with the back propagation neural network (BPNN) technique. First, the radiative transfer simulation is employed to study the relationship between the lunar regolith layer thickness d and the observed brightness temperature TB's. The simulation results show that the parameters such as the surface roughness σ, slope θs and the (FeO+TiO2) abundance S have strong influence on the observed TB's. Therefore, TB's, σ, θs and S are selected as the inputs of the BPNN network. Next, the four-layer BPNN network with seven-dimension input and two hidden layers is constructed by taking nonlinearity into account with sigmoid functions. Then, BPNN network is trained with the corresponding parameters collected in Apollo landing sites. To tackle issues introduced by the small number of the training samples, the six-dimension similarity degree is introduced to indicate similarities of the inversion results to the correspondent training samples. Thus, the output lunar regolith layer thickness is defined as the sum of the product of the similarity degree and the thickness at the corresponding landing site. Once training phase finishes, the lunar regolith layer thickness can be inversed speedily with the four-channel TB's concluded from the CELMS data, σ and θs estimated from LOLA data and S derived from Clementine UV/vis data. the inversed thickness agrees well with the values estimated by ground-based radar data in low latitude regions. The results indicate that the thickness in the maria varies from about 0.5 m to 12 m, and the mean is about 6.52 m; while the thickness in highlands is a bit thicker than the previous estimation, where the thickness varies widely from 10 m to 31.5 m, and the mean thickness is about 16.8 m. In addition, the relation between the ages, the (FeO+TiO2) abundance and the

  14. A Method to have Multi-Layer Thermal Insulation Provide Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Jones, Thomas W.; Shams, Qamar A.; Lyons, Frankel; Henderson, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Design and testing of a multi-layer thermal insulation system that also provides debris and micrometeorite damage detection is presented. One layer of the insulation is designed as an array of passive open-circuit electrically conductive spiral trace sensors. The sensors are a new class of sensors that are electrically open-circuits that have no electrical connections thereby eliminating one cause of failure to circuits. The sensors are powered using external oscillating magnetic fields. Once electrically active, they produce their own harmonic magnetic fields. The responding field frequency changes if any sensor is damaged. When the sensors are used together in close proximity, the inductive coupling between sensors provides a means of telemetry. The spiral trace design using reflective electrically conductive material provides sufficient area coverage for the sensor array to serves as a layer of thermal insulation. The other insulation layers are designed to allow the sensor s magnetic field to permeate the insulation layers while having total reflective surface area to reduce thermal energy transfer. Results of characterizing individual sensors and the sensor array s response to punctures are presented. Results of hypervelocity impact testing using projectiles of 1-3.6 millimeter diameter having speeds ranging from 6.7-7.1 kilometers per second are also presented.

  15. A robust post-processing method to determine skin friction in turbulent boundary layers from the velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes a method to extrapolate the mean wall shear stress, , and the accurate relative position of a velocity probe with respect to the wall, , from an experimentally measured mean velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer. Validation is made between experimental and direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer flows with independent measurement of the shear stress. The set of parameters which minimize the residual error with respect to the canonical description of the boundary layer profile is taken as the solution. Several methods are compared, testing different descriptions of the canonical mean velocity profile (with and without overshoot over the logarithmic law) and different definitions of the residual function of the optimization. The von Kármán constant is used as a parameter of the fitting process in order to avoid any hypothesis regarding its value that may be affected by different initial or boundary conditions of the flow. Results show that the best method provides an accuracy of for the estimation of the friction velocity and for the position of the wall. The robustness of the method is tested including unconverged near-wall measurements, pressure gradient, and reduced number of points; the importance of the location of the first point is also tested, and it is shown that the method presents a high robustness even in highly distorted flows, keeping the aforementioned accuracies if one acquires at least one data point in . The wake component and the thickness of the boundary layer are also simultaneously extrapolated from the mean velocity profile. This results in the first study, to the knowledge of the authors, where a five-parameter fitting is carried out without any assumption on the von Kármán constant and the limits of the logarithmic layer further from its existence.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori isolates from Brazilian children and adolescents: Comparing agar dilution, E-test, and disk diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Silvio Kazuo; Gales, Ana Cristina; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori is increasingly important due to resistance to the most used antimicrobials agents. Only agar dilution method is approved by CLSI, but it is difficult to perform routinely. We evaluated the reliability of E-test and disk diffusion comparing to agar dilution method on Helicobacter pylori antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, furazolidone, metronidazole and tetracycline using E-test, disk-diffusion and agar dilution method in 77 consecutive Helicobacter pylori strains from dyspeptic children and adolescents. Resistance rates were: amoxicillin - 10.4%, 9% and 68.8%; clarithromycin - 19.5%, 20.8%, 36.3%; metronidazole - 40.2%33.7%, 38.9%, respectively by agar dilution, E-test and disk diffusion method. Furazolidone and tetracycline showed no resistance rates. Metronidazole presented strong correlation to E-test (r = 0.7992, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.6962, p < 0.0001). Clarithromycin presented moderate correlation to E-test (r = 0.6369, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=−0.5656, p < 0.0001). Amoxicillin presented weak correlation to E-test (r = 0.3565, p = 0.0015) and disk diffusion (r=−0.3565, p = 0.0015). Tetracycline presented weak correlation with E-test (r = 0.2346, p = 0.04) and furazolidone to disk diffusion (r=−0.0288, p = 0.8038). E-test presented better agreement with gold standard. It is an easy and reliable method for Helicobacter pylori susceptibility testing. Disk diffusion method presented high disagreement and high rates of major errors. PMID:25763052

