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Sample records for agar-well diffusion method

  1. Susceptibility of a polycaprolactone-based root canal filling material to degradation using an agar-well diffusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Hiraishi, Noriko; Sadek, Fernanda T.; King, Nigel M.; Ferrari, Marco; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cholesterol esterase is both a component of salivary hydrolases as well as an inflammatory cell-derived enzyme and has been shown to cause biodegradation of methacrylate-based resin composites. This study examined whether Resilon, a polycaprolactone-based thermoplastic root filling material is susceptible to biodegradation by cholesterol esterase using agar-well diffusion assay of serially-diluted aqueous Resilon emulsions that were dispersed in agar. Materials and methods Emulsions of Resilon and polycaprolactone were prepared and dispersed in agar on culture plates. Two different concentrations of a cholesterol esterase (0.3 and 1.2 U/mL) were prepared and fed to wells prepared in the agar plates using an agar-well diffusion assay for examination the degradation of polymeric materials. Results Degradation of the emulsified Resilon was manifested as the formation of clear zones of different sizes around the agar wells. No clear zones were observed in agar wells that contain sterile distilled water as the negative control. Clinical significance Although dispersion Resilon into an emulsion is not the way in which this material is employed as a root filling material, the potential for Resilon to be degraded by cholesterol esterase is of potential concern as one cannot limit the degradation of extruded Resilon from a root apex by monocyte-derived macrophages to just the anatomical root apex. As the present study employed a high concentration of cholesterol esterase, further studies should be directed to examining the degradation of Resilon using macrophage cell cultures. PMID:18578181

  2. A method for rapid characterization of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Song, Y-Q; Hürlimann, M D; Flaum, C

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes a method to determine molecular displacements as a function of time in just two scans: one reference scan using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, a second scan using a modified CPMG sequence (KCPMG). Measurements on free diffusion in bulk fluids, and on restricted diffusion in porous rock samples are reported. This technique can also be used for rapid measurement of flow and chemical exchange. PMID:12713974

  3. A Mapping method for mixing with diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Conor P.; Christov, Ivan C.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2012-11-01

    We present an accurate and efficient computational method for solving the advection-diffusion equation in time-periodic chaotic flows. The method uses operator splitting which allows advection and diffusion steps to be treated independently. Taking advantage of flow periodicity, the advection step is solved with a mapping method, and diffusion is added discretely after each iteration of the advection map. This approach allows for a ``composite'' mapping matrix to be constructed for an entire period of a chaotic advection-diffusion process, which provides a natural approach to the spectral analysis of mixing. To test the approach, we consider the two-dimensional time-periodic sine flow. When compared to the exact solution for this simple velocity field, the operator splitting method exhibits qualitative agreement (overall concentration structure) for large time steps and is quantitatively accurate (average and maximum error) for small time steps. We extend the operator splitting approach to three-dimensional chaotic flows. Funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1000469. Present affiliation: Princeton University. Supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047.

  4. Diffusion method of seperating gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-01-01

    A method of effecting a relatively large change in the relative concentrations of the components of a gaseous mixture by diffusion which comprises separating the mixture into heavier and lighter portions according to major fraction mass recycle procedure, further separating the heavier portions into still heavier subportions according to a major fraction mass recycle procedure, and further separating the lighter portions into still lighter subportions according to a major fraction equilibrium recycle procedure.

  5. New methods in Diffusion Weighted and Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Holdsworth, Samantha J.; Veldhuis, Wouter B.; Skare, Stefan T.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Considerable strides have been made by countless individual researchers in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to push DWI from an experimental tool – limited to a few institutions with specialized instrumentation – to a powerful tool used routinely for diagnostic imaging. Despite its current success, the field of DWI constantly evolves and progress has been made on several fronts, awaiting adoption by vendors and clinical users to bring in the next generation of DWI. These developments are primarily comprised of improved robustness against patient and physiologic motion, increased spatial resolution, new biophysical and tissue models, and new clinical applications for DWI. This article aims to provide a succinct overview of some of these new developments and a description of some of the major challenges associated with DWI. Trying to understand some of these challenges is helpful not only to the technically savvy MRI user, but also to radiologists who are interested in the potential strengths and weaknesses of these techniques, what is in the “diffusion pipeline”, and in how to interpret artifacts on DWI scans. PMID:19406353

  6. Solution of counter diffusion problem with position dependent diffusion coefficent by using variational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksek, Kemal; Koca, Yeliz; Sadikoglu, Hasan

    2009-10-01

    Unsteady state counter diffusion problem with position dependent diffusion coefficient can be modeled using Fick's second law. A mathematical model was constructed and solved to quantitatively describe the dynamic behavior of solute diffusion through non-homogeneous materials where diffusion coefficient is a function of position. The eigenfunction expansion approach was utilized to solve the model. The eigenvalues and eigenfunction of the system were obtained using a variational method. It has been shown that position dependency of the material can be neglected if the thickness of the material is relatively small. Mathematical models were solved for different thicknesses and different diffusion coefficient functions.

  7. Optimized halftoning using dot diffusion and methods for inverse halftoning.

    PubMed

    Mese, M; Vaidyanathan, P P

    2000-01-01

    Unlike the error diffusion method, the dot diffusion method for digital halftoning has the advantage of pixel-level parallelism. However, the image quality offered by error diffusion is still regarded as superior to most of the other known methods. We show how the dot diffusion method can be improved by optimization of the so-called class matrix. By taking the human visual characteristics into account we show that such optimization consistently results in images comparable to error diffusion, without sacrificing the pixel-level parallelism. Adaptive dot diffusion is also introduced and then a mathematical description of dot diffusion is derived. Furthermore, inverse halftoning of dot diffused images is discussed and two methods are proposed. The first one uses projection onto convex sets (POCS) and the second one uses wavelets. Of these methods, the wavelet method does not make use of the knowledge of the class matrix. Embedded multiresolution dot diffusion is also discussed, which is useful for rendering at different resolutions and transmitting images progressively.

  8. Diffuse-Interface Methods in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review the development of diffuse-interface models of hydrodynamics and their application to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena. The authors discuss the issues involved in formulating diffuse-interface models for single-component and binary fluids. Recent applications and computations using these models are discussed in each case. Further, the authors address issues including sharp-interface analyses that relate these models to the classical free-boundary problem, related computational approaches to describe interfacial phenomena, and related approaches describing fully-miscible fluids.

  9. Comparison of radon diffusion coefficients measured by transient-diffusion and steady-state laboratory methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kalwarf, D.R.; Nielson, K.K.; Rich, D.C.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-11-01

    A method was developed and used to determine radon diffusion coefficients in compacted soils by transient-diffusion measurements. A relative standard deviation of 12% was observed in repeated measurements with a dry soil by the transient-diffusion method, and a 40% uncertainty was determined for moistures exceeding 50% of saturation. Excellent agreement was also obtained between values of the diffusion coefficient for radon in air, as measured by the transient-diffusion method, and those in the published literature. Good agreement was also obtained with diffusion coefficients measured by a steady-state method on the same soils. The agreement was best at low moistures, averaging less than ten percent difference, but differences of up to a factor of two were observed at high moistures. The comparison of the transient-diffusion and steady-state methods at low moistures provides an excellent verification of the theoretical validity and technical accuracy of these approaches, which are based on completely independent experimental conditions, measurement methods and mathematical interpretations.

  10. Semianalytical method of solution for solid phase diffusion in lithium ion battery electrodes: Variable diffusion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renganathan, Sindhuja; White, Ralph E.

    A semianalytical methodology based on the integral transform technique is proposed to solve the diffusion equation with concentration dependent diffusion coefficient in a spherical intercalation electrode particle. The method makes use of an integral transform pair to transform the nonlinear partial differential equation into a set of ordinary differential equations, which is solved with less computational efforts. A general solution procedure is presented and two illustrative examples are used to demonstrate the usefulness of this method for modeling of diffusion process in lithium ion battery electrode. The solutions obtained using the method presented in this study are compared to the numerical solutions.

  11. Variational methods in steady state diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.E.; Fan, W.C.P.; Bratton, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Classical variational techniques are used to obtain accurate solutions to the multigroup multiregion one dimensional steady state neutron diffusion equation. Analytic solutions are constructed for benchmark verification. Functionals with cubic trial functions and conservational lagrangian constraints are exhibited and compared with nonconservational functionals with respect to neutron balance and to relative flux and current at interfaces. Excellent agreement of the conservational functionals using cubic trial functions is obtained in comparison with analytic solutions.

  12. Fluid diffuser and method for constructing

    SciTech Connect

    Reh, I.O.

    1986-02-25

    An apparatus is described consisting of: (a) a salt water solar pond having a halocline with a downwardly directed salinity gradient interposed between an upper wind-mixed layer of brackish water for receiving incident solar radiation and a lower heat storage layer of concentrated brine for storing heat; and (b) an extraction diffuser located in the heat storage layer for extracting heated brine therefrom, the extraction diffuser comprising; (1) top and bottom circular plates having peripheral edges, one of the plates having a circular opening for connection to a conduit by which heated brine is removed from the heat storage layer, the plates having opposite, facing surfaces of revolution with a common axis established by the circular opening for defining first and second fluid flow paths, one end of the first flow path being defined by the circular opening, the other end of the first flow path being connected to one end of the second flow path whose other end is defined by the peripheral edges of the plates, the flow paths being oriented such that fluid traversing the flow paths is turned through 90/sup 0/; (2) the opposite, facing surfaces being constructed and arranged so that the cross-section of the second fluid flow path decreases continuously, throughout its length, in the direction of fluid flow towards the axis.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. G.; Haygarth, P. M.; Withers, P. J. A.; Macleod, C. J. A.; Falloon, P. D.; Beven, K. J.; Ockenden, M. C.; Forber, K. J.; Hollaway, M. J.; Evans, R.; Collins, A. L.; Hiscock, K. M.; Wearing, C.; Kahana, R.; Villamizar Velez, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β , the fractional order α , and the single relaxation time τ , the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering. PMID:27176431

  16. A microfluidic method to measure small molecule diffusion in hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie M; Litzenberger, Andrew L; Ellenberger, Anne E; Maneval, James E; Jablonski, Erin L; Vogel, Brandon M

    2014-02-01

    Drug release from a fluid-contacting biomaterial is simulated using a microfluidic device with a channel defined by solute-loaded hydrogel; as water is pumped through the channel, solute transfers from the hydrogel into the water. Optical analysis of in-situ hydrogels, characterization of the microfluidic device effluent, and NMR methods were used to find diffusion coefficients of several dyes (model drugs) in poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels. Diffusion coefficients for methylene blue and sulforhodamine 101 in PEG-DA calculated using the three methods are in good agreement; both dyes are mobile in the hydrogel and elute from the hydrogel at the aqueous channel interface. However, the dye acid blue 22 deviates from typical diffusion behavior and does not release as expected from the hydrogel. Importantly, only the microfluidic method is capable of detecting this behavior. Characterizing solute diffusion with a combination of NMR, optical and effluent methods offer greater insight into molecular diffusion in hydrogels than employing each technique individually. The NMR method made precise measurements for solute diffusion in all cases. The microfluidic optical method was effective for visualizing diffusion of the optically active solutes. The optical and effluent methods show potential to be used to screen solutes to determine if they elute from a hydrogel in contact with flowing fluid. Our data suggest that when designing a drug delivery device, analyzing the diffusion from the molecular level to the device level is important to establish a complete picture of drug elution, and microfluidic methods to study such diffusion can play a key role.

  17. The method for detecting diffusion ring diameter in Hemagglutinin measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wenbo; Liu, Xue; Duan, Jin; Wang, Xiao-man

    2014-11-01

    The diffuser ring diameter measurement is the most critical in hemagglutinin Measuring. The traditional methods, such as a vernier caliper or high-definition scanned images are subjective and low for the measurement data reliability. Propose high-resolution diffusion ring image for drop-resolution processing, adaptive Canny operator and local detection method to extract complete and clear diffusion ring boundaries, and finally make use of polynomial interpolation algorithm to make diffusion ring outer boundary pixel coordinates achieve sub-pixel accuracy and the least-squares fitting circle algorithm to calculate the precise center of the circle and the diameter of the diffuser ring. Experimental results show that the method detection time is only 63.61ms, which is a faster speed; diffuser ring diameter estimation error can achieve 0.55 pixel, high stability in experimental data. This method is adapted to the various types of influenza vaccine hemagglutinin content measurements, and has important value in the influenza vaccine quality detection.

  18. A novel method to evaluate spin diffusion length of Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-qing; Sun, Niu-yi; Che, Wen-ru; Shan, Rong; Zhu, Zhen-gang

    2016-05-01

    Spin diffusion length of Pt is evaluated via proximity effect of spin orbit coupling (SOC) and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in Pt/Co2FeAl bilayers. By varying the thicknesses of Pt and Co2FeAl layer, the thickness dependences of AHE parameters can be obtained, which are theoretically predicted to be proportional to the square of the SOC strength. According to the physical image of the SOC proximity effect, the spin diffusion length of Pt can easily be identified from these thickness dependences. This work provides a novel method to evaluate spin diffusion length in a material with a small value.

  19. Comparison of regularization methods for human cardiac diffusion tensor MRI.

    PubMed

    Frindel, Carole; Robini, Marc; Croisille, Pierre; Zhu, Yue-Min

    2009-06-01

    Diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) is an imaging technique that is gaining importance in clinical applications. However, there is very little work concerning the human heart. When applying DT-MRI to in vivo human hearts, the data have to be acquired rapidly to minimize artefacts due to cardiac and respiratory motion and to improve patient comfort, often at the expense of image quality. This results in diffusion weighted (DW) images corrupted by noise, which can have a significant impact on the shape and orientation of tensors and leads to diffusion tensor (DT) datasets that are not suitable for fibre tracking. This paper compares regularization approaches that operate either on diffusion weighted images or on diffusion tensors. Experiments on synthetic data show that, for high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the methods operating on DW images produce the best results; they substantially reduce noise error propagation throughout the diffusion calculations. However, when the SNR is low, Rician Cholesky and Log-Euclidean DT regularization methods handle the bias introduced by Rician noise and ensure symmetry and positive definiteness of the tensors. Results based on a set of sixteen ex vivo human hearts show that the different regularization methods tend to provide equivalent results. PMID:19356971

  20. Diffusion-equation method for crystallographic figure of merits.

    PubMed

    Markvardsen, Anders J; David, William I F

    2010-09-01

    Global optimization methods play a significant role in crystallography, particularly in structure solution from powder diffraction data. This paper presents the mathematical foundations for a diffusion-equation-based optimization method. The diffusion equation is best known for describing how heat propagates in matter. However, it has also attracted considerable attention as the basis for global optimization of a multimodal function [Piela et al. (1989). J. Phys. Chem. 93, 3339-3346]. The method relies heavily on available analytical solutions for the diffusion equation. Here it is shown that such solutions can be obtained for two important crystallographic figure-of-merit (FOM) functions that fully account for space-group symmetry and allow the diffusion-equation solution to vary depending on whether atomic coordinates are fixed or not. The resulting expression is computationally efficient, taking the same order of floating-point operations to evaluate as the starting FOM function measured in terms of the number of atoms in the asymmetric unit. This opens the possibility of implementing diffusion-equation methods for crystallographic global optimization algorithms such as structure determination from powder diffraction data.

  1. Efficient stochastic Galerkin methods for random diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu Dongbin Shen Jie

    2009-02-01

    We discuss in this paper efficient solvers for stochastic diffusion equations in random media. We employ generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion to express the solution in a convergent series and obtain a set of deterministic equations for the expansion coefficients by Galerkin projection. Although the resulting system of diffusion equations are coupled, we show that one can construct fast numerical methods to solve them in a decoupled fashion. The methods are based on separation of the diagonal terms and off-diagonal terms in the matrix of the Galerkin system. We examine properties of this matrix and show that the proposed method is unconditionally stable for unsteady problems and convergent for steady problems with a convergent rate independent of discretization parameters. Numerical examples are provided, for both steady and unsteady random diffusions, to support the analysis.

  2. A Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration Method for Block Adaptive Mesh Refinement.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R. C.; Baker, R. S.; Morel, J. E.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype two-dimensional Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) method on a Block-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement (BAMR) transport mesh has been developed. The Block-Adaptive Mesh Refinement Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (BAMR-DSA) method was tested in the PARallel TIme-Dependent SN (PARTISN) deterministic transport code. The BAMR-DSA equations are derived by differencing the DSA equation using a vertex-centered diffusion discretization that is diamond-like and may be characterized as 'partially' consistent. The derivation of a diffusion discretization that is fully consistent with diamond transport differencing on BAMR mesh does not appear to be possible. However, despite being partially consistent, the BAMR-DSA method is effective for many applications. The BAMR-DSA solver was implemented and tested in two dimensions for rectangular (XY) and cylindrical (RZ) geometries. Testing results confirm that a partially consistent BAMR-DSA method will introduce instabilities for extreme cases, e.g., scattering ratios approaching 1.0 with optically thick cells, but for most realistic problems the BAMR-DSA method provides effective acceleration. The initial use of a full matrix to store and LU-Decomposition to solve the BAMR-DSA equations has been extended to include Compressed Sparse Row (CSR) storage and a Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver. The CSR and CG methods provide significantly more efficient and faster storage and solution methods.

  3. A method for thermal diffusivity measurement in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, E.; Hernández-Rosales, E.; Mansanares, A. M.; Ivanov, R.; Rojas-Trigos, J. B.; Calderón, A.

    2013-10-01

    A technique is proposed for thermal diffusivity measurement in fluids. It is based on the Angstrom method, but with excitation of thermal waves by electromagnetic energy absorption and pyroelectric detection. The good agreement between measured thermal diffusivity of air and some test liquids with literature values shows the validity of the method. It is free of some limitations of conventional photopyroelectric technique with length scanning because it is free of moving parts inside the sample and because it avoids problems associated with the non-parallelism between thermal wave generator surface and sensor. It does not require any data normalization procedure or special sample preparation.

  4. A method for thermal diffusivity measurement in fluids.

    PubMed

    Marín, E; Hernández-Rosales, E; Mansanares, A M; Ivanov, R; Rojas-Trigos, J B; Calderón, A

    2013-10-01

    A technique is proposed for thermal diffusivity measurement in fluids. It is based on the Angstrom method, but with excitation of thermal waves by electromagnetic energy absorption and pyroelectric detection. The good agreement between measured thermal diffusivity of air and some test liquids with literature values shows the validity of the method. It is free of some limitations of conventional photopyroelectric technique with length scanning because it is free of moving parts inside the sample and because it avoids problems associated with the non-parallelism between thermal wave generator surface and sensor. It does not require any data normalization procedure or special sample preparation. PMID:24182147

  5. Stochastic operator-splitting method for reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, TaiJung; Maurya, Mano Ram; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-11-01

    Many biochemical processes at the sub-cellular level involve a small number of molecules. The local numbers of these molecules vary in space and time, and exhibit random fluctuations that can only be captured with stochastic simulations. We present a novel stochastic operator-splitting algorithm to model such reaction-diffusion phenomena. The reaction and diffusion steps employ stochastic simulation algorithms and Brownian dynamics, respectively. Through theoretical analysis, we have developed an algorithm to identify if the system is reaction-controlled, diffusion-controlled or is in an intermediate regime. The time-step size is chosen accordingly at each step of the simulation. We have used three examples to demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm. The first example deals with diffusion of two chemical species undergoing an irreversible bimolecular reaction. It is used to validate our algorithm by comparing its results with the solution obtained from a corresponding deterministic partial differential equation at low and high number of molecules. In this example, we also compare the results from our method to those obtained using a Gillespie multi-particle (GMP) method. The second example, which models simplified RNA synthesis, is used to study the performance of our algorithm in reaction- and diffusion-controlled regimes and to investigate the effects of local inhomogeneity. The third example models reaction-diffusion of CheY molecules through the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli during chemotaxis. It is used to compare the algorithm's performance against the GMP method. Our analysis demonstrates that the proposed algorithm enables accurate simulation of the kinetics of complex and spatially heterogeneous systems. It is also computationally more efficient than commonly used alternatives, such as the GMP method.

  6. The Flux-integral Method for Multidimensional Convection and Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Macvean, M. K.; Lock, A. P.

    1994-01-01

    The flux-integral method is a procedure for constructing an explicit, single-step, forward-in-time, conservative, control volume update of the unsteady, multidimensional convection-diffusion equation. The convective plus diffusive flux at each face of a control-volume cell is estimated by integrating the transported variable and its face-normal derivative over the volume swept out by the convecting velocity field. This yields a unique description of the fluxes, whereas other conservative methods rely on nonunique, arbitrary pseudoflux-difference splitting procedures. The accuracy of the resulting scheme depends on the form of the subcell interpolation assumed, given cell-average data. Cellwise constant behavior results in a (very artificially diffusive) first-order convection scheme. Second-order convection-diffusion schemes correspond to cellwise linear (or bilinear) subcell interpolation. Cellwise quadratic subcell interpolants generate a highly accurate convection-diffusion scheme with excellent phase accuracy. Under constant-coefficient conditions, this is a uniformly third-order polynomial interpolation algorithm (UTOPIA).

  7. Weighted average finite difference methods for fractional diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuste, S. B.

    2006-07-01

    A class of finite difference methods for solving fractional diffusion equations is considered. These methods are an extension of the weighted average methods for ordinary (non-fractional) diffusion equations. Their accuracy is of order (Δ x) 2 and Δ t, except for the fractional version of the Crank-Nicholson method, where the accuracy with respect to the timestep is of order (Δ t) 2 if a second-order approximation to the fractional time-derivative is used. Their stability is analyzed by means of a recently proposed procedure akin to the standard von Neumann stability analysis. A simple and accurate stability criterion valid for different discretization schemes of the fractional derivative, arbitrary weight factor, and arbitrary order of the fractional derivative, is found and checked numerically. Some examples are provided in which the new methods' numerical solutions are obtained and compared against exact solutions.

  8. Methods for diffusive relaxation in the Pn equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hauck, Cory D; Mcclarren, Ryan G; Lowrie, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    We present recent progress in the development of two substantially different approaches for simulating the so-called of P{sub N} equations. These are linear hyperbolic systems of PDEs that are used to model particle transport in a material medium, that in highly collisional regimes, are accurately approximated by a simple diffusion equation. This limit is based on a balance between function values and gradients of certain variables in the P{sub N} system. Conventional reconstruction methods based on upwinding approximate such gradients with an error that is dependent on the size of the computational mesh. Thus in order to capture the diffusion limit, a given mesh must resolve the dynamics of the continuum equation at the level of the mean-free-path, which tends to zero in the diffusion limit. The two methods analyzed here produce accurate solutions in both collisional and non-collisional regimes; in particular, they do not require resolution of the mean-free-path in order to properly capture the diffusion limit. The first method is a straight-forward application of the discrete Galerkin (DG) methodology, which uses additional variables in each computational cell to capture the balance between function values and gradients, which are computed locally. The second method uses a temporal splitting of the fast and slow dynamics in the P{sub N} system to derive so-called regularized equations for which the diffusion limit is built-in. We focus specifically on the P{sub N} equations for one-dimensional, slab geometries. Preliminary results for several benchmark problems are presented which highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Further improvements and extensions are also discussed.

  9. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C–O–C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P–O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  10. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C-O-C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P-O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  11. Thermal diffusivity of nonflat plates using the flash method

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Agustin; Fuente, Raquel; Apinaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza

    2011-01-15

    The flash method is the standard technique to measure the thermal diffusivity of solid samples. It consists of heating the front surface of an opaque sample by a brief light pulse and detecting the temperature evolution at its rear surface. The thermal diffusivity is obtained by measuring the time corresponding to the half maximum of the temperature rise, which only depends on the sample thickness and thermal diffusivity through a simple formula. Up to now, the flash method has been restricted to flat samples. In this work, we extend the flash method to measure the thermal diffusivity of nonflat samples. In particular, we focus on plates with cylindrical and spherical shapes. The theoretical model indicates that the same expression for flat samples can also be applied to cylindrical and spherical plates, except for extremely curved samples. Accordingly, a curvature limit for the application of the expression for flat samples is established. Flash measurements on lead foils of cylindrical shape confirm the validity of the model.

  12. An effective phase shift diffusion equation method for analysis of PFG normal and fractional diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoxing

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion measurement has a lot of applications in NMR and MRI. Its analysis relies on the ability to obtain the signal attenuation expressions, which can be obtained by averaging over the accumulating phase shift distribution (APSD). However, current theoretical models are not robust or require approximations to get the APSD. Here, a new formalism, an effective phase shift diffusion (EPSD) equation method is presented to calculate the APSD directly. This is based on the idea that the gradient pulse effect on the change of the APSD can be viewed as a diffusion process in the virtual phase space (VPS). The EPSD has a diffusion coefficient, Kβ(t)D radβ/sα, where α is time derivative order and β is a space derivative order, respectively. The EPSD equations of VPS are built based on the diffusion equations of real space by replacing the diffusion coefficients and the coordinate system (from real space coordinate to virtual phase coordinate). Two different models, the fractal derivative model and the fractional derivative model from the literature were used to build the EPSD fractional diffusion equations. The APSD obtained from solving these EPSD equations were used to calculate the PFG signal attenuation. From the fractal derivative model the attenuation is exp(-γβgβδβDf1 tα), a stretched exponential function (SEF) attenuation, while from the fractional derivative model the attenuation is Eα,1(-γβgβδβDf2 tα), a Mittag-Leffler function (MLF) attenuation. The MLF attenuation can be reduced to SEF attenuation when α = 1, and can be approximated as a SEF attenuation when the attenuation is small. Additionally, the effect of finite gradient pulse widths (FGPW) is calculated. From the fractal derivative model, the signal attenuation including FGPW effect is exp[ -Df1 ∫0τ Kβ (t)dtα ] . The results obtained in this study are in good agreement with the results in literature. Several expressions that describe signal

  13. Split operator method for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using anisotropic diffusion regularisation with prior anatomical information

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Teresa; Aguirre, Juan; Sisniega, Alejandro; Chamorro-Servent, Judit; Abascal, Juan; Vaquero, Juan J.; Desco, Manuel; Kolehmainen, Ville; Arridge, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is an imaging modality that provides images of the fluorochrome distribution within the object of study. The image reconstruction problem is ill-posed and highly underdetermined and, therefore, regularisation techniques need to be used. In this paper we use a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion regularisation term that incorporates anatomical prior information. We introduce a split operator method that reduces the nonlinear inverse problem to two simpler problems, allowing fast and efficient solution of the fDOT problem. We tested our method using simulated, phantom and ex-vivo mouse data, and found that it provides reconstructions with better spatial localisation and size of fluorochrome inclusions than using the standard Tikhonov penalty term. PMID:22091447

  14. Method of making gas diffusion layers for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Frisk, Joseph William; Boand, Wayne Meredith; Larson, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for making a gas diffusion layer for an electrochemical cell comprising the steps of: a) combining carbon particles and one or more surfactants in a typically aqueous vehicle to make a preliminary composition, typically by high shear mixing; b) adding one or more highly fluorinated polymers to said preliminary composition by low shear mixing to make a coating composition; and c) applying the coating composition to an electrically conductive porous substrate, typically by a low shear coating method.

  15. Instantaneous signal attenuation method for analysis of PFG fractional diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoxing

    2016-08-01

    An instantaneous signal attenuation (ISA) method for analyzing pulsed field gradient (PFG) fractional diffusion (FD) has been developed, which is modified from the propagator approach developed in 2001 by Lin et al. for analyzing PFG normal diffusion. Both, the current ISA method and the propagator method have the same fundamental basis that the total signal attenuation (SA) is the accumulation of all the ISA, and the ISA is the average SA of the whole diffusion system at each moment. However, the manner of calculating ISA is different. Unlike the use of the instantaneous propagator in the propagator method, the current method directly calculates ISA as A(K(t‧), t‧ + dt‧)/A(K(t‧), t‧), where A(K(t‧), t‧ + dt‧) and A(K(t‧), t‧) are the SA. This modification makes the current method applicable to PFG FD as the instantaneous propagator may not be obtainable in FD. The ISA method was applied to study PFG SA including the effect of finite gradient pulse widths (FGPW) for free FD, restricted FD and the FD affected by a non-homogeneous gradient field. The SA expressions were successfully obtained for all three types of free FDs while other current methods still have difficulty in obtaining all of them. The results from this method agree with reported results such as that obtained by the effective phase shift diffusion equation (EPSDE) method. The M-Wright phase distribution approximation was also used to derive an SA expression for time FD as a comparison, which agrees with ISA method. Additionally, the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) simulation was performed to simulate the SA of PFG FD, and the simulation results agree with the analytical results. Particularly, the CTRW simulation results give good support to the analytical results including FGPW effect for free FD and restricted time FD based on a fractional derivative model where there have been no corresponding theoretical reports to date. The theoretical SA expressions including FGPW obtained

  16. Instantaneous signal attenuation method for analysis of PFG fractional diffusions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoxing

    2016-08-01

    An instantaneous signal attenuation (ISA) method for analyzing pulsed field gradient (PFG) fractional diffusion (FD) has been developed, which is modified from the propagator approach developed in 2001 by Lin et al. for analyzing PFG normal diffusion. Both, the current ISA method and the propagator method have the same fundamental basis that the total signal attenuation (SA) is the accumulation of all the ISA, and the ISA is the average SA of the whole diffusion system at each moment. However, the manner of calculating ISA is different. Unlike the use of the instantaneous propagator in the propagator method, the current method directly calculates ISA as A(K(t'),t'+dt')/A(K(t'),t'), where A(K(t'),t'+dt') and A(K(t'),t') are the SA. This modification makes the current method applicable to PFG FD as the instantaneous propagator may not be obtainable in FD. The ISA method was applied to study PFG SA including the effect of finite gradient pulse widths (FGPW) for free FD, restricted FD and the FD affected by a non-homogeneous gradient field. The SA expressions were successfully obtained for all three types of free FDs while other current methods still have difficulty in obtaining all of them. The results from this method agree with reported results such as that obtained by the effective phase shift diffusion equation (EPSDE) method. The M-Wright phase distribution approximation was also used to derive an SA expression for time FD as a comparison, which agrees with ISA method. Additionally, the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) simulation was performed to simulate the SA of PFG FD, and the simulation results agree with the analytical results. Particularly, the CTRW simulation results give good support to the analytical results including FGPW effect for free FD and restricted time FD based on a fractional derivative model where there have been no corresponding theoretical reports to date. The theoretical SA expressions including FGPW obtained here such as [Formula: see

  17. Some basic mathematical methods of diffusion theory. [emphasis on atmospheric applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giere, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An introductory treatment of the fundamentals of diffusion theory is presented, starting with molecular diffusion and leading up to the statistical methods of turbulent diffusion. A multilayer diffusion model, designed to permit concentration and dosage calculations downwind of toxic clouds from rocket vehicles, is described. The concepts and equations of diffusion are developed on an elementary level, with emphasis on atmospheric applications.

  18. Support Operators Method for the Diffusion Equation in Multiple Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, Andrew R.; Shashkov, Mikhail J.

    2012-08-14

    A second-order finite difference scheme for the solution of the diffusion equation on non-uniform meshes is implemented. The method allows the heat conductivity to be discontinuous. The algorithm is formulated on a one dimensional mesh and is derived using the support operators method. A key component of the derivation is that the discrete analog of the flux operator is constructed to be the negative adjoint of the discrete divergence, in an inner product that is a discrete analog of the continuum inner product. The resultant discrete operators in the fully discretized diffusion equation are symmetric and positive definite. The algorithm is generalized to operate on meshes with cells which have mixed material properties. A mechanism to recover intermediate temperature values in mixed cells using a limited linear reconstruction is introduced. The implementation of the algorithm is verified and the linear reconstruction mechanism is compared to previous results for obtaining new material temperatures.

  19. A radial basis function Galerkin method for inhomogeneous nonlocal diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Rowe, Stephen T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a discretization for a nonlocal diffusion problem using a localized basis of radial basis functions. The stiffness matrix entries are assembled by a special quadrature routine unique to the localized basis. Combining the quadrature method with the localized basis produces a well-conditioned, sparse, symmetric positive definite stiffness matrix. We demonstrate that both the continuum and discrete problems are well-posed and present numerical results for the convergence behavior of the radial basis function method. As a result, we explore approximating the solution to anisotropic differential equations by solving anisotropic nonlocal integral equations using the radial basis function method.

  20. A localized meshless method for diffusion on folded surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ka Chun; Ling, Leevan; Ruuth, Steven J.

    2015-09-01

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) on surfaces arise in a variety of application areas including biological systems, medical imaging, fluid dynamics, mathematical physics, image processing and computer graphics. In this paper, we propose a radial basis function (RBF) discretization of the closest point method. The corresponding localized meshless method may be used to approximate diffusion on smooth or folded surfaces. Our method has the benefit of having an a priori error bound in terms of percentage of the norm of the solution. A stable solver is used to avoid the ill-conditioning that arises when the radial basis functions (RBFs) become flat.

  1. Background and Mathematical Analysis of Diffusion MRI Methods.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Alpay; Wong, Kenneth H; Larson-Prior, Linda; Cho, Zang-Hee; Mun, Seong K

    2012-03-01

    The addition of a pair of magnetic field gradient pulses had initially provided the measurement of spin motion with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. In the adaptation of DW-NMR techniques to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the taxonomy of mathematical models is divided in two categories: model matching and spectral methods. In this review, the methods are summarized starting from early diffusion weighted (DW) NMR models followed up with their adaptation to DW MRI. Finally, a newly introduced Fourier analysis based unifying theory, so-called Complete Fourier Direct MRI, is included to explain the mechanisms of existing methods.

  2. Diffusely reflecting paints including polytetrafluoroethylene and method of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B.; Shai, M. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The invention pertains to a high diffuse, reflective paint comprising an alcohol soluble binder, polytetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and an alcohol for coating a substrate and forming an optical reference with a superior Lambertian characteristic. A method for making the paint by first mixing the biner and alcohol, and thereafter by mixing in outgassed TFE is described. A wetting agent may be employed to aid the mixing process.

  3. Effective Thermal Diffusivity Study of Powder Biocomposites via Photoacoustic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariucci, V. V. G.; da Cruz, J. A.; Bonadio, T. G. M.; Picolloto, A. M.; Weinand, W. R.; Lima, W. M.; Medina, A. N.; Bento, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    The effective thermal diffusivity for biocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5) on powder form was studied via photoacoustic method adapted for porous materials. The concentration of each element was accompanied with the results of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A theoretical model for the thermal coupling of a three layered sample, designed to contain the powder material is proposed. The method for mixtures obeyed the formula [(1 - x) H A p + ( x) N b 2O5] for 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0. Experimental results for effective thermal diffusivity ranged between (6.4 ± 0.3) × 10-6 m2 s-1 and (9.8 ± 0.4) × 10-6 m2 s-1 for x ≤ 0.7. Values of the effective thermal diffusivity have decreased sharply to (0.7 ± 0.03) ×10-6 m2 s-1 for x > 0.7. SEM micrographs showed a coating of HAp over the particles of Nb2O5 for some mixtures.

  4. A diffusive information preservation method for small Knudsen number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fei; Fan, Jing

    2013-06-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a powerful particle-based method for modeling gas flows. It works well for relatively large Knudsen (Kn) numbers, typically larger than 0.01, but quickly becomes computationally intensive as Kn decreases due to its time step and cell size limitations. An alternative approach was proposed to relax or remove these limitations, based on replacing pairwise collisions with a stochastic model corresponding to the Fokker-Planck equation [J. Comput. Phys., 229, 1077 (2010); J. Fluid Mech., 680, 574 (2011)]. Similar to the DSMC method, the downside of that approach suffers from computationally statistical noise. To solve the problem, a diffusion-based information preservation (D-IP) method has been developed. The main idea is to track the motion of a simulated molecule from the diffusive standpoint, and obtain the flow velocity and temperature through sampling and averaging the IP quantities. To validate the idea and the corresponding model, several benchmark problems with Kn ˜ 10-3-10-4 have been investigated. It is shown that the IP calculations are not only accurate, but also efficient because they make possible using a time step and cell size over an order of magnitude larger than the mean collision time and mean free path, respectively.

  5. A diffusive information preservation method for small Knudsen number flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Fei; Fan, Jing

    2013-06-15

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a powerful particle-based method for modeling gas flows. It works well for relatively large Knudsen (Kn) numbers, typically larger than 0.01, but quickly becomes computationally intensive as Kn decreases due to its time step and cell size limitations. An alternative approach was proposed to relax or remove these limitations, based on replacing pairwise collisions with a stochastic model corresponding to the Fokker–Planck equation [J. Comput. Phys., 229, 1077 (2010); J. Fluid Mech., 680, 574 (2011)]. Similar to the DSMC method, the downside of that approach suffers from computationally statistical noise. To solve the problem, a diffusion-based information preservation (D-IP) method has been developed. The main idea is to track the motion of a simulated molecule from the diffusive standpoint, and obtain the flow velocity and temperature through sampling and averaging the IP quantities. To validate the idea and the corresponding model, several benchmark problems with Kn ∼ 10{sup −3}–10{sup −4} have been investigated. It is shown that the IP calculations are not only accurate, but also efficient because they make possible using a time step and cell size over an order of magnitude larger than the mean collision time and mean free path, respectively.

  6. Newton-Krylov methods applied to nonequilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, D.A.; Rider, W.J.; Olsen, G.L.

    1998-03-10

    The authors present results of applying a matrix-free Newton-Krylov method to a nonequilibrium radiation diffusion problem. Here, there is no use of operator splitting, and Newton`s method is used to convert the nonlinearities within a time step. Since the nonlinear residual is formed, it is used to monitor convergence. It is demonstrated that a simple Picard-based linearization produces a sufficient preconditioning matrix for the Krylov method, thus elevating the need to form or store a Jacobian matrix for Newton`s method. They discuss the possibility that the Newton-Krylov approach may allow larger time steps, without loss of accuracy, as compared to an operator split approach where nonlinearities are not converged within a time step.

  7. On matrix diffusion: formulations, solution methods and qualitative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Sánchez-Vila, Xavier; Benet, Inmaculada; Medina, Agustín; Galarza, Germán; Guimerà, Jordi

    Matrix diffusion has become widely recognized as an important transport mechanism. Unfortunately, accounting for matrix diffusion complicates solute-transport simulations. This problem has led to simplified formulations, partly motivated by the solution method. As a result, some confusion has been generated about how to properly pose the problem. One of the objectives of this work is to find some unity among existing formulations and solution methods. In doing so, some asymptotic properties of matrix diffusion are derived. Specifically, early-time behavior (short tests) depends only on φm2RmDm / Lm2, whereas late-time behavior (long tracer tests) depends only on φmRm, and not on matrix diffusion coefficient or block size and shape. The latter is always true for mean arrival time. These properties help in: (a) analyzing the qualitative behavior of matrix diffusion; (b) explaining one paradox of solute transport through fractured rocks (the apparent dependence of porosity on travel time); (c) discriminating between matrix diffusion and other problems (such as kinetic sorption or heterogeneity); and (d) describing identifiability problems and ways to overcome them. RésuméLa diffusion matricielle est un phénomène reconnu maintenant comme un mécanisme de transport important. Malheureusement, la prise en compte de la diffusion matricielle complique la simulation du transport de soluté. Ce problème a conduit à des formulations simplifiées, en partie à cause de la méthode de résolution. Il s'en est suivi une certaine confusion sur la façon de poser correctement le problème. L'un des objectifs de ce travail est de trouver une certaine unité parmi les formulations et les méthodes de résolution. C'est ainsi que certaines propriétés asymptotiques de la diffusion matricielle ont été dérivées. En particulier, le comportement à l'origine (expériences de traçage courtes) dépend uniquement du terme φm2RmDm / Lm2, alors que le comportement à long terme

  8. On matrix diffusion: formulations, solution methods and qualitative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Sánchez-Vila, Xavier; Benet, Inmaculada; Medina, Agustín; Galarza, Germán; Guimerà, Jordi

    Matrix diffusion has become widely recognized as an important transport mechanism. Unfortunately, accounting for matrix diffusion complicates solute-transport simulations. This problem has led to simplified formulations, partly motivated by the solution method. As a result, some confusion has been generated about how to properly pose the problem. One of the objectives of this work is to find some unity among existing formulations and solution methods. In doing so, some asymptotic properties of matrix diffusion are derived. Specifically, early-time behavior (short tests) depends only on φm2RmDm / Lm2, whereas late-time behavior (long tracer tests) depends only on φmRm, and not on matrix diffusion coefficient or block size and shape. The latter is always true for mean arrival time. These properties help in: (a) analyzing the qualitative behavior of matrix diffusion; (b) explaining one paradox of solute transport through fractured rocks (the apparent dependence of porosity on travel time); (c) discriminating between matrix diffusion and other problems (such as kinetic sorption or heterogeneity); and (d) describing identifiability problems and ways to overcome them. RésuméLa diffusion matricielle est un phénomène reconnu maintenant comme un mécanisme de transport important. Malheureusement, la prise en compte de la diffusion matricielle complique la simulation du transport de soluté. Ce problème a conduit à des formulations simplifiées, en partie à cause de la méthode de résolution. Il s'en est suivi une certaine confusion sur la façon de poser correctement le problème. L'un des objectifs de ce travail est de trouver une certaine unité parmi les formulations et les méthodes de résolution. C'est ainsi que certaines propriétés asymptotiques de la diffusion matricielle ont été dérivées. En particulier, le comportement à l'origine (expériences de traçage courtes) dépend uniquement du terme φm2RmDm / Lm2, alors que le comportement à long terme

  9. Transition from distributional to ergodic behavior in an inhomogeneous diffusion process: Method revealing an unknown surface diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Takuma; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion of molecules in cells plays an important role in providing a biological reaction on the surface by finding a target on the membrane surface. The water retardation (slow diffusion) near the target assists the searching molecules to recognize the target. Here, we consider effects of the surface diffusivity on the effective diffusivity, where diffusion on the surface is slower than that in bulk. We show that the ensemble-averaged mean-square displacements increase linearly with time when the desorption rate from the surface is finite, which is valid even when the diffusion on the surface is anomalous (subdiffusion). Moreover, this slow diffusion on the surface affects the fluctuations of the time-averaged mean-square displacements (TAMSDs). We find that fluctuations of the TAMSDs remain large when the measurement time is smaller than a characteristic time, and decays according to an increase of the measurement time for a relatively large measurement time. Therefore, we find a transition from nonergodic (distributional) to ergodic diffusivity in a target search process. Moreover, this fluctuation analysis provides a method to estimate an unknown surface diffusivity.

  10. Extrapolation techniques applied to matrix methods in neutron diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccready, Robert R

    1956-01-01

    A general matrix method is developed for the solution of characteristic-value problems of the type arising in many physical applications. The scheme employed is essentially that of Gauss and Seidel with appropriate modifications needed to make it applicable to characteristic-value problems. An iterative procedure produces a sequence of estimates to the answer; and extrapolation techniques, based upon previous behavior of iterants, are utilized in speeding convergence. Theoretically sound limits are placed on the magnitude of the extrapolation that may be tolerated. This matrix method is applied to the problem of finding criticality and neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor with control rods. The two-dimensional finite-difference approximation to the two-group neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor with control rods. The two-dimensional finite-difference approximation to the two-group neutron-diffusion equations is treated. Results for this example are indicated.

  11. Multigrid methods for numerical simulation of laminar diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, Z.; Mccormick, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents the result of a computational study of multigrid methods for numerical simulation of 2D diffusion flames. The focus is on a simplified combustion model, which is assumed to be a single step, infinitely fast and irreversible chemical reaction with five species (C3H8, O2, N2, CO2 and H2O). A fully-implicit second-order hybrid scheme is developed on a staggered grid, which is stretched in the streamwise coordinate direction. A full approximation multigrid scheme (FAS) based on line distributive relaxation is developed as a fast solver for the algebraic equations arising at each time step. Convergence of the process for the simplified model problem is more than two-orders of magnitude faster than other iterative methods, and the computational results show good grid convergence, with second-order accuracy, as well as qualitatively agreement with the results of other researchers.

