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Sample records for agar plate assay

  1. A simple agar plate method, using micro-algae, for herbicide bio-assay or detection.

    PubMed

    Wright, S J

    1975-07-01

    A simple, inexpensive method is described for the bio-assay of herbicides using micro-algae growing on agar plates. A result is obtainable in 2 days and the method is suitable for biodetection of herbicide residues, or toxicity studies on soil or aquatic pollutants.

  2. Agar plate freezing assay for the in situ selection of transformed ice nucleating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anastassopoulos, Elias

    2006-10-01

    An agar plate freezing assay is described based on the incorporation of fluorescein dye in agar medium. Upon addition of fluorescein the medium becomes transparent. This facilitates the monitoring of the ice nucleation event in vivo and the subsequent in situ selection of transformed ice nucleating bacteria. In comparison with known assays for the screening of transformants, the proposed assay is very accurate and reproducible. It may be applied in environmental samples screening for ice nucleating organisms, or in cDNA or genomic libraries for identifying novel ice nucleation genes. It may also prove useful in comparative studies of the ice nucleation activity, e.g. in directed evolution experiments involving ice nucleation genes.

  3. Evaluation of an immunochromatographic assay for direct identification of thermostable direct hemolysin-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus colonies on selective agar plates.

    PubMed

    Kawatsu, Kentaro; Sakata, Junko; Yonekita, Taro; Kumeda, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the utility of an immunochromatographic assay (NH IC TDH) in identifying thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus colonies on selective agar plates. The sensitivity of the NH IC TDH assay was 100% (189 samples) and its specificity was 100% (41 samples) compared with the presence of tdh. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of Fast Green in Agar-Diffusion Microbiological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, D. E.; Caldwell, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Microbiological assay plates containing agar stained with fast green and inoculated with test microorganisms could be readily distinguished from unstained seeded agar plates. The boundaries of zones of growth inhibition were more sharply defined in those plates which contained stained agar. PMID:5370664

  5. Automated annotation removal in agar plates.

    PubMed

    Vera, Sergio; Perez, Frederic; Lara, Laura; Ceresa, Mario; Carranza, Noemi; Herrero Jover, Javier; Gonzalez Ballester, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Agar plates are widely used in the biomedical field as a medium in which to artificially grow bacteria, algae or fungi. Agar plates (Petri dishes) are used routinely in microbiology laboratories in order to identify the type of micro-organism responsible for infections. Such diagnoses are based on counting the number and type of bacterial colonies growing in the Petri dish. The count of bacterial colonies is a time consuming task prone to human error, so interest in automated counting systems has increased in the recent years. One of the difficulties of automatizing the counting process is the presence of markers and annotations made in the lower part of the agar plate. Efficient removal of such markers can increase the accuracy of the bacterial counting system. This article introduces a fast method for detection, segmentation and removal of annotations in agar plates that improves the results of existing bacterial colony counting algorithms.

  6. Rapid urease screening of Yersinia on CIN agar plates.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Friederike; Mayrhofer, Sigrid; Smulders, Frans J M

    2003-07-15

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an important foodborne pathogen, but isolation of virulent Yersinia from food sources is still time consuming and requires skills. In this article, we describe a rapid urease screening on cefsulodin-irgasan-novobiocin (CIN) agar plates with an agar overlay assay. This test is simple to perform, all colonies on a plate can be checked simultaneously, it only takes minutes for detection of urease-positive colonies and the colonies survive for transfer, further characterisation, and storage. Additionally, this method is useful to isolate virulent (urease-positive and pYV harbouring) Y. enterocolitica from foodstuffs.

  7. Methods for identifying lipoxygenase producing microorganisms on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Nyyssölä, Antti; Heshof, Ruud; Haarmann, Thomas; Eidner, Jasmin; Westerholm-Parvinen, Ann; Langfelder, Kim; Kruus, Kristiina; de Graaff, Leo; Buchert, Johanna

    2012-03-26

    Plate assays for lipoxygenase producing microorganisms on agar plates have been developed. Both potassium iodide-starch and indamine dye formation methods were effective for detecting soybean lipoxygenase activity on agar plates. A positive result was also achieved using the β-carotene bleaching method, but the sensitivity of this method was lower than the other two methods. The potassium iodide-starch and indamine dye formation methods were also applied for detecting lipoxygenase production by Trichoderma reesei and Pichia pastoris transformants expressing the lipoxygenase gene of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis. In both cases lipoxygenase production in the transformants could be identified. For detection of the G. graminis lipoxygenase produced by Aspergillus nidulans the potassium iodide-starch method was successful. When Escherichia coli was grown on agar and soybean lipoxygenase was applied on the culture lipoxygenase activity could clearly be detected by the indamine dye formation method. This suggests that the method has potential for screening of metagenomic libraries in E. coli for lipoxygenase activity.

  8. Assay for Adhesion and Agar Invasion in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guldal, Cemile G; Broach, James

    2006-01-01

    Yeasts are found in natural biofilms, where many microorganisms colonize surfaces. In artificial environments, such as surfaces of man-made objects, biofilms can reduce industrial productivity, destroy structures, and threaten human life. 1-3 On the other hand, harnessing the power of biofilms can help clean the environment and generate sustainable energy. 4-8 The ability of S. cerevisiae to colonize surfaces and participate in complex biofilms was mostly ignored until the rediscovery of the differentiation programs triggered by various signaling pathways and environmental cues in this organism. 9, 10 The continuing interest in using S. cerevisiae as a model organism to understand the interaction and convergence of signaling pathways, such as the Ras-PKA, Kss1 MAPK, and Hog1 osmolarity pathways, quickly placed S. cerevisiae in the junction of biofilm biology and signal transduction research. 11-20 To this end, differentiation of yeast cells into long, adhesive, pseudohyphal filaments became a convenient readout for the activation of signal transduction pathways upon various environmental changes. However, filamentation is a complex collection of phenotypes, which makes assaying for it as if it were a simple phenotype misleading. In the past decade, several assays were successfully adopted from bacterial biofilm studies to yeast research, such as MAT formation assays to measure colony spread on soft agar and crystal violet staining to quantitatively measure cell-surface adherence. 12, 21 However, there has been some confusion in assays developed to qualitatively assess the adhesive and invasive phenotypes of yeast in agar. Here, we present a simple and reliable method for assessing the adhesive and invasive quality of yeast strains with easy-to-understand steps to isolate the adhesion assessment from invasion assessment. Our method, adopted from previous studies, 10, 16 involves growing cells in liquid media and plating on differential nutrient conditions for growth

  9. Improved Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Modified Agar Plate Cultures.

    PubMed

    Pocaterra, Leonor A; Ferrara, Giuseppe; Peñaranda, Rosaura; Rojas, Elsy; Pérez-Chacón, Gladymar; Hernán, Aurora; Certad, Gabriela; Goldstein, Carlos; Núñez, Luz

    2017-04-01

    AbstractA modification of Koga agar plate culture was performed, consisting of a 2 × 2-cm cellophane paper centered on the agar plate to prevent bacterial contamination of the agar and daily dish examinations (days 2-5). Between January 2000 and July 2005, we examined 1,708 infection-suspected patients, of which 147 (8.6%) harbored S. stercoralis. Single modified agar plate cultures exhibited superior sensitivity (93.2%), compared with different three-sample screening methods (sensitivity-Baermann: 76.6%, formalin-ethyl acetate: 22%, and direct smear: 15.3%). Agar plate cultures stand out as helpful alternatives for improved detection and therapy monitoring in poor countries and endemic areas. Combined with Baermann methods, they provide increased probability for S. stercoralis detection.

  10. Automated counting of bacterial colony forming units on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Silvio D; Baumberger, Christian; Jost, Marcel; Jenni, Werner; Brugger, Urs; Mühlemann, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Manual counting of bacterial colony forming units (CFUs) on agar plates is laborious and error-prone. We therefore implemented a colony counting system with a novel segmentation algorithm to discriminate bacterial colonies from blood and other agar plates.A colony counter hardware was designed and a novel segmentation algorithm was written in MATLAB. In brief, pre-processing with Top-Hat-filtering to obtain a uniform background was followed by the segmentation step, during which the colony images were extracted from the blood agar and individual colonies were separated. A Bayes classifier was then applied to count the final number of bacterial colonies as some of the colonies could still be concatenated to form larger groups. To assess accuracy and performance of the colony counter, we tested automated colony counting of different agar plates with known CFU numbers of S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa and M. catarrhalis and showed excellent performance.

  11. Automated Counting of Bacterial Colony Forming Units on Agar Plates

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Silvio D.; Baumberger, Christian; Jost, Marcel; Jenni, Werner; Brugger, Urs; Mühlemann, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Manual counting of bacterial colony forming units (CFUs) on agar plates is laborious and error-prone. We therefore implemented a colony counting system with a novel segmentation algorithm to discriminate bacterial colonies from blood and other agar plates. A colony counter hardware was designed and a novel segmentation algorithm was written in MATLAB. In brief, pre-processing with Top-Hat-filtering to obtain a uniform background was followed by the segmentation step, during which the colony images were extracted from the blood agar and individual colonies were separated. A Bayes classifier was then applied to count the final number of bacterial colonies as some of the colonies could still be concatenated to form larger groups. To assess accuracy and performance of the colony counter, we tested automated colony counting of different agar plates with known CFU numbers of S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa and M. catarrhalis and showed excellent performance. PMID:22448267

  12. Combination cellulose plate (non-agar solid support) and agar plate method improves isolation of fungi from soil.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Kenichi; Todaka, Nemuri; Ōmura, Satoshi; Masuma, Rokuro

    2014-11-01

    This is the first report describing the improved isolation of common filamentous fungi via a method combining cellulose plate and agar plate system. A cellulose plate is a porous plate made of nanofibrous crystaline cellulose. Isolating fungi from soils using these types of media separately resulted in the number of fungal colonies appearing on cellulose plates being lower than that on agar plates. However, the number of actual fungal species isolated using cellulose plates alone was more or less the same as that found using agar plates. Significantly, the diversity of isolates using a combination of the two media was greater than using each media individually. As a result, numerous new or rare fungal species with potential, including previously proposed new species, were isolated successfully in this way. All fungal colonies, including the Penicillium species, that appeared on the cellulose plate penetrated in potato dextrose were either white or yellow. Cultivation on cellulose plates with added copper ion overcomes the change in coloration, the colonies appearing as they do following cultivation on potato dextrose agar.

  13. Hyperspectral imaging for detecting pathogens grown on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Line, John E.; Park, Bosoon; Windham, William R.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth pattern, color, etc.) of colonies grown on agar plates has been widely used to tentatively differentiate organisms. However, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate target organisms like Campylobacters from other contaminants grown together on the same agar plates. A hyperspectral imaging system operating at the visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectral region from 400 nm to 900 nm was set up to measure spectral signatures of 17 different Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter subspecies. Protocols for culturing, imaging samples and for calibrating measured data were developed. The VNIR spectral library of all 17 organisms commonly encountered in poultry was established from calibrated hyperspectral images. A classification algorithm was developed to locate and identify Campylobacters, non-Campylobacter contaminants, and background agars with 99.29% accuracy. This research has a potential to be expanded to detect other pathogens grown on agar media.

  14. Hyperspectral Imaging for Detecting Pathogens Grown on Agar Plates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth...

  15. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866...

  19. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866...

  20. A modified agar plate method for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Kasuya, S; Khamboonruang, C; Sukhavat, K; Ieda, M; Takatsuka, N; Kita, K; Ohtomo, H

    1991-10-01

    The agar plate method is a new technique with high detection rates for coprological diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. This report details modifications of the technique and establishes a standardized procedure. We recommend that all plates should be carefully observed using a microscope because macroscopic observation can lead to false negative results. It is also advisable to pour formalin solution directly into microscopically positive dishes to collect worms by sedimentation. This procedure enables one to observe worms otherwise hidden. Sealing dishes with adhesive tape prevents larvae from crawling out of the dishes, eliminating any possibility in the reduction of detection rates, and greatly improves the safety conditions for the technician performing the procedure. We consider the agar plate method to be superior to the filter paper method in detecting Strongyloides, and we believe that it will eventually become the technique of choice.

  1. Fractal Growth of Bacillus subtilis on Agar Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    1989-11-01

    Bacteria have been shown to grow with various morphologies under different conditions on agar plates. A Bacillus subtilis strain was inoculated on the plate surface and incubated at 35°C. Colonies grew two-dimensionally with random branches, similar to clusters of the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. The colony patterns were analyzed and found to be self-similar with a fractal dimension of 1.716± 0.008, in excellent agreement with the expected value of the DLA model. Interior branches were observed to stop growing in spite of their open neighborhood during the incubation period, implying the existence of a screening effect. These results clearly suggest that the colony pattern of the organism was formed through the DLA process. Moreover, the colonies were found to grow radially with almost regular branches on agar plates with moist surfaces, reminiscent of “dense radial” morphology.

  2. Improved soft-agar colony assay in a fluid processing apparatus.

    PubMed

    Forsman, A D; Herpich, A R; Chapes, S K

    1999-01-01

    The standard method for quantitating bone marrow precursor cells has been to count the number of colony-forming units that form in semisolid (0.3%) agar. Recently we adapted this assay for use in hardware, the Fluid Processing Apparatus, that is flown in standard payload lockers of the space shuttle. When mouse or rat macrophage colony-forming units were measured with this hardware in ground-based assays, we found significantly more colony growth than that seen in standard plate assays. The improved growth correlates with increased agar thickness but also appears to be due to properties inherent to the Fluid Processing Apparatus. This paper describes an improved method for determining bone marrow macrophage precursor numbers in semisolid agar.

  3. Individual based simulations of bacterial growth on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginovart, M.; López, D.; Valls, J.; Silbert, M.

    2002-03-01

    The individual based simulator, INDividual DIScrete SIMulations (INDISIM) has been used to study the behaviour of the growth of bacterial colonies on a finite dish. The simulations reproduce the qualitative trends of pattern formation that appear during the growth of Bacillus subtilis on an agar plate under different initial conditions of nutrient peptone concentration, the amount of agar on the plate, and the temperature. The simulations are carried out by imposing closed boundary conditions on a square lattice divided into square spatial cells. The simulator studies the temporal evolution of the bacterial population possible by setting rules of behaviour for each bacterium, such as its uptake, metabolism and reproduction, as well as rules for the medium in which the bacterial cells grow, such as concentration of nutrient particles and their diffusion. The determining factors that characterize the structure of the bacterial colony patterns in the presents simulations, are the initial concentrations of nutrient particles, that mimic the amount of peptone in the experiments, and the set of values for the microscopic diffusion parameter related, in the experiments, to the amount of the agar medium.

  4. Periodic growth of Bacillus subtilis colonies on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    1992-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis colonies show periodic growth on agar plates. The organism has been observed to show several colony morphologies including diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) type, dense branching morphology (DBM), Eden type, and spreading without producing openings. The agar concentration for the periodic growth is higher than that of DBM and lower than that of DLA or Eden type. The nutrient (peptone) concentration for the periodic growth is higher than that of DLA and DBM and lower than that of Eden type. The colony grows towards a place with higher peptone concentration. These findings suggest that the diffusion of nutrient particles, i.e. the concentration gradient of peptone particles at the growing perimeter of a colony, would be essentially involved in the periodic growth. The distance between concentric rings of a colony is constant and intervention between two colonies is not observed, unlike the Liesegang ring.

  5. Modelling Fractal Growth of Bacillus subtilis on Agar Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogedby, Hans C.

    1991-02-01

    The observed fractal growth of a bacterial colony of Bacillus subtilis on agar plates is simulated by a simple computer model in two dimensions. Growth morphologies are shown and the fractal dimension is computed. The concentration of nutrients and the time scale ratio of bacterial multiplication and nutrient diffusion are the variable parameters in the model. Fractal growth is observed in the simulations for moderate concentrations and time scale ratios. The simulated morphologies are similar to the ones grown in the biological experiment. The phenomenon is analogous to the fractal morphologies of lipid layers grown on a water surface.

  6. Radiation survival of murine and human melanoma cells utilizing two assay systems: monolayer and soft agar.

    PubMed Central

    Yohem, K. H.; Slymen, D. J.; Bregman, M. D.; Meyskens, F. L.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation response of murine and human melanoma cells assayed in bilayer soft agar and monolayer was examined. Cells from the murine melanoma Cloudman S91 CCL 53.1 cell line and three human melanoma cell strains (C8146C, C8161, and R83-4) developed in our laboratory were irradiated by single dose X-rays and plated either in agar or on plastic. D0 values were the same within 95% confidence intervals for cells from the human melanoma cell strains C8146C, C8161, and R83-4 but were dissimilar for the murine cell line CCL 53.1 Dq values were different for all cells studied. The shape of the survival curve for all four melanomas was not identical for cells assayed in soft agar versus cells grown on plastic. This would indicate that apparent radiosensitivity was influenced by the method of assay although there were no apparent consistent differences between the curves generated by monolayer or bilayer soft agar assays. PMID:3348949

  7. Automated agar plate streaker: a linear plater on Society for Biomolecular Sciences standard plates.

    PubMed

    King, Gregory W; Kath, Gary S; Siciliano, Sal; Simpson, Neal; Masurekar, Prakash; Sigmund, Jan; Polishook, Jon; Skwish, Stephen; Bills, Gerald; Genilloud, Olga; Peláez, Fernando; Martín, Jesus; Dufresne, Claude

    2006-09-01

    Several protocols for bacterial isolation and techniques for aerobic plate counting rely on the use of a spiral plater to deposit concentration gradients of microbial suspensions onto a circular agar plate to isolate colony growth. The advantage of applying a gradient of concentrations across the agar surface is that the original microbiological sample can be applied at a single concentration rather than as multiple serial dilutions. The spiral plater gradually dilutes the sample across a compact area and therefore saves time preparing dilutions and multiple agar plates. Commercial spiral platers are not automated and require manual sample loading. Dispensing of the sample volume and rate of gradients are often very limited in range. Furthermore, the spiral sample application cannot be used with rectangular microplates. Another limitation of commercial spiral platers is that they are useful only for dilute, filtered suspensions and cannot plate suspensions of coarse organic particles therefore precluding the use of many kinds of microorganism-containing substrata. An automated agar plate spreader capable of processing 99 rectangular microplates in unattended mode is described. This novel instrument is capable of dispensing discrete volumes of sample in a linear pattern. It can be programmed to dispense a sample suspense at a uniform application rate or across a decreasing concentration gradient.

  8. Evaluation of Petrifilm™ aerobic count plates as an equivalent alternative to drop plating on R2A agar plates in a biofilm disinfectant efficacy test.

    PubMed

    Fritz, B G; Walker, D K; Goveia, D E; Parker, A E; Goeres, D M

    2015-03-01

    This paper compares Petrifilm™ aerobic count (AC) plates to drop plating on R2A agar plates as an alternative method for biofilm bacteria enumeration after application of a disinfectant. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was grown in a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor (ASTM E2562) and treated with 123 ppm sodium hypochlorite (as free chlorine) according to the Single Tube Method (ASTM E2871). Aliquots from the same dilution tubes were plated on Petrifilm™ AC plates and drop plated on R2A agar plates. The Petrifilm™ AC and R2A plates were incubated for 48 and 24 h, respectively, at 36 ± 1 °C. After nine experimental runs performed by two technicians, the mean difference in biofilm log densities [log biofilm density (LD) = log10(CFU/cm(2))] between the two methods for control coupons, treated coupons, and log reduction (LR) was 0.052 (p = 0.451), -0.102 (p = 0.303), and 0.152 (p = 0.313). Equivalence testing was used to assess equivalence of the two plating methods. The 90 % confidence intervals for the difference in control and treated mean LDs between methods were (-0.065, 0.170) and (-0.270, 0.064), both of which fall within a (-0.5, +0.5) equivalence criterion. The 90 % confidence interval for the mean LR difference (-0.113, 0.420) also falls within this equivalence criterion. Thus, Petrifilm™ AC plates were shown to be statistically equivalent to drop plating on R2A agar for the determination of control LDs, treated LDs, and LR values in an anti-biofilm efficacy test. These are the first published results that establish equivalency to a traditional plate counting technique for biofilms and for a disinfectant assay.

  9. Characterization of Leptospiral Chemoreceptors Using a Microscopic Agar Drop Assay.

    PubMed

    Affroze, Samia; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Takabe, Kyosuke; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is induced by sensing chemical stimuli via chemoreceptors embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, enabling the cells to migrate toward nutrients or away from toxins. The chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. have been well studied and are functionally classified on the basis of detectable substrates. The spirochete Leptospira possesses more than ten chemoreceptors and shows attractive or repellent responses against some sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids. However, the roles of these chemoreceptors have not been investigated. In this study, we conducted a chemotaxis assay called microscopic agar drop assay in combination with competition experiments, determining whether two kinds of attractants are recognized by the same type of chemoreceptor in the saprophytic Leptospira strain, Leptospira biflexa. Analyzing the competition effect observed between several pairs of chemicals, we found that L. biflexa senses sugars via chemoreceptors different from those that sense amino acids and fatty acids.

  10. Evaluation of the effect of agar on the results obtained in the L5178Y mouse lymphoma assay.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Brock, K; Lawrence, K; Casto, B; Moore, M M

    1986-01-01

    The L5178Y TK+/- mouse lymphoma assay is widely used in mutagenicity testing. Trifluorothymidine-resistant (TFTr) mutants are quantitated following growth in agar-supplemented cloning medium. In an attempt to evaluate the effect of agar on plating efficiency, we have tested several lots of Difco Noble agar (cat. No. 0142-01-8; normally used in this assay) and compared it with Baltimore Biological Laboratory (BBL) agar (cat No. 11849). We find that BBL agar gives a higher and less variable plating efficiency than any of the Noble lots tested. Colonies plated in BBL agar tend to appear significantly earlier on the plates than those cloned in Noble agar. The absolute mutant number and the induced mutant frequency quantitated from a treated culture is generally higher in BBL compared to Noble agar. To determine if this higher frequency is due to increased mutant recovery rather than "sneak through" of nonmutant cells, we isolated 97 mutants from treated cultures (44 large colonies and 53 small colonies) and 69 mutants from untreated cultures (24 large colonies and 45 small colonies) and tested them for TFT resistance. All but one (a large colony from an untreated culture) were found to be TFTr, indicating that the mutant frequency is due to an increased mutant recovery. The spontaneous mutant frequency was quantitated for 122 untreated cultures. Showing little variation within and between experiments, the spontaneous mutant frequency yielded a mean of 57.7, with a standard deviation of 14.4. Under our laboratory conditions, BBL agar gave reliable results, and we prefer it for use in cloning L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells.

  11. Modeling surface growth of Escherichia coli on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Morozumi, Satoshi

    2005-12-01

    Surface growth of Escherichia coli cells on a membrane filter placed on a nutrient agar plate under various conditions was studied with a mathematical model. The surface growth of bacterial cells showed a sigmoidal curve with time on a semilogarithmic plot. To describe it, a new logistic model that we presented earlier (H. Fujikawa et al., Food Microbiol. 21:501-509, 2004) was modified. Growth curves at various constant temperatures (10 to 34 degrees C) were successfully described with the modified model (model III). Model III gave better predictions of the rate constant of growth and the lag period than a modified Gompertz model and the Baranyi model. Using the parameter values of model III at the constant temperatures, surface growth at various temperatures was successfully predicted. Surface growth curves at various initial cell numbers were also sigmoidal and converged to the same maximum cell numbers at the stationary phase. Surface growth curves at various nutrient levels were also sigmoidal. The maximum cell number and the rate of growth were lower as the nutrient level decreased. The surface growth curve was the same as that in a liquid, except for the large curvature at the deceleration period. These curves were also well described with model III. The pattern of increase in the ATP content of cells grown on a surface was sigmoidal, similar to that for cell growth. We discovered several characteristics of the surface growth of bacterial cells under various growth conditions and examined the applicability of our model to describe these growth curves.

  12. Development of a selective agar plate for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Jung-Su; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-17

    This study was conducted to develop a selective medium for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Campylobacter spp. (n=4), non-Campylobacter (showing positive results on Campylobacter selective agar) strains (n=49) isolated from fresh produce, indicator bacteria (n=13), and spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce (n=15) were plated on four Campylobacter selective media. Bolton agar and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) exhibited higher sensitivity for Campylobacter spp. than did Preston agar and Hunt agar, although certain non-Campylobacter strains isolated from fresh produce by using a selective agar isolation method, were still able to grow on Bolton agar and mCCDA. To inhibit the growth of non-Campylobacter strains, Bolton agar and mCCDA were supplemented with 5 antibiotics (rifampicin, polymyxin B, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyruvate, ferrous sulfate) and the growth of Campylobacter spp. (n=7) and non-Campylobacter strains (n=44) was evaluated. Although Bolton agar supplemented with rifampicin (BR agar) exhibited a higher selectivity for Campylobacter spp. than did mCCDA supplemented with antibiotics, certain non-Campylobacter strains were still able to grow on BR agar (18.8%). When BR agar with various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were tested with Campylobacter spp. (n=8) and non-Campylobacter (n=7), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was inhibitory against 3 of 7 non-Campylobacter strains. Finally, we validated the use of BR agar containing 50mg/L sulfamethoxazole (BRS agar) or 0.5mg/L ciprofloxacin (BRCS agar) and other selective agars for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and fresh produce. All chicken samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. when tested on mCCDA, BR agar, and BRS agar. In fresh produce samples, BRS agar exhibited the highest selectivity for Campylobacter spp., demonstrating its suitability for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Copyright

  13. Modeling Surface Growth of Escherichia coli on Agar Plates

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Morozumi, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Surface growth of Escherichia coli cells on a membrane filter placed on a nutrient agar plate under various conditions was studied with a mathematical model. The surface growth of bacterial cells showed a sigmoidal curve with time on a semilogarithmic plot. To describe it, a new logistic model that we presented earlier (H. Fujikawa et al., Food Microbiol. 21:501-509, 2004) was modified. Growth curves at various constant temperatures (10 to 34°C) were successfully described with the modified model (model III). Model III gave better predictions of the rate constant of growth and the lag period than a modified Gompertz model and the Baranyi model. Using the parameter values of model III at the constant temperatures, surface growth at various temperatures was successfully predicted. Surface growth curves at various initial cell numbers were also sigmoidal and converged to the same maximum cell numbers at the stationary phase. Surface growth curves at various nutrient levels were also sigmoidal. The maximum cell number and the rate of growth were lower as the nutrient level decreased. The surface growth curve was the same as that in a liquid, except for the large curvature at the deceleration period. These curves were also well described with model III. The pattern of increase in the ATP content of cells grown on a surface was sigmoidal, similar to that for cell growth. We discovered several characteristics of the surface growth of bacterial cells under various growth conditions and examined the applicability of our model to describe these growth curves. PMID:16332768

  14. Use of agar diffusion assay to evaluate bactericidal activity of formulations of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids (FA). Wells in agar media seeded with bacteria were filled with FA-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions, plates were incubated, and zones of inhibition were measured. The relationship between bacteric...

  15. Ceftibuten-containing agar plate for detecting group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS).

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Chitose; Kimura, Kouji; Doyama, Yo; Miyazaki, Akira; Morimoto, Makiko; Banno, Hirotsugu; Nagano, Noriyuki; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-08-01

    Penicillins remain first-line agents for treatment of group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae; GBS) infections; however, several reports have confirmed the existence of GBS with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS). Because no selective agar plates for detection of PRGBS are available to date, in this investigation, we developed the selective agar plate for detection of PRGBS. We used 19 genetically well-confirmed PRGBS isolates and 38 penicillin-susceptible GBS isolates identified in Japan. For preparation of trial PRGBS-selective agar plates, we added 1 of antimicrobial agents (among oxacillin, ceftizoxime, and ceftibuten) to a well-established GBS-selective agar plate. Among 12 trial PRGBS-selective agar plates, Muller-Hinton agar containing 128 μg/mL ceftibuten with 5% sheep blood, 8 μg/mL gentamicin, and 12 μg/mL nalidixic acid was the most appropriate selective agar for PRGBS, showing 100% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity. In cases of potential nosocomial spread of PRGBS, the selective agar plate could be useful and reliable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Membrane-assisted culture of fungal mycelium on agar plates for RNA extraction and pharmacological analyses.

    PubMed

    Lange, Mario; Müller, Carolin; Peiter, Edgar

    2014-05-15

    Fungal mycelium grown in liquid culture is easy to harvest for RNA extraction and gene expression analyses, but liquid cultures often develop rather heterogeneously. In contrast, growth of fungal mycelium on agar plates is highly reproducible. However, this biological material cannot be harvested easily for downstream analyses. This article describes a PVDF (polyvinylidene difluoride) membrane-assisted agar plate culture method that enables the harvest of mycelium grown on agar plates. This culture method leads to a strongly reduced variation in gene expression between biological replicates and requires less growth space as compared with liquid cultures.

  17. Variation in plating efficiency of Salmonellae on eight lots of brilliant green agar.

    PubMed

    Read, R B; Reyes, A L

    1968-05-01

    The plating efficiency of Salmonella anatum, S. cubana, S. dublin, S. tennessee, and S. typhimurium was determined for eight lots of Brilliant Green Agar made by two manufacturers. Washed cells were used as the inoculum and cultures were incubated at 41.5 C. All lots of Brilliant Green Agar were supplemented with 12 mg of sulfadiazine per 100 ml of medium. Of the eight lots of Brilliant Green Agar tested, average recovery of the test salmonellae in three did not differ from recoveries with Trypticase Soy Agar, which was used as a control to indicate the number of viable salmonellae in the test suspension capable of growth on a nonselective medium. Two lots of Brilliant Green Agar gave salmonellae recoveries with geometric means about 25% lower than, and significantly different from, those of the control agar. The remaining three lots of Brilliant Green Agar were generally unproductive.

  18. Susceptibility of a polycaprolactone-based root canal filling material to degradation using an agar-well diffusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Hiraishi, Noriko; Sadek, Fernanda T.; King, Nigel M.; Ferrari, Marco; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cholesterol esterase is both a component of salivary hydrolases as well as an inflammatory cell-derived enzyme and has been shown to cause biodegradation of methacrylate-based resin composites. This study examined whether Resilon, a polycaprolactone-based thermoplastic root filling material is susceptible to biodegradation by cholesterol esterase using agar-well diffusion assay of serially-diluted aqueous Resilon emulsions that were dispersed in agar. Materials and methods Emulsions of Resilon and polycaprolactone were prepared and dispersed in agar on culture plates. Two different concentrations of a cholesterol esterase (0.3 and 1.2 U/mL) were prepared and fed to wells prepared in the agar plates using an agar-well diffusion assay for examination the degradation of polymeric materials. Results Degradation of the emulsified Resilon was manifested as the formation of clear zones of different sizes around the agar wells. No clear zones were observed in agar wells that contain sterile distilled water as the negative control. Clinical significance Although dispersion Resilon into an emulsion is not the way in which this material is employed as a root filling material, the potential for Resilon to be degraded by cholesterol esterase is of potential concern as one cannot limit the degradation of extruded Resilon from a root apex by monocyte-derived macrophages to just the anatomical root apex. As the present study employed a high concentration of cholesterol esterase, further studies should be directed to examining the degradation of Resilon using macrophage cell cultures. PMID:18578181

  19. Agar-gel immunodiffusion assay for pseudorabies virus antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P C; Stewart, W C

    1978-01-01

    Soluble antigen prepared from pseudorabies virus-infected embryonic pig kidney cells was used to demonstrate the presence of pseudorabies virus antibodies in sera taken from naturally and experimentally infected swine. Antibody could be detected by agar-gel immunodiffusion as early as 14 days postexposure and was demonstrable at least 3 months after experimental infection (the longest period tested). The reliability of the agar-gel immunodiffusion test was comparable to that of the microtitration serum-virus neutralization test commonly used in diagnostic laboratories. One advantage of the agar-gel immunodiffusion test was that severely hemolyzed and cytotoxic serum samples could be tested with confidence. The test is simple, rapid, and inexpensive and could be easily adopted by diagnostic laboratories that receive requests for pseudorabies virus antibody determinations in swine sera. Images PMID:207718

  20. Mass production of spores of lactic acid-producing Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 on agar plate.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of sporangiospores (spores) of Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 (identical to NRRL 395 and ATCC 9363) on potato-dextrose-agar medium was studied aiming at starting its L(+)-lactic acid fermentation directly from spore inoculation. Various parameters including harvest time, sowed spore density, size of agar plate, height of air space, and incubation mode of plate (agar-on-bottom or agar-on-top) were studied. Ordinarily used shallow Petri dishes were found out to be unsuitable for the full growth of R. oryzae sporangiophores. In a very wide range of the sowed spore density, the smaller it was, the greater the number of the harvested spores was. It was also interesting to find out that R. oryzae grown downward vertically with a deep air space in an agar-on-top mode gave larger amount of spores than in an agar-on-bottom mode at 30°C for 7-day cultivation. Scale-up of the agar plate culture from 26.4 to 292 cm(2) was studied, resulting in the proportional relationship between the number of the harvested spores/plate and the plate area in the deep Petri dishes. The number of plates of 50 cm in diameter needed for 100 m(3) industrial submerged fermentation started directly from 2 × 10(5) spores/mL inoculum size was estimated as about 6, from which it was inferred that such a fermentation would be feasible. Designing a 50 cm plate and a method of spreading and collecting the spores were suggested. Bioprocess technological significance of the "full-scale industrial submerged fermentation started directly from spore inoculation omitting pre-culture" has been discussed.

  1. Development of hyperspectral imaging technique for salmonella enteritidis and typhimurium on agar plates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella is a common cause of foodborne disease resulting from the consumption of contaminated food products. Although a direct plating method is widely used for presumptive positive screening of pathogenic Salmonella colonies on agar plates, it is labor-intensive, time-consuming and also prone to...

  2. Strongyloidiasis detected by the agar plate culture method among patients infected by HIV.

    PubMed

    Urdez-Hernández, E; Jiménez-Galán, S; Antonio-Manríquez, M; DE León-Juárez, E A; Terrazas-Estrada, J J; Hernández-García, M C; García-Zaldívar, P; Estrada-Aguilera, A

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the rate of strongyloidiasis among HIV/AIDS patients, stools and duodenal juice were examined using the agar plate culture method. From January to June 1993, a total of 60 HIV/AIDS patients were required for duodenal aspirate and three serial samples of freshly passed stools. Stools and duodenal aspirate were dispensed on an agar plate culture; after incubation at 28 degrees C during 48 h, screening of plates was made at 10 x. The presence of furrows and worms of short buccal chamber and prominent genital primordium were positive for Strongyloides stercoralis. Most patients were men (91.7%); their mean age, of 33.9 years (SD +/- 10.6); their median CD4(+) T-cells count, of 105/microL (range of 12 to 646). S. stercoralis was detected in three patients (5%). In duodenal juice, the three patients showed the parasite, but in feces, only two (3.3%). In these two individuals, the worms were found in feces by agar culture and Faust's concentration method. The rate of S. stercoralis in feces of HIV/AIDS individuals (3.3%) by agar culture method was similar to that formerly reported from the general Mexican population (2.9%) using standard concentration procedures. Hence, in this immunocompromised population of a low prevalence city, there was no advantage to using an agar plate culture for strongyloidiasis.

  3. Growth of Physarum gyrosum on Agar Plates and in Liquid Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Richard L.; Mallette, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    The physical and nutritional requirements of the antibiotic-producing slime mold Physarum gyrosum were examined to develop a liquid medium for this myxomycete. Liquid culture is desired to expedite a useful scale of production of antibiotic materials for ease of isolation and structure study. Culture conditions were selected to favor antibiotic production rather than maximum growth. The medium devised consisted of 0.010 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 6.0), 2% bakers' yeast, and 0.2% glucose and was supplemented with either 10−7 M hemoglobin (preferred) or 2.0 ml of live Escherichia coli per 100 ml of culture medium grown to a steady-state population in nutrient broth. The slime mold, which contained some E. coli carried along with the inoculum, was allowed to grow as a surface plasmodium at 20°C in the dark with weekly subculturing for stocks or for 10 days for antibiotic production. P. gyrosum produced the same antibiotic materials when grown in liquid medium as it did when grown on agar plates. A seeded plate disk assay against Bacillus cereus was employed to follow antibiotic activity. PMID:10830

  4. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Shin, Tae-Sung; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance spectra measured in the visible and near-infrared spectral range from 400 and 1,000 nm (473 narrow spectral bands). Multivariate regression methods were used to estimate and predict hyperspectral data from RGB color values. The six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Eschetichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) were grown on Rainbow agar plates. A line-scan pushbroom hyperspectral image sensor was used to scan 36 agar plates grown with pure STEC colonies at each plate. The 36 hyperspectral images of the agar plates were divided in half to create training and test sets. The mean Rsquared value for hyperspectral image estimation was about 0.98 in the spectral range between 400 and 700 nm for linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial regression models and the detection accuracy of the hyperspectral image classification model with the principal component analysis and k-nearest neighbors for the test set was up to 92% (99% with the original hyperspectral images). Thus, the results of the study suggested that color-based detection may be viable as a multispectral imaging solution without much loss of prediction accuracy compared to hyperspectral imaging.

  5. Evaluation of an Automated Instrument for Inoculating and Spreading Samples onto Agar Plates.

    PubMed

    Glasson, J H; Guthrie, L H; Nielsen, D J; Bethell, F A

    2008-04-01

    The findings from a preliminary assessment of a new instrument designed for the inoculation and spreading of specimens for microbiological analysis onto agar plates are described. The study found that the instrument was able to select full or biplates from a number of input cassettes, each containing different agar types. Samples were then inoculated by the instrument onto the agar surfaces and spread by a novel plastic applicator. Following this, the instrument labeled the plates and sorted them into a number of specified output stations. It was found that the instrument was able to inoculate and spread samples over a greater proportion of the agar plate surface than the manual loop-to-plate method. As a consequence, up to 44% more usable colonies were produced per plate from clinical specimens and standard cultures. Viable counts showed that the instrument was able to detect as few as 10(2) CFU/ml in fluids and also facilitated the enumeration of organisms, particularly in specimens such as urine.

  6. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  7. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  8. Increased sensitivity of routine laboratory detection of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm by agar-plate culture.

    PubMed

    Jongwutiwes, S; Charoenkorn, M; Sitthichareonchai, P; Akaraborvorn, P; Putaporntip, C

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of agar-plate culture has been evaluated for the detection of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm, compared with direct smear, the formalin-ether sedimentation technique and the filter-paper method. Of 1085 stool samples from the routine laboratory service at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, 241 samples harboured S. stercoralis, 153 hookworm and 2 Rhabditis hominis. The recovery rate of S. stercoralis by agar-plate culture is significantly superior to the other methods (P < 0.005). The ratios of positive results from the methods used to the total number of S. stercoralis-positive cases were as follows: 1:1.03 by agar-plate culture, 1:1.85 by the filter-paper method, 1:1.98 by the sedimentation technique and 1:10.48 by direct stool smear. A similar trend of the efficacy ratio of each method was obtained for hookworm detection. The characteristic furrows left by hookworm larvae, and larvae and adults of S. stercoralis could be used for preliminary species identification. Daily search for furrows on agar plates for up to 6 consecutive days resulted in an increased sensitivity for diagnosis of both S. stercoralis and hookworm infections.

  9. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance sp...

  10. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus

    PubMed Central

    Cold, Emma R.; Freyria, Nastasia J.; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS– 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham’s F12–5% FBS– 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications. PMID:27149378

  11. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus.

    PubMed

    Cold, Emma R; Freyria, Nastasia J; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications.

  12. Thallium toxicosis in a dog consequent to ingestion of Mycoplasma agar plates.

    PubMed

    Puschner, Birgit; Basso, Marguerite M; Graham, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    A 1-year-old dog ingested a mixture of blood agar and Mycoplasma agar plates. The Mycoplasma agar plates contained thallium acetate, which resulted in an estimated minimum dose of 5 mg thallium acetate/kg bodyweight. Clinical signs over the course of 2-3 weeks included vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, alopecia, dysphonia, ataxia, paresthesia, intension tremors, megaesophagus with subsequent aspiration pneumonia, and several seizure episodes. The dog was treated with intravenous fluids and placement of a gastric feeding tube. Thallium concentrations in hair were 8.2 µg/g in samples taken on day 19, 16.4 µg/g in samples taken 3 months after exposure, 13.4 µg/g in samples taken 5 months after exposure, and nondetectable in samples taken 7 months after exposure. The blood thallium concentration was 190 µg/l on day 19 and nondetec table 3 months after exposure. Megaesophagus and dysphonia continued for 10 months after exposure. This case of thallium poisoning following ingestion of mycoplasma agar plates demonstrates that unusual sources of thallium still exist and suggests that thallium toxicosis should be included in the list of differential diagnoses in dogs presented with megaesophagus, especially if alopecia and other unexplained peripheral neuropathies are present. Hair and blood samples are useful specimens to reach an accurate diagnosis even if taken several weeks post exposure. The postexposure blood and hair thallium concentrations reported in this case are useful data for diagnosticians investigating dogs with potential thallium poisoning.

  13. Growth and differentiation of primary chick embryonic chondrocytes on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Yasumoto, S; Kondo, S; Kato, Y

    1980-06-01

    Freshly dissociated chondrocytes from chick embryonic sterna grew on the surface of solid substratum made of agar or agarose. The chondrocytes retained their differentiated traits such as morphology including intracellular organella and matrix forming ability. Extracellular matrix deposited around the cells exhibited strong metachromasia by staining with toluidine blue. Fibrous network was formed in the extracellular matrix. These characteristics are quite similar to those of the differentiated cartilage tissue. The agar plate seems useful in culturing the differentiated chondrocyte either in mass culture or clonal culture.

  14. Predicting the growth situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs using gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinzhe; Sun, Ye; Tu, Kang; Dong, Qingli; Pan, Leiqing

    2016-12-01

    A rapid method of predicting the growing situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is presented. Gas sensors were used to acquire volatile compounds generated by P. aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs. Then, optimal sensors were selected to simulate P. aeruginosa growth using modified Logistic and Gompertz equations by odor changes. The results showed that the responses of S8 or S10 yielded high coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.89-0.99 and low root mean square errors (RMSE) of 0.06-0.17 for P. aeruginosa growth, fitting the models on the agar plate. The responses of S9, S4 and the first principal component of 10 sensors fit well with the growth of P. aeruginosa inoculated in meat stored at 4 °C and 20 °C, with R2 of 0.73-0.96 and RMSE of 0.25-1.38. The correlation coefficients between the fitting models, as measured by electronic nose responses, and the colony counts of P. aeruginosa were high, ranging from 0.882 to 0.996 for both plate and meat samples. Also, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results indicated the presence of specific volatiles of P. aeruginosa on agar plates. This work demonstrated an acceptable feasibility of using gas sensors—a rapid, easy and nondestructive method for predicting P. aeruginosa growth.

  15. Predicting the growth situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs using gas sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinzhe; Sun, Ye; Tu, Kang; Dong, Qingli; Pan, Leiqing

    2016-01-01

    A rapid method of predicting the growing situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is presented. Gas sensors were used to acquire volatile compounds generated by P. aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs. Then, optimal sensors were selected to simulate P. aeruginosa growth using modified Logistic and Gompertz equations by odor changes. The results showed that the responses of S8 or S10 yielded high coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.89–0.99 and low root mean square errors (RMSE) of 0.06–0.17 for P. aeruginosa growth, fitting the models on the agar plate. The responses of S9, S4 and the first principal component of 10 sensors fit well with the growth of P. aeruginosa inoculated in meat stored at 4 °C and 20 °C, with R2 of 0.73–0.96 and RMSE of 0.25–1.38. The correlation coefficients between the fitting models, as measured by electronic nose responses, and the colony counts of P. aeruginosa were high, ranging from 0.882 to 0.996 for both plate and meat samples. Also, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry results indicated the presence of specific volatiles of P. aeruginosa on agar plates. This work demonstrated an acceptable feasibility of using gas sensors—a rapid, easy and nondestructive method for predicting P. aeruginosa growth. PMID:27941841

  16. Predicting the growth situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs using gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xinzhe; Sun, Ye; Tu, Kang; Dong, Qingli; Pan, Leiqing

    2016-12-12

    A rapid method of predicting the growing situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is presented. Gas sensors were used to acquire volatile compounds generated by P. aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs. Then, optimal sensors were selected to simulate P. aeruginosa growth using modified Logistic and Gompertz equations by odor changes. The results showed that the responses of S8 or S10 yielded high coefficients of determination (R(2)) of 0.89-0.99 and low root mean square errors (RMSE) of 0.06-0.17 for P. aeruginosa growth, fitting the models on the agar plate. The responses of S9, S4 and the first principal component of 10 sensors fit well with the growth of P. aeruginosa inoculated in meat stored at 4 °C and 20 °C, with R(2) of 0.73-0.96 and RMSE of 0.25-1.38. The correlation coefficients between the fitting models, as measured by electronic nose responses, and the colony counts of P. aeruginosa were high, ranging from 0.882 to 0.996 for both plate and meat samples. Also, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results indicated the presence of specific volatiles of P. aeruginosa on agar plates. This work demonstrated an acceptable feasibility of using gas sensors-a rapid, easy and nondestructive method for predicting P. aeruginosa growth.

  17. Enhancing Bioaerosol Sampling by Andersen Impactors Using Mineral-Oil-Spread Agar Plate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Wei, Kai; Wu, Yan; Shen, Fangxia; Chen, Qi; Li, Mingzhen; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    As a bioaerosol sampling standard, Andersen type impactor is widely used since its invention in 1950s, including the investigation of the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001. However, its related problems such as impaction and desiccation stress as well as particle bounce have not been solved. Here, we improved its biological collection efficiencies by plating a mineral oil layer (100 µL) onto the agar plate. An Andersen six-stage sampler and a BioStage impactor were tested with mineral-oil-spread agar plates in collecting indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal aerosols. The effects of sampling times (5, 10 and 20 min) were also studied using the BioStage impactor when sampling environmental bioaerosols as well as aerosolized Bacillus subtilis (G+) and Escherichia coli (G-). In addition, particle bounce reduction by mineral-oil-plate was also investigated using an optical particle counter (OPC). Experimental results revealed that use of mineral-oil-spread agar plate can substantially enhance culturable bioaerosol recoveries by Andersen type impactors (p-values<0.05). The recovery enhancement was shown to depend on bioaerosol size, type, sampling time and environment. In general, more enhancements (extra 20%) were observed for last stage of the Andersen six-stage samplers compared to the BioStage impactor for 10 min sampling. When sampling aerosolized B. subtilis, E. coli and environmental aerosols, the enhancement was shown to increase with increasing sampling time, ranging from 50% increase at 5 min to ∼100% at 20 min. OPC results indicated that use of mineral oil can effectively reduce the particle bounce with an average of 66% for 10 min sampling. Our work suggests that enhancements for fungal aerosols were primarily attributed to the reduced impaction stress, while for bacterial aerosols reduced impaction, desiccation and particle bounce played major roles. The developed technology can readily enhance the agar-based techniques including those high

  18. Enhancing bioaerosol sampling by Andersen impactors using mineral-oil-spread agar plate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Wei, Kai; Wu, Yan; Shen, Fangxia; Chen, Qi; Li, Mingzhen; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    As a bioaerosol sampling standard, Andersen type impactor is widely used since its invention in 1950s, including the investigation of the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001. However, its related problems such as impaction and desiccation stress as well as particle bounce have not been solved. Here, we improved its biological collection efficiencies by plating a mineral oil layer (100 µL) onto the agar plate. An Andersen six-stage sampler and a BioStage impactor were tested with mineral-oil-spread agar plates in collecting indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal aerosols. The effects of sampling times (5, 10 and 20 min) were also studied using the BioStage impactor when sampling environmental bioaerosols as well as aerosolized Bacillus subtilis (G+) and Escherichia coli (G-). In addition, particle bounce reduction by mineral-oil-plate was also investigated using an optical particle counter (OPC). Experimental results revealed that use of mineral-oil-spread agar plate can substantially enhance culturable bioaerosol recoveries by Andersen type impactors (p-values<0.05). The recovery enhancement was shown to depend on bioaerosol size, type, sampling time and environment. In general, more enhancements (extra 20%) were observed for last stage of the Andersen six-stage samplers compared to the BioStage impactor for 10 min sampling. When sampling aerosolized B. subtilis, E. coli and environmental aerosols, the enhancement was shown to increase with increasing sampling time, ranging from 50% increase at 5 min to ∼100% at 20 min. OPC results indicated that use of mineral oil can effectively reduce the particle bounce with an average of 66% for 10 min sampling. Our work suggests that enhancements for fungal aerosols were primarily attributed to the reduced impaction stress, while for bacterial aerosols reduced impaction, desiccation and particle bounce played major roles. The developed technology can readily enhance the agar-based techniques including those high

  19. Simulation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate by diffusion-reaction based continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaoling; Nie, Kai; Li, Mingpeng; Sun, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Various species of bacteria form highly organized spatially-structured aggregates known as biofilms. To understand how microenvironments impact biofilm growth dynamics, we propose a diffusion-reaction continuum model to simulate the formation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar plate. The extended finite element method combined with level set method are employed to perform the simulation, numerical results show the quantitative relationship between colony morphologies and nutrient depletion over time. Considering that the production of polysaccharide in wild-type cells may enhance biofilm spreading on the agar plate, we inoculate mutant colony incapable of producing polysaccharide to verify our results. Predictions of the glutamate source biofilm’s shape parameters agree with the experimental mutant colony better than that of glycerol source biofilm, suggesting that glutamate is rate limiting nutrient for Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate, and the diffusion-limited is a better description to the experiment. In addition, we find that the diffusion time scale is of the same magnitude as growth process, and the common-employed quasi-steady approximation is not applicable here.

  20. Limitations of the clonal agar assay for the assessment of primary human ovarian tumour biopsies.

    PubMed

    Bertoncello, I; Bradley, T R; Campbell, J J; Day, A J; McDonald, I A; McLeish, G R; Quinn, M A; Rome, R; Hodgson, G S

    1982-06-01

    114 biopsy specimens from 70 patients with ovarian carcinoma at all stages of disease were submitted for assessment of clonogenic capacity in agar. A highly significant correlation was found between agar clonogenicity and patient survival after biopsy. However, problems related to inherent tumour heterogeneity, quality of sample and tissue disaggregation indicate that this technique may have limited applicability in the routine assessment of patients. Only 41 biopsy specimens (36%) from 31 patients (44.3%) complied with the prerequisite criteria for agar clonogenic assessment, namely: (a) the confirmed presence of malignant cells in the biopsy, (b) the ability to prepare a single-cell suspension, and (c) adequate viable cell numbers for assay. Furthermore, although the dominant patterns of agar clonogenic growth could be identified and correlated with stage of disease, the heterogeneity in both initial clonogenic capacity and "self-renewal" capacity assessed by the ability of primary clones to propagate in liquid culture and reclone in agar was too inconsistent for the assay to be used as a prognostic index for the individual patient.

  1. A supplemented soft agar chemotaxis assay demonstrates the Helicobacter pylori chemotactic response to zinc and nickel

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Lisa; Andermann, Tessa M.

    2013-01-01

    Directed motility, or chemotaxis, is required for Helicobacter pylori to establish infection in the stomach, although the full repertoire of this bacterium’s chemotactic responses is not yet known. Here we report that H. pylori responds to zinc as an attractant and nickel as a repellent. To reach this conclusion, we employed both a temporal chemotaxis assay based on bacterial reversals and a supplemented soft agar spatial assay. We refined the temporal assay using a previously described chemorepellent, acid, and found that H. pylori requires rich media with serum to maintain optimal swimming motility. Surprisingly, we found that some strains respond to acid as an attractant, and that the TlpC chemoreceptor correlated with whether acid was sensed as an attractant or repellent. Using this same assay, we detected weak repellent responses to nickel and copper, and a varied response to zinc. We thus developed an alternative spatial chemotactic assay called the supplemented soft agar assay, which utilizes soft agar medium supplemented with the test compound. With Escherichia coli, the attractant serine slowed overall bacterial migration, while the repellent nickel increased the speed of overall migration. In H. pylori we detected slowed migration with doubled tryptone media, as well as zinc, consistent with an attractant response. In contrast, nickel increased migration, consistent with repulsion. PMID:23139399

  2. Alternating morphology transitions in crystallization of NH4Cl on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Ya-Fang; Wei, Rong-Bin; Sang, Jian-Ping; Huang, Sheng-You; Zou, Xian-Wu

    2008-04-01

    Two types of alternating morphology transitions have been observed in crystallization of NH4Cl on agar plates. One is the alternating morphology transitions between dense branching morphology and sparse branching morphology, and the other is the alternating morphology transitions between dense branching morphology and zigzag branching morphology. The appearance of them is found to depend on the mass proportion of agar to NH4Cl in the initial solution and the relative humidity. It is suggested that both the two alternating morphology transitions result from the oscillation of solute concentration in front of the growing interface caused by the competition of crystal growth and solute transfer at a moderate mass proportion. Which one of them occurs depends on the relative humidity, which controls the supersaturation.

  3. Alternating morphology transitions in crystallization of NH4Cl on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ya-Fang; Wei, Rong-Bin; Sang, Jian-Ping; Huang, Sheng-You; Zou, Xian-Wu

    2008-04-01

    Two types of alternating morphology transitions have been observed in crystallization of NH4Cl on agar plates. One is the alternating morphology transitions between dense branching morphology and sparse branching morphology, and the other is the alternating morphology transitions between dense branching morphology and zigzag branching morphology. The appearance of them is found to depend on the mass proportion of agar to NH4Cl in the initial solution and the relative humidity. It is suggested that both the two alternating morphology transitions result from the oscillation of solute concentration in front of the growing interface caused by the competition of crystal growth and solute transfer at a moderate mass proportion. Which one of them occurs depends on the relative humidity, which controls the supersaturation.

  4. Big data analytics in hyperspectral imaging for detection of microbial colonies on agar plates (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.

    2017-05-01

    Various types of optical imaging techniques measuring light reflectivity and scattering can detect microbial colonies of foodborne pathogens on agar plates. Until recently, these techniques were developed to provide solutions for hypothesis-driven studies, which focused on developing tools and batch/offline machine learning methods with well defined sets of data. These have relatively high accuracy and rapid response time because the tools and methods are often optimized for the collected data. However, they often need to be retrained or recalibrated when new untrained data and/or features are added. A big-data driven technique is more suitable for online learning of new/ambiguous samples and for mining unknown or hidden features. Although big data research in hyperspectral imaging is emerging in remote sensing and many tools and methods have been developed so far in many other applications such as bioinformatics, the tools and methods still need to be evaluated and adjusted in applications where the conventional batch machine learning algorithms were dominant. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate appropriate big data analytic tools and methods for online learning and mining of foodborne pathogens on agar plates. After the tools and methods are successfully identified, they will be applied to rapidly search big color and hyperspectral image data of microbial colonies collected over the past 5 years in house and find the most probable colony or a group of colonies in the collected big data. The meta-data, such as collection time and any unstructured data (e.g. comments), will also be analyzed and presented with output results. The expected results will be novel, big data-driven technology to correctly detect and recognize microbial colonies of various foodborne pathogens on agar plates.

  5. Improved detection of rhamnolipid production using agar plates containing methylene blue and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Neissa M; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2009-10-01

    Rhamnolipids, produced predominantly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are biosurfactants with important applications. For efficient culture screening according to rhamnolipid productivity, the method using agar plates containing methylene blue (MB) and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was re-examined. An alternative set-up using a fixed underneath light source and image analysis software improved the detection of the circles formed due to complexation between anionic rhamnolipids and cationic MB/CTAB. The roles and effects of MB and CTAB concentrations and pH on the complexation phenomena are reported.

  6. Comparison of the properties of Bacillus subtilis spores made in liquid or on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Rose, R; Setlow, B; Monroe, A; Mallozzi, M; Driks, A; Setlow, P

    2007-09-01

    To compare the properties of the spores of Bacillus subtilis prepared in liquid and on plates. The spores of B. subtilis were prepared at 37 degrees C using a nutrient exhaustion medium either in liquid or on agar plates. The levels of core water, dipicolinic acid (DPA) and small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) were essentially identical in spores made in liquid or on plates. Spores prepared in liquid were killed approximately threefold more rapidly at 90 degrees C in water than the spores prepared on plates, and the spores prepared in liquid were more sensitive to nitrous acid and a diluted stable superoxidized water. Spores prepared in liquid also germinated more rapidly with several agents than those prepared on plates. Pellets of spores prepared on plates were darker than spores prepared in liquid, and spores prepared in liquid had more readily extracted coat protein. However, there were no major differences in the relative levels of individual coat proteins or the cross-linking of the coat protein GerQ in the two types of spores, although the inner membrane of spores prepared on plates had a higher ratio of anteiso- to iso-fatty acids. The preparation in liquid yielded spores with some different properties than those made on agar plates. Spores made in liquid had lower resistance to heat and several chemicals, and germinated more readily with several agents. There were also differences in the composition of the inner membrane of spores prepared under these two conditions. However, there were no major differences in the levels of DPA, core water, SASP and individual coat proteins or the cross-linking of a coat protein in spores made in liquid and on plates. This work demonstrates that the preparation method can affect the resistance and germination properties of bacterial spores, even if an identical medium and temperature are used. Evidence was also obtained consistent with the role of the inner membrane in spore resistance and germination, and that some

  7. Differentiating non-0157:H7 STEC serogroups from ground beef plated on agar media by hyperspetral imaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: The development of an assay to detect and confirm a positive non-O157:H7 isolate is challenging when mixed morphologically results are obtained from the serogroups growing on Rainbow agar. Rainbow agar is only claimed by the manufacturer to be very specific for E.coli O157:H7 strain...

  8. An improved agar-plate method for studying root growth and response of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weifeng; Ding, Guochang; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Li, Qian-Feng; Liu, Yinggao; Shi, Weiming; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a widely used model plant for plant biology research. Under traditional agar-plate culture system (TPG, traditional plant-growing), both plant shoots and roots are exposed to illumination, and roots are grown in sucrose-added medium. This is not a natural environment for the roots and may cause artifact responses. We have developed an improved agar-plate culture system (IPG, improved plant-growing) where shoots are illuminated but roots are grown in darkness without sucrose addition. Compared to TPG, IPG produced plants with significantly less total root length, lateral root length and root hair density, although their primary roots were longer. Root gravitropism, PIN2 (an auxin efflux carrier) abundance, H⁺ efflux or Ca²⁺ influx in root apexes, were weaker in IPG-grown roots than those in TPG-grown roots. We conclude that IPG offers a more natural way to study the root growth and response of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  9. Preenrichment versus direct selective agar plating for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs.

    PubMed

    Valentín-Bon, I E; Brackett, R E; Seo, K H; Hammack, T S; Andrews, W H

    2003-09-01

    The relative effectiveness of two methods for the recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) from jumbo and medium shell eggs was compared. The first method used in the comparison consisted of a preenrichment of the sample, and the second method was developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Three bulk lots of blended, pooled eggs, each containing 220 liquid whole eggs that were thoroughly mixed manually were artificially inoculated with different levels of SE cells between approximately 10(0) and 10(3) CFU/ml. Twenty samples containing the contents of approximately 10 eggs each (by weight) were withdrawn from each of the inoculated bulk lots and incubated for 4 days at room temperature (ca. 23 degrees C). For the APHIS method, each sample was cultured by direct plating onto brilliant green (BG), brilliant green with novobiocin (BGN), xylose lysine desoxycholate (XLD), and xylose lysine agar Tergitol 4 (XLT4) agars. For the preenrichment method, 25-g portions from each pool were enriched in modified tryptic soy broth with 30 mg/liter of FeSO4. After 24 h of incubation, the preenrichments were subcultured to tetrathionate and Rappaport-Vassiliadis broths, and streaked to BG, BGN, bismuth sulfite, XLD, and XLT4 agar plates. SE isolates were confirmed biochemically and serologically. In all of the experiments, the preenrichment method recovered significantly more SE isolates (P < 0.05) of all the phage types and inoculum levels than did the APHIS method. From a total of 539 jumbo egg test portions analyzed, 381 (71%) were SE-positive by the preenrichment method and 232 (43%) were positive by the APHIS method. From a total of 360 medium egg test portions analyzed, 223 (62%) were SE-positive by the preenrichment method and 174 (48%) were positive by the APHIS method. The preenrichment method provided greater sensitivity for the isolation of SE in contaminated egg slurries than did the APHIS method.

  10. Correlation between Agar Plate Screening and Solid-State Fermentation for the Prediction of Cellulase Production by Trichoderma Strains

    PubMed Central

    Florencio, Camila; Couri, Sonia; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2012-01-01

    The viability of converting biomass into biofuels and chemicals still requires further development towards the reduction of the enzyme production costs. Thus, there is a growing demand for the development of efficient procedures for selection of cellulase-producing microorganisms. This work correlates qualitative screening using agar plate assays with quantitative measurements of cellulase production during cultivation under solid-state fermentation (SSF). The initial screening step consisted of observation of the growth of 78 preselected strains of the genus Trichoderma on plates, using microcrystalline cellulose as carbon source. The 49 strains that were able to grow on this substrate were then subjected to a second screening step using the Congo red test. From this test it was possible to select 10 strains that presented the highest enzymatic indices (EI), with values ranging from 1.51 to 1.90. SSF cultivations using sugarcane bagasse and wheat bran as substrates were performed using selected strains. The CG 104NH strain presented the highest EGase activity (25.93 UI·g−1). The EI results obtained in the screening procedure using plates were compared with cellulase production under SSF. A correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.977 was obtained between the Congo red test and SSF, demonstrating that the two methodologies were in good agreement. PMID:23227312

  11. Enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in water for dialysis: Comparison of the efficiency of reasoner'2 agar and plate count agar.

    PubMed

    Bugno, Adriana; Almodóvar, Adriana Aparecida Buzzo; Pereira, Tatiana Caldas

    2010-01-01

    Due to the fact the incubation conditions may influence the microbiological evaluation of water for dialysis, the objective of the present study was the comparison of the efficiency of R2A and PCA media in the enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in 193 samples of water collected in dialysis clinics from 12 cities in São Paulo, between October and December 2007. Results showed counts significantly greater in R2A, suggesting that enumeration should be carried out in R2A, suggesting that enumeration should be carried out in R2A agar associated with longer incubation times, because of the greater sensitivity.