  17. Investigation of the low-depression velocity layer in desert area by multichannel analysis of surface-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, S.; Tian, G.; Xia, J.; He, H.; Shi, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The multichannel analysis of surface-wave method (MASW) is a newly development method. The method has been employed in various applications in environmental and engineering geophysics overseas. However, It can only be found a few case studies in China. Most importantly, there is no application of the MASW in desert area in China or abroad. We present a case study of investigating the low-depression velocity in Temple of North Taba Area in Erdos Basin. The MASW method successfully defined the low-depression velocity layer in the desert area. Comparing results obtained by the MASW method with results by refraction seismic method, we discussed efficiency and simplicity of applying the MASW method in the desert area. It is proved that the maximum investigation depth can reach 60m in the study area when the acquisition and procession parameters are carefully chosen. The MASW method can remedy the incompetence of the refraction method and the micro-seismograph log method in low-depression velocity layer's investigation. The MASW method is also a powerful tool in investigation of near-surface complicated materials and possesses many unique advantages.

  18. Studies on the inactivation of medically important Candida species on agar surfaces using pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Hugh; Garvey, Mary; Rowan, Neil

    2009-09-01

    Development of a pulsed-light (PL) approach to inanimate surface decontamination is timely, as the incidence of yeast-related infections in healthcare remains unacceptably high. Critical electrical and biological factors governing the efficacy of PL for the in vitro inactivation of medically important yeast were established in this study. Predetermined cell numbers of yeast were inoculated separately on agar plates and were flashed with < or =90 pulses of broad-spectrum light under varying operating conditions, and their inactivation was measured. Significant differences in inactivation among different yeasts occurred depending on the intensity of the applied lamp discharge energy and the amount of pulsing applied. Levels of yeast sensitivity also varied depending on the distance between the light source and the treatment surface used, and the population size, type and age of cultures treated. Yeast strains were shown to be significantly more resistant to PL irradiation compared with similarly treated bacterial control cultures. A clear relationship was observed between the concentration of eluted proteins from treated yeast and the severity of PL conditions, with scanning electron micrographs showing irreversible cellular damage. Therefore, the findings from this study will enable further development and optimization of PL as a method of decontaminating surfaces in healthcare setting. PMID:19624750

  19. Self-adaptive difference method for the effective solution of computationally complex problems of boundary layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenauer, W.; Daeubler, H. G.; Glotz, G.; Gruening, J.

    1986-01-01

    An implicit difference procedure for the solution of equations for a chemically reacting hypersonic boundary layer is described. Difference forms of arbitrary error order in the x and y coordinate plane were used to derive estimates for discretization error. Computational complexity and time were minimized by the use of this difference method and the iteration of the nonlinear boundary layer equations was regulated by discretization error. Velocity and temperature profiles are presented for Mach 20.14 and Mach 18.5; variables are velocity profiles, temperature profiles, mass flow factor, Stanton number, and friction drag coefficient; three figures include numeric data.

  20. Determination of in vitro synergy for dual antimicrobial therapy against resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae using Etest and agar dilution.