  12. NMR signal for particles diffusing under potentials: From path integrals and numerical methods to a model of diffusion anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolcu, Cem; Memiç, Muhammet; Şimşek, Kadir; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Özarslan, Evren

    2016-05-01

    We study the influence of diffusion on NMR experiments when the molecules undergo random motion under the influence of a force field and place special emphasis on parabolic (Hookean) potentials. To this end, the problem is studied using path integral methods. Explicit relationships are derived for commonly employed gradient waveforms involving pulsed and oscillating gradients. The Bloch-Torrey equation, describing the temporal evolution of magnetization, is modified by incorporating potentials. A general solution to this equation is obtained for the case of parabolic potential by adopting the multiple correlation function (MCF) formalism, which has been used in the past to quantify the effects of restricted diffusion. Both analytical and MCF results were found to be in agreement with random walk simulations. A multidimensional formulation of the problem is introduced that leads to a new characterization of diffusion anisotropy. Unlike the case of traditional methods that employ a diffusion tensor, anisotropy originates from the tensorial force constant, and bulk diffusivity is retained in the formulation. Our findings suggest that some features of the NMR signal that have traditionally been attributed to restricted diffusion are accommodated by the Hookean model. Under certain conditions, the formalism can be envisioned to provide a viable approximation to the mathematically more challenging restricted diffusion problems.

  13. NMR signal for particles diffusing under potentials: From path integrals and numerical methods to a model of diffusion anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Cem; Memiç, Muhammet; Şimşek, Kadir; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Özarslan, Evren

    2016-05-01

    We study the influence of diffusion on NMR experiments when the molecules undergo random motion under the influence of a force field and place special emphasis on parabolic (Hookean) potentials. To this end, the problem is studied using path integral methods. Explicit relationships are derived for commonly employed gradient waveforms involving pulsed and oscillating gradients. The Bloch-Torrey equation, describing the temporal evolution of magnetization, is modified by incorporating potentials. A general solution to this equation is obtained for the case of parabolic potential by adopting the multiple correlation function (MCF) formalism, which has been used in the past to quantify the effects of restricted diffusion. Both analytical and MCF results were found to be in agreement with random walk simulations. A multidimensional formulation of the problem is introduced that leads to a new characterization of diffusion anisotropy. Unlike the case of traditional methods that employ a diffusion tensor, anisotropy originates from the tensorial force constant, and bulk diffusivity is retained in the formulation. Our findings suggest that some features of the NMR signal that have traditionally been attributed to restricted diffusion are accommodated by the Hookean model. Under certain conditions, the formalism can be envisioned to provide a viable approximation to the mathematically more challenging restricted diffusion problems. PMID:27300946

  14. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  15. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and highly stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Actual cycle results are verified using quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  16. Method for applying a diffusion barrier interlayer for high temperature components

    DOEpatents

    Wei, Ronghua; Cheruvu, Narayana S.

    2016-03-08

    A coated substrate and a method of forming a diffusion barrier coating system between a substrate and a MCrAl coating, including a diffusion barrier coating deposited onto at least a portion of a substrate surface, wherein the diffusion barrier coating comprises a nitride, oxide or carbide of one or more transition metals and/or metalloids and a MCrAl coating, wherein M includes a transition metal or a metalloid, deposited on at least a portion of the diffusion barrier coating, wherein the diffusion barrier coating restricts the inward diffusion of aluminum of the MCrAl coating into the substrate.

  17. Note: Molecular diffusivity in a small pore zeolite measured by a variable pressure (piezometric) uptake method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Kobayashi, Yasukazu; Muhammad, Usman; Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Yao

    2016-03-01

    The use of numerical analysis to solve the diffusion equation in the uptake method allowed the measurement of molecular diffusivity in a zeolite with a variable pressure around it. The diffusivity was obtained from the data in the measurement of the adsorption isotherm, which means that the diffusivity measurement now needs neither a special instrument nor procedure. The diffusivities of all the gases are readily available from the measurement of their adsorption isotherms and these data include how the diffusivity changes versus adsorbed concentration. The modeling introduced can also be used for a zeolite with a surface barrier.

  18. A novel method for effective diffusion coefficient measurement in gas diffusion media of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Sun, Hai; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Suli; Jiang, Luhua; Sun, Gongquan

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for measuring effective diffusion coefficient of porous materials is developed. The oxygen concentration gradient is established by an air-breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The porous sample is set in a sample holder located in the cathode plate of the PEMFC. At a given oxygen flux, the effective diffusion coefficients are related to the difference of oxygen concentration across the samples, which can be correlated with the differences of the output voltage of the PEMFC with and without inserting the sample in the cathode plate. Compared to the conventional electrical conductivity method, this method is more reliable for measuring non-wetting samples.

  19. A mapping method for distributive mixing with diffusion: Interplay between chaos and diffusion in time-periodic sine flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Conor P.; Christov, Ivan C.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2013-05-01

    We present an accurate and efficient computational method for solving the advection-diffusion equation in time-periodic chaotic flows. The method uses operator splitting, which allows the advection and diffusion steps to be treated independently. Taking advantage of flow periodicity, the advection step is solved using a mapping method, and diffusion is "added" discretely after each iteration of the advection map. This approach results in the construction of a composite mapping matrix over an entire period of the chaotic advection-diffusion process and provides a natural framework for the analysis of mixing. To test the approach, we consider two-dimensional time-periodic sine flow. By comparing the numerical solutions obtained by our method to reference solutions, we find qualitative agreement for large time steps (structure of concentration profile) and quantitative agreement for small time steps (low error). Further, we study the interplay between mixing through chaotic advection and mixing through diffusion leading to an analytical model for the evolution of the intensity of segregation with time. Additionally, we demonstrate that our operator splitting mapping approach can be readily extended to three dimensions.

  20. Micronization of silybin by the emulsion solvent diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Bing; Shen, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Jie-Xin; Zhang, Hai-Xia; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Jian-Feng; Yun, Jimmy

    2009-07-01

    Micronized silybin particles were successfully prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method. Uniform spherical and rod-shaped particles with a mean size of 2.48 and 0.89 microm could be obtained using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration of 0.1 wt% at 30 and 15 degrees C, respectively. The characterization of silybin particles by SEM and particle size distribution (PSD) indicated that with the increase of temperature from 15 to 30 degrees C, the as-prepared particles became bigger and had a tendency to turn into spherical shapes; with the increase of SDS concentration from 0.02 to 0.1 wt%, the span of PSD became narrower while the mean particle size kept almost unchanged. XRD patterns and FT-IR spectra showed that the spherical and rod-shaped silybin particles possessed decreased crystallinity; however, the chemical structure and components were similar to those of the commercial silybin powder. Dissolution tests demonstrated that both of the spherical and rod-shaped silybin particles exhibited significantly enhanced dissolution rate when compared to the commercial silybin powder.

  1. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2004-09-07

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  2. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  3. An Integration Factor Method for Stochastic and Stiff Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Catherine; Wang, Dongyong; Nie, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic effects are often present in the biochemical systems involving reactions and diffusions. When the reactions are stiff, existing numerical methods for stochastic reaction diffusion equations require either very small time steps for any explicit schemes or solving large nonlinear systems at each time step for the implicit schemes. Here we present a class of semi-implicit integration factor methods that treat the diffusion term exactly and reaction implicitly for a system of stochastic reaction-diffusion equations. Our linear stability analysis shows the advantage of such methods for both small and large amplitudes of noise. Direct use of the method to solving several linear and nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion equations demonstrates good accuracy, efficiency, and stability properties. This new class of methods, which are easy to implement, will have broader applications in solving stochastic reaction-diffusion equations arising from models in biology and physical sciences. PMID:25983341

  4. An integration factor method for stochastic and stiff reaction–diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ta, Catherine; Wang, Dongyong; Nie, Qing

    2015-08-15

    Stochastic effects are often present in the biochemical systems involving reactions and diffusions. When the reactions are stiff, existing numerical methods for stochastic reaction diffusion equations require either very small time steps for any explicit schemes or solving large nonlinear systems at each time step for the implicit schemes. Here we present a class of semi-implicit integration factor methods that treat the diffusion term exactly and reaction implicitly for a system of stochastic reaction–diffusion equations. Our linear stability analysis shows the advantage of such methods for both small and large amplitudes of noise. Direct use of the method to solving several linear and nonlinear stochastic reaction–diffusion equations demonstrates good accuracy, efficiency, and stability properties. This new class of methods, which are easy to implement, will have broader applications in solving stochastic reaction–diffusion equations arising from models in biology and physical sciences.

  5. An integration factor method for stochastic and stiff reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Catherine; Wang, Dongyong; Nie, Qing

    2015-08-01

    Stochastic effects are often present in the biochemical systems involving reactions and diffusions. When the reactions are stiff, existing numerical methods for stochastic reaction diffusion equations require either very small time steps for any explicit schemes or solving large nonlinear systems at each time step for the implicit schemes. Here we present a class of semi-implicit integration factor methods that treat the diffusion term exactly and reaction implicitly for a system of stochastic reaction-diffusion equations. Our linear stability analysis shows the advantage of such methods for both small and large amplitudes of noise. Direct use of the method to solving several linear and nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion equations demonstrates good accuracy, efficiency, and stability properties. This new class of methods, which are easy to implement, will have broader applications in solving stochastic reaction-diffusion equations arising from models in biology and physical sciences.

  6. A method for distinguishing between propagons, diffusions, and locons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyf, Hamid Reza; Henry, Asegun

    2016-07-01

    The majority of intuition on phonon transport has been derived from studies of homogenous crystalline solids, where the atomic composition and structure are periodic. For this specific class of materials, the solutions to the equations of motions for the atoms (in the harmonic limit) result in plane wave modulated velocity fields for the normal modes of vibration. However, it has been known for several decades that whenever a system lacks periodicity, either compositional or structural, the normal modes of vibration can still be determined (in the harmonic limit), but the solutions take on different characteristics and many modes may not be plane wave modulated. Previous work has classified the types of vibrations into three primary categories, namely, propagons, diffusions, and locons. One can use the participation ratio to distinguish locons, from propagons and diffusons, which measures the extent to which a mode is localized. However, distinguishing between propagons and diffusons has remained a challenge, since both are spatially delocalized. Here, we present a new method that quantifies the extent to which a mode's character corresponds to a propagating mode, e.g., exhibits plane wave modulation. This then allows for clear and quantitative distinctions between propagons and diffusons. By resolving this issue quantitatively, one can now automate the classification of modes for any arbitrary material or structure, subject to a single constraint that the atoms must vibrate stably around their respective equilibrium sites. Several example test cases are studied including crystalline silicon and germanium, crystalline silicon with different defect concentrations, as well as amorphous silicon, germanium, and silica.

  7. A new gauge-invariant method for diagnosing eddy diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, J.; Maddison, J. R.; Marshall, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Coarse resolution numerical ocean models must typically include a parameterisation for mesoscale turbulence. A common recipe for such parameterisations is to invoke mixing of some tracer quantity, such as potential vorticity or buoyancy. However, it is well known that eddy fluxes include large rotational components which necessarily do not lead to any mixing; eddy diffusivities diagnosed from unfiltered fluxes are thus contaminated by the presence of these rotational components. Here a new methodology is applied whereby eddy diffusivities are diagnosed directly from the eddy force function. The eddy force function depends only upon flux divergences, is independent of any rotational flux components, and is inherently non-local and smooth. A one-shot inversion procedure is applied, minimising the mis-match between parameterised force functions and force functions derived from eddy resolving calculations. This enables diffusivities associated with the eddy potential vorticity and Gent-McWilliams coefficients associated with eddy buoyancy fluxes to be diagnosed. This methodology is applied to multi-layer quasi-geostrophic ocean gyre simulations. It is found that: (i) a strictly down-gradient scheme for mixing potential vorticity and quasi-geostrophic buoyancy has limited success in reducing the mis-match compared to one with no sign constraint on the eddy diffusivity or Gent--McWilliams coefficient, with prevalent negative signals around the time-mean jet; (ii) the diagnostic is successful away from the jet region and wind-forced top layer; (iii) the locations of closed mean stream lines correlate with signals of positive eddy potential vorticity diffusivity; (iv) there is indication that the magnitude of the eddy potential vorticity diffusivity correlates well with the eddy energy. Implications for parameterisation are discussed in light of these diagnostic results.

  8. Multilevel methods for transport equations in diffusive regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manteuffel, Thomas A.; Ressel, Klaus

    1993-01-01

    We consider the numerical solution of the single-group, steady state, isotropic transport equation. An analysis by means of the moment equations shows that a discrete ordinate S(sub N) discretization in direction (angle) with a least squares finite element discretization in space does not behave properly in the diffusion limit. A scaling of the S(sub N) equations is introduced so that the least squares discretization has the correct diffusion limit. For the resulting discrete system a full multigrid algorithm was developed.

  9. Thermal diffusivity measurement by lock-in photothermal shadowgraph method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, A.; Alvarado, S.; Cabrera, H.; Calderón, A.; Marín, E.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present a novel application of the shadowgraph technique for obtaining the thermal diffusivity of an opaque solid sample, inspired by the orthogonal skimming photothermal beam deflection technique. This new variant utilizes the shadow projected by the sample when put against a collimated light source. The sample is then heated periodically by another light beam, giving rise to thermal waves, which propagate across it and through its surroundings. Changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media due to the heating distort the shadow. This phenomenon is recorded and lock-in amplified in order to determine the sample's thermal diffusivity.

  10. Grid-free simulation of diffusion using random walk methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoniem, A. F.; Sherman, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    The simulation of the diffusion of a continuum field by the random walk (RW) displacement of a set of particles is considered. Elements of the gradients of the diffusive concentration are transported by computational particles. It is demonstrated that, by the use of concentration gradients in the RW process, statistical errors are reduced and each realization of the numerical solution is a representation of the exact solution. The algorithm is grid-free, and the computational elements move to follow the gradients; hence, the algorithm is self-adaptive, and uniform resolution is achieved for all times.

  11. A hybrid continuous-discrete method for stochastic reaction–diffusion processes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Likun; Nie, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic fluctuations in reaction–diffusion processes often have substantial effect on spatial and temporal dynamics of signal transductions in complex biological systems. One popular approach for simulating these processes is to divide the system into small spatial compartments assuming that molecules react only within the same compartment and jump between adjacent compartments driven by the diffusion. While the approach is convenient in terms of its implementation, its computational cost may become prohibitive when diffusive jumps occur significantly more frequently than reactions, as in the case of rapid diffusion. Here, we present a hybrid continuous-discrete method in which diffusion is simulated using continuous approximation while reactions are based on the Gillespie algorithm. Specifically, the diffusive jumps are approximated as continuous Gaussian random vectors with time-dependent means and covariances, allowing use of a large time step, even for rapid diffusion. By considering the correlation among diffusive jumps, the approximation is accurate for the second moment of the diffusion process. In addition, a criterion is obtained for identifying the region in which such diffusion approximation is required to enable adaptive calculations for better accuracy. Applications to a linear diffusion system and two nonlinear systems of morphogens demonstrate the effectiveness and benefits of the new hybrid method. PMID:27703710

  12. Determining Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbine performance using a combined CFD/BEM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesby, JE; Bradney, D. R.; Clausen, PD

    2016-09-01

    The optimisation of a Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbine has traditionally focused on maximising its power output. Optimising the design of the blade and the shape of the diffuser for maximum turbine power over a range of wind velocities is a complex process, as each will influence the others flow regime. In this paper we propose a method that combines the predictions of flow through a diffuser, using computational fluid dynamics, and the flow from a turbine blade using a modified blade element theory to predict the power output of a diffuser augmented wind turbine. Good agreement was found between the predictions from this new method and experimental data from the literature.

  13. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Rosen, M S; Wang, R; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    2002-12-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. PMID:12807139

  14. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Reproducibility of the Structural Connectome Reconstruction across Diffusion Methods.

    PubMed

    Prčkovska, Vesna; Rodrigues, Paulo; Puigdellivol Sanchez, Ana; Ramos, Marc; Andorra, Magi; Martinez-Heras, Eloy; Falcon, Carles; Prats-Galino, Albert; Villoslada, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the structural connectomes can lead to powerful insights about the brain's organization and damage. However, the accuracy and reproducibility of constructing the structural connectome done with different acquisition and reconstruction techniques is not well defined. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of the structural connectome techniques by performing test-retest (same day) and longitudinal studies (after 1 month) as well as analyzing graph-based measures on the data acquired from 22 healthy volunteers (6 subjects were used for the longitudinal study). We compared connectivity matrices and tract reconstructions obtained with the most typical acquisition schemes used in clinical application: diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI). We observed that all techniques showed high reproducibility in the test-retest analysis (correlation >.9). However, HARDI was the only technique with low variability (2%) in the longitudinal assessment (1-month interval). The intraclass coefficient analysis showed the highest reproducibility for the DTI connectome, however, with more sparse connections than HARDI and DSI. Qualitative (neuroanatomical) assessment of selected tracts confirmed the quantitative results showing that HARDI managed to detect most of the analyzed fiber groups and fanning fibers. In conclusion, we found that HARDI acquisition showed the most balanced trade-off between high reproducibility of the connectome, higher rate of path detection and of fanning fibers, and intermediate acquisition times (10-15 minutes), although at the cost of higher appearance of aberrant fibers. PMID:26464179

  16. Method of independently operating a group of stages within a diffusion cascade

    DOEpatents

    Benedict, Manson; Fruit, Allen J.; Levey, Horace B.

    1976-06-08

    1. A method of operating a group of the diffusion stages of a productive diffusion cascade with countercurrent flow, said group comprising a top and a bottom stage, which comprises isolating said group from said cascade, circulating the diffused gas produced in said top stage to the feed of said bottom stage while at the same time circulating the undiffused gas from said bottom stage to the feed of said top stage whereby major changes in

  17. Kernel weights optimization for error diffusion halftoning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseev, Victor

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes a study to find the best error diffusion kernel for digital halftoning under various restrictions on the number of non-zero kernel coefficients and their set of values. As an objective measure of quality, WSNR was used. The problem of multidimensional optimization was solved numerically using several well-known algorithms: Nelder- Mead, BFGS, and others. The study found a kernel function that provides a quality gain of about 5% in comparison with the best of the commonly used kernel introduced by Floyd and Steinberg. Other kernels obtained allow to significantly reduce the computational complexity of the halftoning process without reducing its quality.

  18. A Review of Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Computational Methods and Software Tools

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Khader M.; Walimuni, Indika S.; Abid, Humaira; Hahn, Klaus R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we provide an up-to-date short review of computational magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and software tools that are widely used to process and analyze diffusion-weighted MRI data. A review of different methods used to acquire, model and analyze diffusion-weighted imaging data (DWI) is first provided with focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The major preprocessing, processing and post-processing procedures applied to DTI data are discussed. A list of freely available software packages to analyze diffusion MRI data is also provided. PMID:21087766

  19. A multigrid Newton-Krylov method for flux-limited radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Knoll, D.A.; Olson, G.L.

    1998-09-01

    The authors focus on the integration of radiation diffusion including flux-limited diffusion coefficients. The nonlinear integration is accomplished with a Newton-Krylov method preconditioned with a multigrid Picard linearization of the governing equations. They investigate the efficiency of the linear and nonlinear iterative techniques.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of oxygen - diffused titanium using spectroscopy method.

    PubMed

    Lubas, M; Sitarz, M; Jasinski, J J; Jelen, P; Klita, L; Podsiad, P; Jasinski, J

    2014-12-10

    A thin native oxide film that forms on the titanium surface makes contact with the bone tissue has been considered to be of great importance to successful osseointegration. The study investigated oxygen-diffused grade 2 titanium obtained by introducing oxygen into the titanium crystal lattice using thermal treatment in fluidized bed performed at 610°C and 640°C in 6, 8, 12h. The thermal treatment at different temperatures and different times led to the formation of a TiO2 rutile film on the titanium surface and a concentration gradient of oxygen into titanium (XRD/GID analyses and GDOS results). Moreover Raman spectroscopy results showed that the TiO2 film on the surface titanium was composed of two oxides (TiO2), i.e. anatase and rutile, for the analyzed variants of heat treatment. The aim of the present study was to establish the optimum conditions for obtaining oxygen-diffused TiO2 film. The results obtained in the study demonstrated that the use of a fluidized bed for titanium oxidation processes allows for obtaining uniform oxide layers with good adhesion to the substrate, thus improving the titanium surface to suit biomedical applications.

  1. A fully implicit method for 3D quasi-steady state magnetic advection-diffusion.

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, Christopher; Robinson, Allen Conrad

    2009-09-01

    We describe the implementation of a prototype fully implicit method for solving three-dimensional quasi-steady state magnetic advection-diffusion problems. This method allows us to solve the magnetic advection diffusion equations in an Eulerian frame with a fixed, user-prescribed velocity field. We have verified the correctness of method and implementation on two standard verification problems, the Solberg-White magnetic shear problem and the Perry-Jones-White rotating cylinder problem.

  2. Universality and specificity in molecular orientation in anisotropic gels prepared by diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Maki, Yasuyuki; Furusawa, Kazuya; Yasuraoka, Sho; Okamura, Hideki; Hosoya, Natsuki; Sunaga, Mari; Dobashi, Toshiaki; Sugimoto, Yasunobu; Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    2014-08-01

    Molecular orientation in anisotropic gels of chitosan, Curdlan and DNA obtained by dialysis of those aqueous solutions in gelation-inducing solutions was investigated. In this diffusion method (or dialysis method), the gel formation was induced by letting small molecules diffuse in or out of the polymer solutions through the surface. For the gels of DNA and chitosan, the polymer chains aligned perpendicular to the diffusion direction. The same direction of molecular orientation was observed for the Curdlan gel prepared in the dialysis cell. On the other hand, a peculiar nature was observed for the Curdlan gel prepared in the dialysis tube: the molecular orientation was perpendicular to the diffusion direction in the outermost layer of the gel, while the orientation was parallel to the diffusion direction in the inner translucent layer. The orientation parallel to the diffusion direction is attributed to a small deformation of the inner translucent layer caused by a slight shrinkage of the central region after the gel formation. At least near the surface of the gel, the molecular orientation perpendicular to the diffusion direction is a universal characteristic for the gels prepared by the diffusion method. PMID:24751255

  3. A comparison between protein crystals grown with vapor diffusion methods in microgravity and protein crystals using a gel liquid-liquid diffusion ground-based method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Teresa Y.; He, Xiao-Min; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Crystals of human serum albumin have been successfully grown in a variety of gels using crystallization conditions otherwise equivalent to those utilized in the popular hanging-drop vapor-equilibrium method. Preliminary comparisons of gel grown crystals with crystals grown by the vapor diffusion method via both ground-based and microgravity methods indicate that crystals superior in size and quality may be grown by limiting solutal convection. Preliminary X-ray diffraction statistics are presented.

  4. Comparative study of methods used to estimate ionic diffusion coefficients using migration tests

    SciTech Connect

    Narsilio, G.A. Li, R. Pivonka, P. Smith, D.W.

    2007-08-15

    Ionic diffusion coefficients are estimated rapidly using electromigration tests. In this paper, electromigration tests are accurately simulated by numerically solving the Nernst-Planck (NP) equation (coupled with the electroneutrality condition (EN)) using the finite element method. Numerical simulations are validated against experimental data obtained elsewhere [E. Samson, J. Marchand, K.A. Snyder, Calculation of ionic diffusion coefficients on the basis of migration test results, Materials and Structures/Materiaux et Constructions 36 (257) (2003) 156-165., H. Friedmann, O. Amiri, A. Ait-Mokhtar, A direct method for determining chloride diffusion coefficient by using migration test, Cement and Concrete Research 34 (11) (2004) 1967-1973.]. It is shown that migration due to the non-linear electric potential completely overwhelms diffusion due to concentration gradients. The effects of different applied voltage differences and chloride source concentrations on estimations of chloride diffusion coefficients are explored. We show that the pore fluid within concrete and mortar specimens generally differs from the curing solution, lowering the apparent diffusion coefficient, primarily due to interactions of chloride ions with other ions in the pore fluid. We show that the variation of source chloride concentration strongly affects the estimation of diffusion coefficients in non-steady-state tests; however this effect vanishes under steady-state conditions. Most importantly, a comparison of diffusion coefficients obtained from sophisticated analyses (i.e., NP-EN) and a variety of commonly used simplifying methods to estimate chloride diffusion coefficients allows us to identify those methods and experimental conditions where both approaches deliver good estimates for chloride diffusion coefficients. Finally, we demonstrate why simultaneous use and monitoring of current density and fluxes are recommended for both the non-steady and steady-state migration tests.

  5. A novel method to determine the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen ion in ruthenium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, George T.; Yen, S. K.

    2002-10-01

    Hydrogen ion diffusion in ruthenium oxide film is of significant interest because of its importance in capacitor, sensor and catalyst applications. In this study, a method based on potential-pH response measurement was used to determine hydrogen ion diffusion in ruthenium oxide films. The drift in the potential-pH response is believed to be due to the hydrated layer, which affects hydrogen ion diffusion onto the oxide film of the pH sensor. Hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient of ruthenium oxide films obtained from this method was 6×10 -14 cm2/ s. The unique feature of the potential-pH response method is its relatively simple experimental procedure, which eliminates complications arising from surface related effects and/or presence of hydrogen traps in membrane such as those found in the conventional permeation method.

  6. A Robust and Efficient Method for Steady State Patterns in Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wing-Cheong; Chen, Long; Wang, Ming; Nie, Qing

    2012-01-01

    An inhomogeneous steady state pattern of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations with no-flux boundary conditions is usually computed by solving the corresponding time-dependent reaction-diffusion equations using temporal schemes. Nonlinear solvers (e.g., Newton’s method) take less CPU time in direct computation for the steady state; however, their convergence is sensitive to the initial guess, often leading to divergence or convergence to spatially homogeneous solution. Systematically numerical exploration of spatial patterns of reaction-diffusion equations under different parameter regimes requires that the numerical method be efficient and robust to initial condition or initial guess, with better likelihood of convergence to an inhomogeneous pattern. Here, a new approach that combines the advantages of temporal schemes in robustness and Newton’s method in fast convergence in solving steady states of reaction-diffusion equations is proposed. In particular, an adaptive implicit Euler with inexact solver (AIIE) method is found to be much more efficient than temporal schemes and more robust in convergence than typical nonlinear solvers (e.g., Newton’s method) in finding the inhomogeneous pattern. Application of this new approach to two reaction-diffusion equations in one, two, and three spatial dimensions, along with direct comparisons to several other existing methods, demonstrates that AIIE is a more desirable method for searching inhomogeneous spatial patterns of reaction-diffusion equations in a large parameter space. PMID:22773849

  7. An efficient wavelet analysis method to film-pore diffusion model arising in mathematical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, G

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we have established an efficient Legendre wavelet based approximation method to solve film-pore diffusion model arising in engineering. Film-pore diffusion model is widely used to determine study the kinetics of adsorption systems. The use of Legendre wavelet based approximation method is found to be accurate, simple, fast, flexible, convenient, and computationally attractive. It is shown that film-pore diffusion model satisfactorily describe kinetics of methylene blue adsorption onto the three low-cost adsorbents, Guava, teak and gulmohar plant leaf powders, used in this study. PMID:24562792

  8. Method for measurement of diffusivity: Calorimetric studies of Fe/Ni multilayer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, JX; Barmak, K

    2015-07-15

    A calorimetric method for the measurement of diffusivity in thin film multilayers is introduced and applied to the Fe Ni system. Using this method, the diffusivity in [Fe (25 nm)/Ni (25 nm)](20) multilayer thin films is measured as 4 x 10(-3)exp(-1.6 +/- 0.1 eV/ k(B)T) cm(2)/s, respectively. The diffusion mechanism in the multilayers and its relevance to laboratory synthesis of L1(0) ordered FeNi are discussed. (C) 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Accurate determination of specific heat at high temperatures using the flash diffusivity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, J. W.; Zoltan, A.; Wood, C.

    1989-01-01

    The flash diffusivity method of Parker et al. (1961) was used to measure accurately the specific heat of test samples simultaneously with thermal diffusivity, thus obtaining the thermal conductivity of these materials directly. The accuracy of data obtained on two types of materials (n-type silicon-germanium alloys and niobium), was + or - 3 percent. It is shown that the method is applicable up to at least 1300 K.

  10. Note on coefficient matrices from stochastic Galerkin methods for random diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Tao; Tang Tao

    2010-11-01

    In a recent work by Xiu and Shen [D. Xiu, J. Shen, Efficient stochastic Galerkin methods for random diffusion equations, J. Comput. Phys. 228 (2009) 266-281], the Galerkin methods are used to solve stochastic diffusion equations in random media, where some properties for the coefficient matrix of the resulting system are provided. They also posed an open question on the properties of the coefficient matrix. In this work, we will provide some results related to the open question.

  11. Antimicrobial potentials of Mentha longifolia by disc diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Bakht, Jehan; Shaheen, Salma; Shafi, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted for the assessment of the antimicrobial activities of different solvents extracted samples from the aerial parts of Mentha longifolia against ten microbial species through the disc diffusion assay using two different concentrations of 1 and 2 mg disc1. All extracts from Mentha longifolia showed different ranges of antimicrobial activities. Butanol and ethyl acetate fractions showed inhibitory activities against all microbial species. Methanol fraction showed inhibitory effects against all the tested microbial species except Salmonella typhi. Salmonella typhi was also not controlled by methanol, petroleum ether and dichloromethane extracted samples. The most susceptible gram positive bacteria was Bacillus atropheus and Bacillus subtilis and were inhibited by all extracts and Staphylococus aureus was least susceptible among gram positive bacteria. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most susceptible gram negative bacterium and Salmonella typhi was highly resistant among the gram negative bacteria. Erwinia carotovora and Agrobacterium tumefaciene were susceptible to all fractions. All fractions showed antifungal activities against Candida albicans except water extracted samples.

  12. Diffuse interface method for a compressible binary fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiewei; Amberg, Gustav; Do-Quang, Minh

    2016-01-01

    Multicomponent, multiphase, compressible flows are very important in real life, as well as in scientific research, while their modeling is in an early stage. In this paper, we propose a diffuse interface model for compressible binary mixtures, based on the balance of mass, momentum, energy, and the second law of thermodynamics. We show both analytically and numerically that this model is able to describe the phase equilibrium for a real binary mixture (CO_{2} + ethanol is considered in this paper) very well by adjusting the parameter which measures the attraction force between molecules of the two components in the model. We also show that the calculated surface tension of the CO_{2} + ethanol mixture at different concentrations match measurements in the literature when the mixing capillary coefficient is taken to be the geometric mean of the capillary coefficient of each component. Three different cases of two droplets in a shear flow, with the same or different concentration, are simulated, showing that the higher concentration of CO_{2} the smaller the surface tension and the easier the drop deforms. PMID:26871168

  13. Development of a numerical method for the prediction of turbulent flows in dump diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yasunori; Kawai, Masafumi; Sato, Yukinori; Toh, Hidemi

    1987-01-01

    In order to obtain an effective tool to design dump diffusers for gas turbine combustors, a finite-volume numerical calculation method has been developed for the solution of two-dimensional/axisymmetric incompressible steady Navier-Stokes equation in general curvilinear coordinate system. This method was applied to the calculations of turbulent flows in a two-dimensional dump diffuser with uniform and distorted inlet velocity profiles as well as an annular dump diffuser with uniform inlet velocity profile, and the calculated results were compared with experimental data. The numerical results showed a good agreement with experimental data in case of both inlet velocity profiles; eventually, the numerical method was confirmed to be an effective tool for the development of dump diffusers which can predict the flow pattern, velocity distribution and the pressure loss.

  14. Evaluation of the direct and diffusion methods for the determination of fluoride content in table salt

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mier, E. Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E.; Buckley, Christine M.; Margineda, Jorge; Zero, Domenick T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess methods currently used for analyzing fluoridated salt in order to identify the most useful method for this type of analysis. Basic research design Seventy-five fluoridated salt samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for fluoride content, with and without pretreatment, using direct and diffusion methods. Element analysis was also conducted in selected samples. Fluoride was added to ultra pure NaCl and non-fluoridated commercial salt samples and Ca and Mg were added to fluoride samples in order to assess fluoride recoveries using modifications to the methods. Results Larger amounts of fluoride were found and recovered using diffusion than direct methods (96%–100% for diffusion vs. 67%–90% for direct). Statistically significant differences were obtained between direct and diffusion methods using different ion strength adjusters. Pretreatment methods reduced the amount of recovered fluoride. Determination of fluoride content was influenced both by the presence of NaCl and other ions in the salt. Conclusion Direct and diffusion techniques for analysis of fluoridated salt are suitable methods for fluoride analysis. The choice of method should depend on the purpose of the analysis. PMID:20088217

  15. Data on the verification and validation of segmentation and registration methods for diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Oscar; Zosso, Dominique; Daducci, Alessandro; Bach-Cuadra, Meritxell; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Santos, Andres

    2016-09-01

    The verification and validation of segmentation and registration methods is a necessary assessment in the development of new processing methods. However, verification and validation of diffusion MRI (dMRI) processing methods is challenging for the lack of gold-standard data. The data described here are related to the research article entitled "Surface-driven registration method for the structure-informed segmentation of diffusion MR images" [1], in which publicly available data are used to derive golden-standard reference-data to validate and evaluate segmentation and registration methods in dMRI. PMID:27508235

  16. Data on the verification and validation of segmentation and registration methods for diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Oscar; Zosso, Dominique; Daducci, Alessandro; Bach-Cuadra, Meritxell; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Santos, Andres

    2016-09-01

    The verification and validation of segmentation and registration methods is a necessary assessment in the development of new processing methods. However, verification and validation of diffusion MRI (dMRI) processing methods is challenging for the lack of gold-standard data. The data described here are related to the research article entitled "Surface-driven registration method for the structure-informed segmentation of diffusion MR images" [1], in which publicly available data are used to derive golden-standard reference-data to validate and evaluate segmentation and registration methods in dMRI.

  17. Thermal Diffusivity of Sintered Steels with Flash Method at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchini, G. F.; Bovesecchi, G.; Coppa, P.; Corasaniti, S.; Montanari, R.; Varone, A.

    2016-04-01

    Due to lack of reliable thermal diffusivity data of sintered steels in literature, experimental investigations were conducted on samples made of different powder types (based on prealloyed, or diffusion-bonded, or admixed powders) and under different process conditions. So the influence of pressing pressure and sintering temperature on thermal diffusivity was established. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the "flash method": a sample in the shape of a slab is irradiated with a light pulse on one of the two surfaces, and temperature of the other surface is detected by an ambient temperature pyrometer. The value of the thermal diffusivity is obtained by a least squares regression on the entire trend of the temperature vs. time using the analytical solution of the heat conduction as regression model. Results show the increase of the thermal diffusivity with increasing density. This outcome can be explained from the mutual effect of thermal conductivity and density on thermal diffusivity in porous media. The experimental results have also permitted to verify the influence of the composition of the sintered materials and carbon contents on thermal diffusivity.

  18. Operator Splitting Implicit Integration Factor Methods for Stiff Reaction-Diffusion-Advection Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Su; Ovadia, Jeremy; Liu, Xinfeng; Zhang, Yong-Tao; Nie, Qing

    2011-01-01

    For reaction-diffusion-advection equations, the stiffness from the reaction and diffusion terms often requires very restricted time step size, while the nonlinear advection term may lead to a sharp gradient in localized spatial regions. It is challenging to design numerical methods that can efficiently handle both difficulties. For reaction-diffusion systems with both stiff reaction and diffusion terms, implicit integration factor (IIF) method and its higher dimensional analog compact IIF (cIIF) serve as an efficient class of time-stepping methods, and their second order version is linearly unconditionally stable. For nonlinear hyperbolic equations, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) methods are a class of schemes with a uniformly high-order of accuracy in smooth regions of the solution, which can also resolve the sharp gradient in an accurate and essentially non-oscillatory fashion. In this paper, we couple IIF/cIIF with WENO methods using the operator splitting approach to solve reaction-diffusion-advection equations. In particular, we apply the IIF/cIIF method to the stiff reaction and diffusion terms and the WENO method to the advection term in two different splitting sequences. Calculation of local truncation error and direct numerical simulations for both splitting approaches show the second order accuracy of the splitting method, and linear stability analysis and direct comparison with other approaches reveals excellent efficiency and stability properties. Applications of the splitting approach to two biological systems demonstrate that the overall method is accurate and efficient, and the splitting sequence consisting of two reaction-diffusion steps is more desirable than the one consisting of two advection steps, because CWC exhibits better accuracy and stability. PMID:21666863

  19. Study of acid diffusion behaves form PAG by using top coat method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko

    2014-03-01

    Our past research on measurements of simulation parameters for ArF resists focused on establishing methods for measuring the following parameters:[1]-[4] • Development parameters[1] • PEB parameters[2] • Dill's ABC parameters[3] • Quencher parameter[4] We entered these parameters into a lithography simulator and performed ArF resist simulations.We then explored ways to optimize the ArF resist material and process. This paper reports on our study of methods for measuring the diffusion length of acid generated from PAG during exposures. In our experiment, we applied a PAG-containing top coat (TC) material (second layer) to a PAG-free ArF resist (first layer), then performed the exposure and PEB processes. The acid generated in the TC during the exposure diffused into the ArF resist in the lower layer (first layer) when PEB was performed. The process of developing this sample removed the TC in the second layer and the parts of the first layer into which the acid had diffused.We obtained the acid diffusion length based on the quantity of film removed by the development. We calculated the acid diffusion coefficient after varying the exposure value and repeating the measurement. For this report, we also performed measurements to determine how differences in PAG anion size, amount of quencher additive, and PEB temperature affected the acid diffusion coefficient.We entered the measurements obtained into the PROLITH simulator and explored the effects of acid diffusion on pattern profile.

  20. Method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a metallic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2009-06-30

    A method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a preferred nickel base alloy substrate has been discovered. A cerium oxide paste containing a halide activator is applied to the polished substrate and then dried. The workpiece is heated in a non-oxidizing atmosphere to diffuse cerium into the substrate. After cooling, any remaining cerium oxide is removed. The resulting cerium diffusion coating on the nickel base substrate demonstrates improved resistance to oxidation. Cerium coated alloys are particularly useful as components in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC).

  1. A new method of optimal design for a two-dimensional diffuser by using dynamic programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Chuangang; Zhang, Moujin; Chen, XI; Miao, Yongmiao

    1991-01-01

    A new method for predicting the optimal velocity distribution on the wall of a two dimensional diffuser is presented. The method uses dynamic programming to solve the optimal control problem with inequality constraints of state variables. The physical model of optimization is designed to prevent the separation of the boundary layer while approaching the maximum pressure ratio in a diffuser of a specified length. The computational results are in fair agreement with the experimental ones. Optimal velocity distribution on a diffuser wall is said to occur when the flow decelerates quickly at first and then smoothly, while the flow is near separation, but always protected from it. The optimal velocity distribution can be used to design the contour of the diffuser.

  2. First-Order Hyperbolic System Method for Time-Dependent Advection-Diffusion Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    A time-dependent extension of the first-order hyperbolic system method for advection-diffusion problems is introduced. Diffusive/viscous terms are written and discretized as a hyperbolic system, which recovers the original equation in the steady state. The resulting scheme offers advantages over traditional schemes: a dramatic simplification in the discretization, high-order accuracy in the solution gradients, and orders-of-magnitude convergence acceleration. The hyperbolic advection-diffusion system is discretized by the second-order upwind residual-distribution scheme in a unified manner, and the system of implicit-residual-equations is solved by Newton's method over every physical time step. The numerical results are presented for linear and nonlinear advection-diffusion problems, demonstrating solutions and gradients produced to the same order of accuracy, with rapid convergence over each physical time step, typically less than five Newton iterations.

  3. Approximate solution of two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph models arising in mathematical physics using optimal homotopy asymptotic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, S.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the analytical approximate solutions for two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph equations. The fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals [0,1], (1,2), and [1,2], respectively. In this paper, we extended optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) for two-term fractional-order wave-diffusion equations. Highly approximate solution is obtained in series form using this extended method. Approximate solution obtained by OHAM is compared with the exact solution. It is observed that OHAM is a prevailing and convergent method for the solutions of nonlinear-fractional-order time-dependent partial differential problems. The numerical results rendering that the applied method is explicit, effective, and easy to use, for handling more general fractional-order wave diffusion, diffusion, and telegraph problems.

  4. A New Method for the Calculation of Diffusion Coefficients with Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Eric

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new Monte Carlo-based method for the calculation of diffusion coefficients. One distinctive feature of this method is that it does not resort to the computation of transport cross sections directly, although their functional form is retained. Instead, a special type of tally derived from a deterministic estimate of Fick's Law is used for tallying the total cross section, which is then combined with a set of other standard Monte Carlo tallies. Some properties of this method are presented by means of numerical examples for a multi-group 1-D implementation. Calculated diffusion coefficients are in general good agreement with values obtained by other methods.

  5. Practical method of diffusion-welding steel plate in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Method is ideal for critical service requirements where parent metal properties are equaled in notch toughness, stress rupture and other characteristics. Welding technique variations may be used on a variety of materials, such as carbon steels, alloy steels, stainless steels, ceramics, and reactive and refractory materials.

  6. Diffusion Capillary Phantom vs. Human Data: Outcomes for Reconstruction Methods Depend on Evaluation Medium

    PubMed Central

    Lichenstein, Sarah D.; Bishop, James H.; Verstynen, Timothy D.; Yeh, Fang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusion MRI provides a non-invasive way of estimating structural connectivity in the brain. Many studies have used diffusion phantoms as benchmarks to assess the performance of different tractography reconstruction algorithms and assumed that the results can be applied to in vivo studies. Here we examined whether quality metrics derived from a common, publically available, diffusion phantom can reliably predict tractography performance in human white matter tissue. Materials and Methods: We compared estimates of fiber length and fiber crossing among a simple tensor model (diffusion tensor imaging), a more complicated model (ball-and-sticks) and model-free (diffusion spectrum imaging, generalized q-sampling imaging) reconstruction methods using a capillary phantom and in vivo human data (N = 14). Results: Our analysis showed that evaluation outcomes differ depending on whether they were obtained from phantom or human data. Specifically, the diffusion phantom favored a more complicated model over a simple tensor model or model-free methods for resolving crossing fibers. On the other hand, the human studies showed the opposite pattern of results, with the model-free methods being more advantageous than model-based methods or simple tensor models. This performance difference was consistent across several metrics, including estimating fiber length and resolving fiber crossings in established white matter pathways. Conclusions: These findings indicate that the construction of current capillary diffusion phantoms tends to favor complicated reconstruction models over a simple tensor model or model-free methods, whereas the in vivo data tends to produce opposite results. This brings into question the previous phantom-based evaluation approaches and suggests that a more realistic phantom or simulation is necessary to accurately predict the relative performance of different tractography reconstruction methods.