  12. Enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in water for dialysis: Comparison of the efficiency of reasoner’2 agar and plate count agar

    PubMed Central

    Bugno, Adriana; Almodóvar, Adriana Aparecida Buzzo; Pereira, Tatiana Caldas

    2010-01-01

    Due to the fact the incubation conditions may influence the microbiological evaluation of water for dialysis, the objective of the present study was the comparison of the efficiency of R2A and PCA media in the enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in 193 samples of water collected in dialysis clinics from 12 cities in São Paulo, between October and December 2007. Results showed counts significantly greater in R2A, suggesting that enumeration should be carried out in R2A, suggesting that enumeration should be carried out in R2A agar associated with longer incubation times, because of the greater sensitivity. PMID:24031456

  13. Evaluation of the Granada agar plate for detection of vaginal and rectal group B streptococci in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gil, E G; Rodríguez, M C; Bartolomé, R; Berjano, B; Cabero, L; Andreu, A

    1999-08-01

    Granada medium was evaluated for the detection of group B streptococci (GBS) in vaginal and rectal swabs compared with selective Columbia blood agar and selective Lim broth. From May 1996 to March 1998, 702 pregnant women (35 to 37 weeks of gestation) participated in this three-phase study; 103 (14.7%) of these women carried GBS. In the first phase of the experiment (n = 273 women), vaginorectal specimens were collected on the same swab; the sensitivities of Granada tube, selective Columbia blood agar, and Lim broth were 31.4, 94.3, and 74.3%, respectively. In the second and third phases (n = 429 women), vaginal and rectal specimens were collected separately; the sensitivities of Granada plate, selective Columbia blood agar, and Lim broth (subcultured at 4 h on selective Columbia agar in the second phase and at 18 to 24 h in Granada plate in the third phase) were 91.1, 83.9, and 75%, respectively, in the second phase and 88.5, 90.4, and 63.5%, respectively, in the third phase. There were no statistically significant differences in GBS recovery between the Granada agar plate and selective Columbia blood agar, but the Granada plate provided a clear advantage; the characteristic red-orange colonies produced overnight by GBS can be identified by the naked eye and is so specific that further identification is unnecessary. The use of the Granada tube and Lim broth did not result in increased isolation of GBS. In conclusion, the Granada agar plate is highly sensitive for detecting GBS in vaginal and rectal swabs from pregnant women and can provide results in 18 to 24 h.

  14. Evaluation of the Granada Agar Plate for Detection of Vaginal and Rectal Group B Streptococci in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Gil, E. García; Rodríguez, M. C.; Bartolomé, R.; Berjano, B.; Cabero, L.; Andreu, A.

    1999-01-01

    Granada medium was evaluated for the detection of group B streptococci (GBS) in vaginal and rectal swabs compared with selective Columbia blood agar and selective Lim broth. From May 1996 to March 1998, 702 pregnant women (35 to 37 weeks of gestation) participated in this three-phase study; 103 (14.7%) of these women carried GBS. In the first phase of the experiment (n = 273 women), vaginorectal specimens were collected on the same swab; the sensitivities of Granada tube, selective Columbia blood agar, and Lim broth were 31.4, 94.3, and 74.3%, respectively. In the second and third phases (n = 429 women), vaginal and rectal specimens were collected separately; the sensitivities of Granada plate, selective Columbia blood agar, and Lim broth (subcultured at 4 h on selective Columbia agar in the second phase and at 18 to 24 h in Granada plate in the third phase) were 91.1, 83.9, and 75%, respectively, in the second phase and 88.5, 90.4, and 63.5%, respectively, in the third phase. There were no statistically significant differences in GBS recovery between the Granada agar plate and selective Columbia blood agar, but the Granada plate provided a clear advantage; the characteristic red-orange colonies produced overnight by GBS can be identified by the naked eye and is so specific that further identification is unnecessary. The use of the Granada tube and Lim broth did not result in increased isolation of GBS. In conclusion, the Granada agar plate is highly sensitive for detecting GBS in vaginal and rectal swabs from pregnant women and can provide results in 18 to 24 h. PMID:10405415

  15. A simple plate-assay for screening extracellular naringinase produced by streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Caraveo, Leonela; Medina, Héctor; Rodríguez-Buenfil, Ingrid; Montalvo-Romero, Carlos; Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed

    2014-07-01

    A simple plate-assay was developed with the purpose of detecting extracellular naringinase in streptomycetes. The naringin agar medium (NAM) was prepared by mixing carbon utilization medium (ISP9) and naringin. The clearing zones around colonies are correlated with the enzymatic activity. The assay validation was performed through the use of commercial naringinase (Penicillium decumbens). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Trace Amounts of Furan-2-Carboxylic Acids Determine the Quality of Solid Agar Plates for Bacterial Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Shintaro; Isoda, Reika; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Background Many investigators have recognised that a significant proportion of environmental bacteria exist in a viable but non-culturable state on agar plates, and some researchers have also noticed that some of such bacteria clearly recover their growth on matrices other than agar. However, the reason why agar is unsuitable for the growth of some bacteria has not been addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings According to the guide of a bioassay for swarming inhibition, we identified 5-hydroxymethylfuran-2-carboxylic acid (5-HMFA) and furan-2-carboxylic acid (FA) as factors that inhibit bacterial swarming and likely inhibit extracellular polysaccharide production on agar. The furan-2-carboxylic acids 5-HMFA and FA effectively inhibited the swarming and swimming of several environmental bacteria at concentrations of 1.8 and 2.3 µg L−1 (13 and 21 nmol L−1), respectively, which are equivalent to the concentrations of these compounds in 0.3% agar. On Luria-Bertani (LB) plates containing 1.0% agar that had been previously washed with MeOH, a mixture of 5-HMFA and FA in amounts equivalent to their original concentrations in the unwashed agar repressed the swarming of Escherichia coli K12 strain W3110, a representative swarming bacterium. Conclusions/Significance Agar that contains trace amounts of 5-HMFA and FA inhibits the proliferation of some slow-growing or difficult-to-culture bacteria on the plates, but it is useful for single colony isolation due to the ease of identification of swarmable bacteria as the non-swarmed colonies. PMID:22848437

  17. Peptoid Library Agar Diffusion (PLAD) Assay for the High-Throughput Identification of Antimicrobial Peptoids.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kevin J; Turkett, Jeremy A; Corson, Ashley E; Bicker, Kevin L

    2016-06-13

    Rapid emergence of antimicrobial resistant organisms necessitates equally rapid methods for the development of new antimicrobial compounds. Of recent interest have been mimics of antimicrobial peptides known as antimicrobial peptoids, which exhibit similar potency to the former but with improved proteolytic stability. Presented herein is a high-throughput method to screen libraries of antimicrobial peptoids immobilized on beads embedded into solid media. Termed the peptoid library agar diffusion (PLAD) assay, this assay allows for individual chemical manipulation of two identical peptoid strands. One strand can be released to diffuse out from a solid support bead and interact with the microorganism during screening. The other strand can be cleaved after screening from beads showing strong antimicrobial activity and analyzed by mass spectrometry to deconvolute the structure of the peptoid. This method was applied to a small library of peptoids to identify an antimicrobial peptoid with modest efficacy against the ESKAPE pathogens.

  18. A simple agar plate preparation for effective transfer of Ureaplasma colonies onto nitrocellulose membranes for colony immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Stiedl, Thomas; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate

    2014-09-01

    A simple method for preparing agar plates is presented, which allows an efficient transfer of Ureaplasma colonies to nitrocellulose membranes for subsequent immunological detection. This simple and reproducible procedure was used to demonstrate antigenic variation in the phase-variable mba-locus of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Morphological Changes in Dendritic Crystal Growth of Ammonium Chloride on Agar Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Masae; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    1992-07-01

    Dendritic crystals of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) have been grown two-dimensionally on the surface of agar medium. Varying initial concentrations of agar and ammonium chloride in the agar medium, a rich variety of morphologies of dendrites, such as DLA-like structure and dense-branching morphology, were found to be observed. They were classified into five main types according to their pattern characteristics. We report the morphological phase diagram and typical patterns obtained in the present experiments.

  20. Development and validation of a microbiological agar assay for determination of cefuroxime sodium in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Cleber A; Agarrayua, Danielle A; Laporta, Luciane V; Machado, Jaison C; Manfio, Maria L; Bittencourt, Celso F

    2009-06-01

    Cefuroxime (CFU) is a semi-synthetic cephalosporin with a relatively broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and belongs to the second generation of cephalosporins. Regarding the quality control of medicines, a validated microbiological assay for determination of cefuroxime sodium in pharmaceutical formulations has not been reported yet. With this purpose, this paper reports the development and validation of a simple, sensitive, accurate and reproducible agar diffusion method to quantify CFU sodium in injectable formulations. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of CFU upon the strain of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P used as test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance and were found to be linear (r=0.9998) in the selected range of 8.0-32.0 microg/ml; precise [repeatability: relative standard deviation (RSD)=1.56%; intermediate precision: between-day RSD=1.27%; between analyst RSD=1.13%] and accurate (101.58%). The bioassay specificity was studied by evaluation of degraded sample at 50 degrees C with analysis at 0, 24 and 48 h in parallel with the pharmacopeial liquid chromatography method for CFU. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed bioassay, which allows reliable quantitation of CFU sodium in pharmaceutical samples and therefore can be used as a useful alternative methodology for the routine quality control of this medicine.

  1. Development and Validation of a Microbiological Agar Assay for Determination of Orbifloxacin in Pharmaceutical Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Cazedey, Edith C. L.; Salgado, Hérida R. N.

    2011-01-01

    Orbifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and belongs to the third generation of quinolones. Regarding the quality control of medicines, a validated microbiological assay for determination of orbifloxacin in pharmaceutical formulations has not as yet been reported. For this purpose, this paper reports the development and validation of a simple, sensitive, accurate and reproducible agar diffusion method to quantify orbifloxacin in tablet formulations. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of orbifloxacin upon the strain of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 used as test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance and were found to be linear (r = 0.9992) in the selected range of 16.0–64.0 μg/mL, precise with relative standard deviation (RSD) of repeatability intraday = 2.88%, intermediate precision RSD = 3.33%, and accurate (100.31%). The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed bioassay, which allows reliable orbifloxacin quantitation in pharmaceutical samples and therefore can be used as a useful alternative methodology for the routine quality control of this medicine. PMID:24310597

  2. Acanthamoeba can be differentiated by the polymerase chain reaction and simple plating assays.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Jarroll, E L; Paget, T A

    2001-09-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic pathogens with invasive and noninvasive species. For clinical purposes it is important to differentiate potentially pathogenic from nonpathogenic isolates. For the rapid and sensitive identification of Acanthamoeba at the genus level, we used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method which detected as few as five cells. Further, we tested nine isolates of Acanthamoeba for their ability to produce cytopathic effects (CPE) on corneal epithelial cells. On the basis of the results, Acanthamoeba were divided into pathogenic or nonpathogenic groups. However, because CPE assays are not available to every diagnostic laboratory, we developed a simple plating assay based on osmotolerance which correlated well with the CPE assays. Pathogenic Acanthamoeba showed growth on higher osmolarity (agar plates containing one molar mannitol), while growth of nonpathogens was inhibited on these plates. In conclusion, we have developed methods for the rapid identification and differentiation of Acanthamoeba.

  3. Solvent-tolerance of fungi located on an interface between an agar plate and an organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shinobu; Sugitani, Ayaka; Ohashi, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    While 6 by 20 of type culture fungi could grow on an interface between organic solvent (log P, 4.12) and agar plate, 13 by 20 of strains could form a large colony after the removal of more toxic solvent, such as styrene (log P, 2.95) and tert-butyl acetate (log P, 1.76) because of viability of spores on the interface.

  4. Wrinkly-Spreader fitness in the two-dimensional agar plate microcosm: maladaptation, compensation and ecological success.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Andrew J

    2007-08-15

    Bacterial adaptation to new environments often leads to the establishment of new genotypes with significantly altered phenotypes. In the Wrinkly Spreader (WS), ecological success in static liquid microcosms was through the rapid colonisation of the air-liquid interface by the production of a cellulose-based biofilm. Rapid surface spreading was also seen on agar plates, but in this two-dimensional environment the WS appears maladapted and rapidly reverts to the ancestral smooth (SM)-like colony genotype. In this work, the fitness of WS relative to SM in mixed colonies was found to be low, confirming the WS instability on agar plates. By examining defined WS mutants, the maladaptive characteristic was found to be the expression of cellulose. SM-like revertants had a higher growth rate than WS and no longer expressed significant amounts of cellulose, further confirming that the expression of this high-cost polymer was the basis of maladaptation and the target of compensatory mutation in developing colonies. However, examination of the fate of WS-founded populations in either multiple-colony or single mega-colony agar plate microcosms demonstrated that the loss of WS lineages could be reduced under conditions in which the rapid spreading colony phenotype could dominate nutrient and oxygen access more effectively than competing SM/SM-like genotypes. WS-like isolates recovered from such populations showed increased WS phenotype stability as well as changes in the degree of colony spreading, confirming that the WS was adapting to the two-dimensional agar plate microcosm.

  5. Wrinkly-Spreader Fitness in the Two-Dimensional Agar Plate Microcosm: Maladaptation, Compensation and Ecological Success

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation to new environments often leads to the establishment of new genotypes with significantly altered phenotypes. In the Wrinkly Spreader (WS), ecological success in static liquid microcosms was through the rapid colonisation of the air-liquid interface by the production of a cellulose-based biofilm. Rapid surface spreading was also seen on agar plates, but in this two-dimensional environment the WS appears maladapted and rapidly reverts to the ancestral smooth (SM)-like colony genotype. In this work, the fitness of WS relative to SM in mixed colonies was found to be low, confirming the WS instability on agar plates. By examining defined WS mutants, the maladaptive characteristic was found to be the expression of cellulose. SM-like revertants had a higher growth rate than WS and no longer expressed significant amounts of cellulose, further confirming that the expression of this high-cost polymer was the basis of maladaptation and the target of compensatory mutation in developing colonies. However, examination of the fate of WS-founded populations in either multiple-colony or single mega-colony agar plate microcosms demonstrated that the loss of WS lineages could be reduced under conditions in which the rapid spreading colony phenotype could dominate nutrient and oxygen access more effectively than competing SM/SM-like genotypes. WS-like isolates recovered from such populations showed increased WS phenotype stability as well as changes in the degree of colony spreading, confirming that the WS was adapting to the two-dimensional agar plate microcosm. PMID:17710140

  6. [Analysis of bactericidal material generated by electrical devices advertising bactericidal ability against bacteria on the agar gel plates].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hidekazu

    2012-11-01

    Several Japanese companies sell electrical devices advertised as effective in inactivating viruses and killing bacteria by releasing special materials, e.g., Plasmacluster ions, Nanoe particle and minus ions, into the air. These companies claim that their devices killed bacteria on plates in their own experiments. We tested device effectiveness using the same experiments from the Plasmacluster ioniser SHARP Co., Japan, the Nanoe generator Panasonic Co., Japan, and the Vion KING JIM Co., Japan, to test their advertising claims. Bactericidal ability on agar plate was tested, using Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, and Enterococcus faecalis as follows: the medium containing a certain amount of each bacterium was put onto an agar plate and smeared. Plates were kept in a closed chamber (inner volume 14.4 m3) or a glove box (inner volume 0.2 m), with one of the devices run for 2 hours. Plates not exposed to any device were used as controls. Each plate was retrieved and put in an incubator to count the number of bacterial colonies formed on the plate. There was no significant difference in the number of colonies on plates exposed to devices compared to control, in the number for all devices, or in all bacteria tested in experiments in the 14.4 m3 chamber. These results strongly suggest that these devices have almost no bactericidal effect, at least in space exceeding this volume. Colony formation was suppressed in the glove box in all devices and in all bacteria tested except P. aeruginosa, although the degree of suppression differed among experiments. The colony formation suppression mechanism was analyzed, and indicated that:colony formation did not change even after the removal of Plasmacluster ions, Nanoe particles, or negative ions from the air, while colony formation was decreased drastically by the removal of ozone from space, which was revealed to be generated inevitably during device operation. These results strongly suggest that the

  7. Broth and agar hop-gradient plates used to evaluate the beer-spoilage potential of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus isolates.

    PubMed

    Haakensen, M; Schubert, A; Ziola, B

    2009-03-15

    Identification of the beer-spoilage Lactobacillus and Pediococcus bacteria has largely taken two approaches; identification of spoilage-associated genes or identification of specific species of bacteria regardless of ability to grow in beer. The problem with these two approaches is that they are either overly inclusive (i.e., detect all bacteria of a given species regardless of spoilage potential) or overly selective (i.e., rely upon individual, putative spoilage-associated genes). Our goal was to design a method to assess the ability of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus to spoil beer that is independent of speciation or genetic background. In searching for a method by which to differentiate between beer-spoilage bacteria and bacteria that cannot grow in beer, we explored the ability of lactobacilli and pediococci isolates to grow in the presence of varying concentrations of hop-compounds and ethanol in broth medium versus on agar medium. The best method for differentiating between bacteria that can grow in beer and bacteria that do not pose a threat as beer-spoilage organisms was found to be a hop-gradient agar plate containing ethanol. This hop-gradient agar plate technique provides a rapid and simple solution to the dilemma of assessing the ability of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus isolates to grow in beer, and provides new insights into the different strategies used by these bacteria to survive under the stringent conditions of beer.

  8. Alternative to the soft-agar assay that permits high-throughput drug and genetic screens for cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Asaf; Janzer, Andreas; Izar, Benjamin; Ji, Zhe; Doench, John G.; Garraway, Levi A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation in soft agar is the gold-standard assay for cellular transformation in vitro, but it is unsuited for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe an assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the soft-agar assay. Using GILA, we describe high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. Such molecules are unlikely to be found through conventional drug screening, and they include kinase inhibitors and drugs for noncancer diseases. In addition to known oncogenes, the genetic screen identifies genes that contribute to cellular transformation. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of Food and Drug Administration-approved noncancer drugs to selectively kill ovarian cancer cells derived from patients with chemotherapy-resistant disease, suggesting this approach may provide useful information for personalized cancer treatment. PMID:25902495

  9. Evaluation of agar plates for direct enumeration of Campylobacter spp. from poultry carcass rinses.

    PubMed

    Oyarzabal, Omar A; Macklin, Kenneth S; Barbaree, James M; Miller, Robert S

    2005-06-01

    Campy-Cefex, a modification of Campy-Cefex, modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate (mCCDA), Karmali, CAMPY, and Campy-Line agars were evaluated for their efficiency to isolate and enumerate Campylobacter spp. from poultry carcass rinses. Campy-Cefex and its modification produced the best results but were statistically similar to CAMPY, mCCDA, and Karmali.

  10. Immobilization of urease from pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) on agar tablets and its application in urea assay.

    PubMed

    Mulagalapalli, Swati; Kumar, Sandeep; Kalathur, Ravi Charan Reddy; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2007-09-01

    The pigeonpea urease was immobilized on agar, a common gelling substance. The tablet strips were used as moulds to cast agar tablets of uniform shape and size. The time and temperature of solidification of agar was 6 min and 44 degrees C, respectively. The 5 % agar (w/v) and 0.019 mg protein/agar tablet yielded an optimum immobilization of 51.7%. The optimum pH was shifted through 0.2 U (from 7.3 to 7.5) towards basic side upon immobilization. The optimum temperature of soluble and immobilized urease was 30 degrees C and 60 degrees C, respectively, showing the improvement in thermal stability of urease. There was an increase in K m from 3.23 to 5.07 mM after immobilization. The half-lives of soluble and immobilized urease were 21 and 53 days, respectively, at pH 7.3 and 4 degrees C. The urea was estimated in different blood samples with the help of immobilized urease and the results were consistent with those from clinical pathology laboratory through an autoanalyzer (Zydus Co., Rome, Italy).

  11. Antagonism of lactic acid bacteria towards Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli on agar plates and in milk.

    PubMed

    Fang, W; Shi, M; Huang, L; Chen, J; Wang, Y

    1996-01-01

    The antagonistic effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB, including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. casei and Streptococcus thermophilus) on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was evaluated on MRS agar with the deferred and cross-streaking techniques, and in milk with the plate counting method. All LAB were repressive to S aureus and E coli on the agar medium. However, their suppressive activity was significantly reduced when the agar medium was buffered to pH 7.2. In normal milk, L acidophilus strains A and B, S thermophilus and its combinations with L acidophilus A and L bulgaricus 6032 were inhibitory to S aureus, while in mastitic milk, only S thermophilus and its combinations showed inhibition. L acidophilus A and L bulgaricus 34104 were repressive to E coli growth in normal milk. S thermophilus and its combinations were inhibitory to E coli in both the normal and mastitic milk samples. These results indicate that the antagonistic activity of LAB on pathogenic bacteria varied with the type of media in which the tests were done, and that testing of in vitro antagonism in milk would be more informative than that in artificial media for in vivo tests concerning the possible roles of competitive microbiological ecology in mastitis control.

  12. Development of a Colony Lift Immunoassay To Facilitate Rapid Detection and Quantification of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Agar Plates and Filter Monitor Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, David T.; Lamichhane, Chinta M.; Rollins, David M.; Carr, Lewis E.; Mallinson, Edward T.; Joseph, Sam W.

    1998-01-01

    E. coli O157:H7 is a food-borne adulterant that can cause hemorrhagic ulcerative colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Faced with an increasing risk of foods contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, food safety officials are seeking improved methods to detect and isolate E. coli O157:H7 in hazard analysis and critical control point systems in meat- and poultry-processing plants. A colony lift immunoassay was developed to facilitate the positive identification and quantification of E. coli O157:H7 by incorporating a simple colony lift enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with filter monitors and traditional culture methods. Polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes (Millipore, Bedford, Mass.) were prewet with methanol and were used to make replicates of every bacterial colony on agar plates or filter monitor membranes that were then reincubated for 15 to 18 h at 36 ± 1°C, during which the colonies not only remained viable but were reestablished. The membranes were dried, blocked with blocking buffer (Kirkegaard and Perry Laboratories [KPL], Gaithersburg, Md.), and exposed for 7 min to an affinity-purified horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-E. coli O157 antibody (KPL). The membranes were washed, exposed to a 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine membrane substrate (TMB; KPL) or aminoethyl carbazole (AEC; Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, Mo.), rinsed in deionized water, and air dried. Colonies of E. coli O157:H7 were identified by either a blue (via TMB) or a red (via AEC) color reaction. The colored spots on the PVDF lift membrane were then matched to their respective parent colonies on the agar plates or filter monitor membranes. The colony lift immunoassay was tested with a wide range of genera in the family Enterobacteriaceae as well as different serotypes within the E. coli genus. The colony lift immunoassay provided a simple, rapid, and accurate method for confirming the presence of E. coli O157:H7 colonies isolated on filter monitors or spread plates by traditional

  13. Development of a colony lift immunoassay to facilitate rapid detection and quantification of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from agar plates and filter monitor membranes.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D T; Lamichhane, C M; Rollins, D M; Carr, L E; Mallinson, E T; Joseph, S W

    1998-07-01

    E. coli O157:H7 is a food-borne adulterant that can cause hemorrhagic ulcerative colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Faced with an increasing risk of foods contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, food safety officials are seeking improved methods to detect and isolate E. coli O157:H7 in hazard analysis and critical control point systems in meat- and poultry-processing plants. A colony lift immunoassay was developed to facilitate the positive identification and quantification of E. coli O157:H7 by incorporating a simple colony lift enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with filter monitors and traditional culture methods. Polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes (Millipore, Bedford, Mass.) were prewet with methanol and were used to make replicates of every bacterial colony on agar plates or filter monitor membranes that were then reincubated for 15 to 18 h at 36 +/- 1 degree C, during which the colonies not only remained viable but were reestablished. The membranes were dried, blocked with blocking buffer (Kirkegaard and Perry Laboratories [KPL], Gaithersburg, Md.), and exposed for 7 min to an affinity-purified horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-E. coli O157 antibody (KPL). The membranes were washed, exposed to a 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine membrane substrate (TMB; KPL) or aminoethyl carbazole (AEC; Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, Mo.), rinsed in deionized water, and air dried. Colonies of E. coli O157:H7 were identified by either a blue (via TMB) or a red (via AEC) color reaction. The colored spots on the PVDF lift membrane were then matched to their respective parent colonies on the agar plates or filter monitor membranes. The colony lift immunoassay was tested with a wide range of genera in the family Enterobacteriaceae as well as different serotypes within the E. coli genus. The colony lift immunoassay provided a simple, rapid, and accurate method for confirming the presence of E. coli O157:H7 colonies isolated on filter monitors or spread plates by

  14. An interlaboratory study on efficient detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 in food using real-time PCR assay and chromogenic agar.

    PubMed

    Hara-Kudo, Yukiko; Konishi, Noriko; Ohtsuka, Kayoko; Iwabuchi, Kaori; Kikuchi, Rie; Isobe, Junko; Yamazaki, Takumiko; Suzuki, Fumie; Nagai, Yuhki; Yamada, Hiroko; Tanouchi, Atsuko; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Ueda, Yasufumi; Terajima, Jun

    2016-08-02

    To establish an efficient detection method for Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 in food, an interlaboratory study using all the serogroups of detection targets was firstly conducted. We employed a series of tests including enrichment, real-time PCR assays, and concentration by immunomagnetic separation, followed by plating onto selective agar media (IMS-plating methods). This study was particularly focused on the efficiencies of real-time PCR assays in detecting stx and O-antigen genes of the six serogroups and of IMS-plating methods onto selective agar media including chromogenic agar. Ground beef and radish sprouts samples were inoculated with the six STEC serogroups either at 4-6CFU/25g (low levels) or at 22-29CFU/25g (high levels). The sensitivity of stx detection in ground beef at both levels of inoculation with all six STEC serogroups was 100%. The sensitivity of stx detection was also 100% in radish sprouts at high levels of inoculation with all six STEC serogroups, and 66.7%-91.7% at low levels of inoculation. The sensitivity of detection of O-antigen genes was 100% in both ground beef and radish sprouts at high inoculation levels, while at low inoculation levels, it was 95.8%-100% in ground beef and 66.7%-91.7% in radish sprouts. The sensitivity of detection with IMS-plating was either the same or lower than those of the real-time PCR assays targeting stx and O-antigen genes. The relationship between the results of IMS-plating methods and Ct values of real-time PCR assays were firstly analyzed in detail. Ct values in most samples that tested negative in the IMS-plating method were higher than the maximum Ct values in samples that tested positive in the IMS-plating method. This study indicates that all six STEC serogroups in food contaminated with more than 29CFU/25g were detected by real-time PCR assays targeting stx and O-antigen genes and IMS-plating onto selective agar media. Therefore, screening

  15. Performance comparison of the BioSys optical assay and the violet red bile agar method for detecting coliforms in food products.

    PubMed

    Firstenberg-Eden, Ruth; Foti, Debra; McDougal, Susan; Beck, Stephen

    2004-12-01

    Coliform counts in a variety of foods, including dairy products (raw milk, pasteurized milk, yogurt, butter, and ice cream), meats (pork sausage, ground beef, and raw chicken), raw eggs, and chocolate, were performed by the rapid automated BioSys optical assay and the conventional method with violet red bile agar (VRBA). The standard deviation (SD) among five replicate counts for the optical assay was similar to or better than that obtained with VRBA plates for all foods tested. The average SD for all foods tested was 0.21 for the optical assay and 0.30 for the VRBA plates. At very low concentrations of coliforms (1 to 10 CFU/ml for liquid products and 10 to 100 CFU/g for solid samples), the average SDs were 0.26 and 0.47, respectively. The optical assay was less susceptible to interference by noncoliform organisms. In naturally contaminated samples, bacteria such as Serratia liquefaciens, Pantoea spp., Vibrio fluvialis, Aeromonas hydrophilia, and Pseudomonas spp. formed typical colonies in VRBA, resulting in false-positive results or a need to verify colonies in brilliant green lactose broth. The optical assay appeared to be more selective than the VRBA conventional method, detecting fewer noncoliforms. There was close agreement in test results between the two methods, as indicated by correlation coefficients of 0.92 to 0.99 obtained for the regression analysis of the two methods. In most cases both methods distinguished accurately between positive samples containing coliforms and negative controls. All products tested using the automated BioSys Optical Assay for coliforms yielded results more quickly (typically 10 to 12 h) than did those tested with the conventional VRBA method (24 to 72 h with confirmation).

  16. Rapid identification of Candida albicans by using Albicans ID and fluoroplate agar plates.

    PubMed Central

    Rousselle, P; Freydiere, A M; Couillerot, P J; de Montclos, H; Gille, Y

    1994-01-01

    Two commercially available agar media, Albicans ID and Fluoroplate, that use a chromogenic or a fluorogenic substrate for the detection and identification of Candida albicans were evaluated. From 1,006 clinical samples containing 723 yeast strains, 352 C. albicans strains were detected with either of the two media. The sensitivity of each of the two media was 93.8% and the specificity was 98.6%, with five false-positive reactions for Candida tropicalis and no false-negative reactions. PMID:7883894

  17. Development of microtitre plates for electrokinetic assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, J. P. H.; Goater, A. D.; Menachery, A.; Pethig, R.; Rizvi, N. H.

    2007-02-01

    Electrokinetic processes have wide ranging applications in microsystems technology. Their optimum performance at micro and nano dimensions allows their use both as characterization and diagnostic tools and as a means of general particle manipulation. Within analytical studies, measurement of the electrokinesis of biological cells has the sensitivity and selectivity to distinguish subtle differences between cell types and cells undergoing changes and is gaining acceptance as a diagnostic tool in high throughput screening for drug discovery applications. In this work the development and manufacture of an electrokinetic-based microtitre plate is described. The plate is intended to be compatible with automated sample loading and handling systems. Manufacturing of the microtitre plate, which employs indium tin oxide microelectrodes, has been entirely undertaken using excimer and ultra-fast pulsed laser micromachining due to its flexibility in materials processing and accuracy in microstructuring. Laser micromachining has the ability to rapidly realize iterations in device prototype design while also having the capability to be scaled up for large scale manufacture. Device verification is achieved by the measurement of the electrorotation and dielectrophoretic properties of yeast cells while the flexibility of the developed microtitre plate is demonstrated by the selective separation of live yeast from polystyrene microbeads.

  18. The agar diffusion scratch assay - A novel method to assess the bioactive and cytotoxic potential of new materials and compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pusnik, Mascha; Imeri, Minire; Deppierraz, Grégoire; Bruinink, Arie; Zinn, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    A profound in vitro evaluation not only of the cytotoxic but also of bioactive potential of a given compound or material is crucial for predicting potential effects in the in vivo situation. However, most of the current methods have weaknesses in either the quantitative or qualitative assessment of cytotoxicity and/or bioactivity of the test compound. Here we describe a novel assay combining the ISO 10993-5 agar diffusion test and the scratch also termed wound healing assay. In contrast to these original tests this assay is able to detect and distinguish between cytotoxic, cell migration modifying and cytotoxic plus cell migration modifying compounds, and this at higher sensitivity and in a quantitative way. PMID:26861591

  19. A rapid and easy method for the detection of microbial cellulases on agar plates using gram's iodine.

    PubMed

    Kasana, Ramesh Chand; Salwan, Richa; Dhar, Hena; Dutt, Som; Gulati, Arvind

    2008-11-01

    Screening for cellulase-producing microorganisms is routinely done on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) plates. The culture plates are flooded either with 1% hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide or with 0.1% Congo red followed by 1 M NaCl. In both cases, it takes a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes to obtain the zone of hydrolysis after flooding, and the hydrolyzed area is not sharply discernible. An improved method is reported herein for the detection of extracellular cellulase production by microorganisms by way of plate assay. In this method, CMC plates were flooded with Gram's iodine instead of the reagents just mentioned. Gram's iodine formed a bluish-black complex with cellulose but not with hydrolyzed cellulose, giving a sharp and distinct zone around the cellulase-producing microbial colonies within 3 to 5 minutes. The new method is rapid and efficient; therefore, it can be easily performed for screening large numbers of microbial cultures of both bacteria and fungi. This is the first report on the use of Gram's iodine for the detection of cellulase production by microorganisms using plate assay.

  20. Soft agar colony formation assay for in vitro testing of sensitivity to chemotherapy of gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Williams, T J; Lieber, M M; Podratz, K C; Malkasian, G D

    1983-04-15

    In vitro growth of tumor cells may provide a way of testing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer. In 1980 and 1981, operations for gynecologic malignancy were performed on 610 Mayo Clinic patients, and malignant tissue and fluids were obtained from 204 cancers that involved the vulva, uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. These yielded 76 clonogenic stem-cell preparations; and various chemotherapeutic agents were tested against these 76 tumors on soft agar. Considered in this study were the overall process of culturing the samples of tumors and, especially, the data from the preparations that showed sufficient growth of tumor cells for testing. Our guiding concerns were the usefulness of this method to gynecologists and the possible benefits to patients.

  1. Visualization of the Charcoal Agar Resazurin Assay for Semi-quantitative, Medium-throughput Enumeration of Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Lopez Quezada, Landys; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to discover and progress anti-infectives that shorten the duration of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of TB, is refractory to rapid and lasting chemotherapy due to the presence of bacilli exhibiting phenotypic drug resistance. The charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) was developed as a tool to characterize active molecules discovered by high-throughput screening campaigns against replicating and non-replicating M. tuberculosis. Inclusion of activated charcoal in bacteriologic agar medium helps mitigate the impact of compound carry-over, and eliminates the requirement to pre-dilute cells prior to spotting on CARA microplates. After a 7-10 day incubation period at 37 °C, the reduction of resazurin by mycobacterial microcolonies growing on the surface of CARA microplate wells permits semi-quantitative assessment of bacterial numbers via fluorometry. The CARA detects approximately a 2-3 log10 difference in bacterial numbers and predicts a minimal bactericidal concentration leading to ≥99% bacterial kill (MBC≥99). The CARA helps determine whether a molecule is active on bacilli that are replicating, non-replicating, or both. Pilot experiments using the CARA facilitate the identification of which concentration of test agent and time of compound exposure require further evaluation by colony forming unit (CFU) assays. In addition, the CARA can predict if replicating actives are bactericidal or bacteriostatic. PMID:28060290

  2. Visualization of the Charcoal Agar Resazurin Assay for Semi-quantitative, Medium-throughput Enumeration of Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ben; Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Lopez Quezada, Landys; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Nathan, Carl

    2016-12-14

    There is an urgent need to discover and progress anti-infectives that shorten the duration of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of TB, is refractory to rapid and lasting chemotherapy due to the presence of bacilli exhibiting phenotypic drug resistance. The charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) was developed as a tool to characterize active molecules discovered by high-throughput screening campaigns against replicating and non-replicating M. tuberculosis. Inclusion of activated charcoal in bacteriologic agar medium helps mitigate the impact of compound carry-over, and eliminates the requirement to pre-dilute cells prior to spotting on CARA microplates. After a 7-10 day incubation period at 37 °C, the reduction of resazurin by mycobacterial microcolonies growing on the surface of CARA microplate wells permits semi-quantitative assessment of bacterial numbers via fluorometry. The CARA detects approximately a 2-3 log10 difference in bacterial numbers and predicts a minimal bactericidal concentration leading to ≥99% bacterial kill (MBC≥99). The CARA helps determine whether a molecule is active on bacilli that are replicating, non-replicating, or both. Pilot experiments using the CARA facilitate the identification of which concentration of test agent and time of compound exposure require further evaluation by colony forming unit (CFU) assays. In addition, the CARA can predict if replicating actives are bactericidal or bacteriostatic.

  3. Comparison of agar-based methods for the isolation and enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria with the new multidose IDEXX SimPlate method.

    PubMed

    Vulindlu, M; Charlett, A; Surman, S; Lee, J V

    2004-01-01

    Pour and spread plates are the conventional methods of choice for the isolation and enumeration of heterotrophic microorganisms in treated water supplies. The tests are performed at 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C for 72 h and 48 h respectively. Counts at 22 degrees C are associated with pollution of water systems from external sources, while counts at 37 degrees C are used as an indication of treatment plant performance and the deterioration of the general quality of water. Conventional methods using Yeast Extract Agar for a pour plate and R2A agar for a spread plate were compared with the multidose IDEXX SimPlate method for the isolation and enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in water. SimPlate gave a significantly higher count on average than the conventional methods. The R2A method showed the next highest count, being significantly higher than Yeast Extract Agar. In addition, unlike the pour and spread plate methods, SimPlate was easier to use, reduced labour, and the test results were far easier to read.

  4. Evaluation of heterotrophic plate and chromogenic agar colony counting in water quality laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Hallas, Gary; Monis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The enumeration of bacteria using plate-based counts is a core technique used by food and water microbiology testing laboratories. However, manual counting of bacterial colonies is both time and labour intensive, can vary between operators and also requires manual entry of results into laboratory information management systems, which can be a source of data entry error. An alternative is to use automated digital colony counters, but there is a lack of peer-reviewed validation data to allow incorporation into standards. We compared the performance of digital counting technology (ProtoCOL3) against manual counting using criteria defined in internationally recognized standard methods. Digital colony counting provided a robust, standardized system suitable for adoption in a commercial testing environment. The digital technology has several advantages:•Improved measurement of uncertainty by using a standard and consistent counting methodology with less operator error.•Efficiency for labour and time (reduced cost).•Elimination of manual entry of data onto LIMS.•Faster result reporting to customers. PMID:26649275

  5. Evaluation of heterotrophic plate and chromogenic agar colony counting in water quality laboratories.

    PubMed

    Hallas, Gary; Monis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The enumeration of bacteria using plate-based counts is a core technique used by food and water microbiology testing laboratories. However, manual counting of bacterial colonies is both time and labour intensive, can vary between operators and also requires manual entry of results into laboratory information management systems, which can be a source of data entry error. An alternative is to use automated digital colony counters, but there is a lack of peer-reviewed validation data to allow incorporation into standards. We compared the performance of digital counting technology (ProtoCOL3) against manual counting using criteria defined in internationally recognized standard methods. Digital colony counting provided a robust, standardized system suitable for adoption in a commercial testing environment. The digital technology has several advantages:•Improved measurement of uncertainty by using a standard and consistent counting methodology with less operator error.•Efficiency for labour and time (reduced cost).•Elimination of manual entry of data onto LIMS.•Faster result reporting to customers.

  6. A rapid, sensitive, simple plate assay for detection of microbial alginate lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Shailesh S; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Kim, Beom Soo

    2015-09-01

    Screening of microorganisms capable of producing alginate lyase enzyme is commonly carried out by investigating their abilities to grow on alginate-containing solid media plates and occurrence of a clearance zone after flooding the plates with agents such as 10% (w/v) cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), which can form complexes with alginate. Although the CPC method is good, advantageous, and routinely used, the agar in the media interferes with the action of CPC, which makes judgment about clearance zones very difficult. In addition, this method takes a minimum of 30 min to obtain the zone of hydrolysis after flooding and the hydrolyzed area is not sharply discernible. An improved plate assay is reported herein for the detection of extracellular alginate lyase production by microorganisms. In this method, alginate-containing agar plates are flooded with Gram's iodine instead of CPC. Gram's iodine forms a bluish black complex with alginate but not with hydrolyzed alginate, giving sharp, distinct zones around the alginate lyase producing microbial colonies within 2-3 min. Gram's iodine method was found to be more effective than the CPC method in terms of visualization and measurement of zone size. The alginate-lyase-activity area indicated using the Gram's iodine method was found to be larger than that indicated by the CPC method. Both methods (CPC and Gram's iodine) showed the largest alginate lyase activity area for Saccharophagus degradans (ATCC 43961) followed by Microbulbifer mangrovi (KCTC 23483), Bacillus cereus (KF801505) and Paracoccus sp. LL1 (KP288668) grown on minimal sea salt medium. The rate of growth and metabolite production in alginate-containing minimal sea salt liquid medium, followed trends similar to that of the zone activity areas for the four bacteria under study. These results suggested that the assay developed in this study of Gram's iodine could be useful to predict the potential of microorganisms to produce alginate lyase. The method also

  7. A fluorescent plate reader assay for ceramide kinase.

    PubMed

    Don, Anthony S; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-04-15

    Ceramide kinase and its product ceramide 1-phosphate have been implicated in cellular proliferation and survival, activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), mast cell degranulation, and phagocytosis. Current assays for ceramide kinase activity employ [(32)P]ATP, with separation of labeled product from excess ATP by organic extraction and thin-layer chromatography. We have developed a fluorescent plate reader assay for ceramide kinase that uses commercially available C6-NBD ceramide (N-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]hexanoyl}-D-erythro-sphingosine). Our assay is based on the differential partitioning of substrate and product following a single chloroform/methanol extraction. The product, which partitions into the aqueous phase at physiological pH, is quantitated directly in a plate reader. The substrate may be delivered using either fatty acid-free albumin or detergent/lipid mixed micelles, and we have found that the use of albumin rather than detergent micelles allows one to detect lipid interactions with the enzyme that might otherwise go unnoticed. Our method is useful for assaying ceramide kinase activity both in vitro and in cultured cells, and it offers several advantages over the conventional assay, including greater speed, the ability to run a larger number of assay replicates at one time, and the elimination of environmental and safety issues associated with the use of radioactive materials.

  8. Development and Validation of a Successful Microbiological Agar Assay for Determination of Ceftriaxone Sodium in Powder for Injectable Solution

    PubMed Central

    Aléssio, Patrícia V.; Salgado, Hérida R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Ceftriaxone sodium is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and belongs to the third generation of cephalosporins. Regarding the quality control of medicines, a validated microbiological assay for the determination of ceftriaxone sodium in powder for injectable solution has not been reported yet. This paper reports the development and validation of a simple, accurate and reproducible agar diffusion method to quantify ceftriaxone sodium in powder for injectable solution. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of ceftriaxone sodium on the strain of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 9371 IAL 1027 used as test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance and were found to be linear (r = 0.999) in the selected range of 15.0–60.0 μg/mL, precise with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of repeatability intraday = 1.40%, accurate (100.46%) and robust with a RSD lower than 1.28%. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed bioassay, which allows reliable ceftriaxone sodium quantitation in pharmaceutical samples and therefore can be used as a useful alternative methodology for the routine quality control of this medicine. PMID:24300294

  9. [Evaluation of the API ZYM system and RPMI agar plates supplemented with Tween 40 for detection of lipolytic enzymes of Candida spp].

    PubMed

    Ciok-Pater, Emilia; Wróblewska, Joanna; Białucha, Agata; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Lipolytic activity of 40 strains of Candida spp. was tested on API ZYM system and on RPMI agar plates supplemented with 1% Tween 40. Lipolytic activity was indicated by opaque zones around the inoculum cylindrical holes were punched in the medium. Clearing of the medium around the bacterial colonies indicated that an isolate produce lipase. Only 4 (21.1%) strains of C. albicans, and 3 (14.1%) strains of non-C. albicans which hydrolyzed 2-naftylomirystylan by use of the API ZYM system was observed. In contrast, 16 (78.9%) strains of C. albicans and 17 (80.7%) strains of non-C. albicans produced lipases on the agar plate using RPMI agar plates supplemented with 1.0% Tween 40. Determination oflipase activities with the API ZYM system were in no agreement with lipase tests in RPMI supplemented with Tween 40. Our study verify greater usefulness of RPMI supplemented with Tween 40 for detection of lipolytic enzymes of Candida species in comparison to the API ZYM.

  10. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  11. Bluetongue in Bosnia: comparisons of competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and standard agar gel immunodiffusion tests.

    PubMed

    Velić, L; Velić, R; Bajrović, T; Dukić, B; Camo, D

    2004-01-01

    At the end of August 2002, clinical symptoms of bluetongue (BT) (fever between 39 degrees C and 41 degrees C, muco-purulent or bloody nasal discharge, oedema of the lips and the intramandibular space, foot lesions including laminitis and coronitis in some cases, diarrhoea and dysentery) were recorded in Pramenka sheep flocks in north-east Bosnia in August 2002. A total of 9 599 serum samples (ovine: 8 967; bovine: 632) from 40 communities of Bosnia and Herzegovina were tested for the presence of anti-bluetongue virus (BTV) antibodies using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) and the standard agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. The c-ELISA revealed BTV-seropositive reactions in 187 (1.94%) samples and the AGID test detected 141 (1.53%) cases. Complete agreement was recorded between the c-ELISA and AGID test results for bovine sera. These results indicate that the ability of c-ELISA to detect anti-bluetongue virus antibodies in ovine sera was superior to that of the AGID. All positive sera were collected from animals in the river areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  12. Comparison of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and agar gel immunodiffusion tests for the serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to estimate the performance characteristics (accuracy, detection limit, and precision) of commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) kits in comparison with a reference AGID kit for the detection of equine infectious anemia (EIA) antibodies in horses for regulatory use in Canada. A total of 285 positive and 315 negative samples by the reference AGID were tested blindly on 2 other AGID and 4 ELISA kits. Commercially available AGID kits for the serodiagnosis of EIA were found equivalent. The 3 ELISAs directed against antibodies to the p26 core protein also performed relatively well in comparison with the reference AGID, with excellent relative accuracy and acceptable precision. The single ELISA directed against antibodies to the gp45 trans-membrane viral protein yielded a lower relative sensitivity. The performance characteristics of the ELISAs directed against antibodies to p26 are, therefore, adequate to support the implementation of ELISA for regulatory purposes in Canada. PMID:15581219

  13. Comparison of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and agar gel immunodiffusion tests for the serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Paré, Julie; Simard, Carole

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the performance characteristics (accuracy, detection limit, and precision) of commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) kits in comparison with a reference AGID kit for the detection of equine infectious anemia (EIA) antibodies in horses for regulatory use in Canada. A total of 285 positive and 315 negative samples by the reference AGID were tested blindly on 2 other AGID and 4 ELISA kits. Commercially available AGID kits for the serodiagnosis of EIA were found equivalent. The 3 ELISAs directed against antibodies to the p26 core protein also performed relatively well in comparison with the reference AGID, with excellent relative accuracy and acceptable precision. The single ELISA directed against antibodies to the gp45 trans-membrane viral protein yielded a lower relative sensitivity. The performance characteristics of the ELISAs directed against antibodies to p26 are, therefore, adequate to support the implementation of ELISA for regulatory purposes in Canada.

  14. Antiserum-agar plate method for simultaneous detection and direct isolation of Legionella species in clinical and environmental specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, W A; Hedlund, K W

    1982-01-01

    Colonies of Legionella pneumophila serotypes 1 through 6, L. micdadei, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, and L. gormanii, which were developed on filtered yeast extract agar containing polyvalent antiserum, were surrounded by distinct, specific precipitin rings. Images PMID:7050153

  15. VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) assay method EasySLM with ChromID Salmonella (SM2) Agar. Performance Tested Method 020901.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John; Colón-Reveles, Judith

    2009-01-01

    A method modification study was conducted for the VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) assay (AOAC Performance Tested Method 020901) using the EasySLM method to validate a matrix extension for peanut butter. The VIDAS EasySLM method is a simple enrichment procedure compared to traditional Salmonella methods, requiring only pre-enrichment and a single selective enrichment media, Salmonella Xpress 2 (SX2) broth. SX2 replaces the two selective broths in traditional methods and eliminates the M broth transfer, incubation, and subsequent pooling of M broths prior to VIDAS assay. The validation study was conducted under the AOAC Research Institute Emergency Response Validation program. VIDAS SLM was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) method for detection of S. enterica ser. Typhimurium in peanut butter. All peanut butter samples were prepared, blind-coded, and shipped to the method developers' laboratory by Q Laboratories. In addition, Q Laboratories performed most probable number and reference method analyses on peanut butter samples. The VIDAS EasySLM ChromID Salmonella (SM2) Agar was previously validated in the Performance Tested Methods program for the detection of Salmonella in roast beef, raw ground pork, turkey, pork sausage, raw chicken breast, dry pet food, whole milk, ice cream, bagged spinach, shrimp (raw, peeled), raw cod, spent irrigation water, pecans, peanut butter, dry pasta, cake mix, ground black pepper, nonfat dry milk, liquid eggs, cantaloupe, and orange juice. In the matrix extension study for peanut butter, the VIDAS EasySLM method was shown to be equivalent to the appropriate reference culture procedure using both buffered peptone water pre-enrichment and the FDA-BAM lactose pre-enrichment in the two-step enrichment method with SX2 media. The current study extends the validation to include peanut butter.

  16. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detection: Comparison of Two Molecular Methods (IDI-MRSA PCR Assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR Assay) with Three Selective MRSA Agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA) for Use with Infection-Control Swabs▿

    PubMed Central

    van Hal, S. J.; Stark, D.; Lockwood, B.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasing problem. Rapid detection of MRSA-colonized patients has the potential to limit spread of the organism. We evaluated the sensitivities and specificities of MRSA detection by two molecular methods (IDI-MRSA PCR assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR assay) and three selective MRSA agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA), using 205 (101 nasal, 52 groin, and 52 axillary samples) samples from consecutive known MRSA-infected and/or -colonized patients. All detection methods had higher MRSA detection rates for nasal swabs than for axillary and groin swabs. Detection of MRSA by IDI-MRSA was the most sensitive method, independent of the site (94% for nasal samples, 80% for nonnasal samples, and 90% overall). The sensitivities of the GenoType MRSA Direct assay and the MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA agars with nasal swabs were 70%, 72%, 68%, and 75%, respectively. All detection methods had high specificities (95 to 99%), independent of the swab site. Extended incubation for a further 24 h with selective MRSA agars increased the detection of MRSA, with a corresponding decline in specificity secondary to a significant increase in false-positive results. There was a noticeable difference in test performance of the GenoType MRSA Direct assay in detection of MRSA (28/38 samples [74%]) compared with detection of nonmultiresistant MRSA (17/31 samples [55%]) (susceptible to two or more non-β-lactam antibiotics). This was not observed with selective MRSA agar plates or IDI-MRSA. Although it is more expensive, in addition to rapid turnaround times of 2 to 4 h, IDI-MRSA offers greater detection of MRSA colonization, independent of the swab site, than do conventional selective agars and GenoType MRSA Direct. PMID:17537949

  17. New lipase assay using Pomegranate oil coating in microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Ülker, Serdar; Placidi, Camille; Point, Vanessa; Gadenne, Benoît; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Lipases play various roles in fat digestion, lipoprotein metabolism, and in the mobilization of fat stored in lipid bodies in animals, plants and microorganisms. In association with these physiological functions, there is an important field of research for discovering lipase inhibitors and developing new treatments of diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes and tuberculosis. In this context, the development of convenient, specific and sensitive analytical methods for the detection and assay of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors is of major importance. It is shown here that purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Punica granatum (Pomegranate) seed oil coated on microtiter plates can be used for the continuous assay of lipase activity by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra at 275 nm. UV absorption is due the release of punicic acid (9Z,11E,13Z-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), a conjugated triene contained in Pomegranate oil. This new microtiter plate assay allows to accurately measure the activity of a wider range of lipases compared to the similar assay previously developed with Tung oil containing α-eleostearic acid (9Z,11E,13E-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), including the LipY lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although punicic acid is a diastereoisomer of α-eleostearic acid, the Δ(13)cis double bound found in punicic acid gives a different structure to the acyl chain that probably favours the interaction of Pomegranate TAGs with the lipase active site. The microplate lipase assay using Pomegranate TAGs shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and remarkable relevance for the high-speed screening of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors directly from raw culture media without any purification step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the ANSR for Salmonella assay for identification of Salmonella spp. from colony picks from selective/differential agar media: first action 2013.14.

    PubMed

    Mozola, Mark; Botimer, Maximilian; Jagadics, Carolyn; Norton, Paul; Caballero, Oscar; Enslin, Nicole; Biswas, Preetha; Rice, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to evaluate performance of the ANSR for Salmonella assay for identification of Salmonella spp. from colony picks taken from selective/differential agar media. The ANSR Salmonella assay is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification test based on the nicking enzyme amplification reaction chemistry. The test can be completed in less than 40 min including sample preparation. A total of 18 laboratories representing industry, government, academic, and commercial testing laboratories participated in the study. Each collaborator tested up to 84 samples, comprised of colony picks of six Salmonella spp. and six non-salmonellae taken from six selective/differential agar media as well as tryptic soy agar. A total of 1441 analyses were performed, 1416 of which gave the correct identification, for overall accuracy of 98.3%. For identification of Salmonella spp., 755 of 756 tests (99.9%) produced the correct result. For identification of non-salmonellae as such, 661 of 685 assays (96.5%) produced the correct result. Of the 18 laboratories, 15 produced data sets with 99-100% accuracy. The majority of false-positive results were clustered in three laboratories; analysis of raw data suggests procedural difficulties in at least two cases, which may explain the atypical data from these collaborators. The ANSR Salmonella assay can be used as a rapid, accurate adjunct or alternative to biochemical testing for identification of presumptive Salmonella spp. isolates.

  19. Light-scattering sensor for real-time identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae colonies on solid agar plate.

    PubMed

    Huff, Karleigh; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Littlejohn, Amy E Fleishman; Rajwa, Bartek; Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P; Patsekin, Valery; Hirleman, E Daniel; Robinson, J Paul; Richards, Gary P; Bhunia, Arun K

    2012-09-01

    The three most common pathogenic species of Vibrio, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, are of major concerns due to increased incidence of water- and seafood-related outbreaks and illness worldwide. Current methods are lengthy and require biochemical and molecular confirmation. A novel label-free forward light-scattering sensor was developed to detect and identify colonies of these three pathogens in real time in the presence of other vibrios in food or water samples. Vibrio colonies grown on agar plates were illuminated by a 635 nm laser beam and scatter-image signatures were acquired using a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera in an automated BARDOT (BActerial Rapid Detection using Optical light-scattering Technology) system. Although a limited number of Vibrio species was tested, each produced a unique light-scattering signature that is consistent from colony to colony. Subsequently a pattern recognition system analysing the collected light-scatter information provided classification in 1-2 min with an accuracy of 99%. The light-scattering signatures were unaffected by subjecting the bacteria to physiological stressors: osmotic imbalance, acid, heat and recovery from a viable but non-culturable state. Furthermore, employing a standard sample enrichment in alkaline peptone water for 6 h followed by plating on selective thiosulphate citrate bile salts sucrose agar at 30°C for ∼ 12 h, the light-scattering sensor successfully detected V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus present in oyster or water samples in 18 h even in the presence of other vibrios or other bacteria, indicating the suitability of the sensor as a powerful screening tool for pathogens on agar plates. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Light‐scattering sensor for real‐time identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae colonies on solid agar plate

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Karleigh; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Littlejohn, Amy E. Fleishman; Rajwa, Bartek; Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Patsekin, Valery; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Robinson, J. Paul; Richards, Gary P.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The three most common pathogenic species of Vibrio, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, are of major concerns due to increased incidence of water‐ and seafood‐related outbreaks and illness worldwide. Current methods are lengthy and require biochemical and molecular confirmation. A novel label‐free forward light‐scattering sensor was developed to detect and identify colonies of these three pathogens in real time in the presence of other vibrios in food or water samples. Vibrio colonies grown on agar plates were illuminated by a 635 nm laser beam and scatter‐image signatures were acquired using a CCD (charge‐coupled device) camera in an automated BARDOT (BActerial Rapid Detection using Optical light‐scattering Technology) system. Although a limited number of Vibrio species was tested, each produced a unique light‐scattering signature that is consistent from colony to colony. Subsequently a pattern recognition system analysing the collected light‐scatter information provided classification in 1−2 min with an accuracy of 99%. The light‐scattering signatures were unaffected by subjecting the bacteria to physiological stressors: osmotic imbalance, acid, heat and recovery from a viable but non‐culturable state. Furthermore, employing a standard sample enrichment in alkaline peptone water for 6 h followed by plating on selective thiosulphate citrate bile salts sucrose agar at 30°C for ∼ 12 h, the light‐scattering sensor successfully detected V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus present in oyster or water samples in 18 h even in the presence of other vibrios or other bacteria, indicating the suitability of the sensor as a powerful screening tool for pathogens on agar plates. PMID:22613192

  1. Abilities of the mCP Agar method and CRENAME alpha toxin-specific real-time PCR assay to detect Clostridium perfringens spores in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bérubé, Eve; Boudreau, Dominique K; Villéger, Romain; Cantin, Philippe; Boissinot, Maurice; Bissonnette, Luc; Bergeron, Michel G

    2013-12-01

    We first determined the analytical specificity and ubiquity (i.e., the ability to detect all or most strains) of a Clostridium perfringens-specific real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay based on the cpa gene (cpa rtPCR) by using a bacterial strain panel composed of C. perfringens and non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains. All non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains tested negative, whereas all C. perfringens strains tested positive with the cpa rtPCR, for an analytical specificity and ubiquity of 100%. The cpa rtPCR assay was then used to confirm the identity of 116 putative C. perfringens isolates recovered after filtration of water samples and culture on mCP agar. Colonies presenting discordant results between the phenotype on mCP agar and cpa rtPCR were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and cpa genes. Four mCP(-)/rtPCR(+) colonies were identified as C. perfringens, whereas 3 mCP(+)/rtPCR(-) colonies were identified as non-C. perfringens. The cpa rtPCR was negative with all 51 non-C. perfringens strains and positive with 64 of 65 C. perfringens strains. Finally, we compared mCP agar and a CRENAME (concentration and recovery of microbial particles, extraction of nucleic acids, and molecular enrichment) procedure plus cpa rtPCR (CRENAME + cpa rtPCR) for their abilities to detect C. perfringens spores in drinking water. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR detected as few as one C. perfringens CFU per 100 ml of drinking water sample in less than 5 h, whereas mCP agar took at least 25 h to deliver results. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR also allows the simultaneous and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli and C. perfringens from the same potable water sample. In itself, it could be used to assess the public health risk posed by drinking water potentially contaminated with pathogens more resistant to disinfection.

  2. Clinical comparison of isolator, Septi-Chek, nonvented tryptic soy broth, and direct agar plating combined with thioglycolate broth for diagnosing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, J E; Cockerill, F R; Kaese, D; Vetter, E A; Wollan, P C; Rakela, J; Wilhelm, M P

    1996-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a life-threatening complication of cirrhotic ascites. Optimal patient management depends on the isolation of the causal organism from ascitic fluid. To evaluate culture techniques for the diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, we prospectively compared three blood culture system, the Isolator system, a lysis-centrifugation system, the Septi-Chek system, a biphasic culture system, and a nonvented tryptic soy broth system, all inoculated at the bedside, and our standard method of direct inoculation of specimens after transport to the laboratory onto agar plates and into thioglycolate broth. The results showed that the Septi-Chek and nonvented tryptic soy broth systems each recovered statistically significantly more pathogens than either the Isolator system (P = 0.0084) or the standard method (P = 0.00098). The Isolator system recovered more pathogens than the standard plate method, but this difference was not statistically significant. Both the Isolator system and the standard plate method recovered more contaminating microorganisms than the Septi-Chek or nonvented tryptic soy broth system. The Isolator system required the most processing time compared with the processing times required by any other method. PMID:8748267

  3. Identification of Brucella by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. Fast and Reliable Identification from Agar Plates and Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Laura; Vega Castaño, Silvia; Sánchez-Juanes, Fernando; González-Cabrero, Sandra; Menegotto, Fabiola; Orduña-Domingo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) is a reliable method for bacteria identification. Some databases used for this purpose lack reference profiles for Brucella species, which is still an important pathogen in wide areas around the world. We report the creation of profiles for MALDI-TOF Biotyper 2.0 database (Bruker Daltonics, Germany) and their usefulness for identifying brucellae from culture plates and blood cultures. Methodology/Principal Findings We created MALDI Biotyper 2.0 profiles for type strains belonging to B. melitensis biotypes 1, 2 and 3; B. abortus biotypes 1, 2, 5 and 9; B. suis, B. canis, B ceti and B. pinnipedialis. Then, 131 clinical isolates grown on plate cultures were used in triplicate to check identification. Identification at genus level was always correct, although in most cases the three replicates reported different identification at species level. Simulated blood cultures were performed with type strains belonging to the main human pathogenic species (B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis and B. canis), and studied by MALDI-TOF MS in triplicate. Identification at genus level was always correct. Conclusions/Significance MALDI-TOF MS is reliable for Brucella identification to the genus level from culture plates and directly from blood culture bottles. PMID:21151913

  4. Multiplexed chemiluminescent assays in ArrayPlates for high-throughput measurement of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Ralph R.; Rounseville, Matthew P.; Botros, Ihab W.; Seligmann, Bruce E.

    2002-06-01

    Multiplexed Molecular Profiling (MMP) assays for drug discovery are performed in ArrayPlates. ArrayPlates are 96- well microtiter plates that contain a 16-element array at the bottom of each well. Each element within an array measures one analyte in a sample. A CCD imager records the quantitative chemiluminescent readout of all 1,536 elements in a 96-well plate simultaneously. Since array elements are reagent modifiable by the end-user, ArrayPlates can be adapted to a broad range of nucleic acid- and protein-based assays. Such multiplexed assays are rapidly established, flexible, robust, automation-friendly and cost-effective. Nucleic acid assays in ArrayPlates can detect DNA and RNA, including SNPs and ESTs. A multiplexed mRNA assay to measure the expression of 16 genes is described. The assay combines a homogeneous nuclease protection assay with subsequent probe immobilization to the array by means of a sandwich hybridization followed with chemiluminescent detection. This assay was used to examine cells grown and treated in microplates and avoided cloning, transfection, RNA insolation, reverse transcription, amplification and fluorochrome labeling. Standard deviations for the measurement of 16 genes ranged from 3 percent to 13 percent in samples of 30,000 cells. Such ArrayPlates transcription assays are useful in drug discovery and development for target validation, screening, lead optimization, metabolism and toxicity profiling. Chemiluminescent detection provides ArrayPlates assays with high signal-to-noise readout and simplifies imager requirements. Imaging a 2D surface that contains arrays simplifies lens requirements relative to imaging columns of liquid in microtiter plate wells. The Omix imager for ArrayPlates is described.

  5. Gene escape model: Transfer of heavy metal resistance genes from Escherichia coli to Alcaligenes eutrophus on agar plates and in soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Top, E. Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Mol ); Mergeay, M.; Springael, D. ); Verstraete, W. )

    1990-08-01

    Conjugal transfer from Escherichia coli to Alcaligenes eutrophus of the A. eutrophus genes coding for plasmid-borne resistance to cadmium, cobalt, and zinc (czc genes) was investigated on agar plates and in soil samples. This czc fragment is not expressed in the donor strain, E. coli, but it is expressed in the recipient strain, A. eutrophus. Hence, expression of heavy metal resistance by cells plated on a medium containing heavy metals represents escape of the czc genes. The two plasmids into which this DNA fragment has been cloned previously and which were used in these experiments are the nonconjugative, mobilizable plasmid pDN705 and the nonconjugative, nonmobilizable plasmid pMOL149. The results demonstrate that even genes incorporated into nonmobilizable plasmids can be exchanged between two different genera and that the presence of broad-host-range plasmids in putative recipients among soil bacteria could increase the risk of gene dissemination in case of release of genetically engineered microorganisms. The results also reveal that in certain soils, environmental conditions and particularly nutrient levels are conducive to gene transfer.