    PubMed

    Wind, Carolien M; de Vries, Henry J C; van Dam, Alje P

    2015-03-01

    In response to antimicrobial resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to last-resort extended-spectrum cephalosporins, combination therapy of azithromycin+ceftriaxone is now recommended. Dual therapy can be effective to treat monoresistant strains as well as multidrug-resistant strains, preferably employing the effect of in vitro synergy. As reports on in vitro synergy of azithromycin+ceftriaxone in N. gonorrhoeae are conflicting, in this study an evaluation of this combination was performed using a cross-wise Etest method and agar dilution. Synergy was defined as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of ≤0.5. To identify other dual treatment options for gonorrhoea, in vitro synergy was evaluated for 65 dual antimicrobial combinations using Etest. Azithromycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, colistin, ertapenem, fosfomycin, gentamicin, minocycline, moxifloxacin, rifampicin, spectinomycin and tigecycline were screened for synergy in all possible combinations. No synergy or antagonism was found for any of the 65 combinations. The geometric mean FICI ranged from 0.82 to 2.00. The mean FICI of azithromycin+ceftriaxone was 1.18 (Etest) and 0.55 (agar dilution). The difference between both methods did not result in a difference in interpretation of synergy. Ceftriaxone-resistant strain F89 was tested in all combinations and no synergy was found for any of them. Most importantly, the ceftriaxone minimum inhibitory concentration of F89 was not decreased below the breakpoint with any concentration of azithromycin. PMID:25532741

  1. An Approximate Axisymmetric Viscous Shock Layer Aeroheating Method for Three-Dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brykina, Irina G.; Scott, Carl D.

    1998-01-01

    A technique is implemented for computing hypersonic aeroheating, shear stress, and other flow properties on the windward side of a three-dimensional (3D) blunt body. The technique uses a 2D/axisymmetric flow solver modified by scale factors for a, corresponding equivalent axisymmetric body. Examples are given in which a 2D solver is used to calculate the flow at selected meridional planes on elliptic paraboloids in reentry flight. The report describes the equations and the codes used to convert the body surface parameters into input used to scale the 2D viscous shock layer equations in the axisymmetric viscous shock layer code. Very good agreement is obtained with solutions to finite rate chemistry 3D thin viscous shock layer equations for a finite rate catalytic body.

  2. APFIM investigations on ordered γ-TiAl using single-layer detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesemann, J.; Frommeyer, G.; Kreuss, M.

    1995-03-01

    The defect structure in the γ-phase of an α 2/γ- Ti 51Al 46Cr 3 alloy and the site occupation of chromium has been studied using atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM). Because of the difficult separation of adjacent atomic layers during conventional APFIM measurements a video-controlled field-evaporation technique was carried out. The γ-phase is hyperstoichiometric in aluminium. Many Al antistructure atoms were detected in Ti layers but no Ti antistructure atoms were found in Al layers. Chromium has a strong preference for occupying Ti sites in the ordered γ-phase (L1 0 type of superlattice). This seems to be in contrast with the results obtained by ALCHEMI (atom location by channelling-enhanced microanalysis). However, this discrepancy can be explained with the dependence of the site preference of chromium on the local Al concentration.

  3. Method of using a germanium layer transfer to Si for photovoltaic applications and heterostructure made thereby

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr., Harry A.; Zahler, James M.

    2006-11-28

    Ge/Si and other nonsilicon film heterostructures are formed by hydrogen-induced exfoliation of the Ge film which is wafer bonded to a cheaper substrate, such as Si. A thin, single-crystal layer of Ge is transferred to Si substrate. The bond at the interface of the Ge/Si heterostructures is covalent to ensure good thermal contact, mechanical strength, and to enable the formation of an ohmic contact between the Si substrate and Ge layers. To accomplish this type of bond, hydrophobic wafer bonding is used, because as the invention demonstrates the hydrogen-surface-terminating species that facilitate van der Waals bonding evolves at temperatures above 600.degree. C. into covalent bonding in hydrophobically bound Ge/Si layer transferred systems.

  4. Optical fiber sensors based on nanostructured coatings fabricated by means of the layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arregui, Francisco J.; Matías, Ignacio R.; Claus, Richard O.