  7. Diffusion Capillary Phantom vs. Human Data: Outcomes for Reconstruction Methods Depend on Evaluation Medium

    PubMed Central

    Lichenstein, Sarah D.; Bishop, James H.; Verstynen, Timothy D.; Yeh, Fang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusion MRI provides a non-invasive way of estimating structural connectivity in the brain. Many studies have used diffusion phantoms as benchmarks to assess the performance of different tractography reconstruction algorithms and assumed that the results can be applied to in vivo studies. Here we examined whether quality metrics derived from a common, publically available, diffusion phantom can reliably predict tractography performance in human white matter tissue. Materials and Methods: We compared estimates of fiber length and fiber crossing among a simple tensor model (diffusion tensor imaging), a more complicated model (ball-and-sticks) and model-free (diffusion spectrum imaging, generalized q-sampling imaging) reconstruction methods using a capillary phantom and in vivo human data (N = 14). Results: Our analysis showed that evaluation outcomes differ depending on whether they were obtained from phantom or human data. Specifically, the diffusion phantom favored a more complicated model over a simple tensor model or model-free methods for resolving crossing fibers. On the other hand, the human studies showed the opposite pattern of results, with the model-free methods being more advantageous than model-based methods or simple tensor models. This performance difference was consistent across several metrics, including estimating fiber length and resolving fiber crossings in established white matter pathways. Conclusions: These findings indicate that the construction of current capillary diffusion phantoms tends to favor complicated reconstruction models over a simple tensor model or model-free methods, whereas the in vivo data tends to produce opposite results. This brings into question the previous phantom-based evaluation approaches and suggests that a more realistic phantom or simulation is necessary to accurately predict the relative performance of different tractography reconstruction methods. PMID:27656122

  8. The arbitrary order mixed mimetic finite difference method for the diffusion equation

    DOE PAGES

    Gyrya, Vitaliy; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2016-05-01

    Here, we propose an arbitrary-order accurate mimetic finite difference (MFD) method for the approximation of diffusion problems in mixed form on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes. As usual in the mimetic numerical technology, the method satisfies local consistency and stability conditions, which determines the accuracy and the well-posedness of the resulting approximation. The method also requires the definition of a high-order discrete divergence operator that is the discrete analog of the divergence operator and is acting on the degrees of freedom. The new family of mimetic methods is proved theoretically to be convergent and optimal error estimates for flux andmore » scalar variable are derived from the convergence analysis. A numerical experiment confirms the high-order accuracy of the method in solving diffusion problems with variable diffusion tensor. It is worth mentioning that the approximation of the scalar variable presents a superconvergence effect.« less

  9. A coarse-mesh nodal method-diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross sections (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly-coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes, and can lead to a difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the Diffusive-Mesh Finite Difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper.

  10. A coarse-mesh nodal method, the diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-12-31

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross section (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes and can lead to difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the diffusive-mesh finite difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper.

  11. Higher order methods for convection-diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. D.; Prenter, P. M.

    This paper applies C1 cubic Hermite polynomials embedded in an orthogonal collocation scheme to the spatial discretization of the unsteady nonlinear Burgers equation as a model of the equations of fluid mechanics. The temporal discretization is carried out by means of either a noniterative finite difference or an iterative finite difference procedure. Results of this method are compared with those of a second-order finite difference scheme and a splined-cubic Taylor's series scheme. Stability limits are derived and the matrix structure of the several schemes are compared.

  12. An adaptive pseudo-spectral method for reaction diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B. J.; Gottlieb, D.; Minkoff, M.

    1989-01-01

    The spectral interpolation error was considered for both the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral and Galerkin approximations. A family of functionals I sub r (u), with the property that the maximum norm of the error is bounded by I sub r (u)/J sub r, where r is an integer and J is the degree of the polynomial approximation, was developed. These functionals are used in the adaptive procedure whereby the problem is dynamically transformed to minimize I sub r (u). The number of collocation points is then chosen to maintain a prescribed error bound. The method is illustrated by various examples from combustion problems in one and two dimensions.

  13. An adaptive pseudo-spectral method for reaction diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Gottlieb, D.; Matkowsky, B. J.; Minkoff, M.

    1987-01-01

    The spectral interpolation error was considered for both the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral and Galerkin approximations. A family of functionals I sub r (u), with the property that the maximum norm of the error is bounded by I sub r (u)/J sub r, where r is an integer and J is the degree of the polynomial approximation, was developed. These functionals are used in the adaptive procedure whereby the problem is dynamically transformed to minimize I sub r (u). The number of collocation points is then chosen to maintain a prescribed error bound. The method is illustrated by various examples from combustion problems in one and two dimensions.

  14. Accelerated molecular dynamics and equation-free methods for simulating diffusion in solids.

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Jie; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Brown, William Michael; Plimpton, Steven James; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Wagner, Gregory John; Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2011-09-01

    Many of the most important and hardest-to-solve problems related to the synthesis, performance, and aging of materials involve diffusion through the material or along surfaces and interfaces. These diffusion processes are driven by motions at the atomic scale, but traditional atomistic simulation methods such as molecular dynamics are limited to very short timescales on the order of the atomic vibration period (less than a picosecond), while macroscale diffusion takes place over timescales many orders of magnitude larger. We have completed an LDRD project with the goal of developing and implementing new simulation tools to overcome this timescale problem. In particular, we have focused on two main classes of methods: accelerated molecular dynamics methods that seek to extend the timescale attainable in atomistic simulations, and so-called 'equation-free' methods that combine a fine scale atomistic description of a system with a slower, coarse scale description in order to project the system forward over long times.

  15. Fourier spectral method for higher order space fractional reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindza, Edson; Owolabi, Kolade M.

    2016-11-01

    Evolution equations containing fractional derivatives can provide suitable mathematical models for describing important physical phenomena. In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate method for numerical solutions of space fractional reaction-diffusion equations. The proposed method is based on an exponential integrator scheme in time and the Fourier spectral method in space. The main advantages of this method are that it yields a fully diagonal representation of the fractional operator, with increased accuracy and efficiency, and a completely straightforward extension to high spatial dimensions. Although, in general, it is not obvious what role a high fractional derivative can play and how to make use of arbitrarily high-order fractional derivatives, we introduce them to describe fractional hyper-diffusions in reaction diffusion. The scheme justified by a number of computational experiments, this includes two and three dimensional partial differential equations. Numerical experiments are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. A First-Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo method for reaction–drift–diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, Ava J.; Sigurdsson, Jon Karl; Shrake, Justin; Atzberger, Paul J.; Isaacson, Samuel A.

    2014-02-15

    Stochastic reaction–diffusion models are now a popular tool for studying physical systems in which both the explicit diffusion of molecules and noise in the chemical reaction process play important roles. The Smoluchowski diffusion-limited reaction model (SDLR) is one of several that have been used to study biological systems. Exact realizations of the underlying stochastic processes described by the SDLR model can be generated by the recently proposed First-Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo (FPKMC) method. This exactness relies on sampling analytical solutions to one and two-body diffusion equations in simplified protective domains. In this work we extend the FPKMC to allow for drift arising from fixed, background potentials. As the corresponding Fokker–Planck equations that describe the motion of each molecule can no longer be solved analytically, we develop a hybrid method that discretizes the protective domains. The discretization is chosen so that the drift–diffusion of each molecule within its protective domain is approximated by a continuous-time random walk on a lattice. New lattices are defined dynamically as the protective domains are updated, hence we will refer to our method as Dynamic Lattice FPKMC or DL-FPKMC. We focus primarily on the one-dimensional case in this manuscript, and demonstrate the numerical convergence and accuracy of our method in this case for both smooth and discontinuous potentials. We also present applications of our method, which illustrate the impact of drift on reaction kinetics.

  17. Advanced computational methods for nodal diffusion, Monte Carlo, and S(sub N) problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    This document describes progress on five efforts for improving effectiveness of computational methods for particle diffusion and transport problems in nuclear engineering: (1) Multigrid methods for obtaining rapidly converging solutions of nodal diffusion problems. An alternative line relaxation scheme is being implemented into a nodal diffusion code. Simplified P2 has been implemented into this code. (2) Local Exponential Transform method for variance reduction in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. This work yielded predictions for both 1-D and 2-D x-y geometry better than conventional Monte Carlo with splitting and Russian Roulette. (3) Asymptotic Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN problems. New transport differencing schemes have been obtained that allow solution by the conjugate gradient method, and the convergence of this approach is rapid. (4) Quasidiffusion (QD) methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN Problems on irregular spatial grids. A symmetrized QD method has been developed in a form that results in a system of two self-adjoint equations that are readily discretized and efficiently solved. (5) Response history method for speeding up the Monte Carlo calculation of electron transport problems. This method was implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. In addition, we have developed and implemented a parallel time-dependent Monte Carlo code on two massively parallel processors.

  18. Advanced computational methods for nodal diffusion, Monte Carlo, and S[sub N] problems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    This document describes progress on five efforts for improving effectiveness of computational methods for particle diffusion and transport problems in nuclear engineering: (1) Multigrid methods for obtaining rapidly converging solutions of nodal diffusion problems. A alternative line relaxation scheme is being implemented into a nodal diffusion code. Simplified P2 has been implemented into this code. (2) Local Exponential Transform method for variance reduction in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. This work yielded predictions for both 1-D and 2-D x-y geometry better than conventional Monte Carlo with splitting and Russian Roulette. (3) Asymptotic Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN problems. New transport differencing schemes have been obtained that allow solution by the conjugate gradient method, and the convergence of this approach is rapid. (4) Quasidiffusion (QD) methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN Problems on irregular spatial grids. A symmetrized QD method has been developed in a form that results in a system of two self-adjoint equations that are readily discretized and efficiently solved. (5) Response history method for speeding up the Monte Carlo calculation of electron transport problems. This method was implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. In addition, we have developed and implemented a parallel time-dependent Monte Carlo code on two massively parallel processors.

  19. Methods for calculating X-ray diffuse scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Punegov, V. I. Sivkov, D. V.

    2015-03-15

    Two independent approaches to calculate the angular distribution of X-ray diffusion scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots (QDs) have been proposed. The first method is based on the analytical solution involving the multipole expansion of elastic strain fields beyond QDs. The second approach is based on calculations of atomic displacements near QDs by the Green’s function method. An analysis of the diffuse scattering intensity distribution in the reciprocal space within these two approaches shows that both methods yield similar results for the chosen models of QD spatial distribution.

  20. Method of fabricating reflection-mode EUV diffusers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Erik; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-03-01

    Techniques for fabricating well-controlled, random relief, engineered surfaces that serve as substrates for EUV optical devices are accomplished with grayscale exposure. The method of fabricating a multilevel EUV optical element includes: (a) providing a substrate; (b) depositing a layer of curable material on a surface of the substrate; (c) creating a relief profile in a layer of cured material from the layer of curable material wherein the relief profile comprises multiple levels of cured material that has a defined contour; and (d) depositing a multilayer reflection film over the relief profile wherein the film has an outer contour that substantially matches that of the relief profile. The curable material can comprise photoresist or a low dielectric constant material.

  1. A new Sumudu transform iterative method for time-fractional Cauchy reaction-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangle; Liu, Sanyang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new Sumudu transform iterative method is established and successfully applied to find the approximate analytical solutions for time-fractional Cauchy reaction-diffusion equations. The approach is easy to implement and understand. The numerical results show that the proposed method is very simple and efficient. PMID:27386314

  2. A comparative study of methods for computing the diffuse radiation viewfactors for complex structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Johansson, O.; Lobo, M.; Abrous, A.

    1988-01-01

    Several different numerical methods for calculating diffuse radiation viewfactors are described. Each is applied to a range of surface configurations, from almost completely unobstructed to a dense set of intersecting surfaces. The speed, accuracy and unique characteristics are discussed in order to define optimal methods for different surface geometries.

  3. Walker Diffusion Method for Calculation of Transport Properties of Finite Composite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Van Siclen, Clinton D

    2002-01-01

    A heterogeneous medium may be represented by a scalar field of local transport coefficients (e.g., conductivity) or by a “resistor network” derived from that scalar field. In either case the effective (macroscopic) and local (microscopic) transport properties may be calculated by the walker diffusion method. Some sample calculations for disordered systems are presented to demonstrate the method.

  4. The Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Time-Dependent Convection-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods for nonlinear, time-dependent convection-diffusion systems. These methods are an extension of the Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin methods for purely hyperbolic systems to convection-diffusion systems and share with those methods their high parallelizability, their high-order formal accuracy, and their easy handling of complicated geometries, for convection dominated problems. It is proven that for scalar equations, the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods are L(sup 2)-stable in the nonlinear case. Moreover, in the linear case, it is shown that if polynomials of degree k are used, the methods are k-th order accurate for general triangulations; although this order of convergence is suboptimal, it is sharp for the LDG methods. Preliminary numerical examples displaying the performance of the method are shown.

  5. Laser interferometric method for determining the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Manukhov, V. V.; Fedortsov, A. B.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2015-09-15

    A new laser interferometric method for measuring the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors is proposed. The method is based on the interference–absorption interaction of two laser radiations in a semiconductor. Injected radiation generates additional carriers in a semiconductor, which causes a change in the material’s optical constants and modulation of the probing radiation passed through the sample. When changing the distance between carrier generation and probing points, a decrease in the carrier concentration, which depends on the diffusion length, is recorded. The diffusion length is determined by comparing the experimental and theoretical dependences of the probe signal on the divergence of the injector and probe beams. The method is successfully tested on semiconductor samples with different thicknesses and surface states and can be used in scientific research and the electronics industry.

  6. An asymptotic induced numerical method for the convection-diffusion-reaction equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scroggs, Jeffrey S.; Sorensen, Danny C.

    1988-01-01

    A parallel algorithm for the efficient solution of a time dependent reaction convection diffusion equation with small parameter on the diffusion term is presented. The method is based on a domain decomposition that is dictated by singular perturbation analysis. The analysis is used to determine regions where certain reduced equations may be solved in place of the full equation. Parallelism is evident at two levels. Domain decomposition provides parallelism at the highest level, and within each domain there is ample opportunity to exploit parallelism. Run time results demonstrate the viability of the method.

  7. Determination of diffusion coefficients in polypyrrole thin films using a current pulse relaxation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Vandyke, Leon S.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The current pulse E sub oc relaxation method and its application to the determination of diffusion coefficients in electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole thin films is described. Diffusion coefficients for such films in Et4NBF4 and MeCN are determined for a series of submicron film thicknesses. Measurement of the double-layer capacitance, C sub dl, and the resistance, R sub u, of polypyrrole thin films as a function of potential obtained with the galvanostatic pulse method is reported. Measurements of the electrolyte concentration in reduced polypyrrole films are also presented to aid in the interpretation of the data.

  8. Monte Carlo-based diffusion tensor tractography with a geometrically corrected voxel-centre connecting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodammer, N. C.; Kaufmann, J.; Kanowski, M.; Tempelmann, C.

    2009-02-01

    Diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) allows one to explore axonal connectivity patterns in neuronal tissue by linking local predominant diffusion directions determined by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The majority of existing tractography approaches use continuous coordinates for calculating single trajectories through the diffusion tensor field. The tractography algorithm we propose is characterized by (1) a trajectory propagation rule that uses voxel centres as vertices and (2) orientation probabilities for the calculated steps in a trajectory that are obtained from the diffusion tensors of either two or three voxels. These voxels include the last voxel of each previous step and one or two candidate successor voxels. The precision and the accuracy of the suggested method are explored with synthetic data. Results clearly favour probabilities based on two consecutive successor voxels. Evidence is also provided that in any voxel-centre-based tractography approach, there is a need for a probability correction that takes into account the geometry of the acquisition grid. Finally, we provide examples in which the proposed fibre-tracking method is applied to the human optical radiation, the cortico-spinal tracts and to connections between Broca's and Wernicke's area to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method on measured data.

  9. Development of Reference Materials for Thermal-Diffusivity Measurements by the Flash Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoshima, M.; Abe, H.; Baba, T.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid materials used for thermal simulations and thermal designs can be obtained as the product of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and bulk density in many cases. The thermal diffusivity is usually measured by the flash method, and the specific heat capacity is usually measured by differential scanning calorimetry. In order to obtain reliable thermal conductivities for strict thermal design, it is necessary to measure the thermal diffusivity using the flash method, a well-validated apparatus. Reference materials are an effective means for validation of most practical measurement apparatus. For the flash method, isotropic graphite was selected as a candidate reference material. A batch of isotropic graphite samples was prepared and characterized in detail in order to be a certified reference material for thermal-diffusivity measurement. The detailed characterization ensures the traceability of the measurement results to the international system of units (SI). A convenient reference material for thermal conductivity was also obtained by using the known thermal-diffusivity measurements, specific heat capacity, and density of the material.

  10. Oxygen self-diffusion “fast-paths” in titanite single crystals and a general method for deconvolving self-diffusion profiles with “tails”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.

    2007-03-01

    Like most other minerals, titanite rarely if ever forms perfect crystals. In addition to the point defects that might affect lattice diffusion, there may be extended line- or planar defects along which fast diffusion could occur. During the course of an experimental study of oxygen lattice diffusion in titanite, we found that almost all of the 18O uptake profiles produced in natural titanite crystals departed from the complementary error function solution expected for simple lattice diffusion with a constant surface concentration. Instead, they exhibited "tails" extending deeper into the samples than expected for simple lattice diffusion. The purpose of this contribution is to report on these features—described as "fast-paths" for oxygen diffusion—and outline a method for coping with them in extracting information from diffusion profiles. For both dry and hydrothermal experiments in which the "fast paths" are observed, 18O was used as the diffusant. In dry experiments, the source material was 18O-enriched SiO 2 powder, while 18O-enriched water was used for the hydrothermal experiments. Diffusive uptake profiles of 18O were measured in all cases by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using the 18O (p,α) 15N reaction [see Zhang X. Y., Cherniak D. J., and Watson E. B. (2006) Oxygen diffusion in titanite: lattice and fast-path diffusion in single crystals. Chem. Geol.235 105-123]. In our experiments, different sizes of "tails" (with varying 18O concentrations) were observed. Theoretically, under the same temperature and pressure conditions, the sizes of tails should be affected by two factors: the diffusion duration and the defect density. For the same experiment duration, the higher the defect density, the larger the "tail"; for the same defect densities, the longer the diffusion duration, the larger the "tail." The diffusion "tails" could be a result of either planar defects or one-dimensional "pipe" diffusion. AFM imaging of HF etched titanite surfaces confirmed

  11. Efficient kinetic Monte Carlo method for reaction-diffusion problems with spatially varying annihilation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Karsten; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-03-01

    We present an efficient Monte Carlo method to simulate reaction-diffusion processes with spatially varying particle annihilation or transformation rates as it occurs for instance in the context of motor-driven intracellular transport. Like Green's function reaction dynamics and first-passage time methods, our algorithm avoids small diffusive hops by propagating sufficiently distant particles in large hops to the boundaries of protective domains. Since for spatially varying annihilation or transformation rates the single particle diffusion propagator is not known analytically, we present an algorithm that generates efficiently either particle displacements or annihilations with the correct statistics, as we prove rigorously. The numerical efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated with an illustrative example.

  12. A Multi-Method Process Evaluation for a Skin Cancer Prevention Diffusion Trial

    PubMed Central

    Escoffery, Cam; Glanz, Karen; Hall, Dawn; Elliott, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This article describes process evaluation methods for the Pool Cool Diffusion Trial across four years. Pool Cool is a skin cancer prevention program that was found to improve behaviors and environments for sun protection at swimming pools in a randomized efficacy trial, which was followed by a national Diffusion Trial. The process evaluation focus shifted from measuring program satisfaction to assessing widespread program implementation, barriers and facilitators to implementation, and program maintenance and sustainability. Data collection methods include training surveys, database tracking, field coordinator activity logs, emails, surveys of parents, lifeguards and pool managers, and process evaluation interviews and site visits. The data revealed high levels of implementation of major program components when disseminated in the diffusion trial, including sun safety lessons, sun safety signs, and sunscreen use. This paper describes program features and participant factors that facilitated local implementation, maintenance and sustainability across dispersed pools such as linkage agents, a packaged program, and adaptations of program elements. PMID:19448162

  13. Diffusion coefficient measurement by the "stop-flow" method in a 5% collagen gel.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M; Schy, A

    1981-01-01

    We measured the translational bulk diffusion coefficient (D) of solute in a collagen gel column of 5% concentration (wt/wt) by a new, noninvasive method applicable to a wide range of solutes and gels. The system also enabled measurement of solute partition coefficients and convective flow velocity since the gel was contained within a chromatography column. The spread of diffusing solute in the gel column is measured during an interval of stopped flow in this method. Experimentally determined values of D/D degrees (free aqueous diffusion coefficient) ranged from 0.24 (3H2O) to 0.13 (ovalbumin) as anticipated by observations of other investigators from interstitium in heart and mesentery, but were significantly smaller than predicted by the widely used Ogston gel model with parameters extracted from partition coefficient data. PMID:7248468

  14. Development of advanced methods for analysis of experimental data in diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaques, Alonso V.

    There are numerous experimental configurations and data analysis techniques for the characterization of diffusion phenomena. However, the mathematical methods for estimating diffusivities traditionally do not take into account the effects of experimental errors in the data, and often require smooth, noiseless data sets to perform the necessary analysis steps. The current methods used for data smoothing require strong assumptions which can introduce numerical "artifacts" into the data, affecting confidence in the estimated parameters. The Boltzmann-Matano method is used extensively in the determination of concentration - dependent diffusivities, D(C), in alloys. In the course of analyzing experimental data, numerical integrations and differentiations of the concentration profile are performed. These methods require smoothing of the data prior to analysis. We present here an approach to the Boltzmann-Matano method that is based on a regularization method to estimate a differentiation operation on the data, i.e., estimate the concentration gradient term, which is important in the analysis process for determining the diffusivity. This approach, therefore, has the potential to be less subjective, and in numerical simulations shows an increased accuracy in the estimated diffusion coefficients. We present a regression approach to estimate linear multicomponent diffusion coefficients that eliminates the need pre-treat or pre-condition the concentration profile. This approach fits the data to a functional form of the mathematical expression for the concentration profile, and allows us to determine the diffusivity matrix directly from the fitted parameters. Reformulation of the equation for the analytical solution is done in order to reduce the size of the problem and accelerate the convergence. The objective function for the regression can incorporate point estimations for error in the concentration, improving the statistical confidence in the estimated diffusivity matrix

  15. The network method for solutions of oscillating reaction-diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horno, J.; Hayas, A.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C.F.

    1995-05-01

    The network approach is a method whereby physicochemical systems are replaced by electrical networks, which are simulated by using a digital computer program such as PSPICE. The network method solves problems of great mathematical complexity in a versatile and efficient way. This method has been applied to a system involving coupled chemical reactions and diffusion (Brusselator system) as a prototype of an oscillating reaction system. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Group iterative methods for the solution of two-dimensional time-fractional diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasim, Alla Tareq; Ali, Norhashidah Hj. Mohd.

    2016-06-01

    Variety of problems in science and engineering may be described by fractional partial differential equations (FPDE) in relation to space and/or time fractional derivatives. The difference between time fractional diffusion equations and standard diffusion equations lies primarily in the time derivative. Over the last few years, iterative schemes derived from the rotated finite difference approximation have been proven to work well in solving standard diffusion equations. However, its application on time fractional diffusion counterpart is still yet to be investigated. In this paper, we will present a preliminary study on the formulation and analysis of new explicit group iterative methods in solving a two-dimensional time fractional diffusion equation. These methods were derived from the standard and rotated Crank-Nicolson difference approximation formula. Several numerical experiments were conducted to show the efficiency of the developed schemes in terms of CPU time and iteration number. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version of this article was published on 7 July 2016. The original version supplied to AIP Publishing contained an error in Table 1 and References 15 and 16 were incomplete. These errors have been corrected in the updated and republished article.

  17. A deterministic Lagrangian particle separation-based method for advective-diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ken T. M.; Lee, Joseph H. W.; Choi, K. W.

    2008-12-01

    A simple and robust Lagrangian particle scheme is proposed to solve the advective-diffusion transport problem. The scheme is based on relative diffusion concepts and simulates diffusion by regulating particle separation. This new approach generates a deterministic result and requires far less number of particles than the random walk method. For the advection process, particles are simply moved according to their velocity. The general scheme is mass conservative and is free from numerical diffusion. It can be applied to a wide variety of advective-diffusion problems, but is particularly suited for ecological and water quality modelling when definition of particle attributes (e.g., cell status for modelling algal blooms or red tides) is a necessity. The basic derivation, numerical stability and practical implementation of the NEighborhood Separation Technique (NEST) are presented. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated through a series of test cases which embrace realistic features of coastal environmental transport problems. Two field application examples on the tidal flushing of a fish farm and the dynamics of vertically migrating marine algae are also presented.

  18. Multiscale numerical methods for passive advection-diffusion in incompressible turbulent flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yoonsang; Engquist, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    We propose a seamless multiscale method which approximates the macroscopic behavior of the passive advection-diffusion equations with steady incompressible velocity fields with multi-spatial scales. The method uses decompositions of the velocity fields in the Fourier space, which are similar to the decomposition in large eddy simulations. It also uses a hierarchy of local domains with different resolutions as in multigrid methods. The effective diffusivity from finer scale is used for the next coarser level computation and this process is repeated up to the coarsest scale of interest. The grids are only in local domains whose sizes decrease depending on the resolution level so that the overall computational complexity increases linearly as the number of different resolution grids increases. The method captures interactions between finer and coarser scales but has to sacrifice some of interactions between different scales. The proposed method is numerically tested with 2D examples including a successful approximation to a continuous spectrum flow.

  19. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOEpatents

    Rutherford, William M.

    1988-05-24

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtainable in the prior art.

  20. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOEpatents

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1985-12-04

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtained in the prior art.

  1. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor-corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  2. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor–corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  3. New contactless method for thermal diffusivity measurements using modulated photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Pham Tu Quoc, S; Cheymol, G; Semerok, A

    2014-05-01

    Modulated photothermal radiometry is a non-destructive and contactless technique for the characterization of materials. It has two major advantages: a good signal-to-noise ratio through a synchronous detection and a low dependence on the heating power and the optical properties of the sample surface. This paper presents a new method for characterizing the thermal diffusivity of a material when the phase shift between a modulated laser power signal and the thermal signal of a plate sample is known at different frequencies. The method is based on a three-dimensional analytical model which is used to determine the temperature amplitude and the phase in the laser heating of the plate. A new simple formula was developed through multi-parametric analysis to determine the thermal diffusivity of the plate with knowledge of the frequency at the minimum phase shift, the laser beam radius r0 and the sample thickness L. This method was developed to control the variation of the thermal diffusivity of nuclear components and it was first applied to determine the thermal diffusivity of different metals: 304 L stainless steel, nickel, titanium, tungsten, molybdenum, zinc, and iron. The experimental results were obtained with 5%-10% accuracy and corresponded well with the reference values. The present paper also demonstrates the limit of application of this method for plate with thickness r0/100 ≤ L ≤ r0/2. The technique is deemed interesting for the characterization of barely accessible components that require a contactless measurement. PMID:24880399

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-DIFFUSION FLUX-SPLITTING METHODS FOR DENSE GAS-SOLID FLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a class of low-diffusion upwinding methods for computing dense gas-solid flows is presented in this work. An artificial compressibility/low-Mach preconditioning strategy is developed for a hyperbolic two-phase flow equation system consisting of separate solids ...

  5. A new in-situ method to determine the apparent gas diffusion coefficient of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Paulus, Sinikka; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biological activity in the soil and soil respiration. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by diffusion and Fick's Law is used to describe the fluxes in the soil. The "apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient" represents the proportional factor between the flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gases through the soil. One common way to determine this coefficient is to take core samples in the field and determine it in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and needs laborious field work and can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence insecurity about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale must remain. We developed a new in-situ method using new gas sampling device, tracer gas and inverse soil gas modelling. The gas sampling device contains several sampling depths and can be easily installed into vertical holes of an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. At the lower end of the device inert tracer gas is injected continuously. The tracer gas diffuses into the surrounding soil. The resulting distribution of the tracer gas concentrations is used to deduce the diffusivity profile of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas sampling device/soil system the program COMSOL is used. We will present the results of a field campaign comparing the new in-situ method with lab measurements on soil cores. The new sampling pole has several interesting advantages: it can be used in-situ and over a long time; so it allows following modifications of diffusion coefficients in interaction with rain but also vegetation cycle and wind.

  6. A method to simulate viscous diffusion of vorticity by convective transport of vortices at a non-solenoidal velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Kempka, S.N.; Strickland, J.H.

    1993-08-01

    A numerical method to simulate viscous diffusion of vorticity using vortex blobs (i.e., without a grid) is presented. The method consists of casting the effects of viscous diffusion into an effective ``diffusion velocity`` at which vortex blobs convect. The diffusion velocity was proposed previously by Ogami and Akamatsu, but they did not consider the effects of the divergence of the diffusion velocity. In fact, the diffusion velocity is highly non-solenoidal, which significantly affects the area over which a vortex blob diffuses. A formulation is presented that relates the area expansion to the diffusion velocity divergence. By taking into account the area expansion, more accurate simulations of diffusion are obtained, as demonstrated by a comparison of numerical and analytical diffusion solutions. Results from simulations show that vortex areas expand significantly in regions of large vorticity gradients. As a result of the area expansion, adjacent vortices remain overlapped, thereby maintaining smooth solution fields. The non-solenoidal diffusion velocity method is easily implemented in vortex blob algorithms, thus facilitating the development of vortex methods to simulate flows with finite Reynolds numbers.

  7. Diffuse interface methods for inverse problems: case study for an elliptic Cauchy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Løseth Elvetun, Ole; Schlottbom, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Many inverse problems have to deal with complex, evolving and often not exactly known geometries, e.g. as domains of forward problems modeled by partial differential equations. This makes it desirable to use methods which are robust with respect to perturbed or not well resolved domains, and which allow for efficient discretizations not resolving any fine detail of those geometries. For forward problems in partial differential equations methods based on diffuse interface representations have gained strong attention in the last years, but so far they have not been considered systematically for inverse problems. In this work we introduce a diffuse domain method as a tool for the solution of variational inverse problems. As a particular example we study ECG inversion in further detail. ECG inversion is a linear inverse source problem with boundary measurements governed by an anisotropic diffusion equation, which naturally cries for solutions under changing geometries, namely the beating heart. We formulate a regularization strategy using Tikhonov regularization and, using standard source conditions, we prove convergence rates. A special property of our approach is that not only operator perturbations are introduced by the diffuse domain method, but more important we have to deal with topologies which depend on a parameter \\varepsilon in the diffuse domain method, i.e. we have to deal with \\varepsilon -dependent forward operators and \\varepsilon -dependent norms. In particular the appropriate function spaces for the unknown and the data depend on \\varepsilon . This prevents the application of some standard convergence techniques for inverse problems, in particular interpreting the perturbations as data errors in the original problem does not yield suitable results. We consequently develop a novel approach based on saddle-point problems. The numerical solution of the problem is discussed as well and results for several computational experiments are reported. In

  8. Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity with lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Jessica Furrer; Or, Dani; Sukop, Michael C.; Steinberg, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Liquid distributions in unsaturated porous media under different gravitational accelerations and corresponding macroscopic gaseous diffusion coefficients were investigated to enhance understanding of plant growth conditions in microgravity. We used a single-component, multiphase lattice Boltzmann code to simulate liquid configurations in two-dimensional porous media at varying water contents for different gravity conditions and measured gas diffusion through the media using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann code. The relative diffusion coefficients (D rel) for simulations with and without gravity as functions of air-filled porosity were in good agreement with measured data and established models. We found significant differences in liquid configuration in porous media, leading to reductions in D rel of up to 25% under zero gravity. The study highlights potential applications of the lattice Boltzmann method for rapid and cost-effective evaluation of alternative plant growth media designs under variable gravity.

  9. Thermal diffusivity measurement of glass at high temperature by using flash method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabayabaya, Thomas; Yu, Fan; Zhang, Xinxin

    2004-02-01

    A measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a semi-transparent material (glass) by means of the “Flash Method” is investigated in the present work. By taking into account the heat losses on the two faces of the sample, and using a new experimental technique design, an improvement of the determination of the thermal diffusivity of the semi-transparent material (glass) at high temperature is realized. The experimental design presented here is an original technical concept that enables a significant reduction in heat loss during the experiments. A very simple model based on the quadrupole method is used to theoretically determine the thermal diffusivity of the semitransparent material by taking into account both conduction and radiation. Theoretical results clarify the effect of the absorption coefficient and the thickness of the sample on the heat transfer in the semi-transparent medium.

  10. Novel front-surface thermal-diffusivity measurement method based on phase analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braggiotti, Alberto; Marinetti, Sergio

    2000-05-01

    The technique described in this paper is for one-side thermal diffusivity measurement. A single stripe-shaped pulse provided by a flash lamp is used to heat the front surface of a specimen slab. Classical methods for estimating a parameter out of a distribution involve fitting the temperature distribution with its theoretical model. With the technique described in this paper the evolution of the temperature distribution along a line perpendicular to the heated stripe is analyzed in the frequency domain. An estimate of the thermal diffusivity is then obtained from comparison of the phase component behavior with an abacus similarly built from the theoretical model. This technique is valid for any shape of flash lamp pulse (i.e. laser spot), and can be used also for estimating the thermal diffusivity of anisotropic materials. The choice of the stripe shape is due to the limitations of the simulation environment used.

  11. Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity with lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Jessica Furrer; Or, Dani; Sukop, Michael C.

    2005-08-01

    Liquid distributions in unsaturated porous media under different gravitational accelerations and corresponding macroscopic gaseous diffusion coefficients were investigated to enhance understanding of plant growth conditions in microgravity. We used a single-component, multiphase lattice Boltzmann code to simulate liquid configurations in two-dimensional porous media at varying water contents for different gravity conditions and measured gas diffusion through the media using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann code. The relative diffusion coefficients (Drel) for simulations with and without gravity as functions of air-filled porosity were in good agreement with measured data and established models. We found significant differences in liquid configuration in porous media, leading to reductions in Drel of up to 25% under zero gravity. The study highlights potential applications of the lattice Boltzmann method for rapid and cost-effective evaluation of alternative plant growth media designs under variable gravity.

  12. Nondestructive Method for Mapping Metal Contact Diffusion in In2O3 Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kryvchenkova, Olga; Abdullah, Isam; Macdonald, John Emyr; Elliott, Martin; Anthopoulos, Thomas D; Lin, Yen-Hung; Igić, Petar; Kalna, Karol; Cobley, Richard J

    2016-09-28

    The channel width-to-length ratio is an important transistor parameter for integrated circuit design. Contact diffusion into the channel during fabrication or operation alters the channel width and this important parameter. A novel methodology combining atomic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) with self-consistent modeling is developed for the nondestructive detection of contact diffusion on active devices. Scans of the surface potential are modeled using physically based Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations when the transistor terminals are grounded and under biased conditions. The simulations also incorporate the tip geometry to investigate its effect on the measurements due to electrostatic tip-sample interactions. The method is particularly useful for semiconductor- and metal-semiconductor interfaces where the potential contrast resulting from dopant diffusion is below that usually detectable with scanning probe microscopy. PMID:27581104

  13. METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF LIGHT ISOTOPE PRODUCT FROM LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION UNITS

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, J.D.; Ballou, J.K.

    1957-11-19

    A method and apparatus are described for removing the lighter isotope of a gaseous-liquid product from a number of diffusion columns of a liquid thermal diffusion system in two stages by the use of freeze valves. The subject liquid flows from the diffusion columns into a heated sloping capsule where the liquid is vaporized by the action of steam in a heated jacket surrounding the capsule. When the capsule is filled the gas flows into a collector. Flow between the various stages is controlled by freeze valves which are opened and closed by the passage of gas and cool water respectively through coils surrounding portions of the pipes through which the process liquid is passed. The use of the dual stage remover-collector and the freeze valves is an improvement on the thermal diffusion separation process whereby the fraction containing the lighter isotope many be removed from the tops of the diffusion columns without intercolumn flow, or prior stage flow while the contents of the capsule is removed to the final receiver.

  14. A semi-discrete finite element method for a class of time-fractional diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Sun, HongGuang; Chen, Wen; Sze, K Y

    2013-05-13

    As fractional diffusion equations can describe the early breakthrough and the heavy-tail decay features observed in anomalous transport of contaminants in groundwater and porous soil, they have been commonly used in the related mathematical descriptions. These models usually involve long-time-range computation, which is a critical obstacle for their application; improvement of computational efficiency is of great significance. In this paper, a semi-discrete method is presented for solving a class of time-fractional diffusion equations that overcome the critical long-time-range computation problem. In the procedure, the spatial domain is discretized by the finite element method, which reduces the fractional diffusion equations to approximate fractional relaxation equations. As analytical solutions exist for the latter equations, the burden arising from long-time-range computation can effectively be minimized. To illustrate its efficiency and simplicity, four examples are presented. In addition, the method is used to solve the time-fractional advection-diffusion equation characterizing the bromide transport process in a fractured granite aquifer. The prediction closely agrees with the experimental data, and the heavy-tail decay of the anomalous transport process is well represented. PMID:23547234

  15. A semi-discrete finite element method for a class of time-fractional diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Sun, HongGuang; Chen, Wen; Sze, K Y

    2013-05-13

    As fractional diffusion equations can describe the early breakthrough and the heavy-tail decay features observed in anomalous transport of contaminants in groundwater and porous soil, they have been commonly used in the related mathematical descriptions. These models usually involve long-time-range computation, which is a critical obstacle for their application; improvement of computational efficiency is of great significance. In this paper, a semi-discrete method is presented for solving a class of time-fractional diffusion equations that overcome the critical long-time-range computation problem. In the procedure, the spatial domain is discretized by the finite element method, which reduces the fractional diffusion equations to approximate fractional relaxation equations. As analytical solutions exist for the latter equations, the burden arising from long-time-range computation can effectively be minimized. To illustrate its efficiency and simplicity, four examples are presented. In addition, the method is used to solve the time-fractional advection-diffusion equation characterizing the bromide transport process in a fractured granite aquifer. The prediction closely agrees with the experimental data, and the heavy-tail decay of the anomalous transport process is well represented.

  16. COMPARISON OF THE COMPLETE FOURIER DIRECT MRI WITH EXISTING DIFFUSION WEIGHTED MRI METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay

    2011-01-01

    The Complete Fourier Direct (CFD) MRI method introduced in earlier work for modeling the diffusion weighted MRI signal is compared with the existing methods. The preservation of Hermitian symmetry in the diffusion weighted MRI signal without affecting its energy is the key point that differentiates CFD–MRI from the existing methods. By keeping the correct Fourier relationship intact, the joint distribution function is represented ‘as it is’, without any constraints, e.g. being symmetric. The necessity to model or assume models for spin motion and try to fit the model to the samples of the Fourier transform as in case of model matching methods is not required because the Discrete Fourier Transform applied to correctly processed signal in CFD–MRI gives more accurate results. PMID:21918715

  17. A quantitative radioluminographic imaging method for evaluating lateral diffusion rates in skin.

    PubMed

    Rush, Allison K; Miller, Matthew A; Smith, Edward D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2015-10-28

    A method is presented for measuring the lateral diffusion coefficients of exogenously applied compounds on excised skin. The method involves sequential high resolution imaging of the spatial distribution of β-radiation associated with [(14)C]-labeled compounds to monitor the development of the concentration profile on the skin surface. It is exemplified by measurements made on three radiolabeled test compounds--caffeine, testosterone, and zinc pyrithione (ZnPT)--administered as solutions. Lateral diffusivity is expected to be an important determinant of the topical bioavailability of ZnPT, which is characteristically administered as a fine suspension and must reach microorganisms in molecular form to exert biocidal activity. Application of the test compounds at levels below and above their estimated saturation doses in the upper stratum corneum allows one to distinguish between diffusion-limited and dissolution rate-limited kinetics. The effective lateral diffusivities of the two chemically stable reference compounds, caffeine and testosterone, were (1-4) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s and (3-9) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s, respectively. Lateral transport of [(14)C] associated with ZnPT was formulation-dependent, with effective diffusivities of (1-2) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s in water and (3-9) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s in a 1% body wash solution. These differences are thought to be related to molecular speciation and/or the presence of a residual surfactant phase on the skin surface. All values were greater than those estimated for the transverse diffusivities of these compounds in stratum corneum by factors ranging from 250 to over 2000. Facile lateral transport on skin, combined with a low transdermal permeation rate, may thus be seen to be a key factor in the safe and effective use of ZnPT as a topical antimicrobial agent. PMID:26241749

  18. A quantitative radioluminographic imaging method for evaluating lateral diffusion rates in skin.

    PubMed

    Rush, Allison K; Miller, Matthew A; Smith, Edward D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2015-10-28

    A method is presented for measuring the lateral diffusion coefficients of exogenously applied compounds on excised skin. The method involves sequential high resolution imaging of the spatial distribution of β-radiation associated with [(14)C]-labeled compounds to monitor the development of the concentration profile on the skin surface. It is exemplified by measurements made on three radiolabeled test compounds--caffeine, testosterone, and zinc pyrithione (ZnPT)--administered as solutions. Lateral diffusivity is expected to be an important determinant of the topical bioavailability of ZnPT, which is characteristically administered as a fine suspension and must reach microorganisms in molecular form to exert biocidal activity. Application of the test compounds at levels below and above their estimated saturation doses in the upper stratum corneum allows one to distinguish between diffusion-limited and dissolution rate-limited kinetics. The effective lateral diffusivities of the two chemically stable reference compounds, caffeine and testosterone, were (1-4) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s and (3-9) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s, respectively. Lateral transport of [(14)C] associated with ZnPT was formulation-dependent, with effective diffusivities of (1-2) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s in water and (3-9) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s in a 1% body wash solution. These differences are thought to be related to molecular speciation and/or the presence of a residual surfactant phase on the skin surface. All values were greater than those estimated for the transverse diffusivities of these compounds in stratum corneum by factors ranging from 250 to over 2000. Facile lateral transport on skin, combined with a low transdermal permeation rate, may thus be seen to be a key factor in the safe and effective use of ZnPT as a topical antimicrobial agent.

  19. Analysis of Preconditioning and Relaxation Operators for the Discontinuous Galerkin Method Applied to Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2001-01-01

    The explicit stability constraint of the discontinuous Galerkin method applied to the diffusion operator decreases dramatically as the order of the method is increased. Block Jacobi and block Gauss-Seidel preconditioner operators are examined for their effectiveness at accelerating convergence. A Fourier analysis for methods of order 2 through 6 reveals that both preconditioner operators bound the eigenvalues of the discrete spatial operator. Additionally, in one dimension, the eigenvalues are grouped into two or three regions that are invariant with order of the method. Local relaxation methods are constructed that rapidly damp high frequencies for arbitrarily large time step.

  20. Preconditioned time-difference methods for advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, C.; Rodrigue, G.; Wolitzer, D.

    1994-12-31

    Explicit time differencing methods for solving differential equations are advantageous in that they are easy to implement on a computer and are intrinsically very parallel. The disadvantage of explicit methods is the severe restrictions placed on stepsize due to stability. Stability bounds for explicit time differencing methods on advection-diffusion-reaction problems are generally quite severe and implicit methods are used instead. The linear systems arising from these implicit methods are large and sparse so that iterative methods must be used to solve them. In this paper the authors develop a methodology for increasing the stability bounds of standard explicit finite differencing methods by combining explicit methods, implicit methods, and iterative methods in a novel way to generate new time-difference schemes, called preconditioned time-difference methods.

  1. An in situ method for real-time monitoring of soil gas diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biogeochemistry of soils. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by molecular diffusion and by this way fluxes can be calculated using by Fick's Law. The soil gas diffusion coefficient DS represents the proportional factor between the gas flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gas through the soil. One common way to determine DS is taking core samples in the field and measuring DS in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and laborious and it can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence, uncertainty about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale, i.e. the real aeration status remains. We developed a method to measure and monitor DS in situ. The set-up consists of a custom made gas sampling device, the continuous injection of an inert tracer gas and inverse gas transport modelling in the soil. The gas sampling device has seven sampling depths (from 0 to -43 cm of depth) and can be easily installed into vertical holes drilled by an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. Helium (He) as inert tracer gas was injected continuously at the lower end of the device. The resulting steady state distribution of He was used to deduce the DS depth distribution of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas-sampling-device/soil system the program COMSOL was used. We tested our new method both in the lab and in a field study and compared the results with a reference lab method using soil cores. DS profiles obtained by our in-situ method were consistent with DS profiles determined based on soil core analyses. Soil gas profiles could be measured with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. During the field study, there was an important rain event and we could monitor the decrease in soil gas diffusivity in the top soil due to water infiltration. The effect

  2. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2012-07-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  3. Rotational flow in a curved-wall diffuser designed by using the inverse method of solution of potential flow theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. T.; Ntone, F.