  6. Abilities of the mCP Agar Method and CRENAME Alpha Toxin-Specific Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Clostridium perfringens Spores in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Villéger, Romain; Cantin, Philippe; Boissinot, Maurice; Bissonnette, Luc

    2013-01-01

    We first determined the analytical specificity and ubiquity (i.e., the ability to detect all or most strains) of a Clostridium perfringens-specific real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay based on the cpa gene (cpa rtPCR) by using a bacterial strain panel composed of C. perfringens and non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains. All non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains tested negative, whereas all C. perfringens strains tested positive with the cpa rtPCR, for an analytical specificity and ubiquity of 100%. The cpa rtPCR assay was then used to confirm the identity of 116 putative C. perfringens isolates recovered after filtration of water samples and culture on mCP agar. Colonies presenting discordant results between the phenotype on mCP agar and cpa rtPCR were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and cpa genes. Four mCP−/rtPCR+ colonies were identified as C. perfringens, whereas 3 mCP+/rtPCR− colonies were identified as non-C. perfringens. The cpa rtPCR was negative with all 51 non-C. perfringens strains and positive with 64 of 65 C. perfringens strains. Finally, we compared mCP agar and a CRENAME (concentration and recovery of microbial particles, extraction of nucleic acids, and molecular enrichment) procedure plus cpa rtPCR (CRENAME + cpa rtPCR) for their abilities to detect C. perfringens spores in drinking water. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR detected as few as one C. perfringens CFU per 100 ml of drinking water sample in less than 5 h, whereas mCP agar took at least 25 h to deliver results. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR also allows the simultaneous and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli and C. perfringens from the same potable water sample. In itself, it could be used to assess the public health risk posed by drinking water potentially contaminated with pathogens more resistant to disinfection. PMID:24077714

  7. Comparison of the Baird-Parker agar and 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate methods for enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in naturally and artificially contaminated foods.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Steven C; Becker, Katie L; Fanslau, Melody A

    2003-11-01

    The recently developed 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate (PFSE) method was compared with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual's Baird-Parker agar spread plate (B-P) method for enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in naturally contaminated, mechanically separated poultry (MSP; n = 92) and raw milk (n = 12). In addition, mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses and hot-smoked rainbow trout and chub were surface inoculated with a three-strain mixture of S. aureus, stored at 5 degrees C, and periodically analyzed with both methods for numbers of S. aureus. For naturally contaminated raw milk and MSP samples, the PFSE method yielded counts that were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from counts obtained using the B-P method. From raw milk and MSP samples, 60% (21 of 35) and 55% (124 of 226), respectively, of confirmed (DNAse-positive) isolates from PFSE plates were identified by further testing as S. aureus. Corresponding S. aureus identification rates for isolates forming typical colonies on B-P plates were 53% (19 of 36) and 50% (125 of 248). For both methods, other staphylococci composed the vast majority of tested isolates that were not identified as S. aureus. For inoculated hot-smoked fish, S. aureus counts from the PFSE method were not significantly different from counts from the B-P method. Compared to the B-P method, significantly lower numbers of inoculated S. aureus were recovered using the PFSE method in analyses of mozzarella cheese stored 28 and 42 days at 4 degrees C. The PFSE and B-P methods were not significantly different for inoculated cheeses at all other sampling times. DNAse-positive isolates from PFSE analyses of inoculated cheeses and smoked fish were identified as S. aureus 98% (51 of 52) and 86% (36 of 42) of the time, respectively, as compared with 100% (58 of 58) and 95% (40 of 42) of the time for typical B-P isolates. Overall, the PFSE and B-P methods appeared to perform similarly in enumeration of S

  8. HIGHLY SENSITIVE ASSAY FOR ANTICHOLINESTERASE COMPOUNDS USING 96 WELL PLATE FORMAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid and sensitive detection of organophosphate insecticides using a 96 well plate format is reported. Several features of this assay make it attractive for development as a laboratory-based or field screening assay. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was stabilized in a gelati...

  9. HIGHLY SENSITIVE ASSAY FOR ANTICHOLINESTERASE COMPOUNDS USING 96 WELL PLATE FORMAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid and sensitive detection of organophosphate insecticides using a 96 well plate format is reported. Several features of this assay make it attractive for development as a laboratory-based or field screening assay. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was stabilized in a gelati...

  10. Evaluation of a quantitative plasma PCR plate assay for detecting cytomegalovirus infection in marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Gallez-Hawkins, G M; Tegtmeier, B R; ter Veer, A; Niland, J C; Forman, S J; Zaia, J A

    1997-01-01

    A plasma PCR test, using a nonradioactive PCR plate assay, was evaluated for detection of human cytomegalovirus reactivation. This assay was compared to Southern blotting and found to perform well. As a noncompetitive method of quantitation, it was similar to a competitive method for detecting the number of genome copies per milliliter of plasma in marrow transplant recipients. This is a technically simplified assay with potential for adaptation to automation. PMID:9041438

  11. Performance of four different agar plate methods for rectal swabs, synergy disk tests and metallo-β-lactamase Etest for clinical isolates in detecting carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Vamvakopoulou, Sophia; Spyropoulou, Αikaterini; Bartzavali, Christina; Marangos, Markos; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Christofidou, Myrto

    2016-09-01

    The aims of the study were to compare four different agar plate methods in the identification of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (CP-Kp) from rectal samples and to assess the role of phenotypic methodologies in the identification of carbapenemase type from clinical K. pneumoniae isolates. Two chromogenic agars (Brilliance CRE and CHROMagar KPC) were compared to MacConkey agar plates with ertapenem (ERT) or imipenem (IMP) disks for the identification of CP-Kp from 912 rectal swabs. CP-Kp was detected in 329 samples by either agar methodology (299 K. pneumoniae carbapenemase positive, 27 Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase positive and 3 K. pneumoniae carbapenemase and Verona integron-encodedmetallo-β-lactamase positive). Sensitivity of Brilliance CRE, CHROMagar KPC and MacConkey agar plus IMP or ERT disk (inhibition zone <25 mm) was 96.8, 99.2, 67.2 and 81.8 %, while specificity was 90.9, 78.2, 98.1 and 97.9 %, respectively. Synergy meropenem-disk tests with EDTA or phenylboronic acid were used in order to detect the carbapenemase type as compared to PCR results (blaVIM, blaKPC and blaNDM) from 2515 isolates with reduced susceptibility to any of the Etest-examined carbapenems (ERT, IMP or meropenem). Metallo-β-lactamase MP/MPI Etest was applied in 616 isolates. Sensitivity was 98.4, 90.9 and 82.2 % for phenylboronic acid synergy test, EDTA synergy test and metallo-β-lactamase Etest, respectively, while their specificity was high (>97.5 %). Phenotypic methodologies can provide reliable results for the identification of carbapenemase production among K. pneumoniae isolates. Chromogenic agars can be applied in high-risk patients as part of surveillance and infection control programs.

  12. A Direct Quantitative Agar-Plate Based Assay for Analysis of Pseudomonas protegens PF-5 Degradation of Polyurethane Films (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    that general colony formation does not compromise coating integrity. LIVE/DEAD Baclight (Life Technologies) staining of the bacteria using the...line is very thin and is possibly new bacteria growth that occurred after the coupons were placed over the culture. Fig. 6c shows an AFM image from...this region verifying the presence of monolayer clusters of bacteria . Examples of individual IR spectra are shown in Fig. 6d and were acquired at the

  13. Detection and quantitation of cellulase by Congo red staining of substrates in a cup-plate diffusion assay.

    PubMed

    Carder, J H

    1986-02-15

    A simple, inexpensive, and sensitive cellulase assay which allows simultaneous enzyme quantitation for many samples has been developed. Radial diffusion of enzyme into substrate incorporated in an agar gel produces zones of hydrolysis which can be visualized by staining undegraded substrate with Congo red dye. Comparisons were made between this and other commonly used cellulase assays based on accuracy, sensitivity, and ease of use.

  14. Development of a new microtiter plate format for clinically relevant assays.

    PubMed

    Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Stanislav S; Whitcombe, Michael J; Chianella, Iva; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2012-02-21

    A new format for the microtiter plate-based assays was proposed. The novelty involves the use of disk-shaped inserts for immobilization of biological and chemical reagents. The internal opening of the disks allows measurements of the reactions by standard microtiter plate readers without any additional steps involving liquid handling. Ideally the plate end-users just have to add the sample and take the measurement without any need of multiple reagent additions or transfer of the liquid to a different plate. The novel assay format also allows handling of reagents which are not soluble in an aqueous environment. As a proof of concept we describe here several model reactions which are compatible with microtiter plate format, such as monitoring enzymatic reactions catalyzed by glucose oxidase (GOx) and urease, measurements of proteins by BCA assay, analysis of pH, and concentration of antioxidants. The "mix and match" approach in the disk-shape format allows multiplexing and could be particularly useful for high throughput screening. One of the potential application areas for this novel assay format could be in a multianalyte system for measurement of clinically relevant analytes in primary care.

  15. A comparison of serial plate agar dilution, Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion, and the Vitek AutoMicrobic system for the determination of susceptibilities of Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ten antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Fekete, T; Tumah, H; Woodwell, J; Truant, A; Satishchandran, V; Axelrod, P; Kreter, B

    1994-04-01

    The use of rapid, automated technologies for assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility and determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations has been evolving for over a decade. We compared the Vitek AutoMicrobic system and Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards methods of serial plate agar dilution for qualitative and quantitative susceptibilities of 301 hospital isolates of Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antibiotics tested were aztreonam, cefoperazone, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, piperacillin, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, and tobramycin. Agar dilution and Bauer-Kirby results were more strongly correlated for all three genera than were the results for agar dilution and Vitek. If agar dilution is presumed to be the "gold standard," Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion had only half the number of false susceptibles as did the Vitek. Thus, the Vitek AutoMicrobic system seems to be somewhat less reliable for both qualitative and quantitative measurement of susceptibility and resistance than is Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion.

  16. 96-Well plate assays for measuring collagenase activity using (3)H-acetylated collagen.

    PubMed

    Koshy, P J; Rowan, A D; Life, P F; Cawston, T E

    1999-11-15

    We describe two alternative assays for measuring collagenolytic activity using (3)H-acetylated collagen. Both assays have been developed for the 96-well plate format and measure the amount of radiolabeled collagen fragments released into the supernatant from an insoluble (3)H-acetylated collagen fibril preparation. The first method separates digested solubilized fragments from the intact fibril by sedimentation of the undigested collagen by centrifugation. The second method achieves this separation by filtration of the supernatant through the membrane of a 96-well filtration plate which retains the undigested collagen fibril. Both methods give linear dose- and time-dependent responses of collagenase activity > or = 70% of total collagen lysis. In addition, both assays can be simply modified to measure tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibitory activity, which is also linear between 20 and 75% of total collagen lysis with the amount of TIMP added.

  17. Optimization of Salmonella Typhi biofilm assay on polypropylene microtiter plates using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ganjali Dashti, M; Abdeshahian, P; Sudesh, K; Phua, K K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an optimized assay for Salmonella Typhi biofilm that mimics the environment of the gallbladder as an experimental model for chronic typhoid fever. Multi-factorial assays are difficult to optimize using traditional one-factor-at-a-time optimization methods. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize six key variables involved in S. Typhi biofilm formation on cholesterol-coated polypropylene 96-well microtiter plates. The results showed that bile (1.22%), glucose (2%), cholesterol (0.05%) and potassium chloride (0.25%) were critical factors affecting the amount of biofilm produced, but agitation (275 rpm) and sodium chloride (0.5%) had antagonistic effects on each other. Under these optimum conditions the maximum OD reading for biofilm formation was 3.4 (λ600 nm), and the coefficients of variation for intra-plate and inter-plate assays were 3% (n = 20) and 5% (n = 8), respectively. These results showed that RSM is an effective approach for biofilm assay optimization.

  18. Miniaturization of mitotic index cell-based assay using "wall-less" plate technology.

    PubMed

    Le Guezennec, Xavier; Phong, Mark; Nor, Liyana; Kim, Namyong

    2014-03-01

    The use of microscopic imaging for the accurate assessment of cells in mitosis is hampered by the round morphology of mitotic cells, which renders them poorly adherent and highly susceptible to loss during the washing stage of cell-based assays. Here, to circumvent these limitations, we make use of DropArray, a recent technology that allows high retention of weakly adherent cells and suspension cells. DropArray offers the competitive advantage of maintaining the classic high throughput format of microtiter plates while reducing classic microwell volume by up to 90% by using a drop format. Here, we present a mitotic index cell-based assay using the mitosis marker phospho histone H3 at serine 10 on a DropArray 384-well plate format. Dose-response curve analysis of the mitotic index assay with an antimitotic drug (docetaxel) on DropArray is presented that shows an effective dosage compared to previous established results similar to those obtained with conventional microtiter plates. The mitotic index assay with DropArray showed a Z-factor >0.6. Our results validate DropArray as a suitable platform for high throughput screening for compounds affecting mitosis or the cell cycle.

  19. A simple and sensitive assay for ascorbate using a plate reader.

    PubMed

    Vislisel, Jesse M; Schafer, Freya Q; Buettner, Garry R

    2007-06-01

    We have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and reliable assay for the determination of ascorbate using a plate reader. In this assay, ascorbic acid is oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid using Tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy) and then reacted with o-phenylenediamine to form the condensation product, 3-(dihydroxyethyl)furo[3,4-b]quinoxaline-1-one. The rate of appearance of this product is monitored over time using fluorescence. With this method, it is possible to analyze 96 wells in less than 10min. This permits the analysis of 20 samples with a full set of standards and blanks, all in triplicate. The assay is robust for a variety of samples, including orange juice, swine plasma, dog plasma, and cultured cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of the assay for the rapid determination of experimental parameters, we investigated the uptake of ascorbate and two different ascorbate derivatives in U937 cells. We found similar plateau levels of intracellular ascorbate at 24h for ascorbate and ascorbate phosphate. However, the intracellular accumulation of ascorbate via the phosphate ester had an initial rate that was three to five times slower than that via the palmitate ester. Only lower concentrations of the palmitate ester could be examined because the ethanol needed as solvent decreased cell viability; it behaved similarly to the other two compounds at lower concentrations. To come to these conclusions, only nine plates needed to be analyzed to provide us with the end result after only 7h of analysis. This clearly demonstrates the strength of the plate reader assay, which allows the analysis of large-sample sets in a fraction of the time required for the methods that are most commonly used today. The assay is quick, is very economical, and provides results with uncertainties on the order of only 5%.

  20. Periodic acid-Schiff's reagent assay for carbohydrates in a microtiter plate format.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Michelle; Gerlach, Jared Q; Farrell, Mark P; Bhavanandan, Veer P; Joshi, Lokesh

    2011-09-01

    Microtiter plate colorimetric assays are widely used for analysis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. However, mucins are often not easily detected, as they have low neutral sugar content. We have adapted and optimised the periodic acid-Schiff's reagent (PAS) staining for microtiter plate assay by examining five factors: concentration and volume of periodic acid, oxidation time, volume of Schiff's reagent, and color development time. This assay requires just 25 μl of sample, utilises standardised Schiff's reagent, and has decreased assay time (140 min to completion). Seventeen monosaccharides (acidic, neutral, basic, phosphorylated, and deoxy) and four disaccharides were assessed. PAS-positive carbohydrates (amino, N-acetylamino, deoxy, and certain neutral monosaccharides, and sialic acids) responded linearly within a 10-100 nmol range approximately, which varied for each carbohydrate. The assay response for fetuin and porcine gastric mucin (PGM) was linear up to 150 μg (highest concentration tested), with no response from nonglycosylated protein. A lower response for asialofetuin was observed, but desialylated PGM preparations were similar or higher in response than their sialylated counterparts. The simplicity and low sample consumption of this method make it an excellent choice for screening or quantitation of chromatographic fractions containing carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, especially in the case of mucins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of antibody binding to cell surface antigens using a plasma membrane-bound plate assay.

    PubMed

    Vater, C A; Reid, K; Bartle, L M; Goldmacher, V S

    1995-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for measuring antibody binding to cell surface antigens using an immobilized plasma membrane fraction. In this method, isolated plasma membranes are dried onto wells of a 96-well microtiter plate and incubated with antibodies that recognize a cell surface protein. Bound antibody is detected indirectly using an enzyme-linked or fluorescently tagged second antibody. Alternatively, the primary antibody itself can be labeled and its binding can be detected directly. The assay is simple and fast and provides several advantages over whole cell binding assays currently in widespread use.

  2. Overview of membranes and membrane plates used in research and diagnostic ELISPOT assays.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane-bottomed, 96-well plates and 8-well strips constitute the formats in which the overwhelming majority of ELISPOT assays used in research and diagnostic applications are performed. PVDF is well suited for ELISPOT because it has a high antibody-binding capacity and because its white color provides an excellent backdrop for ELISPOT enumeration. Nitrocellulose (NC) and PVDF membranes and 96-well plates containing those membranes used in ELISPOT assays were initially commercialized for filtration applications and later optimized for a range of different protein analytical applications. An overview of the development and biotechnology applications of PVDF membrane is provided. Characteristics and attributes of the membrane that are relevant to ELISPOT are summarized. Enhancements in PVDF membrane performance and optimization of devices for automation compatible and diagnostic ELISPOT applications are presented.

  3. Improved Plate Assay for Antifouling Substances Using Blue Mussel Mytilus edulis galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Sera; Iida; Adachi; Shizuri

    2000-07-01

    An improved plate assay for screening antifoulants against blue mussels, Mytilus edulis galloprovincialis, was designed based on an assay contrived by Ina and colleagues. To obtain more reliable results, the number of test mussels for one sample was increased from 4 to 10. Cardboard pieces used as test plates were cut into rectangular shapes to separate the test sample and the blank zone, which are of the same area. Activity was expressed numerically. In this improved method, several inhibitors of byssus thread formation were isolated by using a smaller amount of sample per area than in the original method. Previously our laboratory developed a foot-stimulating bioassay for the same purpose. This method requires only a small amount of sample and is therefore useful for isolating antifouling substances from natural sources, including marine organisms. However, the inhibition of byssus thread formation cannot be directly evaluated in the foot-stimulating method. The improved plate assay and the foot-stimulating method were examined and compared using a secosterol from the sponge Dysidea granulosa and CuSO(4).

  4. Comparison of recovery of airborne microorganisms in a dairy cattle facility using selective agar and thin agar layer resuscitation media.

    PubMed

    Crozier-Dodson, Beth Ann; Fung, Daniel Y C

    2002-09-01

    Thin agar layer (TAL) medium was developed at Kansas State University to improve the resuscitation of injured cells and has been shown to result in higher recovery than is obtained with selective media alone for cold-, heat-, salt-, and acid-injured cells. The experiment presented here was designed to determine the effectiveness of the TAL method for the recovery of possibly injured organisms from air. Eleven agar media were used for the experiment: tryptic soy agar (TSA), MacConkey sorbitol agar (MSA), TAL-MSA, Baird-Parker (BP) agar, TAL-BP agar, modified Oxford (MOX) agar, TAL-MOX agar, xylose lysine sodium desoxycholate (XLD) agar, TAL-XLD agar, Yersinia-selective (CIN) agar, and TAL-CIN agar. The TAL plates were prepared by pipetting 6 ml of selective agar into a BBL Rodac plate (65 by 15 mm). Selective agar was allowed to solidify, and then each plate was overlaid with 6 ml of TSA. Selective agar plates were prepared by pipetting 12 ml of agar into BBL Rodac plates and allowing the agar to solidify. Samples were taken at an indoor cattle facility at five separate locations with a BioScience SAS air-sampling instrument. For each plate, 60 liters of air was sampled. Three replications of the experiment were performed. The TAL method resulted in higher counts of microorganisms on all media tested. In addition, 175 isolates were selected randomly and identified in order to test the selectivity of TAL and the selective media for target organisms. The data obtained in this study show that the TAL resuscitation method is effective and necessary for the recovery of airborne organisms that may be injured.

  5. On-plate enzyme and inhibition assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Wang, Shengtian; Yang, Li

    2015-08-01

    We performed on-plate enzyme and inhibition assays of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography. The assays were accomplished based on different retardation factors of the substrates, enzyme, and products. All the necessary steps were integrated on-plate in one developing process, including substrate/enzyme mixing, reaction starting, and quenching as well as product separation. In order to quantitatively measure the enzyme reaction, the developed plate was then densitometrically evaluated to determine the peak area of the product. Rapid and high-throughput assays were achieved by loading different substrate spots and/or enzyme (and inhibition) spots in different tracks on the plate. The on-plate enzyme assay could be finished in a developing time of only 4 min, with good track-to-track and plate-to-plate repeatability. Moreover, we determined the Km values of the enzyme reaction and Ki values of the inhibition (Pb(2+) Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) as inhibitors), as well as the corresponding kinetics using the on-plate assay. Taken together, our method expanded the application of thin-layer chromatography in enzyme assays, and it could be potentially used in research fields for rapid and quantitative measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A simple, rapid and sensitive plate assay for detection of microbial hyaluronidase activity.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sandip; Chaudhari, Bhushan

    2017-04-01

    Hyaluronidase (hyase) is a glycosidase enzyme that predominantly degrades hyaluronic acid (HA) having important applications in many biotechnological processes and therapeutics. Several assay methods have been proposed to screen hyase producing microorganisms; however, they rely on unique reagents and sophisticated instruments, which are expensive and could be unavailable in general laboratories. In the present studies, a rapid, simple, sensitive, highly reproducible, and cost-effective qualitative plate assay has been developed for the screening of hyase producing microorganisms. The routinely used plate assay method of Richman and Baer requires a special chemical cetylpyridinium chloride and long incubation period of 20 h; but still, the zones of clearance are not very clear and distinct. While, the present method requires an incubation period of only 1 h and the distinct zones of clearance appear with Gram's iodine within 1 min of time. This method does not require any special medium, unlike previously reported methods. Moreover, use of commonly available Gram's iodine makes this method suitable for many researchers. The results of the assay method were validated by TLC, zymographic analysis and determining the growth of isolates in minimal medium containing HA as a sole carbon source. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Morphology of the type strain of Bacillus anthracis EY 3169T=ATCC 14578T grown either aerobically or anaerobically on agar plates--observation by light and laser microscopes.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Eiko; Koseki, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    Growth characteristics including cell-arrangement of the type strain of Bacillus anthracis EY 3169T=ATCC 14578T grown on agar plates in level 3 laboratory were observed by both light and laser microscopes. Small daughter colonies appeared on parent colonies grown on 5% sheep blood or chocolate agar plates after 12 days incubation at room temperature. Daughter colonies, stained by Wirtz-Conklin method, were composed with vegetative cells and spores. Growth of daughter colonies might be supported by the debris of cells in the parent colony. Colonies grown under anaerobic conditions were flat with smooth edges, and the cells neither formed chains of any length, nor produced any spores after 25 days incubation at room temperature. It was thought that spores of B. anthracis were produced at the terminal stage of individual cell life instead of under unfavorable conditions for the organism. Air is needed for spore formation and cell-chain formation. More nutrients, probably amino acids, are needed for anaerobic growth rather than aerobic.

  8. Optimization of tetrazolium salt assay for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm using microtiter plate method.

    PubMed

    Sabaeifard, Parastoo; Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rasoul

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important pathogenic bacteria related to biofilm infections. Due to the biofilm multi-drug resistance, methods of biofilm formation enumeration are of interest for assessment of efficient drug regimen development for biofilm inhibition or eradication. There are many different assay methods to determine the biofilm formation, using vital or non-vital dyes. The primary aim of the current study was to develop an assay using a member of tetrazolium salts family, 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC), for detection of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation in 96-well microtiter plates and also a method of Minimum Biofilm Inhibitory Concentration (MBIC) determination of antibiotics against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Furthermore, the assay was optimized for TTC concentration, wavelength and period of incubation for 4 different antibiotics. The optimized condition was then compared with two other prevalent methods: the crystal violet (CV) assay and the 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenly)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) assay. In general, the optimized TTC assay (0.5% TTC, 6h of incubation and absorbance measurement at 405nm for biofilm assay and 1% TTC, 5h of incubation and absorbance measurement at 490nm for MBIC determination) distinguished between biofilms formed by different concentrations of bacteria and also was able to detect lower amounts of biofilm formed in contrast to the other two assay methods suggesting that TTC assay is more sensitive and also less expensive than other vital staining methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of various plastic microtiter plates with measles, toxoplasma, and gamma globulin antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed Central

    Shekarchi, I C; Sever, J L; Lee, Y J; Castellano, G; Madden, D L

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen lots of microtiter plates which differed in lot, batch, plastic type, or manufacturer were evaluated as solid-phase carriers in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for antibodies to measles, toxoplasma, and human gamma globulin. Most plates of polystyrene or polyvinyl chloride were found to give acceptable binding. The final choice depended on the antigen to be attached. Variations in binding between lots, batches, and types of plastic were found. Well-to-well variation was found to be of greater statistical significance than edge effect and should be a consideration in selection of a plate lot for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Lots of plates should be pretested by the investigator to determine whether there is good binding of the antigen to be used and whether there is low plate-to-plate and well-to-well variation. PMID:6199371

  10. A 96-well plate assay for CYP4503A induction using cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kamiguchi, Naomi; Aoyama, Eiji; Okuda, Teruaki; Moriwaki, Toshiya

    2010-11-01

    A reliable and practical CYP3A induction assay with cryopreserved human hepatocytes in a 96-well format was developed. Various 96-well plates with different basement membrane were evaluated using prototypical inducers, rifampicin, phenytoin, and carbamazepine. Thin-layer (TL) Matrigel was found to yield the highest basal and induced levels of CYP3A activity as determined by testosterone 6β-hydroxylation. Concentration-dependent CYP3A induction of rifampicin was reproducible with the EC(50) values of 0.36 ± 0.28 μM from four batches of human hepatocytes using the 96-well plate with TL Matrigel. The rank order of induction potency for nine inducers or noninducers at a concentration of 10 μM were well comparable among the multiple donors, by expressing the results as percentage of change compared with the positive control, 10 μM rifampicin. Cotreatment of avasimibe or efavirenz with 10 μM rifampicin was found to reduce CYP3A activities induced by rifampicin at a lower rate than treatment with rifampicin alone, whereas treatment with phenobarbital and carbamazepine had no effect. From a comparison of induced CYP3A activities and gene expression levels, there were compounds that would cause induction of CYP3A4 mRNA but not activity, presumably due to their inhibitory effect on CYP3A activity. The cotreatment assay of test compound with rifampicin allows us to exclude the false-negative results caused by the cytotoxicity and/or the mechanism-based inactivation, when the drug candidate's ability for CYP3A induction is evaluating the enzyme activity. This 96-well plate assay, which is robust, reproducible, and convenient, has demonstrated the paramount applicability to the early drug discovery stage.

  11. Passive assay of plutonium metal plates using a fast-neutron multiplicity counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Shin, T. H.; Jordan, T.; Sosa, C.; Ruch, M. L.; Clarke, S. D.; Chichester, D. L.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    We developed a fast-neutron multiplicity counter based on organic scintillators (EJ-309 liquid and stilbene). The system detects correlated photon and neutron multiplets emitted by fission reactions, within a gate time of tens of nanoseconds. The system was used at Idaho National Laboratory to assay a variety of plutonium metal plates. A coincidence counting strategy was used to quantify the 240Pu effective mass of the samples. Coincident neutrons, detected within a 40-ns coincidence window, show a monotonic trend, increasing with the 240Pu-effective mass (in this work, we tested the 0.005-0.5 kg range). After calibration, the system estimated the 240Pu effective mass of an unknown sample (240Pueff >50 g) with an uncertainty lower than 1% in a 4-min assay time.

  12. Comparison of 3 agar media in Fung double tubes and Petri plates to detect and enumerate Clostridium spp. in broiler chicken intestines.

    PubMed

    Barrios, M A; Saini, J K; Rude, C M; Beyer, R S; Fung, D Y C; Crozier-Dodson, B A

    2013-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that may lead to necrotic enteritis, resulting in poor feed efficiency and increased mortality in chickens. It is estimated that C. perfringens infects almost 1 million people in the United States every year. The objective of this research was to compare the Fung double tube (FDT) and conventional Petri plates using 3 different media to detect and enumerate Clostridium spp. in chicken intestines. Nine Cobb 500 broilers were randomly selected and euthanized at 21 and 42 d of age for a total of 18 samples. The jejunum and ileum from each broiler were harvested and studied in 2 methods and 3 media combinations, utilizing a 2 × 3 factorial totaling 6 treatments. The 2 methods were FDT and conventional Petri plates, and the 3 media were Shahidi-Ferguson Perfringens (SFP) with egg yolk supplement, polymyxin B, and kanamycin (E); SFP with polymyxin B and kanamycin (P); and SFP with d-cycloserine (C). Enumerations were performed after 24 h of incubation at 37°C. At 21 d, counts using medium C with FDT (4.51 log10 cfu/g) and plates (2.38 log10 cfu/g) were higher (P < 0.05) than using media E or P. On d 42, there were no differences among plate treatments and medium E had the highest counts (0.98 log10 cfu/g). Of all the FDT, medium C (5.35 log10 cfu/g) had the highest counts (P < 0.05), followed by medium P (3.54 log10 cfu/g). This study illustrates that the FDT method is able to enumerate Clostridium spp. at higher levels (P < 0.001) than the conventional Petri plate method; therefore, the FDT should be implemented and further explored.

  13. Spectral Unmixing Plate Reader: High-Throughput, High-Precision FRET Assays in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Tory M; Peterson, Kurt C; Grant, Benjamin D; Thomas, David D; Gillispie, Gregory D

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a microplate reader that records a complete high-quality fluorescence emission spectrum on a well-by-well basis under true high-throughput screening (HTS) conditions. The read time for an entire 384-well plate is less than 3 min. This instrument is particularly well suited for assays based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Intramolecular protein biosensors with genetically encoded green fluorescent protein (GFP) donor and red fluorescent protein (RFP) acceptor tags at positions sensitive to structural changes were stably expressed and studied in living HEK cells. Accurate quantitation of FRET was achieved by decomposing each observed spectrum into a linear combination of four component (basis) spectra (GFP emission, RFP emission, water Raman, and cell autofluorescence). Excitation and detection are both conducted from the top, allowing for thermoelectric control of the sample temperature from below. This spectral unmixing plate reader (SUPR) delivers an unprecedented combination of speed, precision, and accuracy for studying ensemble-averaged FRET in living cells. It complements our previously reported fluorescence lifetime plate reader, which offers the feature of resolving multiple FRET populations within the ensemble. The combination of these two direct waveform-recording technologies greatly enhances the precision and information content for HTS in drug discovery.

  14. A novel automated electrochemical ascorbic acid assay in the 24-well microtiter plate format.

    PubMed

    Intarakamhang, Sireerat; Leson, Christian; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Schulte, Albert

    2011-02-14

    Automatic ascorbic acid (AA) voltammetry was established in 24-well microtiter plates. The assay used a movable assembly of a pencil rod working, an Ag/AgCl reference and a Pt counter electrode with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) for concentration-dependent current generation. A computer was in command of electrode (z) and microtiter plate (x, y) positioning and timed potentiostat operation. Synchronization of these actions supported sequential approach of all wells and subsequent execution of electrode treatment procedures or AA voltammetry at defined intervals in a measuring cycle. DPV in well solutions offered a linear current/concentration range between 0.1 and 8.0 mM, a sensitivity of about 1 μA mM(-1) AA, and a detection limit of 50 μM. When used with a calibration curve or standard addition, automated voltammetry of samples with added known amounts of AA demonstrated good recovery rates. Also, the assay achieved the accurate determination of the AA content of vitamin C tablets, a fruit juice and an herbal tea extract. Robotic AA voltammetry has the advantage of conveniently handling multiple samples in a single measuring run without the continuous attention of laboratory personnel. It is a good option when the goal is cost-effective AA screening of sample libraries and has potential for applications in health care and the food processing, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  15. A simple and cost-effective solid-phase protein nano-assay using polyacrylamide-coated glass plates.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wladyslaw A

    2015-02-01

    A new solid-phase protein nano-assay is suggested for simple and sensitive estimation of protein content in sample buffers (a 1-μl sample is sufficient for analysis). The assay is different from conventional "on-filter" assays in that it uses inexpensive fully transparent polyacrylamide gel (PAAG)-coated glass plates as solid support and, thus, combines the convenience of "on-membrane" staining with the sensitivity and ease of documentation of "in-gel" staining (and, therefore, is especially suited for standard lab gel documentation systems). The PAAG plates assay is compatible with all dyes for in-gel protein staining. Depending on the sensitivity of the staining protocol, the assay can be used in macro-, micro-, and nano-assay formats. We also describe a low-cost two-component colloidal Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 (CBB G-250) staining protocol for fast quantitative visualization of proteins spotted on a PAAG plate (the detection limit is up to 2 ng of proteins even when using a Nikon CoolPix digital camera and white light transilluminator instead of a gel scanner). The suggested colloidal CBB G-250 protocol could also be used for visualizing nano-amounts of proteins in polyacrylamide gels. The PAAG plate assay could be useful for proteomic applications and, in general, for all cases where a fast, sensitive, and easily documentable cost-effective solid-phase protein assay is required.

  16. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a dried, hydrophyllic, colloidal...

  18. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  19. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  20. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  1. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  2. Performance evaluation of 3D polystyrene 96-well plates with human neural stem cells in a calcium assay.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yinzhi; Kisaalita, William S

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we have generated a high-throughput screening (HTS)-compatible 3D cell culture platform by chemically "welding" polystyrene scaffolds into standard 2D polystyrene 96-well plates. The variability of scaffolds was minimized by introducing automation into the fabrication process. The fabricated 3D cell culture plates were compared with several commercially available 3D cell culture platforms with light and scanning electron microscopy. Voltage-gated calcium channel functionality was used to access the Z' factors of all plates, including a 2D standard plate control. It was found that with the No-Wash Fluo-4 calcium assay and neural progenitor cells, all plates display acceptable Z' factors for use in HTS. The plates with "welded" polystyrene scaffolds have several advantages, such as being versatile and economical, and are ready to use off the shelf. These characteristics are especially desired in HTS preclinical drug discovery applications.

  3. A Cell-based PDE4 Assay in 1536-well Plate format for High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A.; Li, Xiao; Southall, Noel; Lu, Jianming; Inglese, James; Brasch, Michael; Austin, Christopher P.; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are intracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), to their corresponding 5'-nucleotide monophosphates. These enzymes play an important role in controlling cellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides and thus regulate a variety of cellular signaling events. PDEs are emerging as drug targets for several diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. Though biochemical assays with purified recombinant PDE enzymes and cAMP or cGMP substrate are commonly used for compound screening, cell-based assays would provide a better assessment of compound activity in a more physiological context. Here we report the development and validation of a new cell-based PDE4 assay using a constitutively active GPCR as a driving force for cAMP production and a cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) cation channel as a biosensor in 1536-well plates. PMID:18591513

  4. Detection, quantification, and glycotyping of prion protein in specifically activated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates.

    PubMed

    Triantaphyllidou, I E; Sklaviadis, T; Vynios, D H

    2006-12-15

    The conversion of a normal glycoprotein, prion protein (PrP(C)), to its abnormal protease-resistant isoform (PrP(Sc)) seems to be one of the main factors underlying the pathogenesis of spongiform encephalopathies. There are many studies indicating that PrP interacts with glycosaminoglycans, and we exploited this interaction to develop a sensitive solid phase assay for detection of both PrP forms. Glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate and heparin, were immobilized by their negative charge to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plate wells activated by glutaraldehyde and spermine. PrP in the samples examined (recombinant PrP or tissue homogenate) was allowed to interact with glycans. The interaction of recombinant PrP was more efficient against immobilized chondroitin sulfate of type A, and a linear correlation with concentration was demonstrated. From this curve, the concentration of each one of the PrP isoforms in biological samples can be determined. In addition, and taking into account that glycosylation of prion protein is species specific, we used similarly activated ELISA plate wells to determine different PrP glycoforms. A monoclonal antibody against PrP was immobilized, and PrP present in the samples (brain homogenates) was bound and visualized by various lectins. The most interesting outcome of the study is the differential binding of ricinus communis agglutinin I to the normal and scrapie brain homogenates. Dattura stramonium lectin and wheat germ agglutinin seem to bind almost equally to both samples, and all three have an increased sensitivity to PrP(Sc) after proteinase K digestion.

  5. Improved agar diffusion method for detecting residual antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C E; Kondo, F

    2001-03-01

    The improved agar diffusion method for determination of residual antimicrobial agents was investigated, and the sensitivities of various combinations of test organisms and assay media were determined using 7 organisms, 5 media, and 31 antimicrobial agents. Bacillus stearothermophilus and synthetic assay medium (SAM) showed the greatest sensitivity for screening penicillins (penicillin G and ampicillin). The combination of Bacillus subtilis and minimum medium (MM) was the most sensitive for tetracyclines (oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline), B. stearothermophilus and SAM or Micrococcus luteus and Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA) for detecting tylosin and erythromycin, B. subtilis and MHA for aminoglycosides (streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and dihydrostreptomycin), B. stearothermophilus and SAM for polyethers (salinomycin and lasalocid), and B. subtilis and MM or Clostridium perfringens and GAM for polypeptides (thiopeptin, enramycin, virginiamycin, and bacitracin). However, gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli ATCC 27166 and MM were better for screening for colistin and polymixin-B. For detecting the synthetic drugs tested, the best combination was B. subtilis and MM for sulfonamides, E. coli 27166 and MM for quinolones (oxolinic acid and nalidixic acid), B. subtilis and MM for furans (furazolidone), and the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum and luminescence assay medium for chloramphenicol and oxolinic acid. The results showed that the use of four assay plates, B. stearothermophilus and SAM, B. subtilis and MM, M. luteus and MHA, and E. coli 27166 and MM, was superior to the currently available techniques for screening for residual antimicrobial agents in edible animal tissues.

  6. A microtiter plate assay for factor XIII A-chain-fibrin interactions.

    PubMed

    Achyuthan, K E; Santiago, M A; Greenberg, C S

    1994-05-15

    Factor XIII A-chain-fibrin interactions regulate factor XIIIa formation and fibrin cross-linking. A microtiter plate assay was developed for studying these interactions. Microtiter plate wells were coated with fibrinogen and converted to fibrin by thrombin. After blocking the wells with bovine serum albumin, factor XIII A-chain was added and binding was monitored by incubating first with anti-factor XIII followed by anti-rabbit IgG-alkaline phosphatase. Enzymatic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate was quantitated by the absorbance at 405 nm. BInding was specific, sensitive, rapid, saturable, and reversible, requiring only nanograms of either factor XIII or fibrin. Binding was time- and concentration-dependent and independent of divalent cations. The bound material was identified as factor XIII A-chain by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Factor XIII binding was inhibited > 75% by 250 mM sodium chloride or 250 nM anti-factor XIII IgG. The method was also suitable for demonstrating binding using 0.8% plasma or with r-factor XIII expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Escherichia coli. This method is suitable for identifying the binding sites that are important for plasma factor XIII activation and factor XIIIa activity.

  7. Application of Microbiological Method Direct Epifluorescence Filter Techique/Aerobic Plate Count Agar in the Identification of Irradiated Herbs and Spices

    PubMed Central

    Di Schiavi, Maria Teresa; Foti, Marina; Mosconi, Maria Cristina; Mattiolo, Giuseppina; Cavallina, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation is a preservation technology used to improve the safety and hygienic quality of food. Aim of this study was to assess the applicability and validity of the microbiological screening method direct epifluorescence filter technique (DEFT)/aerobic plate count (APC) (EN 13783:2001) for the identification of irradiated herbs and spices. Tests on non-irradiated and irradiated samples of dried herbs and spices were performed. The method was based on the comparison of APC and count obtained using DEFT. In accordance with the standard reference, this method is not applicable to samples with APC<103 colony forming units (CFU)/g and this is its main limit. The results obtained in our laboratories showed that in 50% of cases of non-irradiated samples and in 96% of the samples treated with ionising radiation, the method was not applicable due to a value of CFU/g <103. PMID:27800348

  8. Homogeneous plate based antibody internalization assay using pH sensor fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Zimprich, Chad; Dwight, Stephen J; Corona, Cesear; McDougall, Mark; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-04-01

    Receptor-mediated antibody internalization is a key mechanism underlying several anti-cancer antibody therapeutics. Delivering highly toxic drugs to cancer cells, as in the case of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), efficient removal of surface receptors from cancer cells and changing the pharmacokinetics profile of the antibody drugs are some of key ways that internalization impacts the therapeutic efficacy of the antibodies. Over the years, several techniques have been used to study antibody internalization including radiolabels, fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry and cellular toxicity assays. While these methods allow analysis of internalization, they have limitations including a multistep process and limited throughput and are generally endpoint assays. Here, we present a new homogeneous method that enables time and concentration dependent measurements of antibody internalization. The method uses a new hydrophilic and bright pH sensor dye (pHAb dye), which is not fluorescent at neutral pH but becomes highly fluorescent at acidic pH. For receptor mediated antibody internalization studies, antibodies against receptors are conjugated with the pHAb dye and incubated with the cells expressing the receptors. Upon binding to the receptor, the dyes conjugated to the antibody are not fluorescent because of the neutral pH of the media, but upon internalization and trafficking into endosomal and lysosomal vesicles the pH drops and dyes become fluorescent. The enabling attributes of the pHAb dyes are the hydrophilic nature to minimize antibody aggregation and bright fluorescence at acidic pH which allows development of simple plate based assays using a fluorescent reader. Using two different therapeutic antibodies--Trastuzumab (anti-HER2) and Cetuximab (anti-EGFR)--we show labeling with pHAb dye using amine and thiol chemistries and impact of chemistry and dye to antibody ration on internalization. We finally present two new approaches using the pHAb dye, which will be

  9. Fluorescence assay for mitochondrial permeability transition in cardiomyocytes cultured in a microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Marie Louise Muff; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Treiman, Marek

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) is a voltage-dependent, large-conductance channel of the inner mitochondrial membrane with an important role in a range of pathophysiological conditions. To facilitate studies of pharmacological pore modulation, we describe an assay in a model using neonatal cardiomyocytes in a 96-well microtiter plate format. In the presence of mitochondrial membrane potential Delta Psi m, accumulation of rhodamine-123 in mitochondria (40,000 cells/well, 2.6 microM rhodamine-123) caused fluorescence signal quenching. Following substitution of dye-free buffer, dequenching occurred on the distribution of rhodamine-123 into the extracellular volume. The addition of a small buffer volume containing digitonin (final concentration 10 microg/ml) and Ca(2+) (final concentrations up to 100 microM free Ca(2+)) caused dequenching (Delta F) due to Delta Psi m dissipation by MPTP, as evidenced by inhibition in the presence of cyclosporin A (0.2-2 microM) and facilitation by pH 6.2. Delta F due to Delta Psi m-dissipating agent carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) or alamethicin (10 microM) was insensitive to either pH or cyclosporin A. Inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced (but not of FCCP- or alamethicin-induced) Delta F by glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3 beta) antagonist SB216763 and adenosine, acting at the level of intracellular signaling and plasma membrane receptors, respectively, is shown to illustrate potential applications of this assay. Limitation of the assay to cells with energized mitochondria is stressed.

  10. Imaging and quantitative analysis of tritium-labelled cells in lymphocyte proliferation assays using microchannel plate detectors originally developed for X-ray astronomy.

    PubMed

    Lees, J E; Hales, J M

    2001-01-01

    Microchannel plate detectors have been used in many astronomical X-ray telescopes. Recently we have begun to use similar detectors to image electron emission from radiolabelled biological assays. Here we show how a microchannel plate (MCP) detector can be used to image tritium uptake in T lymphocyte proliferation assays. Quantitative analysis using the MCP detector has the same sensitivity and speed as conventional liquid scintillation counter (LSC) analysis whilst obviating the need for scintillation fluid. In addition the system permits the imaging of whole plate harvests from a range of plate sizes. Here we present data obtained with 96-well plates and Terasaki plates.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a dried...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a dried...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a dried...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a dried...

  15. Application of a fish DNA damage assay as a biological toxicity screening tool for metal plating wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.; Zong, M.; Meier, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    The utility of a fish DNA damage assay as a rapid monitoring tool was investigated. Metal plating wastewater was chosen as a sample because it contains various genotoxic metal species. Fish DNA damage assay results were compared to data generated from the conventional whole effluent toxicity (WET) test procedure. The Microtox{reg_sign} assay (Azur Environmental, Carlsbad, CA, USA) using Vibrio fischeri was also employed. Eleven samples from two metal plating companies were collected for this evaluation. For the fish DNA damage assay, 7-d-old fathead minnow larvae, Pimephales promelas, were utilized. They were exposed to a series of dilutions at 20 C for 2 h. Whole effluent toxicity tests conducted in this study included two acute toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and fathead minnows and two chronic toxicity tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows. The fish DNA damage assay showed good correlations with both the acute and chronic WET test results, especially with those obtained with fathead minnows. The kappa values, an index of agreement, between the fish DNA damage assay and WET tests were shown to be acceptable. These findings imply that this novel fish DNA damage assay has use as an expedient toxicity screening procedure since it produces comparable results to those of the acute and chronic fathead minnow toxicity tests.

  16. A universal plate format for increased throughput of assays that monitor multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activities

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Kirk; Waas, William; Druzina, Zhanna; Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are intensely studied enzymes because of their importance in the establishment of the genetic code and their connection to disease and medicine. During the advancement of this field, several assays were developed. Despite many innovations, the sensitivity, simplicity, and reliability of the radiometric assays (that were among the first to be developed) have ensured their continued use. Four activities are measured by these assays: active site titration, amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and post-transfer editing (deacylation). In an effort to maintain the advantage of these assays, while enhancing throughput, reducing waste, and improving data quality, a universal 96-well filter plate format was developed. This format facilitates the assays for all 4 of the widely studied activities. PMID:17603003

  17. A universal plate format for increased throughput of assays that monitor multiple aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase activities.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Kirk; Waas, William; Druzina, Zhanna; Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-09-01

    Aminoacyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases are intensely studied enzymes because of their importance in the establishment of the genetic code and their connection to disease and medicine. During the advancement of this field, several assays were developed. Despite many innovations, the sensitivity, simplicity, and reliability of the radiometric assays (which were among the first to be developed) have ensured their continued use. Four activities are measured by these assays: active site titration, amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and posttransfer editing (deacylation). In an effort to maintain the advantage of these assays while enhancing throughput, reducing waste, and improving data quality, a universal 96-well filter plate format was developed. This format facilitates the assays for all four of the widely studied activities.

  18. The Resazurin-Agar Method - a Quick Test to Determine Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckfeldt, J.; Westphal, B.; Claußen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Rezasurin has been used as a smart tracer in stream ecosystems to indicate metabolic activity, specifically aerobic respiration by heterotrophic bacteria. Resazurin is a blue compound which is irreversibly reduced to the pink resorufin in the presence of aerobic bacteria. The degree and speed of colour change from blue to pink is a measure of the degree of oxygen consumption and thus an indirect indication of the concentration of aerobic bacteria in a given medium. A high concentration of bacteria in water indicates a bad water quality. In our work a method was developed using resazurin agar plates to find a quick and easy way for testing water quality and comparing concentrations of bacteria in freshwater and seawater samples. The theory was to concentrate bacteria from a defined volume of water sample onto polycarbonate filters (0.2 μm), which are then placed onto the resazurin agar plate. The presence of aerobic bacteria on the filter will reduce the resazurin in the agar and the compound changes its colour. First tests conducted with different dilutions of a pure culture of yoghurt bacteria showed promising results and confirmed the feasibility of the method. In a further assay, we used water samples from different water layers and different temperatures and were also able to observe differences in the concentration of bacteria, depending on these different environmental conditions.The assay was also successfully used with seawater samples, collected from 2 different stations at 3 different depths in the Baltic Sea (salinity=15). The discolouration of the plates showed good correlation with the oxygen concentrations in the water. The resazurin-agar plate method is economical and fast. Several samples could be investigated at the same time without sacrificing the reliability of the results. Thus it is a good pre-screening test for a quantitative evaluation of bacteria in a water sample.

  19. Agar Diffusion Method for the Differentiation of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Angelety, Lorell H.; Wright, George G.

    1971-01-01

    A method was developed for identification of Bacillus anthracis based on elaboration of protective antigen by individual colonies and its detection by double-diffusion precipitation in agar plates. Images PMID:4993230

  20. Production of pseudorabies virus recombinant glycoprotein B and its use in an agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for detection of antibodies with sensitivity and specificity equal to the virus neutralization assay.

    PubMed

    Serena, María Soledad; Geisler, Christoph; Metz, Germán Ernesto; Mórtola, Eduardo Carlos; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2016-04-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PrV) causes Aujeszky's disease (AD), which affects mainly swine, but also cattle, sheep, and wild animals, resulting in substantial economic losses due to animal mortality and lost productivity worldwide. To combat PrV, eradication programs using PrV strains lacking the gene encoding glycoprotein E (gE) are ongoing in several countries. These eradication programs have generated a currently unmet demand for affordable, easy-to-use, and sensitive tests that can detect PrV infection in pigs infected with either wild-type virus or vaccine strain (gE-deleted) virus. To meet this demand, we used the baculovirus-insect cell system to produce recombinant glycoprotein B (gB) as antigen for an immune assay. The high GC-content (70% average) of the gB gene from the Argentinian PrV CL15 strain necessitated the use of betaine as a PCR enhancer to amplify the extracellular domain. Recombinant gB was expressed at high levels and reacted strongly with sera from PrV infected pigs. We used the recombinant gB to develop an agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for detection of PrV antibodies. Compared to the gold standard virus neutralization (VN) assay, the AGID sensitivity and specificity were 95% and 96.6% respectively. Thus, recombinant gB produced in the baculovirus-insect cell system is a viable source of antigen for the detection of PrV antibodies in AGID tests. Considering its relatively lower cost, simplicity of use and result interpretation, our AGID is a valuable alternative tool to the VN assay.

  1. Fluorescence-based liver microsomal assay for screening of pharmaceutical reactive metabolites using a glutathione conjugated 96-well plate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiang; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our paper is to develop and validate a fluorescence-based mouse liver microsomal (MLM) assay in screening pharmaceutical reactive metabolites (RMs) using a glutathione (GSH)-conjugated 96-well plate. Poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (pHEMA) polymeric membrane was coated on 96-well plates to provide a functional support for GSH conjugation. Oxidized GSH (GSSG) was conjugated on a cyanogen bromide (CNBr)-activated pHEMA surface. The conjugated GSH was regenerated after the reduction of GSSG using d,l-dithiothreitol (DTT). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Ellman's, and fluorescence assays were applied to validate the chemistry and optimize the processes of GSH conjugation. The performance of the 96-well assay was further cross-validated using N-acetyl-p-benzo-quinone imine (NAPQI), a RM of acetaminophen (APAP), and the in vitro MLM assay of APAP. Finally, the developed method was applied to screen a batch of marketed drugs and chemicals on the formation of RMs. Our results indicated that optimum conditions were obtained for pHEMA loading, CNBr activation of pHEMA, and GSSG coupling and reduction. The detection limit of the assay for NAPQI was 500 nM with good specificity. In vitro MLM assay of APAP demonstrated a positive trapping index (TI) of 19.3%. The subsequent RM screening of a series of marketed drugs and chemical compounds resulted in a range of TI values (1.0-25.7%) that corroborated with their capacity in generating RMs. The differences of TI values are statistically significant between the compounds which are known to produce RMs and those that do not generate reactive intermediates. In conclusion, we successfully developed a fluorescence-based GSH-conjugated 96-well plate platform for the screening of RMs using MLM.

  2. Comparison of Limulus assay, standard plate count, and total coliform count for microbiological assessment of renovated wastewater.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, J H; Lee, J C; Alexander, G A; Wolf, H W

    1979-01-01

    The Limulus endotoxin assay was compared to the standard plate count and total coliform count for assessment of the bacteriological quality of reclaimed wastewater. A total of 48 water samples from an advanced waste treatment plant in Dallas, Tex. were examined by the three techniques. Limulus assays were technically simpler to perform and provided results much sooner than conventional culture methods. However, the endotoxin values did not correlate extremely well with determinations of viable bacterial numbers. This lack of correlation may have been due to alterations in the normal ratio of viable gram-negative cells to endotoxin caused by water reclamation procedures. PMID:384901

  3. Standardization of the CFU-GM assay: Advantages of plating a fixed number of CD34+ cells in collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Dobo, Irène; Pineau, Danielle; Robillard, Nelly; Geneviève, Frank; Piard, Nicole; Zandecki, Marc; Hermouet, Sylvie

    2003-10-01

    We investigated whether plating a stable amount of CD34(+) cells improves the CFU-GM assay. Data of CFU-GM assays performed with leukaphereses products in two transplant centers using a commercial collagen-based medium and unified CFU-GM scoring criteria were pooled and analyzed according to the numbers of CD34(+) cells plated. A first series of 113 CFU-GM assays was performed with a fixed number of mononuclear cells (i.e., a variable number of CD34(+) cells). In these cultures the CFU-GM/CD34 ratio varied according to the number of CD34(+) cells plated: median CFUGM/CD34 ratios were 1/6.2 to 1/6.6 for grafts containing <2% CD34(+) cells, vs. 1/10.2 for grafts containing > or =2% CD34(+) cells. The median CFU-GM/CD34 ratio also varied depending on pathology: 1/9.3 for multiple myeloma (MM), 1/6.8 for Hodgkin's disease (HD), 1/6.5 for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and 1/4.5 for solid tumors (ST). A second series of 95 CFU-GM assays was performed with a fixed number of CD34(+) cells (220/ml). The range of median CFU-GM/CD34 ratios was narrowed to 1/7.0 to 1/5.2, and coefficients of variation for CFU-GM counts decreased by half to 38.1% (NHL), 36.1% (MM), 49.9% (HD), and 22.4% (ST). In addition, CFU-GM scoring was facilitated as the percentages of cultures with >50 CFU/GM/ml decreased from 6.7% to 43.8% when a variable number of CD34(+) cells was plated, to 4.5% to 16.7% when 220 CD34(+) cells/ml were plated. Hence, plating a fixed number of CD34(+) cells in collagen gels improves the CFU-GM assay by eliminating cell number-related variability and reducing pathology-related variability in colony growth.

  4. Crystal formation in furunculosis agar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullock, G.L.; Ross, A.J.

    1964-01-01

    SINCE ITS INTRODUCTION SOME MONTHS AGO, FURUNCULOSIS AGAR has been employed in the diagnosis of suspect furunculosis and also as a general purpose medium. During our work with this medium we have noticed discrete "colonies," of crystalline material, which very closely resemble microbial colonies. These crystal colonies are compact and appear on both the surface and subsurface; they occur in inoculated slants and plates incubated for long periods (2 to 3 weeks), as well as in uninoculated stored medium. As the crystal colonies could be confusing to workers using this medium, we decided to attempt to identify them and also to determine whether storage conditions and different lots of medium affect crystal formation.

  5. Development of a fluorometric microtiter plate based enzyme assay for MPS IVA (Morquio type A) using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Millington, David S; Bali, Deeksha S

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA or Morquio type-A disease is a hereditary lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). The disease is caused by lysosomal accumulation of unprocessed glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that manifests with severe to mild skeletal and cardiopulmonary abnormalities. We have developed a modified microtiter plate-based enzyme activity assay using dried blood spots and a fluorescent substrate for measuring specific GALNS activity to identify patients with MPS IVA.

  6. A motility test of leukocytes under agar.

    PubMed

    Goedemans, W T; de Jong, M M

    1985-01-01

    A migration test under agar for leukocytes was developed. Leukocytes moved quite a distance under anaerobic Blood Agar Base (blood agar), a Gibco product. Migration on stained and coloured plates was visualized by projection with a profile projector, making the use of a light microscope superfluous. A migration index was defined. Reproducibility was good enough to allow paired comparisons of leukocyte populations subjected to different treatments. Migration was the result of spontaneous and chemotactically directed migration. Cell-labelling complexes as 111In-oxinate and 111In-tropolonate--ligand concentration 3.5 micrograms/mL in the ultimate cell preparation--did not affect leukocyte migration. 111In-pyrithionate (mercapto pyridine-N-oxide) significantly impaired cell motility. The motility test described could be used as retrospective analysis in abscess localization studies using 111In labelled leukocytes.

  7. Image-based ELISA on an activated polypropylene microtest plate--a spectrophotometer-free low cost assay technique.

    PubMed

    Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip

    2013-10-15

    In this communication, we report ELISA technique on an activated polypropylene microtest plate (APPµTP) as an illustrative example of a low cost diagnostic assay. Activated test zone in APPµTP binds a capture biomolecule through covalent linkage thereby, eliminating non-specific binding often prevalent in absorption based techniques. Efficacy of APPµTP is demonstrated by detecting human immunoglobulin G (IgG), human immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Aspergillus fumigatus antibody in patient's sera. Detection is done by taking the image of the assay solution by a desktop scanner and analyzing the color of the image. Human IgE quantification by color saturation in the image-based assay shows excellent correlation with absorbance-based assay (Pearson correlation coefficient, r=0.992). Significance of the relationship is seen from its p value which is 4.087e-11. Performance of APPµTP is also checked with respect to microtiter plate and paper-based ELISA. APPµTP can quantify an analyte as precisely as in microtiter plate with insignificant non-specific binding, a necessary prerequisite for ELISA assay. In contrast, paper-ELISA shows high non-specific binding in control sera (false positive). Finally, we have carried out ELISA steps on APPµTP by ultrasound waves on a sonicator bath and the results show that even in 8 min, it can convincingly differentiate a test sample from a control sample. In short, spectrophotometer-free image-based miniaturized ELISA on APPµTP is precise, reliable, rapid, and sensitive and could be a good substitute for conventional immunoassay procedures widely used in clinical and research laboratories. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A rapid, valid and inexpensive assay for measuring epiphyseal plates in mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Interlichia, Jillian P; Williams, Nolann G; Rodgers, Buel D

    2010-04-01

    One of the most accurate indices of changes in somatic tissue growth rate in rodents is the width of tibial epiphyseal plates as unlike most mammals, rodent growth plates never ossify. Unfortunately, the original procedure to measure tibial epiphyseal plate width (TEPW) was developed for rats and yields poor results with mice. This paper demonstrates a simple method for silver staining growth plates that can be used to inexpensively and quickly measure the TEPW of mice. Poor visualization due to overstaining and the shattering of growth plates necessitated several revisions to the original protocol. These include exposing the growth plate prior to acetone dehydration, reducing the silver nitrate concentration from 2% to 1.5% and staining time from 2 min to 10 s and finally, the use of reflective light rather than transmissive light when imaging. The optimized protocol was then validated by generating an age-dependent TEPW growth curve that matched changes in tibia length. A total of 120 tibias were processed in a combined time of less than one day and for less than $30. By contrast, histological processing in the university's core facility would have cost $1440 and taken approximately three weeks. Thus, the revised protocol is vastly more cost effective, reliable and can be performed considerably quicker with minimal training.

  9. Establishment of a miniaturized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human transferrin quantification using an intelligent multifunctional analytical plate.

    PubMed

    Spies, Peter; Chen, Guo Jun; Gygax, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    A miniaturized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a reaction volume of 5 microl for human transferrin quantification has successfully been developed using an intelligent multifunctional analytical plate (IMAPlate 5RC96), the first miniature analytical platform capable of manually performing parallel liquid transfer, reaction, and analysis. This is the first article to validate the platform for the ELISA application. The data obtained from the standards in this miniaturized ELISA can well be fitted by a one-site binding reaction mode, the coefficient of variation (CV) of the whole plate for an artificial sample (spiking a known concentration of human transferrin into the assay diluent) is 7.0%, and the mean recovery is between 94 and 114% (n=96), comparable to the values from conventional ELISA in a 96-well format plate. The IMAPlate 5RC96-based miniaturized ELISA not only can reduce sample and reagent consumption to 5% of the conventional ELISA but also can shorten the reaction time. Combined with the advantages brought by miniaturization, the easy-to-handle, parallel, and simultaneous liquid transfer features of the IMAPlate 5RC96 provide a completely new lab tool for manually performing high-throughput ELISA. Our results demonstrate that the IMAPlate 5RC96 is a convenient, robust, high-throughput lab device feasible for miniaturized ELISA in an ordinary laboratory.

  10. Comparison of GD2 Binding Capture ELISA Assays for Anti-GD2-Antibodies Using GD2-Coated Plates and a GD2-Expressing Cell-Based ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Gopalan; Yang, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Hengguang; Giardina, Steve; Mitra, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Two assay methods for quantification of the disialoganglioside (GD2)-specific binding activities of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies and antibody immunofusion proteins, such as ch14.18 and hu14.18-IL2, were developed. The methods differed in the use of either microtiter plates coated with purified GD2 or plates seeded with GD2-expressing cell lines to bind the anti-GD2 molecules. The bound antibodies were subsequently detected using the reactivity of the antibodies to an HRP-labeled anti-IgG Fc or antibodies recognizing the conjugate IL-2 part of the Hu 14.18IL-2 fusion protein. The bound HRP was detected using reagents such as orthophenylene diamine, 2, 2’-azinobis [3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid] or tetramethylbenzidine. The capture ELISA using GD2-coated plates was developed earlier in assay development and used to demonstrate assay specificity and to compare lot-to-lot consistency and stability of ch14.18, and Hu14.18 IL-2 in clinical development. During this study, we found a number of issues related to plate-to-plate variability, GD2 lot variability, and variations due to GD2 storage stability, etc., that frequently lead to assay failure in plates coated with purified GD2. The cell-based ELISA (CbELISA) using the GD2 expressing melanoma cell line, M21/P6, was developed as an alternative to the GD2-coated plate ELISA. The results on the comparability of the capture ELISA on GD2-coated plates and the cell-based assay show that both assays give comparable results. However, the cell-based assay is more consistent and reproducible. Subsequently, the anti-GD2 capture ELISA using the GD2-coated plate was replaced with the CbELISA for product lot release testing and stability assessment. PMID:21893062

  11. Evaluation of the Double Agar Gel Immunodiffusion Test and of the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay in the Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Patients with Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Priscila Zacarias; Sylvestre, Tatiane Fernanda; Cavalcante, Ricardo de Souza; de Carvalho, Lídia Raquel; Moris, Daniela Vanessa; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor; Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) depends on the radiologic image and the identification of specific antibodies. The present study aimed to evaluate accuracy parameters of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and of the determination of serum galactomannan level in the diagnosis of patients with CPA, comparing these results with the double agar gel immunodiffusion (DID) test. In addition, the prevalence of cross-reactivity and the serological progression after treatment were evaluated by comparing DID and ELISA. Six study groups were formed: G1: 22 patients with CPA, 17 of whom had Aspergillus fungus ball, one chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis (CCPA) and four chronic fibrosing pulmonary aspergillosis (CFPA); G2: 28 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB); G3: 23 patients with histoplasmosis (HST); G4: 50 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM); G5: 20 patients with cryptococcosis (CRC); and G6: 200 healthy controls. Serum antibodies were measured by DID and ELISA, with two antigen preparations--Aspergillus fumigatus (DID1, ELISA1) and a pool of A. fumigatus, A. flavus and A. niger antigens (DID2, ELISA2). The Platélia Aspergillus Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) kit was used to measure galactomannan. The cut-off points of ELISA were determined for each antigen preparation and for the 95% and 99% confidence intervals. Despite the low sensitivity, DID was the technique of choice due to its specificity, positive and negative predictive values and positive likelihood ratio-especially with the antigen pool and due to the low frequency of cross-reactivity. ELISA1 and a 0.090 cut-off showed high sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value, but a high frequency of cross-reactivity with CRC. The best degree of agreement was observed between ELISA1 and ELISA2. The detection of serum galactomannan showed high sensitivity, comparable to ELISA2. The immunodiffusion test showed an excellent relationship with the progression after

  12. An enzyme-amplified microtiter plate assay for ethanol: Its application to the detection of peanut ethanol and alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.Y.; Vercellotti, J.R.; Sanders, T.H.