    2007-07-01

    The Layer-by-Layer Electrostatic Self-Assembly (ESA) method has been successfully used for the design and fabrication of nanostructured materials. More specifically, this technique has been applied for the deposition of thin films on optical fibers with the purpose of fabricating different types of optical fiber sensors. In fact, optical fiber sensors for measuring humidity, temperature, pH, hydrogen peroxide, glucose, volatile organic compounds or even gluten have been already experimentally demonstrated. The versatility of this technique allows the deposition of these sensing coatings on flat substrates and complex geometries as well. For instance, nanoFabry-Perots and microgratings have been formed on cleaved ends of optical fibers (flat surfaces) and also sensing coatings have been built onto long period gratings (cylindrical shape), tapered fiber ends (conical shape), biconically tapered fibers or even the internal side of hollow core fibers. Among the different materials used for the construction of these sensing nanostructured coatings, diverse types such as polymers, inorganic semiconductors, colorimetric indicators, fluorescent dyes, quantum dots or even biological elements as enzymes can be found. This technique opens the door to the fabrication of new types of optical fiber sensors.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of high-surface-area millimeter-sized silica beads with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure by the addition of agar

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yosep; Choi, Junhyun; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-04-01

    Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure featuring high specific surface area and ordered mesoporous frameworks were successfully prepared using aqueous agar addition, foaming and drop-in-oil processes. The pore-related properties of the prepared spherical silica (SSs) and SSFs were systematically characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), Hg intrusion porosimetry, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm measurements. Improvements in the BET surface area and total pore volume were observed at 504 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 5.45 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, respectively, after an agar addition and foaming process. Despite the increase in the BET surface area, the mesopore wall thickness and the pore size of the mesopores generated from the block copolymer with agar addition were unchanged based on the SAXRD, TEM, and BJH methods. The SSFs prepared in the present study were confirmed to have improved BET surface area and micropore volume through the agar loading, and to exhibit interconnected 3-dimensional network macropore structure leading to the enhancement of total porosity and BET surface area via the foaming process. - Highlights: • Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) are successfully prepared. • SSFs exhibit high BET surface area and ordered hierarchical pore structure. • Agar addition improves BET surface area and micropore volume of SSFs. • Foaming process generates interconnected 3-D network macropore structure of SSFs.

  6. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  7. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  8. Synthesis of layered double hydroxides containing Mg2+, Zn2+, Ca2+ and Al3+ layer cations by co-precipitation methods-A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiss, Frederick L.; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Frost, Ray L.

    2016-10-01

    Co-precipitation is a common method for the preparation of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and related materials. This review article is aimed at providing newcomers to the field with some examples of the types of co-precipitation reactions that have been reported previously and to briefly investigate some of the properties of the products of these reactions. Due to the sheer volume of literature on the subject, the authors have had to limit this article to the synthesis of Mg/Al, Zn/Al and Ca/Al LDHs by co-precipitation and directly related methods. LDHs have been synthesised from various reagents including metal salts, oxides and hydroxides. Co-precipitation is also useful for the direct synthesis of LDHs with a wide range of interlayer anions and various bases have been successfully employed to prepare LDHs. Examples of other synthesis techniques including the urea method, hydrothermal synthesis and various mechanochemical methods that are undoubtedly related to co-precipitation have also been included in this review. The effect of post synthesis hydrothermal has also been summarised.

  9. Novel grafted agar disks for the covalent immobilization of β-D-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Marwa I; Hassan, Mohamed E

    2015-12-01

    Novel grafted agar disks were prepared for the covalent immobilization of β-D-galactosidase (β-gal). The agar disks were activated through reacting with ethylenediamine or different molecular weights of Polyethyleneimine (PEI), followed by glutaraldehyde (GA). The modification of the agar gel and the binding of the enzyme were verified by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and elemental analysis. Moreover, the agar's activation process was optimized, and the amount of immobilized enzyme increased 3.44 folds, from 38.1 to 131.2 U/g gel, during the course of the optimization process. The immobilization of β-gal onto the activated agar disks caused its optimum temperature to increase from 45°C to 45-55°C. The optimum pH of the enzyme was also shifted towards the acidic side (3.6-4.6) after its immobilization. Additionally, the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km ) increased for the immobilized β-gal as compared to its free counterpart whereas the maximum reaction rate (Vmax ) decreased. The immobilized enzyme was also shown to retain 92.99% of its initial activity after being used for 15 consecutive times. PMID:26043937

  10. Strategies to improve the mechanical strength and water resistance of agar films for food packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Gonçalves, Maria P

    2015-11-01

    Agar films possess several properties adequate for food packaging applications. However, their high cost-production and quality variations caused by physiological and environmental factors affecting wild seaweeds make them less attractive for industries. In this work, native (NA) and alkali-modified (AA) agars obtained from sustainably grown seaweeds (integrated multi-trophic aquaculture) were mixed with locust bean gum (LBG) to make 'knife-coated' films with fixed final concentration (1 wt%) and variable agar/LBG ratios. Agar films were easier to process upon LBG addition (viscosity increase and gelling character decrease of the film-forming solutions observed by dynamic oscillatory and steady shear measurements). The mechanical properties and water resistance were optimal for films with 50 and/or 75% LBG contents and best in the case of NA (cheaper to extract). These findings can help reduce the cost-production of agar packaging films. Moreover, the controlled cultivation of seaweeds can provide continuous and reliable feedstock for transformation industries. PMID:26256341