    1981-05-01

    Curved wall diffusers designed by using an inverse method of solution of potential flow theory have been shown to be both short and highly efficient. These features make this type of diffuser attractive in thrust ejector applications. In ejectors, however, the flow at the diffuser inlet is nearly a uniform shear flow. This paper presents a method used in examining the flow velocity along the diffuser wall and some of the analytical results for diffusers designed with potential flow theory and receiving a rotational flow. The inlet flow vorticity and the diffuser area ratios prescribed in the inverse solution of the irrotational flow are the parameters of the study. The geometry of a sample ejector using such a diffuser and its estimated thrust augmentation ratio are also presented.

  4. Studies of the accuracy of time integration methods for reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropp, David L.; Shadid, John N.; Ober, Curtis C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study we present numerical experiments of time integration methods applied to systems of reaction-diffusion equations. Our main interest is in evaluating the relative accuracy and asymptotic order of accuracy of the methods on problems which exhibit an approximate balance between the competing component time scales. Nearly balanced systems can produce a significant coupling of the physical mechanisms and introduce a slow dynamical time scale of interest. These problems provide a challenging test for this evaluation and tend to reveal subtle differences between the various methods. The methods we consider include first- and second-order semi-implicit, fully implicit, and operator-splitting techniques. The test problems include a prototype propagating nonlinear reaction-diffusion wave, a non-equilibrium radiation-diffusion system, a Brusselator chemical dynamics system and a blow-up example. In this evaluation we demonstrate a "split personality" for the operator-splitting methods that we consider. While operator-splitting methods often obtain very good accuracy, they can also manifest a serious degradation in accuracy due to stability problems.

  5. A diffusion-based truncated projection artifact reduction method for iterative digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.

    2013-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has strong promise to improve sensitivity for detecting breast cancer. DBT reconstruction estimates the breast tissue attenuation using projection views (PVs) acquired in a limited angular range. Because of the limited field of view (FOV) of the detector, the PVs may not completely cover the breast in the x-ray source motion direction at large projection angles. The voxels in the imaged volume cannot be updated when they are outside the FOV, thus causing a discontinuity in intensity across the FOV boundaries in the reconstructed slices, which we refer to as the truncated projection artifact (TPA). Most existing TPA reduction methods were developed for the filtered backprojection method in the context of computed tomography. In this study, we developed a new diffusion-based method to reduce TPAs during DBT reconstruction using the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). Our TPA reduction method compensates for the discontinuity in background intensity outside the FOV of the current PV after each PV updating in SART. The difference in voxel values across the FOV boundary is smoothly diffused to the region beyond the FOV of the current PV. Diffusion-based background intensity estimation is performed iteratively to avoid structured artifacts. The method is applicable to TPA in both the forward and backward directions of the PVs and for any number of iterations during reconstruction. The effectiveness of the new method was evaluated by comparing the visual quality of the reconstructed slices and the measured discontinuities across the TPA with and without artifact correction at various iterations. The results demonstrated that the diffusion-based intensity compensation method reduced the TPA while preserving the detailed tissue structures. The visibility of breast lesions obscured by the TPA was improved after artifact reduction.

  6. CMOS-compatible method for doping of buried vertical polysilicon structures by solid phase diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkulets, Yury; Silber, Amir; Ripp, Alexander; Sokolovsky, Mark; Shalish, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Polysilicon receives attention nowadays as a means to incorporate 3D-structured photonic devices into silicon processes. However, doping of buried layers of a typical 3D structure has been a challenge. We present a method for doping of buried polysilicon layers by solid phase diffusion. Using an underlying silicon oxide layer as a dopant source facilitates diffusion of dopants into the bottom side of the polysilicon layer. The polysilicon is grown on top of the oxide layer, after the latter has been doped by ion implantation. Post-growth heat treatment drives in the dopant from the oxide into the polysilicon. To model the process, we studied the diffusion of the two most common silicon dopants, boron (B) and phosphorus (P), using secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles. Our results show that shallow concentration profiles can be achieved in a buried polysilicon layer using the proposed technique. We present a quantitative 3D model for the diffusion of B and P in polysilicon, which turns the proposed method into an engineerable technique.

  7. Dating of black gel pen ink using the dissolution-diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Li, Biao

    2014-01-01

    In many criminal and civil cases in China, the most commonly questioned documents are those written with gel pen ink. An important task for forensic document examiners is to identify whether two or more ink entries in one or more documents were written with the same ink type. The identification of the age of gel ink entries made poses an important and difficult problem for forensic document examiners. In this paper, a dissolution-diffusion method was successfully employed to estimate the relative age of gel ink entries by comparing dissolution-diffusion rates. Using extensive tests, the mixed solution of dimethyl formamide (DMF) and anhydrous ethanol proved to be a suitable solvent and was used to dissolve the dye of gel ink strokes made at different times. As preliminary findings of this study, calibration curves were created to indicate the relationship between the average dissolution-diffusion rate of soluble gel ink components and the age of gel ink entries stored under natural aging conditions. It was also determined that brands of gel inks, types of paper and thickness of gel ink strokes had varying impacts on estimating the dates of gel ink strokes. Experimental results showed that dissolution-diffusion method was applicable for determining the relative age of gel ink entries under certain conditions. PMID:24378312

  8. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland; Perez, Michel

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ˜3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  9. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress.

    PubMed

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S; Morthomas, Julien; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland; Perez, Michel

    2014-07-21

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  10. Stability of operator splitting methods for systems with indefinite operators: reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropp, David L.; Shadid, John N.

    2005-03-01

    In this paper numerical results are reviewed [D.L. Ropp, J.N. Shadid, C.C. Ober, Studies of the accuracy of time integration methods for reaction-diffusion equations, J. Comput. Phys. 194 (2) (2004) 544-574] that demonstrate that common second-order operator-splitting methods can exhibit instabilities when integrating the Brusselator equations out to moderate times of about seven periods of oscillation. These instabilities are manifested as high wave number spatial errors. In this paper, we further analyze this problem, and present a theorem for stability of operator-splitting methods applied to linear reaction-diffusion equations with indefinite reaction terms which controls both low and high wave number instabilities. A corollary shows that if L-stable methods are used for the diffusion term the high wave number instability will be controlled more easily. In the absence of L-stability, an additional time step condition that suppresses the high wave number modes appears to guarantee convergence at the asymptotic order for the operator-splitting method. Numerical results for a model problem confirm this theory, and results for the Brusselator problem agree as well.

  11. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined ‘geometric surface area’ of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60–350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility–mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility–mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility–mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3–10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3. PMID:26692585

  12. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Perez, Michel; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland

    2014-07-21

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  13. A Monte Carlo synthetic-acceleration method for solving the thermal radiation diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Thomas M.; Mosher, Scott W.; Slattery, Stuart R.; Hamilton, Steven P.

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration-based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diffusion equation in three spatial dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that our Monte Carlo method is an effective solver for sparse matrix systems. For solutions converged to the same tolerance, it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned conjugate gradient and GMRES. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  14. Preconditioned iterative methods for space-time fractional advection-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi; Jin, Xiao-Qing; Lin, Matthew M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose practical numerical methods for solving a class of initial-boundary value problems of space-time fractional advection-diffusion equations. First, we propose an implicit method based on two-sided Grünwald formulae and discuss its stability and consistency. Then, we develop the preconditioned generalized minimal residual (preconditioned GMRES) method and preconditioned conjugate gradient normal residual (preconditioned CGNR) method with easily constructed preconditioners. Importantly, because resulting systems are Toeplitz-like, fast Fourier transform can be applied to significantly reduce the computational cost. We perform numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficiency of our preconditioners, even in cases with variable coefficients.

  15. An Advanced Integrated Diffusion/Transport Method for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Very-High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Farzad Rahnema; Dingkang Zhang; Abderrafi Ougouag; Frederick Gleicher

    2011-04-04

    The main objective of this research is to develop an integrated diffusion/transport (IDT) method to substantially improve the accuracy of nodal diffusion methods for the design and analysis of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Because of the presence of control rods in the reflector regions in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR-VHTR), traditional nodal diffusion methods do not accurately model these regions, within which diffusion theory breaks down in the vicinity of high neutron absorption and steep flux gradients. The IDT method uses a local transport solver based on a new incident flux response expansion method in the controlled nodes. Diffusion theory is used in the rest of the core. This approach improves the accuracy of the core solution by generating transport solutions of controlled nodes while maintaining computational efficiency by using diffusion solutions in nodes where such a treatment is sufficient. The transport method is initially developed and coupled to the reformulated 3-D nodal diffusion model in the CYNOD code for PBR core design and fuel cycle analysis. This method is also extended to the prismatic VHTR. The new method accurately captures transport effects in highly heterogeneous regions with steep flux gradients. The calculations of these nodes with transport theory avoid errors associated with spatial homogenization commonly used in diffusion methods in reactor core simulators

  16. A novel model for diffusion based release kinetics using an inverse numerical method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Herzog, Walter

    2011-10-01

    We developed and analyzed an inverse numerical model based on Fick's second law on the dynamics of drug release. In contrast to previous models which required two state descriptions of diffusion for long- and short-term release processes, our model is valid for the entire release process. The proposed model may be used for identifying and reducing experimental errors associated with measurements of diffusion based release kinetics. Knowing the initial and boundary conditions, and assuming Fick's second law to be appropriate, we use the methods of Lagrange multiplier along with least-square algorithms to define a cost function which is discretized using finite difference methods and is optimized so as to minimize errors. Our model can describe diffusion based release kinetics for static and dynamic conditions as accurately as finite element methods, but results are obtained in a fraction of CPU time. Our method can be widely used for drug release procedures and for tissue engineering/repair applications where oxygenation of cells residing within a matrix is important.

  17. Non-invasive measurements of tissue hemodynamics with hybrid diffuse optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durduran, Turgut

    Diffuse optical techniques were used to measure hemodynamics of tissues non-invasively. Spectroscopy and tomography of the brain, muscle and implanted tumors were carried out in animal models and humans. Two qualitatively different methods, diffuse optical tomography and diffuse correlation tomography, were hybridized permitting simultaneous measurement of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation and blood flow. This combination of information was processed further to derive estimates of oxygen metabolism (e.g. CMRO 2) in tissue. The diffuse correlation measurements of blood flow were demonstrated in human tissues, for the first time, demonstrating continous, non-invasive imaging of oxygen metabolism in large tissue volumes several centimeters below the tissue surface. The bulk of these investigations focussed on cerebral hemodynamics. Extensive validation of this methodology was carried out in in vivo rat brain models. Three dimensional images of deep tissue hemodynamics in middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical spreading depression (CSD) were obtained. CSD hemodynamics were found to depend strongly on partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The technique was then adapted for measurement of human brain. All optical spectroscopic measurements of CMRO2 during functional activation were obtained through intact human skull non-invasively. Finally, a high spatio-temporal resolution measurement of cerebral blood flow due to somatosensory cortex activation following electrical forepaw stimulation in rats was carried out with laser speckle flowmetry. New analysis methods were introduced for laser speckle flowmetry. In other organs, deep tissue hemodynamics were measured on human calf muscle during exercise and cuff-ischemia and were shown to have some clinical utility for peripheral vascular disease. In mice tumor models, the measured hemodynamics were shown to be predictive of photodynamic therapy efficacy, again suggesting promise of clinical utility

  18. Prediction of Shale Transport Properties Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method: Permeability and Effective Knudsen Diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Q.; Chen, L.

    2014-12-01

    Although short-term production of unconventional gas depends on the area of contact created by hydraulic fracturing and connections with pre-existing natural fracture networks, sustainable recovery is limited by transfer of gas from nanoporous matrix into the fractures, because the permeability of hydraulic fractures is orders of magnitude higher than that of the shale matrix. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of hydrocarbon mobility in shale matrix is urgently needed for improving recovery efficiencies. Shale transport properties (diffusivity, permeability, and electronic conductivity), which are critical for understanding the fundamental transport mechanisms, are still poorly understood. There have been some studies using experimental techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize the nanoscale structures of shale. Due to the ultra-low porosity and permeability, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the fundamental transport processes inside the shale or accurately measure the transport properties. Advanced pore-scale numerical methods, e.g., the lattice Boltzman method (LBM) may provide an alternative approach. In the present study, three-dimensional nanoscale porous structures of shale are reconstructed based on SEM images of shale samples. Characterization analysis of the nanoscale reconstructed shale is performed, including determination of porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area, and pore connectivity. The LBM flow model and diffusion model are adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion in the reconstructed shale, respectively. Tortuosity, intrinsic permeability, and effective Knudsen diffusivity are numerically predicted. The tortuosity is much higher than what is commonly employed in Bruggeman equation. Correction of the intrinsic permeability by taking into consideration the contribution of Knudsen diffusion, which leads to the apparent permeability, is performed. The correction factor under

  19. The triangular voltage sweep method as a performance metric for diffusion barrier evaluation in copper metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kaushik Arun

    Increasing demands on computer chip technology require exploration of novel materials, deposition techniques and characterization methods. Copper-based interconnects have been implemented in advanced microprocessor designs owing to copper's low resistivity (1.7 muO-cm). Copper interconnects require a barrier layer to prevent diffusion into the dielectric layer. Traditionally, a technique known as bias-thermal-stress-capacitance-voltage (BTS) has been used to quantify barrier reliability against Cu diffusion. Triangular voltage sweep (TVS) is a new method for quantifying barrier reliability against Cu diffusion, whose advantage lies in its ability to discriminate between various mobile charges based on their mobilities in an insulator. In the first phase of this work, physical vapor deposited (PVD) tantalum nitride (TaN) was first used as a baseline barrier to establish and understand the performance metrics of TVS. The development and optimization of PVD TaN employed a design of experiment (DOE) approach. The optimization resulted in stoichiometric TaN films with a resistivity of 250 muO-cm for 50 nm thick films. The films were polycrystalline and exhibited a zone "T" type microstructure. TVS was used to characterize these films. Pertinent results, including possible failure mechanisms, are presented in the document. As the device sizes shrink to 100 nm and below, diffusion barrier thickness is expected to fall to less than 10 nm. One potential material for the barrier layer in the sub-100 nm technology is tungsten nitride (WNx) deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Tungsten nitride is expected to perform well as a barrier because of its refractory nature and excellent thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties. In addition, it can be deposited in amorphous form. Amorphous materials have no grain boundaries, thereby avoiding grain boundary diffusion, which is a fast path diffusion mechanism. Additionally, a low-dielectric constant material, such as Si

  20. Thermal diffusivity study of aged Li-ion batteries using flash method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpure, Shrikant C.; Dinwiddie, Ralph; Babu, S. S.; Rizzoni, Giorgio; Bhushan, Bharat; Frech, Tim

    Advanced Li-ion batteries with high energy and power density are fast approaching compatibility with automotive demands. While the mechanism of operation of these batteries is well understood, the aging mechanisms are still under investigation. Investigation of aging mechanisms in Li-ion batteries becomes very challenging, as aging does not occur due to a single process, but because of multiple physical processes occurring at the same time in a cascading manner. As the current characterization techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy are used independent of each other they do not provide a comprehensive understanding of material degradation at different length (nm 2 to m 2) scales. Thus to relate the damage mechanisms of the cathode at mm length scale to micro/nanoscale, data at an intermediate length scale is needed. As such, we demonstrate here the use of thermal diffusivity analysis by flash method to bridge the gap between different length scales. In this paper we present the thermal diffusivity analysis of an unaged and aged cell. Thermal diffusivity analysis maps the damage to the cathode samples at millimeter scale lengths. Based on these maps we also propose a mechanism leading to the increase of the thermal diffusivity as the cells are aged.

  1. A Proposal for a Novel Method to Measure the Diffusivity of Species in Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhmood, Luckman; Viswanathan, Nurni Neelakantan; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2011-04-01

    The rate of reactions involved in steel-refining operations largely depend on the transport of species through the slag or metal phase at steel refining temperatures; the intrinsic reaction rates are expected to be high. Therefore, the study of diffusivity of species in slag is of great importance. The present work proposes a new methodology, in which experiments can be designed to determine the diffusivity of species in liquid slag. In this article, a mathematical description for the methodology is formulated and subsequently solved using numerical methods. This exercise will help in identifying appropriate bounds for experimental parameters for a desired accuracy. The proposed methodology is generic for any species in the liquid slag phase. However, diffusion of sulfur through slag has been illustrated as a case study. The order of magnitude for the diffusion coefficient for sulfur was taken from the classic works of Saito and Kawai, the sulfide capacity and sulfur partition ratio were retrieved from the works of Taniguchi et al., and the slag density was retrieved from earlier experimental results of the present authors. The slag density was obtained from earlier experimental results from the present group. The Henrian activity coefficients were retrieved from literature. Subsequent to the present work, the design of experiments and measurements carried out using the proposed methodology and the results obtained are presented as the second article on this subject.

  2. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    SciTech Connect

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean -François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-16

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. In conclusion, this study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  3. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-01

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. This study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  4. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    DOE PAGES

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean -François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-16

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion pathsmore » and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. In conclusion, this study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.« less

  5. A new method for measuring the oxygen diffusion constant and oxygen consumption rate of arteriolar walls.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuhiko; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Ushiyama, Akira; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen transport is believed to primarily occur via capillaries and depends on the oxygen tension gradient between the vessels and tissues. As blood flows along branching arterioles, the O(2) saturation drops, indicating either consumption or diffusion. The blood flow rate, the O(2) concentration gradient, and Krogh's O(2) diffusion constant (K) of the vessel wall are parameters affecting O(2)delivery. We devised a method for evaluating K of arteriolar wall in vivo using phosphorescence quenching microscopy to measure the partial pressure of oxygen in two areas almost simultaneously. The K value of arteriolar wall (inner diameter, 63.5 ± 11.9 μm; wall thickness, 18.0 ± 1.2 μm) was found to be 6.0 ± 1.2 × 10(-11) (cm(2)/s)(ml O(2)·cm(-3) tissue·mmHg(-1)). The arteriolar wall O(2) consumption rate (M) was 1.5 ± 0.1 (ml O(2)·100 cm(-3) tissue·min(-1)), as calculated using Krogh's diffusion equation. These results suggest that the arteriolar wall consumes a considerable proportion of the O(2) that diffuses through it.

  6. An adaptive tau-leaping method for stochastic simulations of reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Jill M. A.; Ilie, Silvana

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic modelling is critical for studying many biochemical processes in a cell, in particular when some reacting species have low population numbers. For many such cellular processes the spatial distribution of the molecular species plays a key role. The evolution of spatially heterogeneous biochemical systems with some species in low amounts is accurately described by the mesoscopic model of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation. The Inhomogeneous Stochastic Simulation Algorithm provides an exact strategy to numerically solve this model, but it is computationally very expensive on realistic applications. We propose a novel adaptive time-stepping scheme for the tau-leaping method for approximating the solution of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation. This technique combines effective strategies for variable time-stepping with path preservation to reduce the computational cost, while maintaining the desired accuracy. The numerical tests on various examples arising in applications show the improved efficiency achieved by the new adaptive method.

  7. New contactless method for thermal diffusivity measurements using modulated photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pham Tu Quoc, S. Cheymol, G.; Semerok, A.

    2014-05-15

    Modulated photothermal radiometry is a non-destructive and contactless technique for the characterization of materials. It has two major advantages: a good signal-to-noise ratio through a synchronous detection and a low dependence on the heating power and the optical properties of the sample surface. This paper presents a new method for characterizing the thermal diffusivity of a material when the phase shift between a modulated laser power signal and the thermal signal of a plate sample is known at different frequencies. The method is based on a three-dimensional analytical model which is used to determine the temperature amplitude and the phase in the laser heating of the plate. A new simple formula was developed through multi-parametric analysis to determine the thermal diffusivity of the plate with knowledge of the frequency at the minimum phase shift, the laser beam radius r{sub 0} and the sample thickness L. This method was developed to control the variation of the thermal diffusivity of nuclear components and it was first applied to determine the thermal diffusivity of different metals: 304 L stainless steel, nickel, titanium, tungsten, molybdenum, zinc, and iron. The experimental results were obtained with 5%–10% accuracy and corresponded well with the reference values. The present paper also demonstrates the limit of application of this method for plate with thickness r{sub 0}/100 ≤ L ≤ r{sub 0}/2. The technique is deemed interesting for the characterization of barely accessible components that require a contactless measurement.

  8. Impact of the emulsification-diffusion method on the development of pharmaceutical nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Zambrano-Zaragoza, María de la Luz; Gutierrez-Cortez, Elsa; Mendoza-Munoz, Nestor

    2012-12-01

    Nanotechnology is having a profound impact in many scientific fields and it has become one of the most important and exciting discipline. Like all technological advances, nanotechnology has its own scientific basis with a broad interdisciplinary effect. Perhaps, we are witnessing an exponential growth of nanotechnology, reflection of this is the important increase in the number of patents, scientific papers and specialized "nano" meetings and journals. The impact in the pharmaceutical area is related to the use of colloidal drug delivery systems as carriers for bioactive agents, in particular, the nanoparticle technology. The term nanoparticles designates solid submicronic particles formed of acceptable materials (e.g. polymers, lipids, etc.) containing an active substance. It includes both nanospheres (matricial systems) and nanocapsules (membrane systems). The knowledge of the nanoparticle preparation methods is a key issue for the formulator involved with drug-delivery research and development. In general, the methods based on preformed polymers, in particular biodegradable polymers, are preferred due to their easy implementation and lower potential toxicity. One of the most widely used methods to prepare polymeric nanoparticles is emulsification-diffusion. This method has been discussed in some reviews that compile research works but has a small number of patents. In this review, the emulsification-diffusion method is discussed from a technological point of view in order to show the operating conditions and formulation variables from data extracted of recent patents and experimental works. The main idea is to provide the reader with a general guide for formulators to make decisions about the usefulness of this method to develop specific nanoparticulate systems. The first part of this review provides an overview of the emulsification-diffusion method to prepare polymeric nanoparticles, while the second part evaluates the influence of preparative variables on the

  9. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences.

  10. A Simple Method for Finding Explicit Analytic Transition Densities of Diffusion Processes with General Diploid Selection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yun S.; Steinrücken, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The transition density function of the Wright–Fisher diffusion describes the evolution of population-wide allele frequencies over time. This function has important practical applications in population genetics, but finding an explicit formula under a general diploid selection model has remained a difficult open problem. In this article, we develop a new computational method to tackle this classic problem. Specifically, our method explicitly finds the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the diffusion generator associated with the Wright–Fisher diffusion with recurrent mutation and arbitrary diploid selection, thus allowing one to obtain an accurate spectral representation of the transition density function. Simplicity is one of the appealing features of our approach. Although our derivation involves somewhat advanced mathematical concepts, the resulting algorithm is quite simple and efficient, only involving standard linear algebra. Furthermore, unlike previous approaches based on perturbation, which is applicable only when the population-scaled selection coefficient is small, our method is nonperturbative and is valid for a broad range of parameter values. As a by-product of our work, we obtain the rate of convergence to the stationary distribution under mutation–selection balance. PMID:22209899

  11. The diffuse-scattering method for investigating locally ordered binary solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E. ); Anderson, J.P. ); Chen, H. . Materials Science and Engineering Dept.)

    1994-01-01

    Diffuse-scattering investigations comprise a series of maturing methods for detailed characterization of the local-order structure and atomic displacements of binary alloy systems. The distribution of coherent diffuse scattering is determined by the local atomic ordering, and analytical techniques are available for extracting the relevant structural information. An extension of such structural investigations, for locally ordered alloys at equilibrium, allows one to obtain pairwise interaction energies. Having experimental pairwise interaction energies for the various coordination shells offers one the potential for more realistic kinetic Ising modeling of alloy systems as they relax toward equilibrium. Although the modeling of atomic displacements in conjunction with more conventional studies of chemical ordering is in its infancy, the method appears to offer considerable promise for revealing additional information about the strain fields in locally ordered and clustered alloys. The diffuse-scattering methods for structural characterization and for the recovery of interaction energies are reviewed, and some preliminary results are used to demonstrate the potential of the kinetic Ising modeling technique to follow the evolution of ordering or phase separation in an alloy system.

  12. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns.

    PubMed

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences.

  13. Computing quasi-linear diffusion coefficients using the delta-f particle-in-cell method

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, T. M.; Smithe, D. N.; Ranjbar, V.

    2009-11-26

    Linear wave codes AORSA and TORIC couple to the bounce-averaged nonlinear Fokker-Planck code CQL3D through quasi-linear diffusion coefficients. Both linear wave codes rely on the quasi-local approximation that includes only first-order parallel and perpendicular gradient variations of cyclotron frequency and ignores field line curvature along with temperature and density gradient effects. The delta-f particle-in-cell (DFPIC) method has been successfully used for simulating ion-cyclotron fast wave behavior. This method also permits particle behavior such as multiple pass resonance, banana orbits, and superadiabaticity. We present new work on generating quasi-linear diffusion coefficients using the DFPIC method that will permit the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EMPIC) code, VORPAL, to couple to CQL3D and to compare to AORSA and TORIC. A new multiple weight delta-f approach will be presented that converts velocity derivatives to action derivatives and yields a full tensor quasi-linear diffusion coefficient.

  14. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2015-06-15

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences.

  15. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns.

    PubMed

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences. PMID:26117122

  16. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Bernard; Dresner, Joseph; Szostak, Daniel J.

    1983-07-12

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant-magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. An unmodulated illumination provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV. A vibrating Kelvin method-type probe electrode couples the SPV to a measurement system. The operating optical wavelength of an adjustable monochromator to compensate for the wavelength dependent sensitivity of a photodetector is selected to measure the illumination intensity (photon flux) on the silicon. Measurements of the relative photon flux for a plurality of wavelengths are plotted against the reciprocal of the optical absorption coefficient of the material. A linear plot of the data points is extrapolated to zero intensity. The negative intercept value on the reciprocal optical coefficient axis of the extrapolated linear plot is the diffusion length of the minority carriers.

  17. A modified evaluation method to reduce finite pulse time effects in flash diffusivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye; Yang, Liping; Zhong, Qiu; Xu, Zijun; Luo, Caiyun

    2015-12-01

    A modified evaluation method for laser flash is proposed. In this method, the moment of laser-heating cutoff time is considered as zero point. The penetration depth and formula equation of the sample temperature distribution are obtained with the approximate analytical solution before time zero (during laser heating) for the physical model of a continuously heated half-infinite, well-distributed sample. The weighted-average and approximate-equation methods are then used to quantitatively determine the laser effect depth, which leads to the formulation of a modified evaluation method in flash thermal diffusivity measurement. Results of the simulation calculations and experiments confirm the correctness of the modified method, which remarkably increases flash method applications. The modified method is applicable only to cases in which δ(x) does not exceed the sample thickness ( √{ 12 α τ 0 } ≤ L ) during laser heating.

  18. A New FRAP/FRAPa Method for Three-Dimensional Diffusion Measurements Based on Multiphoton Excitation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Davide; Braeckmans, Kevin; Cella, Francesca; Testa, Ilaria; Vercauteren, Dries; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan S.; Diaspro, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    We present a new convenient method for quantitative three-dimensionally resolved diffusion measurements based on the photobleaching (FRAP) or photoactivation (FRAPa) of a disk-shaped area by the scanning laser beam of a multiphoton microscope. Contrary to previously reported spot-photobleaching protocols, this method has the advantage of full scalability of the size of the photobleached area and thus the range of diffusion coefficients, which can be measured conveniently. The method is compatible with low as well as high numerical aperture objective lenses, allowing us to perform quantitative diffusion measurements in three-dimensional extended samples as well as in very small volumes, such as cell nuclei. Furthermore, by photobleaching/photoactivating a large area, diffusion along the optical axis can be measured separately, which is convenient when studying anisotropic diffusion. First, we show the rigorous mathematical derivation of the model, leading to a closed-form formula describing the fluorescence recovery/redistribution phase. Next, the ability of the multiphoton FRAP method to correctly measure absolute diffusion coefficients is tested thoroughly on many test solutions of FITC-dextrans covering a wide range of diffusion coefficients. The same is done for the FRAPa method on a series of photoactivatable green fluorescent protein solutions with different viscosities. Finally, we apply the method to photoactivatable green fluorescent protein diffusing freely in the nucleus of living NIH-3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts. PMID:18621824

  19. A deterministic particle method for one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascagni, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We derive a deterministic particle method for the solution of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations in one spatial dimension. This deterministic method is an analog of a Monte Carlo method for the solution of these problems that has been previously investigated by the author. The deterministic method leads to the consideration of a system of ordinary differential equations for the positions of suitably defined particles. We then consider the time explicit and implicit methods for this system of ordinary differential equations and we study a Picard and Newton iteration for the solution of the implicit system. Next we solve numerically this system and study the discretization error both analytically and numerically. Numerical computation shows that this deterministic method is automatically adaptive to large gradients in the solution.

  20. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: Permeability and diffusivity

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-01-28

    Here, porous structures of shales are reconstructed using the markov chain monte carlo (MCMC) method based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analysis of the reconstructed shales is performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion within the reconstructed shales. Simulation results reveal that the tortuosity of the shales is much higher than that commonly employed in the Bruggeman equation, and such high tortuosity leads to extremely low intrinsic permeability. Correction of the intrinsicmore » permeability is performed based on the dusty gas model (DGM) by considering the contribution of Knudsen diffusion to the total flow flux, resulting in apparent permeability. The correction factor over a range of Knudsen number and pressure is estimated and compared with empirical correlations in the literature. We find that for the wide pressure range investigated, the correction factor is always greater than 1, indicating Knudsen diffusion always plays a role on shale gas transport mechanisms in the reconstructed shales. Specifically, we found that most of the values of correction factor fall in the slip and transition regime, with no Darcy flow regime observed.« less

  1. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: permeability and diffusivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-01-01

    Porous structures of shales are reconstructed using the markov chain monte carlo (MCMC) method based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analysis of the reconstructed shales is performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion within the reconstructed shales. Simulation results reveal that the tortuosity of the shales is much higher than that commonly employed in the Bruggeman equation, and such high tortuosity leads to extremely low intrinsic permeability. Correction of the intrinsic permeability is performed based on the dusty gas model (DGM) by considering the contribution of Knudsen diffusion to the total flow flux, resulting in apparent permeability. The correction factor over a range of Knudsen number and pressure is estimated and compared with empirical correlations in the literature. For the wide pressure range investigated, the correction factor is always greater than 1, indicating Knudsen diffusion always plays a role on shale gas transport mechanisms in the reconstructed shales. Specifically, we found that most of the values of correction factor fall in the slip and transition regime, with no Darcy flow regime observed. PMID:25627247

  2. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: Permeability and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-01-28

    Here, porous structures of shales are reconstructed using the markov chain monte carlo (MCMC) method based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analysis of the reconstructed shales is performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion within the reconstructed shales. Simulation results reveal that the tortuosity of the shales is much higher than that commonly employed in the Bruggeman equation, and such high tortuosity leads to extremely low intrinsic permeability. Correction of the intrinsic permeability is performed based on the dusty gas model (DGM) by considering the contribution of Knudsen diffusion to the total flow flux, resulting in apparent permeability. The correction factor over a range of Knudsen number and pressure is estimated and compared with empirical correlations in the literature. We find that for the wide pressure range investigated, the correction factor is always greater than 1, indicating Knudsen diffusion always plays a role on shale gas transport mechanisms in the reconstructed shales. Specifically, we found that most of the values of correction factor fall in the slip and transition regime, with no Darcy flow regime observed.

  3. New method for the simultaneous determination of diffusion and adsorption of dyes in silica hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Perullini, Mercedes; Jobbágy, Matías; Japas, María Laura; Bilmes, Sara A

    2014-07-01

    The fine tuning of porosity in sol gel based devices makes possible the design of novel applications in which the transport of molecules through the oxide gel plays a crucial role. In this work we develop a new method for the simultaneous analysis of diffusion and adsorption of small diffusing probes, as anionic and cationic dyes, through silica mesoporous hydrogels synthesized by sol-gel. The novelty of the work resides in the simplicity of acquisition of the experimental data (by means of a desk scanner) and further mathematical modeling, which is in line with high throughput screening procedures, enabling rapid and simultaneous determination of relevant diffusion and adsorption parameters. Net mass transport and adsorption properties of the silica based hydrogels were contrasted to dye adsorption isotherms and textural characterization of the wet gels by SAXS, as well as that of the corresponding aerogels determined by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and N2 adsorption. Thus, the validation of the results with well-established characterization methods demonstrates that our approach is robust enough to give reliable physicochemical information on these systems.

  4. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: permeability and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-01-01

    Porous structures of shales are reconstructed using the markov chain monte carlo (MCMC) method based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analysis of the reconstructed shales is performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion within the reconstructed shales. Simulation results reveal that the tortuosity of the shales is much higher than that commonly employed in the Bruggeman equation, and such high tortuosity leads to extremely low intrinsic permeability. Correction of the intrinsic permeability is performed based on the dusty gas model (DGM) by considering the contribution of Knudsen diffusion to the total flow flux, resulting in apparent permeability. The correction factor over a range of Knudsen number and pressure is estimated and compared with empirical correlations in the literature. For the wide pressure range investigated, the correction factor is always greater than 1, indicating Knudsen diffusion always plays a role on shale gas transport mechanisms in the reconstructed shales. Specifically, we found that most of the values of correction factor fall in the slip and transition regime, with no Darcy flow regime observed. PMID:25627247

  5. Fixed and pulsed gradient diffusion methods in low-field core analysis.

    PubMed

    Leu, Gabriela; Fordham, Edmund J; Hürlimann, Martin D; Frulla, Phil

    2005-02-01

    We review diffusion-weighted relaxation protocols for two-dimensional diffusion/relaxation time (D, T(2)) distributions and their application to fluid-saturated sedimentary rocks at low fields typical of oil-well logging tools (< or = 2 MHz for 1H). Fixed field gradient (FFG) protocols may be implemented in logging tools and in the laboratory; there, pulsed field gradient (PFG) protocols are also available. In either category, direct or stimulated echoes may be used for the diffusion evolution periods. We compare the results of several variant FFG and PFG protocols obtained on liquids and two contrasting sedimentary rocks. For liquids and rocks of negligible internal gradients (g(int)), results are comparable, as expected, for all the studied protocols. For rocks of strong g(int), protocol-dependent artifacts are seen in the joint (D, T2) distributions, consistent with the effects of the internal fields. For laboratory petrophysics, the PFG methods offer several advantages: (a) significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio and acquisition times for repetitions over many samples; (b) freedom from heteronuclear contamination when fluorinated liquids are used in core holders; and (c) a palette of variants--one comparable with the FFG--for the study of rocks of significant g(int). Given suitable hardware, both PFG and FFG methods can be implemented in the same bench-top apparatus, providing a versatile test bed for application in a petrophysical laboratory. PMID:15833632

  6. Improved diffusion methods for nitrogen and 15nitrogen analysis of Kjeldahl digests.

    PubMed

    Stevens, W B; Mulvaney, R L; Khan, S A; Hoeft, R G

    2000-01-01

    Simple methods are described that permit the use of either H3BO3 indicator solution or acidified filter disks to collect NH3 liberated by treatment of Kjeldahl digests with NaOH. These methods incorporate modifications to improve reliability, analytical capacity, and convenience. A semimicro digest was diluted to 25 mL with deionized water, and a 10 mL aliquot, containing up to 4 mg N (150 microg N for diffusions into acidified disks), was transferred to a shell vial, which was placed inside a 473 mL (1 pint) Mason jar containing 10 mL 10N NaOH. The NH3 liberated by overturning the vial was collected after 12 to 48 h at ambient temperature, or after 4 h at 45 to 50 degrees C on a hotplate, for quantitative and/or isotope-ratio analyses. With either H3BO3 indicator solution or acidified filter disks, recovery of diffused N was quantitative. Isotope-ratio analyses of diffused N from 15N-labeled chemical, plant, and soil samples were within 3% of analyses using steam distillation.

  7. Fixed and pulsed gradient diffusion methods in low-field core analysis.

    PubMed

    Leu, Gabriela; Fordham, Edmund J; Hürlimann, Martin D; Frulla, Phil

    2005-02-01

    We review diffusion-weighted relaxation protocols for two-dimensional diffusion/relaxation time (D, T(2)) distributions and their application to fluid-saturated sedimentary rocks at low fields typical of oil-well logging tools (< or = 2 MHz for 1H). Fixed field gradient (FFG) protocols may be implemented in logging tools and in the laboratory; there, pulsed field gradient (PFG) protocols are also available. In either category, direct or stimulated echoes may be used for the diffusion evolution periods. We compare the results of several variant FFG and PFG protocols obtained on liquids and two contrasting sedimentary rocks. For liquids and rocks of negligible internal gradients (g(int)), results are comparable, as expected, for all the studied protocols. For rocks of strong g(int), protocol-dependent artifacts are seen in the joint (D, T2) distributions, consistent with the effects of the internal fields. For laboratory petrophysics, the PFG methods offer several advantages: (a) significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio and acquisition times for repetitions over many samples; (b) freedom from heteronuclear contamination when fluorinated liquids are used in core holders; and (c) a palette of variants--one comparable with the FFG--for the study of rocks of significant g(int). Given suitable hardware, both PFG and FFG methods can be implemented in the same bench-top apparatus, providing a versatile test bed for application in a petrophysical laboratory.

  8. An explicit approach to capture diffusive effects in finite water-content method for solving vadose zone flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianting; Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Chen, Xiangfeng; Talbot, Cary A.

    2016-04-01

    Vadose zone flow problems are usually solved from the Richards equation. Solution to the Richards equation is generally challenging because the hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity in the equation are strongly non-linear functions of water content. The finite water-content method was proposed as an alternative general solution method of the vadose zone flow problem for infiltration, falling slugs, and vadose zone response to water table dynamics based on discretizing the water content domain into numerous bins instead of the traditional spatial discretization. In this study, we develop an improved approach to the original finite water-content method (referred to as TO method hereinafter) that better simulates diffusive effects but retains the robustness of the TO method. The approach treats advection and diffusion separately and considers diffusion on a bin by bin basis. After discretizing into water content bins, we treat the conductivity and diffusivity in individual bins as water content dependent constant evaluated at given water content corresponding to each bin. For each bin, we can solve the flow equations analytically since the hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity can be treated as a constant. We then develop solutions for each bin to determine the diffusive water amounts at each time step. The water amount ahead of the convective front for each bin is redistributed among water content bins to account for diffusive effects. The application of developed solution is straightforward only involving algebraic manipulations at each time step. The method can mainly improve water content profiles, but has no significant difference for the total infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration compared to the TO method. Although the method separately deals with advection and diffusion, it can account for the coupling effects of advection and diffusion reasonably well.

  9. GPU-Accelerated Finite Element Method for Modelling Light Transport in Diffuse Optical Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a GPU-accelerated finite element forward solver for the computation of light transport in scattering media. The forward model is the computationally most expensive component of iterative methods for image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography, and performance optimisation of the forward solver is therefore crucial for improving the efficiency of the solution of the inverse problem. The GPU forward solver uses a CUDA implementation that evaluates on the graphics hardware the sparse linear system arising in the finite element formulation of the diffusion equation. We present solutions for both time-domain and frequency-domain problems. A comparison with a CPU-based implementation shows significant performance gains of the graphics accelerated solution, with improvements of approximately a factor of 10 for double-precision computations, and factors beyond 20 for single-precision computations. The gains are also shown to be dependent on the mesh complexity, where the largest gains are achieved for high mesh resolutions. PMID:22013431

  10. Direct estimation of diffuse gaseous emissions from coal fires: current methods and future directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, Mark A.; Olea, Ricardo A.; O'Keefe, Jennifer M. K.; Hower, James C.; Geboy, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Coal fires occur in nature spontaneously, contribute to increases in greenhouse gases, and emit atmospheric toxicants. Increasing interest in quantifying coal fire emissions has resulted in the adaptation and development of specialized approaches and adoption of numerical modeling techniques. Overview of these methods for direct estimation of diffuse gas emissions from coal fires is presented in this paper. Here we take advantage of stochastic Gaussian simulation to interpolate CO2 fluxes measured using a dynamic closed chamber at the Ruth Mullins coal fire in Perry County, Kentucky. This approach allows for preparing a map of diffuse gas emissions, one of the two primary ways that gases emanate from coal fires, and establishing the reliability of the study both locally and for the entire fire. Future research directions include continuous and automated sampling to improve quantification of gaseous coal fire emissions.

  11. GPU-Accelerated Finite Element Method for Modelling Light Transport in Diffuse Optical Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a GPU-accelerated finite element forward solver for the computation of light transport in scattering media. The forward model is the computationally most expensive component of iterative methods for image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography, and performance optimisation of the forward solver is therefore crucial for improving the efficiency of the solution of the inverse problem. The GPU forward solver uses a CUDA implementation that evaluates on the graphics hardware the sparse linear system arising in the finite element formulation of the diffusion equation. We present solutions for both time-domain and frequency-domain problems. A comparison with a CPU-based implementation shows significant performance gains of the graphics accelerated solution, with improvements of approximately a factor of 10 for double-precision computations, and factors beyond 20 for single-precision computations. The gains are also shown to be dependent on the mesh complexity, where the largest gains are achieved for high mesh resolutions.

  12. Hierarchical clustering method for improved prostate cancer imaging in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavuri, Venkaiah C.; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the feasibility of trans-rectal near infrared (NIR) based diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for early detection of prostate cancer using a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) compatible imaging probe. For this purpose, we designed a TRUS-compatible, NIR-based image system (780nm), in which the photo diodes were placed on the trans-rectal probe. DC signals were recorded and used for estimating the absorption coefficient. We validated the system using laboratory phantoms. For further improvement, we also developed a hierarchical clustering method (HCM) to improve the accuracy of image reconstruction with limited prior information. We demonstrated the method using computer simulations laboratory phantom experiments.

  13. A transient divided-bar method for simultaneous measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bording, Thue S.; Nielsen, Søren B.; Balling, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Accurate information on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of materials is of central importance in relation to geoscience and engineering problems involving the transfer of heat. Within the geosciences, this applies to all aspects regarding the determination of terrestrial heat flow and subsurface temperature modelling. Several methods, including the classical divided-bar technique, are available for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity, and much fewer for thermal diffusivity. We have generalized the divided-bar technique to the transient case, in which thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity, and thereby also thermal diffusivity, are measured simultaneously. As the density of samples is easily determined independently, specific heat capacity may also be determined. Finite element formulation provides a flexible forward solution for heat transfer across the bar and thermal properties are estimated by inverse Monte Carlo modelling. This methodology enables a proper quantification of experimental uncertainties on measured thermal properties. The developed methodology was applied to laboratory measurements of various materials, including a standard ceramic material and different rock samples, and measuring results were compared with results applying traditional steady-state divided-bar and an independent line-source method. All measurements show highly consistent results and with excellent reproducibility and high accuracy. For conductivity, uncertainty is typically 1-3 %, and for diffusivity uncertainty may be reduced to about 3-5 %. The main uncertainty originates from the presence of thermal contact resistance associated with the internal interfaces of the bar. They are not resolved during inversion, and it is highly important that they are minimized by careful sample preparation.