    1995-12-01

    A calorimetric microliter plate assay for ethanol amplified by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was developed. In the assay ethanol from a sample took part in a chain-reaction catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and amplified by ALDH in the presence of NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, and p-ibdonitrotetrazolium-violet (INT-violet)(a precursor of red product). The resultant reaction gave a red color, the intensity of which was proportional to the amount of ethanol present. Using the technique, the content of activity from peanuts of differing maturity and curing stages were determined respectively. Data showed that immature peanuts had a higher level of ethanol and a lower ADH activity than mature peanuts, and that the level of ethanol and ADH activity decreased with the curing time. This indicates that peanut maturity and curing have an effect on ethanol. Also, this implies that other peanut volatiles could be affected in the same way as ethanol, a major volatile in peanuts.

  13. A human CXCL13-induced actin polymerization assay measured by fluorescence plate reader.

    PubMed

    Alley, Jennifer; Bloom, Laird; Kasaian, Marion; Gao, Huilan; Berstein, Gabriel; Clark, James D; Miao, Wenyan

    2010-02-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR5 is predominantly expressed on mature B cells and follicular T-helper cells. CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13 participate in ectopic germinal center formation at the inflammatory sites of multiple immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and Sjogren's syndrome. Therefore, disrupting CXCL13-induced chemotaxis may be a fruitful approach for developing therapeutics in treating these diseases. Cells undergo cytoskeletal rearrangement prior to chemotaxis, and therefore actin polymerization can be used as a surrogate readout more proximal to chemokine receptor activation than chemotaxis. Conventionally, actin polymerization is measured by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry, which are either of low throughput or in need of special instruments. We developed a 96-well actin polymerization assay that can process 1,000 to 1,500 samples a day. This assay uses a standard laboratory fluorescence microplate reader as the detection instrument and was optimized for various experimental conditions such as cell density, actin filament staining reagent, staining buffer, and cell culture conditions. We demonstrate that this actin polymerization assay in 96-well format exhibits the expected pharmacology for human CXCR5 and is suitable as a primary functional assay to screen neutralizing scFv in crude bacterial peri-preps and a secondary assay for small compound collections.

  14. Development of a Plate-Based Screening Assay to Investigate the Substrate Specificity of the PRMT Family of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hao C; Wang, Min; Salsburg, Andrew; Knuckley, Bryan

    2015-09-14

    There are nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs 1-9) expressed in humans that vary in both subcellular localization and substrate specificity. The variation in substrate specificity between isozymes leads to competing effects that result in either activation or repression of tumor suppressor genes. Current methods used to study substrate specificity for these enzymes utilize radioisotopic labeling of substrates, mass spectrometry analysis of complex samples, or coupled assays that monitor cofactor degradation. Herein, we report the development of a rapid, nonradioactive, and sensitive method for screening multiple peptides in parallel to gain insight into the substrate specificity of PRMT enzymes. Our assay provides a major advantage over other high-throughput screening assays (e.g., ELISA, AlphaScreen chemiluminescence) by eliminating the need for purification of individual peptides and provides a timesaving, cost-effective alternative to the traditional PRMT assays. A one-bead one-compound (OBOC) peptide library was synthesized and subsequently screened against PRMT1 in a 96-well plate. This screen resulted in identification of a novel PRMT1 substrate with kinetic parameters similar to histone H4-21 (e.g., the best-known PRMT1 peptide substrate).

  15. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-04-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases - pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, D-amino acid oxidase, and L-lactate oxidase - was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs.

  16. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases – pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, d-amino acid oxidase, and l-lactate oxidase – was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  17. High-throughput microtitre plate-based assay for DNA topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James A; Burton, Nicolas P; Maxwell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a rapid, high-throughput assay for measuring the catalytic activity (DNA supercoiling or relaxation) of DNA topoisomerases. The assay utilizes intermolecular triplex formation between an immobilized triplex-forming oligo (TFO) and a triplex-forming region inserted into the plasmid substrate (pNO1), and capitalizes on the observation that supercoiled DNA forms triplexes more readily than relaxed DNA. Thus, supercoiled DNA is preferentially retained by the TFO under triplex-forming conditions while relaxed DNA can be washed away. Due to its high speed of sample analysis and reduced sample handling over conventional gel-based techniques, this assay can be used to screen chemical libraries for novel inhibitors of topoisomerases.

  18. Human tear analysis with miniaturized multiplex cytokine assay on "wall-less" 96-well plate.

    PubMed

    Le Guezennec, Xavier; Quah, Joanne; Tong, Louis; Kim, Namyong

    2015-01-01

    Tears are a particularly limited body fluid and commonly used in the diagnosis of patients who have ocular diseases. A popular method for analysis of ocular inflammation in tears uses Luminex® bead multiplex technology to generate valuable multiple cytokine profile outputs with 25-50 µl tear sample volume. We propose a method for measuring tear cytokines with 5 μl tear sample volume and 80% reduced Luminex reagents compared to previous protocols. Using human tears pooled from 1,000 participants, the DA-Bead-based method running at 5-20 µl volume, using manual pipetting, in conjunction with a magnetic Luminex cytokine (four-plex) panel assay in a 96-well format was performed and validated for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Upon use of the DA-Bead method at the 5 μl volume with cytokine standards, the concentrations of each of the four cytokines were found to be linear over a range of 3.5-4 log pg/ml with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) ≤5%, inter-assay %CV ≤10%, and accuracy within the 70-130% range. Upon use of a 5 µl healthy pooled tear sample, cytokine concentrations were detected with a precision intra-assay %CV ˂ 20% for IL-6, IFN-γ, or TNF-α or 30.37% with IL-1β. The inter-assay %CV with tears was ≤20.84% for all cytokines. Tear volumes run at 5 μl on DA-Bead produced a similar cytokine expression profile at a 1-month interval and were highly correlated with the larger 10 μl-based tear sample volume cytokine profile with R(2) = 0.98. DA-Bead assay is highly sensitive and reproducible and has a performance profile that is potentially suitable for use in standard clinical scenarios. Considering the use of as little as 5 µl of assay beads and 5 µl sample, this is also likely to reduce the assay cost significantly and ease diagnosis of patients with ocular diseases.

  19. Human tear analysis with miniaturized multiplex cytokine assay on “wall-less” 96-well plate

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Joanne; Tong, Louis; Kim, Namyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Tears are a particularly limited body fluid and commonly used in the diagnosis of patients who have ocular diseases. A popular method for analysis of ocular inflammation in tears uses Luminex® bead multiplex technology to generate valuable multiple cytokine profile outputs with 25–50 µl tear sample volume. We propose a method for measuring tear cytokines with 5 μl tear sample volume and 80% reduced Luminex reagents compared to previous protocols. Methods Using human tears pooled from 1,000 participants, the DA-Bead-based method running at 5–20 µl volume, using manual pipetting, in conjunction with a magnetic Luminex cytokine (four-plex) panel assay in a 96-well format was performed and validated for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Results Upon use of the DA-Bead method at the 5 μl volume with cytokine standards, the concentrations of each of the four cytokines were found to be linear over a range of 3.5–4 log pg/ml with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) ≤5%, inter-assay %CV ≤10%, and accuracy within the 70–130% range. Upon use of a 5 µl healthy pooled tear sample, cytokine concentrations were detected with a precision intra-assay %CV ˂ 20% for IL-6, IFN-γ, or TNF-α or 30.37% with IL-1β. The inter-assay %CV with tears was ≤20.84% for all cytokines. Tear volumes run at 5 μl on DA-Bead produced a similar cytokine expression profile at a 1-month interval and were highly correlated with the larger 10 μl–based tear sample volume cytokine profile with R2 = 0.98. Conclusions DA-Bead assay is highly sensitive and reproducible and has a performance profile that is potentially suitable for use in standard clinical scenarios. Considering the use of as little as 5 µl of assay beads and 5 µl sample, this is also likely to reduce the assay cost significantly and ease diagnosis of patients with ocular diseases. PMID:26539027

  20. 96-Well Plate Colorimetric Assay for K(sub i) Determination of (plusmn)-2-Benzylsuccinic Acid, an Inhibitor of Carboxypeptidase A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentland, Mark P.; Raza, Shaan; Yingtong Gao

    2004-01-01

    An appropriate assay to determine the inhibition potency of carboxypeptidase A (CPA) in 96-well format to illustrate how high throughput screening is used in modern drug discovery to identify bioactive molecules is developed. Efforts in developing a colorimetric 96-well plate assay for determination of the K(sub i) for inhibition of CPA by…

  1. 96-Well Plate Colorimetric Assay for K(sub i) Determination of (plusmn)-2-Benzylsuccinic Acid, an Inhibitor of Carboxypeptidase A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentland, Mark P.; Raza, Shaan; Yingtong Gao

    2004-01-01

    An appropriate assay to determine the inhibition potency of carboxypeptidase A (CPA) in 96-well format to illustrate how high throughput screening is used in modern drug discovery to identify bioactive molecules is developed. Efforts in developing a colorimetric 96-well plate assay for determination of the K(sub i) for inhibition of CPA by…

  2. High-throughput micro plate vanillin assay for determination of tannin in sorghum grain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sorghum tannins are phenolic compounds that offer health promoting antioxidant properties. The conventional HCl-vanillin assay for determining tannin content is a time-consuming method for screening large sample sets as seen in association mapping panels or breeder nursery samples. The objective of ...

  3. Electro-osmosis in gels: Application to Agar-Agar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, Fabien; Boscus, Jérôme; Bénet, Jean-Claude

    2008-10-01

    Widely used in food- and bio-engineering as a reference material, Agar-Agar gel is the focus of an experimental investigation concerning the electro-osmosis phenomenon. After presenting the experimental methods, one trial is discussed in detail. A fair reproducibility of results is obtained, and the averaged electro-osmotic permeability is provided. This value lies in the range generally measured on various kind of soils, even if Agar-Agar gel does not share any micro-structural characteristics with soils. To cite this article: F. Cherblanc et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  4. Evaluation of the Double Agar Gel Immunodiffusion Test and of the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay in the Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Patients with Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Priscila Zacarias; Sylvestre, Tatiane Fernanda; Cavalcante, Ricardo de Souza; de Carvalho, Lídia Raquel; Moris, Daniela Vanessa; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor; Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) depends on the radiologic image and the identification of specific antibodies. The present study aimed to evaluate accuracy parameters of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and of the determination of serum galactomannan level in the diagnosis of patients with CPA, comparing these results with the double agar gel immunodiffusion (DID) test. In addition, the prevalence of cross-reactivity and the serological progression after treatment were evaluated by comparing DID and ELISA. Six study groups were formed: G1: 22 patients with CPA, 17 of whom had Aspergillus fungus ball, one chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis (CCPA) and four chronic fibrosing pulmonary aspergillosis (CFPA); G2: 28 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB); G3: 23 patients with histoplasmosis (HST); G4: 50 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM); G5: 20 patients with cryptococcosis (CRC); and G6: 200 healthy controls. Serum antibodies were measured by DID and ELISA, with two antigen preparations—Aspergillus fumigatus (DID1, ELISA1) and a pool of A. fumigatus, A. flavus and A. niger antigens (DID2, ELISA2). The Platélia Aspergillus Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) kit was used to measure galactomannan. The cut-off points of ELISA were determined for each antigen preparation and for the 95% and 99% confidence intervals. Despite the low sensitivity, DID was the technique of choice due to its specificity, positive and negative predictive values and positive likelihood ratio–especially with the antigen pool and due to the low frequency of cross-reactivity. ELISA1 and a 0.090 cut-off showed high sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value, but a high frequency of cross-reactivity with CRC. The best degree of agreement was observed between ELISA1 and ELISA2. The detection of serum galactomannan showed high sensitivity, comparable to ELISA2. The immunodiffusion test showed an excellent relationship with the progression after

  5. Assessment of a 96-Well Plate Assay of Quantitative Drug Susceptibility Testing for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex in China

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hui; Zheng, Yang; Zhao, Bing; van den Hof, Susan; Cobelens, Frank; Zhao, YanLin

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of the Sensitire MYCOTB MIC Plate (MYCOTB) which could measure the twelve anti-tuberculosis drugs susceptibility on one 96-wells plate. Methods A total of 140 MDR-TB strains and 60 non-MDR strains were sub-cultured and 193 strains were finally tested for drug resistance using MYCOTB and agar proportion method (APM) and another 7 strains failed of subculture. The drugs included ofloxacin (Ofx), moxifloxacin (Mfx), rifampin (RFP), amikacin (Am), rifabutin (Rfb), para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), ethionamide (Eth), isoniazid (INH), kanamycin (Km), ethambutol (EMB), streptomycin (Sm), and cycloserine(Cs). The categorical agreement, conditional agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MYCOTB were assessed in comparison with APM. For strains with inconsistent results between MYCOTB and APM, the drug resistance related gene fragments were amplified and sequenced: gyrA for Ofx and Mfx; rpoB for RFP and Rfb; embB for EMB; rpsl for Sm; katG and the promoter region of inhA for INH, ethA and the promoter region of inhA for Eth. The sequence results were compared with results of MYCOTB and APM to analyze the consistency between sequence results and MYCOTB or APM. Results The categorical agreement between two methods for each drug ranged from 88.6% to 100%. It was the lowest for INH (88.6%). The sensitivity and specificity of MYCOTB ranged from 71.4% to 100% and 84.3% to 100%, respectively. The sensitivity was lowest for Cs(71.4%), EMB at 10μg/ml (80.0%) and INH at 10.0μg/ml (84.6%). The specificity was lowest for Rfb (84.3%). Overall discordance between the two phenotypic methods was observed for 96 strains, of which 63 (65.6%) were found susceptible with APM and resistant with MYCOTB and the remaining 33(34.4%) strains were resistant by APM and susceptible with MYCOTB. 34/52 (65.4%) sequenced APM susceptible and MYCOTB resistant(APM-S/MYCOTB-R) strains had mutations or insertions in the amplified regions. 20/30 (66.7%) sequenced APM

  6. Serum sialic acid enzymatic assay based on microtitre plates: application for measuring capillary serum sialic acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H; Chusney, G D; Crook, M A; Pickup, J C

    1993-06-01

    We have adapted a commercially-available kit for the enzymatic determination of sialic acid so that the reaction can be carried out in microtitre wells and the coloured end product quantitated on an ELISA plate reader. The small volume of serum used allows sialic acid to be measured in capillary blood samples. The assay was based on release of sialic acid from glycoconjugates by neuraminidase, cleavage of sialic acid by N-acetyl neuraminic acid aldolase to pyruvate, and then oxidation of pyruvate to hydrogen peroxide by pyruvate oxidase. Hydrogen peroxide was determined by the red product formed in the presence of peroxidase, 4-aminoantipyrine and N-ethyl-N-2-hydroxyethyl-3-toluidine. The assay was linear to at least 10 mmol/l and unaffected by haemolysis, and by the addition of glucose, 3-hydroxybutyrate, bilirubin and pyruvate. Capillary serum sialic acid concentrations were not significantly different from simultaneously measured venous serum sialic acid levels. Self-collected capillary blood samples were obtained from healthy subjects over 6 h during the day. No variations in serum sialic acid concentrations were found in response to a meal. We conclude that this micro-adaptation of a specific sialic acid assay will be suitable for epidemiological surveys of serum sialic acid collected by patients and normal subjects.

  7. Semiautomated microtiter plate assay for monitoring peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase activity in normal and pathological human sera.

    PubMed

    Küllertz, G; Lüthe, S; Fischer, G

    1998-03-01

    An UV/VIS spectrophotometric assay technique was developed that was able to routinely monitor peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity of biological fluids in 96-well microtiter plates. The assay, based on monitoring the cis-to-trans isomerization of succinyl-Phe-cisPro-Phe-4-nitroanilide as substrate in a chymotrypsin-coupled reaction, yields a throughput of 96 samples per 30 min. The assay's capacity was exemplified by dealing with the PPIase activity in several normal and pathological human sera. Reference values of 151 healthy subjects (83 females, 69 males, 17 to 60 years old) were found to possess significant sex-specific differences. PPIase activity factor K of the sera was significantly greater in males (5th, 50th, 95th percentiles: 17, 36, 55 K) than females (14, 30, 48 K). PPIase activities of sera from healthy donors (n = 151) were significantly higher (Mann-Whitney rank-sum test P < 0.0001) than those of patients (n = 47). PPIase activity in serum samples stored at 4 degrees C was stable for at least 20 h.

  8. Understanding colonization and proliferation potential of endophytes and pathogen in planta via plating, polymerase chain reaction and ergosterol assay.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yiing Yng; Rahman, Sadequr; Ting, Adeline Su Yien

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to establish the colonization behavior and proliferation potential of three endophytes and one pathogen Ganoderma boninense (Gb) introduced into oil palm ramets (host model). The endophytes selected were Diaporthe phaseolorum (WAA02), Trichoderma asperellum (T2), and Penicillium citrinum (BTF08). Ramets were first inoculated with 100 mL of fungal cells (10(6) cfu mL(-)(1)) via soil drenching. For the next 7 days, ramets were sampled and subjected to three different assays to detect and identify fungal colonization, and establish their proliferation potential in planta. Plate assay revealed the presence of endophytes in root, stem and leaf tissues within 7 days after inoculation. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) detected and identified the isolates from the plant tissues. The ergosterol assay (via high performance liquid chromatography, HPLC) confirmed the presence of endophytes and Gb in planta. The increase in ergosterol levels throughout 49 days was however insignificant, suggesting that proliferation may be absent or may occur very slowly in planta. This study strongly suggests that the selected endophytes could colonize the host upon inoculation, but proliferation occurs at a slower rate, which may subsequently influence the biocontrol expression of endophytes against the pathogen.

  9. Colony growth of Philippine isolates of Blastocystis hominis in simplified, soft agar medium.

    PubMed

    Valido, Ezra M; Rivera, Windell L

    2007-06-01

    The agar-cloning technique of Blastocystis hominis has been observed in both solid and semisolid agar using Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium. In this study, Philippine isolates of B. hominis were grown by pour-plate method in semisolid agar using Locke's solution. Inoculated plates contained 0.7% agar, 10% horse serum, and 0.1% sodium thioglycollate. Plates were incubated at 37 degrees C in a microaerophilic jar for 7-10 days. Biconvex disk-shaped colonies were seen abound at the bottom half of the medium. Colonies growing at the agar-glass interface were flat and consisted of thin layers of cells. From these colonies, large amoeboid cells were frequently seen on the periphery, whereas smaller cells were concentrated at the core. Analysis of the SSU rDNA genetically established the identity of the clones to be B. hominis. This is the first report on agar cloning of Blastocystis in a compound medium.

  10. Gravimorphogenesis in agarics.

    PubMed

    Moore, D; Hock, B; Greening, J P; Kern, V D; Novak Frazer, L; Monzer, J

    1996-03-01

    The shape changes which occur in agaric fruit bodies in response to change in the direction of gravity, usually referred to as gravitropism are morphogenetic changes. Our interest in what we prefer to call gravimorphogenesis is to use it to examine morphogenesis experimentally. We are examining two agarics, Coprinus cinereus and Flammulina velutipes, and applying the best available technologies, including video analysis, all forms of electron microscopy, computer-aided image analysis and experiments in orbit in Spacelab. Responses to gravity of the two organisms differ in ways which can be related to their ecological and structural adaptations. C. cinereus reacts extremely rapidly; its fruit body can regain the vertical within 3 h of being placed horizontal, whereas F. velutipes requires 12 h to bend through 90 degrees. The fungi also differ in the bulk of tissue involved in the response. In Coprinus, a zone extending several cm down from the apex is normally involved in bending. In Flammulina, gravisensing is limited to a region just a few mm immediately below the cap, although curvature is performed in a zone of up to 2 cm below. Flammulina cultures were flown on the Spacelab D-2 mission in 1993, and fruit body disorientation in orbit provides the first definitive proof that 'gravitropism' really is a response to the unidirectional gravity vector. Experiments with different clinostat rotation rates in Flammulina indicate that the perception threshold is about 10(-4) x g. Analysis of different times of exposure to an altered gravity vector prior to clinorotation in Coprinus reveals that the perception time is 7 minutes and that continued response requires continued exposure. Cell size determinations in Coprinus demonstrate that cells of the stem increase in length, not diameter, to produce the growth differential. In Flammulina a unique population of highly electron-transparent microvacuoles changes in distribution; decreasing in upper cells and increasing in the

  11. Evaluation of resazurin microtiter plate assay and HPLC- photodiode array analysis of the roots of Asparagus adscendens.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kashif Maqbool; Nahar, Lutfun; Mannan, Abdul; Arfan, Muhammad; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali; Hobbs, Glyn; Sarker, Satyajit D

    2017-07-19

    Asparagus adscendens Roxb. (Asparagaceae), is native to the Himalayas. The present study, for the first time, was undertaken to explore the antimicrobial potential, to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the methanol extract of the roots of A. adscendens and its solid-phase extraction (SPE) fractions using resazurin microtitre assay against Gram-positive and negative bacterial-registered strains and to carry out HPLC-photodiode array analysis of the SPE fractions. The methanol extract and all SPE exhibited considerable level of antibacterial potential against Gram-positive bacteria (MIC: 2.5-0.009 mg/mL) than against Gram-negative bacteria (MIC: 1.25-2.5 mg/mL). The use of microtitre plates has the advantage of lower cost, fast and quantitative results. Like other Asparagus species, the presence of phenolic compounds in all SPE fractions was evident in the HPLC-PDA data.

  12. Agar Underlay Method for Recovery of Sublethally Heat-Injured Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, D. H.; Siragusa, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A method of recovering sublethally heat-injured bacteria was developed. The procedure (termed the agar underlay method) uses a nonselective agar underlaid with a selective medium. In a two-chambered petri dish, the Lutri plate (LP), a nonselective agar is inoculated with a population of sublethally heat-injured bacteria. After a 2-h repair incubation period, selective agar is added to the bottom chamber of the LP and incubated. By diffusing through the nonselective top agar, selective agents from the underlay medium impart selectivity to the system. By the agar underlay method, recovery rates of the heat-injured food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium were not different (P > 0.05) from recovery rates determined with nonselective media. Sublethally heat-injured cells (60°C for 1.5 min in buffer or 80°C for 30 s on meat surfaces) grew and produced a typical colony morphology and color reaction when the agar underlay procedure was used with the appropriate respective selective agars. Unlike agar overlay methods for injury repair, the agar underlay procedure allows the typical selective-medium colony morphology to develop and allows colonies to be more easily picked for further characterization. Higher recovery rates of heat-injured fecal enterococci from bovine fecal samples and total coliforms from animal waste lagoons were obtained by the agar underlay method with selective agars than by direct plating on the respective selective media. PMID:10583985

  13. Prescreening bacterial colonies for bioactive molecules with Janus plates, a SBS standard double-faced microbial culturing system.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Pascual, Javier; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Martín, Jesús; Kath, Gary S; Sigmund, Janet M; Masurekar, Prakash; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Bills, Gerald F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the availability of many culture-based antibiotic screening methods, the lack of sensitive automated methods to identify functional molecules directly from microbial cells still limits the search for new biologically active compounds. The effectiveness of antibiotic detection is influenced by the solubility of the assayed compounds, indicator strain sensitivity, culture media and assay configuration. We describe a qualitative high throughput screening system for detecting cell-perturbing molecules from bacterial colonies employing two opposed agar layers sequentially formed in prototype Society for Biomolecular Screening (SBS) plates, named Janus plates. Direct assay of microbial colonies against target organisms in opposed agar layers overcomes some of the limitations of agar overlay methods. The system enables the rapid detection of extracellular cell-perturbing molecules, e.g., antibiotics, excreted directly from environmental isolates. The source bacterial colonies remain separate from the target organism. The growth layer is prepared and grown independently, so environmental strains can be grown for longer intervals, at temperatures and in media that favor their growth and metabolite expression, while the assay layer with pathogens, usually requiring nutrient-rich medium and elevated temperatures, are added later. Colonies to be tested can be precisely arrayed on the first agar surface, thus avoiding dispersion and disturbance of potential antibiotic-producing colonies by overlaying agar with the target strain. The rectangular SBS configuration facilitates factorial replication of dense microbial colony arrays for testing with multiple assays and assay conditions employing robotic colony pickers and pin tools. Opposed agar layers only slightly reduced the effectiveness for detecting growth inhibition from pure antibiotics compared to single-layer agar diffusion assays. The Janus plate enabled an automation-assisted workflow where a lone operator can

  14. Evaluation of a Test Article in the Salmonella typhimurium/Ecscherichia coli Plate Incorporation Mutation Assay in the Presence and Absence of Induced Rat Liver S-9. Test Article - Diethylene triamine trinitrate (DETN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-25

    the culture is required in order to be metabolized prior to plating . The Pre-Incubation method of treatment is perfonned at the request ofthe...Kalamazoo, Michigan. CULTURE CONDITIONS The cells were grown in Oxoid Nutrient Broth No.2 (Oxoid LTD, Hampshire, England) in a shaker incubator... aseptically placed in the center of the agar overlay. Ten ilL of a 1.0 mg/mL crystal violet solution was then added to the disc. The plates were

  15. Development of a rapid ATP bioluminescence assay for biocidal susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Renuka; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2010-10-01

    An ATP-based biocide susceptibility assay for mycobacteria was developed by optimizing the cell lysis and assay conditions. Compared to the conventional agar plating method, the assay was rapid (1.5 h) and showed high sensitivity and specificity as determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The test species, Mycobacterium immunogenum, M. chelonae, and M. abscessus, showed various susceptibilities to the glutaraldehyde- and isothiazolone-based test biocides.

  16. Automatic agar tray inoculation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic agar tray inoculation device is simple in design and foolproof in operation. It employs either conventional inoculating loop or cotton swab for uniform inoculation of agar media, and it allows technician to carry on with other activities while tray is being inoculated.

  17. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith A.; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts.

  18. Facile preparation of a photoactivatable surface on a 96-well plate: a versatile and multiplex cell migration assay platform.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Masao; Scheideler, Olivia; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Shota; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Jun

    2015-06-07

    Cell migration is an essential cellular activity in various physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. Therefore, in vitro cell migration assays are important not only for fundamental biological studies but also for evaluating potential drugs that control cell migration activity in medical applications. In this regard, robust control over cell migrating microenvironments is critical for reliable and quantitative analysis as cell migration is highly dependent upon the microenvironments. Here, we developed a facile method for making a commercial glass-bottom 96-well plate photoactivatable for cell adhesion, aiming to develop a versatile and multiplex cell migration assay platform. Cationic poly-d-lysine was adsorbed to the anionic glass surface via electrostatic interactions and, subsequently, functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) bearing a photocleavable reactive group. The initial PEGylated surface is non-cell-adhesive. However, upon near-ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, the photorelease of PEG switches the surface from non-biofouling to cell-adhesive. With this platform, we assayed cell migration in the following procedure: (1) create cell-attaching regions of precise geometries by controlled photoirradiation, (2) seed cells to allow them to attach selectively to the irradiated regions, (3) expose UV light to the remaining PEGylated regions to extend the cell-adhesive area, (4) analyse cell migration using microscopy. Surface modification of the glass surface was characterized by ζ-potential and contact angle measurements. The PEGylated surface showed cell-resistivity and became cell-adhesive upon releasing PEG by near-UV irradiation. The method was applied for parallelly evaluating the effect of model drugs on the migration of epithelial MDCK cells in the multiplexed platform. The dose-response relationship for cytochalasin D treatment on cell migration behavior was successfully evaluated with high

  19. Preparation, imaging, and quantification of bacterial surface motility assays.

    PubMed

    Morales-Soto, Nydia; Anyan, Morgen E; Mattingly, Anne E; Madukoma, Chinedu S; Harvey, Cameron W; Alber, Mark; Déziel, Eric; Kearns, Daniel B; Shrout, Joshua D

    2015-04-07

    Bacterial surface motility, such as swarming, is commonly examined in the laboratory using plate assays that necessitate specific concentrations of agar and sometimes inclusion of specific nutrients in the growth medium. The preparation of such explicit media and surface growth conditions serves to provide the favorable conditions that allow not just bacterial growth but coordinated motility of bacteria over these surfaces within thin liquid films. Reproducibility of swarm plate and other surface motility plate assays can be a major challenge. Especially for more "temperate swarmers" that exhibit motility only within agar ranges of 0.4%-0.8% (wt/vol), minor changes in protocol or laboratory environment can greatly influence swarm assay results. "Wettability", or water content at the liquid-solid-air interface of these plate assays, is often a key variable to be controlled. An additional challenge in assessing swarming is how to quantify observed differences between any two (or more) experiments. Here we detail a versatile two-phase protocol to prepare and image swarm assays. We include guidelines to circumvent the challenges commonly associated with swarm assay media preparation and quantification of data from these assays. We specifically demonstrate our method using bacteria that express fluorescent or bioluminescent genetic reporters like green fluorescent protein (GFP), luciferase (lux operon), or cellular stains to enable time-lapse optical imaging. We further demonstrate the ability of our method to track competing swarming species in the same experiment.

  20. Procedure for the Transfer of Small Discs of Agar-Containing Media Under Sterile Conditions and Some Applications of This Technique (Agar Disc Auxanography)

    PubMed Central

    Woolfolk, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    Small agar discs are formed and transferred under sterile conditions. This technique permits the efficient and versatile use of the petri plate when many growth conditions and (or) cultures are being examined. Images PMID:4943593

  1. Selection of Brain Metastasis-Initiating Breast Cancer Cells Determined by Growth on Hard Agar

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Langley, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44+ and CD133+ and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice. PMID:21514446

  2. Selection of brain metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells determined by growth on hard agar.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J; Langley, Robert R

    2011-05-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44(+) and CD133(+) and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice.

  3. Modified agar diffusion bioassay for better quantification of Nisaplin(®).

    PubMed

    Lalpuria, M; Karwa, V; Anantheswaran, R C; Floros, J D

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effect of different well sizes and pre-diffusion times at 4 °C, on the sensitivity, accuracy and precision of nisin quantification by agar diffusion bioassay. Nisin solution (0.625-125 μg ml(-1) ) was filled in wells (3.5 mm or 7 mm diameter) made on agar plates inoculated with Micrococcus luteus, followed by pre-diffusion (0, 24, 48 or 72 h), incubation and measurement of inhibition zone. Regression analysis indicated that wells with 3.5 mm diameter had smaller standard deviation and higher predictive accuracy, compared to wells with 7 mm diameter. Based on Tukey's test, pre-diffusion resulted in significantly different inhibition zones at different nisin concentrations. Pre-diffusion also improved sensitivity of the assay. Different regression models were considered to explore the relationship between inhibition zone and nisin concentration for different pre-diffusion times. A spline model was determined to be the best-fit model, and 48 h was the best pre-diffusion time. Wells with 3.5 mm diameter demonstrated higher accuracy for nisin quantification compared to wells with 7 mm diameter. 48 h was the best pre-diffusion time for nisin concentration in the range 0.625-125 μg ml(-1) . The findings from this study will be helpful in quantifying nisin and compounds with antimicrobial properties accurately over a wide range of concentrations using agar diffusion bioassay. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Recovery of Sublethally Injured Bacteria Using Selective Agar Overlays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, John L.

    2001-01-01

    This experiment subjects bacteria in a food sample and an environmental sample to conditions of sublethal stress in order to assess the effectiveness of the agar overlay method to recover sublethally injured cells compared to direct plating onto the appropriate selective medium. (SAH)

  5. Evaluation of microtiter-plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the analysis of triazine and chloroacetanilide herbicides in rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomes, M.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Triazine and chloroacetanilide concentrations in rainfall samples collected from a 23-state region of the United States were analyzed with microtiter-plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thirty-six percent of rainfall samples (2072 out of 5691) were confirmed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to evaluate the operating performance of ELISA as a screening test. Comparison of ELISA to GC/MS results showed that the two ELISA methods accurately reported GC/MS results (m = 1), but with more variability evident with the triazine than with the chloroacetanilide ELISA. Bayes's rule, a standardized method to report the results of screening tests, indicated that the two ELISA methods yielded comparable predictive values (80%), but the triazine ELISA yielded a false- positive rate of 11.8% and the chloroacetanilide ELISA yielded a false- negative rate of 23.1%. The false-positive rate for the triazine ELISA may arise from cross reactivity with an unknown triazine or metabolite. The false-negative rate of the chloroacetanilide ELISA probably resulted from a combination of low sensitivity at the reporting limit of 0.15 ??g/L and a distribution characterized by 75% of the samples at or below the reporting limit of 0.15 ??g/L.Triazine and chloroacetanilide concentrations in rainfall samples collected from a 23-state region of the United States were analyzed with microtiter-plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thirty-six percent of rainfall samples (2072 out of 5691) were confirmed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to evaluate the operating performance of ELISA as a screening test. Comparison of ELISA to GC/MS results showed that the two ELISA methods accurately reported GC/MS results (m = 1), but with more variability evident with the triazine than with the chloroacetanilide ELISA. Bayes's rule, a standardized method to report the results of screening tests, indicated that the two ELISA methods yielded comparable predictive

  6. Growth of Desulfovibrio on the Surface of Agar Media

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, Warren P.

    1966-01-01

    Growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (API strain) was found to take place in an atmosphere of hydrogen on the agar surface of complex media, including yeast extract (Difco), and Trypticase Soy Agar (BBL) without any added reducing agents. For growth on a 2% yeast extract-agar surface in the absence of hydrogen (nitrogen atmosphere), sodium lactate was required in the medium. Growth on the surface of Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA) under nitrogen took place readily in the absence of an added hydrogen donor. A medium (TSA plus salts) is described based upon the addition of sodium lactate (4 ml per liter), magnesium sulfate (2 g per liter), and ferrous ammonium sulfate (0.05%) to TSA, which appears suitable for the isolation and growth of Desulfovibrio on the surface of agar plates in an atmosphere of hydrogen. Sodium lactate does not appear to be essential in this medium for good growth and sulfate reduction in a hydrogen atmosphere, but is essential in a nitrogen atmosphere. Growth of Desulfovibrio (hydrogen atmosphere) on the agar surface of media commonly used for its cultivation as well as on an inorganic medium containing bicarbonate as a source of carbon is poor and erratic unless inoculated (Desulfovibrio) plates of TSA plus salts are incubated in the same container with plates of these media. This stimulatory effect of incubation with inoculated plates of TSA plus salts medium appears to be due to as yet unidentified volatile material produced by D. desulfuricans when growing on this medium. Another volatile material, or possibly the identical material, appears to act similarly to a hydrogen donor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:5955798

  7. Aptamer-Based Single-Step Assay by the Fluorescence Enhancement on Electroless Plated Nano Au Substrate.

    PubMed

    Nambi Krishnan, Jegatha; Park, Sang-Hwi; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2017-09-07

    A new single-step aptamer-based surface-enhanced fluorescent optical sensor is built, by combining an aptamer-target interaction for target recognition and a fluorophore interaction for signal enhancement. The developed aptasensor is simple, sensitive, specific and stable for the detection of thrombin. A new nanometallic Au structure in the range of 100 nm was constructed through effective electroless plating method on a Cu thin film. Cu⁺ ions act as sacrificial seeds for the reduction of Au(2+/3+) ions to form Au nanolawns. In order to utilize the structure for a fluorescence-based sensor, aptamer conjugated with Cy3 was immobilized on the nanogold substrate through electrostatic attraction. The Au substrate was coated with chitosan (molecular weight 1000 Da). Thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) was applied as a model system demonstrating the aptamer-based fluorescence assay on nanogold substrates. Thrice-enhanced fluorescence emission was achieved with Cy3-conjugated TBA stably immobilized on the chitosan-coated Au substrate. The intensity change was proportional to the concentration of thrombin from 10 μM to 10 pM, whereas the intensity change was ignorable for other proteins such as human serum albumin (HSA). Aptamer-based assay benefited from simple immobilization of receptors and Au nanostructure contributed in building an effective surface enhancing/positively charged substrate was proved. Such an aptasensor holding high utilities for point-of-care devices by incorporating simplicity, sensitivity and selectivity in detection, low-cost for test, small sample volumes has been developed.

  8. Isothermal microcalorimetry accurately detects bacteria, tumorous microtissues, and parasitic worms in a label-free well-plate assay

    PubMed Central

    Braissant, Olivier; Keiser, Jennifer; Meister, Isabel; Bachmann, Alexander; Wirz, Dieter; Göpfert, Beat; Bonkat, Gernot; Wadsö, Ingemar

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry is a label-free assay that allows monitoring of enzymatic and metabolic activities. The technique has strengths, but most instruments have a low throughput, which has limited their use for bioassays. Here, an isothermal microcalorimeter, equipped with a vessel holder similar to a 48-well plate, was used. The increased throughput of this microcalorimeter makes it valuable for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our results show that the sensitivity of the instrument allows the detection of 3 × 104 bacteria per vial. Growth of P. mirabilis in Luria Broth medium was detected between 2 and 9 h with decreasing inoculum. The culture released 2.1J with a maximum thermal power of 76 μW. The growth rate calculated using calorimetric and spectrophotometric data were 0.60 and 0.57 h–1, respectively. Additional insight on protease activities of P. mirabilis matching the last peak in heat production could be gathered as well. Growth of tumor microtissues releasing a maximum thermal power of 2.1 μW was also monitored and corresponds to a diameter increase of the microtissues from ca. 100 to 428 μm. This opens new research avenues in cancer research, diagnostics, and development of new antitumor drugs. For parasitic worms, the technique allows assessment of parasite survival using motor and metabolic activities even with a single worm. PMID:25511812

  9. Fastidious anaerobe agar compared with Wilkins-Chalgren agar, brain heart infusion agar, and brucella agar for susceptibility testing of Fusobacterium species.

    PubMed Central

    Brazier, J S; Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Ostovari, M I

    1990-01-01

    Fastidious anaerobe agar supported the growth of 82 strains of fusobacteria better than brain heart infusion agar, brucella agar, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Fastidious anaerobe agar showed less hazing and fewer tailing endpoints with beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-blood supplementation improved the performance of all media. Wilkins-Chalgren agar without blood failed to support the growth of 17% of the strains. All Fusobacterium ulcerans strains were resistant to clindamycin. PMID:2073122

  10. Fastidious anaerobe agar compared with Wilkins-Chalgren agar, brain heart infusion agar, and brucella agar for susceptibility testing of Fusobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S; Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Ostovari, M I

    1990-11-01

    Fastidious anaerobe agar supported the growth of 82 strains of fusobacteria better than brain heart infusion agar, brucella agar, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Fastidious anaerobe agar showed less hazing and fewer tailing endpoints with beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-blood supplementation improved the performance of all media. Wilkins-Chalgren agar without blood failed to support the growth of 17% of the strains. All Fusobacterium ulcerans strains were resistant to clindamycin.

  11. A simple micro-extraction plate assay for automated LC-MS/MS analysis of human serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

    PubMed

    Geib, Timon; Meier, Florian; Schorr, Pascal; Lammert, Frank; Stokes, Caroline S; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-01-01

    This short application note describes a simple and automated assay for determination of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in very small volumes of human serum. It utilizes commercial 96-well micro-extraction plates with commercial 25(OH)D isotope calibration and quality control kits. Separation was achieved using a pentafluorophenyl liquid chromatography column followed by multiple reaction monitoring-based quantification on an electrospray triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on providing a simple assay that can be rapidly established in non-specialized laboratories within days, without the need for laborious and time consuming sample preparation steps, advanced calibration or data acquisition routines. The analytical figures of merit obtained from this assay compared well to established assays. To demonstrate the applicability, the assay was applied to analysis of serum samples from patients with chronic liver diseases and compared to results from a routine clinical immunoassay.

  12. A solid agar overlay method for recovery of heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhinong; Gurtler, Joshua B; Kornacki, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-01

    A solid agar overlay method was developed for recovery of heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes. Presolidified nonselective tryptic soy agar with 0.6% yeast extract (TSAYE, 2% agar) was overlaid on top of solidified modified Oxford agar (MOX). Heat injury of L. monocytogenes was conducted at 58 degrees C for 6 min in a jacketed flask filled with tryptic soy broth. Both noninjured and heat-treated L. monocytogenes cells were plated onto TSAYE, MOX, and TSAYE-MOX plates. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in recovery were found among the three media for noninjured bacterial cells. Recovery of heat-injured L. monocytogenes cells on TSAYE-MOX overlay plates was equivalent to that on the nonselective TSAYE medium, whereas recovery on the selective MOX medium was significantly lower (P < 0.05) compared with both TSAYE and the overlay plates. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) among the overlay plates prepared 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16, and 24 h prior to plating heat-injured bacterial cells. The TSAYE-MOX overlay also allowed differentiation of L. monocytogenes from a mixture of four other types of foodborne pathogens. This solid agar overlay method for recovery of heat-injured L. monocytogenes cells is less time-consuming and less complicated than the conventional overlay-underlay technique and the double overlay modification of the thin agar layer method and may allow for greater laboratory plating efficiencies.

  13. Agar degradation by microorganisms and agar-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Won-Jae; Chang, Yong-Keun; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2012-05-01

    Agar is a mixture of heterogeneous galactans, mainly composed of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactoses (or L-galactose-6-sulfates) D-galactoses and L-galactoses (routinely in the forms of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactoses or L-galactose-6-sulfates) alternately linked by β-(1,4) and α-(1,3) linkages. It is a major component of the cell walls of red algae and has been used in a variety of laboratory and industrial applications, owing to its jellifying properties. Many microorganisms that can hydrolyze and metabolize agar as a carbon and energy source have been identified in seawater and marine sediments. Agarolytic microorganisms commonly produce agarases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of agar. Numerous agarases have been identified in microorganisms of various genera. They are classified according to their cleavage pattern into three types-α-agarase, β-agarase, and β-porphyranase. Although, in a broad sense, many other agarases are involved in complete hydrolysis of agar, most of those identified are β-agarases. In this article we review agarolytic microorganisms and their agar-hydrolyzing systems, covering β-agarases as well as α-agarases, α-neoagarobiose hydrolases, and β-porphyranases, with emphasis on the recent discoveries. We also present an overview of the biochemical and structural characteristics of the various types of agarases. Further, we summarize and compare the agar-hydrolyzing systems of two specific microorganisms: Gram-negative Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 and Gram-positive Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). We conclude with a brief discussion of the importance of agarases and their possible future application in producing oligosaccharides with various nutraceutical activities and in sustainably generating stock chemicals for biorefinement and bioenergy.

  14. A Hidden Pitfall in the Preparation of Agar Media Undermines Microorganism Cultivability

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kosei; Daimon, Serina; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiologists have been using agar growth medium for over 120 years. It revolutionized microbiology in the 1890s when microbiologists were seeking effective methods to isolate microorganisms, which led to the successful cultivation of microorganisms as single clones. But there has been a disparity between total cell counts and cultivable cell counts on plates, often referred to as the “great plate count anomaly,” that has long been a phenomenon that still remains unsolved. Here, we report that a common practice microbiologists have employed to prepare agar medium has a hidden pitfall: when phosphate was autoclaved together with agar to prepare solid growth media (PT medium), total colony counts were remarkably lower than those grown on agar plates in which phosphate and agar were separately autoclaved and mixed right before solidification (PS medium). We used a pure culture of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca T-27T and three representative sources of environmental samples, soil, sediment, and water, as inocula and compared colony counts between PT and PS agar plates. There were higher numbers of CFU on PS medium than on PT medium using G. aurantiaca or any of the environmental samples. Chemical analysis of PT agar plates suggested that hydrogen peroxide was contributing to growth inhibition. Comparison of 454 pyrosequences of the environmental samples to the isolates revealed that taxa grown on PS medium were more reflective of the original community structure than those grown on PT medium. Moreover, more hitherto-uncultivated microbes grew on PS than on PT medium. PMID:25281372

  15. Application of in vitro soft agar techniques for growth of tumor cells to the study of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Buick, R N; Fry, S E; Salmon, S E

    1980-03-15

    An in vitro assay to measure the clonogenic or colony-forming capability of cancer cells present in biopsy samples has recently been applied to study the biology and drug-sensitivity of a variety of human neoplasms. This approach appears to be suitable for study of the tumor stem or progenitor cells present in malignant effusions from patients with colonic carcinoma. In our preliminary studies, morphology of the tumor colonies by inverted microscopy and with Papanicolaou staining of dried agar plating layers as well as immunofluorescent localization with a specific antiserum to human carcinoembrionic antigen have been used as markers of the neoplastic origin of colon tumor colony-forming cells. Successful application of this assay to colonic solid tumors will require improvement in techniques for disaggregation of viable clonogenic cells. We anticipate that short term clonal assays will have increasing use for clinical and biological studies of human colon cancer.

  16. Isothermal microcalorimetry accurately detects bacteria, tumorous microtissues, and parasitic worms in a label-free well-plate assay.

    PubMed

    Braissant, Olivier; Keiser, Jennifer; Meister, Isabel; Bachmann, Alexander; Wirz, Dieter; Göpfert, Beat; Bonkat, Gernot; Wadsö, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry is a label-free assay that allows monitoring of enzymatic and metabolic activities. The technique has strengths, but most instruments have a low throughput, which has limited their use for bioassays. Here, an isothermal microcalorimeter, equipped with a vessel holder similar to a 48-well plate, was used. The increased throughput of this microcalorimeter makes it valuable for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our results show that the sensitivity of the instrument allows the detection of 3 × 10(4) bacteria per vial. Growth of P. mirabilis in Luria Broth medium was detected between 2 and 9 h with decreasing inoculum. The culture released 2.1J with a maximum thermal power of 76 μW. The growth rate calculated using calorimetric and spectrophotometric data were 0.60 and 0.57 h(-1) , respectively. Additional insight on protease activities of P. mirabilis matching the last peak in heat production could be gathered as well. Growth of tumor microtissues releasing a maximum thermal power of 2.1 μW was also monitored and corresponds to a diameter increase of the microtissues from ca. 100 to 428 μm. This opens new research avenues in cancer research, diagnostics, and development of new antitumor drugs. For parasitic worms, the technique allows assessment of parasite survival using motor and metabolic activities even with a single worm. © 2015 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  17. Improvement of Karmali Agar by Supplementation with Tazobactam for Detecting Campylobacter in Raw Poultry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ji; Whan, Chon-Jung; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Yeop; Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Cho, Seung-Hak; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-11-01

    In this study, Karmali agar was modified by adding tazobactam (T-Karmali agar) to suppress the growth of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli , which frequently contaminates raw poultry meat. By inoculating 30 Campylobacter spp. strains and 25 ESBL-producing E. coli strains onto Karmali agar and T-Karmali agar containing various concentrations of the antibacterial agent, we determined the optimum concentration of tazobactam to be 4 mg/liter. The Campylobacter spp. isolation rate on T-Karmali agar (13.3%) was higher than that on Karmali agar (8.3%), although the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). However, T-Karmali agar showed a significantly greater selectivity than Karmali agar, as evaluated by comparing the numbers of contaminated agar plates (20.8 versus 82.5%; P < 0.05) and the growth indexes (1.36 versus 2.83) of competing flora. The predominant competing flora on Karmali and T-Karmali agar were identified as ESBL-producing E. coli . Thus, T-Karmali agar might be effective for determining the real prevalence of Campylobacter in raw poultry and, especially, contamination with ESBL-producing E. coli .

  18. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a) To...

  19. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a) To...

  20. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a) To...

  1. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a) To...

  2. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a) To...

  3. Evaluation of eight agar media for the isolation of shiga toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gill, Alexander; Huszczynski, George; Gauthier, Martine; Blais, Burton

    2014-01-01

    The growth characteristics of 96 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains representing 36 different O-types (including priority O types O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O157) on commercial and in-house agar media were studied. The ability of the strains to grow on agar media with varying selective supplement formulations was evaluated using MacConkey Agar (MAC); Rainbow® Agar O157 (RBA); Rainbow® Agar O157 with manufacturer-recommended selective supplements (RBA-NT); Rainbow® Agar O157 with USDA-recommended selective supplements (RBA-USDA); CHROMagar STEC™ (CH STEC); Tryptone Bile agar containing cefixime and tellurite (TBA-CT); Tryptone Bile agar containing cefixime, tellurite, eosin and methylene blue (TBA-EM); and VTEC agar. All of the strains were able to grow on MAC, RBA and VTEC agar, whereas a number of strains (including some non-O157 priority O types) were unable to grow on the highly selective media CH STEC, RBA-NT, RBA-USDA, TBA-EM and TBA-CT. Only RBA-NT and CH STEC exhibited significant inhibition of background flora from ground beef enrichment. Significant inhibition of background flora from beef trim enrichment was observed with RBA-NT, RBA-USDA, CH STEC, TBA-EM and VTEC agar. With exception of E. coli O157, several different colony morphologies were observed on the differential plating media among strains of the same O type, indicating that this colony morphology is not a reliable means of identifying target STEC. These results suggest that an approach to maximize the recovery of target STEC from beef enrichment cultures is dual plating on lesser (RBA, MAC, VTEC agar) and more highly (RBA-NT, CH STEC) selective agars. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Microtitre plate-based antibacterial assay incorporating resazurin as an indicator of cell growth, and its application in the in vitro antibacterial screening of phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Satyajit D.; Nahar, Lutfun; Kumarasamy, Yashodharan

    2007-01-01

    The resazurin assay utilising microtitre-plate, described by Drummond and Waigh in 2000, has been modified to achieve more accuracy in the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of natural products, including crude extracts, chromatographic fractions or purified compounds against various bacterial strains. This modified resazurin method is simple, sensitive, rapid, robust and reliable, and could be used successfully to assess antibacterial properties of natural products. PMID:17560319

  5. Acute Dermal Irritation Study and Salmonella-Escherichia coli/Microsome Plate Incorporation Assay of Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids (HEFA) Bio-Based Jet Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    microsome plate incorporation assay testing procedures were consistent with the OPPTS, Health Effects Test Guidelines, 870.5100 (U.S. EPA, 1998b). Both...exposure to the skin of NZW albino rabbits. This study is intended to provide information on the health hazards likely to arise from a short-term...be found in Appendix B. The purpose of this study was to provide data relating to the test substance’s health effects, environmental effects, or

  6. Residual Agar Determination in Bacterial Spores by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or non-irradiated and not in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 108 spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only 3 false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.

  7. A novel agar formulation for isolation and direct enumeration of Vibrio vulnificus from oyster tissue.

    PubMed

    Griffitt, Kimberly J; Grimes, D Jay

    2013-08-01

    A new selective and differential medium, Vibrio vulnificus X-Gal (VVX), was developed for direct enumeration of V. vulnificus (Vv) from oyster samples. This agar utilizes cellobiose and lactose as carbon sources, and the antibiotics colistin and polymyxin B as selective agents. Hydrolysis of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl- beta-d-galactopyranoside (x-gal), used in the agar as a lactose analog, produces an insoluble blue dye that makes lactose positive colonies easily distinguishable from any non-lactose fermenting bacteria. Various bacterial species were spot plated onto thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar (TCBS), and CHROMagar Vibrio, two vibrio-specific selective agars, non-selective agar, and VVX to compare selectivity of VVX to other widely used media. A V. vulnificus pure culture was serially diluted on VVX and non-selective agar to determine the VVX percent recovery. Water and oyster samples were spread plated on VVX agar and allowed to incubate for 16-18 h at 33 °C. Blue and white colonies from VVX agar were picked and screened by end point PCR for the Vv hemolysin vvhA. VVX agar showed a significant improvement over TCBS and CHROMagar at preventing non-target growth. There was an 87.5% recovery compared to non-selective plating and a 98% positivity rate of blue colonies picked from oyster tissue plating. The findings suggest that this new agar is a fast, distinctive, and accurate method for enumeration of V. vulnificus from the environment.

  8. Improvement of Karmali agar by addition of polymyxin B for the detection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli in whole-chicken carcass rinse.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hyunsook; Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Song, Kwang-Young; Moon, Jin-San; Kim, Young-Jo; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2013-05-01

    The Karmali agar was modified by supplementation with a high concentration of polymyxin B. The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of a high concentration of polymyxin B on the ability and selectivity of the modified Karmali agar to isolate Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from whole chicken carcass rinse. A total of 80 whole chickens were rinsed with 400 mL of buffer peptone water. The rinsed samples were incubated with 2× blood-free modified Bolton enrichment broth for 48 h, and then streaked onto unmodified Karmali agar and modified Karmali agar supplemented with 100000 IU/L polymixin B (P-Karmali agar). The suspected colonies were finally confirmed by colony PCR. The P-Karmali agar exhibited a significantly better (P < 0.05) isolation rate than the unmodified Karmali agar (P-Karmali agar, 73.8%; unmodified Karmali agar, 33.8%). Moreover, the selectivity of the P-Karmali agar was also better (P < 0.05) than that of the other selective agar when comparing the number of contaminated plates (P-Karmali agar, 68.8%; unmodified Karmali agar, 87.5%) and growth index of competing flora (P-Karmali agar, 1.4; unmodified Karmali agar, 2.7). The improved selective agar excluded competing flora resistant to antibiotic agents in unmodified Karmali agar, increasing isolation rate and selectivity for C. jejuni and C. coli. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Comparison of different fungal agar for the environmental monitoring of pharmaceutical-grade cleanrooms.

    PubMed

    Gebala, Barbara; Sandle, Tim

    2013-01-01

    In relation to a growth in reported incidents of fungal contamination of pharmaceutical products, there has been a developing interest by U.S. and U.K. regulators concerning the risk of fungi. This paper describes a study undertaken to examine the suitability of different commercially available mycological agars for the environmental monitoring of pharmaceutical-grade cleanrooms. Five agars were evaluated in relation to the detection of both numbers and different species of fungi (yeasts and moulds). The objective was to determine if one mycological medium is more suitable than another. Data was collected using different sampling techniques (settle plates, active air samples, and contact plates) from different locations within representative cleanrooms. Samples were taken over a 3 month time period. The study results indicated that fungi are not distributed evenly across cleanrooms and that that the prevalence of fungi partly relates to the room design and operation. In relation to the different agar types, the study indicated that Sabouraud dextrose agar was the most effective at detecting the widest number of different types of isolates, and that Sabouraud dextrose agar and malt extract agar were the most efficient in terms of the numbers of recovered isolates. Other media, notably potato dextrose agar, was relatively less effective. There has been an increased regulatory concern about the presence of fungi in cleanrooms. Some environmental monitoring regimes are not especially orientated towards the examination of fungi, and it may be that special agars are required. Given the choice of different agars available, this paper outlines a case study where different fungal agars were evaluated. The study showed that Sabouraud dextrose agar was the optimal agar.

  10. [Evaluation of a new medium, eggplant (Solanum melongena) agar as a screening medium for Cryptococcus neoformans in environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Sengul, Mustafa; Ergin, Cağrı; Kartal, Tuğba

    2014-04-01

    .neoformans colony forming unit (cfu) per plate were found as 51, 57 and 48 (median values) on simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar, respectively, while tobacco agar has lower performance with 33 cfu/petri. No statistically significant difference were found between simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar's performances for C.neoformans isolations from the nature (p=0.71). In conclusion, easily prepared eggplant agar is as functional as widely used media such as simplified Staib agar and Pal's agar for the isolation of C.neoformans from the natural environment.

  11. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, L; De Bruijn, I; De Mot, R; Rediers, H; Lievens, B

    2016-08-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens. We showed that when using the same medium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacterium was strongly affected. Consequently, results from in vitro screenings should be interpreted cautiously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Resazurin Microtiter Assay Plate Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Susceptibilities to Second-Line Drugs: Rapid, Simple, and Inexpensive Method

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anandi; Camacho, Mirtha; Portaels, Françoise; Palomino, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis calls for new, rapid drug susceptibility tests. We have tested 150 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates against the second-line drugs ethionamide, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, and para-aminosalicylic acid by the colorimetric resazurin microtiter assay and the proportion method. By visual reading, MICs were obtained after 8 days. A very good correlation between results by the colorimetric resazurin microtiter assay and the proportion method was obtained. The colorimetric resazurin microtiter assay is inexpensive, rapid, and simple to perform, and implementation of the assay is feasible for low-resource countries. PMID:14576129

  13. A Quantitative High-Throughput 96-well plate Fluorescence Assay for Mechanism-Based Inactivators of Cytochromes P450 Exemplified using CYP2B6

    PubMed Central

    Kenaan, Cesar; Zhang, Haoming; Hollenberg, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanism-based inactivators such as bergamottin are useful chemical tools for identifying the roles of specific active-site amino acid residues in the reactions catalyzed by the cytochromes P450 (CYPs or P450s) that are responsible for the metabolism of a wide variety of drugs and endogenous substrates. In clinical settings mechanism-based inactivation of P450s involved in xenobiotic metabolism has the potential to lead to adverse drug-drug interactions and assays to identify and characterize drug candidates as P450 inactivators are important in drug discovery and development. Here we present a quantitative high-throughput protocol for investigating cytochrome P450 mechanism-based inactivators using the example of CYP2B6 and bergamottin to illustrate the finer points of this protocol. This protocol details the adaptation of a 7-ethoxytrifluoromethyl coumarin (7-EFC) O-deethylation fluorescence activity assay to a 96-well microtiter plate format and uses a plate-reader to detect the fluorescence of the product. Compared to previous methods, this protocol requires less P450 and takes significantly less time while greatly increasing throughput. The protocol as written takes approximately two hours to complete. The principles and procedures outlined in this protocol can be easily adapted to other inactivators, P450 isoforms, substrates and plate-readers. PMID:20885377

  14. Ultra-sensitive detection of tumorigenic cellular impurities in human cell-processed therapeutic products by digital analysis of soft agar colony formation.

    PubMed

    Kusakawa, Shinji; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takuya; Kawamata, Shin; Sato, Yoji

    2015-12-08

    Contamination with tumorigenic cellular impurities is one of the most pressing concerns for human cell-processed therapeutic products (hCTPs). The soft agar colony formation (SACF) assay, which is a well-known in vitro assay for the detection of malignant transformed cells, is applicable for the quality assessment of hCTPs. Here we established an image-based screening system for the SACF assay using a high-content cell analyzer termed the digital SACF assay. Dual fluorescence staining of formed colonies and the dissolution of soft agar led to accurate detection of transformed cells with the imaging cytometer. Partitioning a cell sample into multiple wells of culture plates enabled digital readout of the presence of colonies and elevated the sensitivity for their detection. In practice, the digital SACF assay detected impurity levels as low as 0.00001% of the hCTPs, i.e. only one HeLa cell contained in 10,000,000 human mesenchymal stem cells, within 30 days. The digital SACF assay saves time, is more sensitive than in vivo tumorigenicity tests, and would be useful for the quality control of hCTPs in the manufacturing process.

  15. Layer plate CAS assay for the quantitation of siderophore production and determination of exudation patterns for fungi.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-02-01

    The chrome azurol S (CAS) assay measures the chelating activity of siderophores, but its application (especially to fungi) is limited by toxicity issues. In this note, we describe a modified version of the CAS assay that is suitable for quantifying siderophore exudation for microorganisms, including fungi.

  16. Gradient Plate Bioassay for Tyrothricin and its Application to Dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Janet C.

    1963-01-01

    A bioassay for tyrothricin, based on a procedure used by Szybalski in bacterial resistance studies, was developed. Replacement of the tube dilution assay with this procedure represented economy in time and equipment, with a resultant increase in productivity. The procedure involved preparation of special agar plates which provided graded concentrations of tyrothricin along a horizontal axis. A culture dish was inclined, and a base layer of agar, without antibiotic, was poured to cover the bottom of the dish and allowed to harden. A second layer of agar, containing 1 ppm of tyrothricin, was poured and allowed to harden with the dish in a level position. Diffusion of the antibiotic from the top layer into the bottom layer yielded a concentration gradient. A third thin layer of agar seeded with Streptococcus faecalis was poured on the surface. After incubation, a bacterial growth front, representing the minimal effective concentration (MEC), developed. The MEC is expressed as distance (in millimeters) from the edge of the plate. Unknowns were directly related to a standard preparation for calculation of tyrothricin concentration. Images Fig. 1 PMID:14075054

  17. A novel colorimetric assay of β-D-glucans in basidiomycete strains by alcian blue dye in a 96-well microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    C Semedo, Magda; Karmali, Amin; Fonseca, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Basidiomycete strains synthesize several types of β-d-glucans, which play a major role in the medicinal properties of mushrooms. Therefore, the specific quantification of these β-d-glucans in mushroom strains is of great biochemical importance. Because published assay methods for these β-d-glucans present some disadvantages, a novel colorimetric assay method for β-d-glucan with alcian blue dye was developed. The complex formation was detected by following the decrease in absorbance in the range of 620 nm and by hypsochromic shift from 620 to 606 nm (∼14 nm) in UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Analysis of variance was used for optimization of the slope of the calibration curve by using the assay mixture containing 0.017% (w/v) alcian blue in 2% (v/v) acetic acid at pH 3.0. The high-throughput colorimetric assay method on microtiter plates was used for quantification of β-d-glucans in the range of 0-0.8 μg, with a slope of 44.15 × 10(-2) and a limit of detection of 0.017 μg/well. Recovery experiments were carried out by using a sample of Hericium erinaceus, which exhibited a recovery of 95.8% for β-1,3-d-glucan. The present assay method exhibited a 10-fold higher sensitivity and a 59-fold lower limit of detection compared with the published method with congo red. β-d-glucans of several mushrooms strains were isolated from fruiting bodies and mycelia, and they were quantified by this assay method. This assay method is fast, specific, simple, and it can be used to quantify β-d-glucans from other biological sources. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Real-time thermal imaging of microwave accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF) based assays on sapphire plates.

    PubMed

    Previte, Michael J R; Zhang, Yongxia; Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we describe an optical geometry that facilitates our further characterization of the temperature changes above silver island films (SiFs) on sapphire plates, when exposed to microwave radiation. Since sapphire transmits IR, we designed an optical scheme to capture real-time temperature images of a thin water film on sapphire plates with and without SiFs during the application of a short microwave pulse. Using this optical scheme, we can accurately determine the temperature profile of solvents in proximity to metal structures when exposed to microwave irradiation. We believe that this optical scheme will provide us with a basis for further studies in designing metal structures to further improve plasmonic-fluorescence clinical sensing applications, such as those used in microwave accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF).

  19. An extension of the Coconut Cream Agar method to screen Penicillium citrinum isolates for citrinin production.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, S; Flint, S; Palmer, J; Fletcher, G C; Pitt, J I

    2013-09-01

    A simple and rapid screening method was developed for the detection of citrinin in fungal cultures using Coconut Cream Agar (CCA) described previously for detecting aflatoxin and ochratoxin A. Fifteen isolates of Penicillium citrinum were inoculated onto CCA and incubated at 25 and 30°C for 10 days. All isolates produced a distinct yellow green fluorescence on CCA when the reverse side of the agar plates were viewed under long wavelength UV light. Detection was optimal at 25°C after four to 5 days of incubation. Isolates positive by the CCA method also tested positive for citrinin production by the TLC agar plug method after growth on CCA, Czapek yeast extract agar and yeast extract sucrose agar. Control cultures were negative by both methods, indicating that the CCA Petri dish method was suitable for screening cultures for citrinin production. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. As a bacterial culture medium, citrated sheep blood agar is a practical alternative to citrated human blood agar in laboratories of developing countries.