  11. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes. PMID:25827444

  12. Evaluation of Remel Spectra CRE Agar for Detection of Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria from Rectal Swabs Obtained from Residents of a Long-Term-Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Carl M.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Chen, Liang; Osorio, Giuliana; Kopacz, Joanna; Labaze, Georges; Segal-Maurer, Sorana

    2015-01-01

    We compared the Remel Spectra CRE agar plate to CDC standard methodology for the isolation of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) from 300 rectal swab specimens obtained from patients residing in a long-term-care facility (LTCF). Multiplex PCR experiments were performed on isolates to identify specific Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC) and additional β-lactamases. Of the 300 patients, 72 (24%) harbored CRE and were PCR positive for KPC enzymes. The Remel Spectra CRE plates detected KPC-type CRE in isolates from 70 of 72 patients (97.2%), while the CDC method detected CRE in 56 of 72 (77.8%). CRE identification results were available in 18 h compared to 36 h for the CDC method. Remel Spectra CRE agar plates can provide useful means for a fast and reliable method for detecting KPC-type CRE and for accelerated institution of appropriate infection control precautions. PMID:26085613

  13. Preparation and characterization of CuInS2 absorber layers by sol-gel method for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerioun, M. H.; Ghazi, M. E.; Izadifard, M.; Bahramian, B.

    2016-04-01

    CuInSe2 , CuInS2 ( CIS2 and CuInGaS2 alloys and their compounds with band gaps between 1.05 and 1.7eV are absorbance materials based on chalcopyrite, in which, because of their suitable direct band gap, high absorbance coefficient and short carrier diffusion are used as absorbance layers in solar cells. In this work, the effects of decrease in p H and thickness variation on characteristics of the CIS2 absorber layers, grown by spin coating on glass substrates, are investigated. Furthermore by using thiourea as a sulphur source in solvent, the sulfurization of layers was done easier than other sulfurization methods. Due to the difficulty in dissolving thiourea in the considered solvent that leads to a fast deposition during the dissolving process, precise conditions are employed in order to prepare the solution. In fact, this procedure can facilitate the sulfurization process of CuIn layers. The results obtained from this investigation indicate reductions in absorbance and band gap in the visible region of the spectrum as a result of decrease in p H. Finally, conductivity of layers is studied by the current vs. voltage curve that represents reduction of electrical resistance with decrease and increase in p H and thickness, respectively.

  14. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Spengler, Charles J.; Folser, George R.; Vora, Shailesh D.; Kuo, Lewis; Richards, Von L.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO.sub.3 layer to about 1100.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell.

  15. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Spengler, C.J.; Folser, G.R.; Vora, S.D.; Kuo, L.; Richards, V.L.

    1995-06-20

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO{sub 3} powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO{sub 3} layer to about 1100 C to 1300 C to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell. 6 figs.

  16. Thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) separations and bioassays of plant extracts to identify antimicrobial compounds.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Isabelle A; Flythe, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    A common screen for plant antimicrobial compounds consists of separating plant extracts by paper or thin-layer chromatography (PC or TLC), exposing the chromatograms to microbial suspensions (e.g. fungi or bacteria in broth or agar), allowing time for the microbes to grow in a humid environment, and visualizing zones with no microbial growth. The effectiveness of this screening method, known as bioautography, depends on both the quality of the chromatographic separation and the care taken with microbial culture conditions. This paper describes standard protocols for TLC and contact bioautography with a novel application to amino acid-fermenting bacteria. The extract is separated on flexible (aluminum-backed) silica TLC plates, and bands are visualized under ultraviolet (UV) light. Zones are cut out and incubated face down onto agar inoculated with the test microorganism. Inhibitory bands are visualized by staining the agar plates with tetrazolium red. The method is applied to the separation of red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Kenland) phenolic compounds and their screening for activity against Clostridium sticklandii, a hyper ammonia-producing bacterium (HAB) that is native to the bovine rumen. The TLC methods apply to many types of plant extracts and other bacterial species (aerobic or anaerobic), as well as fungi, can be used as test organisms if culture conditions are modified to fit the growth requirements of the species. PMID:24747583