  14. New method for obtaining drift mobility and diffusion coefficient and their relation in photorefractive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirao, Akiko; Nishizawa, Hideyuki; Tsukamoto, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Kazuki

    1999-10-01

    A new easy method for obtaining a drift mobility and a diffusion coefficient from a nondispersive time-of-flight transient has been developed. Nondispersive transients are described well in the theoretical photocurrent equation (PTE) based on the fact that a carrier packet drifts at a constant velocity and is spread by diffusion, the top electrode acts as a reflecting and partially absorbing wall, and the counter electrode acts as an absorbing wall. The fitting of the PTE to photocurrent transients gives the mobility and the diffusion coefficient (D) simultaneously. These are suitable characteristic values for descriptions of carriers transport because they do not show the thickness dependence and the negative field dependence in a low electric field. The mobility that sometimes shows the thickness dependence and the negative field dependence in a low electric field, however, has usually been measured from the time of the intersection of the asymptotes to the plateau and trailing edge of the transients. In order to obtain (mu) a from photocurrent transients by a simple method, we have tried to describe t0 and tail-broadening parameter W as functions of (mu) a and D, where W is defined as (t1/2 - t0)/t1/2 and t1/2 is the time at which the current is a half of that in the plateau region. The dependences of calculated (mu) k and W on the electric field and the sample thickness agreed well with those of the experimental data. These results verify the PTE and suggest that (mu) a and D can be calculated from t0 and W. We also report that the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the power of 2 of the mobility. This result agrees with a theory based on the Langevin equation which describes motions of carriers in a fluctuated field.

  15. A tracer-based inversion method for diagnosing eddy-induced diffusivity and advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S. D.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bryan, F. O.

    2015-02-01

    A diagnosis method is presented which inverts a set of tracer flux statistics into an eddy-induced transport intended to apply for all tracers. The underlying assumption is that a linear flux-gradient relationship describes eddy-induced tracer transport, but a full tensor coefficient is assumed rather than a scalar coefficient which allows for down-gradient and skew transports. Thus, Lagrangian advection and anisotropic diffusion not necessarily aligned with the tracer gradient can be diagnosed. In this method, multiple passive tracers are initialized in an eddy-resolving flow simulation. Their spatially-averaged gradients form a matrix, where the gradient of each tracer is assumed to satisfy an identical flux-gradient relationship. The resulting linear system, which is overdetermined when using more than three tracers, is then solved to obtain an eddy transport tensor R which describes the eddy advection (antisymmetric part of R) and potentially anisotropic diffusion (symmetric part of R) in terms of coarse-grained variables. The mathematical basis for this inversion method is presented here, along with practical guidelines for its implementation. We present recommendations for initialization of the passive tracers, maintaining the required misalignment of the tracer gradients, correcting for nonconservative effects, and quantifying the error in the diagnosed transport tensor. A method is proposed to find unique, tracer-independent, distinct rotational and divergent Lagrangian transport operators, but the results indicate that these operators are not meaningfully relatable to tracer-independent eddy advection or diffusion. With the optimal method of diagnosis, the diagnosed transport tensor is capable of predicting the fluxes of other tracers that are withheld from the diagnosis, including even active tracers such as buoyancy, such that relative errors of 14% or less are found.

  16. Numerical methods for one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations arising in combustion theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos, J. I.

    1987-01-01

    A review of numerical methods for one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations arising in combustion theory is presented. The methods reviewed include explicit, implicit, quasi-linearization, time linearization, operator-splitting, random walk and finite-element techniques and methods of lines. Adaptive and nonadaptive procedures are also reviewed. These techniques are applied first to solve two model problems which have exact traveling wave solutions with which the numerical results can be compared. This comparison is performed in terms of both the wave profile and computed wave speed. It is shown that the computed wave speed is not a good indicator of the accuracy of a particular method. A fourth-order time-linearized, Hermitian compact operator technique is found to be the most accurate method for a variety of time and space sizes.

  17. Social diffusion of novel foraging methods in brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella)

    PubMed Central

    Dindo, Marietta; Thierry, Bernard; Whiten, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that wild capuchin monkeys exhibit several group-specific behavioural traditions. By contrast, experiments have found little evidence for the social learning assumed necessary to support such traditions. The present study used a diffusion chain paradigm to investigate whether a novel foraging task could be observationally learned by capuchins (Cebus apella) and then transmitted along a chain of individuals. We used a two-action paradigm to control for independent learning. Either of two methods (lift or slide) could be used to open the door of a foraging apparatus to retrieve food. Two chains were tested (N1=4; N2=5), each beginning with an experimenter-trained model who demonstrated to a partner its group-specific method for opening the foraging apparatus. After the demonstration, if the observer was able to open the apparatus 20 times by either method, then it became the demonstrator for a new subject, thus simulating the spread of a foraging tradition among ‘generations’ of group members. Each method was transmitted along these respective chains with high fidelity, echoing similar results presently available only for chimpanzees and children. These results provide the first clear evidence for faithful diffusion of alternative foraging methods in monkeys, consistent with claims for capuchin traditions in the wild. PMID:17971322

  18. Quantifying water diffusion in high-viscosity and glassy aqueous solutions using a Raman isotope tracer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, H. C.; Murray, B. J.; Mattsson, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Wilson, T. W.; Baustian, K. J.; Benning, L. G.

    2014-04-01

    Recent research suggests that under certain temperature and relative humidity conditions atmospheric aerosol may be present in the form of a glassy solid. In order to understand the impacts that this may have on aerosol-cloud interactions and atmospheric chemistry, knowledge of water diffusion within such aerosol particles is required. Here, a method is described in which Raman spectroscopy is used to observe D2O diffusion in high-viscosity aqueous solutions, enabling a quantitative assessment of water diffusion coefficients, Dwater, as a function of relative humidity. Results for sucrose solutions compare well with literature data at 23.5 ± 0.3 °C, and demonstrate that water diffusion is slow (Dwater ~5 × 10-17 m2 s-1), but not arrested, just below the glass transition at a water activity of 0.2. Room temperature water diffusion coefficients are also presented for aqueous levoglucosan and an aqueous mixture of raffinose, dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate: at low humidity, diffusion is retarded but still occurs on millisecond to second timescales in atmospherically relevant-sized particles. The effect of gel formation on diffusion in magnesium sulfate solutions is shown to be markedly different from the gradual decrease in diffusion coefficients of highly viscous liquids. We show that using the Stokes-Einstein equation to determine diffusion timescales from viscosity leads to values which are more than 5 orders of magnitude too big, which emphasises the need to make measurements of diffusion coefficients. In addition, comparison of bounce fraction data for levoglucosan with measured diffusion data reveals that even when particles bounce the diffusion timescales for water are a fraction of a second for a 100 nm particle. This suggests a high bounce fraction does not necessarily indicate retarded water diffusion.

  19. Studies on Aspirin Crystals Generated by a Modified Vapor Diffusion Method.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit; Malhotra, Deepak; Jain, Preeti; Kalia, Anupama; Shunmugaperumal, Tamilvanan

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of the current investigation were (1) to study the influence of selected two different non-solvents (diethylether and dichloromethane) on the drug crystal formation of a model drug, aspirin (ASP-I) by the modified vapor diffusion method and (2) to characterize and compare the generated crystals (ASP-II and ASP-III) using different analytical techniques with that of unprocessed ASP-I. When compared to the classical vapor diffusion method which consumes about 15 days to generate drug crystals, the modified method needs only 12 h to get the same. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that the internal structures of ASP-II and ASP-III crystals were identical when compared with ASP-I. Although the drug crystals showed a close similarity in X-ray diffraction patterns, the difference in the relative intensities of some of the diffraction peaks (especially at 2θ values of around 7.7 and 15.5) could be attributed to the crystal habit or crystal size modification. Similarly, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study speculates that only the crystal habit modifications might occur but without involving any change in internal structure of the generated drug polymorphic form I. This is further substantiated from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures that indicated the formation of platy shape for the ASP-II crystals and needle shape for the ASP-III crystals. In addition, the observed slow dissolution of ASP crystals should indicate polymorph form I formation. Thus, the modified vapor diffusion method could routinely be used to screen and legally secure all possible forms of other drug entities too.

  20. A method to analyze the diffuse gamma-ray emission with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Markus; Johannesson, Gueolaugur; Digel, Seth; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Reimer, Olaf; Porter, Troy; Strong, Andrew

    2008-12-24

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope with its main instrument the LAT is the most sensitive {gamma}-ray telescope in the energy region between 30 MeV and 100 GeV. One of the prime scientific goals of this mission is the measurement and interpretation of the diffuse Galactic and extragalactic {gamma}-ray emission. While not limited by photon statistics, this analysis presents several challenges: Instrumental response functions, residual background from cosmic rays as well as resolved and unresolved foreground {gamma}-ray sources have to be taken carefully into account in the interpretation of the data. Detailed modeling of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission is being performed and will form the basis of the investigations. We present the analysis approach to be applied to the Fermi LAT data, namely the modeling of the diffuse emission components and the background contributions, followed by an all-sky maximum-likelihood fitting procedure. We also report on the performance of this method evaluated in tests on simulated Fermi LAT and real EGRET data.

  1. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Based Method for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed M.; Mauk, Michael G.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gross, Robert; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, such as HIV, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assess disease progression and effectiveness of drug therapy. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low-resource settings. This paper describes a simple, low-cost, reaction-diffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. The method was tested for HIV viral load monitoring and performed on par with conventional benchtop methods. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. PMID:25477046

  2. Solid lipid nanoparticles prepared by solvent diffusion method in a nanoreactor system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Huang, Ling-Fei; Du, Yong-Zhong; Ying, Xiao-Ying; You, Jian; Hu, Fu-Qiang; Zeng, Su

    2008-02-15

    In this study, water-in-oil (W/O) miniemulsion was used as nanoreactor to prepare solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) by solvent diffusion method. n-Hexane, Tween 80 and Span 80 were used as the oil phase and surfactant combination for preparation of W/O miniemulsion, respectively. The stable miniemulsion with the particle size of 27.1+/-7.6 nm was obtained when the composition of water/Tween 80/Span 80/n-hexane was 1 ml/18 mg/200 mg/10 ml. Clobetasol propionate (CP) was used as a model drug. The physicochemical properties of the SLN, such as particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, drug entrapment efficiency, drug loading capacity and in vitro drug release behaviors were investigated, comparing with those of SLN prepared by conventional aqueoethod. The SLN prepared by the novel method displayed smaller particles size and higher dus solvent diffusion mrug entrapment efficiency than those of SLN prepared by the conventional method. The drug entrapment efficiency decreased with increasing of charged amount of drug, and 15.9% of drug loading was achieved as the charged amount of drug was 20%. The in vitro drug release tests indicated that the drug release rate was faster than that of SLN prepared by the conventional method, and the drug content in SLN did not affect the in vitro drug release profile.

  3. Self-feeding MUSE: a robust method for high resolution diffusion imaging using interleaved EPI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Huang, Feng; Ma, Xiaodong; Xie, Sheng; Guo, Hua

    2015-01-15

    Single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) with parallel imaging techniques has been well established as the most popular method for clinical diffusion imaging, due to its fast acquisition and motion insensitivity. However, this approach is limited by the relatively low spatial resolution and image distortion. Interleaved EPI is able to break the limitations but the phase variations among different shots must be considered for artifact suppression. The introduction of multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE) can address the phase issue using sensitivity encoding (SENSE) for self-navigation of each interleave. However, MUSE has suboptimal results when the number of shots is high. To achieve higher spatial resolution and lower geometric distortion, we introduce two new schemes into the MUSE framework: 1) a self-feeding mechanism is adopted by using prior information regularized SENSE in order to obtain reliable phase estimation; and 2) retrospective motion detection and data rejection strategies are performed to exclude unusable data corrupted by severe pulsatile motions. The proposed method is named self-feeding MUSE (SF-MUSE). Experiments on healthy volunteers demonstrate that this new SF-MUSE approach provides more accurate motion-induced phase estimation and fewer artifacts caused by data corruption when compared with the original MUSE method. SF-MUSE is a robust method for high resolution diffusion imaging and suitable for practical applications with reasonable scan time.

  4. A Method for Studying Atomic Diffusion by STM Tip-Crash Induced Vacancy Island Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, R. E.; Lange, A. P.; Ray, M. P.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2007-11-01

    The study of vacancy and adatom island motion on single crystal metals with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has explained many of the underlying atomic diffusion mechanisms responsible for movement of atoms on a surface. We present a new method for vacancy island creation at room temperature using a controlled mechanical tip-surface interaction. The method allows us to control the relative positions and initial sizes of vacancy islands with respect to one another and to surface defects. Complicated and closely spaced vacancy island configurations can also be engineered. This enhances our ability to collect statistics on the movement of the macro-scale vacancy islands and distinguish between mass transport channels. To demonstrate the technique, time series analysis of coalescence events on the surface of Ag(111) is presented. Diffusion coefficients of the Ag surface atoms obtained with this method are in general agreement with previous stochastic methods for creating vacancy islands such as low-dose sputtering [1]. [1] M. Eßer, K. Morgenstern, G. Rosenfeld, G. Comsa, Surf. Sci. 402-404, 341 (1998).

  5. A self-organizing Lagrangian particle method for adaptive-resolution advection-diffusion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboux, Sylvain; Schrader, Birte; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel adaptive-resolution particle method for continuous parabolic problems. In this method, particles self-organize in order to adapt to local resolution requirements. This is achieved by pseudo forces that are designed so as to guarantee that the solution is always well sampled and that no holes or clusters develop in the particle distribution. The particle sizes are locally adapted to the length scale of the solution. Differential operators are consistently evaluated on the evolving set of irregularly distributed particles of varying sizes using discretization-corrected operators. The method does not rely on any global transforms or mapping functions. After presenting the method and its error analysis, we demonstrate its capabilities and limitations on a set of two- and three-dimensional benchmark problems. These include advection-diffusion, the Burgers equation, the Buckley-Leverett five-spot problem, and curvature-driven level-set surface refinement.

  6. A diffuse-interface method for two-phase flows with soluble surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Teigen, Knut Erik; Song, Peng; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented to solve two-phase problems involving soluble surfactants. The incompressible Navier–Stokes equations are solved along with equations for the bulk and interfacial surfactant concentrations. A non-linear equation of state is used to relate the surface tension to the interfacial surfactant concentration. The method is based on the use of a diffuse interface, which allows a simple implementation using standard finite difference or finite element techniques. Here, finite difference methods on a block-structured adaptive grid are used, and the resulting equations are solved using a non-linear multigrid method. Results are presented for a drop in shear flow in both 2D and 3D, and the effect of solubility is discussed. PMID:21218125

  7. A method for the estimate of the wall diffusion for non-axisymmetric fields using rotating external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Fridström, R.; Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Volpe, F. A.; Drake, J.

    2013-08-01

    A new method for the estimate of the wall diffusion time of non-axisymmetric fields is developed. The method based on rotating external fields and on the measurement of the wall frequency response is developed and tested in EXTRAP T2R. The method allows the experimental estimate of the wall diffusion time for each Fourier harmonic and the estimate of the wall diffusion toroidal asymmetries. The method intrinsically considers the effects of three-dimensional structures and of the shell gaps. Far from the gaps, experimental results are in good agreement with the diffusion time estimated with a simple cylindrical model that assumes a homogeneous wall. The method is also applied with non-standard configurations of the coil array, in order to mimic tokamak-relevant settings with a partial wall coverage and active coils of large toroidal extent. The comparison with the full coverage results shows good agreement if the effects of the relevant sidebands are considered.

  8. cAMP diffusion in Dictyostelium discoideum: A Green's function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calovi, Daniel S.; Brunnet, Leonardo G.; de Almeida, Rita M. C.

    2010-07-01

    A Green’s function method is developed to approach the spatiotemporal equations describing the cAMP production in Dictyostelium discoideum, markedly reducing numerical calculations times: cAMP concentrations and gradients are calculated just at the amoeba locations. A single set of parameters is capable of reproducing the different observed behaviors, from cAMP synchronization, spiral waves and reaction-diffusion patterns to streaming and mound formation. After aggregation, the emergence of a circular motion of amoebas, breaking the radial cAMP field symmetry, is observed.

  9. Axial expansion methods for solution of the multi-dimensional neutron diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Beaklini Filho, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility and practical implementation of axial expansion methods for the solution of the multi-dimensional multigroup neutron diffusion (MGD) equations is investigated. The theoretical examination which is applicable to the general MGD equations in arbitrary geometry includes the derivation of a new weak (reduced) form of the MGD equations by expanding the axial component of the neutron flux in a series of known trial functions and utilizing the Galerkin weighting. A general two-group albedo boundary condition is included in the weak form as a natural boundary condition. The application of different types of trial functions is presented.

  10. Quantifying water diffusion in high-viscosity and glassy aqueous solutions using a Raman isotope tracer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, H. C.; Murray, B. J.; Mattsson, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Wilson, T. W.; Baustian, K. J.; Benning, L. G.

    2013-11-01

    Recent research suggests that under certain temperature and relative humidity conditions atmospheric aerosol may be present in the form of a glassy solid. In order to understand the impacts that this may have on aerosol-cloud interactions and atmospheric chemistry, knowledge of water diffusion within such aerosol particles is required. Here, a method is described in which Raman spectroscopy is used to observe D2O diffusion in high-viscosity aqueous solutions, enabling a quantitative assessment of water diffusion coefficients, Dwater, as a function of relative humidity. Results for sucrose solutions compare well with literature data at 23.5 ± 0.3 °C, and demonstrate that water diffusion is slow (Dwater~5 ×10-17m2s-1), but not arrested, just below the glass transition. Room temperature water diffusion coefficients are also presented for aqueous levoglucosan and an aqueous mixture of raffinose, dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate: at low humidity, diffusion is retarded but still occurs on millisecond to second timescales in atmospherically relevant-sized particles. The effect of gel formation on diffusion in magnesium sulfate solutions is shown to be markedly different from the gradual decrease in diffusion coefficients of highly viscous liquids. We show that using the Stokes-Einstein equation to determine diffusion timescales from viscosity leads to values which are more than five orders of magnitude too big, which emphasises the need to make measurements of diffusion coefficients. In addition, comparison of bounce fraction data for levoglucosan with measured diffusion data reveals that even when particles bounce the equilibration timescales for water are a fraction of a second for a 100 nm particle. This suggests a high bounce fraction does not necessarily indicate retarded water diffusion.

  11. Modification of flow and compressibility of corn starch using quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method

    PubMed Central

    Akhgari, Abbas; Sadeghi, Hasti; Dabbagh, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to improve flowability and compressibility characteristics of starch to use as a suitable excipient in direct compression tabletting. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion was used as a crystal modification method. Materials and Methods: Corn starch was dissolved in hydrochloric acid at 80°C and then ethanol as a non-solvent was added with lowering temperature until the formation of a precipitate of modified starch. Flow parameters, particle size and thermal behavior of the treated powders were compared with the native starch. Finally, the 1:1 mixture of naproxen and each excipient was tabletted, and hardness and friability of different tablets were evaluated. Results: Larger and well shaped agglomerates were formed which showed different thermal behavior. Treated starch exhibited suitable flow properties and tablets made by the treated powder had relatively high hardness. Conclusion: It was found that recrystallization of corn starch by quasi emulsion solvent diffusion method could improve its flowability and compressibility characteristics. PMID:25422746

  12. Synthesis of metal-organic framework films by pore diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Naohiro; Nishimura, Yuki; Kajiro, Hiroshi; Kishida, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kentaro; Tottori Univ Team; Nippon Steel; Sumitomo Metal Co. Collaboration; Tottori Integrated Frontier Resaerch Center (Tifrec) Collaboration; Tottori University Electronic Display Resaerch Center (Tedrec) Collaboration

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) presents high controllability in designing the nano-scale pore, and this enable molecular storages, catalysts, gas sensors, gas separation membranes, and electronic devices for next-generation. Therefore, a simple method for film synthesis of MOFs compared with conventional methods [1] is strongly required. In this paper, we provide pore diffusion method, in which a substrate containing constituent metals of MOF is inserted in solution that includes only linker molecules of MOF. As a result, 2D growth of MOF was effectively enhanced, and the formation of flat and dense MOF films was attained. The growth time, t, dependence of film thickness, d, can be expressed by the relation of d = Aln(t + 1) + B, where A and B are constants. It means that ionized coppers diffuse through the pores of MOFs and the synthesis reaction proceeds at the MOF/solvent interface. We demonstrated the fabrication of a HKUST-1/Cu-TPA hetero structure by synthesizing a Cu-TPA film continuously after the growth of a HKUST-1 film on the CuOx substrate.

  13. A comparison between the fission matrix method, the diffusion model and the transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Dehaye, B.; Hugot, F. X.; Diop, C. M.

    2013-07-01

    The fission matrix method may be used to solve the critical eigenvalue problem in a Monte Carlo simulation. This method gives us access to the different eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the transport or fission operator. We propose to compare the results obtained via the fission matrix method with those of the diffusion model, and an approximated transport model. To do so, we choose to analyse the mono-kinetic and continuous energy cases for a Godiva-inspired critical sphere. The first five eigenvalues are computed with TRIPOLI-4{sup R} and compared to the theoretical ones. An extension of the notion of the extrapolation distance is proposed for the modes other than the fundamental one. (authors)

  14. An ADI extrapolated Crank-Nicolson orthogonal spline collocation method for nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Ryan I.; Fairweather, Graeme

    2012-08-01

    An alternating direction implicit (ADI) orthogonal spline collocation (OSC) method is described for the approximate solution of a class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Its efficacy is demonstrated on the solution of well-known examples of such systems, specifically the Brusselator, Gray-Scott, Gierer-Meinhardt and Schnakenberg models, and comparisons are made with other numerical techniques considered in the literature. The new ADI method is based on an extrapolated Crank-Nicolson OSC method and is algebraically linear. It is efficient, requiring at each time level only O(N) operations where N is the number of unknowns. Moreover, it is shown to produce approximations which are of optimal global accuracy in various norms, and to possess superconvergence properties.

  15. Diffused bounce-back condition and refill algorithm for the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krithivasan, Siddharth; Wahal, Siddhant; Ansumali, Santosh

    2014-03-01

    A solid-fluid boundary condition for the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method, which retains the simplicity of the bounce-back method and leads to positive definite populations similar to the diffusive boundary condition, is presented. As a refill algorithm, it is proposed that quasi-equilibrium distributions be used to model distributions at fluid nodes uncovered due to solid movement. The method is tested for flow past an impulsively started cylinder and demonstrates considerable enhancement in the accuracy of the unsteady force calculation at moderate and high Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, via simulations, we show that momentum exchange procedure used in LB to compute forces is not Galilean invariant. A modified momentum exchange procedure is proposed to reduce the errors due to violation of Galilean invariance.

  16. Torsional diffusion Monte Carlo: A method for quantum simulations of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, David C.

    2001-06-01

    The quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method is extended to the treatment of coupled torsional motions in proteins. A general algorithm and computer program has been developed by interfacing this torsional-DMC method with all-atom force-fields for proteins. The method gives the zero-point energy and atomic coordinates averaged over the coupled torsional motions in the quantum ground state of the protein. Application of the new algorithm is made to the proteins gelsolin (356 atoms and 142 torsions) and gp41-HIV (1101 atoms and 452 torsions). The results indicate that quantum-dynamical effects are important for the energies and geometries of typical proteins such as these.

  17. Selection of charge methods for lithium ion batteries by considering diffusion induced stress and charge time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Song, Yicheng; Zhang, Junqian

    2016-07-01

    This article demonstrates the design of charging strategies for lithium ion batteries with considering the balance between diffusion induced stress and total charge time for two- and three-stage charge methods. For the two-stage galvanostatic-potentiostatic charge method the low mechanical stress can be achieved without increasing total charge time by switching the galvanostatic to the potentiostatic at the time moment when the lithium concentration at the surface of particles reaches the limit cbarsurf = 0 . A three-stage method, which consists of an initial galvanostatic stage of high current, a galvanostatic stage of low current and a potentiostatic ending stage, is suggested. Employing the initial galvanostatic stage of high current is helpful not only in accelerating the charge process, but also in controlling the mechanical stress once the electrical current and time duration of the initial galvanostatic stage are properly designed.

  18. A method for modeling oxygen diffusion in an agent-based model with application to host-pathogen infection

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steven J.; Sershen, Cheryl L.; May, Elebeoba E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a method for incorporating a diffusion field modeling oxygen usage and dispersion in a multi-scale model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection mediated granuloma formation. We implemented this method over a floating-point field to model oxygen dynamics in host tissue during chronic phase response and Mtb persistence. The method avoids the requirement of satisfying the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, which is necessary in implementing the explicit version of the finite-difference method, but imposes an impractical bound on the time step. Instead, diffusion is modeled by a matrix-based, steady state approximate solution to the diffusion equation. Moreover, presented in figure 1 is the evolution of the diffusion profiles of a containment granuloma over time.

  19. A method for modeling oxygen diffusion in an agent-based model with application to host-pathogen infection

    DOE PAGES

    Plimpton, Steven J.; Sershen, Cheryl L.; May, Elebeoba E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a method for incorporating a diffusion field modeling oxygen usage and dispersion in a multi-scale model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection mediated granuloma formation. We implemented this method over a floating-point field to model oxygen dynamics in host tissue during chronic phase response and Mtb persistence. The method avoids the requirement of satisfying the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, which is necessary in implementing the explicit version of the finite-difference method, but imposes an impractical bound on the time step. Instead, diffusion is modeled by a matrix-based, steady state approximate solution to the diffusion equation. Moreover, presented in figuremore » 1 is the evolution of the diffusion profiles of a containment granuloma over time.« less

  20. Reassembling the Information Technology Innovation Process: An Actor Network Theory Method for Managing the Initiation, Production, and Diffusion of Innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendejas, Gerardo; Chiasson, Mike

    This paper will propose and explore a method to enhance focal actors' abilities to enroll and control the many social and technical components interacting during the initiation, production, and diffusion of innovations. The reassembling and stabilizing of such components is the challenging goal of the focal actors involved in these processes. To address this possibility, a healthcare project involving the initiation, production, and diffusion of an IT-based innovation will be influenced by the researcher, using concepts from actor network theory (ANT), within an action research methodology (ARM). The experiences using this method, and the nature of enrolment and translation during its use, will highlight if and how ANT can provide a problem-solving method to help assemble the social and technical actants involved in the diffusion of an innovation. Finally, the paper will discuss the challenges and benefits of implementing such methods to attain widespread diffusion.

  1. A new method for apportionnement of diffuse nutrient sources of surface water contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenendijk, Piet; Mulder, Martin; Van Boekel, Erwin; Van der Bolt, Frank; Hendriks, Rob; Renaud, Leo

    2014-05-01

    Surface water quality has improved slightly in many regions of the Netherlands during the last decades, due to a reduction of the nutrient loads from point sources, but in most areas the concentrations do not meet the targets to comply with the objectives of the Water Framework Directive. Leaching from agricultural soils is currently the largest source. Quantitative insight into the contribution of the various land management related sources is necessary to discuss the responsibility of different authorities to further improve the quality. Such an understanding is also needed to assess the effects of mitigation measures. The STONE model was developed in 1998- 2000 aiming at the assessment of the effectiveness of Dutch policy measures to reduce nutrient loads to groundwater and surface waters from agricultural land. The process oriented model simulates the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in soil and is capable to calculate N and P fluxes to surface waters. Due to the nature of the interdependent soil transformation processes, straight forward model runs don't yield in the relative contribution of the use of fertilizers and other diffuse sources to the total diffuse loads to surface waters. A new method was developed to reveal the relative contribution to surface water contamination of resp. the actual fertilization practise, the historical fertilizer excesses, the atmospheric deposition rates, the inputs by upward seeping water flow, the inputs by infiltrated surface water during summer time in polders and the natural soil release. The method is based on a linear proxy model of the STONE model. The coefficients were derived from the results of a sensitivity analysis. At the national level, the diffuse nitrogen and phosphorus load on surface waters due to the actual fertilization practise amounts to resp. 64% and 48% of the total diffuse loads from agricultural land. Deposition, the input by upward seeping water and the input by infiltrated surface water in

  2. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Convection: Advection and Diffusion Schemes for Marker Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Dabrowski, Marcin; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's deep mantle can be studied by modeling vigorous convection in a chemically heterogeneous fluid. Numerical modeling of such a system poses several computational challenges. Dominance of heat advection over the diffusive heat transport, and a negligible amount of chemical diffusion results in sharp gradients of thermal and chemical fields. The exponential dependence of the viscosity of mantle materials on temperature also leads to high gradients of the velocity field. The accuracy of many numerical advection schemes degrades quickly with increasing gradient of the solution, while the computational effort, in terms of the scheme complexity and required resolution, grows. Additional numerical challenges arise due to a large range of length-scales characteristic of a thermochemical convection system with highly variable viscosity. To examplify, the thickness of the stem of a rising thermal plume may be a few percent of the mantle thickness. An even thinner filament of an anomalous material that is entrained by that plume may consitute less than a tenth of a percent of the mantle thickness. We have developed a two-dimensional FEM code to model thermochemical convection in a hollow cylinder domain, with a depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity representative of the mantle (Steinberger and Calderwood, 2006). We use marker-in-cell method for advection of chemical and thermal fields. The main advantage of perfoming advection using markers is absence of numerical diffusion during the advection step, as opposed to the more diffusive field-methods. However, in the common implementation of the marker-methods, the solution of the momentum and energy equations takes place on a computational grid, and nodes do not generally coincide with the positions of the markers. Transferring velocity-, temperature-, and chemistry- information between nodes and markers introduces errors inherent to inter- and extrapolation. In the numerical scheme

  3. A sparse representation based method to classify pulmonary patterns of diffuse lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Xu, Rui; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Kido, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    We applied and optimized the sparse representation (SR) approaches in the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) to classify normal tissues and five kinds of diffuse lung disease (DLD) patterns: consolidation, ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, emphysema, and nodule. By using the K-SVD which is based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) and orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), it can achieve a satisfied recognition rate, but too much time was spent in the experiment. To reduce the runtime of the method, the K-Means algorithm was substituted for the K-SVD, and the OMP was simplified by searching the desired atoms at one time (OMP1). We proposed three SR based methods for evaluation: SR1 (K-SVD+OMP), SR2 (K-Means+OMP), and SR3 (K-Means+OMP1). 1161 volumes of interest (VOIs) were used to optimize the parameters and train each method, and 1049 VOIs were adopted to evaluate the performances of the methods. The SR based methods were powerful to recognize the DLD patterns (SR1: 96.1%, SR2: 95.6%, SR3: 96.4%) and significantly better than the baseline methods. Furthermore, when the K-Means and OMP1 were applied, the runtime of the SR based methods can be reduced by 98.2% and 55.2%, respectively. Therefore, we thought that the method using the K-Means and OMP1 (SR3) was efficient for the CAD of the DLDs.

  4. A sparse representation based method to classify pulmonary patterns of diffuse lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Xu, Rui; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Kido, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    We applied and optimized the sparse representation (SR) approaches in the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) to classify normal tissues and five kinds of diffuse lung disease (DLD) patterns: consolidation, ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, emphysema, and nodule. By using the K-SVD which is based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) and orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), it can achieve a satisfied recognition rate, but too much time was spent in the experiment. To reduce the runtime of the method, the K-Means algorithm was substituted for the K-SVD, and the OMP was simplified by searching the desired atoms at one time (OMP1). We proposed three SR based methods for evaluation: SR1 (K-SVD+OMP), SR2 (K-Means+OMP), and SR3 (K-Means+OMP1). 1161 volumes of interest (VOIs) were used to optimize the parameters and train each method, and 1049 VOIs were adopted to evaluate the performances of the methods. The SR based methods were powerful to recognize the DLD patterns (SR1: 96.1%, SR2: 95.6%, SR3: 96.4%) and significantly better than the baseline methods. Furthermore, when the K-Means and OMP1 were applied, the runtime of the SR based methods can be reduced by 98.2% and 55.2%, respectively. Therefore, we thought that the method using the K-Means and OMP1 (SR3) was efficient for the CAD of the DLDs. PMID:25821509

  5. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Arnold R.

    1984-02-21

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon, which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. Steady or modulated illumination at several wavelengths provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV for each wavelength. A probe electrode immersed in an electrolyte solution containing redox couples (preferably quinhydrone) having an oxidation-reduction potential (E) in the order of +0.6 to -1.65 volts couples the SPV to a measurement system. The redox couple solution functions to create a liquid Schottky barrier at the surface of the material. The Schottky barrier is contacted by merely placing the probe in the solution. The redox solution is placed over and in contact with the material to be tested and light is passed through the solution to generate the SPV. To compensate for colored redox solutions a portion of the redox solution not over the material is also illuminated for determining the color compensated light intensity. Steady red light is also used as an optical bias to reduce deleterious space-charge effects that occur in amorphous silicon.

  6. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Arnold R.

    1984-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. Steady or modulated illumination at several wavelengths provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV for each wavelength. A drop of a transparent electrolyte solution containing redox couples (preferably quinhydrone) having an oxidation-reduction potential (E) in the order of +0.6 to -1.65 volts couples the SPV to a measurement system. The drop of redox couple solution functions to create a liquid Schottky barrier at the surface of the material. Illumination light is passed through a transparent rod supported over the surface and through the drop of transparent electrolyte. The drop is held in the gap between the rod and the surface. Steady red light is also used as an optical bias to reduce deleterious space-charge effects that occur in amorphous silicon.

  7. Blood species identification using Near-Infrared diffuse transmitted spectra and PLS-DA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linna; Zhang, Shengzhao; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Li, Hongxiao; Li, Yingxin; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Blood species identification is of great significance for blood supervision and wildlife investigations. The current methods used to identify the blood species are destructive. Near-Infrared spectroscopy method is known for its non-invasive properties. In this research, we combined Near-Infrared diffuse transmitted spectra and Partial Least Square Discrimination Analysis (PLS-DA) to identify three blood species, including macaque, human and mouse. Blind test and external test were used to assess the PLS-DA model. The model performed 100% accuracy in its identification between three blood species. This approach does not require a specific knowledge of biochemical features for each individual class but relies on a spectroscopic statistical differentiation of the whole components. This is the first time to demonstrate Near-Infrared diffuse transmitted spectra have the ability to identify the species of origin of blood samples. The results also support a good potential of absorption and scattering spectroscopy for species identification in practical applications for real-time detection.

  8. A Simple and Efficient Diffuse Interface Method for Compressible Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ray A. Berry; Richard Saurel; Fabien Petitpas

    2009-05-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. For many reasons, to be discussed, there is growing interest in the application of two-phase flow models to provide diffuse, but nevertheless resolved, simulation of interfaces between two immiscible compressible fluids – diffuse interface method (DIM). Because of its ability to dynamically create interfaces and to solve interfaces separating pure media and mixtures for DNS-like (Direct Numerical Simulation) simulations of interfacial flows, we examine the construction of a simple, robust, fast, and accurate numerical formulation for the 5-equation Kapila et al. [1] reduced two-phase model. Though apparently simple, the Kapila et al. model contains a volume fraction differential transport equation containing a nonlinear, non-conservative term which poses serious computational challenges. To circumvent the difficulties encountered with the single velocity and single pressure Kapila et al. [1] multiphase flow model, a 6-equation relaxation hyperbolic model is built to solve interface problems with compressible fluids. In this approach, pressure non-equilibrium is first restored, followed by a relaxation to an asymptotic solution which is convergent to the solutions of the Kapila et al. reduced model. The apparent complexity introduced with this extended hyperbolic model actually leads to considerable simplifications regarding numerical resolution, and the various ingredients used by this method are general enough to consider future extensions to problems involving complex physics.

  9. Application of a Particle Method to the Advection-Diffusion-Reaction Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    A reaction between two chemical species can only happen if molecules collide and react. Thus, the mixing of a system can become a limiting factor in the onset of reaction. Solving for reaction rate in a well-mixed system is typically a straightforward task. However, when incomplete mixing kicks in, obtaining a solution becomes more challenging. Since reaction can only happen in regions where both reactants co-exist, the incomplete mixing may slow down the reaction rate, when compared to a well-mixed system. The effect of incomplete mixing upon reaction is a highly important aspect of various processes in natural and engineered systems, ranging from mineral precipitation in geological formations to groundwater remediation in aquifers. We study a relatively simple system with a bi-molecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B → Ø where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by an advection-diffusion equation, and the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a perturbation. Such a system does not have an analytical solution to date, even for the zero advection case. We model the system by a Monte Carlo particle tracking method, where particles represent some reactant mass. In this method, diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of the annihilation is proportional to the reaction rate constant and the probability density associated with particle co-location. We study the numerical method in depth, characterizing typical numerical errors and time step restrictions. In particular, we show that the numerical method converges to the advection-diffusion-reaction equation at the limit Δt →0. We also rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the initial concentrations perturbations represented by that number. We then use the particle simulations of zero-advection system to demonstrate the well

  10. Numerical Study of Two-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Brusselator System by Differential Quadrature Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, R. C.; Jiwari, Ram

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a rapid, convergent and accurate differential quadrature method (DQM) is employed for numerical study of a two-dimensional reaction-diffusion Brusselator system. In the Brusselator system the reaction terms arise from the mathematical modeling of chemical systems such as in enzymatic reactions, and in plasma and laser physics in multiple coupling between modes. By employing DQM, accurate results can be obtained using fewer grid points in spatial domain for a large value of T = 50. We also found that Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto grid points give excellent results in comparison to other grid points such as uniform grid points. Three examples are solved to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the DQM. Convergence and stability of the method is also examined.

  11. Efficient method for near real-time diffuse optical tomography of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Culver, Joseph P.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have showed only regions with a sensitivity higher that 1% of the maximum value can affect the recovery result for diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Two methods of efficient sensitivity map generation based on Finite Element Models (FEM) are developed based on (1) reduced sensitivity matrix and (2) parallelisation process. Time and memory efficiency of these processes are evaluated and compared with conventional methods. It is shown that the computational time for a full head model containing 200k nodes is reduced from 3 hours to 48 minutes and the required memory is reduced from 5.5 GB to 0.5 GB. For a range of mesh densities up to 320k nodes, the required memory is improved by ~1000% and computational time by ~400% to allow near real-time image recovery.

  12. Biodegradable and magnetic core-shell composite particle prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes optimization of preparation conditions of a core-shell composite particle, and its heat generation by alternating magnetic fields. The composite particles are prepared with a modified emulsion solvent diffusion method, which is combined with Pickering emulsion stabilized by magnetic nanoparticles. In this method, the magnetic nanoparticles act as an emulsifier, and its amount and size are crucial to morphology of the composite particles. The magnetic nanoparticles of 8-9 nm would be strongly adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface rather than the larger nanoparticles. At the optimized concentration of the magnetic nanoparticle’s suspension for the preparation, small and uniform composite particles are obtained since the amount of the nanoparticles is enough to prevent coalescence of droplets during the formation of the composites. The heat generation by alternating magnetic fields emerged certainly. This result suggests the composite particles have a property as a heat-generating carrier for hyperthermia treatment.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann methods for some 2-D nonlinear diffusion equations:Computational results

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, B.H.; Rodrigue, G.H. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Levermore, C.D. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we examine two lattice Boltzmann methods (that are a derivative of lattice gas methods) for computing solutions to two two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations of the form {partial derivative}/{partial derivative}t u = v ({partial derivative}/{partial derivative}x D(u){partial derivative}/{partial derivative}x u + {partial derivative}/{partial derivative}y D(u){partial derivative}/{partial derivative}y u), where u = u({rvec x},t), {rvec x} {element of} R{sup 2}, v is a constant, and D(u) is a nonlinear term that arises from a Chapman-Enskog asymptotic expansion. In particular, we provide computational evidence supporting recent results showing that the methods are second order convergent (in the L{sub 1}-norm), conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Solutions computed via the lattice Boltzmann methods are compared with those computed by other explicit, second order, conservative, monotone finite difference methods. Results are reported for both the L{sub 1}- and L{sub {infinity}}-norms.

  14. Operational methods for minimising soil compaction and diffuse pollution risk from wheelings in winter cereals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bob; Silgram, Martyn; Quinton, John

    2010-05-01

    Recent UK government-funded research has shown that compacted, unvegetated tramlines wheelings can represent an important source and transport pathway, which can account for 80% of surface runoff, sediment and phosphorus losses to edge-of-field from cereals on moderate slopes. For example, recent research found 5.5-15.8% of rainfall lost as runoff, and losses of 0.8-2.9 kg TP/ha and 0.3-4.8 T/ha sediment from tramline wheelings. When compaction was released by shallow cultivation, runoff was reduced to 0.2-1.7% of rainfall with losses of 0.0-0.2 kg TP/ha and 0.003-0.3 T/ha sediment respectively i.e. close to reference losses from control areas without tramlines. Recent independent assessments using novel tracer techniques have also shown that tramline wheelings can represent important sediment sources at river catchment scale. In response to these latest findings, a new project is now underway investigating the most cost-effective and practical ways of operationalising methods for managing tramline wheelings in autumn-sown cereal systems to reduce the risk of soil compaction from the autumn spray operation and the associated risk of surface runoff and diffuse pollution loss of sediment, phosphorus and nitrogen to edge of field. Research is focusing on the over-winter period when soils are close to field capacity and the physical protection of the soil surface granted by growing crop is limited. This paper outlines this new multi-disciplinary project and associated methodologies, which include hillslope-scale event-based evaluations of the effectiveness of novel mitigation methods on surface runoff and diffuse pollution losses to edge of field, assessments of the economic and practical viability of mitigation methods, and modelling the impact on water quality of implementation of the most promising techniques at both farm and catchment scale. The study involves a large consortium with 20 partners, including many industrial organisations representing tractor, crop

  15. Testing the U-Th/4He dating method on carbonates I. Helium diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, D. L.; Ghaleb, B. G.; Sano, Y.; Blanchette, S.; Mathouchanh, E.; Takahata, N.

    2012-12-01

    Corals and other carbonates, such as speleothems, are important climatic-change proxies which need to be precisely dated for paleoclimatic reconstructions. Yet, U-Th disequilibrium method is applicable up to ca. 500 ka old carbonates. Calcite is difficult to date precisely by U-Pb method because of the low U amounts often found and difficulties in correcting for the common lead. Radiogenic 4He produced by decay of 238U and 235U incorporated into carbonates is a potential chronometer of Quaternary, and possibly Tertiary, corals and speleothems. However, several limitations exist for this method, related to the few data on the He diffusion [1] and on the alpha recoil effect in carbonate minerals. We decided to measure 4He by step heating in carbonate samples dated previously by U-Th disequilibrium: a coral (Scleractinia) from Cape Verde dated at 125 ka; a stalagmite from Patagonia dated at 128 ka; and two hydrothermal travertines from the Ziz Valley in Morocco with ages ≥ 500 ka. A one cm3 of each sample was cut by saw, crushed, washed and sieved to 80-100μm and 100-125μm fractions. Crushed samples (0.5 to 1 gram) were loaded in a vacuum crucible and 4He extracted by step heating. Previous step heating experiments on a sub-Arctic flowstone suggested that 4He is mainly released between 400 and 600°C [2]. However, the first coral sample heated at 100°C steps, showed a release pattern profile with 4He mainly released between 200 and 400°C. Measured 4He amount of 2.05 x 10-8 (±0.03% 1σ) ccSTP/g and U content of 2.7 ppm yield a U-4He age of 62.5 ka, lower than that obtained by U-Th disequilibrium. Data were not precise enough to calculate diffusion parameters using the Arrhenius diagram. The second step-heating pyrolysis of the coral using 50°C-steps indicated that all 4He is released between 250 and 350°C. The measured 4He amount was 2.27 x 10-8 (±0.04% 1σ) ccSTP/g, yielding an age of 83 ka, again lower compared to that obtained by U-Th disequilibrium. The

  16. Lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zexi; Huang, Juntao; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose an interfacial scheme accompanying the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions, including conjugate conditions with or without jumps in heat and mass transfer, continuity of macroscopic variables and normal fluxes in ion diffusion in porous media with different porosity, and the Kapitza resistance in heat transfer. The construction of this scheme is based on our boundary schemes [Huang and Yong, J. Comput. Phys. 300, 70 (2015), 10.1016/j.jcp.2015.07.045] for Robin boundary conditions on straight or curved boundaries. It gives second-order accuracy for straight interfaces and first-order accuracy for curved ones. In addition, the new scheme inherits the advantage of the boundary schemes in which only the current lattice nodes are involved. Such an interfacial scheme is highly desirable for problems with complex geometries or in porous media. The interfacial scheme is numerically validated with several examples. The results show the utility of the constructed scheme and very well support our theoretical predications.