    PubMed

    Russell, F M; Biribo, S S N; Selvaraj, G; Oppedisano, F; Warren, S; Seduadua, A; Mulholland, E K; Carapetis, J R

    2006-09-01

    Human blood agar (HuBA) is widely used in developing countries for the isolation of bacteria from clinical specimens. This study compared citrated sheep blood agar (CSBA) and HuBA with defibrinated horse blood agar and defibrinated sheep blood agar (DSBA) for the isolation and antibiotic susceptibility testing of reference and clinical strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Reference and clinical strains of all organisms were diluted in brain heart infusion and a clinical specimen of cerebrospinal fluid and cultured on all agars. Viable counts, colony morphology, and colony size were recorded. Susceptibility testing for S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes was performed on defibrinated sheep blood Mueller-Hinton agar, citrated sheep blood Mueller-Hinton agar (CSB MHA), and human blood Mueller-Hinton agar plates. For all organisms, the colony numbers were similar on all agars. Substantially smaller colony sizes and absent or minimal hemolysis were noted on HuBA for all organisms. Antibiotic susceptibility results for S. pneumoniae were similar for the two sheep blood agars; however, larger zone sizes were displayed on HuBA, and quality control for the reference strain failed on HuBA. For S. pyogenes, larger zone sizes were demonstrated on HuBA and CSBA than on DSBA. Poor hemolysis made interpretation of the zone sizes difficult on HuBA. CSBA is an acceptable alternative for the isolation of these organisms. The characteristic morphology is not evident, and hemolysis is poor on HuBA; and so HuBA is not recommended for use for the isolation or the susceptibility testing of any of these organisms. CSB MHA may be suitable for use for the susceptibility testing of S. pneumoniae.

  1. As a Bacterial Culture Medium, Citrated Sheep Blood Agar Is a Practical Alternative to Citrated Human Blood Agar in Laboratories of Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. M.; Biribo, S. S. N.; Selvaraj, G.; Oppedisano, F.; Warren, S.; Seduadua, A.; Mulholland, E. K.; Carapetis, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    Human blood agar (HuBA) is widely used in developing countries for the isolation of bacteria from clinical specimens. This study compared citrated sheep blood agar (CSBA) and HuBA with defibrinated horse blood agar and defibrinated sheep blood agar (DSBA) for the isolation and antibiotic susceptibility testing of reference and clinical strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Reference and clinical strains of all organisms were diluted in brain heart infusion and a clinical specimen of cerebrospinal fluid and cultured on all agars. Viable counts, colony morphology, and colony size were recorded. Susceptibility testing for S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes was performed on defibrinated sheep blood Mueller-Hinton agar, citrated sheep blood Mueller-Hinton agar (CSB MHA), and human blood Mueller-Hinton agar plates. For all organisms, the colony numbers were similar on all agars. Substantially smaller colony sizes and absent or minimal hemolysis were noted on HuBA for all organisms. Antibiotic susceptibility results for S. pneumoniae were similar for the two sheep blood agars; however, larger zone sizes were displayed on HuBA, and quality control for the reference strain failed on HuBA. For S. pyogenes, larger zone sizes were demonstrated on HuBA and CSBA than on DSBA. Poor hemolysis made interpretation of the zone sizes difficult on HuBA. CSBA is an acceptable alternative for the isolation of these organisms. The characteristic morphology is not evident, and hemolysis is poor on HuBA; and so HuBA is not recommended for use for the isolation or the susceptibility testing of any of these organisms. CSB MHA may be suitable for use for the susceptibility testing of S. pneumoniae. PMID:16954271

  2. Expression of the difference between the Cold (Han) and Hot (Re) natures of traditional Chinese medicines (Strobal and Rhubarb) based on the cold/hot plate differentiating assay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, HaiPing; Zhao, YanLing; Wang, JiaBo; Li, HanBing; Ren, YongShen; Zhou, CanPing; Yan, Dan; Xiao, XiaoHe

    2009-12-01

    In this study, objective differences between the Cold (Han) and Hot (Re) nature of traditional Chinese medicines, e.g. Strobal and Rhubarb, are determined by using a cold/hot plate differentiation technology. A novel, self-designed cold/hot plate differentiating instrument, with methodological study, was used to investigate the intervention of Strobal and Rhubarb on the temperature tropism of mice. Compared with the ICR and BALB/c mice, it was found that KM mice on the cold/hot plate were more sensitive to the change of temperature, within the tolerant temperature range of 15-40 degrees C. The temperature tropism behavior of mice is influenced by treatment with Rhubarb and Strobal, as is the activity of ATPase in liver tissue. These trends are consistent with the definition of the Cold/Hot nature of Chinese medicines based on traditional Chinese medicinal theory. This study showed that the differences of the Cold/Hot nature of traditional Chinese medicines. might be objectively represented by the temperature tropism of animal by means of cold/hot differentiating assay.

  3. Development of a fluorometric microtiter plate-based enzyme assay for arylsulfatase B (MPS VI) using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Millington, David S; Bali, Deeksha S

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARS-B) enzyme activity. It results in mild to severe multi-organ system failure from accumulation of undigested glycosaminoglycans (GAGs); dermatan sulfate and chondroitin-4-sulfate. We have developed a single-step enzyme assay using a fluorescent substrate and dried blood spots to measure ARS-B activity to identify disease patients. This assay is robust, reproducible, specific and convenient to perform.

  4. Transferring Luminex® cytokine assays to a wall-less plate technology: Validation and comparison study with plasma and cell culture supernatants.

    PubMed

    Versteeg, Leroy; Le Guezennec, Xavier; Zhan, Bin; Liu, Zhuyun; Angagaw, Minilik; Woodhouse, Janice D; Biswas, Subhabrata; Beaumier, Coreen M

    2017-01-01

    Luminex® technology provides a powerful methodology for multiplex cytokine detection but remains constrained by high costs and a minimum of 25-50μL sample volume requirement per assay-well often hindering analysis of limited biological samples. Here we compare the results of Luminex-based cytokine multiplexing assay performed using conventional 96-well microtiter plates and a particular 96-well wall-less plate based on Droparray® technology ("DA-Bead"). The application of the DA-Bead plate allows 80% reduction of sample and reagent volume, thus an opportunity for significant cost savings in Luminex reagents with no change to the workflow. To compare the DA-Bead method to the conventional method, two different types of samples were tested with two different commercially available Luminex kits and the results for each method were compared. The first type was splenocyte culture supernatants from murine spleens which were harvested from mice immunized with Ascaris suum protein As24 and followed by cell stimulation ex vivo at various time points with this same antigen. Cytokine levels in these supernatants were evaluated using a Bio-Plex® TH1/TH2 8-plex kit. The second sample type was plasma from mice from an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) study, and these samples were evaluated using a Milliplex® TH17 25-plex kit. The data showed that the DA-Bead method for analysis was comparable to, if not superior to, the conventional method in terms of consistency/precision, accuracy, sensitivity and dynamic range and these results are not specific to sample type, reagents, or commercial vendor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chlamydospore formation on Staib agar as a species-specific characteristic of Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Staib, P; Morschhäuser, J

    1999-01-01

    Staib agar (Syn. Guizotia abyssinica creatinine agar) was evaluated for differentiation between the highly related yeast species Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis. On these agar plates C. dubliniensis formed rough colonies due to mycelial growth and produced abundant chlamydospores whereas C. albicans grew only in smooth colonies and without chlamydospore formation. The rough colonies of C. dubliniensis could be readily distinguished from the smooth C. albicans colonies. These results demonstrate that, under certain growth conditions, mycelial growth with chlamydospore formation is a species-specific marker that can be used for the identification of C. dubliniensis.

  6. Development and Testing of a Colorimetric 96 Well Plate Assay for the Determination of HD Hydrolysis Rate in Various Formulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Cold Foam 1% ethylene glycol 1% benzalkonium chloride 1% polyvinylpolypyrrolidone 1% Brij 58 1% Benzyldimethyl tetradecyl ammonium chloride dihydrate...LITERA TURE CITED ..................................................................................... 15 5 FIGURES 1. Rates of Chloride Release in...Ground, MD). The HD was stabilized with tributylamine and was approximately 90% pure. Quantitative assays were conducted with a chloride electrode

  7. High-throughput micro-plate HCL-vanillin assay for screening tannin content in sorghum grain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sorghum contains tannin which is a phenolic compound that offers health promoting antioxidant capacity. The HCl-vanillin assay is a common and time consuming method for determining tannin content, but is not efficient for screening large sample sets as seen in association mapping panels or breeding ...

  8. A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BOISE, IDAHO, AMBIENT AIR FINE PARTICLE SAMPLES USING THE PLATE AND MICROSUSPENSION SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study is to characterize the genotoxic potential of the ambient air aerosols collected within an air shed impacted primarily by wood smoke and automotive emissions. The study also examines the relative merits of a microsuspension assay and the standa...

  9. A hidden pitfall in the preparation of agar media undermines microorganism cultivability.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kosei; Daimon, Serina; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    Microbiologists have been using agar growth medium for over 120 years. It revolutionized microbiology in the 1890s when microbiologists were seeking effective methods to isolate microorganisms, which led to the successful cultivation of microorganisms as single clones. But there has been a disparity between total cell counts and cultivable cell counts on plates, often referred to as the "great plate count anomaly," that has long been a phenomenon that still remains unsolved. Here, we report that a common practice microbiologists have employed to prepare agar medium has a hidden pitfall: when phosphate was autoclaved together with agar to prepare solid growth media (PT medium), total colony counts were remarkably lower than those grown on agar plates in which phosphate and agar were separately autoclaved and mixed right before solidification (PS medium). We used a pure culture of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca T-27(T) and three representative sources of environmental samples, soil, sediment, and water, as inocula and compared colony counts between PT and PS agar plates. There were higher numbers of CFU on PS medium than on PT medium using G. aurantiaca or any of the environmental samples. Chemical analysis of PT agar plates suggested that hydrogen peroxide was contributing to growth inhibition. Comparison of 454 pyrosequences of the environmental samples to the isolates revealed that taxa grown on PS medium were more reflective of the original community structure than those grown on PT medium. Moreover, more hitherto-uncultivated microbes grew on PS than on PT medium. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Effect of storage conditions of the performance of bismuth sulfite agar.

    PubMed

    D'aoust, J Y

    1977-02-01

    Refrigerated storage of bismuth sulfite agar plates for up to 4 days did not adversely affect growth and colonial characteristics of selected Salmonella strains. Incubation of inoculated plates for 48 h favored the development of more salmonellae with typical morphology. Inoculated plates of freshly poured medium incubated for 48 h gave recoveries similar to those on refrigerated plates and showed a high selectivity against Citrobacter freundii and Proteus vulgaris, organisms which mimic the colonial characteristics of Salmonella on this medium. The use of bismuth sulfite plates stored at room temperature for more than 2 days should be avoided.

  11. A rapid, efficient and sensitive plate assay for detection and screening of l-asparaginase-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Richi V; Saran, Saurabh; Saxena, Rajendra K; Srivastava, Ayush K

    2013-04-01

    l-Asparaginase-producing microbes are conventionally screened on phenol red l-asparagine-containing plates. However, sometimes the contrast of the zone obtained (between yellow and pink) is not very sharp and distinct. In the present investigation, an improved method for screening of the microorganisms producing extracellular l-asparaginase is reported wherein bromothymol blue (BTB) is incorporated as pH indicator in l-asparagine-containing medium instead of phenol red. Plates containing BTB at acidic pH are yellow and turn dark blue at alkaline pH. Thus, a dense dark blue zone is formed around microbial colonies producing l-asparaginase, differentiating between enzyme producers and non-producers. The present method is more sensitive and accurate than the conventional method for screening of both fungi and bacteria producing extracellular l-asparaginase. Furthermore, BTB gives a transient green colour at neutral pH (7.0) and dark blue colour at higher pH 8.0-9.0, indicating the potency of the microorganism for l-asparaginase production.

  12. Glass bead cultivation of fungi: combining the best of liquid and agar media.

    PubMed

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, Henriette; Sondergaard, Teis Esben

    2013-09-01

    Production of bioactive compounds and enzymes from filamentous fungi is highly dependent on cultivation conditions. Here we present an easy way to cultivate filamentous fungi on glass beads that allow complete control of nutrient supply. Secondary metabolite production in Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium solani cultivated on agar plates, in shaking liquid culture or on glass beads was compared. Agar plate culture and glass bead cultivation yielded comparable results while liquid culture had lower production of secondary metabolites. RNA extraction from glass beads and liquid cultures was easier than from agar plates and the quality was superior. The system allows simple control of nutrient availability throughout fungal cultivation. This combined with the ease of extraction of nucleic acids and metabolites makes the system highly suitable for the study of gene regulation in response to specific nutrient factors. © 2013.

  13. A 96-well microtiter plate assay for high-throughput screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoxia; Sha, Shanshan; Liu, Likun; Li, Xin; Ma, Yufang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase (RmlB) is the second enzyme for the biosynthesis of dTDP-l-rhamnose, which is a sugar donor to the synthesis of the cell wall linker, d-N-acetylglucosamine-l-rhamnose. RmlB is essential to mycobacterial growth and is not found in humans; therefore, it is a potential target for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. So far, there has been no suitable method for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. Here, the recombinant M. tuberculosis RmlB was purified and an absorbance-based microtiter plate assay was developed for RmlB activity. It could be used for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. The kinetic properties of M. tuberculosis RmlB, including optimal pH, optimal temperature, the effect of metal ions, and the kinetic parameters, were determined with this assay. The inhibitory effects of dTTP and dTDP on M. tuberculosis RmlB were also studied with the assay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Control of the pattern of perithecium development in Sordaria fimicola on agar medium.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R T

    1975-06-01

    In a Sordaria fimicola (Rob.) Ces. and de Not. colony grown on agar medium in a petri plate, perithecia developed in a narrow band around the plate edge after the colony margin reached the edge. Physical wounding of the colony carried out shortly before or during the time perithecia were developing around the plate edge stimulated perithecium development in the wound area. Diffusion barriers were created by cutting small trenches in the agar parallel to the plate edge. The trenches were made at several different positions between the plate center and edge using cultures of several different ages, and the resultant distribution of perithecia along the trench edges suggested that the colony center and periphery produce diffusible inhibitors of perithecium development. These inhibitors may be responsible, in part, for the observed pattern of perithecium development in the colony.

  15. WormAssay: a novel computer application for whole-plate motion-based screening of macroscopic parasites.

    PubMed

    Marcellino, Chris; Gut, Jiri; Lim, K C; Singh, Rahul; McKerrow, James; Sakanari, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is caused by filarial nematode parasites, including Brugia malayi. Adult worms live in the lymphatic system and cause a strong immune reaction that leads to the obstruction of lymph vessels and swelling of the extremities. Chronic disease leads to the painful and disfiguring condition known as elephantiasis. Current drug therapy is effective against the microfilariae (larval stage) of the parasite, but no drugs are effective against the adult worms. One of the major stumbling blocks toward developing effective macrofilaricides to kill the adult worms is the lack of a high throughput screening method for candidate drugs. Current methods utilize systems that measure one well at a time and are time consuming and often expensive. We have developed a low-cost and simple visual imaging system to automate and quantify screening entire plates based on parasite movement. This system can be applied to the study of many macroparasites as well as other macroscopic organisms.

  16. WormAssay: A Novel Computer Application for Whole-Plate Motion-based Screening of Macroscopic Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Marcellino, Chris; Gut, Jiri; Lim, K. C.; Singh, Rahul; McKerrow, James; Sakanari, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is caused by filarial nematode parasites, including Brugia malayi. Adult worms live in the lymphatic system and cause a strong immune reaction that leads to the obstruction of lymph vessels and swelling of the extremities. Chronic disease leads to the painful and disfiguring condition known as elephantiasis. Current drug therapy is effective against the microfilariae (larval stage) of the parasite, but no drugs are effective against the adult worms. One of the major stumbling blocks toward developing effective macrofilaricides to kill the adult worms is the lack of a high throughput screening method for candidate drugs. Current methods utilize systems that measure one well at a time and are time consuming and often expensive. We have developed a low-cost and simple visual imaging system to automate and quantify screening entire plates based on parasite movement. This system can be applied to the study of many macroparasites as well as other macroscopic organisms. PMID:22303493

  17. Comparison of fluorescent gentamicin-thallous-carbonate and KF streptococcal agars to enumerate enterococci and fecal streptococci in meats.

    PubMed Central

    Knudtson, L M; Hartman, P A

    1993-01-01

    Two selective and differential media were compared for their abilities to enumerate enterococci and fecal streptococci in pork, beef, and poultry products. Counts obtained on KF streptococcal (KF) agar were compared with counts obtained on fluorescent gentamicin-thallous-carbonate (fGTC) agar. Reactions of 13 known enterococcal species were also observed. All 13 species of enterococci as well as Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus equinus grew equally well on fGTC agar. KF streptococcal medium allowed growth of most species of enterococci but not S. bovis and S. equinus. Quantitative comparisons between the two media inoculated with pure cultures of known species of enterococci revealed equivalent plate counts following incubation. However, when meat samples were plated, counts on fGTC agar were consistently and significantly higher than counts on KF agar for all sample sources. PMID:8481014

  18. Thin agar film for enhanced fungal growth and microscopic viewing in a new sealable fungal culture case.

    PubMed

    Hill, D R

    1996-09-01

    This project was undertaken to find ways to enhance fungus colony maturation, to make viewing of fungal cultures easier, and to reduce disruption of the fungal structures to be observed for identification. Accordingly, a technique using a thin (0.2-mm) agar film that avoids problems inherent in traditional methods of fungal culture and identification was developed. In addition, to accommodate the 0.2-mm layer of agar film and a contiguous thicker 4-mm section of agar, a sealable fungal culture case that fits within microscope stage calipers and under the objective lenses was invented. The growth and identification of 28 organisms were evaluated in the sealable fungal culture cases and on double-pour agar plates by using potato dextrose agar in both. Compared with results obtained with the double-pour agar plates (rated as "good"), fungal growth and identification with the sealable fungal culture case were superior (rated as "excellent") (P < 0.05, chi-square test). The thin agar film limits excessive mycelial growth, while it often promotes complete sporulation or other forms of maturation of the fungal colony. More importantly, the thin agar film allows direct microscopic viewing of the developing fungal colonies. The portion of the sealable fungal culture case with the 4-mm layer of agar can be used for evaluation of colony pigment and texture. In conclusion, this new sealable fungal culture case allows direct viewing and earlier fungal species identification with greater intrinsic safety.

  19. Evaluation of enrichment, storage, and age of blood agar medium in relation to its ability to support growth of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hanson, C W; Martin, W J

    1976-11-01

    By measuring the colony size of a variety of anaerobic bacteria isolated from clinical specimens, an evaluation was made of the benefits derived from the addition of several enrichments to blood agar medium commonly used for the growth of anaerobes. Similar methods were used to study the effects of various storage conditions and age of the medium. The results were compared with those obtained on freshly prepared and enriched blood agar plates as well as commercially available blood agar plates. Freshly prepared and enriched blood agar was found to give substantially larger colonies than could be grown on commercially obtained blood agar plates when both were inoculated and incubated under identical conditions. Storage of plating media under CO2 for periods of up to 72 h had only a minor effect on the growth of the anaerobic bacteria studied, but longer periods of storage under CO2 resulted in a less efficient plating medium. Nonenriched brain heart infusion (BHI) was found to be a better basal medium than Trypticase soy agar (TSA) medium. Colony size on fully enriched BHI blood agar plates was greater than nonenriched BHI greater than nonenriched TSA greater than commercially prepared nonenriched TSA plates. The data suggest that freshness of the plates may be as important as using rich media.

  20. Monitoring the production of inclusion bodies during fermentation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of intact inclusion bodies using cryogel minicolumn plates.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Josefin; Dainiak, Maria B; Kumar, Ashok; Hörnsten, E Gunnar; Galaev, Igor Yu; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-07-15

    A novel minicolumn chromatographic method to monitor the production of inclusion bodies during fermentation and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system allowing direct analysis of the particles with surface-displayed antigens are described. A 33-kDa protein containing 306 amino acids with three sulfur bridges produced as inclusion bodies was labeled with polyclonal antibodies against 15 amino acid (anti-A15) and 17 amino acid (anti-B17) residues at the N- and C-terminal ends of the protein, respectively. Labeled particles were bound to macroporous monolithic protein A-cryogel adsorbents inserted into the open-ended wells of a 96-well plate (referred to as protein A-cryogel minicolumn plate). The concept behind this application is that the binding degree of inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth to the cryogel minicolumns increases with an increase in their concentration during fermentation. The technique allowed us to monitor the increase in the production levels of the inclusion bodies as the fermentation process progressed. The system also has a built-in quality parameter to ensure that the target protein has been fully expressed. Alternatively, inclusion bodies immobilized on phenyl-cryogel minicolumn plate were used in indirect ELISA based on anti-A15 and anti-B17 antibodies against terminal amino acid residues displayed on the surface of inclusion bodies. Drainage-protected properties of the cryogel minicolumns allow performance of successive reactions with tested immunoglobulin G (IgG) samples and enzyme-conjugated secondary IgG and of enzymatic reaction within the adsorbent.

  1. Development and comparative evaluation of a plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on recombinant outer membrane antigens Omp28 and Omp31 for diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sapana; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Mangalgi, Smita; Rathod, Vedika; Prakash, Archana; Barua, Anita; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2013-08-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic infectious disease of humans and livestock with worldwide distribution and is caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. The diagnosis of brucellosis always requires laboratory confirmation by either isolation of pathogens or detection of specific antibodies. The conventional serological tests available for the diagnosis of brucellosis are less specific and show cross-reactivity with other closely related organisms. These tests also necessitate the handling of Brucella species for antigen preparation. Therefore, there is a need to develop reliable, rapid, and user-friendly systems for disease diagnosis and alternatives to vaccine approaches. Keeping in mind the importance of brucellosis as an emerging infection and the prevalence in India, we carried out the present study to compare the recombinant antigens with the native antigens (cell envelope and sonicated antigen) of Brucella for diagnosis of human brucellosis by an indirect plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant outer membrane protein 28 (rOmp28) and rOmp31 antigens were cloned, expressed, and purified in the bacterial expression system, and the purified proteins were used as antigens. Indirect plate ELISAs were then performed and standardized for comparison of the reactivities of recombinant and native antigens against the 433 clinical samples submitted for brucellosis testing, 15 culture-positive samples, and 20 healthy donor samples. The samples were separated into four groups based on their positivity to rose bengal plate agglutination tests (RBPTs), standard tube agglutination tests (STATs), and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) tests. The sensitivities and specificities of all the antigens were calculated, and the rOmp28 antigen was found to be more suitable for the clinical diagnosis of brucellosis than the rOmp31 antigen and native antigens. The rOmp28-based ELISA showed a very high degree of agreement with the conventional agglutination tests and

  2. Development and Comparative Evaluation of a Plate Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Recombinant Outer Membrane Antigens Omp28 and Omp31 for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sapana; Kumar, Ashu; Mangalgi, Smita; Rathod, Vedika; Prakash, Archana; Barua, Anita; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic infectious disease of humans and livestock with worldwide distribution and is caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. The diagnosis of brucellosis always requires laboratory confirmation by either isolation of pathogens or detection of specific antibodies. The conventional serological tests available for the diagnosis of brucellosis are less specific and show cross-reactivity with other closely related organisms. These tests also necessitate the handling of Brucella species for antigen preparation. Therefore, there is a need to develop reliable, rapid, and user-friendly systems for disease diagnosis and alternatives to vaccine approaches. Keeping in mind the importance of brucellosis as an emerging infection and the prevalence in India, we carried out the present study to compare the recombinant antigens with the native antigens (cell envelope and sonicated antigen) of Brucella for diagnosis of human brucellosis by an indirect plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant outer membrane protein 28 (rOmp28) and rOmp31 antigens were cloned, expressed, and purified in the bacterial expression system, and the purified proteins were used as antigens. Indirect plate ELISAs were then performed and standardized for comparison of the reactivities of recombinant and native antigens against the 433 clinical samples submitted for brucellosis testing, 15 culture-positive samples, and 20 healthy donor samples. The samples were separated into four groups based on their positivity to rose bengal plate agglutination tests (RBPTs), standard tube agglutination tests (STATs), and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) tests. The sensitivities and specificities of all the antigens were calculated, and the rOmp28 antigen was found to be more suitable for the clinical diagnosis of brucellosis than the rOmp31 antigen and native antigens. The rOmp28-based ELISA showed a very high degree of agreement with the conventional agglutination tests and

  3. General qPCR and Plate Reader Methods for Rapid Optimization of Membrane Protein Purification and Crystallization Using Thermostability Assays.

    PubMed

    Tomasiak, Thomas M; Pedersen, Bjørn P; Chaudhary, Sarika; Rodriguez, Andrew; Colmanares, Yaneth Robles; Roe-Zurz, Zygy; Thamminana, Sobha; Tessema, Meseret; Stroud, Robert M

    2014-08-01

    This unit describes rapid and generally applicable methods to identify conditions that stabilize membrane proteins using temperature-based denaturation measurements as a proxy for target time-dependent stability. Recent developments with thiol-reactive dyes sensitive to the unmasking of cysteine residues upon protein unfolding have allowed for routine application of thermostability assays to systematically evaluate the stability of membrane protein preparations after various purification procedures. Test conditions can include different lipid cocktails, lipid-detergent micelles, pH, salts, osmolytes, and potential active-site ligands. Identification and use of conditions that stabilize the structure have proven successful in enabling the structure determination of numerous families of membrane proteins that otherwise were intractable.

  4. Evaluation of an Automated Instrument for Inoculating and Spreading Samples onto Agar Plates▿

    PubMed Central

    Glasson, J. H.; Guthrie, L. H.; Nielsen, D. J.; Bethell, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    The findings from a preliminary assessment of a new instrument designed for the inoculation and spreading of specimens for microbiological analysis onto agar plates are described. The study found that the instrument was able to select full or biplates from a number of input cassettes, each containing different agar types. Samples were then inoculated by the instrument onto the agar surfaces and spread by a novel plastic applicator. Following this, the instrument labeled the plates and sorted them into a number of specified output stations. It was found that the instrument was able to inoculate and spread samples over a greater proportion of the agar plate surface than the manual loop-to-plate method. As a consequence, up to 44% more usable colonies were produced per plate from clinical specimens and standard cultures. Viable counts showed that the instrument was able to detect as few as 102 CFU/ml in fluids and also facilitated the enumeration of organisms, particularly in specimens such as urine. PMID:18272700

  5. The physicochemical property characterization of agar acetate.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Jingkun; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-09-22

    A series of agar acetates with different degree of substitution (DS) were prepared, and their properties were determined and analyzed. The results showed that the gelling temperature, the gel melting temperature, the gel strength, the gel hardness, the gel fracturability, the gel springiness and the solution apparent viscosity of agar acetates all decreased except that their gel cohesiveness increased with the increase of DS. The variation process of agar molecules in solution from coil to helix could be also observed by measuring solution optical rotation in a lower concentration at which even the solution could not form a gel. The gel skeleton structures of agar acetates were of porous network structures, and the pores became smaller and denser with the increase of DS. After acetylation, the water holding capacity of the agar was improved, but its thermal stability was lowered.

  6. Evaluation of direct plating methods to enumerate Alicyclobacillus in beverages.

    PubMed

    Murray, Melinda B; Gurtler, Joshua B; Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Harrison, Mark A; Beuchat, Larry R

    2007-04-01

    Ten agar media were evaluated for their suitability to support spore germination and colony development by six strains of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, three strains of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, and one strain of Alicyclobacillus cycloheptanicus. The influence of plating method (pour versus spread), incubation temperature (43 degrees C and 50 degrees C), and incubation time (up to 10 days) on colony development were determined. K agar, Alicyclobacillus medium (ALI agar), and Bacillus acidoterrestris thermophilic (BAT) agar recovered the highest numbers of spores. Orange serum agar and Hiraishi glucose yeast extract agar were the least suitable. Overall, surface plating was superior to pour plating and, with the exception of one strain of A. acidocaldarius which grew better at 50 degrees C, incubation of K agar, ALI agar, and BAT agar plates at 43 degrees C or 50 degrees C resulted in recovery of equivalent numbers of spores. Essentially all viable spores were detected on media incubated for 3 days at 43 degrees C. The ability of one strain of each Alicyclobacillus species to grow in ten non-carbonated commercially manufactured beverages at 30 degrees C and 43 degrees C was markedly affected by the composition of the beverages. Results show that surface plating samples on BAT agar, followed by incubating plates at 43 degrees C for 3 days provide the most suitable conditions to enumerate ten strains of three species of Alicyclobacillus most commonly responsible for spoilage of beverages.

  7. Modification of Karmali agar by supplementation with potassium clavulanate for the isolation of Campylobacter from chicken carcass rinses.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyunsook; Choi, In-Soo; Oh, Deog-Hwan; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2014-07-01

    The detection ability and selectivity of Karmali agar was improved by supplementation of an extended-spectrum β-lactamase inhibitor, potassium clavulanate. The optimum concentration of potassium clavulanate (0.5 μg/ml) in Karmali agar was determined by inoculation of 50 Campylobacter and 30 extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli strains onto normal and modified Karmali agar containing various concentrations of the agent. Eighty retail carcasses were rinsed with 400 ml of buffered peptone water. The rinse samples were enriched in 2 × blood-free Bolton enrichment broth at 42°C for 48 h and then were streaked onto normal and modified Karmali agar containing 0.5 μg/ml potassium clavulanate. The suspicious colonies were subcultured on Columbia blood agar and confirmed by colony PCR. In chicken carcass samples, the modified Karmali agar showed a significantly greater isolation rate than normal Karmali agar (42.5 versus 21.3%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, the selectivity of the modified Karmali agar was also significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the normal Karmali agar, as seen by comparison of the number of contaminated agar plates (83.8 versus 97.5%) and the growth index (1.67 versus 2.91) of the non-Campylobacter colonies.

  8. NAS agar is more suitable than McKay agar for primary culture of Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) fastidious bacteria, S. intermedius in particular.

    PubMed

    Raclavsky, Vladislav; Novotny, Radko; Stary, Lubomir; Navratilova, Lucie; Zatloukal, Jaromir; Jakubec, Petr; Zapalka, Martin; Kopriva, Frantisek; Kolek, Vitezslav

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) is a group of three streptococcal species (S. anginosus, intermedius and constellatus) that act as opportunist pathogens, among others in cystic fibrosis. Due to their fastidious character, they are both difficult to cultivate and to differentiate from less pathogenic streptococcal species, therefore being most probably underdiagnosed. Semi-selective McKay agar and NAS agar were developed to facilitate SMG recovery from clinical samples; however, direct comparison of recovery rates has not been published yet. We tested the performance of both media on 123 patient samples and demonstrated general superiority of NAS agar for SMG recovery during primary cultivation convincingly. This observation was also confirmed by quantitative drop tests during subculture. Despite the undisputed overall superiority of NAS agar over McKay agar, a smaller fraction of strains grew better on McKay agar. Inter-strain differences were the most probable explanation. Therefore, when economic conditions are not limiting and maximum recovery rate is desirable, both plates are advised to be used in parallel for primary cultivation of clinical samples.

  9. Xanthan gum: an economical partial substitute for agar in microbial culture media.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Shashi B; Jain, Ruchi

    2006-04-01

    Xanthan gum, microbial desiccation-resistant polysaccharide prepared commercially by aerobic submerged fermentation from Xanthomonas campestris, has been successfully used alone and in combination with agar for microbial culture media. As illustrative examples, eight bacteria and eight fungi were grown on media solidified with either agar (A, 1.5%), xanthan gum (X, 1%), or combinations of both (0.9% X + 0.1% A, 0.8% X + 0.2% A, 0.7% X + 0.3% A, 0.6% X + 0.4% A). All fungi and bacteria exhibited normal growth and differentiation in all these treatments. Rather, growth of most of the fungi was better on xanthan (alone) and xanthan + agar media than agar medium. As the media gelled with xanthan gum alone flow, it was not possible to incubate Petri plates in inverted position. Moreover, because of the softness, streaking of bacteria was difficult on such media. However, these problems could be overcome by partially replacing xanthan gum with 0.3% agar. Bacterial enumeration studies carried out for Serratia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. by serial dilution and pour-plate method on agar (1.5%), 0.7%/0.6% X + 0.3%/0.4% A yielded similar counts. Selective media, succinate medium for Pseudomonas sp., and MacConkey broth medium for Escherichia coli gelled with 0.7%/0.6% X + 0.3%/0.4% A did not support growth of other bacteria when inoculated along with the above-mentioned bacteria. Likewise, differential medium, CRMA (Congo red mannitol agar) gelled with xanthan-agar combination could differentiate between Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium sp.

  10. Use of the spiral Salmonella assay to detect the mutagenicity of complex environmental mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, V.S.; Early, G.; Claxton, L.D. )

    1991-01-01

    The success demonstrated by the spiral Salmonella assay in a recent study of 20 pure prompted us to examine the effectiveness of this automated bacterial mutagenicity assay for testing complex environmental mixtures. Three sets of combustion emissions were selected for evaluation: automotive diesel exhaust, woodsmoke, and a coal combustion emission. Each sample was tested in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay according to standard protocol (plate incorporation) and spiral assay techniques. In the spiral assay, a specialized plating instrument dispenses the bacteria, test agent, and S9 mix in a spiral pattern onto a minimal agar plate supplemented with histidine and biotin. The components of the assay are administered in such a way that a uniform density of bacteria is exposed to a concentration gradient of the test agent on a single plate. When results are analyzed, a dose-response curve comprised of 13 data points is generated. A comparison of results from the two assays demonstrated the following: (1) Diesel exhaust was generally the most mutagenically potent sample in both assays, followed closely by the coal combustion emission. The woodsmoke sample was only weakly mutagenic in the standard assay but demonstrated higher mutagenic activity in the spiral assay. (2) Samples were more mutagenic on rev/microgram basis in the spiral assay, especially when metabolic activation was added. This disparity presumably was due to differences in the relative amounts of S9 administered across the dose range. (3) The spiral assay required 1/20 the sample mass of the standard assay to test equivalent doses; in addition, for some samples, 50 times more sample mass was required by the standard assay to generate a comparable dose response. (4) Dichloromethane extracts of the complex mixtures could be tested for mutagenicity in the spiral assay.

  11. Solubilization and bio-conjugation of quantum dots and bacterial toxicity assays by growth curve and plate count.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Nadeau, Jay

    2012-07-11

    previous study, we showed that coupling of antibiotics to CdTe can increase toxicity to bacteria but decrease toxicity to mammalian cells, due to decreased production of reactive oxygen species from the conjugates. Although it is unlikely that cadmium-containing compounds will be approved for use in humans, such preparations could be used for disinfection of surfaces or sterilization of water. In this protocol, we give a straightforward approach to solubilizing CdTe QDs with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The QDs are ready to use within an hour. We then demonstrate coupling to an antimicrobial agent. The second part of the protocol demonstrates a 96-well bacterial inhibition assay using the conjugated and unconjugated QDs. The optical density is read over many hours, permitting the effects of QD addition and light exposure to be evaluated immediately as well as after a recovery period. We also illustrate a colony count for quantifying bacterial survival.

  12. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  13. Acetamide Agar for Differentiation of Nonfermentative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Oberhofer, Thomas R.; Rowen, Joyce W.

    1974-01-01

    An acetamide agar medium is described for use in the differentiation of nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria. With few exceptions, indicator reactions were rapid, intense, and clear-cut. PMID:4417708

  14. Characterization of physicochemical properties of carboxymethyl agar.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingzhao; Liu, Xin; Luan, Jimei; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-10-13

    A series of carboxymethyl agars (CMAs) with different degree of substitution (DS) were prepared, and their properties were determined and analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of DS, the dissolving temperature, the gelling temperature, the gel melting temperature, the gel strength, the gel hardness, the gel fracturability, and the solution apparent viscosity of CMA all decreased, except that its gel cohesiveness and gel springiness increased. The variation process of agar molecules in solution from coil to helix could be observed by measuring the optical rotation of the solution at such a low concentration, at which even the solution could not form a gel. The gel skeleton microstructures of both agar and CMA were of porous network structure, and the pore size of CMA became smaller and denser with the increase of its DS. After carboxymethylation, the agar hygroscopicity was improved, but its thermal stability was lowered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  16. Adherence assays and Slime production of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abdallah, Fethi; Chaieb, Kamel; Zmantar, Tarek; Kallel, Hela; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2009-01-01

    In this study we investigated the phenotypic slime production of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains, food-borne pathogens, using a Congo red agar plate assay. Furthermore, we studied their ability to adhere to abiotic surfaces and Vero cells line. Our results showed that only V. alginolyticus ATCC 17749 was a slime-producer developing almost black colonies on Congo red agar plate. Adherence to glace tube showed that all V. alginolyticus strains were more adherent than V. parahaemolyticus. Only V. alginolyticus ATCC 17749 was found to be able to form biofilm on polystyrene microplate wells (OD570 = 0.532). Adherence to Vero cells showed that all tested strains were non adherent after 30 min, however after 60 min all the studied strains become adherent. The percentage of adherence ranged from1.23% to 4.66%. PMID:24031378

  17. Adherence assays and Slime production of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Fethi; Chaieb, Kamel; Zmantar, Tarek; Kallel, Hela; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2009-04-01

    In this study we investigated the phenotypic slime production of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains, food-borne pathogens, using a Congo red agar plate assay. Furthermore, we studied their ability to adhere to abiotic surfaces and Vero cells line. Our results showed that only V. alginolyticus ATCC 17749 was a slime-producer developing almost black colonies on Congo red agar plate. Adherence to glace tube showed that all V. alginolyticus strains were more adherent than V. parahaemolyticus. Only V. alginolyticus ATCC 17749 was found to be able to form biofilm on polystyrene microplate wells (OD570 = 0.532). Adherence to Vero cells showed that all tested strains were non adherent after 30 min, however after 60 min all the studied strains become adherent. The percentage of adherence ranged from1.23% to 4.66%.

  18. A comparison of titers of anti-Brucella antibodies of naturally infected and healthy vaccinated cattle by standard tube agglutination test, microtiter plate agglutination test, indirect hemagglutination assay, and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anju; Saxena, Hari Mohan; Malhotra, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We determined the antibody response in cattle naturally infected with brucellosis and normal healthy adult cattle vaccinated during calf hood with strain 19. Materials and Methods: The antibody titers were measured by standard tube agglutination test (STAT), microtiter plate agglutination test (MAT), indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA), and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) as per standard protocols. Results: The mean STAT titers were 1.963±0.345 in infected cattle and 1.200±0.155 in healthy vaccinated cattle. The difference was extremely significant (p<0.0001). The mean MAT titers were 2.244±0.727 in infected cattle and 1.200±0.155 in healthy vaccinated cattle. The difference was very significant (p<0.005). The mean IHA titers in infected cattle were 2.284±0.574, and those in healthy vaccinated cattle were 1.200±0.155. The difference was extremely significant (p=0.0002). However, the difference in mean iELISA titers of infected cattle (1.3678±0.014) and healthy vaccinated cattle (1.367±0.014) was non-significant. The infected animals showed very high titers of agglutinating antibodies compared to the vaccinated animals. However, it cannot be ascertained whether these antibodies are due to vaccine or response to infection. Since the infected animals had been vaccinated earlier, the current infection may suggest that vaccination was unable to induce protective levels of antibody. The heightened antibody response after infection may also indicate a secondary immune response to the antigens common to the vaccine strain and wild Brucella organisms. Conclusion: The brucellosis infected animals showed very high titers of agglutinating antibodies compared to the vaccinated animals. PMID:27536032

  19. Morphological development of Morchella conica mycelium on different agar media.

    PubMed

    Guler, P; Ozkaya, E G

    2009-07-01

    The present study presents the development of mycelium of Morchella conica where different concentration of sucrose added at different agar media. For this sucrose have been added as 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00 and 1.25% concentration to wheat agar potato dextrose agar malt extract agar and complete medium yeast agar The radial growth speed, morphologic specifications, radial growth radius and pigmentation of mycelium were taken as criteria, the development period of mycelium in wheat agar was completed in 4 days and mycelium were very thin. The colonization period of the mycelium was determined; 7 days in potato dextrose agar 5 days in malt extract agar and 5 days at complete medium yeast agar. The development of the mycelium; at potato dextrose agar was dense and circular; at malt extract agar and at completed medium yeast agar was rhizomorphic. Mycelium has developed very well at sucrose medium and formed creamy and light yellow pigmentation.

  20. A Pitfall of the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5(3-carboxymethonyphenol)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay due to evaporation in wells on the edge of a 96 well plate.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish I; Tuckerman, Rodney; Dong, Qihan

    2005-06-01

    The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5(3-carboxymethonyphenol)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) calorimetric assay is replacing the traditional 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a fast, one-step assay of cell viability. We have observed that evaporation of the outer wells of a 96 well plate increases the absorbancy by 52% compared to the inner wells. Filling the outer 2 rows of wells with media and replacement of the media prior to addition of the MTS reagent will, however, correct this inaccuracy.

  1. Comparison of seven plating media for enumeration of Listeria spp.

    PubMed Central

    Loessner, M J; Bell, R H; Jay, J M; Shelef, L A

    1988-01-01

    The suitability of seven media for the enumeration of Listeria spp. was evaluated at 30 degrees C for 48 h. The media tested were (i) the original McBride Listeria agar formulation (with glycine); (ii) modified McBride agar containing glycine anhydride; (iii) LiCl-phenylethanol-moxalactam (LPM) agar; (iv) acriflavine-ceftazidime agar; (v) Rodriguez isolation agar (RISA); (vi) modified Vogel-Johnson (MVJ) agar; (vii) cyclohexanedione-nalidixic acid-phenylethanol agar; and tryptose agar as control. A total of 66 organisms were used including 11 Listeria monocytogenes strains and 5 other Listeria spp. For L. monocytogenes strains only, all media performed highly similarly. Of the other Listeria spp., only two grew on MVJ agar and three each grew on LPM and RISA. Only LPM agar inhibited the 50 non-listeriae, including five yeasts, while MVJ agar inhibited all but one yeast. The McBride Listeria agar formulation that contained glycine anhydride was less selective than the original. When pure cultures of 10 bacteria (including one L. monocytogenes strain) were combined and plated on four media, L. monocytogenes colonies were easiest to enumerate on MVJ agar, followed by LPM and RISA. These media ranked in the same order when plated with homogenates of various foods to which was added L. monocytogenes Scott A, but LPM agar was the best overall since Scott A was inhibited by MVJ. Upon microscopic examination of listerial colonies from the plating media, atypical cell morphology was noted with cells being about twofold in size on LPM, MVJ, and acriflavine-ceftazidime agars. Overall, LPM agar was the most suitable of the media tested even though it was inhibitory to Listeria grayi and Listeria murrayi. PMID:3146947

  2. Comparative evaluation of chromogenic agar medium and conventional culture system for isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens.

    PubMed

    Akter, Laila; Haque, Rezwana; Salam, Md Abdus

    2014-09-01

    Urine is the most frequent specimen received for culture/sensitivity by clinical laboratories. The microbiological performance of HiCrome UTI agar medium was compared with Blood agar and MacConkey agar for isolation and presumptive identification of bacteria from urine culture. A total of 443 consecutively collected midstream and/or catheter-catch urine samples from patients attending the Islami Bank Medical College Hospital, Rajshahi, Bangladesh during January to December, 2012 were cultured. Urine samples showing pus cells ≥ 5/HPF were inoculated on to Blood agar (BA), MacConkey agar (MAC) and HiCrome UTI agar (CA) media simultaneously and incubated overnight aerobically at 37(0)C. Rate of isolation and presumptive identification of bacterial species were compared for different media. Culture yielded a total of 199 bacterial isolates from 189 (42.67%) positive plates including 179 (40.40%) unimicrobial and 10 (2.26%) polymicrobial (mixed growth of pair of bacteria) growths. Both HiCrome UTI agar and Blood agar media supported 100% growths while 151 (75.88%) growths were observed on MacConkey agar. The rate of presumptive identification was found significantly higher on HiCrome UTI agar (97.49%) than MAC agar (67.34%) (P<0.001) as primary urine culture medium. Of 199 isolates, E. coli was found to be the leading uropathogen isolated from 118 (59.30%) samples with its presumptive identification rate of 95.76%, 93.22% and 5.93% on CA, MAC and BA respectively. All 10 (100%) polymicrobial growths were demonstrated distinctly on CA against only 01(10%) on each BA and MAC. HiCrome UTI agar was found to be more useful as primary urine culture medium in both higher rate of isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens in comparison to conventional media. Its inherent characteristics in demonstrating polymicrobial growth and ease of rapid identification by distinct colony colour are unique.

  3. Evaluation of agar films in the prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Mamoudieh, Mohsen; Mirkheshti, Nooshin; Alavi, Sayyed Ali

    2011-03-01

    Peritoneal adhesions cause significant long-term postoperative morbidity. This study evaluates the efficacy of agar plates as the physical barrier in reducing adhesion formation after abdominal surgery in an animal model. Adhesions were induced, by cecum abrasion, in 20 C57/BL6 mice during a laparotomy procedure. Agar plates were used in 10 mice as the experimental group. At a second operation, 28 days later, the adhesions were graded, in two groups. Data were analyzed by using Student t test. There was no significant difference in weight gain of the two groups during the study period. A comparison of the morphological appearances of the adhesions demonstrated that there was no evident difference between the two groups. There was also no significant difference in the incidence ratio of adhesions or postoperative adhesion scores between the two groups (p value >0.05). Despite the hydrogel properties of agar, it was not successful in practice in the reduction of adhesion formation after peritoneal surgery. Since agar is a biological product, it may cause a hyperreactivity induced by the innate immune system in peritoneum. Therefore, agar does not appear to be useful in clinical practice for the reduction of adhesion formation after peritoneal surgery.

  4. Cell communication with the neural plate is required for induction of neural markers by BMP inhibition: evidence for homeogenetic induction and implications for Xenopus animal cap and chick explant assays.

    PubMed

    Linker, Claudia; De Almeida, Irene; Papanayotou, Costis; Stower, Matthew; Sabado, Virginie; Ghorani, Ehsan; Streit, Andrea; Mayor, Roberto; Stern, Claudio D

    2009-03-15

    In Xenopus, the animal cap is very sensitive to BMP antagonists, which result in neuralization. In chick, however, only cells at the border of the neural plate can be neuralized by BMP inhibition. Here we compare the two systems. BMP antagonists can induce neural plate border markers in both ventral Xenopus epidermis and non-neural chick epiblast. However, BMP antagonism can only neuralize ectodermal cells when the BMP-inhibited cells form a continuous trail connecting them to the neural plate or its border, suggesting that homeogenetic neuralizing factors can only travel between BMP-inhibited cells. Xenopus animal cap explants contain cells fated to contribute to the neural plate border and even to the anterior neural plate, explaining why they are so easily neuralized by BMP-inhibition. Furthermore, chick explants isolated from embryonic epiblast behave like Xenopus animal caps and express border markers. We propose that the animal cap assay in Xenopus and explant assays in the chick are unsuitable for studying instructive signals in neural induction.

  5. The Efficiency of UVC Radiation in the Inactivation of
Listeria monocytogenes on Beef-Agar Food Models

    PubMed Central

    James, Christian; James, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of meat content and surface smoothness on the deactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in beef-agar food models achieved by shortwave ultraviolet (UVC) light. Food models with various meat contents were made using chopped beef slices and agar solution. Prepared models together with a Listeria selective agar (LSA) plate and a slice of cooked beef were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and then exposed to UVC light. Population of Listeria reduced to below the level of detection on the LSA plates. As the content of beef in the beef-agar models increased, more L. monocytogenes cells survived. Survival was greatest on the treated cooked slice of beef. To better understand the effect of surface irregularities, a white light interferometer was used to analyse the surface smoothness of beef-agar media and LSA plates. No correlation was observed between the surface roughness of seven out of nine types of produced beef-agar media and the degree of inactivation resulting from UVC radiation at the given dose, whereas, less bacterial cells were killed as beef content of the food models increased. The findings of the current study show that the chemical composition of the treated sample also plays an important role in pathogen resistance and survival, meaning that two samples with similar surface irregularities but different chemical composition might produce very different inactivation results when exposed to UVC light. PMID:27904353

  6. The Efficiency of UVC Radiation in the Inactivation of
Listeria monocytogenes on Beef-Agar Food Models.

    PubMed

    Hamidi-Oskouei, Amir M; James, Christian; James, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of meat content and surface smoothness on the deactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in beef-agar food models achieved by shortwave ultraviolet (UVC) light. Food models with various meat contents were made using chopped beef slices and agar solution. Prepared models together with a Listeria selective agar (LSA) plate and a slice of cooked beef were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and then exposed to UVC light. Population of Listeria reduced to below the level of detection on the LSA plates. As the content of beef in the beef-agar models increased, more L. monocytogenes cells survived. Survival was greatest on the treated cooked slice of beef. To better understand the effect of surface irregularities, a white light interferometer was used to analyse the surface smoothness of beef-agar media and LSA plates. No correlation was observed between the surface roughness of seven out of nine types of produced beef-agar media and the degree of inactivation resulting from UVC radiation at the given dose, whereas, less bacterial cells were killed as beef content of the food models increased. The findings of the current study show that the chemical composition of the treated sample also plays an important role in pathogen resistance and survival, meaning that two samples with similar surface irregularities but different chemical composition might produce very different inactivation results when exposed to UVC light.

  7. Pigments of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian; Schliemann, Willibald

    2007-01-01

    The complex pigment pattern of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) cap skins has been studied by LC-DAD and mass spectrometry. Among the betaxanthins the corresponding derivatives of serine, threonine, ethanolamine, alanine, Dopa, phenylalanine and tryptophan are reported for the first time to contribute to the pigment pattern of fly agarics. Betalamic acid, the chromophoric precursor of betaxanthins and betacyanins, muscaflavin and seco-dopas were also detected. Furthermore, the red-purple muscapurpurin and the red muscarubrin were tentatively assigned while further six betacyanin-like components could not be structurally allocated. Stability studies indicated a high susceptibility of pigment extracts to degradation which led to rapid colour loss thus rendering a complete characterization of betacyanin-like compounds impossible at present. Taking into account these difficulties the presented results may be a starting point for a comprehensive characterization of the pigment composition of fly agarics.

  8. Extraction of agar from Gelidium sesquipedale (Rhodopyta) and surface characterization of agar based films.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, P; Etxabide, A; Leceta, I; Peñalba, M; de la Caba, K

    2014-01-01

    The chemical structure of the agar obtained from Gelidium sesquipedale (Rhodophyta) has been determined by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Agar (AG) films with different amounts of soy protein isolate (SPI) were prepared using a thermo-moulding method, and transparent and hydrophobic films were obtained and characterized. FTIR analysis provided a detailed description of the binding groups present in the films, such as carboxylic, hydroxyl and sulfonate groups, while the surface composition was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes observed by FTIR and XPS spectra suggested interactions between functional groups of agar and SPI. This is a novel approach to the characterization of agar-based films and provides knowledge about the compatibility of agar and soy protein for further investigation of the functional properties of biodegradable films based on these biopolymers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Standard operating procedure to prepare agar phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, R. M.; Santos, T. Q.; Oliveira, D. P.; Souza, R. M.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Agar phantoms are widely used as soft tissue mimics and some preparation techniques are described in the literature. There are also standards that describe the recipe of a soft tissue mimicking material (TMM). However some details of manufacture process are not clearly defined. The standardization of the phantom's preparation can produce a metrological impact on the results of the acoustic properties measured. In this direction, this paper presents a standard operating procedure (SOP) to prepare the agar TMM described on the IEC 60601-237.

  10. Rapid depletion of dissolved oxygen in 96-well microtiter plate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm assays promotes biofilm development and is influenced by inoculum cell concentration.

    PubMed

    Cotter, John J; O'Gara, James P; Casey, Eoin

    2009-08-01

    Biofilm-related research using 96-well microtiter plates involves static incubation of plates indiscriminate of environmental conditions, making oxygen availability an important variable which has not been considered to date. By directly measuring dissolved oxygen concentration over time we report here that dissolved oxygen is rapidly consumed in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm cultures grown in 96-well plates irrespective of the oxygen concentration in the gaseous environment in which the plates are incubated. These data indicate that depletion of dissolved oxygen during growth of bacterial biofilm cultures in 96-well plates may significantly influence biofilm production. Furthermore higher inoculum cell concentrations are associated with more rapid consumption of dissolved oxygen and higher levels of S. epidermidis biofilm production. Our data reveal that oxygen depletion during bacterial growth in 96-well plates may significantly influence biofilm production and should be considered in the interpretation of experimental data using this biofilm model.

  11. [Laboratory-based evaluation of a selective X-SA agar medium supplemented with chromogenic substrate for Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Isamu; Yamane, Nobuhisa

    2005-01-01

    The newly developed culture medium, X-SA agar medium (Nissui Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo) selective for Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated for its ability to detect clinical isolates of S. aureus. Besides S. aureus, X-SA agar media allowed the growth of coagulase-negative staphylococci, Bacillus cereus and some isolates of corynebacteria. However, those species were easily distinguishable from the blue and convex colonies of S. aureus. When compared to the traditional egg yolk mannitol salt agar, selectivity for the species other than S. aureus was more specific, and growth support for S. aureus was more comparable to sheep blood agar. Also, when various phenotypic variants of S. aureus were inoculated, visible colonies of mucoid colony variants and attenuated growth variants on Mueller-Hinton agar appeared on X-SA agar plates after 24 hour-incubation, but it required 48 hour-incubation for small colony variants. The fully automated microbiology system, RAISUS (Nissui Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd.) gave comparable species-identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test results when cell suspension directly prepared from X-SA agar media was tested. However, species-identification for phenotypic variants of S. aureus was more complicated for RAISUS testing and detection of coagulase. With these results, it could be concluded that the X-SA agar medium supplemented with chromogenic substrate is superior to the traditional selective media for the detection of S. aureus, and is widely applicable for clinical microbiology as well as food microbiology.

  12. Normal force controlled rheology applied to agar gelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bosi; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous polymer solutions. During the sol-gel transition, such materials may experience a volume contraction which is traditionally overlooked as rheological measurements are usually performed in geometries of constant volume. In this article, we revisit the formation of 1.5\\% wt. agar gels through a series of benchmark rheological experiments performed with a plate-plate geometry. We demonstrate on that particular gel of polysaccharides that the contraction associated with the sol/gel transition cannot be neglected. Indeed, imposing a constant gap width during the gelation results in the strain hardening of the sample, as evidenced by the large negative normal force that develops. Such hardening leads to the slow drift in time of the gel elastic modulus $G'$ towards ever larger values, and thus to an erroneous estimate of $G'$. As an alternative, we show that imposing a constant normal force equals to zero during the gelation, instead of a constant gap width, suppresses the hardening as the decrease of the gap compensates for the sample contraction. Using normal force controlled rheology, we then investigate the impact of thermal history on 1.5\\% wt. agar gels. We show that neither the value of the cooling rate, nor the introduction of a constant temperature stage during the cooling process influence the gel elastic properties. Instead, $G'$ only depends on the terminal temperature reached at the end of the cooling ramp, as confirmed by direct imaging of the gel microstructure by cryoelectron microscopy. The present work offers an extensive review of the technical difficulties associated with the rheology of hydrogels and paves the way for a systematic use of normal force controlled rheology to monitor non-isochoric processes.

  13. Use of agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Velimirović, Milica; Wagner, Stephan; Micić Batka, Vesna; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    A major obstacle for use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles as a nontoxic material for effective in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) is the high production cost. For that reason, submicro-scale milled zero-valent iron particles were recently developed (milled ZVI, UVR-FIA, Germany) by grinding macroscopic raw materials of elementary iron as a cheaper alternative to products produced by solid-state reduction. However, milled ZVI particles tend to aggregate and due to the rather large particle size (d50= 11.9 µm) also rapidly sediment. To prevent aggregation and consequently sedimentation of milled ZVI particles and therefore improve the mobility after in situ application, the use of a stabilizer is considered in literature as a most promising option. In this study, milled ZVI particles (1 g L-1 of particle concentration) were stabilized by environmentally friendly polymer agar agar (>0.5 g L-1), which had a positive impact on the milled ZVI stability. Sedimentation rate was significantly decreased by increasing the suspension viscosity. Column transport experiments were performed for bare and agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles in commercially available fine grained quartz sand (DORSILIT® Nr.8, Gebrüder Dorfner GmbH Co, Germany) and different porous media collected from brownfields. The experiments were carried out under field relevant injection conditions of 100 m d-1. The maximal travel distance (LT) of less than 10 cm was determined for non-stabilized suspension in fine grained quartz sand, while agar agar (1 g L-1) stabilized milled ZVI suspension revealed LT of 12 m. Similar results were observed for porous media from brownfields showing that mobility of agar agar stabilized particle suspensions was significantly improved compared to bare particles. Based on the mobility data, agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles could be used for in situ application. Finally, lab-scale batch degradation

  14. Comparison of Fecal Coliform Agar and Violet Red Bile Lactose Agar for Fecal Coliform Enumeration in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, A.; Wanegue, C.; Baylac, P.

    2002-01-01

    A 24-h direct plating method for fecal coliform enumeration with a resuscitation step (preincubation for 2 h at 37 ± 1°C and transfer to 44 ± 1°C for 22 h) using fecal coliform agar (FCA) was compared with the 24-h standardized violet red bile lactose agar (VRBL) method. FCA and VRBL have equivalent specificities and sensitivities, except for lactose-positive non-fecal coliforms such as Hafnia alvei, which could form typical colonies on FCA and VRBL. Recovery of cold-stressed Escherichia coli in mashed potatoes on FCA was about 1 log unit lower than that with VRBL. When the FCA method was compared with standard VRBL for enumeration of fecal coliforms, based on counting carried out on 170 different food samples, results were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Based on 203 typical identified colonies selected as found on VRBL and FCA, the latter medium appears to allow the enumeration of more true fecal coliforms and has higher performance in certain ways (specificity, sensitivity, and negative and positive predictive values) than VRBL. Most colonies clearly identified on both media were E. coli and H. alvei, a non-fecal coliform. Therefore, the replacement of fecal coliform enumeration by E. coli enumeration to estimate food sanitary quality should be recommended. PMID:11916678

  15. Evaluation of cephamycins as supplements to selective agar for detecting Campylobacter spp. in chicken carcass rinses.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Young-Ji; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyunsook; Song, Kwang-Young; Sung, Kidon; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-04-16

    Although cefoperazone is the most commonly used antibiotic in Campylobacter-selective media, the distribution of cefoperazone-resistant bacteria such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli is increasing. Here we evaluated the potential of cephamycins for use as supplements to improve modified charcoal-cefoperazone-deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) by replacing cefoperazone with the same concentrations (32 mg/L) of cefotetan (modified charcoal-cefotetan-deoxycholate agar, mCCtDA) and cefoxitin (modified charcoal-cefoxitin-deoxycholate agar, mCCxDA). In chicken carcass rinse samples, the number of mCCDA plates detecting for Campylobacter (18/70, 26%) was significantly lower than that of mCCtDA (42/70, 60%) or mCCxDA plates (40/70, 57%). The number of mCCDA plates (70/70, 100%) that were contaminated with non-Campylobacter species was significantly higher than that of mCCtDA (20/70, 29%) or mCCxDA plates (21/70, 30%). The most common competing species identified using mCCDA was ESBL-producing E. coli, while Pseudomonas species frequently appeared on mCCtDA and mCCxDA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Possible influence of surfactants and proteins on the efficiency of contact agar microbiological surface sampling.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Sylvie M; Sindic, Marianne; Anceau, Christine; Brostaux, Yves; Detry, Jean G

    2010-11-01

    Agar contact microbiological sampling techniques, based on a transfer of the microorganisms present on a surface to a culture medium, are widely used to assess and control surface cleanliness and to evaluate microbial contamination levels. The effectiveness of these techniques depends on many environmental parameters that influence the strength of attachment of the bacteria to the surface. In the present study, stainless steel and high density polyethylene surfaces were inoculated with known concentrations of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Following an experimental design, the surfaces were sampled with different types of replicate organism direct agar contact plates and Petrifilm; results indicated that recovery rates were influenced by the presence of egg white albumin or Tween 80 in the inoculum solutions or by the introduction of surfactants into the contact agar of the microbiological sampling techniques. The techniques yielded significantly different results, depending on sampling conditions, underlining the need for a standardization of laboratory experiments to allow relevant comparisons of such techniques.

  17. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of chelating agents using the agar diffusion method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of 2 metal chelators. Concentrations of 0 to 40 mM of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediamine-N,N’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) were prepared in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The pH of the solutions was adjusted to 1...

  18. A quantitative in vitro assay for the evaluation of phototoxic potential of topically applied materials.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, S; DiNardo, J; Morris, W E; Wolf, B A; Schnetzinger, R W

    1984-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro method for phototoxic evaluation of chemicals has been developed and validated. The assay uses Saccharomyces cerevisiae, seeded in an agar overlay on top of a plate count agar base. 8-Methoxy psoralen is used as a reference standard against which materials are measured. Activity is quantified by cytotoxicity measured as zones of inhibition. Several known phototoxins (heliotropine, lyral, phantolid, and bergamot oil) and photoallergens (6-methyl coumarin and musk ambrette) are used to validate the assay. An excellent correlation is observed between in vivo studies employing Hartley albino guinea pigs and the in vitro assay for several fragrance raw materials and other chemicals. The in vitro assay exhibits a greater sensitivity from 2-500 fold. For three fragrance oils, the in vitro assay detects low levels of photobiological activity while the in vivo assay is negative. Although the in vitro assay does not discriminate between phototoxins and photoallergens, it can be used for screening of raw materials so that reduction in animal usage can be achieved while maintaining the protection of the consumer.

  19. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species.

    PubMed

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-10-29

    The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37 degrees C. The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar.

  20. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-01-01

    Background The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. Methods A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar. PMID:14613587

  1. [Screening and identification of a bacterium capable of converting agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides].

    PubMed

    Han, Junping; Huang, Yayan; Ye, Jing; Xiao, Meitian

    2015-09-04

    To screen and identify a bacterium capable of converting agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides. We took samples of porphyra haitanensis and nearby seawater, and then used the medium containing 1 per thousand agar to enrich the target bacteria. The target isolates were obtained by dilution-plate method, of which crude enzymes were further obtained by liquid culture. We adopted DNS method to determine the target bacteria which can convert agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides. The phylogenetics was identified by analyzing 16S rDNA sequence and combining the strain's morphological and bacterial colonial physiological biochemical characteristics. We isolated a gram-negative bacterial strain HJPHYXJ-1 capable of transforming agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) search of HJPHYXJ-1's 16S rDNA sequence on GenBank suggested that the similarity between this strain and Vibrio natriegens reached 99% . In addition, the morphological and physiological biochemical characteristics of HJPHYXJ-1 also showed highly similarity to Vibrio natriegens. So we identified HJPHYXJ-1 as Vibrio natriegens. The results of HPLC suggested that the metabolite of enzymatic degradation was neoagaro oligosaccharides. HJPHYXJ-1 or the new isolate of Vibrio natriegens was capable of converting agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides.