  17. Thin-layer Chromatographic (TLC) Separations and Bioassays of Plant Extracts to Identify Antimicrobial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Isabelle A.; Flythe, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    A common screen for plant antimicrobial compounds consists of separating plant extracts by paper or thin-layer chromatography (PC or TLC), exposing the chromatograms to microbial suspensions (e.g. fungi or bacteria in broth or agar), allowing time for the microbes to grow in a humid environment, and visualizing zones with no microbial growth. The effectiveness of this screening method, known as bioautography, depends on both the quality of the chromatographic separation and the care taken with microbial culture conditions. This paper describes standard protocols for TLC and contact bioautography with a novel application to amino acid-fermenting bacteria. The extract is separated on flexible (aluminum-backed) silica TLC plates, and bands are visualized under ultraviolet (UV) light. Zones are cut out and incubated face down onto agar inoculated with the test microorganism. Inhibitory bands are visualized by staining the agar plates with tetrazolium red. The method is applied to the separation of red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Kenland) phenolic compounds and their screening for activity against Clostridium sticklandii, a hyper ammonia-producing bacterium (HAB) that is native to the bovine rumen. The TLC methods apply to many types of plant extracts and other bacterial species (aerobic or anaerobic), as well as fungi, can be used as test organisms if culture conditions are modified to fit the growth requirements of the species. PMID:24747583

  18. Comparison of a new, bismuth-iron-sulfite-cycloserine agar for isolation of Clostridium perfringens with the tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine and blood agars.

    PubMed

    Gubash, S M; Ingham, L

    1997-02-01

    A new differential and selective, bismuth-iron-sulfite-cycloserine (BISC) medium, for isolation and enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from food and feces, was developed. The medium was compared with the widely-used tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC) medium and blood agar (BA) in recovering actively growing cells, cold- (refrigerated and frozen) stressed, and heat-stressed C. perfringens cells, and heat-activated spores from human feces. Both selective media were satisfactory in recovering actively growing cells and heat-activated spores of C. perfringens. Both were inferior to non-inhibitory blood agar in recovering heat or cold-stressed cells. The advantages of the new BISC medium over the TSC medium were: elimination of the need to prepare pour- or overlay-agar plates, which simplified inoculation of specimens on the medium and simplified the subcultures of colonies for confirmatory identification. All colonies of C. perfringens developed on BISC were black or dark gray. This was contrary to TSC medium, which gave, on average, 39.6% of white colonies when inoculated with the pure cultures of C. perfringens. PMID:9084113

  19. Effect of Diethylaminoethyl Dextran on the Growth of Mycoplasma in Agar

    PubMed Central

    Tauraso, Nicola M.

    1967-01-01

    The growth of certain strains of Mycoplasma is inhibited by substances present in commercial agar preparations. The addition of diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) dextran (10 mg per 100 ml) to agar media appears to enhance the growth of some strains. Of eight strains initially tested, the presence of DEAE dextran grossly enhanced the growth of three strains. One strain appeared not to be affected, and a clearly enhancing effect was not evident with four strains. Quantitative studies revealed that growth enhancement varied from 10 colony-forming units (CFU) for M. hominis type II (strain Campo) to 103.3 CFU for M. pulmonis (strain 880). The growth-enhancing effect is probably due to the ability of DEAE dextran to bind the sulfated polysaccharide moieties in agar and not to the DEAE dextran, per se. Images PMID:6025444

  20. An agar diffusion study comparing the antimicrobial activity of Nanoseal with some other endodontic sealers.

    PubMed

    Aal-Saraj, Ali Burak; Ariffin, Zaihan; Masudi, Sam'an Malik

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of a new experimental nano-hydroxyapatite epoxy resin-based sealer (Nanoseal) with several other commercially available sealers; AH26, Tubliseal, Sealapex and Roekoseal against Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus and Escherichia coli for up to 7 days. Agar diffusion was used in this study. Fifty Muller-Hinton agar plates were prepared and divided into five experimental groups (n = 10), for each micro-organism. Another 10 agar plates were used as positive and negative controls. Endodontic sealers were tested against each micro-organism. Inhibition zones produced were recorded. The results of this study showed that all test materials exhibited inhibition zones towards the tested micro-organisms for 7 days except for Roekoseal, which showed no inhibition zones. Nanoseal and AH26 exhibited similar zones of inhibition. Significant difference was found between Nanoseal and the other tested sealers (P < 0.001). PMID:22827817