  17. [Study on the characteristics of the imaging spectrometer calibration using diffuser method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Lei; Xiang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Using a white diffuser to calibrate the imaging spectrometer has been a new technology developed to calibrate the imaging spectrometer recently. It has characteristics of easy realization and higher calibration accuracy. The expression of the collected signal electron number in each spectral channel of the imaging spectrometer detector pixels was deduced with the slit parallel and perpendicular to the meridional plane according to the principal of the calibration of imaging spectrometer using diffuser method in the present paper. The spectral radiometric calibration characteristics of the imaging spectrometer was numerically analyzed under the two special slit directions. The results indicate that the slit direction has significant effect on the spectral radiometric calibration of the imaging spectrometer. The signal electron number of the same spectral channel collected by the different scene pixels is different when the slit parallels to the meridional plane, and when the pixel is closer to the standard lamp, it collects more signal electrons;the signal electron number of the same spectral channel collected by the different scene pixels doesn't change with the scene pixel position when the slit is perpendicular to the meridional plane.

  18. Measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids by the forced Rayleigh scattering method: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaka, Y.; Hatakeyama, T.; Okuda, M.; Nagashima, A.

    1988-07-01

    This article is devoted to the theory and experiment of the forced Rayleigh scattering method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of liquids which can be employed in the form of an instrument operated optically in a contact-free manner. The theoretical considerations included are: (1) effect of cell wall, (2) effect of dye, (3) effect of Gaussian beam intensity distribution, (4) effect of heating duration time, and (5) effect of coupled dye and wall for a heavily absorbing sample. The errors caused by inadequate setting of optical conditions are also analyzed: (1) effects of grating thickness and (2) effects of initial temperature amplitude. Experimental verifications of the theory have been carried out through the measurements on toluene and water as standard reference substances. As a result of these experiments and theory, the criteria for optimum measuring conditions became available. To demonstrate the applicability of the present theory and the apparatus, the thermal diffusivities of toluene and methanol have been measured near room temperature under atmospheric pressure. The accuracy of the present measurement is estimated to be ±3%.

  19. Diffusion Weighted Imaging for Differentiating Benign from Malignant Orbital Tumors: Diagnostic Performance of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Based on Region of Interest Selection Method

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Quan; Hu, Hao; Su, Guo-Yi; Liu, Hu; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements based on three different region of interest (ROI) selection methods, and compare their diagnostic performance in differentiating benign from malignant orbital tumors. Materials and Methods Diffusion-weighted imaging data of sixty-four patients with orbital tumors (33 benign and 31 malignant) were retrospectively analyzed. Two readers independently measured the ADC values using three different ROIs selection methods including whole-tumor (WT), single-slice (SS), and reader-defined small sample (RDSS). The differences of ADC values (ADC-ROIWT, ADC-ROISS, and ADC-ROIRDSS) between benign and malignant group were compared using unpaired t test. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine and compare their diagnostic ability. The ADC measurement time was compared using ANOVA analysis and the measurement reproducibility was assessed using Bland-Altman method and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Results Malignant group showed significantly lower ADC-ROIWT, ADC-ROISS, and ADC-ROIRDSS than benign group (all p < 0.05). The areas under the curve showed no significant difference when using ADC-ROIWT, ADC-ROISS, and ADC-ROIRDSS as differentiating index, respectively (all p > 0.05). The ROISS and ROIRDSS required comparable measurement time (p > 0.05), while significantly shorter than ROIWT (p < 0.05). The ROISS showed the best reproducibility (mean difference ± limits of agreement between two readers were 0.022 [-0.080–0.123] × 10-3 mm2/s; ICC, 0.997) among three ROI methods. Conclusion Apparent diffusion coefficient values based on the three different ROI selection methods can help to differentiate benign from malignant orbital tumors. The results of measurement time, reproducibility and diagnostic ability suggest that the ROISS method are potentially useful for clinical practice. PMID:27587953

  20. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa; Urbán, Edit

    2015-02-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides fragilis group isolates the need of susceptibility testing in routine laboratories is increasing. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing in case of different clinical isolates of Bacteroides spp by comparing zone diameter results with MICs obtained earlier during an Europe-wide antibiotic susceptibility surveillance, and to propose zone diameter breakpoints, which correlate for the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. We tested 381 clinical isolates of the B. fragilis group to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline by agar dilution method previously. The inhibition zones of the same antibiotics including meropenem disc were determined by the disc diffusion on Brucella blood agar supplemented with haemin and vitamin K1. Plates were incubated at 37 °C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 24 h. The zone diameters were read at 100% inhibition. In case of discrepant results MICs were determined by gradient test and compared with the inhibition zones on the same plate. We found a good agreement between the inhibition zone diameters and the MICs for imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin and tigecyclin. The inhibition zone diameters of meropenem also separated clearly the isolates, which can be considered wild-type isolates. In case of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and piperacillin/tazobactam intermediate and susceptible isolates according to the MIC determination, overlap during the zone diameter determination. Isolates with an inhibition zone <23 mm for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and <25 mm for piperacillin/tazobactam should be retested by a MIC determination method. The 10 μg clindamycin disc clearly separated the resistant and the susceptible population of B. fragilis group strains. In the case of cefoxitin only resistant population could be separated with an inhibition

  1. A high throughput and efficient visualization method for diffusion tensor imaging of human brain white matter employing diffusion-map space.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Mohammad Hadi; Kazerooni, Anahita Fathi; Salehi, Narges; Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) possesses high dimension and complex structure, so that detecting available pattern information and its analysis based on conventional linear statistics and classification methods become inefficient. In order to facilitate classification, segmentation, compression or visualization of the data, dimension reduction is far-reaching. There have been many approaches proposed for this purpose, which mostly rely on complex low dimensional manifold embedding of the high-dimensional space. Dimension reduction is commonly applicable through linear algorithms, such as principal component analysis and multi-dimensional scaling; however, they are not able to deal with complex and high dimensional data. In this light, nonlinear algorithms with the capability to preserve the distance of high dimensional data have been developed. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new method for meaningful visualization of brain white matter using diffusion tensor data to map the 6-dimensional tensor to a three dimensional space employing Markov random walk and diffusion distance algorithms, leading to a new distance-preserving map for the DTI data with lower dimension and higher throughput information. PMID:25570465

  2. IN-VITRO CHARACTERIZATION OF GASTRORETENTIVE MICROBALLOONS PREPARED BY THE EMULSION SOLVENT DIFFUSION METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Akash; Jain, Dinesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Microballoons floatable on JPXIII No.1 solution were developed as a dosage form capable of floating in the stomach. Microballoons were prepared by the emulsion solvent diffusion method using enteric acrylic and other polymers with drug in a mixture of dichloromethane and ethanol. It was found that preparation temperature determined the formation of cavity inside the microsphere and the surface smoothness, determining the floatability and the drug release rate of the microballoons. The correlation between the buoyancy of microballoons and their physical properties, e.g. apparent density and roundness of microballoons were elucidated. The drug loading efficiency of microballoons was also determined. The optimum loading amount of metformin in the microballoons was found to impart ideal floatable properties to the microballoons. By fitting the data into zero order, first order and Highuchi model it was concluded that the release followed zero order release. PMID:22247832

  3. InP synthesis by the synthesis, solute diffusion (SSD) method using glassy-carbon crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Miskys, C.R.; Oliveira, C.E.M. de; Carvalho, M.M.G. de

    1996-12-31

    An Indium Phosphide (InP) Synthesis system by the Synthesis, Solute Diffusion (SSD) method has been built. It provides high purity InP charges with low carrier densities (3 {times} 10{sup 14} to 2 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3}) to be used as starting material for InP single-crystal Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) growth. Glassy-carbon is a refractory material with low vapor pressure that can be moulded in various forms and sizes. Indeed the glassy-carbon crucible is reusable after the synthesis because InP does not stick to its walls. Preliminary electrical characteristics measurements showed residual carrier concentration below 3 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3}. These results are comparable with those achieved utilizing quartz crucibles. The features denoted makes glassy-carbon an interesting alternative in comparison with quartz and PBN crucibles.

  4. Scalable implicit methods for reaction-diffusion equations in two and three space dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Veronese, S.V.; Othmer, H.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the implementation of a solver for systems of semi-linear parabolic partial differential equations in two and three space dimensions. The solver is based on a parallel implementation of a non-linear Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) scheme which uses a Cartesian grid in space and an implicit time-stepping algorithm. Various reordering strategies for the linearized equations are used to reduce the stride and improve the overall effectiveness of the parallel implementation. We have successfully used this solver for large-scale reaction-diffusion problems in computational biology and medicine in which the desired solution is a traveling wave that may contain rapid transitions. A number of examples that illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the method are given here; the theoretical analysis will be presented.

  5. [Mechanical properties of nickel-titanium alloy wire developed by the diffusion method].

    PubMed

    Sakuda, M; Tanne, K; Araki, K; Kinami, H; Ishibe, H; Kokubu, K

    1989-12-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate mechanical properties of the nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) alloy wire developed by the diffusion method, in comparison with the previous Ni-Ti wires. Two types of the wire, work hardening and super elastic wires, were used for three experiments; three-point bending test, tension test and torque test. The following findings were obtained. 1. A newly developed work hardening wire exhibited lower force level with a generous reduction of force at various wire deflections, in comparison with the previous work hardening Ni-Ti wires. It was also found that tension strength and extension ratio of this wire were greater, and its modulus of longitudinal elasticity was smaller than those of the previous wires, indicating high resistibility to breakage. 2. A super elastic wire, developed by the diffusion method, showed similar pattern of force reduction associated with varying wire deflections, although magnitude of force was slightly larger than those of the previous super elastic wires. 3. An interesting finding was that force and its reduction with various deflections were varied by controlling how the wire was ligated onto a bracket, which was more obvious in the work hardening type of the present Ni-Ti wire. 4. Magnitudes of force exerted by Ni-Ti wires were around 200 gf at a deflection of 2 mm with an interbracket distance of 7 mm, and seemed to be beyond an optimal orthodontic force for anterior teeth. A further refinement is expected in terms of improving mechanical properties and/or developing finer wires. PMID:2488929

  6. A semi-Lagrangian model incorporating a spectral method for pollutant transport and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.N.

    1994-12-31

    To improve the semi-Lagrangian model, a spectral method was incorporated in the numerical calculations. This spectral method for solving nonperiodic boundary problems was based on a technique of decomposing a variable (i.e. pollutant concentration) into a polynomial and a periodic Fourier residual. A fifth-order polynomial was proposed. When performing the semi-Lagrangian calculation, the spectral intrapolation for estimating the transport of material between grid points was used. From this, a method for removing small negative masses without lossing mass conservation was developed. The numerical tests of the semi-Lagrangian scheme with the spectral interpolation on the advective transport of a mass under nonuniform and uniform winds in a limited computational domain were performed previously and published. In this study, the scheme was applied to solve the two-dimensional time-dependent advection-diffusion equation describing the transport and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. The calculations demonstrated the efficiency and accuracy of the numerical solutions in a limited region by using this semi-Lagrangian technique incorporated with the spectral method. The main objective of this present study was to develop an advanced numerical modelling technique for air pollution studies on a regional scale.

  7. NDRC: A Disease-Causing Genes Prioritized Method Based on Network Diffusion and Rank Concordance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Minghong; Hu, Xiaohua; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; He, Tingting

    2015-07-01

    Disease-causing genes prioritization is very important to understand disease mechanisms and biomedical applications, such as design of drugs. Previous studies have shown that promising candidate genes are mostly ranked according to their relatedness to known disease genes or closely related disease genes. Therefore, a dangling gene (isolated gene) with no edges in the network can not be effectively prioritized. These approaches tend to prioritize those genes that are highly connected in the PPI network while perform poorly when they are applied to loosely connected disease genes. To address these problems, we propose a new disease-causing genes prioritization method that based on network diffusion and rank concordance (NDRC). The method is evaluated by leave-one-out cross validation on 1931 diseases in which at least one gene is known to be involved, and it is able to rank the true causal gene first in 849 of all 2542 cases. The experimental results suggest that NDRC significantly outperforms other existing methods such as RWR, VAVIEN, DADA and PRINCE on identifying loosely connected disease genes and successfully put dangling genes as potential candidate disease genes. Furthermore, we apply NDRC method to study three representative diseases, Meckel syndrome 1, Protein C deficiency and Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 1A (Zellweger). Our study has also found that certain complex disease-causing genes can be divided into several modules that are closely associated with different disease phenotype.

  8. Development of an efficient multigrid method for the NEM form of the multigroup neutron diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Chalabi, Rifat M. Khalil

    1997-09-01

    Development of an improvement to the computational efficiency of the existing nested iterative solution strategy of the Nodal Exapansion Method (NEM) nodal based neutron diffusion code NESTLE is presented. The improvement in the solution strategy is the result of developing a multilevel acceleration scheme that does not suffer from the numerical stalling associated with a number of iterative solution methods. The acceleration scheme is based on the multigrid method, which is specifically adapted for incorporation into the NEM nonlinear iterative strategy. This scheme optimizes the computational interplay between the spatial discretization and the NEM nonlinear iterative solution process through the use of the multigrid method. The combination of the NEM nodal method, calculation of the homogenized, neutron nodal balance coefficients (i.e. restriction operator), efficient underlying smoothing algorithm (power method of NESTLE), and the finer mesh reconstruction algorithm (i.e. prolongation operator), all operating on a sequence of coarser spatial nodes, constitutes the multilevel acceleration scheme employed in this research. Two implementations of the multigrid method into the NESTLE code were examined; the Imbedded NEM Strategy and the Imbedded CMFD Strategy. The main difference in implementation between the two methods is that in the Imbedded NEM Strategy, the NEM solution is required at every MG level. Numerical tests have shown that the Imbedded NEM Strategy suffers from divergence at coarse- grid levels, hence all the results for the different benchmarks presented here were obtained using the Imbedded CMFD Strategy. The novelties in the developed MG method are as follows: the formulation of the restriction and prolongation operators, and the selection of the relaxation method. The restriction operator utilizes a variation of the reactor physics, consistent homogenization technique. The prolongation operator is based upon a variant of the pin power

  9. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily Kara

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  10. Multiscale diffusion method for simulations of long-time defect evolution with application to dislocation climb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. L.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-07-01

    In many problems of interest to materials scientists and engineers, the evolution of crystalline extended defects (dislocations, cracks, grain boundaries, interfaces, voids, precipitates) is controlled by the flow of point defects (interstitial/substitutional atoms and/or vacancies) through the crystal into the extended defect. Precise modeling of this behavior requires fully atomistic methods in and around the extended defect, but the flow of point defects entering the defect region can be treated by coarse-grained methods. Here, a multiscale algorithm is presented to provide this coupling. Specifically, direct accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) of extended defect evolution is coupled to a diffusing point defect concentration field that captures the long spatial and temporal scales of point defect motion in the presence of the internal stress fields generated by the evolving defect. The algorithm is applied to study vacancy absorption into an edge dislocation in aluminum where vacancy accumulation in the core leads to nucleation of a double-jog that then operates as a sink for additional vacancies; this corresponds to the initial stages of dislocation climb modeled with explicit atomistic resolution. The method is general and so can be applied to many other problems associated with nucleation, growth, and reaction due to accumulation of point defects in crystalline materials.

  11. A reaction-diffusion model of the Darien Gap Sterile Insect Release Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, John G.

    2015-05-01

    The Sterile Insect Release Method (SIRM) is used as a biological control for invasive insect species. SIRM involves introducing large quantities of sterilized male insects into a wild population of invading insects. A fertile/sterile mating produces offspring that are not viable and the wild insect population will eventually be eradicated. A U.S. government program maintains a permanent sterile fly barrier zone in the Darien Gap between Panama and Columbia to control the screwworm fly (Cochliomyia Hominivorax), an insect that feeds off of living tissue in mammals and has devastating effects on livestock. This barrier zone is maintained by regular releases of massive quantities of sterilized male screwworm flies from aircraft. We analyze a reaction-diffusion model of the Darien Gap barrier zone. Simulations of the model equations yield two types of spatially inhomogeneous steady-state solutions representing a sterile fly barrier that does not prevent invasion and a barrier that does prevent invasion. We investigate steady-state solutions using both phase plane methods and monotone iteration methods and describe how barrier width and the sterile fly release rate affects steady-state behavior.

  12. Diffuse reflectance near infrared-chemometric methods development and validation of amoxicillin capsule formulations

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahmed Nawaz; Khar, Roop Krishen; Ajayakumar, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was to establish near infrared-chemometric methods that could be effectively used for quality profiling through identification and quantification of amoxicillin (AMOX) in formulated capsule which were similar to commercial products. In order to evaluate a large number of market products easily and quickly, these methods were modeled. Materials and Methods: Thermo Scientific Antaris II near infrared analyzer with TQ Analyst Chemometric Software were used for the development and validation of the identification and quantification models. Several AMOX formulations were composed with four excipients microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, croscarmellose sodium and colloidal silicon dioxide. Development includes quadratic mixture formulation design, near infrared spectrum acquisition, spectral pretreatment and outlier detection. According to prescribed guidelines by International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) and European Medicine Agency (EMA) developed methods were validated in terms of specificity, accuracy, precision, linearity, and robustness. Results: On diffuse reflectance mode, an identification model based on discriminant analysis was successfully processed with 76 formulations; and same samples were also used for quantitative analysis using partial least square algorithm with four latent variables and 0.9937 correlation of coefficient followed by 2.17% root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC), 2.38% root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), 2.43% root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV). Conclusion: Proposed model established a good relationship between the spectral information and AMOX identity as well as content. Resulted values show the performance of the proposed models which offers alternate choice for AMOX capsule evaluation, relative to that of well-established high-performance liquid chromatography method. Ultimately three commercial products were successfully evaluated using developed

  13. A Novel, Nondestructive, Dried Blood Spot-Based Hematocrit Prediction Method Using Noncontact Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Capiau, Sara; Wilk, Leah S; Aalders, Maurice C G; Stove, Christophe P

    2016-06-21

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling is recognized as a valuable alternative sampling strategy both in research and in clinical routine. Although many advantages are associated with DBS sampling, its more widespread use is hampered by several issues, of which the hematocrit effect on DBS-based quantitation remains undoubtedly the most widely discussed one. Previously, we developed a method to derive the approximate hematocrit from a nonvolumetrically applied DBS based on its potassium content. Although this method yielded good results and was straightforward to perform, it was also destructive and required sample preparation. Therefore, we now developed a nondestructive method which allows to predict the hematocrit of a DBS based on its hemoglobin content, measured via noncontact diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The developed method was thoroughly validated. A linear calibration curve was established after log/log transformation. The bias, intraday and interday imprecision of quality controls at three hematocrit levels and at the lower and upper limit of quantitation (0.20 and 0.67, respectively) were less than 11%. In addition, the influence of storage and the volume spotted was evaluated, as well as DBS homogeneity. Application of the method to venous DBSs prepared from whole blood patient samples (n = 233) revealed a good correlation between the actual and the predicted hematocrit. Limits of agreement obtained after Bland and Altman analysis were -0.076 and +0.018. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated good method reproducibility. In conclusion, mere scanning of a DBS suffices to derive its approximate hematocrit, one of the most important variables in DBS analysis.

  14. Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction-diffusion simulations

    PubMed Central

    Flegga, Mark B.; Hellander, Stefan; Erban, Radek

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is called the ghost cell method (GCM), since it works by constructing a “ghost cell” in which molecules can disappear and jump into the compartment-based simulation. Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step Δt (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter h, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appear in applications, are considered: (i) Δt → 0 and h is fixed; (ii) Δt → 0 and h → 0 such that √Δt/h is fixed. The error for previously developed approaches (the TRM and CPM) converges to zero only in the limiting case (ii), but not in case (i). It is shown that the error of the GCM converges in the limiting case (i). Thus the GCM is superior to previous coupling techniques if the mesoscopic description is much coarser than the microscopic part of the model. PMID:26568640

  15. Fast solute diffusivity in ionic liquids with silyl or siloxane groups studied by the transient grating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Takatsugu; Nemugaki, Shinya; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Ozaki, Hiroaki; Hiejima, Yusuke; Kimura, Yoshifumi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    To achieve ionic liquids (ILs) that show fast solute diffusivity independent of viscosity domination, sixteen ILs containing Si or Si-O-Si groups (SiILs) were synthesized. Diffusion coefficients of three solute molecules with different molecular sizes, i.e., CO, diphenylacetylene, and diphenylcyclopropenone, were determined in SiILs using the transient grating method and the results were compared to other solvent system. SiILs showed distinguishably faster diffusivity for the smallest solute, CO, than conventional ILs at the same viscosity, particularly in the high viscosity region. Based on previous results and our estimation, three plausible factors exists that contribute to the faster solute diffusivity in SiILs, i.e., the flexibility of the Si or Si-O-Si group, decreased interaction between the cation and the solute, and increased free volume because of the bulky structure.

  16. Examination of methods to determine free-ion diffusivity and number density from analysis of electrode polarization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyang; Sun, Che-Nan; Fan, Fei; Sangoro, Joshua R; Berman, Marc B; Greenbaum, Steve G; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2013-04-01

    Electrode polarization analysis is frequently used to determine free-ion diffusivity and number density in ionic conductors. In the present study, this approach is critically examined in a wide variety of electrolytes, including aqueous and nonaqueous solutions, polymer electrolytes, and ionic liquids. It is shown that the electrode polarization analysis based on the Macdonald-Trukhan model [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 144903 (2006); J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 3064 (2011)] progressively fails to give reasonable values of free-ion diffusivity and number density with increasing salt concentration. This should be expected because the original model of electrode polarization is designed for dilute electrolytes. An empirical correction method which yields ion diffusivities in reasonable agreement with pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements is proposed. However, the analysis of free-ion diffusivity and number density from electrode polarization should still be exercised with great caution because there is no solid theoretical justification for the proposed corrections. PMID:23679415

  17. Examination of methods to determine free-ion diffusivity and number density from analysis of electrode polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yangyang; Sun, Che-Nan; Fan, Fei; Sangoro, Joshua R; Berman, Marc; Greenbaum, Steve; Zawodzinski, Thomas; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2013-01-01

    Electrode polarization analysis is frequently used to determine free-ion diffusivity and number density in ionic conductors. In the present study, this approach is critically examined in a wide variety of electrolytes, including aqueous and nonaqueous solutions, polymer electrolytes, and ionic liquids. It is shown that the electrode polarization analysis based on theMacdonald-Trukhan model [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 144903 (2006); J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 3064 (2011)] progressively fails to give reasonable values of free-ion diffusivity and number density with increasing salt concentration. This should be expected because the original model of electrode polarization is designed for dilute electrolytes. An empirical correction method which yields ion diffusivities in reasonable agreement with pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements is proposed. However, the analysis of free-ion diffusivity and number density from electrode polarization should still be exercised with great caution because there is no solid theoretical justification for the proposed corrections.

  18. Atomistic study of diffusion-mediated plasticity and creep using phase field crystal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Rottler, Jörg; Sinclair, Chad W.; Provatas, Nikolas

    2015-10-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of diffusion-mediated plasticity and creep in materials subjected to constant load at high homologous temperatures is studied atomistically using phase field crystal (PFC) methods. Creep stress and grain size exponents obtained for nanopolycrystalline systems, m ≃1.02 and p ≃1.98 , respectively, closely match those expected for idealized diffusional Nabarro-Herring creep. These exponents are observed in the presence of significant stress-assisted diffusive grain boundary migration, indicating that Nabarro-Herring creep and stress-assisted boundary migration contribute in the same manner to the macroscopic constitutive relation. When plastic response is dislocation-mediated, power-law stress exponents inferred from dislocation climb rates are found to increase monotonically from m ≃3 , as expected for generic climb-mediated natural creep, to m ≃5.8 as the dislocation density ρd is increased beyond typical experimental values. Stress exponents m ≳3 directly measured from simulations that include dislocation nucleation, climb, glide, and annihilation are attributed primarily to these large ρd effects. Extrapolation to lower ρd suggests that m ≃4 -4.5 should be obtained from our PFC description at typical experimental ρd values, which is consistent with expectations for power-law creep via mixed climb and glide. The anomalously large stress exponents observed in our atomistic simulations at large ρd may nonetheless be relevant to systems in which comparable densities are obtained locally within heterogeneous defect domains such as dislocation cell walls or tangles.

  19. Antiseptic wound ventilation with a gas diffuser: a new intraoperative method to prevent surgical wound infection?

    PubMed

    Persson, M; Flock, J-I; van der Linden, J

    2003-08-01

    Postoperative wound infections are often a result of peri-operative contamination by Staphylococcus aureus. With a new insufflation device, a gas diffuser, it has become possible to establish a local micro-environment of almost 100% carbon dioxide in an open surgical wound. The device enables ventilation of the wound with an antiseptic agent, which in gaseous form can be delivered as a low uniform dose to all parts of the wound. The use of carbon dioxide (CO2) as a carrier gas eliminates possible inflammability of an antiseptic agent and helps to concentrate it to the site of interest by gravity. Using the above delivery system we have demonstrated the antibacterial effect of gaseous ethanol on S. aureus inoculated on sterile filter disks and blood agar plates, respectively. Ethanol is a very potent antiseptic agent with known properties, which makes it suitable for testing the maximal decontamination level. On filter disks, CO2 carrying vapour from a 95% ethanol solution decreased the number of colony-forming units after 5 min of exposure (P=0.04), and killed all bacteria within 10-15 min (P<0.001). In the presence of organic material, i.e. on exposed blood agar plates, the colony size decreased with exposure time, and no colonies were detected after 60 min of exposure (P<0.001). Antiseptic gas derived from 70% ethanol solution was less effective than that from 95% ethanol (P<0.001). CO2 humidified with water did not have a significant effect on number or size of the colonies. Our findings suggest that intraoperative wound antisepsis with a gas mixture of CO2 and an antiseptic agent delivered with a gas diffuser, may be a simple method to reduce the risk of postoperative wound infection.

  20. Levofloxacin susceptibility testing against Helicobacter pylori: evaluation of a modified disk diffusion method compared to E test.

    PubMed

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Ilieva, Juliana; Gergova, Galina; Mitov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We compared levofloxacin (1 μg/disk) disk diffusion method to E test against 212 Helicobacter pylori strains. Using diameter breakpoints for susceptibility (≥15 mm) and resistance (≤9 mm), very major error, major error rate, and categoric agreement were 0.0%, 0.6%, and 93.9%, respectively. The method may be useful in low-resource laboratories.

  1. Results of the oxygen Fick method in a closed blood circulation model including "total arteriovenous diffusive shunt of oxygen".

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Mustafa; Akay, Ahmet

    2004-09-01

    It is considered that arteriovenous diffusive shunts of oxygen may cause inaccuracy of the oxygen Fick method as[Formula: see text] where[Formula: see text] is the pulmonary oxygen uptake,[Formula: see text] is the cardiac output, and CaO(2) and CvO(2) are the arterial and venous oxygen contents, respectively.A simple circulation model, including the whole circulation with nine well-mixed compartments (C1, ... C9), is constructed: the[Formula: see text] is assigned as constant as 6000 ml min(-1); the blood portions of 60 ml move at an interval of 600 ms. C1 and C2 compartments, each having 60 ml volume, represent the blood of pulmonary microcirculation, C3 represents the arterial blood with a volume of 1500 ml, C4, ..., C8, each also having a volume of 60 ml, represent the blood of peripheral microcirculation, whereas C9 represents the venous blood with a volume of 3000 ml. The pulmonary oxygen uptake[Formula: see text], related to C1 and C2, the oxygen release[Formula: see text], related to C4,...,C8, as well as a "total arteriovenous diffusive shunt of oxygen"[Formula: see text], from the arterial blood (C3) to the venous blood (C9), are calculated simultaneously. The alveolar gas has a constant oxygen partial pressure, and the pulmonary diffusion capacity is also constant; similar to modeling the pulmonry, oxygen diffusion, constant partial oxygen pressures for all peripheral tissues as well as constant diffusion capacities for all peripheral oxygen diffusion are also assigned. The diffusion capacities for the[Formula: see text] (between C3 and C9) are arbitrarily assigned.The Fick method gives incorrect results depending on the total arteriovenous diffusive shunt of oxygen[Formula: see text]. But the mechanism determining the magnitude of[Formula: see text] remains unclear.

  2. Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient of Downwelling Irradiance: An Evaluation of Remote Sensing Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Darecki, Miroslaw; Carder, Kendall L.; Davis, Curtiss O.; Stramski, Dariusz; Rhea, W. Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The propagation of downwelling irradiance at wavelength lambda from surface to a depth (z) in the ocean is governed by the diffuse attenuation coefficient, K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda). There are two standard methods for the derivation of K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda) in remote sensing, which both are based on empirical relationships involving the blue-to-green ratio of ocean color. Recently, a semianalytical method to derive K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda) from reflectance has also been developed. In this study, using K(sup -)(sub d)(490) and K(sup -)(sub d)(443) as examples, we compare the K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda) values derived from the three methods using data collected in three different regions that cover oceanic and coastal waters, with K(sup -)(sub d)(490) ranging from approximately 0.04 to 4.0 per meter. The derived values are compared with the data calculated from in situ measurements of the vertical profiles of downwelling irradiance. The comparisons show that the two standard methods produced satisfactory estimates of K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda) in oceanic waters where attenuation is relatively low but resulted in significant errors in coastal waters. The newly developed semianalytical method appears to have no such limitation as it performed well for both oceanic and coastal waters. For all data in this study the average of absolute percentage difference between the in situ measured and the semianalytically derived K(sup -)(sub d) is approximately 14% for lambda = 490 nm and approximately 11% for lambda = 443 nm.

  3. Mean Apparent Propagator (MAP) MRI: a novel diffusion imaging method for mapping tissue microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Özarslan, Evren; Koay, Cheng Guan; Shepherd, Timothy M.; Komlosh, Michal E.; İrfanoğlu, M. Okan; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Basser, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) signals reflect information about underlying tissue microstructure and cytoarchitecture. We propose a quantitative, efficient, and robust mathematical and physical framework for representing diffusion-weighted MR imaging (MRI) data obtained in “q-space,” and the corresponding “mean apparent propagator (MAP)” describing molecular displacements in “r-space.” We also define and map novel quantitative descriptors of diffusion that can be computed robustly using this MAP-MRI framework. We describe efficient analytical representation of the three-dimensional q-space MR signal in a series expansion of basis functions that accurately describes diffusion in many complex geometries. The lowest order term in this expansion contains a diffusion tensor that characterizes the Gaussian displacement distribution, equivalent to diffusion tensor MRI (DTI). Inclusion of higher order terms enables the reconstruction of the true average propagator whose projection onto the unit “displacement” sphere provides an orientational distribution function (ODF) that contains only the orientational dependence of the diffusion process. The representation characterizes novel features of diffusion anisotropy and the non-Gaussian character of the three-dimensional diffusion process. Other important measures this representation provides include the return-to-the-origin probability (RTOP), and its variants for diffusion in one- and two-dimensions—the return-to-the-plane probability (RTPP), and the return-to-the-axis probability (RTAP), respectively. These zero net displacement probabilities measure the mean compartment (pore) volume and cross-sectional area in distributions of isolated pores irrespective of the pore shape. MAP-MRI represents a new comprehensive framework to model the three-dimensional q-space signal and transform it into diffusion propagators. Experiments on an excised marmoset brain specimen demonstrate that MAP

  4. DSA Image Blood Vessel Skeleton Extraction Based on Anti-concentration Diffusion and Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Wu, Jian; Feng, Daming; Cui, Zhiming

    Serious types of vascular diseases such as carotid stenosis, aneurysm and vascular malformation may lead to brain stroke, which are the third leading cause of death and the number one cause of disability. In the clinical practice of diagnosis and treatment of cerebral vascular diseases, how to do effective detection and description of the vascular structure of two-dimensional angiography sequence image that is blood vessel skeleton extraction has been a difficult study for a long time. This paper mainly discussed two-dimensional image of blood vessel skeleton extraction based on the level set method, first do the preprocessing to the DSA image, namely uses anti-concentration diffusion model for the effective enhancement and uses improved Otsu local threshold segmentation technology based on regional division for the image binarization, then vascular skeleton extraction based on GMM (Group marching method) with fast sweeping theory was actualized. Experiments show that our approach not only improved the time complexity, but also make a good extraction results.

  5. Artifact reduction method in ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography using exogenous contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Biswal, Nrusingh; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2011-04-01

    In diffuse optical tomography (DOT), a typical perturbation approach requires two sets of measurements obtained at the lesion breast (lesion or target site) and a contra-lateral location of the normal breast (reference site) for image reconstruction. For patients who have a small amount of breast tissue, the chest-wall underneath the breast tissue at both sites affects the imaging results. In this group of patients, the perturbation, which is the difference between measurements obtained at the lesion and reference sites, may include the information of background mismatch which can generate artifacts or affect the reconstructed quantitative absorption coefficient of the lesion. Also, for patients who have a single breast due to prior surgery, the contra-lateral reference is not available. To improve the DOT performance or overcome its limitation, we introduced a new method based on an exogenous contrast agent and demonstrate its performance using animal models. Co-registered ultrasound was used to guide the lesion localization. The results have shown that artifacts caused by background mismatch can be reduced significantly by using this new method.

  6. Bifurcation analysis of brown tide by reaction-diffusion equation using finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Mutsuto; Ding, Yan

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze the bifurcation of a biodynamics system in a two-dimensional domain by virtue of reaction-diffusion equations. The discretization method in space is the finite element method. The computational algorithm for an eigenspectrum is described in detail. On the basis of an analysis of eigenspectra according to Helmholtz`s equation, the discrete spectra in regards to the physical variables are numerically obtained in two-dimensional space. In order to investigate this mathematical model in regards to its practical use, we analyzed the stability of two cases, i.e., hydranth regeneration in the marine hydroid Tubularia and a brown tide in a harbor in Japan. By evaluating the stability according to the linearized stability definition, the critical parameters for outbreaks of brown tide can be theoretically determined. In addition, results for the linear combination of eigenspectrum coincide with the distribution of the observed brown tide. Its periodic characteristic was also verified. 10 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. A Simple Educational Method for the Measurement of Liquid Binary Diffusivities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Nicholas P.; de Beer, Martin P.; Williamson, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    A simple low-cost experiment has been developed for the measurement of the binary diffusion coefficients of liquid substances. The experiment is suitable for demonstrating molecular diffusion to small or large undergraduate classes in chemistry or chemical engineering. Students use a cell phone camera in conjunction with open-source image…

  8. A METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF DIFFUSION CONSTANTS AND THE CALCULATION OF THE RADIUS AND WEIGHT OF THE HEMOGLOBIN MOLECULE

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, John H.; Anson, M. L.

    1929-01-01

    A method is described for determining the diffusion coefficient of solutes by determining the rate of passage of the solute through a thin porous membrane between two solutions of different concentration. The method has been used to determine the diffusion coefficient of carbon monoxide hemoglobin. This was found to be 0.0420 ± 0.0005 cm.2 per day at 5°C. The molecular weight of carbon monoxide hemoglobin calculated by means of Einstein's equation from this quantity is 68,600 ± 1,000. PMID:19872481

  9. DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION: ENHANCING THE DISSEMINATION OF THE PONSETI METHOD IN LATIN AMERICA THROUGH VIRTUAL FORUMS

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Asitha; Boardman, Allison; Cook, Thomas; Oprescu, Florin; Morcuende, Jose A

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study evaluated the use of low-bandwidth web-conferencing to enhance diffusion of a specific best practice, the Ponseti method to treat clubfoot, in three economically diverse countries in Latin America. A “Ponseti Virtual Forum” (PVF) was organized in Guatemala, Peru and Chile to examine the influences of economic level and telecommunication infrastructure on the effectiveness of tins approach. Across the three countries, a total of 14 different sites participated in the PVFs. Thirty-three Ponseti-trained practitioners were interviewed before and after each PVF, which included interactions with a Spanish-speaking Ponseti method expert. Semi-structured interviews, observations, and IP address data were triangulated and analyzed. The results demonstrated that 100% of the practitioners rated the sessions as very useful and that they would use this approach again. The largest obstacles to using PVFs were financial (7 out of 9 practitioners) in Guatemala; a lack of equipment and network access (6 out of 11) in Peru; and the organization and implementation of the conferences themselves (7 out of 9) in Chile. This study illustrates the usefulness of Ponseti Virtual Forums in Latin America. Health officials in Peru are currently developing a large-scale information session for traumatologists about the Ponseti method, while practitioners in Guatemala and Chile are organizing monthly scholarly meetings for physicians in remote areas. This initial feedback suggests that low-bandwidth web-conferencing can be an important vehicle for the dissemination of best practices, such as the Ponseti method, in developing countries. PMID:22096417

  10. A generalized diffusion model for growth of nanoparticles synthesized by colloidal methods.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tianlong; Brush, Lucien N; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2014-04-01

    A nanoparticle growth model is developed to predict and guide the syntheses of monodisperse colloidal nanoparticles in the liquid phase. The model, without any a priori assumptions, is based on the Fick's law of diffusion, conservation of mass and the Gibbs-Thomson equation for crystal growth. In the limiting case, this model reduces to the same expression as the currently accepted model that requires the assumption of a diffusion layer around each nanoparticle. The present growth model bridges the two limiting cases of the previous model i.e. complete diffusion controlled and adsorption controlled growth of nanoparticles. Specifically, the results show that a monodispersion of nanoparticles can be obtained both with fast monomer diffusion and with surface reaction under conditions of small diffusivity to surface reaction constant ratio that results is growth 'focusing'. This comprehensive description of nanoparticle growth provides new insights and establishes the required conditions for fabricating monodisperse nanoparticles critical for a wide range of applications.

  11. A microneedle-based method for the characterization of diffusion in skin tissue using doxorubicin as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Iman; Lai, Jacqueline; Ranamukhaarachchi, Sahan; Schmitt, Veronika; Lambert, Dana; Dutz, Jan; Häfeli, Urs O; Stoeber, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Hollow microneedles can overcome the stratum corneum (SC) barrier and deposit a compound directly into the viable epidermis or the dermis, unlike adhesive patches that rely on drug diffusion across the SC. The traditional one-dimensional methods used to study the diffusivity of drugs across the skin layers are not very accurate for hollow microneedles, since the ejection of compounds out of microneedle lumens resembles a point-source spreading in all directions and is highly dependent on injection depth. This paper presents a technique that is useful for studying drug injection using hollow microneedles at various depths below the SC. This technique uses confocal microscopy to image the distribution of a fluorescent compound in the skin after injection. The fluorescence distribution in the skin is observed over time and applied to a spherical Gaussian diffusion model for limited source diffusion to determine the diffusion coefficient of the compound in the skin. Applied to freshly excised pig skin, the diffusion coefficient for the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin was measured as 4.61 × 10(-9) cm(2)/s, while the diffusion coefficient in previously refrigerated or frozen pig skin was 1.31 × 10(-8) cm(2)/s and 4.21 × 10(-8) cm(2)/s, respectively. Our data suggests that skin storage conditions can substantially alter the diffusion of drugs. The use of refrigerated and, even more so, previously frozen skin should be avoided for quantitative transdermal drug delivery studies.

  12. Diffusion of two-dimensional Cu islets on Ag(111) studied with the Molecular Dynamics Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Sadar S.; Alcantara Ortigoza, Marisol; Rahman, Talat S.

    2009-03-01

    Our molecular dynamics simulations (at 300, 500 and 700 K) of the diffusion of two-dimensional Cun islets (1<=n<=9) on Ag(111) using many-body potentials yield an Arrhenius behavior. Concerted motion is seen to dominate the diffusion of smaller islets (2-4 atoms) whereas multiple-atom, shape-adjusting processes control the diffusion of the larger ones. Although the effective energy barrier scales with islet size, the barriers do not change considerably for islands containing 4 to 9 atoms (they are ˜ 220 ± 37 meV). While the diffusion barrier for Cu monomers on Ag(111) is higher than that on Cu(111) (both in experiment and theory), the situation reverses starting from the dimer. Our results for monomer and dimer are in excellent agreement with those extracted from experiments.^1 On comparing our results with those for Cu islets on Cu(111), we find that the comparatively large Ag-Ag bond-length sets the contrast between Cu monomer diffusion on Cu(111) and on Ag(111). The diffusivity of Cu dimer, however, is boosted on Ag(111) by the competition between optimizing the Cu-Cu and the Cu-Ag bonds. For larger islets (3-9 atoms) our results reveal several novel diffusion processes, including those in which an islet-atom climbs atop. ^1 Morgenstern et al. PRL93, 056102 (2005). Work supported by NSF-ITR 0428826.

  13. A finite elements method to solve the Bloch–Torrey equation applied to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dang Van; Li, Jing-Rebecca; Grebenkov, Denis; Le Bihan, Denis

    2014-04-15

    The complex transverse water proton magnetization subject to diffusion-encoding magnetic field gradient pulses in a heterogeneous medium can be modeled by the multiple compartment Bloch–Torrey partial differential equation (PDE). In addition, steady-state Laplace PDEs can be formulated to produce the homogenized diffusion tensor that describes the diffusion characteristics of the medium in the long time limit. In spatial domains that model biological tissues at the cellular level, these two types of PDEs have to be completed with permeability conditions on the cellular interfaces. To solve these PDEs, we implemented a finite elements method that allows jumps in the solution at the cell interfaces by using double nodes. Using a transformation of the Bloch–Torrey PDE we reduced oscillations in the searched-for solution and simplified the implementation of the boundary conditions. The spatial discretization was then coupled to the adaptive explicit Runge–Kutta–Chebyshev time-stepping method. Our proposed method is second order accurate in space and second order accurate in time. We implemented this method on the FEniCS C++ platform and show time and spatial convergence results. Finally, this method is applied to study some relevant questions in diffusion MRI.

  14. [Comparison of disk-diffusion method and PCR for detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Budzyńska, Anna; Mikołajczyk, Dorota; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the disk-diffusion (oxacillin 1 microg, cefoxitin 30 microg) method and PCR for detection of methicillin-resistance in S. aureus. The investigation were carried out on 120 S. aureus strains isolated from clinical materials of patients hospitalized in the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Toruń. Of the 120 S. aureus strains tested, 60 (50%) were mecA-positive by PCR. Consistency of results between oxacillin disk-difussion method and PCR amounted 92.5% and cefoxitin disk-diffusion method and PCR--98.3%. The oxacillin disk-difussion method falsely identified 3 (2.5%) strains as MSSA (sensitivity 95.0%) and 4 strains as MRSA (specificity 93.3%) in comparison with PCR. The cefoxitin disk-diffusion method falsely identified 2 (1.6%) strains as MSSA (sensitivity 96.7%) and there were no false resistant results (specificity 100%). Our results showed that in disk-diffusion tests, cefoxitin is a better than oxacillin for the identification of MRSA.