  2. Sensitive molecular diagnostic assays to mitigate the risks of asymptomatic bacterial diseases of plants.

    PubMed

    Schaad, N; Schuenzel, E

    2010-01-01

    Our highly concentrated monoculture makes crops vulnerable to pests and diseases. An increase in emerging non-indigenous bacterial diseases poses a real threat to US agriculture. The United States has 100,000 miles of shoreline and 6,000 miles of border, making possible easy introduction of crop pests and diseases. Most threatening to crops are the cross-domain enteric bacteria. In contrast to animals, crops have hundreds of major diseases and development of molecular-based detection protocols for each pathogen is impossible with current technology. Rathayibacter toxicus, a neurotoxin-producing bacterium transmitted by a seed gall nematode, is an example of a high-risk Select Agent. The bacterium infects seeds of grasses without showing any symptoms, often resulting in the death of grazing cattle. A prerequisite for the control of any disease is sensitive detection and proper identification of the causal organism. Detecting bacteria in samples of plants showing symptoms is relatively simple, whereas detection in asymptomatic tissues is difficult due to the extremely low numbers of the target pathogen present. Rapid serological assays work well with symptomatic tissues but not from asymptomatic tissue when bacteria levels are below sensitivity limits. Classical agar-plating assays are 1,000 fold more sensitive then serology or PCR. However, agar plating assays take from 3 to 5 days and require pathogenicity tests to confirm the identity. PCR-based assays allow for rapid, accurate identification but are insensitive due to use of 1 microL sample in comparison to 100 microL used for agar plating. To overcome this disadvantage, an enrichment technique termed BIO-PCR can be used in combination with agar plating for detection with asymptomatic tissues. The key to developing a successful BIO-PCR protocol is to determine the time required for development of pin point-size colonies to appear. For most plant pathogens 15 to 24 hours is sufficient time, whereas for the cross

  3. Adhesion and Disintegration Phenomena on Fractal Agar Gel Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Ayano; Sato, Marika; Sawaguchi, Haruna; Hotta, Jun-Ichi; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, mechanical phenomena on fractal agar gel were analyzed to understand the interfacial properties of hydrophilic biosurfaces. The evaluation of adhesion strength between the fractal agar gel surfaces showed that the fractal structure inhibits the adhesion between the agar gel surfaces. In addition, when the disintegration behavior of an agar gel block was observed between fractal agar gel substrates, the rough structure prevented the sliding of an agar gel block. These findings are useful for understanding the biological significance of rough structure on the biological surfaces.

  4. Screening bacterial metabolites for inhibitory effects against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis using a spectrophotometric assay.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sara C; Alford, Ross A; Garland, Stephen; Padilla, Gabriel; Thomas, Annette D

    2013-03-13

    Certain bacteria present on frog skin can prevent infection by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), conferring disease resistance. Previous studies have used agar-based in vitro challenge assays to screen bacteria for Bd-inhibitory activity and to identify candidates for bacterial supplementation trials. However, agar-based assays can be difficult to set up and to replicate reliably. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a semi-quantitative spectrophotometric challenge assay technique. Cell-free supernatants were prepared from filtered bacterial cultures and added to 96-well plates in replicated wells containing Bd zoospores suspended in tryptone-gelatin hydrolysate-lactose (TGhL) broth medium. Plates were then read daily on a spectrophotometer until positive controls reached maximum growth in order to determine growth curves for Bd. We tested the technique by screening skin bacteria from the Australian green-eyed tree frog Litoria serrata. Of bacteria tested, 31% showed some degree of Bd inhibition, while some may have promoted Bd growth, a previously unknown effect. Our cell-free supernatant challenge assay technique is an effective in vitro method for screening bacterial isolates for strong Bd-inhibitory activity. It contributes to the expanding field of bioaugmentation research, which could play a significant role in mitigating the effects of chytridiomycosis on amphibians around the world.

  5. Comparison of Brilliant Green Agar and Hektoen Enteric Agar Media in the Isolation of Salmonellae from Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Velma Y. L.; Ching, George Q. L.; Gooch, John M.

    1973-01-01

    Brilliant Green (BG) agar and Hektoen enteric (HE) agar media were compared for their efficiency in isolating salmonellae from various food products. Of the 11,226 food specimens examined, 1,662 (or 14.9%) yielded salmonellae. Of this number, 1,475 (88.7%) were recovered from BG agar and 1,315 (79.1%) were recovered from HE agar media. The results indicate that BG agar is more effective in isolating salmonellae from food products. A smaller subsidiary study showed HE agar to be more selective than BG agar. Four hundred ten specimens yielded 92 nonlactose-fermenting isolants other than salmonellae on BG agar and only 11 such isolants on HE agar. PMID:4584576

  6. Automatic surface inoculation of agar trays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.; Boykin, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a machine and technique for the automatic inoculation of a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture, using either a conventional inoculation loop or a cotton swab. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. The described technique makes possible the visualization of the overall qualitative and, to some extent, quantitative relationships of various bacterial types in a sample tested.

  7. Antibacterial properties of aged dental cements evaluated by direct-contact and agar diffusion tests.

    PubMed

    Lewinstein, Israel; Matalon, Shlomo; Slutzkey, Shimshon; Weiss, Ervin I

    2005-04-01

    Since failure of fixed partial dentures is most frequently caused by caries, it would be advantageous if cements possessed antibacterial properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of 3 dental cements using the direct-contact test and agar diffusion test. For the direct-contact test, wells (n = 4) of microtiter plates were coated with the tested cements (Harvard cement, Duralon, and Ketac-Cem) while Streptococcus mutans suspension was placed directly on the cements. Bacterial growth was evaluated by a temperature-controlled microplate spectrophotometer. Eight wells of bacteria without the tested cements served as the positive control. Six wells of the tested cement without bacteria served as the negative control. For the agar diffusion test, triplicate specimens of freshly mixed cements were poured into uniform wells (5 mm in diameter) punched in the agar plates inoculated with Streptococcus mutans . After incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the agar plates were examined for bacterial growth and the diameter of the halo formed in the bacterial lawn was measured. In both tests, each cement was mixed in 2 different powder/liquid ratios. For the direct-contact test, data were initially recorded after 1 hour of incubation. Additional experiments were performed on specimens that were aged for 24 hours, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months before assessment by either direct-contact test or agar diffusion test. The data were subjected to 1-way ANOVA with the Tukey post hoc test (alpha=.05). Compared with the control group, Duralon and Harvard cements demonstrated antibacterial properties even after 3 months with the direct-contact test (P <.002), while Ketac-Cem exhibited no antibacterial properties. In the agar diffusion test, no antibacterial activity was observed for any of the tested cements. The different powder/liquid ratios had a negligible effect on the antibacterial properties of the tested cements. Within the limitations of

  8. Development of an automated, high-throughput bactericidal assay that measures cellular respiration as a survival readout for Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Puiying A; Santos, George F; Masterman, Kelly-Anne; Janes, Jeff; Wacknov, Bill; Vienken, Kay; Giuliani, Marzia; Herman, Ann E; Cooke, Michael; Mbow, M Lamine; Donnelly, John

    2011-08-01

    Complement-mediated bactericidal activity has long been regarded as the serological correlate of protective immunity against Neisseria meningitidis. This was affirmed in 2005 at a WHO-sponsored meningococcal serology standardization workshop. The assay currently employed by most laboratories involves determining surviving bacterial colony counts on agar as a readout which is labor-intensive, time-consuming, and not amendable to rapid data analysis for clinical trials. Consequently, there is an acute need to develop a sensitive, high-throughput bactericidal assay to enable a rapid and robust assessment of the effectiveness of vaccine candidates. To this end, we have developed an automated, kinetic assay based on the fluorescent respiration product of resazurin which reduces assay volume, shortens assay time, and facilitates automation of data analysis. We demonstrate proof of concept for applicability of this high-throughput system with multiple meningococcal strains and utilizing different lots of human complement. The assay is robust and highly reproducible. Titers obtained by the fluorescence readout method are strongly correlated with the data obtained using the conventional, agar plate-based assay. These results demonstrate that the detection of bacteria that have survived the bactericidal reaction by measuring metabolic activity using a fluorescent dye as an alternative readout is a promising approach for the development of a high-throughput bactericidal assay.

  9. Migration of Chemotactic Bacteria in Soft Agar: Role of Gel Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Croze, Ottavio A.; Ferguson, Gail P.; Cates, Michael E.; Poon, Wilson C.K.

    2011-01-01

    We study the migration of chemotactic wild-type Escherichia coli populations in semisolid (soft) agar in the concentration range C = 0.15–0.5% (w/v). For C≲0.35%, expanding bacterial colonies display characteristic chemotactic rings. At C = 0.35%, however, bacteria migrate as broad circular bands rather than sharp rings. These are growth/diffusion waves arising because of suppression of chemotaxis by the agar and have not been previously reported experimentally to our knowledge. For C = 0.4–0.5%, expanding colonies do not span the depth of the agar and develop pronounced front instabilities. The migration front speed is weakly dependent on agar concentration at C < 0.25%, but decreases sharply above this value. We discuss these observations in terms of an extended Keller-Segel model for which we derived novel transport parameter expressions accounting for perturbations of the chemotactic response by collisions with the agar. The model makes it possible to fit the observed front speed decay in the range C = 0.15–0.35%, and its solutions qualitatively reproduce the observed transition from chemotactic to growth/diffusion bands. We discuss the implications of our results for the study of bacteria in porous media and for the design of improved bacteriological chemotaxis assays. PMID:21806920

  10. Colony immunoblot assay for the detection of hemolysin BL enterotoxin producing Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Moravek, Maximilian; Wegscheider, Monika; Schulz, Anja; Dietrich, Richard; Bürk, Christine; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2004-09-01

    Bacillus cereus strains involved in food poisoning cases of the diarrheal type may produce two different enterotoxin complexes. To facilitate the identification of hemolysin BL-enterotoxin complex (HBL) and/or the nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE) producing colonies a colony immunoblot procedure was developed, which allows a fast and easy identification of the respective colonies from blood agar plates. The enterotoxins were transferred from the blood agar medium to a nitrocellulose membrane and the immobilized toxins were probed with monoclonal antibodies. The antibodies 2A3 and 1A8 allowed the specific detection of the B component of HBL and the nheA component of NHE. The assay enabled the reliable identification of HBL expressing colonies and differentiation from NHE producing but HBL negative colonies.

  11. Use of Dehydrated Agar to Estimate Microbial Water Quality for Horticulture Irrigation.

    PubMed

    Meador, Dustin P; Fisher, Paul R; Guy, Charles L; Harmon, Philip F; Peres, Natalia A; Teplitski, Max

    2016-07-01

    Petrifilms are dehydrated agar culture plates that have been used to quantify colony forming units (CFU) mL of either aerobic bacteria (Petrifilm-AC) or fungus (Petrifilm-YM), depending on substrate composition. Microbes in irrigation systems can indicate biofilm risk and potential clogging of irrigation emitters. The research objective was to compare counts on Petrifilms versus traditional, hydrated-agar plates using samples collected from recirculated irrigation waters and cultures of isolated known species. The estimated count (in CFU mL) from a recirculated irrigation sample after 7 d of incubation on Petrifilm-YM was only 5.5% of the count quantified using sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) with chloramphenicol after 14 d. In a separate experiment with a known species, Petrifilm-YM did not successfully culture zoospores of . Isolates of viable zoospores were cultured successfully on potato-dextrose agar (PDA), with comparable counts with a vegetable juice medium supplemented with the antibiotics pimaricin, ampicillin, rifamycin, pentochloronitrobenzene and hymexazol (PARP-H). The quantification of pv. Begoniaceae on Petrifilm-AC was not significantly different ( < 0.05) than on PDA, but was lower than on Reasoner and Goldrich agar (R2A) or with a hemocytometer. The current formulation of Petrifilm-YM is unlikely to be a useful monitoring method for plant pathogens in irrigation water because of the inability to successfully culture oomycetes. However, Petrifilm-AC was an effective method to quantify bacteria and can provide an easy-to-use on-farm tool to monitor biofilm risk and microbial density. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Comparison of sorbitol MacConkey and hemorrhagic coli agars for recovery of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from brie, ice cream, and whole milk.

    PubMed

    Hammack, T S; Feng, P; Amaguaña, R M; June, G A; Sherrod, P S; Andrews, W H

    1997-01-01

    The relative efficacies of hemorrhagic coli (HC) agar and several formulations of sorbitol MacConkey (SorMac) agar, with and without 0.1% (w/v) 4-methyllumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG), in recovering unstressed and heat-stressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Brie cheese, ice cream, and whole milk were determined. Recovery of unstressed E. coli O157:H7 was determined quantitatively by spread-plating diluted samples onto different agars and performing plate counts. Recovery of stressed E. coli O157:H7 was determined qualitatively by enriching samples in modified trypticase soy broth, streaking the incubated enrichments, and isolating E. coli O157:H7 colonies from the agars. HC agar and the SorMac agar formulations did not differ significantly in their ability to recover unstressed E. coli O157:H7 from ice cream and whole milk; however, HC agar recovered significantly more unstressed E. coli O157:H7 from Brie cheese than did the SorMac agar formulations. Bacteriological Analytical Manual and Oxoid SorMac agar formulations made from individual ingredients, did not differ significantly in recovering unstressed E. coli O157:H7 from Brie cheese. The efficiency of the commercially available Oxoid SorMac agar could not be determined because of overgrowth by indigenous microflora. HC and SorMac agars did not differ significantly in recovering stressed E. coli O157:H7 from Brie cheese, ice cream, and whole milk. MUG had no apparent effect on recovery of either stressed or unstressed E. coli O157:H7 from the dairy foods examined.

  13. Disk diffusion test and E-test with enriched Mueller-Hinton agar for determining susceptibility of Candida species to voriconazole and fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sai-Cheong; Lo, Hsiu-Jung; Fung, Chang-Phone; Lee, Ning; See, Lai-Chu

    2009-04-01

    A simplified antifungal disk diffusion test using Mueller-Hinton agar containing 2% glucose and methylene blue 5 microg/mL (GM-MH, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute [CLSI] M44-A) has proved to correlate well with the standard reference test. A new azole, voriconazole, has recently been approved for clinical therapy in Taiwan. This study investigated the reliability of the disk diffusion test with GM-MH agar and compared the results with those of the E-test using GM-MH agar to determine the voriconazole and fluconazole susceptibility of Candida isolates. The antimicrobial susceptibility of Candida isolates were evaluated by E-test and disk diffusion test in accordance with the guidelines of the CLSI, and compared with the reference antifungal macrodilution susceptibility test (CLSI M27-A). The antifungal disk diffusion test and the E-test using GM-MH agar plate provided a sufficiently accurate, time-efficient, and cost-effective way to determine the susceptibility of 182 Candida spp. to voriconazole and fluconazole. There was a high correlation between the test results of the E-test using the GM-MH agar plate and those obtained by the reference antifungal macrodilution susceptibility test (CLSI M27-A). The results of the E-test and those of the 1-microg voriconazole disk diffusion test on the GM-MH agar plate at 24 h had a high correlation. All the minimal inhibitory concentrations of voriconazole for all Candida spp. were <8 microg/mL. The positive predictive value of the susceptible disk test of voriconazole on the GM-MH agar plate was 100% at 24 h for C. albicans and other Candida spp. The disk diffusion test and the E-test using the GM-MH agar plate can be performed quickly, simply, and cost-effectively, and are practicable methods for the initial testing of the susceptibility of Candida spp. to voriconazole and fluconazole.

  14. The agar microdilution method - a new method for antimicrobial susceptibility testing for essential oils and plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Golus, J; Sawicki, R; Widelski, J; Ginalska, G

    2016-11-01

    To develop a new agar microdilution technique suitable for the assessment of the antimicrobial activity of natural plant products such as essential oils or plant extracts as well as to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of several essential oils and plant extracts. The proposed agar microdilution method was evolved on the basis of the CLSI agar dilution method, approved for conventional antimicrobials. However, this new method combines convenience and time/cost effectiveness typical for microtitre methods with the advantages of the agar dilution of hydrophobic or coloured substances. Different concentrations of the tested agents were added to Eppendorf tubes with molten Mueller-Hinton agar, vortexed and dispensed into the 96-well microplate in a small volume of 100 μl per well which allows for rapid, easy and economical preparation of samples as well as providing a uniform and stable dispersion without separation of the oil-water phases which occurs in methods with liquid medium. Next, the agar microdilution plates were inoculated with four reference bacterial strains. The results of our study demonstrated that the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were successfully determined using the agar microdilution method even with hydrophobic essential oils or strongly coloured plant extracts. The new agar microdilution method avoids the problems associated with testing of water insoluble, oily or strongly coloured plant natural products. Moreover, it enables the reliable, cheap and easy MIC determination of such agents. In the era of increasing antibiotic resistance high hopes are associated with new drugs of plant origin. However, the lack of standardized and reliable testing methods for assessing antibacterial activity of plant natural products causes impediment to research into this area. This study demonstrated that the agar microdilution method can be used successfully for testing oily and coloured substances. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Agar-block microcosms for controlled plant tissue decomposition by aerobic fungi.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jonathan S; Jacobson, K Brook

    2011-02-03

    The two principal methods for studying fungal biodegradation of lignocellulosic plant tissues were developed for wood preservative testing (soil-block; agar-block). It is well-accepted that soil-block microcosms yield higher decay rates, fewer moisture issues, lower variability among studies, and higher thresholds of preservative toxicity. Soil-block testing is thus the more utilized technique and has been standardized by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) (method D 1413-07). The soil-block design has drawbacks, however, using locally-variable soil sources and in limiting the control of nutrients external (exogenous) to the decaying tissues. These drawbacks have emerged as a problem in applying this method to other, increasingly popular research aims. These modern aims include degrading lignocellulosics for bioenergy research, testing bioremediation of co-metabolized toxics, evaluating oxidative mechanisms, and tracking translocated elements along hyphal networks. Soil-blocks do not lend enough control in these applications. A refined agar-block approach is necessary. Here, we use the brown rot wood-degrading fungus Serpula lacrymans to degrade wood in agar-block microcosms, using deep Petri dishes with low-calcium agar. We test the role of exogenous gypsum on decay in a time-series, to demonstrate the utility and expected variability. Blocks from a single board rip (longitudinal cut) are conditioned, weighed, autoclaved, and introduced aseptically atop plastic mesh. Fungal inoculations are at each block face, with exogenous gypsum added at interfaces. Harvests are aseptic until the final destructive harvest. These microcosms are designed to avoid block contact with agar or Petri dish walls. Condensation is minimized during plate pours and during incubation. Finally, inoculum/gypsum/wood spacing is minimized but without allowing contact. These less technical aspects of agar-block design are also the most common causes of failure and the key source of

  16. Characteristic features and dye degrading capability of agar-agar gel immobilized manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz

    2016-05-01

    Immobilization of enzymes has been regarded as an efficient approach to develop biocatalyst with improved activity and stability characteristics under reaction conditions. In the present study, purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 was immobilized in agar-agar support using entrapment technique. Maximum immobilization yield was accomplished at 4.0% agar-agar gel. The immobilized MnP exhibited better resistance to changes in pH and temperature than the free enzyme, with optimal conditions being pH 6.0 and 50 °C. The kinetic parameters Km and Kcat/Km for free and entrapped MnP were calculated to be 65.6 mM and 6.99 M(-1) s(-1), and 82 mM and 8.15 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Thermo-stability was significantly improved after immobilization. After 120 h, the insolubilized MnP retained its activity up to 71.9% and 60.3% at 30 °C and 40 °C, respectively. It showed activity until 10th cycle and retained 74.3% residual activity after 3th cycle. The effects of H2O2, ionic strength and potential inhibitors on activity of free and immobilized enzyme were investigated. Moreover, the decolorization of three structurally different dyes was monitored in order to assess the degrading capability of the entrapped MnP. The decolorization efficiencies for all the tested dyes were 78.6-84.7% after 12h. The studies concluded that the toxicity of dyes aqueous solutions was significantly reduced after treatment. The remarkable catalytic, thermo-stability and re-cycling features of the agar-agar immobilized MnP display a high potential for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance of the EUCAST Disk Diffusion Method, the CLSI Agar Screen Method, and the Vitek 2 Automated Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing System for Detection of Clinical Isolates of Enterococci with Low- and Medium-Level VanB-Type Vancomycin Resistance: a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Giske, Christian G.; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Matuschek, Erika; Schønning, Kristian; Leegaard, Truls M.; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect low-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci were evaluated in a Scandinavian multicenter study (n = 28). A phenotypically and genotypically well-characterized diverse collection of Enterococcus faecalis (n = 12) and Enterococcus faecium (n = 18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n = 5), Norwegian (n = 13), and Swedish (n = 10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n = 28) and the CLSI agar screen (n = 18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n = 5). The EUCAST disk diffusion method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P = 0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME rate, 0%; specificity, 1). The performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method was challenged by differences in vancomycin inhibition zone sizes as well as the experience of the personnel in interpreting fuzzy zone edges as an indication of vancomycin resistance. Laboratories using Oxoid agar (P < 0.0001) or Merck Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar (P = 0.027) for the disk diffusion assay performed significantly better than did laboratories using BBL MH II medium. Laboratories using Difco brain heart infusion (BHI) agar for the CLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P = 0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI agar. In conclusion, both the EUCAST disk diffusion and CLSI agar screening methods performed acceptably (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.94 to 0.98) in the detection of VanB-type vancomycin-resistant enterococci with low-level resistance. Importantly, use of the CLSI agar screen requires careful monitoring of the vancomycin concentration in the plates. Moreover, disk diffusion methodology requires that personnel be trained in interpreting zone edges

  18. Performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method, the CLSI agar screen method, and the Vitek 2 automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing system for detection of clinical isolates of Enterococci with low- and medium-level VanB-type vancomycin resistance: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Kristin; Giske, Christian G; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Matuschek, Erika; Schønning, Kristian; Leegaard, Truls M; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn

    2014-05-01

    Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect low-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci were evaluated in a Scandinavian multicenter study (n=28). A phenotypically and genotypically well-characterized diverse collection of Enterococcus faecalis (n=12) and Enterococcus faecium (n=18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n=5), Norwegian (n=13), and Swedish (n=10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n=28) and the CLSI agar screen (n=18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n=5). The EUCAST disk diffusion method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P=0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME rate, 0%; specificity, 1). The performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method was challenged by differences in vancomycin inhibition zone sizes as well as the experience of the personnel in interpreting fuzzy zone edges as an indication of vancomycin resistance. Laboratories using Oxoid agar (P<0.0001) or Merck Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar (P=0.027) for the disk diffusion assay performed significantly better than did laboratories using BBL MH II medium. Laboratories using Difco brain heart infusion (BHI) agar for the CLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P=0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI agar. In conclusion, both the EUCAST disk diffusion and CLSI agar screening methods performed acceptably (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.94 to 0.98) in the detection of VanB-type vancomycin-resistant enterococci with low-level resistance. Importantly, use of the CLSI agar screen requires careful monitoring of the vancomycin concentration in the plates. Moreover, disk diffusion methodology requires that personnel be trained in interpreting zone edges.

  19. Ultrasonic backscatter coefficients for weakly scattering, agar spheres in agar phantoms

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Anderson, Janelle J.; Herd, Maria-Teresa; Ma, Darryl; Haak, Alexander; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Zagzebski, James A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Hall, Timothy J.; O’Brien, William D.

    2010-01-01

    Applicability of ultrasound phantoms to biological tissue has been limited because most phantoms have generally used strong scatterers. The objective was to develop very weakly scattering phantoms, whose acoustic scattering properties are likely closer to those of tissues and then compare theoretical simulations and experimental backscatter coefficient (BSC) results. The phantoms consisted of agar spheres of various diameters (nominally between 90 and 212 μm), containing ultrafiltered milk, suspended in an agar background. BSC estimates were performed at two institutions over the frequency range 1–13 MHz, and compared to three models. Excellent agreement was shown between the two laboratory results as well as with the three models. PMID:20707460

  20. Influence of Agar on the Morphology and Pigmentation of Streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Okami, Yoshiro; Arima, Shigezumi; Suzuki, Motoko

    1963-01-01

    The effect of various agar preparations in a chemically defined medium on promoting the development of taxonomic characteristics of streptomycetes was studied. Various agar products gave different results. Agar purified to a certain extent was favorable for good, constant development of such characteristics. The presence of certain metals played a great role in this domain. Agar purified to a high degree may give poor results unless supplemented with the proper metals. Recommendations were made for the standardization of agar media used for the study of characteristics of streptomycetes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:14075049

  1. Paper microzone plates.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, Emanuel; Phillips, Scott T; Vella, Sarah J; Martinez, Andres W; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes 96- and 384-microzone plates fabricated in paper as alternatives to conventional multiwell plates fabricated in molded polymers. Paper-based plates are functionally related to plastic well plates, but they offer new capabilities. For example, paper-microzone plates are thin (approximately 180 microm), require small volumes of sample (5 microL per zone), and can be manufactured from inexpensive materials ($0.05 per plate). The paper-based plates are fabricated by patterning sheets of paper, using photolithography, into hydrophilic zones surrounded by hydrophobic polymeric barriers. This photolithography used an inexpensive formulation photoresist that allows rapid (approximately 15 min) prototyping of paper-based plates. These plates are compatible with conventional microplate readers for quantitative absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The limit of detection per zone loaded for fluorescence was 125 fmol for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and this level corresponds to 0.02 the quantity of analyte per well used to achieve comparable signal-to-noise in a 96-well plastic plate (using a solution of 25 nM labeled protein). The limits of detection for absorbance on paper was approximately 50 pmol per zone for both Coomassie Brilliant Blue and Amaranth dyes; these values were 0.4 that required for the plastic plate. Demonstration of quantitative colorimetric correlations using a scanner or camera to image the zones and to measure the intensity of color, makes it possible to conduct assays without a microplate reader.

  2. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium.

  3. Comparative evaluation of chromogenic agar medium and conventional culture system for isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Laila; Haque, Rezwana; Salam, Md. Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Urine is the most frequent specimen received for culture/sensitivity by clinical laboratories. The microbiological performance of HiCrome UTI agar medium was compared with Blood agar and MacConkey agar for isolation and presumptive identification of bacteria from urine culture. Methods: A total of 443 consecutively collected midstream and/or catheter-catch urine samples from patients attending the Islami Bank Medical College Hospital, Rajshahi, Bangladesh during January to December, 2012 were cultured. Urine samples showing pus cells ≥ 5/HPF were inoculated on to Blood agar (BA), MacConkey agar (MAC) and HiCrome UTI agar (CA) media simultaneously and incubated overnight aerobically at 370C. Rate of isolation and presumptive identification of bacterial species were compared for different media. Results: Culture yielded a total of 199 bacterial isolates from 189 (42.67%) positive plates including 179 (40.40%) unimicrobial and 10 (2.26%) polymicrobial (mixed growth of pair of bacteria) growths. Both HiCrome UTI agar and Blood agar media supported 100% growths while 151 (75.88%) growths were observed on MacConkey agar. The rate of presumptive identification was found significantly higher on HiCrome UTI agar (97.49%) than MAC agar (67.34%) (P<0.001) as primary urine culture medium. Of 199 isolates, E. coli was found to be the leading uropathogen isolated from 118 (59.30%) samples with its presumptive identification rate of 95.76%, 93.22% and 5.93% on CA, MAC and BA respectively. All 10 (100%) polymicrobial growths were demonstrated distinctly on CA against only 01(10%) on each BA and MAC. Conclusion: HiCrome UTI agar was found to be more useful as primary urine culture medium in both higher rate of isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens in comparison to conventional media. Its inherent characteristics in demonstrating polymicrobial growth and ease of rapid identification by distinct colony colour are unique. PMID:25225521

  4. Recombinant envelope protein (rgp90) ELISA for equine infectious anemia virus provides comparable results to the agar gel immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Reis, Jenner K P; Diniz, Rejane S; Haddad, João P A; Ferraz, Isabella B F; Carvalho, Alex F; Kroon, Erna G; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Leite, Rômulo C

    2012-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) is an important viral infection affecting horses worldwide. The course of infection is accompanied generally by three characteristic stages: acute, chronic and inapparent. There is no effective EIA vaccine or treatment, and the control of the disease is based currently on identification of EIAV inapparent carriers by laboratory tests. Recombinant envelope protein (rgp90) was expressed in Escherichia coli and evaluated via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). There was an excellent agreement (95.42%) between the ELISA results using rgp90 and agar gel immunodiffusion test results. AGID is considered the "gold-standard" serologic test for equine infectious anemia (EIA). After 1160 serum samples were tested, the relative sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA were 96.1% and 96.4%, respectively. Moreover, analysis diagnostic accuracy of the ELISA was performed. The ELISA proved robust. Furthermore, good reproducibility was observed for the negative controls and, positive controls for all plates tested. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  6. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (∼80 °C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials.

  7. Automatic Surface Inoculation of Agar Trays1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Judd R.; Mills, Stacey M.; Boykin, Elizabeth H.

    1972-01-01

    A machine is described which automatically inoculates a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture by use of either a conventional inoculating loop or a cotton swab. Isolated colonies were obtained with an inoculating loop when a heavy inoculum (109 cells/ml) was used or with a cotton swab when a light inoculum (ca. 104 cells/ml) was used. Trays containing combinations of differential or selective media were used to (i) separate mixtures of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, (ii) facilitate isolation of organisms from clinical specimens, and (iii) compare colony growth characteristics of pure cultures. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. Images PMID:16349943

  8. Poisoning with brown fly agaric, Amanita regalis.

    PubMed

    Elonen, E; Tarssanen, L; Härkönen, M

    1979-01-01

    Three patients ate different amounts of a common northern mushroom, brown fly agaric, Amanita regalis. All of them believed they had eaten delicious parasol mushrooms, Macrolepiota procera. The symptoms of poisoning began 1--2 hours after ingestion of the mushrooms. All the patients had marked gastrointestinal symptoms: nausea and heavy vomiting. Two had central nervous system manifestations and cholinergic symptoms: hallucinations, confusion, or loss of consciousness as well as copious salivation, or sweating. All patients recovered within 4--24 hours without any damage to liver, kidneys or central nervous system. It seems that cooking the mushrooms does not completely neutralize the toxic agents of Amanita regalis. The analysis of fried mushrooms shows that it may be possible to identify mushrooms reliably from the remains of a meal.

  9. Fluorogenic assays for immediate confirmation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, P C; Hartman, P A

    1982-01-01

    Rapid assays for Escherichia coli were developed by using the compound 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronide (MUG), which is hydrolyzed by glucuronidase to yield a fluorogenic product. The production of glucuronidase was limited to strains of E. coli and some Salmonella and Shigella strains in the family Enterobacteriaceae. For immediate confirmation of the presence of E. coli in most-probable-number tubes, MUG was incorporated into lauryl tryptose broth at a final concentration of 100 micrograms/ml. Results of both the presumptive test (gas production) and the confirmed test (fluorescence) for E. coli were obtained from a variety of food, water, and milk samples after incubation for only 24 h at 35 degrees C. Approximately 90% of the tubes showing both gas production and fluorescence contained fecal coliforms (they were positive in EC broth incubated at 45 degrees C). Few false-positive reactions were observed. The lauryl tryptose broth-MUG-most-probable-number assay was superior to violet red bile agar for the detection of heat- and chlorine-injured E. coli cells. Anaerogenic strains produced positive reactions, and small numbers of E. coli could be detected in the presence of large numbers of competing bacteria. The fluorogenic assay was sensitive and rapid; the presence of one viable cell was detected within 20 h. E. coli colonies could be distinguished from other coliforms on membrane filters and plates of violet red bile agar if MUG was incorporated into the culture media. A rapid confirmatory test for E. coli that is amenable to automation was developed by using microtitration plates filled with a nonselective medium containing MUG. Pure or mixed cultures containing E. coli produced fluorescence within 4 h (most strains) to 24 h (a few weakly positive strains). Images PMID:7049088

  10. Assessment of the TLC/Salmonella assay for screening hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, V.S.; Claxton, L.D.

    1987-09-01

    Using a modified version of the TLC/Salmonella assay developed by Bjorseth et al. (1982), 10 complex hazardous wastes were tested for mutagenic activity. The method couples thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome (Ames) assay for the detection of mutagenic constituents in complex mixtures. Crude hazardous wastes and selected hazardous-waste extracts were fractionated on commercially available cellulose TLC plates. Mutagenicity testing was performed by applying a single overlay of minimal growth agar containing a tester strain of Salmonella and the optional metabolic activation system directly onto the developed chromatogram. Seven of 10 hazardous wastes demonstrated mutagenic activity when tested by the method. To assess the sensitivity of the modified TLC/Salmonella assay, 14 Salmonella mutagens from a wide range of chemical classes and polarities were tested. Eleven of the 14 mutagens were positive in the test system.

  11. A simple test for lacrimal gland function: a tear lactoferrin assay by radial immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Janssen, P T; van Bijsterveld, O P

    1983-01-01

    A radial immunodiffusion assay for tear lactoferrin is described. Tear samples, collected on filter paper discs, could be applied directly to immunodiffusion plates after blotting. In 58 tear samples from healthy subjects an average lactoferrin concentration of 1.42 g/l was found. A high degree of correlation was found between the lactoferrin radial immunodiffusion and the lysozyme agar diffusion assay in a heterogeneous group, ranging from healthy subjects to patients with severe keratoconjunctivitis sicca. A lower limit of normal (0.78 g/l) could be determined for the tear lactoferrin concentration. The assay does not require laboratory facilities and therefore is an easily accessible alternative for or an addition to lacrimal gland function tests currently used.

  12. The Life Cycle of Didymium laxifilum and Physarum album on Oat Agar Culture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Tao, Wei; Yan, Shu-Zhen; Chen, Shuang-Lin

    2017-07-01

    The plasmodial slime molds is the largest group in the phylum Amoebozoa. Its life cycle includes the plasmodial trophic stage and the spore-bearing fruiting bodies. However, only a few species have their complete life cycle known in details so far. This study is the first reporting the morphogenesis of Didymium laxifilum and Physarum album. Spores, from field-collected sporangia, were incubated into hanging drop cultures for viewing germination and axenic oat agar plates for viewing plasmodial development and sporulation. The spores of D. laxifilum and P. album germinated by method of V-shape split and minute pore, respectively. The amoeboflagellates, released from spores, were observed in water film. The phaneroplasmodia of two species developed into a number of sporangia by subhypothallic type on oat agar culture. The main interspecific difference of morphogenesis was also discussed. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  13. In vitro antistaphylococcal effects of a novel 45S5 bioglass/agar-gelatin biocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneira, J; Carina Audisio, M; Boccaccini, A R; Gorustovich, A A

    2013-08-01

    To assess the antibacterial efficacy of new composite materials developed from microparticles of 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) and agar-gelatin films. In vitro antibacterial activity was evaluated against Staphylococcus spp. because of the importance of this pathogen in damaged tissues and in failures associated with biomaterial implants. To our knowledge, this is the first paper reporting on the suitable combination of BG and agar-gelatin for bioactive and antibacterial films. Bacterial suspensions up or below 10(5) CFU ml(-1) reflecting situations of wound infection and of noninfection, respectively, were prepared and then put in contact with the biomaterials at 37°C. After 24 and 48 h of incubation, the pH value was measured and the staphylococci strains viability was determined by counting in Mueller-Hinton agar plates. Moreover, the biomaterials were prepared for observation under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Biocomposites (BCs) showed a strong antibacterial effect against all staphylococci strains tested. Some differences were found depending on the strain, the inoculum size and the contact time. This effect was correlated with an alkalinization of the media. By SEM analyses, no bacterial presence was observed on the surface of BCs in any of the cell concentrations tested at any time. Overall, the coating of 45S5 BG on agar-gelatin films promoted BCs with strong antistaphylococcal activity. The effect was efficient under bacterial concentration up or below 10(5) CFU ml(-1). Additionally, none of the strains were found on BCs surfaces. 45S5 bioglass/agar-gelatin biocomposite films are reported for the first time. The results suggest a potential application as wound dressing. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Acanthamoeba on Sabouraud's agar from a patient with keratitis.

    PubMed

    Baradkar, Vasant; Samal, Badhuli; Mali, Swapna A; Kulkarni, Ketaki; Shastri, Jayanthi

    2011-07-01

    A 25-year-old transgender patient came with complaints of watery discharge, red eye and photophobia in the left eye since 2 days. The patient had a history of wearing colored contact lenses since 4 years and cleaning the lens with tap water. Culture of lenses on Mac Conkey and blood agar yielded Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Sabouroud's agar showed yeast cells and double-walled cysts of Acanthamoeba species. On further incubation of Sabouroud's agar, the cysts transformed to trophozoites. Parallel results were obtained on tap water agar. The previous therapy of moxifloxacin was changed to local Neosporin application.

  15. Application of a novel microtitre plate-based assay for the discovery of new inhibitors of DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase VI.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James A; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Rejzek, Martin; Field, Robert A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are highly exploited targets for antimicrobial drugs. The spread of antibiotic resistance represents a significant threat to public health and necessitates the discovery of inhibitors that target topoisomerases in novel ways. However, the traditional assays for topoisomerase activity are not suitable for the high-throughput approaches necessary for drug discovery. In this study we validate a novel assay for screening topoisomerase inhibitors. A library of 960 compounds was screened against Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and archaeal Methanosarcina mazei DNA topoisomerase VI. Several novel inhibitors were identified for both enzymes, and subsequently characterised in vitro and in vivo. Inhibitors from the M. mazei topoisomerase VI screen were tested for their ability to inhibit Arabidopsis topoisomerase VI in planta. The data from this work present new options for antibiotic drug discovery and provide insight into the mechanism of topoisomerase VI.

  16. Application of a Novel Microtitre Plate-Based Assay for the Discovery of New Inhibitors of DNA Gyrase and DNA Topoisomerase VI

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James A.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Rejzek, Martin; Field, Robert A.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are highly exploited targets for antimicrobial drugs. The spread of antibiotic resistance represents a significant threat to public health and necessitates the discovery of inhibitors that target topoisomerases in novel ways. However, the traditional assays for topoisomerase activity are not suitable for the high-throughput approaches necessary for drug discovery. In this study we validate a novel assay for screening topoisomerase inhibitors. A library of 960 compounds was screened against Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and archaeal Methanosarcina mazei DNA topoisomerase VI. Several novel inhibitors were identified for both enzymes, and subsequently characterised in vitro and in vivo. Inhibitors from the M. mazei topoisomerase VI screen were tested for their ability to inhibit Arabidopsis topoisomerase VI in planta. The data from this work present new options for antibiotic drug discovery and provide insight into the mechanism of topoisomerase VI. PMID:23469129

  17. Agar media that indicate acid production from sorbitol by oral microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kalfas, S; Edwardsson, S

    1985-01-01

    Two varieties of agar medium (Trypticase [BBL Microbiology Systems]-serum-sorbitol-bromcresol purple agar [TSSB] and Trypticase-blood-sorbitol-CaCO3 agar [TBSCa]) indicating microbial acid production from sorbitol were tested. The media were devised for use in studies on the prevalence of sorbitol-fermenting human oral microorganisms incubated in an anaerobic or microaerophilic atmosphere containing 5 to 6% CO2. TSSB contains bromcresol purple as the pH indicator and NaHCO3 as the main buffering salt. TBSCa contains CaCO3 as both the buffering salt and the indicator of acid production. The growth yield of pure cultures of oral microorganisms on TBSCa was shown to equal that on blood agar incubated under similar conditions. TSSB inhibited the growth of several bacteria to various extents. The recovery of sorbitol-fermenting microorganisms from oral specimens was the greatest when the specimens were assayed with TBSCa. The poorer results obtained with TSSB were mainly due to the decoloration of the pH indicator in this medium and the presence of greater numbers of sorbitol false-positive colonies. Images PMID:2933424

  18. In vitro growth of bioactive nanostructured apatites via agar-gelatin hybrid hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Zhao, Xianghui; Zhou, Yongsheng; Zhu, Peizhi; Zhang, Li; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-12-01

    Biomimetic synthesis of bone-like carbonated apatite with good biocompatibility is a promising strategy for the development of novel biomaterials for bone engineering applications. Most research efforts have been focused on only protein-based or only polysaccharide-based template for synthesis of apatite minerals. To understand the cooperative roles of gelatin and polysaccharide playing in the biomineralization, agar hydrogel, gelatin and agar-gelatin hybrid hydrogel were respectively introduced as mineralization matrix for the in vitro growth of apatite in the study. It was shown that bundle-like carbonated apatite was successfully prepared in agar-gelatin hybrid hydrogel for the first time, through the interaction between apatite and matrix macromolecule under physiological temperature. Moreover, the in vitro biocompatibility of the prepared nanostructured apatite crystals was investigated using CCK-8 assay and alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1. Compared with HA synthesized by traditional method, the obtained apatite in agar-gelatin hybrid hydrogel could provide significantly higher cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity. Through the study, we could better understand the role of gelatin and polysaccharide in bone formation process, and the product is a promising candidate to be used in bone tissue engineering.

  19. Reliability of the agar based method to assess the production of degradative enzymes in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Paula Tamião; Sanitá, Paula Volpato; Santezi, Carolina; Barbeiro, Camila de Oliveira; Reina, Bárbara Donadon; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Dovigo, Lívia Nordi

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a reproducible protocol using the methodology of hyaline zones around the colonies on specific agar plates for phospholipase and proteinase production. This was an in vitro double-blind experiment, in which the dependent variables were the enzymatic activity measurements (Pz) for the production of phospholipase (Pz-ph) and the production of secreted aspartyl proteinases (Pz-sap). Three independent variables give rise to different measurement protocols. All measurements were carried out at two different moments by four examiners (E1, E2, E3, and E4). The minimum sample size was 30 Candida albicans clinical isolates. Specific agar plates for phospholipase and SAPs production were prepared according the literature. The intra-and inter-examiner reproducibility for each protocol was estimated using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and its confidence interval (95% CI). Based on the results obtained for both phospholipase and SAPs, there appears to be no consensus on the protocol chosen for each particular examiner. Measuring the colonies in triplicate may be the main factor associated with the increase in measurement accuracy and should therefore take precedence over measuring only one colony. When only one examiner is responsible for taking measurements, a standard protocol should be put in place and the statistical calibration of this researcher should be done prior to data collection. However, if two or more researchers are involved in the assessment of agar plates, our results suggest that the protocols using software to undertake plate reading is preferred.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Disk Diffusion with Microdilution Assay in Susceptibility Testing of Caspofungin against Aspergillus and Fusarium Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Arikan, Sevtap; Paetznick, Victor; Rex, John H.

    2002-01-01

    We compared the disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods for susceptibility testing of caspofungin against Aspergillus (n = 78) and Fusarium (n = 22) isolates. Microdilution testing followed the NCCLS M-38P guidelines but was performed in antibiotic medium 3 supplemented to 2% glucose (AM3). Disk diffusion assays were performed on AM3 agar plates with a 2-μg caspofungin disk. By both methods, caspofungin showed favorable activity against Aspergillus isolates and no activity against Fusarium isolates. In the disk-based format, intrazonal growth that was not influenced by the drug concentration gradient was consistently observed for all of the Aspergillus isolates tested. PMID:12183278

  1. Agarose soy casein digest medium for replacement of blood agar for potency determinations of live Pasteurella vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rebers, P A; Christianson, G G; Laird, G A; Symanowski, J

    1989-01-01

    Blood agar, prepared with Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) soy agar and 5% defibrinated bovine blood, is used for testing the potency of live Pasteurella multocida and Pasteurella haemolytica vaccines, but its potential for variation makes it undesirable to use in a standard assay method. Tests done with RPMI 1640 and Trypticase soy medium indicated that the benefits obtained by adding defibrinated blood to the Trypticase soy agar medium were more likely due to neutralization of toxic components than to the presence of transferrin or iron as growth factors. Reduction of toxic components in the Trypticase soy agar medium was accomplished by replacing agar with agarose and by autoclaving glucose as a separate solution to produce the replacement medium. The replacement medium was prepared by autoclaving three separate solutions--Trypticase soy broth without glucose; glucose; and agarose--cooling to 55 degrees C, and mixing and then pouring the mixtures into petri dishes. The growth obtained with this medium as judged by determination of the number of CFU and the colony sizes of P. multocida or P. haemolytica was equal to or better than those obtained with blood agar.

  2. An assay for growth of mouse bone marrow cells in microtiter liquid culture using the tetrazolium salt MTT, and its application to studies of myelopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Monner, D A

    1988-12-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells were grown in liquid culture in microtiter plates in the presence of different colony-stimulating factors (CSF). Growth was assayed using the tetrazolium salt MTT, which is reduced in the mitochondria of viable cells to a water-insoluble blue formazan dye. Two technical problems have limited the use of this assay: the solubilization of the dye crystals and the necessity to acidify the phenol red in the culture medium. Both could be solved here by the use of a developing solution of 5% formic acid in isopropanol. Using manual mixing combined with a short sonication by floating the plates in a sonic bath, the crystals were dissolved within minutes. There was no flocculation of protein, even using medium with 20% serum. The color remained stable for at least 4 h. This enabled the semi-automatic measurement of large numbers of cultures directly in the microtiter plates. Growth and differentiation of myelopoietic precursor cells in the liquid cultures was shown to be comparable to that in soft agar. Cell growth was CSF-dependent. The calculated cell yield per colony forming cell (CFC) seeded was within the range of the average cell number per colony found in soft agar, and the spectrum of mature cells obtained reflected the type of CSF used as stimulus. Using the combined culture and assay systems, it was possible to perform detailed kinetic studies of myelopoiesis. This technique should be useful for studying the mechanisms of action of pharmacological modulators of myelopoiesis.

  3. Aseptic Laboratory Techniques: Plating Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Erin R.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms are present on all inanimate surfaces creating ubiquitous sources of possible contamination in the laboratory. Experimental success relies on the ability of a scientist to sterilize work surfaces and equipment as well as prevent contact of sterile instruments and solutions with non-sterile surfaces. Here we present the steps for several plating methods routinely used in the laboratory to isolate, propagate, or enumerate microorganisms such as bacteria and phage. All five methods incorporate aseptic technique, or procedures that maintain the sterility of experimental materials. Procedures described include (1) streak-plating bacterial cultures to isolate single colonies, (2) pour-plating and (3) spread-plating to enumerate viable bacterial colonies, (4) soft agar overlays to isolate phage and enumerate plaques, and (5) replica-plating to transfer cells from one plate to another in an identical spatial pattern. These procedures can be performed at the laboratory bench, provided they involve non-pathogenic strains of microorganisms (Biosafety Level 1, BSL-1). If working with BSL-2 organisms, then these manipulations must take place in a biosafety cabinet. Consult the most current edition of the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for Infectious Substances to determine the biohazard classification as well as the safety precautions and containment facilities required for the microorganism in question. Bacterial strains and phage stocks can be obtained from research investigators, companies, and collections maintained by particular organizations such as the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It is recommended that non-pathogenic strains be used when learning the various plating methods. By following the procedures described in this protocol, students should be able to: ● Perform plating procedures without contaminating media. ● Isolate single bacterial colonies by the

  4. Aseptic laboratory techniques: plating methods.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Erin R

    2012-05-11

    Microorganisms are present on all inanimate surfaces creating ubiquitous sources of possible contamination in the laboratory. Experimental success relies on the ability of a scientist to sterilize work surfaces and equipment as well as prevent contact of sterile instruments and solutions with non-sterile surfaces. Here we present the steps for several plating methods routinely used in the laboratory to isolate, propagate, or enumerate microorganisms such as bacteria and phage. All five methods incorporate aseptic technique, or procedures that maintain the sterility of experimental materials. Procedures described include (1) streak-plating bacterial cultures to isolate single colonies, (2) pour-plating and (3) spread-plating to enumerate viable bacterial colonies, (4) soft agar overlays to isolate phage and enumerate plaques, and (5) replica-plating to transfer cells from one plate to another in an identical spatial pattern. These procedures can be performed at the laboratory bench, provided they involve non-pathogenic strains of microorganisms (Biosafety Level 1, BSL-1). If working with BSL-2 organisms, then these manipulations must take place in a biosafety cabinet. Consult the most current edition of the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for Infectious Substances to determine the biohazard classification as well as the safety precautions and containment facilities required for the microorganism in question. Bacterial strains and phage stocks can be obtained from research investigators, companies, and collections maintained by particular organizations such as the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It is recommended that non-pathogenic strains be used when learning the various plating methods. By following the procedures described in this protocol, students should be able to: Perform plating procedures without contaminating media. Isolate single bacterial colonies by the streak-plating

  5. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  6. A Novel Chromogenic Ester Agar Medium for Detection of Salmonellae

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Venitia M.; Miles, R. J.; Price, R. G.; Richardson, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A novel agar medium, chromogenic Salmonella esterase (CSE) agar, for the differentiation of salmonellae is described. The agar contains peptones and nutrient extracts together with the following (grams per liter unless otherwise specified): 4-[2-(4-octanoyloxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-vinyl]-quinolinium-1-(propan-3-yl carboxylic acid) bromide (SLPA-octanoate; bromide form), 0.3223; lactose, 14.65; trisodium citrate dihydrate, 0.5; Tween 20, 3.0; ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate, 0.035% (wt/vol), novobiocin, 70 mg liter−1. The key component of the medium is SLPA-octanoate, a newly synthesized ester formed from a C8 fatty acid and a phenolic chromophore. In CSE agar, the ester is hydrolyzed by Salmonella spp. to yield a brightly colored phenol which remains tightly bound within colonies. After 24 h of incubation at 37 or 42°C, colonies of typical Salmonella spp. were burgundy colored on a transparent yellow background, whereas non-Salmonella spp. were white, cream, yellow or transparent. CSE agar was evaluated by using a panel of strains including a high proportion of Salmonella and non-Salmonella strains giving atypical reactions on other differential agars. The sensitivity (93.1%) of CSE agar for non-typhi salmonellae compared favorably with those of Rambach (82.8%), xylose-lysine-deoxycholate (XLD; 91.4%), Hektoen-enteric (89.7%), and SM ID (91.4%) agars. The specificity (93.9%) was also comparable to those of other Salmonella media (SM ID agar, 95.9%; Rambach agar, 91.8%; XLD agar, 91.8%; Hektoen-enteric agar, 87.8%). Strains of Citrobacter freundii and Proteus spp. giving false-positive reactions with other media gave a negative color reaction on CSE agar. CSE agar enabled the detection of >30 Salmonella serotypes, including agona, anatum, enteritidis, hadar, heidelberg, infantis, montevideo, thompson, typhimurium, and virchow, which accounted for 91.8% of the salmonella isolates recorded by the Public Health Laboratory Service (Colindale, London, England) for 1997

  7. Evaluation of beta-naphthoxyacetic acid for mutagenic activity in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Rashid, K A; Mumma, R O

    1986-06-01

    Beta-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) is used as a plant growth regulator on tomatoes and strawberries. It is the active ingredient in Blossom-Set and Berry-Set, two plant hormone sprays for fruit-set. The mutagenic activity of BNOA was evaluated in four strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA1535) in the presence and absence of liver microsomal and cytosolic enzymes derived from Aroclor induced rats. BNOA did not produce any significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the reversion of any of the four tester strains in the standard plate incorporation assay. Results of the agar overlay toxicity tests indicates that the chemical shows toxic effects at concentrations above 500 micrograms/plate. It was concluded that under the conditions of these tests, BNOA did not exhibit any mutagenic activity.

  8. Campylobacter in broiler slaughter samples assessed by direct count on mCCDA and Campy-Cefex agar.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Camila Cristina; Borsoi, Anderlise; Perdoncini, Gustavo; Rodrigues, Laura Beatriz; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. cause foodborne illnesses in humans primarily through the consumption of contaminated chicken. The aim of this study was to evaluate the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) recommended methodology, protocol MLG 41.02, for the isolation, identification and direct plate counting of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli samples from the broiler slaughtering process. A plating method using both mCCDA and Campy-Cefex agars is recommended to recover Campylobacter cells. It is also possible to use this method in different matrices (cloacal swabs and water samples). Cloacal swabs, samples from pre-chiller and post-chiller carcasses and samples of pre-chiller, chiller and direct supply water were collected each week for four weeks from the same flock at a slaughterhouse located in an abattoir in southern Brazil. Samples were analyzed to directly count Campylobacter spp., and the results showed a high frequency of Campylobacter spp. on Campy-Cefex agar. For the isolated species, 72% were identified as Campylobacter jejuni and 38% as Campylobacter coli. It was possible to count Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from different samples, including the water supply samples, using the two-agar method. These results suggest that slaughterhouses can use direct counting methods with both agars and different matrices as a monitoring tool to assess the presence of Campylobacter bacteria in their products. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation and characterization of agar-digesting Vibrio species from the rotten thallus of Gracilariopsis heteroclada Zhang et Xia.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Joval N; Padilla, Philip Ian P

    2016-08-01

    Gracilariopsis heteroclada Zhang et Xia (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta) is one of the most studied marine seaweeds due to its economic importance. This has been cultivated extensively on commercial scale in the Philippines and other Asian countries. However, sustainable production of G. heteroclada in the Philippines could not be maximized due to the occurrence of rotten thallus disease. Thus, isolation and characterization of agar-digesting bacteria from the rotten thalli of G. heteroclada was conducted. A total of seven representative bacterial isolates were randomly selected based on their ability to digest agar as evidenced by the formation of depressions around the bacterial colonies on nutrient agar plates supplemented with 1.5% NaCl and liquefaction of agar. Gram-staining and biochemical characterization revealed that isolates tested were gram-negative rods and taxonomically identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus (86-99.5%) and Vibrio alginolyticus (94.2-97.7%), respectively. It is yet to be confirmed whether these agar-digesting vibrios are involved in the induction and development of rotten thallus disease in G. heteroclada in concomitance with other opportunistic bacterial pathogens coupled with adverse environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Selected elements in fly agaric Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Kunito, T; Kubota, R; Lipka, K; Mazur, A; Falandysz, Justyna J; Tanabe, S

    2007-09-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb, Rb, Se, Sb, Sr, V, Tl and Zn have been determined in the whole fruiting bodies, as well as separately in caps and stalks, of fly agaric collected from three geographically distant sites in northern part of Poland. The elements were determined using ICP-MS, ICP-OES, HG-AAS and CV-AAS, respectively. For elements such as Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Ga, Mo, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, Tl, and V concentrations were similar in the caps and stalks, respectively, and for K, Zn, Ag, Ca, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Rb and Se were greater in the caps, while for Co, Cs and Na in the stalks. For Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sr, Tl and V concentration in the caps showed spatial variations (P<0.05), while for Cu, K, Mg, Na, Se and Zn was independent of the site. The elements such as K with median or mean in the caps between 37,000 and 43,000 microg/g.dm and Mg with 920 and 1,100 microg/g dm were most abundant. Next, within median values range from approximately 100 to 500 microg/g dm were such as Ca, Fe and Al, and in descending order they followed by Rb (100-400 microg/g dm); V, Na, Zn (50-200 microg/g dm); Cu, Mn (10-50 microg/g dm); Cd (10-20 microg/g dm); Se (5 microg/g dm); Ba (<1-3); Cr, Ag, Pb, Sr (<1-2 microg/g dm); Cs, Co, Hg (<1-1 microg/g dm); Ga (<0.5), Sb, Mo and Tl (<0.1 microg/g dm).

  11. Comparison of inhibitory mold agar to Sabouraud dextrose agar as a primary medium for isolation of fungi.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Theresa; Zinchuk, Riva; Gumpeni, Pramod; Larone, Davise H

    2010-05-01

    Clinical specimens cultured on two selective fungal media, inhibitory mold agar (IMA) and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), were compared with respect to recovery of fungi. Of the 840 fungal isolates recovered, 69.3% grew on both IMA and SDA; 24.9% grew only on IMA; and 5.8% grew only on SDA, showing that IMA is superior (P=0.003).

  12. The use of agar as a novel filler for monolithic matrices produced using hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Lyons, John G; Devine, Declan M; Kennedy, James E; Geever, Luke M; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2006-08-01

    The use of filler materials in an extended release monolithic polymer matrix can lead to a vastly altered release profile for the active pharmaceutical ingredient. A range of excipients for use in monolithic matrices have been discussed in the literature. The body of work described in this research paper outlines the use of agar as a novel filler material in a hot melt extruded polymer matrix. Several batches of matrix material were prepared with Diclofenac sodium used as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Agar and microcrystalline cellulose were used as the filler materials in varying ratios, to examine the effect of % filler content as well as filler type on the properties of the hot melt extruded matrix. The resultant extrudates were characterised using steady state parallel plate rheometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dissolution testing. The rheometry analysis concluded that the fillers used resulted in an increase in the matrix viscosity. The DSC scans obtained showed negligible effects on the melting behavior of the matrix as a result of the filler inclusion. Dissolution analysis showed that the presence of the fillers resulted in a slower release rate of API than for the matrix alone. The results detailed within this paper indicate that agar is a viable filler for extended release hot melt produced dosage forms.

  13. Evaluation of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Kingella kingae and Staphylococcus aureus from Synovial Fluid in Suspected Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Malay; Butler, Meghan; Quinn, Criziel D.; Stratton, Charles W.; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Direct plating of synovial fluid (SF) on agar-based media often fails to identify pathogens in septic arthritis (SA). We developed a PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of Kingella kingae and Staphylococcus aureus from SF to evaluate molecular detection in SF and to estimate the incidence of K. kingae in SA in North America. The assay was based on detection of the cpn60 gene of K. kingae and the spa gene of S. aureus in multiplex real-time PCR. K. kingae was identified in 50% of patients between 0 and 5 yr of age (n=6) but not in any patients >18 yr old (n=105). Direct plating of SF on agar-based media failed to detect K. kingae in all samples. The PCR assay was inferior to the culture-based method for S. aureus, detecting only 50% of culture-positive cases. Our findings suggest that K. kingae is a common pathogen in pediatric SA in North America, in agreement with previous reports from Europe. PCR-based assays for the detection of K. kingae may be considered in children with SA, especially in those with a high degree of clinical suspicion. PMID:24982837

  14. Evaluation of a real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Kingella kingae and Staphylococcus aureus from synovial fluid in suspected septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Malay; Butler, Meghan; Quinn, Criziel D; Stratton, Charles W; Tang, Yi-Wei; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2014-07-01

    Direct plating of synovial fluid (SF) on agar-based media often fails to identify pathogens in septic arthritis (SA). We developed a PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of Kingella kingae and Staphylococcus aureus from SF to evaluate molecular detection in SF and to estimate the incidence of K. kingae in SA in North America. The assay was based on detection of the cpn60 gene of K. kingae and the spa gene of S. aureus in multiplex real-time PCR. K. kingae was identified in 50% of patients between 0 and 5 yr of age (n=6) but not in any patients >18 yr old (n=105). Direct plating of SF on agar-based media failed to detect K. kingae in all samples. The PCR assay was inferior to the culture-based method for S. aureus, detecting only 50% of culture-positive cases. Our findings suggest that K. kingae is a common pathogen in pediatric SA in North America, in agreement with previous reports from Europe. PCR-based assays for the detection of K. kingae may be considered in children with SA, especially in those with a high degree of clinical suspicion.