  15. Comparison of dialysis membrane diffusion samplers and two purging methods in bedrock wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Ehlke, T.A.; Lacombe, P.J.; Dale, J.M.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Collection of ground-water samples from bedrock wells using low-flow purging techniques is problematic because of the random spacing, variable hydraulic conductivity, and variable contamination of contributing fractures in each well's open interval. To test alternatives to this purging method, a field comparison of three ground-water-sampling techniques was conducted on wells in fractured bedrock at a site contaminated primarily with volatile organic compounds. Constituent concentrations in samples collected with a diffusion sampler constructed from dialysis membrane material were compared to those in samples collected from the same wells with a standard low-flow purging technique and a hybrid (high-flow/low-flow) purging technique. Concentrations of trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, calcium, chloride, and alkalinity agreed well among samples collected with all three techniques in 9 of the 10 wells tested. Iron concentrations varied more than those of the other parameters, but their pattern of variation was not consistent. Overall, the results of nonparametric analysis of variance testing on the nine wells sampled twice showed no statistically significant difference at the 95-percent confidence level among the concentrations of volatile organic compounds or inorganic constituents recovered by use of any of the three sampling techniques.

  16. Cyclodextrins as stabilizers for the preparation of drug nanocrystals by the emulsion solvent diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Makhlof, Abdallah; Miyazaki, Yuta; Tozuka, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2008-06-01

    Cyclodextrins (CyDs) were employed as protective stabilizers for the preparation of surfactant-free nanocrystals of indomethacin (IMC) by using the emulsion solvent diffusion method. The effect of changing the type and concentration of CyDs on the formation of IMC nanocrystals was investigated. Dispersions were freeze-dried to characterize the size, shape, nanoparticle yield, crystallinity, and dissolution behavior of the obtained particles. Submicron-sized particles of IMC with average diameters in the range of 300-500 nm were obtained by incorporating alpha-, beta-, or gamma-CyD in the outer phase of the primary emulsions. Quantitative determination demonstrated that more than 80% of IMC was recovered as fine particles smaller than 0.8 microm. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses of the freeze-dried samples confirmed the polymorphic change of IMC to the meta-stable form. A significant enhancement in the dissolution rate of IMC nanocrystals was observed when compared to the commercial powder.

  17. Lookup-table method for imaging optical properties with structured illumination beyond the diffusion theory regime.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Tim A; Mazhar, Amaan; Cuccia, David; Durkin, Anthony J; Tunnell, James W

    2010-01-01

    Sinusoidally structured illumination is used in concert with a phantom-based lookup-table (LUT) to map wide-field optical properties in turbid media with reduced albedos as low as 0.44. A key advantage of the lookup-table approach is the ability to measure the absorption (mu(a)) and reduced scattering coefficients (mu(s) (')) over a much broader range of values than permitted by current diffusion theory methods. Through calibration with a single reflectance standard, the LUT can extract mu(s) (') from 0.8 to 2.4 mm(-1) with an average root-mean-square (rms) error of 7% and extract mu(a) from 0 to 1.0 mm(-1) with an average rms error of 6%. The LUT is based solely on measurements of two parameters, reflectance R and modulation M at an illumination period of 10 mm. A single set of three phase-shifted images is sufficient to measure both M and R, which are then used to generate maps of absorption and scattering by referencing the LUT. We establish empirically that each pair (M,R) maps uniquely to only one pair of (micro(s) ('),micro(a)) and report that the phase function (i.e., size) of the scatterers can influence the accuracy of optical property extraction. PMID:20615015

  18. Optimal Analysis Method for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Diffuse Optical Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ghijsen, Michael; Lin, Yuting; Hsing, Mitchell; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is an optical imaging modality that has various clinical applications. However, the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of DOT is poor due to strong photon scatting in biological tissue. Structural a priori information from another high spatial resolution imaging modality such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated to significantly improve DOT accuracy. In addition, a contrast agent can be used to obtain differential absorption images of the lesion by using dynamic contrast enhanced DOT (DCE-DOT). This produces a relative absorption map that consists of subtracting a reconstructed baseline image from reconstructed images in which optical contrast is included. In this study, we investigated and compared different reconstruction methods and analysis approaches for regular endogenous DOT and DCE-DOT with and without MR anatomical a priori information for arbitrarily-shaped objects. Our phantom and animal studies have shown that superior image quality and higher accuracy can be achieved using DCE-DOT together with MR structural a priori information. Hence, implementation of a combined MRI-DOT system to image ICG enhancement can potentially be a promising tool for breast cancer imaging. PMID:21811492

  19. Integration of experimental and computational methods for identifying geometric, thermal and diffusive properties of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weres, Jerzy; Kujawa, Sebastian; Olek, Wiesław; Czajkowski, Łukasz

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of physical properties of biomaterials is important in understanding and designing agri-food and wood processing industries. In the study presented in this paper computational methods were developed and combined with experiments to enhance identification of agri-food and forest product properties, and to predict heat and water transport in such products. They were based on the finite element model of heat and water transport and supplemented with experimental data. Algorithms were proposed for image processing, geometry meshing, and inverse/direct finite element modelling. The resulting software system was composed of integrated subsystems for 3D geometry data acquisition and mesh generation, for 3D geometry modelling and visualization, and for inverse/direct problem computations for the heat and water transport processes. Auxiliary packages were developed to assess performance, accuracy and unification of data access. The software was validated by identifying selected properties and using the estimated values to predict the examined processes, and then comparing predictions to experimental data. The geometry, thermal conductivity, specific heat, coefficient of water diffusion, equilibrium water content and convective heat and water transfer coefficients in the boundary layer were analysed. The estimated values, used as an input for simulation of the examined processes, enabled reduction in the uncertainty associated with predictions.

  20. Method of coating the interior surface of hollow objects with a diffusion coating

    DOEpatents

    Knowles, Shawn D.; Senor, David J.; Forbes, Steven V.; Johnson, Roger N.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-03-15

    A method for forming a diffusion coating on the interior of surface of a hollow object wherein a filament, extending through a hollow object and adjacent to the interior surface of the object, is provided, with a coating material, in a vacuum. An electrical current is then applied to the filament to resistively heat the filament to a temperature sufficient to transfer the coating material from the filament to the interior surface of the object. The filament is electrically isolated from the object while the filament is being resistively heated. Preferably, the filament is provided as a tungsten filament or molybdenum filament. Preferably, the coating materials are selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hg, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni P, Pb, Pd, Pr, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Te, Tl, Y, Yb, Zn, and combinations thereof. The invention additionally allows for the formation of nitrides, hydrides, or carbides of all the possible coating materials, where such compounds exist, by providing a partial pressure of nitrogen, hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or combination thereof, within the vacuum.

  1. METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WITHDRAWING LIGHT ISOTOPIC PRODUCT FROM A LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION PLANT

    DOEpatents

    Dole, M.

    1959-09-22

    An improved process and apparatus are described for removing enriched product from the columns of a thermal diffusion plant for separation of isotopes. In the removal cycle, light product at the top cf the diffusion columns is circulated through the column tops and a shipping cylinder connected thereto unttl the concertation of enriched product in the cylinder reaches the desired point. During the removal, circulation through the bottoms is blocked bv freezing. in the diffusion cycle, the bottom portion is unfrozen, fresh feed is distributed to the bottoms of the columns, ard heavy product is withdrawn from the bottoms, while the tops of the columns are blocked by freezing.

  2. Diffusion Coefficient and Electric Field Studies for HSX using Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Talmadge, J. N.

    1999-11-01

    The HSX experiment has a magnetic field spectrum which closely approximates helical symmetry. Never the less, symmetry breaking terms are present which lead to asymmetric diffusion. Models for the asymmetric component of the monoenergetic diffusion coefficient are unable to account for all the terms in the HSX magnetic spectrum and the functional dependence on the radial electric field (Er). To model the diffusion coefficient as a function of Er and collisionality, Monte Carlo simulations have been made for different values of Er and background density. These results are fit to analytic models for the diffusion coefficient. Enforcing ambipolarity on these fluxes can lead to a calculation of the stellarator Er. To measure Er, we will use a spectroscopic system to measure impurity flow. A 1-meter spectrometer with a CCD detector has been purchased for this purpose; a LabVIEW control system has been implemented and collection optics designed. Details of the spectroscopic system will be presented.

  3. A comparison of implicit numerical methods for solving the transient spherical diffusion equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Comparative numerical temperature results obtained by using two implicit finite difference procedures for the solution of the transient diffusion equation in spherical coordinates are presented. The validity and accuracy of these solutions are demonstrated by comparison with exact analytical solutions.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF SPLIT-OPERATOR, PETROV-GALERKIN METHODS TO SIMULATE TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate at which contaminants in groundwater undergo sorption and desorption is routinely described using diffusion models. Such approaches, when incorporated into transport models, lead to large systems of coupled equations, often nonlinear. This has restricted applications of ...

  5. Investigation to develop a method to apply diffusion barrier to high strength fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veltri, R. D.; Paradis, R. D.; Douglas, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    A radio frequency powered ion plating process was used to apply the diffusion barriers of aluminum oxide, yttrium oxide, hafnium oxide and titanium carbide to a substrate tungsten fiber. Each of the coatings was examined as to its effect on both room temperature strength and tensile strength of the base tungsten fiber. The coated fibers were then overcoated with a nickel alloy to become single cell diffusion couples. These diffusion couples were exposed to 1093 C for 24 hours, cycled between room temperature and 1093 C, and given a thermal anneal for 100 hours at 1200 C. Tensile testing and metallographic examinations determined that the hafnium oxide coating produced the best high temperature diffusion barrier for tungsten of the four coatings.

  6. A novel full-field experimental method to measure the local compressibility of gas diffusion media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Li, Yongqiang; Rock, Jeffrey A.

    The gas diffusion medium (GDM) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell needs to simultaneously satisfy the requirements of transporting reactant gases, removing product water, conducting electrons and heat, and providing mechanical support to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Concerning the localized over-compression which may force carbon fibers and other conductive debris into the membrane to cause fuel cell failure by electronically shorting through the membrane, we have developed a novel full-field experimental method to measure the local thickness and compressibility of GDM. Applying a uniform air pressure upon a thin polyimide film bonded on the top surface of the GDM with support from the bottom by a flat metal substrate and measuring the thickness change using the 3-D digital image correlation technique with an out-of-plane displacement resolution less than 0.5 μm, we have determined the local thickness and compressive stress/strain behavior in the GDM. Using the local thickness and compressibility data over an area of 11.2 mm × 11.2 mm, we numerically construct the nominal compressive response of a commercial Toray™ TGP-H-060 based GDM subjected to compression by flat platens. Good agreement in the nominal stress/strain curves from the numerical construction and direct experimental flat-platen measurement confirms the validity of the methodology proposed in this article. The result shows that a nominal pressure of 1.4 MPa compressed between two flat platens can introduce localized compressive stress concentration of more than 3 MPa in up to 1% of the total area at various locations from several hundred micrometers to 1 mm in diameter. We believe that this full-field experimental method can be useful in GDM material and process development to reduce the local hard spots and help to mitigate the membrane shorting failure in PEM fuel cells.

  7. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  8. A method for estimating soil water diffusivity from moisture profiles and its application across an experimental catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, A.; Giráldez, J. V.; Vanderlinden, K.; Taguas, E. V.; Pedrera, A.

    2014-08-01

    Despite the well-accepted value of soil hydraulic properties for describing and modeling matter and energy fluxes in the unsaturated zone, their accurate measurement across scales is still a daunting task. The increasing availability of continuous soil water content measurements at discrete points in space, as provided by sensor networks, offers still unexplored possibilities for evaluating soil physical properties across landscapes. In this study, we propose a new method, based on the Bruce and Klute equation, to estimate effective soil water diffusivity from soil water profile data observed during continuous desiccation periods. An analytical expression is proposed for the diffusion-soil water relationship, assuming an exponential relationship between soil water content and the Boltzmann variable. The method has been evaluated using soil water profile data observed at inter-row and under canopy locations across a rainfed olive orchard in SW Spain. The spatial variability of the effective soil water diffusivity across the orchard was estimated. Different soil conditions under the tree canopies as compared to inter-row areas resulted in significantly different effective diffusivity relationships, reflecting the effect of trees on soil physical properties and water dynamics across olive orchards. The proposed method offers a suitable alternative to traditional laboratory methods and can be easily extended to estimate soil hydraulic conductivity and water retention curves.

  9. Effect of the 5E Model on Prospective Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Diffusion and Osmosis: A Mixed Method Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artun, Huseyin; Costu, Bayram

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore a group of prospective primary teachers' conceptual understanding of diffusion and osmosis as they implemented a 5E constructivist model and related materials in a science methods course. Fifty prospective primary teachers' ideas were elicited using a pre- and post-test and delayed post-test survey consisting…

  10. Simultaneous Determination of Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Food and Agricultural Materials Using a Transient Plane-Source Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are two important physical properties essential for designing any food engineering processes. Recently a new transient plane-source method was developed to measure a variety of materials, but its application in foods has not been documented. Therefore, ...

  11. Measuring the mutual diffusion coefficient for dodecyl acrylate in low molecular weight poly(dodecyl acrylate) with laser line deflection (Wiener's Method) and the fluorescence of pyrene.

    PubMed

    Antrim, Daniel; Bunton, Patrick; Lewis, Lydia Lee; Zoltowski, Brian D; Pojman, John A

    2005-06-16

    Diffusion of small molecules into glassy polymers is quite complicated and almost always non-Fickian. Little work has been done with the diffusion of low molecular weight polymers that are liquids at room temperature (such as poly(dodecyl acrylate)) into their miscible monomers. We have studied three molecular weights under 20 000 to determine if poly(dodecyl acrylate) diffusion into dodecyl acrylate could be treated with Fick's law and if so to determine the values of the diffusion coefficients. We compare two methods for measuring the diffusion of dodecyl acrylate into poly(dodecyl acrylate): We used laser line deflection (Wiener's method) and improved upon the method from published reports. We also used the dependence of pyrene's fluorescence on the viscosity to measure the concentration distribution, and thus to extract the diffusion coefficient. After an initial relaxation period, diffusion in all cases followed Fick's law with a single concentration-independent diffusion coefficient. Comparison of the diffusion coefficients obtained by both methods yielded the same order of magnitude for the diffusion coefficients (10(-7) cm2/s) and showed the same trend in the dependence on the average molecular weight of the polymer (a decrease in the diffusion coefficient with an increase in the molecular weight).

  12. A finite analytic method for solving the 2-D time-dependent advection diffusion equation with time-invariant coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Thomas; Li, Shu-Guang

    2005-02-01

    Difficulty in solving the transient advection-diffusion equation (ADE) stems from the relationship between the advection derivatives and the time derivative. For a solution method to be viable, it must account for this relationship by being accurate in both space and time. This research presents a unique method for solving the time-dependent ADE that does not discretize the derivative terms but rather solves the equation analytically in the space-time domain. The method is computationally efficient and numerically accurate and addresses the common limitations of numerical dispersion and spurious oscillations that can be prevalent in other solution methods. The method is based on the improved finite analytic (IFA) solution method [Lowry TS, Li S-G. A characteristic based finite analytic method for solving the two-dimensional steady-state advection-diffusion equation. Water Resour Res 38 (7), 10.1029/2001WR000518] in space coupled with a Laplace transformation in time. In this way, the method has no Courant condition and maintains accuracy in space and time, performing well even at high Peclet numbers. The method is compared to a hybrid method of characteristics, a random walk particle tracking method, and an Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method using various degrees of flow-field heterogeneity across multiple Peclet numbers. Results show the IFALT method to be computationally more efficient while producing similar or better accuracy than the other methods.

  13. Novel method for converting digital Fresnel hologram to phase-only hologram based on bidirectional error diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C

    2013-10-01

    We report a novel and fast method for converting a digital, complex Fresnel hologram into a phase-only hologram. Briefly, the pixels in the complex hologram are scanned sequentially in a row by row manner. The odd and even rows are scanned from opposite directions, constituting to a bidirectional error diffusion process. The magnitude of each visited pixel is forced to be a constant value, while preserving the exact phase value. The resulting error is diffused to the neighboring pixels that have not been visited before. The resulting novel phase-only hologram is called the bidirectional error diffusion (BERD) hologram. The reconstructed image from the BERD hologram exhibits high fidelity as compared with those obtained with the original complex hologram.

  14. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, P; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A; Kent, Paul R C

    2014-12-01

    Highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based on point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. The results demonstrate that the lithium-carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches. PMID:26583215

  15. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh, P.; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-03

    In highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Moreover, the highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based on point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. Our results demonstrate that the lithium carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches.

  16. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, P; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A; Kent, Paul R C

    2014-12-01

    Highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based on point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. The results demonstrate that the lithium-carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches.

  17. Investigations on the efficiency of cardiac-gated methods for the acquisition of diffusion-weighted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rita G.; Jezzard, Peter; Clare, Stuart

    2005-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted images are inherently very sensitive to motion. Pulsatile motion of the brain can give rise to artifactual signal attenuation leading to over-estimation of the apparent diffusion coefficients, even with snapshot echo planar imaging. Such miscalculations can result in erroneous estimates of the principal diffusion directions. Cardiac gating can be performed to confine acquisition to the quiet portion of the cycle. Although effective, this approach leads to significantly longer acquisition times. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that pulsatile motion is not significant in regions above the corpus callosum. To reduce acquisition times and improve the efficiency of whole brain cardiac-gated acquisitions, the upper slices of the brain can be imaged during systole, reserving diastole for those slices most affected by pulsatile motion. The merits and disadvantages of this optimized approach are investigated here, in comparison to a more standard gating method and to the non-gated approach.

  18. Measuring thermal diffusivity of mechanical and optical grades of polycrystalline diamond using an AC laser calorimetry method

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, Toby D.; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Because of its extremely high thermal conductivity, measuring the thermal conductivity or diffusivity of optical-grade diamond can be challenging. Various methods have been used to measure the thermal conductivity of thick diamond films. For the purposes of commercial quality control, the AC laser calorimetry method is appealing because it enables fairly rapid and convenient sample preparation and measurement. In this paper, the method is used to measure the thermal diffusivity of optical diamond. It is found that sample dimensions and measurement parameters are critical, and data analysis must be performed with great care. The results suggest that the method as it is applied to optical-grade diamond could be enhanced by a more powerful laser, higher frequency beam modulation, and post-processing based on 2D thermal simulation.

  19. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strains using agar diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna B

    2011-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis is a common soil saprotroph and has been isolated from air, organic waste and also from plant, animal and human tissues. Scopulariopsis has mainly been associated in humans with superficial mycoses, but it has also been described as the cause of subcutaneous and invasive infections. The most common aetiological agent of infections in humans is Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. This species has been reported to be resistant in vitro to broad-spectrum antifungal agents available today. The aim of the study was to establish in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 35 S. brevicaulis strains against amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (FC), caspofungin (CAS), terbinafine (TER), ciclopirox (CIC), voriconazole (VOR), clotrimazole (CTR), miconazole (MCZ), econazole (ECO), ketoconazole (KET), itraconazole (ITR), and fluconazole (FLU). Antifungal susceptibility tests were evaluated by an agar diffusion method (Neo-Sensitabs, Rosco, Denmark). AMB, FC, CAS, ITR and FLU showed no antifungal activity against S. brevicaulis. TER, CIC, CTR, KET, VOR, ECO, and MCZ revealed inhibitory activity for S. brevicaulis, but it varied for each of the drugs. The best antifungal effect was observed for TER and CIC. All isolates had large inhibition zones for TER and CIC. CTR was also inhibitory for all tested S. brevicaulis isolates, but the diameters of inhibition zones were smaller than for TER and CIC. Nearly 89% isolates showed inhibition zones for KET and the mean diameter of the inhibition zone was comparable to CTR. The least antifungal activity exhibited VQR, ECO and MCZ. Because of the multiresistance of S. brevicaulis, infections due to this species may not respond to particular antifungal treatment and other therapeutic approaches should be considered, e.g., combined therapy and/or surgery. PMID:21682097

  20. Recursive estimation methods for tracking of localized perturbations in absorption using diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Amine; Miller, Eric L.; Boas, David; Franceschini, Maria A.; Kilmer, Misha E.

    2005-03-01

    Analysis of the quasi-sinusoidal temporal signals measured by a Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) instrument can be used to determine both quantitative and qualitative characteristics of functional brain activities arising from visual and auditory simulations, motor activities, and cognitive tasks performances. Once the activated regions in the brain are resolved using DOT, the temporal resolution of this modality is such that one can track the spatial evolution (both the location and morphology) of these regions with time. In this paper, we explore a state-estimation approach using Extended Kalman Filters to track the dynamics of functionally activated brain regions. We develop a model to determine the size, shape, location and contrast of an area of activity as a function of time. Under the assumption that previously acquired MRI data has provided us with a segmentation of the brain, we restrict the location of the area of functional activity to the thin, cortical sheet. To describe the geometry of the region, we employ a mathematical model in which the projection of the area of activity onto the plane of the sensors is assumed to be describable by a low dimensional algebraic curve. In this study, we consider in detail the case where the perturbations in optical absorption parameters arising due to activation are confined to independent regions in the cortex layer. We estimate the geometric parameters (axis lengths, rotation angle, center positions) defining the best fit ellipse for the activation area's projection onto the source-detector plane. At a single point in time, an adjoint field-based nonlinear inversion routine is used to extract the activated area's information. Examples of the utility of the method will be shown using synthetic data.

  1. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strains using agar diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna B

    2011-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis is a common soil saprotroph and has been isolated from air, organic waste and also from plant, animal and human tissues. Scopulariopsis has mainly been associated in humans with superficial mycoses, but it has also been described as the cause of subcutaneous and invasive infections. The most common aetiological agent of infections in humans is Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. This species has been reported to be resistant in vitro to broad-spectrum antifungal agents available today. The aim of the study was to establish in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 35 S. brevicaulis strains against amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (FC), caspofungin (CAS), terbinafine (TER), ciclopirox (CIC), voriconazole (VOR), clotrimazole (CTR), miconazole (MCZ), econazole (ECO), ketoconazole (KET), itraconazole (ITR), and fluconazole (FLU). Antifungal susceptibility tests were evaluated by an agar diffusion method (Neo-Sensitabs, Rosco, Denmark). AMB, FC, CAS, ITR and FLU showed no antifungal activity against S. brevicaulis. TER, CIC, CTR, KET, VOR, ECO, and MCZ revealed inhibitory activity for S. brevicaulis, but it varied for each of the drugs. The best antifungal effect was observed for TER and CIC. All isolates had large inhibition zones for TER and CIC. CTR was also inhibitory for all tested S. brevicaulis isolates, but the diameters of inhibition zones were smaller than for TER and CIC. Nearly 89% isolates showed inhibition zones for KET and the mean diameter of the inhibition zone was comparable to CTR. The least antifungal activity exhibited VQR, ECO and MCZ. Because of the multiresistance of S. brevicaulis, infections due to this species may not respond to particular antifungal treatment and other therapeutic approaches should be considered, e.g., combined therapy and/or surgery.

  2. Preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing cyclosporine by the emulsification-diffusion method

    PubMed Central

    Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Ganem-Rondero, Adriana; Melgoza-Contreras, Luz María; Escobar-Chávez, José Juan; Nava-Arzaluz, María Guadalupe; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2010-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have been used for carrying different therapeutic agents because they improve absorption and bioavailability. The aim of the study was to prepare lipidic nanoparticles containing cyclosporine (CyA) by the emulsification-diffusion method and to study their physicochemical stability. Glyceryl behenate (Compritol® ATO 888) and lauroyl macrogolglycerides (Gelucire® 44/14) were used as carrier materials. Nanoparticles with good stability were obtained with Gelucire®, while it was difficult to obtain stable systems with Compritol®. Systems with Gelucire® were characterized by particle size, Z-potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. Particle size and Z-potential were evaluated for at least three months. With a high CyA content (≥60 mg) in Gelucire® SLNs, variations in size were greater and particle size also increased over time in all batches; this effect may have been caused by a probable expulsion of the drug due to the lipid’s partial rearrangement. While the Z-potential decreased 10 mV after three months, this effect may be explained by the superficial properties of the drug that make the molecules to be preferably oriented at the solid-liquid interface, causing a change in the net charge of the particle. SEM confirmed size and shape of the nanoparticles. DSC studies evidenced that CyA affects the lipid structure by a mechanism still unknown. The entrapment efficiency was higher than 92%, and CyA release from SLNs was relatively fast (99.60% in 45 min). PMID:20856836

  3. Preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing cyclosporine by the emulsification-diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Ganem-Rondero, Adriana; Melgoza-Contreras, Luz María; Escobar-Chávez, José Juan; Nava-Arzaluz, María Guadalupe; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2010-09-07

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have been used for carrying different therapeutic agents because they improve absorption and bioavailability. The aim of the study was to prepare lipidic nanoparticles containing cyclosporine (CyA) by the emulsification-diffusion method and to study their physicochemical stability. Glyceryl behenate (Compritol(®) ATO 888) and lauroyl macrogolglycerides (Gelucire(®) 44/14) were used as carrier materials. Nanoparticles with good stability were obtained with Gelucire(®), while it was difficult to obtain stable systems with Compritol(®). Systems with Gelucire(®) were characterized by particle size, Z-potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. Particle size and Z-potential were evaluated for at least three months. With a high CyA content (≥60 mg) in Gelucire(®) SLNs, variations in size were greater and particle size also increased over time in all batches; this effect may have been caused by a probable expulsion of the drug due to the lipid's partial rearrangement. While the Z-potential decreased 10 mV after three months, this effect may be explained by the superficial properties of the drug that make the molecules to be preferably oriented at the solid-liquid interface, causing a change in the net charge of the particle. SEM confirmed size and shape of the nanoparticles. DSC studies evidenced that CyA affects the lipid structure by a mechanism still unknown. The entrapment efficiency was higher than 92%, and CyA release from SLNs was relatively fast (99.60% in 45 min).

  4. A modified method for diffusive monitoring of 3-ethenylpyridine as a specific marker of environmental tobacco smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusimäki, Leea; Peltonen, Kimmo; Vainiotalo, Sinikka

    A previously introduced method for monitoring environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was further validated. The method is based on diffusive sampling of a vapour-phase marker, 3-ethenylpyridine (3-EP), with 3 M passive monitors (type 3500). Experiments were done in a dynamic chamber to assess diffusive sampling in comparison with active sampling in charcoal tubes or XAD-4 tubes. The sampling rate for 3-EP collected on the diffusive sampler was 23.1±0.6 mL min -1. The relative standard deviation for parallel samples ( n=6) ranged from 4% to 14% among experiments ( n=9). No marked reverse diffusion of 3-EP was detected nor any significant effect of relative humidity at 20%, 50% or 80%. The diffusive sampling of 3-EP was validated in field measurements in 15 restaurants in comparison with 3-EP and nicotine measurements using active sampling. The 3-EP concentration in restaurants ranged from 0.01 to 9.8 μg m -3, and the uptake rate for 3-EP based on 92 parallel samples was 24.0±0.4 mL min -1. A linear correlation ( r=0.98) was observed between 3-EP and nicotine concentrations, the average ratio of 3-EP to nicotine being 1:8. Active sampling of 3-EP and nicotine in charcoal tubes provided more reliable results than sampling in XAD-4 tubes. All samples were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after elution with a 15% solution of pyridine in toluene. For nicotine, the limit of quantification of the charcoal tube method was 4 ng per sample, corresponding to 0.04 μg m -3 for an air sample of 96 L. For 3-EP, the limit of quantification of the diffusive method was 0.5-1.0 ng per sample, corresponding to 0.04-0.09 μg m -3 for 8 h sampling. The diffusive method proved suitable for ETS monitoring, even at low levels of ETS.

  5. Total Antioxidant Capacity of Serum Determined Using the Potassium Permanganate Agar Method Based on Serum Diffusion in Agar

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Meijuan; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a new method for determining total antioxidants in serum and to evaluate the total antioxidant capacity of organisms. Design and Methods. Sodium hyposulfite (Na2S2O3) and serum were used to evaluate the linearity and precision of the potassium permanganate agar method. The area of serum diffusion in samples from 30 intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with 44 healthy subjects was determined by the potassium permanganate agar method. Results. The linearity (R2 in the linear experiment of Na2S2O3 was 0.994; R2 in the linear experiment of serum was 0.987) and precision (coefficient of variation of area of high level serum diffusion within-run, between-run, and between-day and coefficient of variation of area of low serum diffusion within-run, between-run, and between-day were all less than 10%) were acceptable using the potassium permanganate agar method. Total antioxidants of serum between the ICU group and the healthy group were different (p = 0.002, two tailed). Conclusions. Total antioxidants in serum can be determined by the potassium permanganate agar method. The total antioxidant capacity of an organism can be evaluated by the amount of total antioxidants in serum. PMID:26347595

  6. Diffuse interstellar band at 8620 Å in rave: A new method for detecting the diffuse interstellar band in spectra of cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, J.; Zwitter, T.; Grebel, E. K.; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kordopatis, G.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are usually observed in spectra of hot stars, where interstellar lines are rarely blended with stellar ones. The need for hot stars is a strong limitation in the number of sightlines we can observe and their distribution in the Galaxy, as hot stars are rare and concentrated in the Galactic plane. We are introducing a new method, where interstellar lines can be observed in spectra of cool stars in large spectroscopic surveys. The method is completely automated and does not require prior knowledge of the stellar parameters. The main step is a construction of the stellar spectrum, which is done by finding other observed spectra that lack interstellar features and are otherwise very similar to the spectrum in question. Such spectra are then combined into a single stellar spectrum template, matching the stellar component of the observed spectrum. We demonstrate the performance of this new method on a sample of 482,430 Radial Velocity Experiment survey spectra. However, many spectra have to be combined (48 on average) in order to achieve a signal-to-noise ratio high enough to measure the profile of the DIB at 8620 Å, hence limiting the spatial information about the interstellar medium. We compare its equivalent width with extinction maps and with Bayesian reddening, calculated for individual stars, and provide a linear relation between the equivalent width and reddening. Separately from the introduced method, we calculate equivalent widths of the DIB in spectra of hot stars with known extinction and compare all three linear relations.

  7. The Conforming Virtual Element Method for the convection-diffusion-reaction equation with variable coeffcients.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Cangiani, Andrea; Sutton, Oliver

    2014-10-02

    This document describes the conforming formulations for virtual element approximation of the convection-reaction-diffusion equation with variable coefficients. Emphasis is given to construction of the projection operators onto polynomial spaces of appropriate order. These projections make it possible the virtual formulation to achieve any order of accuracy. We present the construction of the internal and the external formulation. The difference between the two is in the way the projection operators act on the derivatives (laplacian, gradient) of the partial differential equation. For the diffusive regime we prove the well-posedness of the external formulation and we derive an estimate of the approximation error in the H1-norm. For the convection-dominated case, the streamline diffusion stabilization (aka SUPG) is also discussed.

  8. Method for estimating closed-form solutions of the light diffusion equation for turbid media of any boundary shape

    PubMed Central

    Alqasemi, Umar; Salehi, Hassan S.; Zhu, Quing

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a method of estimating an approximate closed-form solution to the light diffusion equation for any type of geometry involving Dirichlet’s boundary condition with known source location. It is based on estimating the optimum locations of multiple imaginary point sources to cancel the fluence at the extrapolated boundary by constrained optimization using a genetic algorithm. The mathematical derivation of the problem to approach the optimum solution for the direct-current type of diffuse optical systems is described in detail. Our method is first applied to slab geometry and compared with a truncated series solution. After that, it is applied to hemispherical geometry and compared with Monte Carlo simulation results. The method provides a fast and sufficiently accurate fluence distribution for optical reconstruction. PMID:26831771

  9. A finite element-boundary element method for advection-diffusion problems with variable advective fields and infinite domains

    SciTech Connect

    Driessen, B.J.; Dohner, J.L.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper a hybrid, finite element--boundary element method which can be used to solve for particle advection-diffusion in infinite domains with variable advective fields is presented. In previous work either boundary element, finite element, or difference methods have been used to solve for particle motion in advective-diffusive domains. These methods have a number of limitations. Due to the complexity of computing spatially dependent Green`s functions, the boundary element method is limited to domains containing only constant advective fields, and due to their inherent formulation, finite element and finite difference methods are limited to only domains of finite spatial extent. Thus, finite element and finite difference methods are limited to finite space problems for which the boundary element method is not, and the boundary element method is limited to constant advection field problems for which finite element and finite difference methods are not. In this paper it is proposed to split a domain into two sub-domains, and for each of these sub domains, apply the appropriate solution method; thereby, producing a method for the total infinite space, variable advective field domain.

  10. [The use of oxacillin and cefoxitin disk-diffusion method and PCR for the identification methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis].

    PubMed

    Budzyńska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Dorota; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis are recognized as one of the most important nosocomial infections. Because of the different expression level of mecA gene which is under regulatory genes control, detection of methicillin resistance by phenotypic methods may leads to false negative or false positive results. The aim of this study was to estimate effectiveness of MRSE strains identification using oxacillin (1 microg) and cefoxitin (30 microg) disk-diffusion method in comparison with PCR, considered as a "gold standard". The analysis of 120 strains isolated from clinical materials of patients of the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Toruń indicated high degree of correlation between phenotypic methods with taken disks. Results consistency of detecting methicillin resistance between oxacillin disk diffusion method and PCR concerned 95% strains. In case of cefoxitin 4,2% S. epidermidis strains detected phenotypically as MSSE were mecA-positive. Our results show that disk-diffusion method with disks mentioned above is characterized by comparable specificity and sensitivity amounted 90,8% and 100% for oxacillin and 92,3% and 100% for cefoxitin respectively.

  11. Comparison of diffusion- and pumped-sampling methods to monitor volatile organic compounds in ground water, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, July 1999-December 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate diffusion sampling as an alternative method to monitor volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in ground water, concentrations in samples collected by traditional pumped-sampling methods were compared to concentrations in samples collected by diffusion-sampling methods for 89 monitoring wells at or near the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod. Samples were analyzed for 36 VOCs. There was no substantial difference between the utility of diffusion and pumped samples to detect the presence or absence of a VOC. In wells where VOCs were detected, diffusion-sample concentrations of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) were significantly lower than pumped-sample concentrations. Because PCE and TCE concentrations detected in the wells dominated the calculation of many of the total VOC concentrations, when VOC concentrations were summed and compared by sampling method, visual inspection also showed a downward concentration bias in the diffusion-sample concentration. The degree to which pumped- and diffusion-sample concentrations agreed was not a result of variability inherent within the sampling methods or the diffusion process itself. A comparison of the degree of agreement in the results from the two methods to 13 quantifiable characteristics external to the sampling methods offered only well-screen length as being related to the degree of agreement between the methods; however, there is also evidence to indicate that the flushing rate of water through the well screen affected the agreement between the sampling methods. Despite poor agreement between the concentrations obtained by the two methods at some wells, the degree to which the concentrations agree at a given well is repeatable. A one-time, well-bywell comparison between diffusion- and pumped-sampling methods could determine which wells are good candidates for the use of diffusion samplers. For wells with good method agreement, the diffusion-sampling method is a time

  12. An Innovative Method for Preparing Semiconductor Change Used in Crystal Growth and Shear Cell Diffusion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anrold, William A.; Matthiesen, David; Benett, Robert J.; Jayne, Douglas T.

    1997-01-01

    An innovative technique for machining semiconductors has been developed. This technique was used to prepare semiconductor charges for crystal growth and shear cell diffusion experiments. The technique allows brittle semiconductor materials to be quickly and accurately machined. Lightly doping the semiconductor material increases the conductivity enough to allow the material to be shaped by an electrical discharge machine (EDM).

  13. Spectrophotometric Method for Differentiation of Human Skin Melanoma. I. Optical Diffuse Reflection Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, V. G.; Ivanov, A. P.; Kvaternyuk, S. M.; Barun, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed an experimental setup, based on two integrating spheres, that lets us measure the optical diffuse reflectance spectra (diffuse reflection coefficient vs. wavelength) of human skin quickly under clinical conditions in vivo. For the wavelength interval 520-1100 nm, we give the values of the diffuse reflection coefficient for healthy tissue, skin with a benign nevus, and skin with a malignant melanoma for a large group of test subjects. We experimentally established a number of wavelengths in the red-near IR region of the spectrum which can be used for early differential diagnosis of nevi and melanoma in patient cancer screening. According to the Kramer-Welch test, the probability of the diffuse reflection coefficient for skin with melanoma and a nevus having different distributions is >0.94, and at many wavelengths it is >0.999. By solving the inverse problem, we estimated the changes in a number of structural and biophysical parameters of the tissue on going from healthy skin to nevus and melanoma. The results obtained can provide a basis for developing a clinical approach to identifying the risk of malignant transformation of the skin before surgery and histological analysis of the tissue.

  14. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films.

    PubMed

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm(2)) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm(2)) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature. PMID:27587146

  15. Antibacterial properties of Au doped polycarbonate synthesized by gamma radiation assisted diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareesh, K.; Deore, Avinash V.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Kanjilal, D.; Ojha, Sunil; Dhole, N. A.; Kodam, K. M.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    Gold (Au)-Polycarbonate (PC) matrix was prepared by gamma radiation assisted diffusion of Au nanoparticles in PC matrix. UV-Visible spectroscopy showed the surface plasmon resonance around 550 nm which corresponds to Au and this peak shift towards lower wavelength i.e. blue shift indicating the decrease in particle size of Au. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) experiment confirmed the diffusion of Au in PC and depth of diffusion is found to be around 0.85 μm. X-ray Diffractogram (XRD) results also revealed the diffusion of Au in PC where the peak observed at 2θ∼38.29° which correspond to the FCC structure. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images showed the hexagonal shaped Au nanoparticles and average particle size is found to be around 110 nm. These samples also showed anti-bacterial properties with both gram positive and gram negative bacteria's and revealed the inhibition of the overall growth of the bacteria with gamma dose.

  16. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films.

    PubMed

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm(2)) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm(2)) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature.

  17. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm2) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm2) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature.

  18. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of chelating agents using the agar diffusion method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of 2 metal chelators. Concentrations of 0 to 40 mM of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediamine-N,N’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) were prepared in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The pH of the solutions was adjusted to 1...

  19. A Simple and Accurate Method To Calculate Free Energy Profiles and Reaction Rates from Restrained Molecular Simulations of Diffusive Processes.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Nam, Kwangho; Karplus, Martin

    2016-08-25

    A method is developed to obtain simultaneously free energy profiles and diffusion constants from restrained molecular simulations in diffusive systems. The method is based on low-order expansions of the free energy and diffusivity as functions of the reaction coordinate. These expansions lead to simple analytical relationships between simulation statistics and model parameters. The method is tested on 1D and 2D model systems; its accuracy is found to be comparable to or better than that of the existing alternatives, which are briefly discussed. An important aspect of the method is that the free energy is constructed by integrating its derivatives, which can be computed without need for overlapping sampling windows. The implementation of the method in any molecular simulation program that supports external umbrella potentials (e.g., CHARMM) requires modification of only a few lines of code. As a demonstration of its applicability to realistic biomolecular systems, the method is applied to model the α-helix ↔ β-sheet transition in a 16-residue peptide in implicit solvent, with the reaction coordinate provided by the string method. Possible modifications of the method are briefly discussed; they include generalization to multidimensional reaction coordinates [in the spirit of the model of Ermak and McCammon (Ermak, D. L.; McCammon, J. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1978, 69, 1352-1360)], a higher-order expansion of the free energy surface, applicability in nonequilibrium systems, and a simple test for Markovianity. In view of the small overhead of the method relative to standard umbrella sampling, we suggest its routine application in the cases where umbrella potential simulations are appropriate.

  20. Development of a Compact Snow Crystal Formation Apparatus Based on a Diffusion Method Using a Peltier Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Shinsuke; Endo, Hiroshi; Seki, Mitsuo

    We developed a compact snow crystal formation apparatus based on a diffusion method using a Peltier device. This apparatus does not need an assemblage and is small enough to be operated on a desk. Anyone can easily observe snow crystal formation in a normal temperature room. We adopted a diffusion method because the shape enable that several people can simultaneously observe the snow crystal formation from above. To estimate a performance of the apparatus, we investigated temperature profiles in the apparatus by measurement and simulations with (Case 1) and without (Case 2) natural convection. As results of the simulations, Case 1 and Case 2 reached a steady state. In each case, temperature stratification condition was formed in lower part of the apparatus. From the comparison of the results of measurement and simulations, finally, it is concluded that there is a natural convection, but the air current is not so strong as disturbing the temperature stratification condition in the apparatus.

  1. Vapor diffusion method: Dependence of polymorphs and morphologies of calcium carbonate crystals on the depth of an aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Hai-Shui; Zeng, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    The polymorph control of calcium carbonate by the vapor diffusion method is still a challenging issue because the resultant crystal polymorphs and morphologies highly depend on the experimental setup. In this communication, we demonstrated that the concentration gradients accompanied by the vapor diffusion method (ammonia concentration, pH and the ratio of CO32- to Ca2+ are changed with the solution depth and with time) are probably the main reasons to significantly affect the formation of crystal polymorphs. Raman, SEM and XRD data showed that calcite and vaterite crystals were preferred to nucleate and grow in the upper or the lower areas of aqueous solution respectively. The above results can be explained by the gradient effect.

  2. Reconstruction of optical absorption coefficient maps of heterogeneous media by photoacoustic tomography coupled with diffusion equation based regularized Newton method.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhen; Wang, Qiang; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-12-24

    We describe a novel reconstruction method that allows for quantitative recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps of heterogeneous media using tomographic photoacoustic measurements. Images of optical absorption coefficient are obtained from a diffusion equation based regularized Newton method where the absorbed energy density distribution from conventional photoacoustic tomography serves as the measured field data. We experimentally demonstrate this new method using tissue-mimicking phantom measurements and simulations. The reconstruction results show that the optical absorption coefficient images obtained are quantitative in terms of the shape, size, location and optical property values of the heterogeneities examined.

  3. Traveling wave solutions of density-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation via the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengne, Emmanuel; Saydé, Michel; Ben Hamouda, Fathi; Lakhssassi, Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Analytical entire traveling wave solutions to the 1+1 density-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation via the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method are presented in this paper. This equation can be regarded as an extension case of the Fisher-Kolmogoroff equation, which is used for studying insect and animal dispersal with growth dynamics. The analytical solutions are then used to investigate the effect of equation parameters on the population distribution.

  4. Autonomous basin climbing method with sampling of multiple transition pathways: application to anisotropic diffusion of point defects in hcp Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz, Bilge

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an extension of the autonomous basin climbing (ABC) method, an atomistic activation-relaxation technique for sampling transition-state pathways. The extended algorithm (ABC-E) allows the sampling of multiple transition pathways from a given minimum, with the additional feature of identifying the pathways in the order of increasing activation barriers, thereby prioritizing them according to their importance in the kinetics. Combined with on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo calculations, the method is applied to simulate the anisotropic diffusion of point defects in hcp Zr. Multiple migration mechanisms are identified for both the interstitials and vacancies, and benchmarked against results from other methods in the literature. The self-interstitial atom (SIA) diffusion kinetics shows a maximum anisotropy at intermediate temperatures (400~700 K), a non-monotonic behavior that we explain to originate from the stabilities and migration mechanisms associated with different SIA sites. The accuracy of the ABC-E calculations is validated, in part, by the existing results in the literature for point defect diffusion in hcp Zr, and by benchmarking against analytical results on a hypothetical rough-energy landscape. Lastly, sampling prioritization and computational efficiency are demonstrated through a direct comparison between the ABC-E and the activation relaxation technique.