  15. Comparison of Assurance GDS(®) MPX ID for Top STEC with Reference Culture Methods for the Detection of E. coli Top 6 STEC; Direct Confirmation of Top 6 STEC from Isolation Plates and Determination of Equivalence of PickPen(®) and FSIS OctoMACS™ Concentration Protocols.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip; Lienau, Andrew H; Shah, Khyati; Immermann, Amy; Soliven, Khanh; Kaur, Mandeep; Kerr, David E; Jucker, Markus; Hammack, Tom; Brodsky, Michael; Agin, James

    2016-01-01

    Assurance GDS(®) MPX ID for Top Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC; MPX ID) was validated according to the AOAC INTERNATIONAL Methods Committee Guidelines for Validation of Microbiological Methods for Foods and Environmental Surfaces as (1) a secondary screening method for specific detection of the Top 6 STEC serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) in raw beef trim, raw ground beef, raw spinach, and on stainless steel; and (2) as a confirmatory method for the identification of pure culture isolates as Top 6 STEC. MPX ID is used in conjunction with the upfront BCS Assurance GDS MPX Top 7 STEC assay. This Performance Tested Method(SM) validation has two main parts: Method Developer studies and the Independent Laboratory study. A total of 180 samples and controls were analyzed. Results showed that MPX ID had no statistically significant differences with the reference culture methods for the detection of Top 6 STEC in the food matrixes (raw beef trim, raw ground beef, and raw spinach) and environmental sponges (stainless steel) studied. Inclusivity/exclusivity studies were also conducted. One hundred percent inclusivity among the 50 Top 6 STEC serovars tested and 100% exclusivity for the 30 non-Top 6 STEC organisms tested were demonstrated. For validation of MPX ID as a confirmatory method for isolated colonies, all inclusivity and exclusivity organisms were streaked for isolation onto five STEC plating media: modified rainbow agar, Levine's eosin-methylene blue (L-EMB) agar, rainbow agar with novobiocin and cefixime, and enterohemolysin agar with selective agents as well as trypticase soy agar with yeast extract. These isolated colonies were suspended and analyzed by Assurance GDS MPX Top 7 STEC and MPX ID. MPX ID was able to correctly confirm all inclusivity organisms from all plate types, except two STEC isolates from L-EMB agar plates only in the Independent Laboratory study. All exclusivity organisms were correctly determined by MPX ID as non

  16. Differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans on rosemary extract agar and oregano extract agar.

    PubMed

    de Loreto, Erico Silva; Pozzatti, Patrícia; Alves Scheid, Liliane; Santurio, Deise; Morais Santurio, Janio; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently described pathogenic species which shares many phenotypic features with Candida albicans and therefore, may be misidentified in microbiological laboratories. Because molecular methods can be onerous and unfeasible in routine mycological laboratories with restricted budgets such as those in developing countries, phenotypic techniques have been encouraged in the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of these species. We examined the colony morphology and chlamydospore production of 30 C. dubliniensis isolates and 100 C. albicans isolates on two new proposed media: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract agar (REA) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) extract agar (OEA). These substrates are traditionally used as spices and medicinal herbs. In both of these media, all C. dubliniensis isolates (100%) showed rough colonies with peripheral hyphal fringes and abundant chlamydospores after 24 to 48 hr of incubation at 25 degrees C. In contrast, under the same conditions, all isolates of C. albicans (100%) showed smooth colonies without hyphal fringes or chlamydospores. In conclusion, REA and OEA offer a simple, rapid, and inexpensive screening media for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  17. Colonyzer: automated quantification of micro-organism growth characteristics on solid agar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High-throughput screens comparing growth rates of arrays of distinct micro-organism cultures on solid agar are useful, rapid methods of quantifying genetic interactions. Growth rate is an informative phenotype which can be estimated by measuring cell densities at one or more times after inoculation. Precise estimates can be made by inoculating cultures onto agar and capturing cell density frequently by plate-scanning or photography, especially throughout the exponential growth phase, and summarising growth with a simple dynamic model (e.g. the logistic growth model). In order to parametrize such a model, a robust image analysis tool capable of capturing a wide range of cell densities from plate photographs is required. Results Colonyzer is a collection of image analysis algorithms for automatic quantification of the size, granularity, colour and location of micro-organism cultures grown on solid agar. Colonyzer is uniquely sensitive to extremely low cell densities photographed after dilute liquid culture inoculation (spotting) due to image segmentation using a mixed Gaussian model for plate-wide thresholding based on pixel intensity. Colonyzer is robust to slight experimental imperfections and corrects for lighting gradients which would otherwise introduce spatial bias to cell density estimates without the need for imaging dummy plates. Colonyzer is general enough to quantify cultures growing in any rectangular array format, either growing after pinning with a dense inoculum or growing with the irregular morphology characteristic of spotted cultures. Colonyzer was developed using the open source packages: Python, RPy and the Python Imaging Library and its source code and documentation are available on SourceForge under GNU General Public License. Colonyzer is adaptable to suit specific requirements: e.g. automatic detection of cultures at irregular locations on streaked plates for robotic picking, or decreasing analysis time by disabling components such

  18. Colonyzer: automated quantification of micro-organism growth characteristics on solid agar.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Conor; Wilkinson, Darren J; Young, Alexander; Addinall, Stephen G; Lydall, David A

    2010-05-28

    High-throughput screens comparing growth rates of arrays of distinct micro-organism cultures on solid agar are useful, rapid methods of quantifying genetic interactions. Growth rate is an informative phenotype which can be estimated by measuring cell densities at one or more times after inoculation. Precise estimates can be made by inoculating cultures onto agar and capturing cell density frequently by plate-scanning or photography, especially throughout the exponential growth phase, and summarising growth with a simple dynamic model (e.g. the logistic growth model). In order to parametrize such a model, a robust image analysis tool capable of capturing a wide range of cell densities from plate photographs is required. Colonyzer is a collection of image analysis algorithms for automatic quantification of the size, granularity, colour and location of micro-organism cultures grown on solid agar. Colonyzer is uniquely sensitive to extremely low cell densities photographed after dilute liquid culture inoculation (spotting) due to image segmentation using a mixed Gaussian model for plate-wide thresholding based on pixel intensity. Colonyzer is robust to slight experimental imperfections and corrects for lighting gradients which would otherwise introduce spatial bias to cell density estimates without the need for imaging dummy plates. Colonyzer is general enough to quantify cultures growing in any rectangular array format, either growing after pinning with a dense inoculum or growing with the irregular morphology characteristic of spotted cultures. Colonyzer was developed using the open source packages: Python, RPy and the Python Imaging Library and its source code and documentation are available on SourceForge under GNU General Public License. Colonyzer is adaptable to suit specific requirements: e.g. automatic detection of cultures at irregular locations on streaked plates for robotic picking, or decreasing analysis time by disabling components such as lighting

  19. In vitro activity of titanocenedichloride versus cisplatin in four ovarian carcinoma cell lines evaluated by a microtiter plate ATP bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Kurbacher, C M; Bruckner, H W; Andreotti, P E; Kurbacher, J A; Sass, G; Krebs, D

    1995-10-01

    Titanocenedichloride (MKT 4) is a novel anticancer drug with a broad spectrum of activity in mammalian tumors. We investigated the anticancer efficacy of MKT 4 versus cisplatin and its chemomodulation by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) in four different human ovarian carcinoma (OvCA) cell lines derived from both primary (A2780. OTN 14) and recurrent tumors (SKOV-3 and OV-MZ-1b) using an in vitro microplate ATP bioluminescence assay (ATP-TCA). Sensitivity against cisplatin was higher in A2780 and OTN 14 compared with MKT 4, whereas the opposite was found in SKOV-3 and OV-MZ-1b cells. In A2780, SKOV-3 and OV-MZ-1b, the cytotoxicity of both agents could be effectively improved by BSO with supraadditive effects observed for MKT 4 in all three cell lines. In OTN 14, however, BSO treatment failed to increase the cytotoxicity of both cisplatin and MKT 4. These results suggest antineoplastic activity of MKT 4 in cisplatin-sensitive and mainly in cisplatin-resistant OvCA cells which can be significantly modulated by BSO-mediated glutathione depletion. Since antineoplastic activity of both cisplatin and MKT-4 observed in OTN 14 could not be reversed by BSO, other mechanisms of drug resistance different from the glutathione redox cycle are likely to be important for both metal compounds.

  20. The water agar test: a new test to measure the bacteriological quality of cream.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M M

    1975-06-01

    A new test, the water agar test, is described that gives a qualitative index of the presence of bacteria that indicate contamination of the cream, poor storage conditions or both of these factors. The method is simple and requires little equipment. The bacteria grow in a film of diluted cream adsorbed on the surface of a non-nutrient base. After incubation at 30 +/- 0-5 degrees C. for 18-20 hr., a proteolytic and mucoid colony count is obtained which has the same percentage coefficient of variance as a standard plate count. An examination of the effect of storage at different temperatures on the types of bacteria present in cream showed that of all the tests done initially, only the water agar test could predict subsequent bacterial growth with any consistency. The multiplication of presumptive coliform organisms occurred even at 3-5 degrees C. Irrespective of the colony count, the methylene blue reduction time was not shorter than 7 1/2 hr. unless the bacteria were in the logarithmic phase of growth when sampled. A survey was made of the bacterial flora of 188 retail samples of double cream of 15 different brands. The age of the samples varied from freshly separated cream to cream that had been kept in the shop for a day longer than that recommended for sale. The water agar test was compared with the colony count, the presumptive coliform test, a confirmatory coliform count in violet red-bile agar, a lipolytic colony count, a staphylococcal count and the methylene blue reduction test.

  1. High-throughput screening to estimate single or multiple enzymes involved in drug metabolism: microtitre plate assay using a combination of recombinant CYP2D6 and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Suzuki, A; Kohno, Y

    2003-08-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to estimate readily involvement of single or multiple enzymes in the metabolism of a drug through inhibitory assessment. Inhibitory effects of various compounds on CYP2D6 activity assayed by formation of fluorescent metabolite from 3-[2-(N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-ammonium)ethyl]-7-methoxy-4-methyl-coumarin (AMMC) were assessed using microtitre plate (MTP) assays with a combination of recombinant CYP2D6 and human liver microsomes (HLM). 2. Among various compounds studied, antipsychotic drugs extensively inhibited recombinant CYP2D6 activity and the IC50 values were generally lower than those of antidepressants and antiarrhythmic drugs. 3. After pre-incubation, the IC50 values of mianserin, chlorpromadine, risperidone, thioridazine, alprenolol, propafenone and dextromethorphan increased but the values of timolol, S-metoprolol and propranolol substantially decreased compared with those in case of co-incubation. 4. The IC50 values of typical substrates of CYP2D6 (bufuralol and dextromethorphan at lower substrate concentration) in inhibition studies using HLM, were similar to those in the case of recombinant CYP2D6, but the values of the compounds that are metabolized by multiple CYP forms (perphenazine and chlorpromazine) in HLM were much larger. 5. If the ratio (HLM/rCYP ratio) of IC50 values between HLM and recombinant CYP2D6 exceeds approximately 2, it suggests that other CYP forms in addition to CYP2D6 might be involved in the metabolism of the test compounds. From the advantage such as speed, high throughput and ease of the technique, the MTP assay using a combination of the recombinant CYP2D6 and HLM is useful to estimate the involvement of single or multiple enzymes in the metabolism of drugs at the stage of drug discovery.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolated from pigs in Southern Japan with a modified agar dilution method.

    PubMed

    Chuma, Takehisa; Kawamoto, Toshio; Shahada, Francis; Fujimoto, Hideki; Okamoto, Karoku

    2010-05-01

    The determination of antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae by using the agar dilution method has not been covered by the Clinical and Laboratory Institute (CLSI). Only the broth microdilution method has been outlined. This report describes a modification of the agar dilution procedure for E. rhusiopathiae using Trypto-soy agar supplemented with 0.1% Tween 80 and incubation in ambient air at 37 degrees C for 24 hr. The MICs of the assay were in agreement with those of the broth microdilution method recommended by the CLSI. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed using this method for 149 E. rhusiopathiae isolates from 2 meat processing plants in Kagoshima Prefecture during the period of April 2004 to March 2005. The number of strains resistant to oxytetracycline, erythromycin, lincomycin, ofloxacin and enrofloxacin were 56 (37.6%), 4 (2.7%), 18 (12.1%), 21 (14.1%) and 19 (12.8%), respectively. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin.

  3. A steep thermal gradient thermotaxis assay for the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cassata, G; Kuhn, F; Witmer, A; Kirchhofer, R; Bürglin, T R

    2000-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans with its well-described nervous system is one of the multicellular organisms of choice to study thermotaxis. The neuronal circuitry for thermosensation has been analyzed at the level of individual cells. Two methods have previously been described to study the behavior of C. elegans with respect to temperature: 1) isothermal tracking assays and 2) linear thermal gradients (Hedgecock and Russell, 1975). Here we present a short linear thermal gradient assay which is faster and which allows statistical evaluation of different populations using a thermotaxis index. Thin agar plates are used on which a temperature gradient from about 10 degrees to 30 degrees is induced over the distance of about 5 cm. The short linear thermal gradient uses inexpensive materials so that multiple tests can be performed in parallel in a short period of time.

  4. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on agar and processed meat surfaces by atmospheric pressure plasma jets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Jung, Heesoo; Choe, Wonho; Ham, Jun Sang; Lee, Jun Heon; Jo, Cheorun

    2011-12-01

    An apparatus for generating atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet was used to investigate the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of agar plates and slices of cooked chicken breast and ham. He, N₂ (both 7 L/min), and mixtures of each with O₂ (0.07 L/min) were used to produce the plasma jets. After treatment for 2 min with APP jets of He, He + O₂, N₂, or N₂ + O₂, the numbers of L. monocytogenes on agar plates were reduced by 0.87, 4.19, 4.26, and 7.59 log units, respectively. Similar treatments reduced the L. monocytogenes inoculated onto sliced chicken breast and ham by 1.37 to 4.73 and 1.94 to 6.52 log units, respectively, according to the input gas used with the N₂ + O₂ mixture being the most effective. Most APP jets reduced the numbers of aerobic bacteria on the meat surfaces to <10² CFU/g, and the numbers remained below that level of detection after storage at 10 °C for 7 days. The results indicate that APP jets are effective for the inactivation of L. monocytogenes on sliced meats and for prolonging the shelf-life of such foods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of non-streptococcal organisms from human dental plaque grown on the Streptococcus-selective medium mitis-salivarius agar.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Si Young

    2015-02-01

    Mitis-salivarius (MS) agar has been used widely in microbial epidemiological studies because oral viridans streptococci can be selectively grown on this medium. Even though the previous findings reported the limited selecting power of MS agar for streptococcus strains, the identities of non-streptococcal strains from human oral samples which can grow on this medium are not clear yet. In this study, we identified non-streptococcal organisms grown on MS agar plates by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. Eighty bacterial colonies on MS plates were isolated from plaque samples, and bacterial identification was achieved with the rapid ID 32 Strep system and mini API reader. The bacterial colonies identified as non-streptococci by the API system were selected for further identification. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR and verified using DNA sequencing analysis for identification. Sequences were compared with those of reference organisms in the genome database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Among the 11 isolated non-streptococcal strains on MS plates, 3 strains were identified as Actinomyces naeslundii, 7 strains were identified as Actinomyces oris and 1 strain were identified as Actinomyces sp. using Blastn. In this study, we showed that some oral Actinomyces species can grow on Streptococcus-selective MS agar plates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of water structure on gelation of agar in glycerol solutions and phase diagram of agar organogels.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Bohidar, H B

    2012-06-21

    A comprehensive study of hydration of polyanionic agar molecules in its solution and gel phase in glycerol-water binary solvent is reported. Raman spectroscopy results predict differential water structure arrangement for glycerol-water binary solvent, 0.02% (w/v) agar in glycerol solution and 0.3% (w/v) agar organogel. The 3200 cm(-1) Raman band pertaining to ice-like structure of water was found to increase in gel phase alike in glycerol-water solvent while it decreased in agar solutions with increase in glycerol concentration. In contrast, the partially structured water corresponding to the component 3310 cm(-1) of Raman spectra increased in agar solution, and decreased in gel phase similar to glycerol-water solvent case. We have explained these observations based on a simple model where the available oxygen to hydrogen atom ratio in a given solvent-polymer system uniquely defines hydration in solution and gel phases. The gelation concentration was found to increase from 0.18 (for water) to 0.22% (w/v) (50% v/v glycerol solution) as the glycerol concentration was raised. Correspondingly, the gelation temperature, T(g), showed a decline from 40 to 20 °C, and the gel melting temperature, T(m), revealed a reduction from 81 to 65 °C in the same glycerol concentration regime. Two distinctive features are evident here: (i) presence of glycerol as a cosolvent does not favor the gelation of agar as compared to water and (ii) agar organogels are softer than their hydrogels. A unique 3D phase diagram for the agar organogel is proposed. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the agar molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that thermo-mechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and adapted as per application requirement.

  7. Evaluation of potassium-clavulanate-supplemented modified charcoal-cefoperazone-deoxycholate agar for enumeration of Campylobacter in chicken carcass rinse.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Hyunsook; Oh, Deog-Hwan; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2014-05-01

    Potassium-clavulanate-supplemented modified charcoal-cefoperazone-deoxycholate agar (C-mCCDA) that was described in our previous study was compared with original mCCDA for the enumeration of Campylobacter in pure culture and chicken carcass rinse. The quantitative detection of viable Campylobacter cells from a pure culture, plated on C-mCCDA, is statistically similar (P > 0.05) to mCCDA. In total, 120 chickens were rinsed using 400 mL buffered peptone water. The rinses were inoculated onto C-mCCDA and mCCDA followed by incubation at 42 °C for 48 h. There was no statistical difference between C-mCCDA (45 of 120 plates; mean count, 145.5 CFU/mL) and normal mCCDA (46 of 120 plates; mean count, 160.8 CFU/mL) in the isolation rate and recovery of Campylobacter (P > 0.05) from chicken carcass rinse. The Pearson correlation coefficient value for the number of Campylobacter cells recovered in the 2 media was 0.942. However, the selectivity was much better on C-mCCDA than on mCCDA plates (P < 0.05). Significantly fewer C-mCCDA plates (33 out of 120 plates; mean count, 1.9 CFU/mL) were contaminated with non-Campylobacter cells than the normal mCCDA plates (67 out of 120 plates; mean count, 27.1 CFU/mL). The C-mCCDA may provide improved results for enumeration of Campylobacter in chicken meat alternative to mCCDA with its increased selectivity the modified agar possess. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Tryptophan and hydrogen sulfide reaction from modified trypticase soy agar.

    PubMed Central

    VON Riesen, V L

    1978-01-01

    The use of Trypticase soy agar modified by the addition of 0.05% ferric ammonium citrate and 0.01% sodium thiosulfate for the determination of indole, phenylpyruvic acid, anthranilate, kynurenine, and hydrogen sulfide reactions is described. PMID:624768

  9. Hair Sheep Blood, Citrated or Defibrinated, Fulfills All Requirements of Blood Agar for Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory Tests

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ellen; Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Banaei, Niaz; Baron, Ellen Jo

    2009-01-01

    Background Blood agar is used for the identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of many bacterial pathogens. In the developing world, microbiologists use human blood agar because of the high cost and inhospitable conditions for raising wool sheep or horses to supply blood. Many pathogens either fail to grow entirely or exhibit morphologies and hemolytic patterns on human blood agar that confound colony recognition. Furthermore, human blood can be hazardous to handle due to HIV and hepatitis [1], [2]. This study investigated whether blood from hair sheep, a hardy, low-maintenance variety of sheep adapted for hot climates, was suitable for routine clinical microbiology studies. Methods and Findings Hair sheep blood obtained by jugular venipuncture was anticoagulated by either manual defibrination or collection in human blood bank bags containing citrate-phosphate-dextrose. Trypticase soy 5% blood agar was made from both forms of hair sheep blood and commercial defibrinated wool sheep blood. Growth characteristics, colony morphologies, and hemolytic patterns of selected human pathogens, including several streptococcal species, were evaluated. Specialized identification tests, including CAMP test, reverse CAMP test, and satellite colony formation with Haemophilus influenzae and Abiotrophia defectiva were also performed. Mueller-Hinton blood agar plates prepared from the three blood types were compared in antibiotic susceptibility tests by disk diffusion and E-test. Conclusions The results of all studies showed that blood agar prepared from citrated hair sheep blood is suitable for microbiological tests used in routine identification and susceptibility profiling of human pathogens. The validation of citrated hair sheep blood eliminates the labor-intensive and equipment-requiring process of manual defibrination. Use of hair sheep blood, in lieu of human blood currently used by many developing world laboratories and as an alternative to cost

  10. Anticlostridial agent 8-hydroxyquinoline improves the isolation of faecal bifidobacteria on modified Wilkins-Chalgren agar with mupirocin.

    PubMed

    Novakova, J; Vlkova, E; Salmonova, H; Pechar, R; Rada, V; Kokoska, L

    2016-04-01

    The need for suitable selective cultivation media for the isolation of Bifidobacterium spp. continues to be a real concern in the field of intestinal microbiology. Isolation of bifidobacteria from human and animal faecal samples using selective agar plating may be problematic especially in samples with increased clostridial counts than bifidobacterial counts. Due to the absence of anticlostridial agents in existing selective media, clostridia can displace bifidobacteria resulting in incorrect estimation of their counts. Therefore, we supplemented the existing selective medium 'modified Wilkins Chalgren agar with mupirocin' (MWM) with 90 mg l(-1) of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ), which was recently proved to act selectively against clostridia. The newly composed 'modified Wilkins-Chalgren agar with 8HQ' (MWMQ) was tested on pure bifidobacterial and clostridial strains, their mixtures, and using faecal samples of mammalian origin; its selectivity was evaluated by genus-specific identification of isolates. The results demonstrated that the presence of 8HQ in this agar eliminated the growth of nonbifidobacterial strains on MWMQ compared to that on MWM, whereas the recovery of bifidobacterial counts was at satisfactory levels. In conclusion, MWMQ could be recommended for bifidobacterial isolation from human and animal faeces especially when bifidobacteria are not numerically dominant and there are chances of clostridial contamination. Routine isolation of bifidobacteria from mammalian faeces does not use a reliable selective agar with an anticlostridial agent. Overgrowth of clostridia may result in incorrect estimation of bifidobacterial counts. Thus, in order to improve the selectivity of existing media for bifidobacterial isolation, we chose the modified Wilkins-Chalgren agar with mupirocin and supplemented it with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ), a molecule that shows anticlostridial activity without affecting the growth of bifidobacteria. This newly composed medium showed

  11. Thermal characterization of magnetically aligned carbonyl iron/agar composites.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Bleis, D; Vales-Pinzón, C; Freile-Pelegrín, Y; Alvarado-Gil, J J

    2014-01-01

    Composites of magnetic particles into polymeric matrices have received increasing research interest due to their capacity to respond to external magnetic or electromagnetic fields. In this study, agar from Gelidium robustum has been chosen as natural biocompatible polymer to build the matrix of the magnetic carbonyl iron particles (CIP) for their uses in biomedical fields. Heat transfer behavior of the CIP-agar composites containing different concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% w/w) of magnetically aligned and non-aligned CIP in the agar matrix was studied using photothermal radiometry (PTR) in the back-propagation emission configuration. The morphology of the CIP-agar composites with aligned and non-aligned CIP under magnetic field was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed a dominant effect of CIP concentration over the alignment patterns induced by the magnetic field, which agrees with the behavior of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. Agar served as a perfect matrix to be used with CIP, and CIP-agar composites magnetically aligned at 20% CIP concentration can be considered as promising 'smart' material for hyperthermia treatments in the biomedical field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of agar/soy protein biocomposite films: Effect of agar on the extruded pellets and compression moulded films.

    PubMed

    Garrido, T; Etxabide, A; Guerrero, P; de la Caba, K

    2016-10-20

    Agar/soy protein biocomposite films were successfully processed by extrusion and compression moulding, obtaining transparent and homogeneous films. The conformational changes occurred during the extrusion process and the effect of agar on the final properties were analyzed. As shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and specific mechanical energy (SME) values, during the extrusion process protein denatured and unfolded protein chains could interact with agar. These interactions were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the secondary structure was determined from the amide I band. Those interactions were supported by the decrease of film solubility. Furthermore, the good compatibility between agar and soy protein was confirmed by the images from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of Mannitol Salt Agar for Detection of Oxacillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by Disk Diffusion and Agar Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Lecke, Christoph; Cimbal, Ann-Katrin; Weist, Klaus; Rüden, Henning

    1998-01-01

    Mannitol salt agar was evaluated for detection of oxacillin resistance in 136 Staphylococcus aureus isolates. All mecA-positive isolates (n = 54) were correctly categorized as oxacillin resistant by the disk diffusion test (1-μg disk; zone diameter, <16 mm); the specificity was 97.6%. Agar screening (2 μg of oxacillin per ml) revealed a sensitivity of 98.1% and a specificity of 95.1%. PMID:9666001

  14. Qualitative and quantitative agar invasion test based on bacterial colony/biofilm.

    PubMed

    Corcuera, María Teresa; Gómez-Aguado, Fernando; Gómez-Lus, María Luisa; Ramos, Carmen; de la Parte, María Antonia; Alonso, María José; Prieto, José

    2013-09-01

    Invasion of the culture medium is a feature frequently studied in yeasts, in which it has been related to a greater virulence, but it is practically unknown in bacteria. Recently, it has been demonstrated that several clinically relevant bacterial species were also able of invading agar media, so it was necessary to design a microbiological assay to study the expression of this character in bacteria. Accordingly, a bacterial agar invasion test based on colony/biofilm development was designed, which allows qualitative and quantitative characterization of bacterial growth into the agar culture medium. Once the culture conditions were optimized, the test was applied to 90 strains from nine bacterial species, validating its usefulness for differentiating invasive strains (positive) from those non invasive (negative). The test also allows sorting invasive strains according to agar invasion intensity (low, moderate, high) and topographic invasion pattern (peripheral, homogeneous, mixed). Moreover, an image analysis routine to quantify the invasion was developed. Implemented method enables direct measuring of two invasion parameters (invasion area and number of invasion dots), automated calculation of three relative variables (invasion relative area, invasion dots relative density, and invasion dot average area), and the establishment of strain specific frequency histograms. This new methodology is simple, fast, reproducible, objective, inexpensive and can be used to study a great number of specimens simultaneously, all of which make it suitable for incorporation to the routine of any microbiology laboratory. It could also be a useful tool for additional studies related to clinical aspects of bacterial isolates such as virulence and antimicrobial response. © 2013.

  15. Bacterial assay of contact lens wearers.

    PubMed

    Hart, D E; Hosmer, M; Georgescu, M; Farris, R L

    1996-03-01

    The goal of the project was to determine the quantity of bacteria on the contact lens and adjacent areas of the eye. This paper is a quantitative study of the contact lens and ocular aerobic microbiota in a mixed group of daily and extended wear disposable contact lens users. The contact lens, the lower fornix, tears collecting at the lower fornix, and edge of the lower lid at the Meibomian gland margin were assayed for the quantity of bacterial colony forming units (CFU). Eighteen patients wearing 49 disposable high water content hydrogel contact lenses were assayed and the mean lens age was 8.8 +/- 4.6 days. Three patients wore their lenses on a daily wear basis and 15 on an extended wear schedule. Tear samples were obtained with sterile microbial loops and the lens was macerated into small particles with a tissue grinder. The samples were poured onto the surface of chocolate agar plates and incubated at 35 degrees C for 48 h in 5% Co2. The lid margin revealed the greatest bacterial presence (mean = 9.7 CFU; median = 2 CFU; mode = 0 CFU). The lens showed the next greatest presence of CFU (mean = 4.5 CFU; median = 1 CFU; mode = 0). The fornix and tears revealed the least bacterial presence (fornix: mean = 2.6 CFU; median = 0 CFU; mode = 0 CFU). The bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci. The bacterial assay of disposable lens wearing contact lens subjects indicates that the lid margins are the greatest source of bacteria with the tears being the lowest. These studies support the concept that in the eye, the lens typically does not possess a large number of bacteria under normal conditions.

  16. Use of agar/glycerol and agar/glycerol/water as a translucent brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Jermy, Mark C; Winter, Taylor; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    The suitability of agar/glycerol/water and agar/glycerol mixtures as brain simulants was investigated. Test specimens (n=15) (50x27×37mm) were fabricated for these different mixtures and conditioned to 12°C, 22°C, and 26°C prior to testing. For comparison, fresh deer brain specimens (n=20) were sourced and prepared to the same dimensions as the agar/glycerol(/water) mixtures and conditioned to 12°C and 37°C. High impact tests were carried out with a 0.22-caliber air rifle pellet and a high-speed camera was used to record the projectile as it passed through the specimens, allowing for energy loss and vertical displacement velocity calculation. Although the agar/glycerol/water mixture presented with similar vertical expansion and contraction of the specimens to the warm and cold deer brains, a two-fold decrease of the vertical expansion and contraction was noticed with the agar/glycerol specimens. Also considerably less extrusion of this mixture out of the exit and entry sides after specimen penetration was observed. Of the simulants tested, agar/glycerol/water was the most suitable brain simulant for ballistic testing and impact studies.

  17. Immobilization of pectin degrading enzyme from Bacillus licheniformis KIBGE IB-21 using agar-agar as a support.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Haneef Ur; Aman, Afsheen; Zohra, Raheela Rahmat; Qader, Shah Ali Ul

    2014-02-15

    Pectinase from Bacillus licheniformis KIBGE IB-21 was immobilized in agar-agar matrix using entrapment technique. Effect of different concentrations of agar-agar on pectinase immobilization was investigated and it was found that maximum immobilization was achieved at 3.0% agar-agar with 80% enzyme activity. After immobilization, the optimum temperature of enzyme increased from 45 to 50 °C and reaction time from 5 to 10 minutes as compared to free enzyme. Due to the limited diffusion of high molecular weight substrate, K(m) of immobilized enzyme slightly increased from 1.017 to 1.055 mg ml(-1), while Vmax decreased from 23,800 to 19,392 μM min(-1) as compared to free enzyme. After 120 h entrapped pectinase retained their activity up to 82% and 71% at 30 °C and 40 °C, respectively. The entrapped pectinase showed activity until 10th cycle and maintain 69.21% activity even after third cycle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Mueller-Hinton-agar as a simple medium for the germ tube production of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Rimek, Dagmar; Fehse, Brigitte; Göpel, Petra

    2008-05-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated yeast species from clinical specimens. A classical rapid presumptive differentiation from non-albicans species is based on its ability to produce germ tubes after incubation in human serum. The only non-albicans Candida species producing germ tubes is Candida dubliniensis. In this study, we evaluated Mueller-Hinton-agar (MH-agar) as a medium for germ tube formation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. A total of 859 yeast isolates from stool samples, including 632 strains of C. albicans, 10 C. dubliniensis and 217 other yeast strains from 20 different species, were grown on Sabouraud glucose (2%) agar at 37 degrees C for 24-72 h. Species were identified by standard methods. For the germ tube test (GTT), an inoculum from a single colony was streaked onto a MH-agar plate and covered by a sterile coverslip. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 2 h, the MH plates were examined using a light microscope at x200. The GTT was positive in 578 of 632 C. albicans strains (sensitivity 91.5%), in six of 10 C. dubliniensis strains (sensitivity 60.0%), and in none of the other yeast strains. MH-agar is a suitable medium for the GTT and the presumptive identification of C. albicans. It is safer to use than human serum and is widely available in microbiology laboratories.

  19. Effects of immersion disinfection of agar-alginate combined impressions on the surface properties of stone casts.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yukiko; Hiraguchi, Hisako; Iwasaki, Eriko; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of disinfection of agar-alginate combined impressions on the surface properties of the resulting stone casts. Two brands of cartridge-form agar impression material and one alginate impression material were used. Agar-alginate combined impressions of smooth glass plates were prepared. The impressions were immersed in 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solution or 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution for 1, 3, 5 and 10 min. A stone cast made with an impression that had not been immersed was prepared as a control. The surface roughness (Ra) of the stone casts was measured, and the cast surfaces were observed by SEM. Immersion of agar-alginate combined impressions in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution for up to 10 min had no serious adverse effects on the surface properties of the stone casts. In contrast, even 1 min of immersion in 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solution caused deterioration of the cast surface properties.

  20. Evaluation of the iNtRON VRE vanA/vanB Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Hee Jae; Jang, Mi-Ae; Seo, Ja Young; Kim, Ji-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Nam Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, the iNtRON VRE vanA/vanB real-time PCR (iNtRON; iNtRON Biotechnology, Korea) assay, a multiplex real-time PCR method, was introduced. In this prospective study, we compared the iNtRON assay with the Seeplex VRE ACE detection kit (Seeplex; Seegene, Korea), a conventional multiplex PCR assay. Methods A chromogenic agar-based culture, in which pre-selected vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) was grown and subsequently plated on blood agar with vancomycin disks, was regarded as the reference method. A total of 304 consecutive rectal swab specimens were tested for VRE by culture and by iNtRON and Seeplex PCR assays. For the PCR assays, specimens were enriched for 16-24 hr before PCR. Results VRE were isolated from 44 (14.5%) specimens by chromogenic agar-based culture. The clinical sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the iNtRON assay were 100% (95% confidence interval: 89.8%-100%), 99.2% (96.9%-99.9%), 95.6% (83.6%-99.2%), and 100% (98.2%-100%), respectively, while those of the Seeplex assay were 97.7% (86.2%-99.9%), 99.6% (97.5%-99.9%), 97.7% (86.2%-99.9%), and 99.6% (97.5%-99.9%), respectively. The iNtRON assay had a detection limit of 3,159 copies/µL and 13,702 copies/µL for the vanA and vanB genes, respectively. No cross-reactivity was observed in 11 non-VRE bacterial culture isolates. Conclusions The overall performance of the iNtRON assay was comparable to that of a chromogenic agar-based culture method for prompt identification of VRE-colonized patients in hospitals. This assay could be an alternative or supportive method for the effective control of nosocomial VRE infection. PMID:25553284

  1. Evaluation of the iNtRON VRE vanA/vanB real-time PCR assay for detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Huh, Hee Jae; Jang, Mi-Ae; Seo, Ja Young; Kim, Ji-Youn; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Nam Yong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the iNtRON VRE vanA/vanB real-time PCR (iNtRON; iNtRON Biotechnology, Korea) assay, a multiplex real-time PCR method, was introduced. In this prospective study, we compared the iNtRON assay with the Seeplex VRE ACE detection kit (Seeplex; Seegene, Korea), a conventional multiplex PCR assay. A chromogenic agar-based culture, in which pre-selected vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) was grown and subsequently plated on blood agar with vancomycin disks, was regarded as the reference method. A total of 304 consecutive rectal swab specimens were tested for VRE by culture and by iNtRON and Seeplex PCR assays. For the PCR assays, specimens were enriched for 16-24 hr before PCR. VRE were isolated from 44 (14.5%) specimens by chromogenic agar-based culture. The clinical sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the iNtRON assay were 100% (95% confidence interval: 89.8%-100%), 99.2% (96.9%-99.9%), 95.6% (83.6%-99.2%), and 100% (98.2%-100%), respectively, while those of the Seeplex assay were 97.7% (86.2%-99.9%), 99.6% (97.5%-99.9%), 97.7% (86.2%-99.9%), and 99.6% (97.5%-99.9%), respectively. The iNtRON assay had a detection limit of 3,159 copies/µL and 13,702 copies/µL for the vanA and vanB genes, respectively. No cross-reactivity was observed in 11 non-VRE bacterial culture isolates. The overall performance of the iNtRON assay was comparable to that of a chromogenic agar-based culture method for prompt identification of VRE-colonized patients in hospitals. This assay could be an alternative or supportive method for the effective control of nosocomial VRE infection.

  2. Comparison of the dot-immunobinding assay with the serum agglutination test, the rose bengal plate test and the milk ring test for the detection of Brucella antibodies in bovine sera and milk.

    PubMed

    Gürtürk, K; Boynukara, B; Ilhan, Z; Hakki Ekin, I; Gülhan, T

    1999-05-01

    In this study, Brucella antibodies in bovine sera and milk were detected using the dot-immunobinding assay (DIA), the serum agglutination test (SAT), the Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT) and the milk ring test (MRT). For this purpose, a total of 116 paired blood and milk samples collected at the same time from 56 aborted and from 60 healthy dairy cows was examined. In DIA, a nitrocellulose membrane (NCM) was used as the solid phase. Antigen adsorbed on the NCM was extracted from Brucella abortus S99 by heat treatment. The results obtained by DIA were compared with those of SAT, RBPT and MRT. Of the 116 paired blood and milk samples, 24 were positive and 72 were negative by all tests used. Serum samples of six aborted cows were positive by DIA, SAT and RBPT but the milk samples were negative by DIA and MRT. Serum and milk samples of four aborted cows gave positive reaction only by DIA tests. The remaining six aborted cows were negative only by MRT and two of them were negative by both RBPT and MRT. Four sera of healthy cows were found to be positive only by SAT.

  3. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could provide additional protection in chlorinated drinking water distribution systems. Copper-Silver (Cu-Ag) ionization treatment systems are commercially available for use in large building water systems to help control the risks from Legionella bacteria. The objectives of this study were to develop and optimize Legionella viability assays and use them to investigate the viability of Legionella bacteria after exposure to water treated with coppper and silver ions. Methods: Log phase L. pneumophila cells were used in all experiments and were generated by incubation at 35C for 48 hours in buffered yeast extract broth. Viability assays used included plating on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar to determine the number of culturable cells and treating cells with propidium monoazide (PMA) or ethidium monoazide (EMA) followed by quantitative PCR targeting mip gene of L. pneumophila. The qPCR viability assays were optimized using L. pneumophila inactivated by heat treatment at 65C for 60 min. The effectiveness of Cu-Ag ionization treatment was studied by inoculating L. pneumonia at 105 CFU/mL in water collected directly from a building water system that employed this technology and incubat

  4. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could provide additional protection in chlorinated drinking water distribution systems. Copper-Silver (Cu-Ag) ionization treatment systems are commercially available for use in large building water systems to help control the risks from Legionella bacteria. The objectives of this study were to develop and optimize Legionella viability assays and use them to investigate the viability of Legionella bacteria after exposure to water treated with coppper and silver ions. Methods: Log phase L. pneumophila cells were used in all experiments and were generated by incubation at 35C for 48 hours in buffered yeast extract broth. Viability assays used included plating on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar to determine the number of culturable cells and treating cells with propidium monoazide (PMA) or ethidium monoazide (EMA) followed by quantitative PCR targeting mip gene of L. pneumophila. The qPCR viability assays were optimized using L. pneumophila inactivated by heat treatment at 65C for 60 min. The effectiveness of Cu-Ag ionization treatment was studied by inoculating L. pneumonia at 105 CFU/mL in water collected directly from a building water system that employed this technology and incubat

  5. Inoculation of culture plates: straightforward or is it?

    PubMed

    Carlin, E M; Hammond, J A; Boag, F C

    1997-04-01

    In view of the recent vogue in some genitourinary medicine (GUM) units towards selective microscopy we aimed to assess the adequacy of culture plate inoculation in our own GUM clinic by the visual examination of 350 consecutively inoculated plates. Seventy-five (21%) plates were inoculated so lightly that no indentation in the agar could be seen whilst in 20 (60%) the agar was shredded. Eighty-five per cent of inadequately plated samples were inoculated by the same staff members who were either relatively inexperienced, or well-distanced from their last in-service training. This has many important implications not only in the identification and control of infection but also with respect to staff training. We have now introduced practical plating instruction for all new members of clinical staff and additional in-service training. We plan to repeat the audit in 6 months' time to assess the effect of these changes.

  6. Use of propyl paraben to control growth and ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus section Nigri species on peanut meal extract agar.

    PubMed

    Barberis, Carla; Astoreca, Andrea; Fernandez-Juri, Guillermina; Chulze, Sofía; Dalcero, Ana; Magnoli, Carina

    2009-11-30

    This study was carried out to determine the efficacy of the phenolic antioxidant propyl paraben (PP) under different interacting water activity (a(W)) and temperature regimes on lag phase, growth rate and Ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus section Nigri strains. In this experiment six Aspergillus section Nigri strains were used. Peanut meal extract agar (PMEA) was prepared at 2%. The a(W) of the medium was adjusted to 0.995, 0.980 and 0.930, PP levels of 1, 5, 10 and 20 mmol/L were added to the basic medium. Plates were inoculated and incubated for 30 days at 18 and 25 degrees C. Lag phase (h) and radial growth rates (mm/day) were calculated. In control treatments, the lag phase increased and the growth rate decreased as a(W) reduced in all assayed strains. At all a(W) levels, when antioxidant concentrations increased the growth rate decreased. At 5, 10 and 20 mmol/L of PP the strains were not able to reach the exponential phase and completely inhibited fungal growth and OTA production regardless of a(W) used in all the evaluated strains.

  7. Enumeration of sublethally injured Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 and Escherichia coli strain B-41560 using selective agar overlays versus commercial methods.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda R; Ellison, Alysha L; Robinson, Amanda L; Drake, Maryanne; McDowell, Susan A; Mitchell, James K; Gerard, Patrick D; Heckler, Rachel A; McKillip, John L

    2013-04-01

    Quality control procedures during food processing may involve direct inoculation of food samples onto appropriate selective media for subsequent enumeration. However, sublethally injured bacteria often fail to grow, enabling them to evade detection and intervention measures and ultimately threaten the health of consumers. This study compares traditional selective and nonselective agar-based overlays versus two commercial systems (Petrifilm and Easygel) for recovery of injured E. coli B-41560 and O157:H7 strains. Bacteria were propagated in tryptic soy broth (TSB), ground beef slurry, and infant milk formula to a density of 10(6) to 10(8) CFU/ml and then were stressed for 6 min either in lactic acid (pH 4.5) or heat shocked for 3 min at 60°C. Samples were pour plated in basal layers of either tryptic soy agar (TSA), sorbitol MacConkey agar (SMAC), or violet red bile agar (VRB) and were resuscitated for 4 h prior to addition of agar overlays. Other stressed bacteria were plated directly onto Petrifilm and Easygel. Results indicate that selective and nonselective agar overlays recovered significantly higher numbers (greater than 1 log) of acid- and heat-injured E. coli O157:H7 from TSB, ground beef, and infant milk formula compared with direct plating onto selective media, Petrifilm, or Easygel, while no significant differences among these media combinations were observed for stressed E. coli B-41560. Nonstressed bacteria from TSB and ground beef were also recovered at densities significantly higher in nonselective TSA-TSA and in VRB-VRB and SMAC-SMAC compared with Petrifilm and Easygel. These data underscore the need to implement food safety measures that address sublethally injured pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7 in order to avoid underestimation of true densities for target pathogens.

  8. Heterotrophic plate count methodology in the United States.

    PubMed

    Reasoner, Donald J

    2004-05-01

    In the United States (US), the history of bacterial plate counting (BPC) methods used for water can be traced largely through Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater (Standard Methods). The bacterial count method has evolved from the original Standard Methods (1st edition, 1905) plate count which used nutrient gelatin and incubation at 20 degrees C for 48 h, to the HPC method options in the latest edition of Standard Methods that provide greater flexibility of application, depending on the data needs of the water analyst. The use of agar-agar as a gelling agent, replacing gelatin, allowed the use of higher incubation temperatures and resulted in the "body temperature count" (37 degrees C) found in the 3rd through the 8th edition of Standard Methods. The change from 37 degrees C incubation to 35+/-0.5 degrees C accommodated laboratories that did both milk and water analyses. By using a single temperature, fewer incubators were needed. The term "standard plate count" (SPC) first appeared in 1960 (11th edition) along with plate count agar. Incubation at 20 degrees C for the plate count was dropped from the 13th to 15th editions and few changes were made in the SPC method from the 11th edition through the 13th editions. Plate count analysis of bottled waters was included in the 14th edition (1975), calling for incubation at 35+/-0.5 degrees C for 72+/-4 h. Perhaps the most significant changes in plate count methods occurred with the 16th edition (1985). The term heterotrophic plate count replaced the standard plate count, and the spread plate (SP) and membrane filter (MF) methods were added along with new media for pour and spread plates (R2A agar and NWRI agar, both low nutrient) and for the membrane filter method (mHPC medium). The use of low nutrient media, lower incubation temperature, and longer incubation times, results in higher plate count results for most water samples. The options currently available, including low and high nutrient media

  9. Light transfer in agar immobilized microalgae cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandilian, Razmig; Jesus, Bruno; Legrand, Jack; Pilon, Laurent; Pruvost, Jérémy

    2017-09-01

    This paper experimentally and theoretically investigates light transfer in agar-immobilized cell cultures. Certain biotechnological applications such as production of metabolites secreted by photosynthetic microorganisms require cells to be immobilized in biopolymers to minimize contamination and to facilitate metabolite recovery. In such applications, light absorption by cells is one of the most important parameters affecting cell growth or metabolite productivity. Modeling light transfer therein can aid design and optimize immobilized-cell reactors. In this study, Parachlorella kessleri cells with areal biomass concentrations ranging from 0.36 to 16.9 g/m2 were immobilized in 2.6 mm thick agar gels. The average absorption and scattering cross-sections as well as the scattering phase function of P. kessleri cells were measured. Then, the absorption and transport scattering coefficients of the agar gel were determined using an inverse method based on the modified two-flux approximation. The forward model was used to predict the normal-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance of the immobilized-cell films accounting for absorption and scattering by both microalgae and the agar gel. Good agreement was found between the measured and predicted normal-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance provided absorption and scattering by agar were taken into account. Moreover, good agreement was found between experimentally measured and predicted mean rate of photon absorption. Finally, optimal areal biomass concentration was determined to achieve complete absorption of the incident radiation.

  10. Screening for Drug-resistant Candida yeasts with Chromogenic Agar

    PubMed Central

    KIRKPATRICK, WILLIAM R.; ZIMMERMAN, JOSEPH D.; HAIKAL, FADI P.; BROKER, MICHAEL J.; BROCKWAY, ERIN; FOTHERGILL, ANNETTE W.; MCCARTHY, DORA I.; PATTERSON, THOMAS F.; REDDING, SPENCER W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We examined the utility of agar dilution to screen yeasts for reduced susceptibility to several newer antifungal drugs including echinocandins and azoles. We compared agar dilution susceptibility screening with the CLSI method for Candida isolates. CHROMagar Candida medium was prepared with echinocandins and azoles added independently to agar prior to solidification. Assessment of resistance was based on growth characteristics, wherein decreased colony size in the presence of antifungal drugs was used as an indicator of resistance. Clinical Candida isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, C. lusitaniae, C. rugosa and C. dubliniensis were screened for drug susceptibility. Overall, antifungal susceptibility against anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, posaconazole and voriconazole, determined using CHROMagar agar dilution, were shown to be 96, 80, 94, 90 and 97% accurate, respectively, within one tube dilution of CLSI MICs for these clinical isolates. Categorical errors by percentage, had a broader range. Major errors with anidulafungin, caspofungin and micafungin were 3, 6 and 0%, respectively, while very major errors were 15, 55 and 38%. Major errors with posaconazole and voriconazole, respectively, were 12 and 0%, while very major errors were 0 and 22% respectively, compared to CLSI standards. Most of the assessment errors were with C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis. Agar dilution screening for drug susceptibility with the current panel of antifungal drugs is rapid, accurate and effective, however, determination of resistance or non-susceptibility in yeasts may be more problematic, and may be species dependent. PMID:20109095

  11. Bacterial contamination of hemodialysis center water and dialysate: are current assays adequate?

    PubMed

    Harding, G B; Pass, T; Million, C; Wright, R; DeJarnette, J; Klein, E

    1989-04-01

    Many dialysis centers depend on clinical laboratories or a commercially available dip culture to determine the contamination levels in water and dialysate. To determine whether these standard clinical culture procedures adequately quantitate bacterial contamination in hemodialysis center water and dialysate, test results of two routine clinical media was compared, trypticase soy agar (TSA) and plate count agar (PCA), with those of nutrient-poor R2A medium. Dialysate samples demonstrated significant differences in media, the temperature of incubation, and plating techniques (pour plate versus spread plates). Purified water for dialysis demonstrated significant differences only for media; however, temperature was an important variable. Selective growth on R2A agar of some water- and dialysate-contaminating species was studied by velvet disk and loop transfer of colonies. A strong selectivity for water-borne bacteria was demonstrated by R2A agar; the bacteria that did not grow on TSA and PCA have been identified.

  12. Enhanced chlorine resistance of tap water-adapted Legionella pneumophila as compared with agar medium-passaged strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchta, J M; States, S J; McGlaughlin, J E; Overmeyer, J H; Wadowsky, R M; McNamara, A M; Wolford, R S; Yee, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bacteria maintained in a low-nutrient "natural" environment such as swimming pool water are much more resistant to disinfection by various chemical agents than strains maintained on rich media. In the present study a comparison was made of the chlorine (Cl2) susceptibility of hot-water tank isolates of Legionella pneumophila maintained in tap water and strains passaged on either nonselective buffered charcoal-yeast extract or selective differential glycine-vancomycin-polymyxin agar medium. Our earlier work has shown that environmental and clinical isolates of L. pneumophila maintained on agar medium are much more resistant to Cl2 than coliforms are. Under the present experimental conditions (21 degrees C, pH 7.6 to 8.0, and 0.25 mg of free residual Cl2 per liter, we found the tap water-maintained L. pneumophila strains to be even more resistant than the agar-passaged isolates. Under these conditions, 99% kill of tap water-maintained strains of L. pneumophila was usually achieved within 60 to 90 min compared with 10 min for agar-passaged strains. Samples from plumbing fixtures in a hospital yielded legionellae which were "super"-chlorine resistant when assayed under natural conditions. After one agar passage their resistance dropped to levels of comparable strains which had not been previously exposed to additional chlorination. These studies more closely approximate natural conditions than our previous work and show that tap water-maintained L. pneumophila is even more resistant to Cl2 than its already resistant agar medium-passaged counterpart. PMID:3896142

  13. Enhanced chlorine resistance of tap water-adapted Legionella pneumophila as compared with agar medium-passaged strains.

    PubMed

    Kuchta, J M; States, S J; McGlaughlin, J E; Overmeyer, J H; Wadowsky, R M; McNamara, A M; Wolford, R S; Yee, R B

    1985-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bacteria maintained in a low-nutrient "natural" environment such as swimming pool water are much more resistant to disinfection by various chemical agents than strains maintained on rich media. In the present study a comparison was made of the chlorine (Cl2) susceptibility of hot-water tank isolates of Legionella pneumophila maintained in tap water and strains passaged on either nonselective buffered charcoal-yeast extract or selective differential glycine-vancomycin-polymyxin agar medium. Our earlier work has shown that environmental and clinical isolates of L. pneumophila maintained on agar medium are much more resistant to Cl2 than coliforms are. Under the present experimental conditions (21 degrees C, pH 7.6 to 8.0, and 0.25 mg of free residual Cl2 per liter, we found the tap water-maintained L. pneumophila strains to be even more resistant than the agar-passaged isolates. Under these conditions, 99% kill of tap water-maintained strains of L. pneumophila was usually achieved within 60 to 90 min compared with 10 min for agar-passaged strains. Samples from plumbing fixtures in a hospital yielded legionellae which were "super"-chlorine resistant when assayed under natural conditions. After one agar passage their resistance dropped to levels of comparable strains which had not been previously exposed to additional chlorination. These studies more closely approximate natural conditions than our previous work and show that tap water-maintained L. pneumophila is even more resistant to Cl2 than its already resistant agar medium-passaged counterpart.

  14. Detection of group D salmonellae including Salmonella Enteritidis in eggs by polymyxin-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Blais, Burton W; Martinez-Perez, Amalia

    2008-02-01

    A high-throughput, rapid method was devised for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg products. For each target organism, preenrichment in nutrient broth was followed by selective enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis soya peptone and tetrathionate brilliant green broths or by plating on modified semisolid Rappaport Vassiliadis (MSRV) agar medium. The presence of Salmonella Enteritidis was determined by subjecting portions of the selective broth cultures or swarming growth on MSRV medium to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedure using polymyxin immobilized in the wells of a microtiter plate as a high-affinity adsorbent for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sample extracts were reacted with polymyxin-coated microwells, and captured LPS antigens were detected immunoenzymatically with a commercially available Salmonella factor O9-specific antibody. The polymyxin-ELISA was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for Salmonella strains bearing the O9 antigen. When the ELISA was combined with enrichment using either the selective broths or plating on MSRV medium, the system was an effective means for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in artificially inoculated egg products. The polymyxin-ELISA is a simple and inexpensive assay for group D salmonellae (including Salmonella Enteritidis) in a convenient 96-well microtiter plate format, making this system ideally suited for processing large numbers of samples.

  15. Detection of Clarithromycin-Resistant Helicobacter pylori Strains by a Preferential Homoduplex Formation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Matsunaga, Hironari; Ogura, Keiji; Kawamata, Osamu; Shiratori, Yasushi; Omata, Masao

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that resistance to clarithromycin, a major cause of failure in Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy, is associated with point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. We sought to apply the preferential homoduplex formation assay (PHFA), a novel technique for the efficient detection of point mutations, to detection of the mutations. PHFA was performed on streptavidin-coated microtiter plates with biotin- and dinitrophenyl-labeled amplicons to detect the wild-type gene or each mutant gene. DNA samples were extracted from gastric juice specimens of 412 patients with H. pylori infection and were applied to the assay. The detection threshold of PHFA was as few as 10 gene copies. The sensitivity of PHFA for the detection of H. pylori infection was higher than those of culture and the rapid urease test. A total of 337 (81.8%) samples had the wild-type gene, 38 (9.2%) had the A2144G mutation, and 37 (9.0%) contained both the wild type and a mutation (A2144G in 30 samples, A2143G in 5 samples, and A2143G plus A2144G in 2 samples). About half the strains isolated from patients with mixed infection were susceptible by the agar dilution method (MIC, <0.1 mg/liter). Therefore, PHFA can detect clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori strains, even in patients with mixed infections with the wild type, that are not detectable by the agar dilution method. PMID:10618089

  16. Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) poisoning, case report and review.

    PubMed

    Satora, Leszek; Pach, Dorota; Butryn, Beata; Hydzik, Piotr; Balicka-Slusarczyk, Barbara

    2005-06-01

    Gathering and eating mushrooms and other plants containing psychoactive substances has become increasingly popular among young people experimenting with drugs. Dried fly agaric Amanita muscaria fruiting bodies were eaten by five young persons (18-21 years of age) at a party in order to evoke hallucinations. Visual and auditory hallucinations occurred in four of them, whereas a 18-year-old girl lost consciousness. The following morning, she went to the Clinic of Toxicology. Due to the fact that not all the active substances present in the fly agaric have been identified, and some of them have an effect after a period of latency, the patient was admitted for several days of observation during which check-up examinations were performed. After four days without any problems, she was discharged. The poisoning regressed with no organ complications. The remaining persons who had eaten the fly agaric were free from any complaints.

  17. Differentiation of fluorescent pseudomonads by their effect on milk agar.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, M T; Falkiner, F R; Hardy, R; Keane, C T

    1979-08-01

    Eighty-six clinical isolates of fluorescent pseudomonads that did not produce pyocyanin on Diagnostic Sensitivity Test Agar or Cetrimide Agar were identified on the basis of their antibiotic sensitivity, production of pigment on King's "A" medium, growth at 42 degrees C, production of lecithinase and hydrolysis of gelatin. The identity of the strains was confirmed in tests with the ammonium salt sugars ethanol, glucose and mannitol. These tests were adequate for distinguishing between the three important fluorescent pseudomonads. The detection of casein hydrolysis on milk agar was assessed as a rapid method of distinguishing P. aeruginosa from the other species of fluorescent pseudomonads but proved unhelpful when compared with, or included in, a small set of tests. Most strains of P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens hydrolysed casein.

  18. A high-throughput screening assay to identify bacterial antagonists against Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-López, Alejandro Miguel; Cordero-Ramírez, Jesús Damián; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    A high-throughput antagonistic assay was developed to screen for bacterial isolates capable of controlling the maize fungal phytopathogen Fusarium verticillioides. This assay combines a straightforward methodology, in which the fungus is challenged with bacterial isolates in liquid medium, with a novel approach that uses the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) coupled to a fluorophore (Alexa-Fluor® 488) under the commercial name of WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. The assay is performed in a 96-well plate format, which reduces the required laboratory space and streamlines quantitation and automation of the process, making it fast and accurate. The basis of our assay is that fungal biomass can be assessed by WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate staining, which recognizes the chitin in the fungal cell wall and thus permits the identification of potential antagonistic bacteria that inhibit fungal growth. This principle was validated by chitin-competition binding assays against WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate; confocal laser microscopy confirmed that the fluorescent WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate binds to the chitin of the fungal cell wall. The majority of bacterial isolates did not bind to the WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. Furthermore, including washing steps significantly reduced any bacterial staining to background levels, even in the rare cases where bacterial isolates were capable of binding to WGA. Confirmatory conventional agar plate antagonistic assays were also conducted to validate our technique. We are now successfully employing this large-scale antagonistic assay as a pre-screening step for potential fungal antagonists in extensive bacteria collections (on the order of thousands of isolates).

  19. A new chromogenic agar medium, chromID VRE, to screen for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Tibbetts, Robert J; Dunne, William M

    2007-12-01

    We compared the performance of a chromogenic agar medium chromID VRE (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Etoile, France) designed to recover and identify vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) from clinical specimens with bile esculin azide vancomycin (BEAV) agar. For this study, 120 stool specimens were plated on chromID VRE and BEAV and examined after 24 and 48 h. At 24 h, the sensitivity and specificity were as follows: BEAV, 90.2% and 73%, respectively; chromID VRE, 86.3% and 100.0%, respectively. Furthermore, we determined that the sensitivity and specificity of chromID VRE for Enterococcus faecium were 85.4% and 100%, respectively, and for Enterococcus faecalis, 90% and 100%, respectively. We conclude that chromID VRE provides an equivalent sensitivity for the recovery of VRE from stool specimens, with improved specificity, and the added advantage of providing differentiation between vancomycin-resistant E. faecium and E. faecalis.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of the Cepheid GeneXpert vanA/vanB assay ver. 1.0 to detect the vanA and vanB vancomycin resistance genes in Enterococcus from perianal specimens.

    PubMed

    Marner, Erin S; Wolk, Donna M; Carr, Jeanne; Hewitt, Carolyn; Dominguez, Lorraine L; Kovacs, Thomas; Johnson, Desiree R; Hayden, Randall T

    2011-04-01

    Rapid detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) carriers could be useful to health care facilities to minimize transmission. To that end, we compared the performance of the Cepheid GeneXpert vanA/vanB assay with that of direct and broth-enriched culture methods for detection of VRE from perianal swabs. Enterococci were cultivated on Enterococcosel™ agar with 8 μg/mL vancomycin, Bile Esculin Azide Agar with 6 μg/mL vancomycin, and Bile Esculin Azide Enterococcosel Broth. Compared to the reference standard (combination of direct agar plating, broth-enriched culture, and clinical chart review), the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the vanA/vanB assay were 96.4%, 93.0%, 92.0%, and 96.9%, respectively (n=184). The 95% limit of detection was 100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL for vanA and 114 CFU/mL for vanB. In summary, the GeneXpert vanA/vanB assay is a rapid and accurate method to identify vanA/vanB-colonized patients for VRE screening programs that use perianal swab specimens.

  1. Method for Measuring Changes in Surface Tension on Agar

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, David S.; Dworkin, Martin

    1983-01-01

    The surface tension of agar surfaces was determined by measuring the contact angles formed by drops of various hydrophobic liquids on the surface and then calculating the composite surface free energy function by solving a series of simultaneous equations derived from these data. This method was used to measure the change in the surface tension of agar produced by the addition of various concentrations of albumin. The resulting curve was typical of the effect of increasing concentrations of surfactants on surface tension. The method was compared with other methods of determining surface tension of solids, and it was concluded that the technique used here provided the most reliable results. PMID:16346273

  2. Evaluation of a new chromogenic agar medium for Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi; Teramura, Hajime; Kashida, Mitsuaki; Kodaka, Hidemasa

    2013-01-01

    Spoilage of fruit juices by a thermoacidophilic spore-forming bacterium, Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, is a big problem for fruit juice industries worldwide. We have developed a novel chromogenic selective agar medium (EAATSM) for the isolation and enumeration of A. acidoterrestris. A. acidoterrestris strains appeared as blue colonies on the EAATSM. Other Alicyclobacillus strains appeared as white colonies or were inhibited. A study comparing EAATSM and YSG agar was carried out using artificially contaminated samples of 50 fruit juice products. The correlation coefficient between EAATSM and YSG was 0.991.

  3. Lysine-iron agar in the detection of Arizona cultures.

    PubMed

    EDWARDS, P R; FIFE, M A

    1961-11-01

    A lysine-iron agar is described and recommended for the detection of Arizona strains which ferment lactose rapidly. Black colonies which appear on bismuth sulfite agar should be transferred to the medium. Salmonellae and Arizona cultures produce a distinctive reaction since they are the only recognized groups of enteric bacteria which regularly produce lysine decarboxylase rapidly and form large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Use of the medium is particularly recommended in the examination of specimens from enteric infections in which shigellae and salmonellae are not detected.

  4. Activity of two strobilurin fungicides against three species of decay fungi in agar plate tests

    Treesearch

    Juliet D. Tang; Tina Ciaramitaro; Maria Tomaso-Peterson; Susan V. Diehl

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity of strobilurin fungicides against wood decay fungi in order to assess their potential to act as a co-biocide for copper-based wood protection. Two strobilurin fungicides, Heritage (50% azoxystrobin active ingredient) and Insignia (20% pyraclostrobin active ingredients), and copper sulfate pentahydrate were tested...

  5. Abolition of Swarming of Proteus by p-Nitrophenyl Glycerin: Application to Blood Agar Media

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fred D.

    1973-01-01

    Comparative plate counts were made of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes growing on blood agar supplemented with individual chemicals to abolish the swarming of Proteus. B-phenylethanol, sodium azide, and p-nitrophenyl glycerin (PNPG) were used as anti-swarm agents. Each anti-swarm agent effectively abolished swarming for 24 h, but azide failed to control swarming for longer periods of incubation. In addition, azide displayed growth inhibition towards the staphylococci and streptococci resulting in no hemolysis and reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci. Phenylethanol showed reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci and unreliable hemolytic reactions. At 0.1 to 0.3 mM, PNPG proved to be a superior anti-swarm agent in that it showed no growth inhibition and allowed normal hemolysis, but abolished swarming for extended periods of time. When laboratory strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Listeria monocytogenes, and Vibrio cholerae were screened on a blood agar medium containing 0.1 mm PNPG, they displayed similar growth and hemolytic characteristics to the identical medium without PNPG. PMID:4715553

  6. Qualitative and Quantitative Assays of Transposition and Homologous Recombination of the Retrotransposon Tf1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sangesland, Maya; Atwood-Moore, Angela; Rai, Sudhir K; Levin, Henry L

    2016-01-01

    Transposition and homologous recombination assays are valuable genetic tools to measure the production and integration of cDNA from the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon Tf1 in the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Here we describe two genetic assays, one that measures the transposition activity of Tf1 by monitoring the mobility of a drug resistance marked Tf1 element expressed from a multi-copy plasmid and another assay that measures homologous recombination between Tf1 cDNA and the expression plasmid. While the transposition assay measures insertion of full-length Tf1 cDNA mediated by the transposon integrase, the homologous recombination assay measures levels of cDNA present in the nucleus and is independent of integrase activity. Combined, these assays can be used to systematically screen large collections of strains to identify mutations that specifically inhibit the integration step in the retroelement life cycle. Such mutations can be identified because they reduce transposition activity but nevertheless have wild-type frequencies of homologous recombination. Qualitative assays of yeast patches on agar plates detect large defects in integration and recombination, while the quantitative approach provides a precise method of determining integration and recombination frequencies.

  7. Agar disk diffusion (Bauer-Kirby) tests with various fastidious and nonfastidious reference (ATCC) strains: comparison of several agar media.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H; Leonhard, B

    1994-01-01

    Several agar media (Mueller-Hinton agar, MHA; diagnostic sensitivity test agar, DSTA; Schaedler agar, SchA; Todd-Hewitt agar with added yeast extract, THYA; Wilkins-Chalgren agar, WCA) were compared using the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test against six nonfastidious quality control strains: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and ATCC 29213, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and ATCC 35218, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. MHA, DSTA, and THYA yielded essentially comparable inhibition zones. However, WCA and SchA antagonized cotrimoxazole and aminoglycoside antibiotics; furthermore, SchA antagonized polymyxin B, and both WCA and SchA antagonized imipenem against the P. aeruginosa strain, but not against the E. coli strains. Sheep blood-MHA (Bl-MHA), WCA, THYA, and DSTA were examined with Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 13813, and Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 6306. In comparison with Bl-MHA, both WCA and THYA yielded comparable inhibition zones against S. pyogenes; DSTA afforded suboptimal growth. DSTA yielded larger inhibition zones with the majority of antimicrobial drugs against S. agalactiae, whereas WCA and THYA enhanced the activity of oxacillin and penicillin G against this strain. S. pneumoniae strain ATCC 6306 grew well on Bl-MHA, yielded suboptimal growth on WCA and faint growth on THYA, and failed to grow on DSTA. Chocolate-supplemented sheep blood-MHA (CHOC-MHA) was compared with Haemophilus test medium (HTM), WCA with added NAD, and THYA with added hematin and NAD against Haemophilus influenzae strains ATCC 35056 and ATCC 49247. The activities of doxycycline and rifampin were enhanced against both strains by HTM, WCA+NAD, and THYA+hematin+NAD. Only WCA+NAD antagonized cotrimoxazole against both H. influenzae strains, an effect due to thymidine; however, HTM antagonized cotrimoxazole against S. aureus ATCC 25923 and E. coli ATCC 25922. It was concluded that Bl-MHA performed best for

  8. Microtiter Assay for Detecting Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori with Surface Gangliosides Which Bind Cholera Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Sack, David A.; Lastovica, Albert J.; Chang, Sunny H.; Pazzaglia, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni with Gm1 ganglioside in the core of its lipopolysaccharide has been associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome. Since this epitope may be of considerable pathophysiologic importance and since this ganglioside binds cholera toxin, a rapid screening assay to detect bacteria that bind cholera toxin as an indication of Gm1 on their surfaces was developed. In the assay, bacterial lawns were grown on agar plates, harvested with phosphate-buffered saline, boiled, and incubated with a standard concentration of cholera B subunit. Preparations from strains with Gm1 were observed to inhibit the binding of cholera B subunit to Gm1 in a microtiter enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. By using this assay with two groups of strains, 37 positive strains were detected among the 197 tested. Species with positive isolates included C. jejuni, Campylobacter coli, and Helicobacter pylori. The assay is capable of testing large numbers of isolates and should prove useful in future clinical and epidemiological studies of bacteria with this epitope. PMID:9650959

  9. Comparison of most probable number and pour plate procedures for isolation and enumeration of sulphite-reducing Clostridium spores and group D faecal streptococci from oysters.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, T J; West, P A

    1987-05-01

    A comparative study of methods to enumerate sulphite-reducing Clostridium spores and Group D faecal streptococci in oysters demonstrated that pour plate solid agar techniques gave higher counts than liquid broth most probable number procedures. Reinforced clostridial broth with supplements to detect sulphite reduction was compared with pour plates of egg yolk-free tryptose sulphite cycloserine agar incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Azide dextrose broth was compared with pour plates using Slanetz and Bartley (SB) agar or KF-streptococcus agar at 37 degrees C. Most probable number procedures used for both groups of organisms gave excessive numbers of improbable tube combinations. For enumeration of Group D faecal streptococci, a pour plate technique using SB agar incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 h is recommended.

  10. Maintenance of Helicobacter pylori Cultures in Agar Stabs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinghua; Czinn, Steven J.; Blanchard, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori requires frequent passage at 37 °C with reduced oxygen tension to maintain viability, and recovery from frozen stocks can be unpredictable and slow. Agar stab cultures were assessed as a possible means of maintaining viability without the need to passage every 4–7 days. Materials and Methods Agar stabs prepared from either Brucella or Brain Heart Infusion media were inoculated deeply with H. pylori strains or H. felis and grown under varying conditions for up to 13 weeks. Subcultures were prepared from these stabs at various intervals to test for viability. Results Established cultures in agar stabs failed to survive at room temperature but did survive at 37 °C with 10% CO2 for up to 56 days. H. felis remained viable for up to 28 days. No difference was observed between the two media formulations. Conclusion H. pylori grown in agar stabs remains viable for prolonged periods of time without the need to subculture and may represent an improved method for storing H. pylori for infrequent use. PMID:21083755

  11. Growth kinetics of three species of Tetrahymena on solid agar

    SciTech Connect

    Dobra, K.W.; McArdle, E.W.; Ehret, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    A nutrient-agar method without liquid overlay has been developed for cultivation of ciliates. Three species of Tetrahymena-T. pyriformis strain W, T. rostrata strain UNI, and T. vorax strain V/sub 2/S, representing the 3 main groups of Tetrahymena species, were used; however the method should apply to other ciliates. Growth on the surface of the agar was facilitated by an optimal surface-to-volume ratio yielding a high density of ciliates and short generation times. At the highest density achieved, the cells became irregularly hexagonal and formed a monolayer tissue on the agar. Ciliates grown on agar were like those in liquid culture, typical oral ciliature, food-vacuole formation, and typical cortical patterns being retained. Advantages of this method include high cell density, easy recovery, and optimal O/sub 2/ supply. The organisms can also be cultivated on the surface of sterile cellulose-nitrate filters, facilitating in situ fixation and staining as well as transfer into different media by transfer of filters with cells, without prior centrifugation and resuspension.

  12. An improved agar medium for growth of Geobacillus thermoglucosidarius strains.

    PubMed

    Javed, M; Baghaei-Yazdi, N; Qin, W; Amartey, S

    2017-01-01

    Geobacillus species have potential applications in many biotechnological processes. They are fastidious in their vitamin and amino acid requirements. A new semi-defined agar medium (SDM) was developed which gave consistently high viable cell counts of various G. thermoglucosidasius strains (5×10(8)-6×10(8)cfu/ml) under aerobic conditions at 70°C.

  13. Internal structure and thermo-viscoelastic properties of agar ionogels.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R; Aswal, V K; Kohlbrecher, J; Bohidar, H B

    2015-12-10

    Ionic liquids (IL) can alter the physical properties of agar hydrogels. Rheology studies show that gels with wide range of storage moduli (gel strength) G0 values ranging from 1 to 20 KPa could be made in imidazolium based IL solutions where the IL concentration may not exceed 5% (w/v). Gelation and gel melting temperatures (tgel and Tm) could be altered by as much as ≈ 10 °C. Small angle neutron scattering studies revealed the presence of fibre bundles of agar double helices having typical length of 120 nm that increased to ≈ 180 nm under favorable conditions. These structures gain flexibility from the cladding of the agar bundles by IL molecules which in turn caused partial charge neutralization of its surface. Raman spectroscopy revealed differential hydration of these bundles. It was found that IL molecules with longer alkyl chain (more hydrophobic) altered the gel homogeneity, and changed its thermal and mechanical properties significantly. Therefore, customization of agar hydrogels in green solvent medium (IL solutions) widens the scope of its application potential that may include sensing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  15. [Modification of the lysine-iron agar (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wauters, G

    1975-12-01

    The addition of L-phenylalanine to the lysine-iron agar described by Edwards and Fife ]1] allows a more valuable screening of the Proteus group based on its deamination properties. Some minor modifications of the indicator and thiosulfate content lead to improve and earlier recording of the results.

  16. Morphometric and colorimetric analyses of human tumor cell line growth and drug sensitivity in soft agar culture.

    PubMed

    Alley, M C; Pacula-Cox, C M; Hursey, M L; Rubinstein, L R; Boyd, M R

    1991-02-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated the suitability of image analysis of tetrazolium-stained colonies to assess growth and drug sensitivity of human tumor cells cultivated in soft agar culture. In the present study, the potential utility of colorimetric analysis to expedite experimental drug evaluations using human tumor cell lines was investigated. The same culture dishes were assessed by image analysis and by formazan colorimetry for purposes of comparing multiple methods of measuring growth as well as growth inhibition. Replicate cultures treated with 2-(p-iodonitrophenyl)-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide exhibited nearly identical colony count and volume indices as well as excellent correlation in colorimetric end points. Colony-forming unit volume analysis versus colorimetric assessment of the same cultures following dimethyl sulfoxide extraction of protamine sulfate-rinsed, dried soft agar cultures exhibited excellent linear correlation for both growth (Pearson r ranging from 0.95 to 1.00) and drug sensitivity (Pearson r ranging from 0.90 to 0.99, and Spearman r ranging from 0.82 to 0.97) and similar drug sensitivity profiles. Results of the current investigation indicate that end points of soft agar culture remain stable for a period of at least 2 weeks following assay termination. In addition, a colorimetric detection range of 1.3-2.2 log units permits determinations of survival levels ranging from 100 to 5% of respective control levels. Colorimetric analysis is anticipated to expedite soft agar colony formation assay evaluations (a) by reducing the need to use the more rigorous and time-consuming image analysis procedures to measure activity in preliminary drug sensitivity assays and (b) by permitting the determination of effective concentration ranges of new experimental agents for subsequent, more detailed investigations.

  17. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITIES FROM WATER-DAMAGED CEILING TILE MATERIAL FOLLOWING INCUBATION ON BLOOD AGAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of ceiling tiles with high levels of bacteria exhibited cytotoxic activities on a HEP-2 tissue culture assay. Ceiling tiles containing low levels of bacterial colonization did not show cytotoxic activities on the HEP-2 tissue culture assay. Using a spread plate procedure ...

  18. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITIES FROM WATER-DAMAGED CEILING TILE MATERIAL FOLLOWING INCUBATION ON BLOOD AGAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of ceiling tiles with high levels of bacteria exhibited cytotoxic activities on a HEP-2 tissue culture assay. Ceiling tiles containing low levels of bacterial colonization did not show cytotoxic activities on the HEP-2 tissue culture assay. Using a spread plate procedure ...

  19. Peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babecki, A. J. (Inventor); Haehner, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A process for metal plating which comprises spraying a mixture of metallic powder and small peening particles at high velocity against a surface is described. The velocity must be sufficient to impact and bond metallic powder onto the surface. In the case of metal surfaces, the process has as one of its advantages providing mechanical working (hardening) of the surface simultaneously with the metal plating.

  20. Direct identification and recognition of yeast species from clinical material by using albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida plates.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, C; Freydiere, A M; Gille, Y

    1996-01-01

    Two chromogenic media, Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates, were compared with a reference medium, Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar, and standard methods for the identification of yeast species. This study involved 951 clinical specimens. The detection rates for the two chromogenic media for polymicrobial specimens were 20% higher than that for the Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar plates. The rates of identification of Candida albicans for Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates were, respectively, 37.0 and 6.0% after 24 h of incubation and 93.6 and 92.2% after 72 h of incubation, with specificities of 99.8 and 100%. Furthermore, CHROMagar Candida plates identified 13 of 14 Candida tropicalis and 9 of 12 Candida krusei strains after 48 h of incubation. PMID:8789038

  1. Thermal-induced ageing of agar solutions: impact on the structural and mechanical properties of agar gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bosi; Bentaleb, Ahmed; Louerat, Frédéric; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    Numerous hydrogels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature, aqueous polymer solutions brought to a boil. Although the incubation time of the polymer solution at such a high temperature could be used as a tuning parameter, its impact on the subsequent gelation has been poorly investigated. Here we study the effect of prolonged heating at 80°C on a 1.5% wt solution of agar, a natural polysaccharide. The incubation time is varied from a few hours up to five days. We show that the agar sol. continuously degrades as the result of both the hydrolysis and the intermolecular oxidation of the polymer chains. Furthermore, electronic microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments reveal that gels formed from older agar sols display an increasingly coarser microstructure composed of micron-sized aggregated pieces of polysaccharides, in contrast with the fibrous-like structure of gels made from fresh sols. Along with structural changes prolonged incubation time leads to weaker gels of lower shear elastic modulus. Finally, macro-indentation experiments coupled to direct visualization show that increasing the incubation time of the agar sol. decreases the yield strain of the gel by a factor of three, while the rupture scenario turns continuously from brittle to ductile-like. Acknowledging funding from BioMérieux & CNRS.

  2. Responses of the L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. V: 27 coded chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.G.; Howgate, S.; McBride, D.; Riach, C. ); Caspary, W.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk{sup +}/tk{sup {minus}} mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 {mu}g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Statistically significant responses were obtained with acid orange 10, aniline, benzaldehyde o-chloroaniline, chlorodibromomethane, cytembena, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromomethyl) cyclohexane, dieldrin, lithocholic acid, oxytetracycline, phenazopyridine HCl, 1phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, solvent yellow 14, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate. Apart from phenazopyridine HCl, acid orange 10, and solvent yellow 14, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the mutagenic activity of these compounds.

  3. Comparison of dry sheet media and conventional agar media methods for enumerating yeasts and molds in food.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, L R; Mann, David A; Gurtler, Joshua B

    2007-11-01

    A study was done to compare Nissui Compact Dry Yeast and Mold plates (CDYM), 3M Petrifilm Yeast and Mold count plates (PYM), dichloran-rose bengal chloramphenicol (DRBC) agar, and dichloran 18% glycerol (DG18) agar for enumerating yeasts and molds naturally occurring in 97 foods (grains, legumes, raw fruits and vegetables, nuts, dairy products, meats, and miscellaneous processed foods and dry mixes). Correlation coefficients for plates incubated for 5 days were DG18 versus DRBC (0.93), PYM versus DRBC (0.81), CDYM versus DG18 (0.81), PYM versus DG18 (0.80), CDYM versus DRBC (0.79), and CDYM versus PYM (0.75). The number of yeasts and molds recovered from a group of foods (n = 32) analyzed on a weight basis (CFU per gram) was not significantly different (alpha = 0.05) when samples were plated on DRBC, DG18, PYM, or CDYM. However, the order of recovery from foods (n = 65) in a group analyzed on a unit or piece basis, or a composite of both groups (n = 97), was DRBC > DG18 = CDYM > PYM. Compared with PYM, CDYM recovered equivalent, significantly higher (alpha = 0.05) or significantly lower (alpha = 0.05) numbers of yeasts and molds in 51.5, 27.8, and 20.6%, respectively, of the 97 foods tested; respective values were 68.8, 15.6, and 15.6% in the small group (n = 32) and 43.1, 33.8, and 23.1% in the large group (n = 65) of foods. The two groups contained different types of foods, the latter consisting largely (73.8%) of raw fruits (n = 16) and vegetables (n = 32). Differences in efficacy of the four methods in recovering yeasts and molds from foods in the two groups are attributed in part to differences in genera and predominant mycoflora. While DG18 agar, CDYM, and PYM appear to be acceptable for enumerating yeasts and molds in the foods analyzed in this study, overall, DRBC agar recovered higher numbers from the 97 test foods, thereby supporting its recommended use as a general purpose medium for mycological analysis.

  4. Using the overlay assay to qualitatively measure bacterial production of and sensitivity to pneumococcal bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Maricic, Natalie; Dawid, Suzanne

    2014-09-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the highly diverse polymicrobial community of the nasopharynx where it must compete with resident organisms. We have shown that bacterially produced antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) dictate the outcome of these competitive interactions. All fully-sequenced pneumococcal strains harbor a bacteriocin-like peptide (blp) locus. The blp locus encodes for a range of diverse bacteriocins and all of the highly conserved components needed for their regulation, processing, and secretion. The diversity of the bacteriocins found in the bacteriocin immunity region (BIR) of the locus is a major contributor of pneumococcal competition. Along with the bacteriocins, immunity genes are found in the BIR and are needed to protect the producer cell from the effects of its own bacteriocin. The overlay assay is a quick method for examining a large number of strains for competitive interactions mediated by bacteriocins. The overlay assay also allows for the characterization of bacteriocin-specific immunity, and detection of secreted quorum sensing peptides. The assay is performed by pre-inoculating an agar plate with a strain to be tested for bacteriocin production followed by application of a soft agar overlay containing a strain to be tested for bacteriocin sensitivity. A zone of clearance surrounding the stab indicates that the overlay strain is sensitive to the bacteriocins produced by the pre-inoculated strain. If no zone of clearance is observed, either the overlay strain is immune to the bacteriocins being produced or the pre-inoculated strain does not produce bacteriocins. To determine if the blp locus is functional in a given strain, the overlay assay can be adapted to evaluate for peptide pheromone secretion by the pre-inoculated strain. In this case, a series of four lacZ-reporter strains with different pheromone specificity are used in the overlay.

  5. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J. David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days—about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU—fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  6. A comparison of antibiotic disks from different sources on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar media in evaluation of antibacterial susceptibility testing

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Neda; Salmanzadeh-Ahrabi, Siavosh; Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Rezaei-Hemami, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Antibacterial susceptibility testing of clinical bacterial isolates through disk diffusion method plays a major role in antibacterial treatment. One of the main factors affecting the result of these tests is the type, structure and quality of the disks. The main objective of this study was to compare the agreement of antibiotic disks originated from three companies on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar. Materials and Methods: Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar media were used in disk diffusion method. Seventy clinical isolates from Enterobacteriaceae family (21 Klebsiella spp., 36 Escherichia coli, 1 Enterobacter spp. and 12 Shigella spp.) were investigated in the study. After obtaining data, the results were interpreted as resistant, sensitive or intermediate. Kappa coefficient measured the agreement of two media. Coefficient of variation (CV) was also calculated for antibiotic disks. Results: The kappa agreement values for three types of antibiotic disks on Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar plates were good or excellent for all the examined antibiotics. CV values were also very satisfactory in the majority of cases. Conclusion: Antibiotic disks from three manufacturers can successfully be used on both Quicolor and Mueller-Hinton agar plates. PMID:28149489

  7. Isolation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli from fresh produce using STEC heart infusion washed blood agar with mitomycin-C.

    PubMed

    Lin, Andrew; Nguyen, Lam; Clotilde, Laurie M; Kase, Julie A; Son, Insook; Lauzon, Carol R

    2012-11-01

    The ability to detect and isolate Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) remains a major challenge for food microbiologists. Although methods based on nucleic acids and antibodies have improved detection of STECs in foods, isolation of these bacteria remains arduous. STEC isolation is necessary for matching food, environmental, and clinical isolates during outbreak investigations and for distinguishing between pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms. STEC heart infusion washed blood agar with mitomycin-C (SHIBAM) is a modification of washed sheep blood agar prepared by adding mitomycin-C and optimizing both the washed blood and base agar to better isolate STECs. Most STEC isolates produce a zone of hemolysis on SHIBAM plates and are easily distinguishable from background microbiota. Here, we present data supporting the use of SHIBAM to isolate STECs from fresh produce. SHIBAM was tested for accuracy in identifying STECs (365 of 410 STEC strains were hemolytic, and 63 of 73 E. coli strains that did not produce Shiga toxin were not hemolytic) and for recovery from artificially inoculated fresh produce (11 of 24 romaine lettuce samples and 6 of 24 tomato samples). STEC recovery with SHIBAM agar was greatly improved when compared with recovery on Levine's eosin-methylene blue agar as a reference method.

  8. Serum Sulfonamide Concentration After Oral Administration: Comparison of Results of Chemical Assay with Two Bioassay Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Harris A.; Barza, Michael; Weinstein, Louis

    1972-01-01

    Sulfonamide concentrations were studied in 210 serum samples from 10 volunteers after ingestion of sulfacytine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfadiazine. Results obtained by chemical assay were compared with bioassay values determined by two techniques: twofold broth dilution and agar diffusion. Although the correlation for individual samples was rather poor for the twofold broth-dilution method, the agar-diffusion bioassay correlated well with chemical determinations. The agar-diffusion assay tended to “underread” the chemical assay by an amount characteristic of each drug. PMID:5045472

  9. Mechanical touch responses of Arabidopsis TCH1-3 mutant roots on inclined hard-agar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Guodong; Wang, Bochu; Liu, Junyu; Yan, Jie; Zhu, Liqing; Yang, Xingyan

    2016-01-01

    The gravity-induced mechanical touch stimulus can affect plant root architecture. Mechanical touch responses of plant roots are an important aspect of plant root growth and development. Previous studies have reported that Arabidopsis TCH1-3 genes are involved in mechano-related events, how-ever, the physiological functions of TCH1-3 genes in Arabidopsis root mechanoresponses remain unclear. In the present study, we applied an inclined hard agar plate method to produce mechanical touch stimulus, and provided evidence that altered mechanical environment could influence root growth. Furthermore, tch1-3 Arabidopsis mutants were investigated on inclined agar surfaces to explore the functions of TCH1-3 genes on Arabidopsis root mechanoresponses. The results showed that two tch2 mutants, cml24-2 and cml24-4, exhibited significantly reduced root length, biased skewing, and decreased density of lateral root. In addition, primary root length and density of lateral root of tch3 (cml12-2) was significantly decreased on inclined agar surfaces. This study indicates that the tch2 and tch3 mutants are hypersensitive to mechanical touch stimulus, and TCH2 (CML24-2 and CML24-4) and TCH3 (CML12-2) genes may participate in the mechanical touch response of Arabidopsis roots.

  10. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Philipp A; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R; Ideker, Trey

    2015-08-15

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments

    PubMed Central

    McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R.

    2015-01-01

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  12. Comparison of dosimetry gels prepared by agar and bovine gelatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sağsöz, M. E.; Korkut, Ö.; Alemdar, N.; Aktaş, S.; Çalı, E. B.; Kantarcı, M.

    2016-04-01

    Gel dosimeters are unique materials capable of showing three dimensional (3D) dose distributions of therapeutic or diagnostic exposures. Fricke gel dosimeters can be considered as chemical dosimeters that rely on a radiation-induced chemical reaction. Dose distribution of Fricke solutions containing Fe+2 ions determines the transformation of acidic, oxygen saturated Fe+2 ions to Fe+3 ions by the ionizing radiation in aqueous solutions. In this study we produced two different types of gel dosimeters using agar and bovine gelatin with similar fabrication methods. We compared the magnetic resonance (MR) T1 imaging responses of these two gel dosimeters to acquire a dose dependency of MR intensities. In conclusion agar gel dosimeters found to be produced easily and more consistent.

  13. Anomalous spreading with Marangoni flow on agar gel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Chida, Shigeki; Seino, Eri; Mayama, Hiroyuki

    2012-02-28

    We have experimentally observed anomalous spreading of aqueous alcohol solutions on flat and rough fractal agar gel surfaces. On flat agar gel surfaces, extremely fast spreading [θ(D)(t) ∝ t(-0.92)] that differs from Tanner's law [θ(D)(t) ∝ t(-0.3)] was observed when the liquid contained over 9 wt % of 1-propanol in which strong Marangoni flow was observed as a fluctuation on the liquid surface. However, on fractal gel surfaces, different spreading dynamics [θ(D)(t) ∝ t(-0.58)] were observed, although Marangoni flow still occurred. We found the surface-dependent spreading can be discussed in terms of competition between Marangoni flow and the pinning effect due to surface roughness. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  14. Agar-degrading bacteria isolated from Antarctic macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Roxana; Leiva, Sergio

    2017-03-10

    This study describes the taxonomic diversity of pigmented, agar-degrading bacteria isolated from the surface of macroalgae collected in King George Island, Antarctica. A total of 30 pigmented, agarolytic bacteria were isolated from the surface of the Antarctic macroalgae Adenocystis utricularis, Monostroma hariotii, Iridaea cordata, and Pantoneura plocamioides. Based on the 16S rRNA data, the agarolytic isolates were affiliated to the genera Algibacter, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Cellulophaga, Citricoccus, Labedella, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Salinibacterium, Sanguibacter, and Zobellia. Isolates phylogenetically related to Cellulophaga algicola showed the highest agarase activity in culture supernatants when tested at 4 and 37 °C. This is the first investigation of pigmented agar-degrading bacteria, members of microbial communities associated with Antarctic macroalgae, and the results suggest that they represent a potential source of cold-adapted agarases of possible biotechnological interest.

  15. Diagnostic assays used to control small ruminant lentiviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The serological diagnostic tests such as the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) assay and various types of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have contributed to the reduction of small ruminant lentivirus infections worldwide. Since there are no treatments or efficacious vaccines, the serolog...

  16. Correlation of Netilmicin Agar Dilution and Disk Diffusion Susceptibilities

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Donald A.; Syriopoulou, Georgia Ph.; Semple, Anne Markley

    1977-01-01

    A study of 283 isolates of gram-negative bacilli revealed a good correlation (r = −0.74) between disk diffusion zones of inhibition and agar dilution minimal inhibitory concentrations. Regression analysis suggested that strains with zone sizes ⋜11 mm should be considered resistant, but 34 of 45 strains resistant by minimal inhibitory concentration (including 27 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa) would have been called susceptible using this break point. PMID:900923

  17. A selective chromogenic agar that distinguishes Bacillus anthracis from Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Juergensmeyer, Margaret A; Gingras, Bruce A; Restaino, Lawrence; Frampton, Elon W

    2006-08-01

    A selective and differential plating medium, R & F anthracis chromogenic agar (ACA), has been developed for isolating and identifying presumptive colonies of Bacillus anthracis. ACA contains the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoxyl-choline phosphate that upon hydrolysis yields teal (blue green) colonies indicating the presence of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) activity. Among seven Bacillus species tested on ACA, only members of the Bacillus cereus group (B. anthracis, B. cereus, and B. thuringiensis) produced teal colonies (PC-PLC positive) having cream rings. Examination of colony morphology in 18 pure culture strains of B. anthracis (15 ATCC strains plus AMES-1-RIID, ANR-1, and AMED-RIID), with one exception, required 48 h at 35 to 37 degrees C for significant color production, whereas only 24 h was required for B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This differential rate of PC-PLC synthesis in B. anthracis (due to the truncated plcR gene and PlcR regulator in B. anthracis) allowed for the rapid differentiation on ACA of presumptive colonies of B. anthracis from B. cereus and B. thuringiensis in both pure and mixed cultures. Effective recovery of B. anthracis from a variety of matrices having both high (soil and sewage) and low microbial backgrounds (cloth, paper, and blood) spiked with B. anthracis ANR-1 spores suggests the probable utility of ACA plating for B. anthracis recovery in a diversity of applications.

  18. Comparison of CHROMagar Salmonella Medium and Hektoen Enteric Agar for Isolation of Salmonellae from Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gaillot, Olivier; Di Camillo, Patrick; Berche, Patrick; Courcol, René; Savage, Colette

    1999-01-01

    CHROMagar Salmonella (CAS), a new chromogenic medium, was retrospectively compared to Hektoen enteric agar (HEA) with 501 Salmonella stock isolates and was then prospectively compared to HEA for the detection and presumptive identification of Salmonella spp. with 508 stool samples before and after enrichment. All stock cultures (100%), including cultures of H2S-negative isolates, yielded typical mauve colonies on CAS, while 497 (99%) isolates produced typical lactose-negative, black-centered colonies on HEA. Following overnight incubation at 37°C, a total of 20 Salmonella strains were isolated from the 508 clinical samples. Sensitivities for primary plating and after enrichment were 95% (19 isolates) and 100% (20 isolates), respectively, for CAS and 80% (16 isolates) and 100% (20 isolates), respectively, for HEA. The specificity of CAS (88.9%) was significantly higher than that of HEA (78.5%; P < 0.0001). On the basis of its good sensitivity and specificity, CAS medium can be recommended for use for primary plating when human stool samples are screened for Salmonella spp. PMID:9986847

  19. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    PubMed

    Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech; Parafati, Lucia; Musilova, Sarka; Bunesova, Vera; Vlkova, Eva; Killer, Jiri; Mrazek, Jakub; Kmet, Vladimir; Svejstil, Roman

    2014-11-17

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is a bacterial species exclusively found in the human intestinal tract. This species is becoming increasingly popular as a probiotic organism added to lyophilized products. In this study, porcine mucin was used as the sole carbon source for the selective enumeration of B. bifidum in probiotic food additives. Thirty-six bifidobacterial strains were cultivated in broth with mucin. Only 13 strains of B. bifidum utilized the mucin to produce acids. B. bifidum was selectively enumerated in eight probiotic food supplements using agar (MM agar) containing mupirocin (100 mg/L) and mucin (20 g/L) as the sole carbon source. MM agar was fully selective if the B. bifidum species was presented together with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum species and with lactic acid bacteria (lactobacilli, streptococci). Isolated strains of B. bifidum were identified using biochemical, PCR, MALDI-TOF procedures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The novel selective medium was also suitable for the isolation of B. bifidum strains from human fecal samples.

  20. Enzymatic desulfation of the red seaweeds agar by Marinomonas arylsulfatase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyan; Duan, Delin; Fu, Xiaoting

    2016-12-01

    Agar and sulfated galactans were isolated from the red seaweeds Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis and Gelidium amansii. A previously purified arylsulfatase from Marinomonas sp. FW-1 was used to remove sulfate groups in agar and sulfated galactans. After enzymatic desulfation, the sulfate content decreased to about 0.16% and gel strength increased about two folds. Moreover, there was no difference between the DNA electrophoresis spectrum on the gel of the arylsulfatase-treated agar and that of the commercial agarose. In order to reveal the desulfation ratio and site, chemical and structural identification of sulfated galactan were carried out. G. amansii sulfated galactan with 7.4% sulfated content was composed of galactose and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose. Meanwhile, G. lemaneiformis sulfated galactan with 8.5% sulfated content was composed of galactose, 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose, 2-O-methyl-3,6-anhydro-l-galactose and xylose. Data from (13)C NMR, FT-IR, GC-MS provided evidence of sulfate groups at C-4 and C-6 of d-galactose and C-6 of l-galactose both in GRAP and GEAP. Data from GC-MS revealed that desulfation was carried out by the arylsulfatase at the sulfate bonds at C-4 and C-6 of d-galactose and C-6 of l-galactose, with a desulfation ratio of 83.4% and 86.0% against GEAP and GRAP, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-01-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (Tc) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at Tc was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL−1, and Tc was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R2 = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii. PMID:26405525

  2. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-09-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (T c) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at T c was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL(-1), and T c was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R (2) = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii.

  3. Evaluating survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in frozen and thawed apple cider: potential use of a hydrophobic grid membrane filter-SD-39 agar method.

    PubMed

    Sage, J R; Ingham, S C

    1998-04-01

    To determine the susceptibility of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to freezing and thawing in apple cider, methods that recover injured cells are needed for accurate enumeration. This study compared the ISO-GRID hydrophobic grid membrane filter (HGMF) SD-39 agar method to two other methods: a reference most probable number (MPN) method, and plating on sorbitol MacConkey agar (SMA). To determine numbers of injured cells, SMA spread plating was also compared to Trypticase soy agar (TSA) spread plating. Two strains of E. coli O157:H7 QA 326 and ATCC 43895, were inoculated into presterilized apple cider (10 ml) which was then frozen (-20 degrees C for 24 h). Samples were thawed at 4 degrees C for 4 h, or at 23 degrees C for 1.5 h, or in a microwave oven (700 W for 10 s). Substantial cell death (0.69- to 6.33 log10 CFU/ml decreases) and injury (0.70- to 2.38-log10 CFU/ml decreases) occurred during freezing and thawing. The extent of death and injury varied with strain and thawing method. The TSA spread plating method recovered the most cells while the HGMF method always recovered more viable cells than the reference MPN method and also either recovered significantly more (P < 0.05) cells or a not significantly different number of cells than SMA spread plating. Some injured cells of both strains were not counted by the HGMF method. Significant numbers of cells injured by freezing and thawing at 4 degrees C in apple cider were enumerated in the cider was diluted 1:2 Trypticase soy broth immediately before plating. Two epifluorescent microscopic methods showed that injury was not associated with loss of cell membrane integrity.

  4. A new preclinical 3-dimensional agarose colony formation assay.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Panchabhai, Sonali; Levin, Victor A

    2008-08-01

    The evaluation of new drug treatments and combination treatments for gliomas and other cancers requires a robust means to interrogate wide dose ranges and varying times of drug exposure without stain-inactivation of the cells (colonies). To this end, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) colony formation assay that makes use of GelCount technology, a new cell colony counter for gels and soft agars. We used U251MG, SNB19, and LNZ308 glioma cell lines and MiaPaCa pancreas adenocarcinoma and SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Colonies were grown in a two-tiered agarose that had 0.7% agarose on the bottom and 0.3% agarose on top. We then studied the effects of DFMO, carboplatin, and SAHA over a 3-log dose range and over multiple days of drug exposure. Using GelCount we approximated the area under the curve (AUC) of colony volumes as the sum of colony volumes (microm2xOD) in each plate to calculate IC50 values. Adenocarcinoma colonies were recognized by GelCount scanning at 3-4 days, while it took 6-7 days to detect glioma colonies. The growth rate of MiaPaCa and SW480 cells was rapid, with 100 colonies counted in 5-6 days; glioma cells grew more slowly, with 100 colonies counted in 9-10 days. Reliable log dose versus AUC curves were observed for all drugs studied. In conclusion, the GelCount method that we describe is more quantitative than traditional colony assays and allows precise study of drug effects with respect to both dose and time of exposure using fewer culture plates.

  5. Combined Use of Pastorex Staph-Plus and Either of Two New Chromogenic Agars, MRSA ID and CHROMagar MRSA, for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Compernolle, Veerle; Verschraegen, Gerda; Claeys, Geert

    2007-01-01

    We describe the search toward a fast and reliable strategy to detect and confirm the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in screening samples. First, we evaluated the sensitivities and specificities of oxacillin resistance screening agar (ORSA) with enrichment (tryptic soy broth [TSB] and ORSA [TSB-ORSA]) and without enrichment (ORSA), MRSA ID (MRSA_ID) plates, and CHROMagar MRSA (C_MRSA) plates, all of which were inoculated with equal volumes of a suspension made by emulsifying screening swabs. Whereas the sensitivities after 48 h were similar for all media tested (77% for MRSA_ID and ORSA; 73% for C_MRSA and ORSA after enrichment [TSB-ORSA]), the specificities of MRSA_ID (98% after 24 h and 94% after 48 h) and C_MRSA (98% after 24 h and 90% after 48 h) were superior to the specificities of ORSAs (92% after 24 h and 83% after 48 h) and TSB-ORSA (86% after 24 h and 81% after 48 h). Subsequently, the performance of the Pastorex Staph-Plus agglutination test with presumptive MRSA isolates taken directly from chromogenic agars (direct_Pastorex agglutination) was compared to that of the Pastorex Staph-Plus agglutination test with isolates from blood agar subcultures (conventional_Pastorex agglutination). When the direct_Pastorex agglutination test on MRSA_ID plates was combined with Gram staining, the direct_Pastorex agglutination test with samples from MRSA_ID plates was as reliable as the conventional_Pastorex agglutination test with samples from blood agar subcultures from MRSA_ID plates. In contrast, the direct_Pastorex agglutination test with samples from C_MRSA plates gave false-negative results. Finally, we calculated the processing times of the four different strategies, namely, (i) enrichment in TSB supplemented with NaCl, subsequent culture on ORSA, and the conventional_Pastorex agglutination test; (ii) direct inoculation of ORSA combined with conventional_Pastorex agglutination test; (iii) direct inoculation of MRSA_ID plates

  6. Agar-agar entrapment increases the stability of endo-β-1,4-xylanase for repeated biodegradation of xylan.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Zainab; Shahid, Faiza; Ul Qader, Shah Ali; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-04-01

    Microbial xylanases, specially endo-β-1,4-xylanase catalyzes the hydrolysis of xylan, is considered one of the most significant hydrolases. It has numerous applications but most extensively is utilized in paper and pulp industry as a bio-bleaching agent. Immobilization technique is comprehensively studied with the expectation of modifying and improving enzyme stability and characteristics for commercial purposes. Currently, matrix entrapment technique is applied to immobilize endo-β-1,4-xylanase within agar-agar gel beads produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29. Maximal enzyme immobilization yield was achieved at 2.5% of agar-agar concentration. Optimized conditions demonstrated an increase in the optimal reaction time from 05 min to 30 min and incubation temperature from 50 °C to 60 °C with reference to free enzyme whereas; no effect was observed for optimum pH. Entrapment technique uniquely changed the kinetic parameters of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase (Km: 0.5074 mg min(-1) to 0.5230 mg min(-1) and Vmax: 4773 U min(-1) to 968 U min(-1)) as compared to free enzyme. However, immobilized enzyme displayed broad thermal stability and retained 79.0% of its initial activity at 80 °C up to 30 min whereas; free enzyme completely lost its activity at this temperature. With respect to economic feasibility, the immobilized enzyme showed impressive recycling efficiency up to six reaction cycles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spectra MRSA, a New Chromogenic Agar Medium To Screen for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jess F.; Riebe, Katherine M.; Hall, Gerri S.; Wilson, Deborah; Whittier, Susan; Palavecino, Elizabeth; Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel chromogenic medium, Spectra MRSA (Remel, Lenexa, KS), was designed to detect methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) rapidly and more efficiently than traditional media (i.e., tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood [SBA] and mannitol salt agar [MSA]). A multicenter study (including four clinical trial sites and the Medical College of Wisconsin [MCW] Milwaukee, WI) compared the performance characteristics of Spectra MRSA to those of the traditional media for the detection of MRSA. For this study, 767 nasal swab specimens from the multicenter study (traditional medium used, SBA) and 667 nasal swab specimens from MCW (traditional medium used, MSA) were plated on each test medium and examined after 24 and 48 h of incubation. At 24 h, the sensitivity and the specificity of each medium were as follows: in the multicenter study, 95.4% and 99.7%, respectively, for Spectra MRSA and 93.6% and 100%, respectively, for SBA; at MCW, 95.2% and 99.5%, respectively, for Spectra MRSA and 88.7% and 94.0%, respectively, for MSA. The positive predictive values of each medium at 24 h were as follows: in the multicenter study, 98.1% for Spectra MRSA and 100% for SBA; at MCW, 95.2% for Spectra MRSA and 60.4% for MSA. In our evaluation, we found that Spectra MRSA was able to rapidly identify and differentiate methicillin-resistant S. aureus from methicillin-susceptible S. aureus on the basis of the utilization of chromogens that result in denim blue colonies, thus eliminating the need for biochemical analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Extending the incubation beyond 24 h did not significantly improve the recovery of MRSA and resulted in decreased specificity. PMID:19889898

  8. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay in low volume.

    PubMed

    Bainor, Anthony; Chang, Lyra; McQuade, Thomas J; Webb, Brian; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2011-03-15

    The BCA assay is a colorimetric method for estimating protein concentration. In 96-well plates, the relationship between protein content and absorbance is nearly linear over a wide range; however, performance is reduced in lower volume. To overcome this limitation, we performed the BCA assays in opaque, white 384-well plates. These plates emit fluorescence between 450-600 nm when excited at 430 nm; thus, their fluorescence is quenched by the BCA chromophore (λ(max) 562 nm). This arrangement allowed accurate determination of protein content using only 2 μL of sample. Moreover, soluble flourescein could replace the white plates, creating a homogenous format.

  9. Agar Diffusion Procedures for Susceptibility Testing of Malassezia pachydermatis: Evaluation of Mueller-Hinton Agar Plus 2 % Glucose and 0.5 µg/ml Methylene Blue as the Test Medium.

    PubMed

    Pasquetti, M; Chiavassa, E; Tizzani, P; Danesi, P; Peano, A

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study was to verify whether Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 2 % glucose and methylene blue (MH-GM), which is used for disk diffusion susceptibility testing of Candida species by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, is suitable for testing Malassezia pachydermatis. A variant of the disk diffusion procedure utilizing a 9-mm tablet was used to test 31 isolates against clotrimazole and miconazole using MH-GM as test medium. The MH-GM agar optimally supported the growth of all M. pachydermatis isolates, provided that the yeast inoculum was prepared with a lipid source (Tween 40 and 80). Zone edges were frequently definite and clear, facilitating the measurement of zone size and minimizing subjectivity. The inhibition zones correlated with MIC values obtained in a broth dilution assay. The agar diffusion method with MH-GM as the test medium appears as a suitable procedure for testing the susceptibility of M. pachydermatis to CTZ and MCZ in clinical laboratories. This test format may allow processing a large number of isolates in epidemiological studies. This may in turn facilitate clarifying to what extent the problem "drug resistance" accounts for cases of treatment failure in dogs with Malassezia otitis and dermatitis.

  10. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by an electrospinning technique using water as the solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operated at 50 deg C, to avoid agar gelation. Pure agar solution 1% (w/w) showed inadequ...

  11. Development of an eco-friendly agar extraction technique from the red seaweed Gracilaria lemaneiformis.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yuanling

    2008-05-01

    The red seaweed, Gracilaria lemaneiformis growing as an aquaculture bioremediator along the coasts of Liaodong Peninsula, China, was investigated for the agar production. An eco-friendly method called agar photobleaching extraction process was developed for the benefit of workers' health and safety of the environment. The native agar (NA), alkali-modified agar (AA), chemical-bleached agar (CA) and photobleached agar (PA), which were extracted using different processes, were evaluated for their physical and chemical properties. The PA showed most desirable performances in terms of gel strength, gelling temperature, sulfate content and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose content. Among the different processed agars, PA gel strength was 1913 g/cm2, the highest among the different processed agars, which increased 8.6% on the basis of the AA. Further we applied this new technique to extract agars from Gracilaria asiatica, and similar results were obtained with that of G. lemaneiformis. This indicates that the agar photobleaching extraction process is a feasible method for Gracilaria species and has a potential application. During the whole agar photobleaching extraction process the pigment content of G. lemaneiformis declined gradually and the TOC concentration in photobleaching solution increased along with the increase in the irradiation time. The mechanism of agar photobleaching could be elucidated by the photolysis theory.

  12. Plating isolation of various catalase-negative microorganisms from soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labeda, D. P.; Hunt, C. M.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A unique plating procedure was developed that allows isolation, but not enumeration, of representatives of the catalase-negative soil microflora. The numbers recovered, however, are low as compared to the numbers recovered when the modified dilution-to-extinction isolation procedure is used. The latter procedure provides prolonged inoculation in sealed tubes containing a nutritionally rich broth medium over small submerged agar slants. In contrast, the plating procedure utilizes nutritionally minimal media and the shorter incubations mandated by the inherent problems associated with plating.

  13. Plating isolation of various catalase-negative microorganisms from soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labeda, D. P.; Hunt, C. M.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A unique plating procedure was developed that allows isolation, but not enumeration, of representatives of the catalase-negative soil microflora. The numbers recovered, however, are low as compared to the numbers recovered when the modified dilution-to-extinction isolation procedure is used. The latter procedure provides prolonged inoculation in sealed tubes containing a nutritionally rich broth medium over small submerged agar slants. In contrast, the plating procedure utilizes nutritionally minimal media and the shorter incubations mandated by the inherent problems associated with plating.

  14. Rapid isolation of gluten-digesting bacteria from human stool and saliva by using gliadin-containing plates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Martina; Sarantopoulos, Christos; Ongchangco, Deryn; Sry, Jeremy; Cesario, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The number of individuals with gluten intolerance has increased dramatically over the last years. To date, the only therapy for gluten intolerance is the complete avoidance of dietary gluten. To sustain a strictly gluten-free diet, however, is very challenging. Therefore, there is need for a non-dietary therapy. Any such treatment must appreciate that the immunogenic part of gluten are gliadin peptides which are poorly degraded by the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotic therapy and oral enzyme therapy containing gluten-degrading bacteria (GDB) and their gliadin-digesting enzymes are possible new approaches for the treatment of gluten intolerance, however effectively isolating GDB for these treatments is problematic. The goal of this study was to develop an easy technique to isolate GDB rapidly and efficiently with the hope it might lead to newer ways of developing either probiotics or traditional medicines to treat gluten intolerance. Several researchers have already isolated successfully GDB by using gluten minimal or limited agar plates. Although these plates can be used to isolate bacteria which can tolerate gluten, further assays are needed to investigate if the same bacteria can also digest gluten. The agar plates we developed can detect bacteria which cannot only tolerate gluten but are able to digest it as well. Therefore, we were able to combine two steps into one step. Using such technologies, we were able to isolate five GDB from saliva and stool, and identified three bacterial reference strains with gluten-degrading activity. The technique we developed to isolate bacteria with gluten-degrading activity is fast, effective, and easy to use. The GDB isolated by our technology could have potential as part of a probiotic or enzymatic therapy for people with gluten intolerance.

  15. Rapid isolation of gluten-digesting bacteria from human stool and saliva by using gliadin-containing plates

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Christos; Ongchangco, Deryn; Sry, Jeremy; Cesario, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The number of individuals with gluten intolerance has increased dramatically over the last years. To date, the only therapy for gluten intolerance is the complete avoidance of dietary gluten. To sustain a strictly gluten-free diet, however, is very challenging. Therefore, there is need for a non-dietary therapy. Any such treatment must appreciate that the immunogenic part of gluten are gliadin peptides which are poorly degraded by the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotic therapy and oral enzyme therapy containing gluten-degrading bacteria (GDB) and their gliadin-digesting enzymes are possible new approaches for the treatment of gluten intolerance, however effectively isolating GDB for these treatments is problematic. The goal of this study was to develop an easy technique to isolate GDB rapidly and efficiently with the hope it might lead to newer ways of developing either probiotics or traditional medicines to treat gluten intolerance. Several researchers have already isolated successfully GDB by using gluten minimal or limited agar plates. Although these plates can be used to isolate bacteria which can tolerate gluten, further assays are needed to investigate if the same bacteria can also digest gluten. The agar plates we developed can detect bacteria which cannot only tolerate gluten but are able to digest it as well. Therefore, we were able to combine two steps into one step. Using such technologies, we were able to isolate five GDB from saliva and stool, and identified three bacterial reference strains with gluten-degrading activity. The technique we developed to isolate bacteria with gluten-degrading activity is fast, effective, and easy to use. The GDB isolated by our technology could have potential as part of a probiotic or enzymatic therapy for people with gluten intolerance. PMID:25519429

  16. Plate electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Using a Cray T3D supercomputer and a simple assumption about the physical character of Earth's mantle, a pair of researchers from the University of California at Berkeley have built a computer model that may help explain why the planet's tectonic plates look the way they do.In creating a three-dimensional numerical simulation of convection in the Earth's interior, UC researchers Hans-Peter Bunge and Mark Richards simplified their model to account for just one major physical effect: that the viscosity of the mantle increases with depth. Reviewing some recent—but not yet widely accepted—seismic data, Bunge and Richards assumed for the sake of the model that the viscosity of the mantle increases by a factor of 30 from the lithosphere to the core-mantle boundary. Relying on that assumption, the pair ran the model for nearly three weeks on a supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory and found that the simulation produced an effect similar to what we see on the surface of Earth. The model produced a surface paralleling the actual width of plates and the geometry of the plate boundaries.

  17. Optimisation of a direct plating method for the detection and enumeration of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spores.

    PubMed

    Henczka, Marek; Djas, Małgorzata; Filipek, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    A direct plating method for the detection and enumeration of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spores has been optimised. The results of the application of four types of growth media (BAT agar, YSG agar, K agar and SK agar) regarding the recovery and enumeration of A. acidoterrestris spores were compared. The influence of the type of applied growth medium, heat shock conditions, incubation temperature, incubation time, plating technique and the presence of apple juice in the sample on the accuracy of the detection and enumeration of A. acidoterrestris spores was investigated. Among the investigated media, YSG agar was the most sensitive medium, and its application resulted in the highest recovery of A. acidoterrestris spores, while K agar and BAT agar were the least suitable media. The effect of the heat shock time on the recovery of spores was negligible. When there was a low concentration of spores in a sample, the membrane filtration method was superior to the spread plating method. The obtained results show that heat shock carried out at 80°C for 10 min and plating samples in combination with membrane filtration on YSG agar, followed by incubation at 46°C for 3 days provided the optimal conditions for the detection and enumeration of A. acidoterrestris spores. Application of the presented method allows highly efficient, fast and sensitive identification and enumeration of A. acidoterrestris spores in food products. This methodology will be useful for the fruit juice industry for identifying products contaminated with A. acidoterrestris spores, and its practical application may prevent economic losses for manufacturers.

  18. Hyperspectral imaging for differentiating colonies of non-O157 shiga-toxin producing echerichia coli (STEC) serogroups on spread plates of pure cultures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Direct plating onto solid agar media has been widely used in microbiology laboratories for presumptive-positive pathogen detection in spite of the fact that it is often subjective, labor intensive and time consuming. Rainbow agar is a selective and chromogenic medium that helps to detect pathogenic ...

  19. Clonogenic Assay: Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T.; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2011-01-01

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 19561. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture1. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811)2. Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  20. Increased selectivity of Mitis-Salivarius agar containing polymyxin.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R F; Adams, B O

    1975-02-01

    Incorporation of the antibiotic polymixin B sulfate in plates of Mitis-Salivarius medium at a level of 100 U per ml effectively suppressed the growth of gram-negative spreading organisms which occasionally overgrow Mitis-Salivarius plates of oral samples and make them unsuitable for enumeration and differentiation of streptococci. At the indicated level the antibiotic did not affect the growth or typical colonial characteristics of the oral streptococci.

  1. Epidemiology of Klebsiella oxytoca-associated diarrhea detected by Simmons citrate agar supplemented with inositol, tryptophan, and bile salts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vincent C C; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Tsang, Lee-Lee; Yau, Miranda C Y; Siu, Gilman K H; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; To, Kelvin K W; Tse, Herman; Hung, Ivan F N; Tai, Josepha W M; Ho, Pak-Leung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-05-01

    We studied the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of Klebsiella oxytoca-associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients in Hong Kong. Between 1 November 2009 and 30 April 2011, all inositol-fermenting colonies found on Simmons citrate agar supplemented with inositol, tryptophan, and bile salts (SCITB agar) used for the culturing of diarrheal stool samples were screened by a spot indole test for K. oxytoca. The overall sensitivity of SCITB agar plus the spot indole test (93.3%) for the detection of K. oxytoca in stool samples was superior to that of MacConkey agar (63.3%), while the specificities were 100% and 60.4%, respectively. The former achieved a 23-fold reduction in the workload and cost of subsequent standard biochemical identifications. Cytotoxin production and the clonality of K. oxytoca were determined by a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay using HEp-2 cells and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), respectively. Of 5,581 stool samples from 3,537 patients, K. oxytoca was cultured from 117/5,581 (2.1%) stool samples from 104/3,537 (2.9%) patients. Seventy-six of 104 (73.1%) patients with K. oxytoca had no copathogens in their diarrheal stool samples. Twenty-four (31.6%) of 76 patients carried cytotoxin-producing strains, which were significantly associated with antibiotic therapy after hospital admission (50% versus 21.2%; P = 0.01). Health care-associated diarrhea was found in 44 (42%) of 104 patients with K. oxytoca, but there was no epidemiological linkage suggestive of a nosocomial outbreak, and PFGE showed a diverse pattern. None of the patients with cytotoxin-producing K. oxytoca developed antibiotic-associated hemorrhagic colitis, suggesting that K. oxytoca can cause a mild disease manifesting as uncomplicated antibiotic-associated diarrhea with winter seasonality.

  2. Comparison of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus Agar Medium to Conventional Media for Detection of Staphylococcus aureus in Respiratory Samples

    PubMed Central

    Flayhart, Diane; Lema, Clara; Borek, Anita; Carroll, Karen C.

    2004-01-01

    Screening for Staphylococcus aureus has become routine in certain patient populations. This study is the first clinical evaluation of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus agar (CSA) medium (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, Md.) for detection of S. aureus in nasal surveillance cultures and in respiratory samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. S. aureus colonies appear mauve on CSA. Other organisms are inhibited or produce a distinctly different colony color. S. aureus was identified from all media by slide coagulase, exogenous DNase, and mannitol fermentation assays. Susceptibility testing was performed using the agar dilution method. A total of 679 samples were evaluated. All samples were inoculated onto CSA. Nasal surveillance cultures were inoculated onto sheep blood agar (SBA) (BD Diagnostics), and samples from CF patients were inoculated onto mannitol salt agar (MSA) (BD Diagnostics). Of the 679 samples cultured, 200 organisms produced a mauve color on CSA (suspicious for S. aureus) and 180 were positive for S. aureus on SBA or MSA. Of 200 CSA-positive samples 191 were identified as S. aureus. Nine mauve colonies were slide coagulase negative and were subsequently identified as Staphylococcus lugdunensis (one), Staphylococcus epidermidis (three), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one), and Corynebacterium species (four). CSA improved the ability to detect S. aureus by recovering 12 S. aureus isolates missed by conventional media. Of the 192 S. aureus isolates recovered, 122 were methicillin susceptible and 70 were methicillin resistant. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of CSA in this study were 99.5 and 98%, respectively. There was no difference in the performance of the slide coagulase test or in susceptibility testing performed on S. aureus recovered from CSA compared to SBA or MSA. Our data support the use of CSA in place of standard culture media for detection of S. aureus in heavily contaminated respiratory samples. PMID:15297498

  3. Comparison of Seeplex VRE detection kit with ChromID VRE agar for detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in rectal swab specimens.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Gun Dong; Park, Jung Jun; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2010-01-01

    The performance of the recently developed Seeplex VRE detection kit was compared with chromID VRE agar and the conventional blood agar plate with vancomycin disk (BAP-VA) for detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) from 180 rectal swab specimens. After 18 hr enrichment in enterococcosel broth (EB), the sensitivity and specificity for detection of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium were as follows: Seeplex VRE detection kit, 92.5% and 98.9%; chromID VRE agar, 92.5% and 97.8%; BAP-VA, 77.5% and 70.3%, respectively. The reporting times averaged 2, 3.4, and 3.6 days, respectively. The Seeplex VRE detection kit and chromID VRE agar were comparable and were superior to BAP-VA. Unexpectedly, 15.7% of VRE were vanA-positive Enterococcus species other than E. faecium and E. faecalis. Vigilance is suggested to see if these species eventually emerge as significant pathogens.

  4. Evaluation of enhanced haemolysis agar for detection of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes from production lines of fresh to cold-smoked fish.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Velho, M; Duarte, G; Gibbs, P

    2001-08-01

    Enhanced haemolysis agar (EHA) was compared to the two conventional Listeria isolation agars Oxford and PALCAM for its ability to detect Listeria spp. from production lines of fresh to cold-smoked fish. The ability of EHA for distinguishing L. monocytogenes colonies from other Listeria spp. was also evaluated.A total of 243 fish and environmental samples were analysed. Overall, 42 samples were found to contain Listeria spp. Only 34 samples were positive simultaneously by the three plating media. Two samples considered to be negative by the two conventional agars were found to be positive after isolation on EHA. All three selective agars were shown to be less effective in recovering Listeria spp. after primary enrichment in half-Fraser broth, compared to secondary enrichment in Fraser broth after 24 and 48 h. From 79 Listeria but presumptive negative L. monocytogenes colonies, EHA identified correctly 76 Listeria spp. and presented three false-negative results_three colonies further identified as L. monocytogenes but showing no noticeable haemolysis on EHA. Twenty-three of the thirty-three L. monocytogenes presumptive positive colonies, were confirmed positive and ten were identified as L. seeligeri. Despite its ability of distinguishing L. monocytogenes from the other Listeria spp., unless it is produced as a commercial medium, EHA cannot be an alternative to time-consuming classical identification because the preparation of this medium is both time and labour intensive.

  5. Microbial contamination in intraoral phosphor storage plates: the dilemma.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Tricia Murielly Pereira Andrade; de Castro, Ricardo Dias; de Vasconcelos, Laís César; Pontual, Andréa Dos Anjos; de Moraes Ramos Perez, Flávia Maria; Pontual, Maria Luiza Dos Anjos

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate microbial contamination in phosphor storage plates in dental radiology services and discuss the possible origin of this contamination. The sample comprised 50 phosphor plates: 14 plates from service A, 30 from service B, and 6 in the control group, consisting of plates never used. Damp sterile swabs were rubbed on the phosphor plates, and then transferred to tests tubes containing sterile saline solution. Serial dilutions were made, and then inoculated in triplicate on Mueller Hinton agar plates and incubated at 37 °C/48 h, before counting the colony-forming units (CFU). The samples were also seeded in brain-heart infusion medium to confirm contamination by turbidity of the culture medium. All solutions, turbid and clean, were seeded in selective and non-selective media. At service A and B, 50 and 73.3 % of the phosphor plates were contaminated, respectively. This contamination was mainly due to bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus. CFU counts ranged from 26.4 to 80.0 CFU/plate. Most of the phosphor plates evaluated shown to be contaminated, mainly by Staphylococcus ssp. Quantitatively, this contamination occurred at low levels, possibly arising from handling of the plates. The use of a second plastic barrier may have diminished contamination by microorganisms from the oral cavity. There is a risk of cross-contamination by phosphor storage plates used in dental radiology services.

  6. Topoisomerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.; Soans, Eroica; Rogojina, Anna; Seth, Aman; Mishina, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases are nuclear enzymes that play essential roles in DNA replication, transcription, chromosome segregation, and recombination. All cells have two major forms of topoisomerases: type I, which makes single-stranded cuts in DNA, and type II enzymes, which cut and pass double-stranded DNA. DNA topoisomerases are important targets of approved and experimental anti-cancer agents. The protocols described in this unit are of assays used to assess new chemical entities for their ability to inhibit both forms of DNA topoisomerase. Included are an in vitro assay for topoisomerase I activity based on relaxation of supercoiled DNA and an assay for topoisomerase II based on the decatenation of double-stranded DNA. The preparation of mammalian cell extracts for assaying topoisomerase activity is described, along with a protocol for an ICE assay for examining topoisomerase covalent complexes in vivo and an assay for measuring DNA cleavage in vitro. PMID:22684721

  7. Deferred Growth Inhibition Assay to Quantify the Effect of Bacteria-derived Antimicrobials on Competition.

    PubMed

    Moran, Josephine C; Crank, Emma L; Ghabban, Hanaa A; Horsburgh, Malcolm J

    2016-09-03

    Competitive exclusion can occur in microbial communities when, for example, an inhibitor-producing strain outcompetes its competitor for an essential nutrient or produces antimicrobial compounds that its competitor is not resistant to. Here we describe a deferred growth inhibition assay, a method for assessing the ability of one bacterium to inhibit the growth of another through the production of antimicrobial compounds or through competition for nutrients. This technique has been used to investigate the correlation of nasal isolates with the exclusion of particular species from a community. This technique can also be used to screen for lantibiotic producers or potentially novel antimicrobials. The assay is performed by first culturing the test inhibitor-producing strain overnight on an agar plate, then spraying over the test competitor strain and incubating again. After incubation, the extent of inhibition can be measured quantitatively, through the size of the zone of clearing around the inhibitor-producing strain, and qualitatively, by assessing the clarity of the inhibition zone. Here we present the protocol for the deferred inhibition assay, describe ways to minimize variation between experiments, and define a clarity scale that can be used to qualitatively assess the degree of inhibition.

  8. Deferred Growth Inhibition Assay to Quantify the Effect of Bacteria-derived Antimicrobials on Competition

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Josephine C.; Crank, Emma L.; Ghabban, Hanaa A.; Horsburgh, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Competitive exclusion can occur in microbial communities when, for example, an inhibitor-producing strain outcompetes its competitor for an essential nutrient or produces antimicrobial compounds that its competitor is not resistant to. Here we describe a deferred growth inhibition assay, a method for assessing the ability of one bacterium to inhibit the growth of another through the production of antimicrobial compounds or through competition for nutrients. This technique has been used to investigate the correlation of nasal isolates with the exclusion of particular species from a community. This technique can also be used to screen for lantibiotic producers or potentially novel antimicrobials. The assay is performed by first culturing the test inhibitor-producing strain overnight on an agar plate, then spraying over the test competitor strain and incubating again. After incubation, the extent of inhibition can be measured quantitatively, through the size of the zone of clearing around the inhibitor-producing strain, and qualitatively, by assessing the clarity of the inhibition zone. Here we present the protocol for the deferred inhibition assay, describe ways to minimize variation between experiments, and define a clarity scale that can be used to qualitatively assess the degree of inhibition. PMID:27684443

  9. Serum Bactericidal Assay: New Role in Salmonella Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Da; Sun, Min; Deng, Mingjun; Cui, Shuhua; Liang, Chengzhu; Geng, Juan; Sun, Tao; Long, Ling; Xiao, Xizhi

    2016-01-01

    While inspecting animal feed for Salmonella contamination, we routinely observed bacterial colonies on selective agars that were similar in appearance to those formed by Salmonella. These were identified as Citrobacter freundii, Proteus mirabilis, and Serratia fonticola using biochemical and serological techniques. Because the presence of these bacterial species confounds identification of Salmonella, we refer to them as "interference bacteria." Polyvalent antisera against these interference bacteria were prepared by immunizing rabbits with a mixture of all three organisms. To minimize or eliminate interference by these bacteria, the polyvalent antisera were introduced between the steps of selective enrichment and Salmonella-selective plating. The antisera raised against the interference bacteria, when combined with neonatal rabbit complement, exhibited specific bactericidal activity against C. freundii, P. mirabilis, and S. fonticola. The respective serum bactericidal assay titers were 2(9), 2(8), and 2(10). In selective broth, polyvalent antisera could also kill the target bacterial cells effectively. We tested 526 samples (186 white fishmeal, 97 red fishmeal, and 243 cattle bone powder) using the polyvalent antisera and found that the rates of contamination of each species of the three respective foods decreased by 58.8, 100, and 83%. Our data indicates that polyvalent sera against C. freundii, P. mirabilis, and S. fonticola can be used as inhibitors to increase the accuracy of Salmonella detection.

  10. Chromogenic agar medium for detection and isolation of Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 from fresh beef and cattle feces.

    PubMed

    Kalchayanand, Norasak; Arthur, Terrance M; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Wells, James E; Wheeler, Tommy L

    2013-02-01

    Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are clinically important foodborne pathogens. Unlike E. coli O157:H7, these foodborne pathogens have no unique biochemical characteristics to readily distinguish them from other E. coli strains growing on plating media. In this study, a chromogenic agar medium was developed in order to differentiate among non-O157 STEC strains of serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 on a single agar medium. The ability of this chromogenic agar medium to select and distinguish among these pathogens is based on a combination of utilization of carbohydrates, b -galactosidase activity, and resistance to selective agents. The agar medium in combination with immunomagnetic separation was evaluated and successfully allowed for the detection and isolation of these six serogroups from artificially contaminated fresh beef. The agar medium in combination with immunomagnetic separation also allowed successful detection and isolation of naturally occurring non-O157 STEC strains present in cattle feces. Thirty-five strains of the top six non-O157 STEC serogroups were isolated from 1,897 fecal samples collected from 271 feedlot cattle. This chromogenic agar medium could help significantly in routine screening for the top six non-O157 STEC serogroups from beef cattle and other food.

  11. Evaluation of Five Chromogenic Agar Media and the Rosco Rapid Carb Screen Kit for Detection and Confirmation of Carbapenemase Production in Gram-Negative Bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, Matthew W.; DeGagne, Pat; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James A.

    2014-01-01

    An efficient workflow to screen for and confirm the presence of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli was developed by evaluating five chromogenic screening agar media and two confirmatory assays, the Rapid Carb screen test (Rosco Diagnostica A/S, Taastrup, Denmark) and the modified Hodge test. A panel of 150 isolates was used, including 49 carbapenemase-producing isolates representing a variety of β-lactamase enzyme classes. An evaluation of analytical performance, assay cost, and turnaround time indicated that the preferred workflow (screening test followed by confirmatory testing) was the chromID Carba agar medium (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Étoile, France), followed by the Rapid Carb screen test, yielding a combined sensitivity of 89.8% and a specificity of 100%. As an optional component of the workflow, a determination of carbapenemase gene class via molecular means could be performed subsequent to confirmatory testing. PMID:25355764

  12. Evaluation of five chromogenic agar media and the Rosco Rapid Carb screen kit for detection and confirmation of carbapenemase production in Gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Simner, Patricia J; Gilmour, Matthew W; DeGagne, Pat; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James A

    2015-01-01

    An efficient workflow to screen for and confirm the presence of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli was developed by evaluating five chromogenic screening agar media and two confirmatory assays, the Rapid Carb screen test (Rosco Diagnostica A/S, Taastrup, Denmark) and the modified Hodge test. A panel of 150 isolates was used, including 49 carbapenemase-producing isolates representing a variety of β-lactamase enzyme classes. An evaluation of analytical performance, assay cost, and turnaround time indicated that the preferred workflow (screening test followed by confirmatory testing) was the chromID Carba agar medium (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Étoile, France), followed by the Rapid Carb screen test, yielding a combined sensitivity of 89.8% and a specificity of 100%. As an optional component of the workflow, a determination of carbapenemase gene class via molecular means could be performed subsequent to confirmatory testing. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Endodontic Medicaments and Vehicles using Agar Well Diffusion Method on Facultative and Obligate Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Kishore G; Sogi, Suma

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to determine the relative antimicrobial effectiveness of these endodontic medicaments and various vehicles using an agar well diffusion assay. Materials and methods Double Antibiotic Paste(DAP), modified DAP, 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate and their combination with four vehicles namely Polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG), Propylene glycol (PG), combinations of PG with PEG and lastly Glycerine were tested using agar well diffusion assay. The minimum bactericidal concentration was noted against four standard strains of organisms ie Streptococcus mutans ATCC( American Type Culture Collection) 25175, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12598, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 35550 and Eschericia coli ATCC 25922. Successful endodontic therapy depends upon thorough disinfection of root canals. In some refractory cases, routine endodontic therapy is not sufficient, so intracanal medicaments are used for proper disinfection of canals. Issues of resistance, limited spectrum of activity and lack of antifungal properties, the hunt for the ideal intracanal medicament continues. In this regard, the vehicles used to form the pastes play a supportive role by forming the appropriate consistency for placement and may dramatically influence their chemical characteristics like their solubility and diffusion. Thus, inorder to use safer and equally effective intracanal medicaments, Chlorhexidine gluconate is being unveiled in this study. Results The differe