  5. Intrauterine device for laser light diffusion and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-01-01

    An improved device for delivery of photoenergy from a light source, such as a laser, into a uterine cavity for photodynamic therapy is comprised of a plurality of optic fibers, which are bundled together and inserted into the uterine cavity by means of a uterine cannula. The cannula is positioned within the uterine cavity at a preferred location and then withdrawn thereby allowing the plurality of optic fibers to splay or diverge one from the other within the cavity. Different portions of the distal tip of the optic fiber is provided with a light diffusing tip, the remainder being provided with a nondiffusing tip portion. The fiber optic shape, as well as the segment which is permitted to actively diffuse light through the tip, is selected in order to provide a more uniform exposure intensity of the photo energy or at least sufficient radiation directed to each segment of the uterine walls.

  6. Intrauterine device for laser light diffusion and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Tadir, Y.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Tromberg, B.J.

    1995-12-26

    An improved device for delivery of photoenergy from a light source, such as a laser, into a uterine cavity for photodynamic therapy is comprised of a plurality of optic fibers, which are bundled together and inserted into the uterine cavity by means of a uterine cannula. The cannula is positioned within the uterine cavity at a preferred location and then withdrawn thereby allowing the plurality of optic fibers to splay or diverge one from the other within the cavity. Different portions of the distal tip of the optic fiber is provided with a light diffusing tip, the remainder being provided with a nondiffusing tip portion. The fiber optic shape, as well as the segment which is permitted to actively diffuse light through the tip, is selected in order to provide a more uniform exposure intensity of the photo energy or at least sufficient radiation directed to each segment of the uterine walls. 5 figs.

  7. Determination of the Solute Diffusion Coefficient by the Droplet Migration Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Liu; Jing Teng; Jeongyun Choi

    2007-07-01

    Further analysis of droplet migration in a temperature gradient field indicates that different terms can be used to evaluate the solute diffusion coefficient in liquid (D{sub L}) and that there exists a characteristic curve that can describe the motion of all the droplets for a given composition and temperature gradient. Critical experiments are subsequently conducted in succinonitrile (SCN)-salol and SCN-camphor transparent alloys in order to observe dynamic migration processes of a number of droplets. The derived diffusion coefficients from different terms are the same within experimental error. For SCN-salol alloys, D{sub L} = (0.69 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, and for SCN-camphor alloys, D{sub L} = (0.24 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s.

  8. Asymptotic-preserving methods for hyperbolic and transport equations with random inputs and diffusive scalings

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shi; Xiu, Dongbin; Zhu, Xueyu

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we develop a set of stochastic numerical schemes for hyperbolic and transport equations with diffusive scalings and subject to random inputs. The schemes are asymptotic preserving (AP), in the sense that they preserve the diffusive limits of the equations in discrete setting, without requiring excessive refinement of the discretization. Our stochastic AP schemes are extensions of the well-developed deterministic AP schemes. To handle the random inputs, we employ generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion and combine it with stochastic Galerkin procedure. We apply the gPC Galerkin scheme to a set of representative hyperbolic and transport equations and establish the AP property in the stochastic setting. We then provide several numerical examples to illustrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the stochastic AP schemes.

  9. A graphical method for estimating charge collected by diffusion from an ion track

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, L.D.

    1996-08-01

    The diffusion equation has some applications relevant to charge collection from ion tracks in silicon devices. This problem has been treated in the past for cases in which the entire upper surface can be represented as a sink of minority carriers. The present paper treats the case in which there are a number of disconnected upper junctions separated by reflective surfaces. Numerical results, presented as plots of charge-collection efficiency contours, are given for several device geometries. Such plots, combined with a simple superposition, provide charge-collection estimates for arbitrary track length, location, and direction. The mathematical theory applies to any geometry and can be used by the reader to obtain additional plots and/or analytical expressions. The diffusion coefficient can be an arbitrary function of carrier density.

  10. Real-time electro-diffusion method to discriminate carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Chatterjee, Arumoy; Chatterjee, Budhaditya; Raja, Sufi O; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2015-12-01

    We report both the experimental and theoretical insights of differential electro-diffusion behavior of carbon nanomaterials (e.g. single wall, multiwall carbon nanotubes, and graphene). We thus discriminate one from the other in a soft gel system. The differential mobility of such material depends on their intrinsic properties, both extend and rate of migration bearing the discriminatory signature. The mobility analysis is made by a real time monitoring of the respective bands. PMID:26395102

  11. Measurements of the thermal diffusivity tensor of polymer-carbon fiber composites by photothermal methods

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, A.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    1998-03-01

    The thermal diffusivity tensor of a polymer-carbon fiber composite with unidirectionally distributed fibers has been measured using a modulated photothermal mirage device. The thermal diffusivity along the fibers is k{sub {parallel}} = 6.0 {+-} 0.5 mm{sup 2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}, that perpendicular to the fibers is k{sub {perpendicular}} = 0.35 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}, and that perpendicular to the sample surface is k{sub z} = 0.40 {+-} 0.15 mm{sup 2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}. These results have been confirmed by independent measurements on the sample by other laboratories using three other different photothermal techniques. A previous claim on anomalous results found on this sample (k{sub {parallel}} < k{sub {perpendicular}} and high thermal diffusivities) can be explained by the inappropriate use of the frequency range. The authors have also found that there is not perfect thermal contact between the fibers and the matrix, which can be characterized by the thermal contact resistance of R{sub th} = (9 {+-} 2) {times} 10{sup {minus}6} m{sup 2}{center_dot}K{center_dot}W{sup {minus}1}.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann method for diffusion-limited partial dissolution of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aursjø, Olav; Pride, Steven R.

    2015-07-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for two partially miscible fluids is developed. By partially miscible we mean that, although there is a definite interfacial region separating the two fluids with a surface tension force acting at all points of the transition region, each fluid can nonetheless accept molecules from the other fluid up to a set solubility limit. We allow each fluid to diffuse into the other with the solubility and diffusivity in each fluid being input parameters. The approach is to define two regions within the fluid: one interfacial region having finite width, across which most of the concentration change occurs, and in which a surface tension force and color separation step are allowed for and one miscible fluid region where the concentration of the binary fluids follows an advection-diffusion equation and the mixture as a whole obeys the Navier-Stokes incompressible flow equations. Numerical examples are presented in which the algorithm produces results that are quantitatively compared to exact analytical results as well as qualitatively examined for their reasonableness. The model has the ability to simulate how bubbles of one fluid flow through another while dissolving their contents as well as to simulate a range of practical invasion problems such as injecting supercritical CO2 into a porous material saturated with water for sequestration purposes.

  13. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  14. A remark on the theory of measuring thermal diffusivity by the modified Angstrom's method. [in lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horai, K.-I.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a sample by the modified Angstrom method is developed for the case in which radiative heat loss from the end surface of the sample is not negligible, and applied to measurements performed on lunar samples. Formulas allowing sample thermal diffusivity to be determined from the amplitude decay and phase lag of a temperature wave traveling through the sample are derived for a flat disk sample for which only heat loss from the end surface is important, and a sample of finite diameter and length for which heat loss through the end and side surfaces must be considered. It is noted that in the case of a flat disk, measurements at a single angular frequency of the temperature wave are sufficient, while the sample of finite diameter and length requires measurements at two discrete angular frequencies. Comparison of the values of the thermal diffusivities of two lunar samples of dimensions approximately 1 x 1 x 2 cm derived by the present methods and by the Angstrom theory for a finite bar reveals them to differ by not more than 5%, and indicates that more refined data are required as the measurement theory becomes more complicated.

  15. A Nonfitting Method Using a Spatial Sine Window Transform for Inhomogeneous Effective-Diffusion Measurements by FRAP

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Darya Y.; Bártová, Eva; Maltsev, Valeri P.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Chernyshev, Andrei V.

    2011-01-01

    Determining averaged effective diffusion constants from experimental measurements of fluorescent proteins in an inhomogeneous medium in the presence of ligand-receptor interactions poses problems of analytical tractability. Here, we introduced a nonfitting method to evaluate the averaged effective diffusion coefficient of a region of interest (which may include a whole nucleus) by mathematical processing of the entire cellular two-dimensional spatial pattern of recovered fluorescence. Spatially and temporally resolved measurements of protein transport inside cells were obtained using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Two-dimensional images of fluorescence patterns were collected by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The method was demonstrated by applying it to an estimation of the mobility of green fluorescent protein-tagged heterochromatin protein 1 in the nuclei of living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This approach does not require the mathematical solution of a corresponding system of diffusion-reaction equations that is typical of conventional fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data processing, and is most useful for investigating highly inhomogeneous areas, such as cell nuclei, which contain many protein foci and chromatin domains. PMID:21244847

  16. Polyamide-thallium selenide composite materials via temperature and pH controlled adsorption-diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanauskas, Remigijus; Samardokas, Linas; Mikolajunas, Marius; Virzonis, Darius; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2014-10-01

    Composite materials based on III-VI elements are promising in designing efficient photoelectronic devices, such as thin film organic-inorganic solar cells. In this work, TlSe composite materials were synthesized on a model polymer polyamide using temperature and pH controlled adsorption-diffusion method via (a) selenization followed by (b) the exposure to the group III metal (Tl) salt solution and their surface morphological, chemical and crystalline phase information was determined with particular focus on their corresponding structure-optical property relationship. XRD analysis yielded a complex crystalline phase distribution which correlated well with the optical and surface morphological properties measured. pH 11.3 and 80 °C yielded well defined, low structural disorder composite material surface. After annealing in N2 at 100 °C, polycrystalline PA-TlxSey composite materials yielded a single TlSe phase due to the enhanced diffusion and reaction of thallium ions into the polymer. The method described here can be used to synthesize variety of binary III-VI compounds diffused into the polymer at relatively low temperatures and low overall cost, thus providing for a flexible synthesis route for novel composite solar energy harvesting materials.

  17. Is a New Standard Needed for Diffusion Methods for In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Fosfomycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa?

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Martínez-García, Laura; Morosini, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed fosfomycin susceptibility results in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates obtained by MIC gradient strips and disk diffusion methods using two different inocula, 108 and 106 CFU/ml, and compared them to the agar dilution reference method. Essential and categorical agreements were 93.6% and 95%, respectively, for the 106 CFU/ml alternative inoculum, and they were 67.6% and 78.2%, respectively, for the standard inoculum (108 CFU/ml). The use of the 106 CFU/ml inoculum improves the agreement values and inhibition zone readings. PMID:26643341

  18. Alternative formulations of the Laplace transform boundary element (LTBE) numerical method for the solution of diffusion-type equations

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.

    1992-03-01

    The Laplace Transform Boundary Element (LTBE) method is a recently introduced numerical method, and has been used for the solution of diffusion-type PDEs. It completely eliminates the time dependency of the problem and the need for time discretization, yielding solutions numerical in space and semi-analytical in time. In LTBE solutions are obtained in the Laplace spare, and are then inverted numerically to yield the solution in time. The Stehfest and the DeHoog formulations of LTBE, based on two different inversion algorithms, are investigated. Both formulations produce comparable, extremely accurate solutions.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy – a non-invasive method in evaluating focal and diffuse central nervous system disease

    PubMed Central

    Scheau, C; Preda, EM; Popa, GA; Ghergus, AE; Capsa, RA; Lupescu, IG

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is a non-invasive method, which can be performed following a routine Magnetic Resonance investigation within the same examination, and can provide very useful molecular information related to the metabolism and function of the normal and pathological structures of the brain. Its role is increasing in the establishment of a clear diagnosis, in both focal and diffuse central nervous system diseases, and the tendency is to replace the histopathology test, in certain cases, with similar or sometimes better diagnostic accuracy. This paper summarizes the principle, method, and main clinical applications, standing as a guide to procedure performing and results interpretation. PMID:23346244

  20. Is a New Standard Needed for Diffusion Methods for In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Fosfomycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa?

    PubMed

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Martínez-García, Laura; Cantón, Rafael; Morosini, María Isabel

    2016-02-01

    We analyzed fosfomycin susceptibility results in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates obtained by MIC gradient strips and disk diffusion methods using two different inocula, 10(8) and 10(6) CFU/ml, and compared them to the agar dilution reference method. Essential and categorical agreements were 93.6% and 95%, respectively, for the 10(6) CFU/ml alternative inoculum, and they were 67.6% and 78.2%, respectively, for the standard inoculum (10(8) CFU/ml). The use of the 10(6) CFU/ml inoculum improves the agreement values and inhibition zone readings.

  1. Proton-diffused channel waveguides on Y-cut LiNbO3 using a self-aligned SiO2-cap diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Yung-Sung; Lee, Hyung J.; Yi, Sang-Yoon; Shin, Sang-Yung

    1991-02-01

    We report on proton-diffused channel waveguides on Y-cut LiNbO3 fabricated by using pure benzoic acid for proton exchange and a self-aligned Si02 cap for diffusion. They do not exhibit surface damage since the rate of initial proton exchange can be lowered due to the proton conserving property of a selfaligned Si02 cap. The electrooptic property of the waveguide is investigated by the cutoff modulation of a channel waveguide. The proton diffusion with a self-aligned Si02 cap is proved to render good Y-cut LiNbO3 channel waveguides.

  2. Gas diffusion liquid storage bag and method of use for storing blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bank, H.; Cleland, E. L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The shelf life of stored whole blood may be doubled by adding a buffer which maintains a desired pH level. However, this buffer causes the generation of CO2 which, if not removed at a controlled rate, causes the pH value of the blood to decrease, which shortens the useful life of the blood. A blood storage bag is described which permits the CO2 to be diffused out at a controlled rate into the atmosphere, thereby maintaining the desired pH value and providing a bag strong enough to permit handling.

  3. Best practices: implementation of a glucose screening program based on diffusion of innovation theory methods.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Ginger E; Morrato, Elaine H; Johnson, Mark C; Campagna, Elizabeth; Yingling, Michael D; Pham, Victor; Newcomer, John W

    2011-01-01

    There is public health interest in the identification and treatment of modifiable cardiometabolic risk factors among patients treated with antipsychotic medications. However, best-practice screening recommendations endorsed by multiple medical organizations have not translated into real-world clinical practice. Quality improvement strategies may help to address the gap between policy and implementation. This column describes the successful implementation of a best-practice glucose screening program in a large network of community mental health centers that was based on Six Sigma and diffusion of innovation theory.

  4. Numerical solutions and error estimations for the space fractional diffusion equation with variable coefficients via Fibonacci collocation method.

    PubMed

    Bahşı, Ayşe Kurt; Yalçınbaş, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Fibonacci collocation method based on the Fibonacci polynomials are presented to solve for the fractional diffusion equations with variable coefficients. The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo sense. This method is derived by expanding the approximate solution with Fibonacci polynomials. Using this method of the fractional derivative this equation can be reduced to a set of linear algebraic equations. Also, an error estimation algorithm which is based on the residual functions is presented for this method. The approximate solutions are improved by using this error estimation algorithm. If the exact solution of the problem is not known, the absolute error function of the problems can be approximately computed by using the Fibonacci polynomial solution. By using this error estimation function, we can find improved solutions which are more efficient than direct numerical solutions. Numerical examples, figures, tables are comparisons have been presented to show efficiency and usable of proposed method. PMID:27610294

  5. A simple method for the determination of ionic diffusion coefficients in flooded soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, P. J.; Flynn, N.; Maltby, E.

    2001-02-01

    Soil cores from river marginal wetlands from the Torridge and Severn catchments in the UK were collected to study rates of soil denitrification at different sites and at two stations (levee and backplain depression) at the river margin. Half the cores were sterilized prior to flooding to destroy the denitrifying bacteria. After flooding and equilibration, monitoring the concentration of amended nitrate in the supernatant of the sterile cores over a period of 7 days provided a simple procedure for the estimation of the diffusion coefficient of the nitrate ion in the flooded soils. An expression was developed that permitted this diffusion coefficient to be extracted from the slope of a plot of supernatant concentration versus (time)1/2. The values obtained, at 15 °C, varied from 2·4 to 6·8 × 10-10m2s-1. Sterile cores are usually treated as controls in denitrification experiments; this work develops a procedure whereby they may yield useful soil process information.

  6. Comparative evaluation of antibacterial activity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and PLGA nanoparticle formulation by different methods.

    PubMed

    Arasoglu, Tülin; Derman, Serap; Mansuroglu, Banu

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of nanoparticle and free formulations of the CAPE compound using different methods and comparing the results in the literature for the first time. In parallel with this purpose, encapsulation of CAPE with the PLGA nanoparticle system (CAPE-PLGA-NPs) and characterization of nanoparticles were carried out. Afterwards, antimicrobial activity of free CAPE and CAPE-PLGA-NPs was determined using agar well diffusion, disk diffusion, broth microdilution and reduction percentage methods. P. aeroginosa, E. coli, S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were chosen as model bacteria since they have different cell wall structures. CAPE-PLGA-NPs within the range of 214.0 ± 8.80 nm particle size and with an encapsulation efficiency of 91.59 ± 4.97% were prepared using the oil-in-water (o-w) single-emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microbiological results indicated that free CAPE did not have any antimicrobial activity in any of the applied methods whereas CAPE-PLGA-NPs had significant antimicrobial activity in both broth dilution and reduction percentage methods. CAPE-PLGA-NPs showed moderate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and MRSA strains particularly in hourly measurements at 30.63 and 61.25 μg ml(-1) concentrations (both p < 0.05), whereas they failed to show antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria (P. aeroginosa and E. coli, p > 0.05). In the reduction percentage method, in which the highest results of antimicrobial activity were obtained, it was observed that the antimicrobial effect on S. aureus was more long-standing (3 days) and higher in reduction percentage (over 90%). The appearance of antibacterial activity of CAPE-PLGA-NPs may be related to higher penetration into cells due to low solubility of free CAPE in the aqueous medium. Additionally, the biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles could be an alternative to solvents such as ethanol

  7. Comparative evaluation of antibacterial activity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and PLGA nanoparticle formulation by different methods.

    PubMed

    Arasoglu, Tülin; Derman, Serap; Mansuroglu, Banu

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of nanoparticle and free formulations of the CAPE compound using different methods and comparing the results in the literature for the first time. In parallel with this purpose, encapsulation of CAPE with the PLGA nanoparticle system (CAPE-PLGA-NPs) and characterization of nanoparticles were carried out. Afterwards, antimicrobial activity of free CAPE and CAPE-PLGA-NPs was determined using agar well diffusion, disk diffusion, broth microdilution and reduction percentage methods. P. aeroginosa, E. coli, S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were chosen as model bacteria since they have different cell wall structures. CAPE-PLGA-NPs within the range of 214.0 ± 8.80 nm particle size and with an encapsulation efficiency of 91.59 ± 4.97% were prepared using the oil-in-water (o-w) single-emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microbiological results indicated that free CAPE did not have any antimicrobial activity in any of the applied methods whereas CAPE-PLGA-NPs had significant antimicrobial activity in both broth dilution and reduction percentage methods. CAPE-PLGA-NPs showed moderate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and MRSA strains particularly in hourly measurements at 30.63 and 61.25 μg ml(-1) concentrations (both p < 0.05), whereas they failed to show antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria (P. aeroginosa and E. coli, p > 0.05). In the reduction percentage method, in which the highest results of antimicrobial activity were obtained, it was observed that the antimicrobial effect on S. aureus was more long-standing (3 days) and higher in reduction percentage (over 90%). The appearance of antibacterial activity of CAPE-PLGA-NPs may be related to higher penetration into cells due to low solubility of free CAPE in the aqueous medium. Additionally, the biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles could be an alternative to solvents such as ethanol

  8. Comparative evaluation of antibacterial activity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and PLGA nanoparticle formulation by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasoglu, Tülin; Derman, Serap; Mansuroglu, Banu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of nanoparticle and free formulations of the CAPE compound using different methods and comparing the results in the literature for the first time. In parallel with this purpose, encapsulation of CAPE with the PLGA nanoparticle system (CAPE-PLGA-NPs) and characterization of nanoparticles were carried out. Afterwards, antimicrobial activity of free CAPE and CAPE-PLGA-NPs was determined using agar well diffusion, disk diffusion, broth microdilution and reduction percentage methods. P. aeroginosa, E. coli, S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were chosen as model bacteria since they have different cell wall structures. CAPE-PLGA-NPs within the range of 214.0 ± 8.80 nm particle size and with an encapsulation efficiency of 91.59 ± 4.97% were prepared using the oil-in-water (o-w) single-emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microbiological results indicated that free CAPE did not have any antimicrobial activity in any of the applied methods whereas CAPE-PLGA-NPs had significant antimicrobial activity in both broth dilution and reduction percentage methods. CAPE-PLGA-NPs showed moderate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and MRSA strains particularly in hourly measurements at 30.63 and 61.25 μg ml-1 concentrations (both p < 0.05), whereas they failed to show antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria (P. aeroginosa and E. coli, p > 0.05). In the reduction percentage method, in which the highest results of antimicrobial activity were obtained, it was observed that the antimicrobial effect on S. aureus was more long-standing (3 days) and higher in reduction percentage (over 90%). The appearance of antibacterial activity of CAPE-PLGA-NPs may be related to higher penetration into cells due to low solubility of free CAPE in the aqueous medium. Additionally, the biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles could be an alternative to solvents such as ethanol

  9. Multiparameter Screening on SlipChip Used for Nanoliter Protein Crystallization Combining Free Interface Diffusion and Microbatch Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang; Du, Wenbin; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2010-08-04

    This paper describes two SlipChip-based approaches to protein crystallization: a SlipChip-based free interface diffusion (FID) method and a SlipChip-based composite method that simultaneously performs microbatch and FID crystallization methods in a single device. The FID SlipChip was designed to screen multiple reagents, each at multiple diffusion equilibration times, and was validated by screening conditions for crystallization of two proteins, enoyl-CoA hydratase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dihydrofolate reductase/thymidylate synthase from Babesia bovis, against 48 different reagents at five different equilibration times each, consuming 12 {micro}L of each protein for a total of 480 experiments using three SlipChips. The composite SlipChip was designed to screen multiple reagents, each at multiple mixing ratios and multiple equilibration times, and was validated by screening conditions for crystallization of two proteins, enoyl-CoA hydratase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dihydrofolate reductase/thymidylate synthase from Babesia bovis. To prevent cross-contamination while keeping the solution in the neck channels for FID stable, the plates of the SlipChip were etched with a pattern of nanowells. This nanopattern was used to increase the contact angle of aqueous solutions on the surface of the silanized glass. The composite SlipChip increased the number of successful crystallization conditions and identified more conditions for crystallization than separate FID and microbatch screenings. Crystallization experiments were scaled up in well plates using conditions identified during the SlipChip screenings, and X-ray diffraction data were obtained to yield the protein structure of dihydrofolate reductase/thymidylate synthase at 1.95 {angstrom} resolution. This free-interface diffusion approach provides a convenient and high-throughput method of setting up gradients in microfluidic devices and may find additional applications in cell-based assays.

  10. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods

    DOE PAGES

    Ganesh, P.; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-03

    In highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Moreover, the highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based onmore » point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. Our results demonstrate that the lithium carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches.« less

  11. Nonequilibrium scheme for computing the flux of the convection-diffusion equation in the framework of the lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhenhua; Zhao, T S

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a local nonequilibrium scheme for computing the flux of the convection-diffusion equation with a source term in the framework of the multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Both the Chapman-Enskog analysis and the numerical results show that, at the diffusive scaling, the present nonequilibrium scheme has a second-order convergence rate in space. A comparison between the nonequilibrium scheme and the conventional second-order central-difference scheme indicates that, although both schemes have a second-order convergence rate in space, the present nonequilibrium scheme is more accurate than the central-difference scheme. In addition, the flux computation rendered by the present scheme also preserves the parallel computation feature of the LBM, making the scheme more efficient than conventional finite-difference schemes in the study of large-scale problems. Finally, a comparison between the single-relaxation-time model and the MRT model is also conducted, and the results show that the MRT model is more accurate than the single-relaxation-time model, both in solving the convection-diffusion equation and in computing the flux.

  12. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-01

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  13. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  14. Development of a Pefloxacin Disk Diffusion Method for Detection of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Matuschek, Erika; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Åhman, Jenny; Petersen, Andreas; Stegger, Marc; Torpdahl, Mia; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are among the drugs of choice for treatment of Salmonella infections. However, fluoroquinolone resistance is increasing in Salmonella due to chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the topoisomerase genes gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE and/or plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) mechanisms including qnr variants, aac(6′)-Ib-cr, qepA, and oqxAB. Some of these mutations cause only subtle increases in the MIC, i.e., MICs ranging from 0.12 to 0.25 mg/liter for ciprofloxacin (just above the wild-type MIC of ≤0.06 mg/liter). These isolates are difficult to detect with standard ciprofloxacin disk diffusion, and plasmid-mediated resistance, such as qnr, is often not detected by the nalidixic acid screen test. We evaluated 16 quinolone/fluoroquinolone disks for their ability to detect low-level-resistant Salmonella enterica isolates that are not serotype Typhi. A total of 153 Salmonella isolates characterized for the presence (n = 104) or absence (n = 49) of gyrA and/or parC topoisomerase mutations, qnrA, qnrB, qnrD, qnrS, aac(6′)-Ib-cr, or qepA genes were investigated. All isolates were MIC tested by broth microdilution against ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin and by disk diffusion using EUCAST or CLSI methodology. MIC determination correctly categorized all isolates as either wild-type isolates (MIC of ≤0.06 mg/liter and absence of resistance genes) or non-wild-type isolates (MIC of >0.06 mg/liter and presence of a resistance gene). Disk diffusion using these antibiotics and nalidixic acid failed to detect some low-level-resistant isolates, whereas the 5-μg pefloxacin disk correctly identified all resistant isolates. However, pefloxacin will not detect isolates having aac(6′)-Ib-cr as the only resistance determinant. The pefloxacin disk assay was approved and implemented by EUCAST (in 2014) and CLSI (in 2015). PMID:26292292

  15. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S K; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  16. Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets

    DOEpatents

    Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.; Davis, Daniel L.

    2011-03-08

    This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgical planning: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Winston, Gavin P; Mancini, Laura; Stretton, Jason; Ashmore, Jonathan; Symms, Mark R; Duncan, John S; Yousry, Tarek A

    2011-11-01

    The optic radiation is a key white matter structure at risk during epilepsy surgery involving the temporal, parietal or occipital lobes. It shows considerable anatomical variability, cannot be delineated on clinical MRI sequences and damage may cause a disabling visual field deficit. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography allows non-invasive mapping of this pathway. Numerous methods have been published but direct comparison is difficult as patient, acquisition and analysis parameters differ. Two methods for delineating the optic radiation were applied to 6 healthy controls and 4 patients with epileptogenic lesions near the optic radiation. By comparing methods with the same datasets, many of the parameters could be controlled. The first method was previously developed to accurately identify Meyer's loop for planning anterior temporal lobe resection. The second aimed to address limitations of this method by using a more automated technique to reduce operator time and to depict the entire optic radiation. Whilst the core of the tract was common to both methods, there was significant variability between the methods. Method 1 gave a more consistent depiction of Meyer's loop with fewer spurious tracts. Method 2 gave a better depiction of the entire optic radiation, particularly in more posterior portions, but did not identify Meyer's loop in one patient. These results show that whilst tractography is a promising technique, there is significant variability depending on the method chosen even when the majority of parameters are fixed. Different methods may need to be chosen for surgical planning depending on the individual clinical situation.

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgical planning: A comparison of two methods

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Gavin P.; Mancini, Laura; Stretton, Jason; Ashmore, Jonathan; Symms, Mark R.; Duncan, John S.; Yousry, Tarek A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The optic radiation is a key white matter structure at risk during epilepsy surgery involving the temporal, parietal or occipital lobes. It shows considerable anatomical variability, cannot be delineated on clinical MRI sequences and damage may cause a disabling visual field deficit. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography allows non-invasive mapping of this pathway. Numerous methods have been published but direct comparison is difficult as patient, acquisition and analysis parameters differ. Two methods for delineating the optic radiation were applied to 6 healthy controls and 4 patients with epileptogenic lesions near the optic radiation. By comparing methods with the same datasets, many of the parameters could be controlled. The first method was previously developed to accurately identify Meyer's loop for planning anterior temporal lobe resection. The second aimed to address limitations of this method by using a more automated technique to reduce operator time and to depict the entire optic radiation. Whilst the core of the tract was common to both methods, there was significant variability between the methods. Method 1 gave a more consistent depiction of Meyer's loop with fewer spurious tracts. Method 2 gave a better depiction of the entire optic radiation, particularly in more posterior portions, but did not identify Meyer's loop in one patient. These results show that whilst tractography is a promising technique, there is significant variability depending on the method chosen even when the majority of parameters are fixed. Different methods may need to be chosen for surgical planning depending on the individual clinical situation. PMID:21885257

  19. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion-relaxation data--2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition.

    PubMed

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T; Engelsen, Søren B

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T(2)-D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T(2)-D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T(2)-D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D=3 x 10(-12) m(2) s(-1) and T(2)=180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D=10(-9) m(2) s(-1), T(2)=10 ms and D=3 x 10(-13) m(2) s(-1), T(2)=13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  20. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion relaxation data—2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T2- D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T2- D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T2- D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D = 3 × 10 -12 m 2 s -1 and T2 = 180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D = 10 -9 m 2 s -1, T2 = 10 ms and D = 3 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1, T2 = 13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  1. Thermal Diffusivity Measurements of Oxide and Metallic Melts at High Temperature by the Laser Flash Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Hiromichi; Waseda, Yoshio

    The importance of heat transfer properties such as thermal conductivity or thermal diffusivity of various materials at high temperature is strongly emphasized, in parallel with recent progress in surface technology for several electronic devices. Such importance has been well recognized in many pyrometallurgical processes related to plant design and accurate control of continuous casting in steelmaking. For example, heat transfer properties of molten salts are essential to design applications to heat transfer fluids for fusion reactors, breeder reactors, and thermal energy storage systems. Then, thermal property data of molten salts with sufficient reliability are strongly required to select an optimum composition of salt mixture for the desired condition [1]. We also need thermal property data of molten iron at elevated temperature and continuous casting powder melts consisting of various oxide components; SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3, etc. for further improving the present continuous casting process for steel [2].

  2. A Diffusion Approximation and Numerical Methods for Adaptive Neuron Models with Stochastic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the spiking statistics of neurons receiving noisy synaptic input is a central problem in computational neuroscience. Monte Carlo approaches to this problem are computationally expensive and often fail to provide mechanistic insight. Thus, the field has seen the development of mathematical and numerical approaches, often relying on a Fokker-Planck formalism. These approaches force a compromise between biological realism, accuracy and computational efficiency. In this article we develop an extension of existing diffusion approximations to more accurately approximate the response of neurons with adaptation currents and noisy synaptic currents. The implementation refines existing numerical schemes for solving the associated Fokker-Planck equations to improve computationally efficiency and accuracy. Computer code implementing the developed algorithms is made available to the public. PMID:27148036

  3. A Diffusion Approximation and Numerical Methods for Adaptive Neuron Models with Stochastic Inputs.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the spiking statistics of neurons receiving noisy synaptic input is a central problem in computational neuroscience. Monte Carlo approaches to this problem are computationally expensive and often fail to provide mechanistic insight. Thus, the field has seen the development of mathematical and numerical approaches, often relying on a Fokker-Planck formalism. These approaches force a compromise between biological realism, accuracy and computational efficiency. In this article we develop an extension of existing diffusion approximations to more accurately approximate the response of neurons with adaptation currents and noisy synaptic currents. The implementation refines existing numerical schemes for solving the associated Fokker-Planck equations to improve computationally efficiency and accuracy. Computer code implementing the developed algorithms is made available to the public. PMID:27148036

  4. The effect of hydrogen bonding on the diffusion of water in n-alkanes and n-alcohols measured with a novel single microdroplet method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jonathan T.; Duncan, P. Brent; Momaya, Amit; Jutila, Arimatti; Needham, David

    2010-01-01

    While the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation predicts that the diffusion coefficient of a solute will be inversely proportional to the viscosity of the solvent, this relation is commonly known to fail for solutes, which are the same size or smaller than the solvent. Multiple researchers have reported that for small solutes, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the viscosity to a fractional power, and that solutes actually diffuse faster than SE predicts. For other solvent systems, attractive solute-solvent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, are known to retard the diffusion of a solute. Some researchers have interpreted the slower diffusion due to hydrogen bonding as resulting from the effective diffusion of a larger complex of a solute and solvent molecules. We have developed and used a novel micropipette technique, which can form and hold a single microdroplet of water while it dissolves in a diffusion controlled environment into the solvent. This method has been used to examine the diffusion of water in both n-alkanes and n-alcohols. It was found that the polar solute water, diffusing in a solvent with which it cannot hydrogen bond, closely resembles small nonpolar solutes such as xenon and krypton diffusing in n-alkanes, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 12.5×10-5 cm2/s for water in n-pentane to 1.15×10-5 cm2/s for water in hexadecane. Diffusion coefficients were found to be inversely proportional to viscosity to a fractional power, and diffusion coefficients were faster than SE predicts. For water diffusing in a solvent (n-alcohols) with which it can hydrogen bond, diffusion coefficient values ranged from 1.75×10-5 cm2/s in n-methanol to 0.364×10-5 cm2/s in n-octanol, and diffusion was slower than an alkane of corresponding viscosity. We find no evidence for solute-solvent complex diffusion. Rather, it is possible that the small solute water may be retarded by relatively longer residence times (compared to non-H-bonding solvents

  5. Application of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method to One-Dimensional Advection-Diffusion Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1999-01-01

    Test problems are used to examine the performance of several one-dimensional numerical schemes based on the space-time conservation and solution element (CE/SE) method. Investigated in this paper are the CE/SE schemes constructed previously for solving the linear unsteady advection-diffusion equation and the schemes derived here for solving the nonlinear viscous and inviscid Burgers equations. In comparison with the numerical solutions obtained using several traditional finite-difference schemes with similar accuracy, the CE/SE solutions display much lower numerical dissipation and dispersion errors.

  6. Determination of the helium diffusion coefficient in nuclear waste storage ceramics by a nuclear reaction analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, Dominique; Trocellier, Patrick; Serruys, Yves

    2002-06-01

    Host matrices for actinide immobilisation will undergo the formation of large helium quantities due to alpha decay. Helium diffusion rate has to be known in order to predict the long-term behaviour of the material, and particularly, the influence of helium accumulation on mechanical properties. A nuclear reaction analysis method, namely the 3He(d, p) 4He reaction, has been used to analyse the evolution of 3He profiles after ion implantations at 1 and 3 MeV in two materials, monoclinic ZrO 2 (as a test material) and Ca 9Nd(PO 4) 5(SiO 4)F 1.5(OH) 0.5 britholite (envisaged for Am and Pu long-term storage). Two data processing methods are used: the classical excitation curve (proton yields versus deuteron energy) and second, the proton energy spectrum for a given deuteron energy. The characteristics of the 3He profiles (depth, width) obtained by both methods are compared to SRIM estimations. Their evolution during subsequent annealings allows an estimation of the helium diffusion rate in the britholite: D ( cm2/ s)=(2.5±1.5)×10 -4exp(-(1.07±0.03 eV)/ kT) in the temperature range 200-400 °C, in agreement with previous results on similar materials. Moreover, the shape of the proton energy spectra suggests channeling effects in britholite.

  7. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  8. A fast accurate approximation method with multigrid solver for two-dimensional fractional sub-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xue-lei; Lu, Xin; Ng, Micheal K.; Sun, Hai-Wei

    2016-10-01

    A fast accurate approximation method with multigrid solver is proposed to solve a two-dimensional fractional sub-diffusion equation. Using the finite difference discretization of fractional time derivative, a block lower triangular Toeplitz matrix is obtained where each main diagonal block contains a two-dimensional matrix for the Laplacian operator. Our idea is to make use of the block ɛ-circulant approximation via fast Fourier transforms, so that the resulting task is to solve a block diagonal system, where each diagonal block matrix is the sum of a complex scalar times the identity matrix and a Laplacian matrix. We show that the accuracy of the approximation scheme is of O (ɛ). Because of the special diagonal block structure, we employ the multigrid method to solve the resulting linear systems. The convergence of the multigrid method is studied. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the accuracy of the proposed approximation scheme and the efficiency of the proposed solver.

  9. Highly sensitive determination method for total carbonate in water samples by flow injection analysis coupled with gas-diffusion separation.

    PubMed

    Oshima, M; Wei, Y; Yamamoto, M; Tanaka, H; Takayanagi, T; Motomizu, S

    2001-11-01

    A spectrophotometric method for the determination of total carbonate in water samples was developed. The method is based on the color change of an acid-base indicator in relation to the concentration of permeable gas substances through a membrane. By using a new portable FIA system equipped with a gas-diffusion unit, a highly sensitive and on-site determination of total carbonate in aqueous solutions was investigated. A new color-change system with 4-(2',4'-dinitrophenylazo)-1-naphthol-5-sulfonic acid (DNN5S) was developed. Absorbance changes of the reagent solution were measured at 450 nm with a light-emitting diode (LED) as a light source. A new type of gas-diffusion unit was used, and was constructed with double tubing: the inner tubing was a micro porous PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tubing (1.0 mm inner diameter and 1.8 mm outer diameter, pore size 2 microns, porosity 50%); the outer tubing was made of glass with 2.0 mm inner diameter. The optimized system conditions were as follows: the sample size was 200 microliters, the temperature of the air bath for the gas-diffusion unit was 25 degrees C, and the length of the gas-diffusion unit was 15 cm; each flow rate was 0.3 ml min-1. For measuring carbonate at low concentrations, a method for preparing water with less carbonate was proposed: the carbonate content of the water was decreased down to 5 x 10(-7) M. The calibration graph was rectilinear from 1 x 10(-6) M to 10(-3) M, and the detection limit (corresponding to a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) was 1 x 10(-6) M of carbonate. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of ten measurements of 2.3 x 10(-5) M Na2CO3 solution was 1.9%. The total carbonate in various kinds of water (such as river, sea, rain, distilled and ultra purified) was determined.

  10. A mass-conserved diffuse interface method and its application for incompressible multiphase flows with large density ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Shao, J. Y.; Wu, J.; Niu, X. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this work a mass-conserved diffuse interface method is proposed for simulating incompressible flows of binary fluids with large density ratio. In the method, a mass correction term is introduced into the Cahn-Hilliard equation to compensate the mass losses or offset the mass increases caused by the numerical and modeling diffusion. Since the mass losses or increases are through the phase interfaces and at each time step, their values are very small, to keep mass conservation, mass sources or sinks are introduced and uniformly distributed in the volume of diffuse layer. With the uniform distribution, the mass correction term representing mass sources or sinks is derived analytically by applying mass conservation principle. By including the mass correction, the modified Cahn-Hilliard equation is solved by the fifth-order upwind scheme to capture the phase field of the bindery fluids. The flow field is simulated by the newly-developed multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver [20]. The proposed approach is validated by simulating the Laplace law, the merging of two bubbles, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and bubble rising under gravity with density ratio of 1000 and viscosity ratio of 100. Numerical results of interface shapes and flow properties agree well with both analytical solutions and benchmark data in the literature. Numerical results also show that the mass is well-conserved in all cases considered. In addition, it is demonstrated that the mass correction term at each time step is in the order of 10-4 ∼10-5, which is a small number compared with the magnitude of order parameter.

  11. A method to account for acoustic microstreaming when predicting bubble growth rates produced by rectified diffusion.

    PubMed

    Church, C C

    1988-11-01

    A reinterpretation of existing theory for rectified diffusion, the process by which bubbles in a sound field may grow in radius, is presented in order to quantitate the effect of acoustic microstreaming on bubble growth rates. The 1/t term in the growth rate equation is defined as the "decay term" and t as the "decay time," the time required for the gas concentration in the liquid contacting the bubble to rise (or fall) from its initial to its final value. In the absence of microstreaming, t is the duration of sonification. In the presence of microstreaming, t may be calculated from the streaming velocity and the bubble radius. A comparison between theory and the experimental results of Eller [A. Eller, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 46, 1246-1250 (1969)] and of Gould [R.K. Gould, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 56, 1740-1746 (1974)] shows reasonable agreement in the low kHz range. Theoretical results in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz at 1 and 4 bar are also presented.

  12. A new, coupled transport-diffusion method for radiative transfer calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaber, A. B.; Warsa, J. S.

    2013-07-01

    We derive and present a new frequency- and angle-integrated low-order system of equations designed to enhance the accuracy of a coupled, high-order (transport) solution of the thermal radiative transfer equations. In particular, our new low-order system is designed to use intensity-weighted opacities and anisotropic diffusion coefficients generated by a solution of the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations in order to predict the spatial dependence of the material temperature and radiation energies in the ensuing time cycle. The predicted temperature solution can then be exploited to generate appropriately time-centered opacities, specific heats, and Planck emission spectra for the upcoming IMC solution. Additionally, the relatively inexpensive solution of the low-order system can be iteratively solved to recommend an adaptive time step size before the IMC solution is computed. A test implementation has been implemented using existing software available from the Jayenne and Capsaicin projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We present initial results from a new driver code that has integrated these stochastic and deterministic software packages. (authors)

  13. A comparative study of penalization and phase field methods for the solution of the diffusion equation in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauriello, Gerardo; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2015-02-01

    We present a comparative study of penalization and phase field methods for the solution of the diffusion equation in complex geometries embedded using simple Cartesian meshes. The two methods have been widely employed to solve partial differential equations in complex and moving geometries for applications ranging from solid and fluid mechanics to biology and geophysics. Their popularity is largely due to their discretization on Cartesian meshes thus avoiding the need to create body-fitted grids. At the same time, there are questions regarding their accuracy and it appears that the use of each one is confined by disciplinary boundaries. Here, we compare penalization and phase field methods to handle problems with Neumann and Robin boundary conditions. We discuss extensions for Dirichlet boundary conditions and in turn compare with methods that have been explicitly designed to handle Dirichlet boundary conditions. The accuracy of all methods is analyzed using one and two dimensional benchmark problems such as the flow induced by an oscillating wall and by a cylinder performing rotary oscillations. This comparative study provides information to decide which methods to consider for a given application and their incorporation in broader computational frameworks. We demonstrate that phase field methods are more accurate than penalization methods on problems with Neumann boundary conditions and we present an error analysis explaining this result.

  14. An Efficient Method of Modeling Material Properties Using a Thermal Diffusion Analogy: An Example Based on Craniofacial Bone

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Julian L.; Dumont, Elizabeth R.; Strait, David S.; Grosse, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to incorporate detailed geometry into finite element models has allowed researchers to investigate the influence of morphology on performance aspects of skeletal components. This advance has also allowed researchers to explore the effect of different material models, ranging from simple (e.g., isotropic) to complex (e.g., orthotropic), on the response of bone. However, bone's complicated geometry makes it difficult to incorporate complex material models into finite element models of bone. This difficulty is due to variation in the spatial orientation of material properties throughout bone. Our analysis addresses this problem by taking full advantage of a finite element program's ability to solve thermal-structural problems. Using a linear relationship between temperature and modulus, we seeded specific nodes of the finite element model with temperatures. We then used thermal diffusion to propagate the modulus throughout the finite element model. Finally, we solved for the mechanical response of the finite element model to the applied loads and constraints. We found that using the thermal diffusion analogy to control the modulus of bone throughout its structure provides a simple and effective method of spatially varying modulus. Results compare favorably against both experimental data and results from an FE model that incorporated a complex (orthotropic) material model. This method presented will allow researchers the ability to easily incorporate more material property data into their finite element models in an effort to improve the model's accuracy. PMID:21347288

  15. A combined kick-out and dissociative diffusion mechanism of grown-in Be in InGaAs and InGaAsP. A new finite difference-Bairstow method for solution of the diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koumetz, Serge D. Martin, Patrick; Murray, Hugues

    2014-09-14

    Experimental results on the diffusion of grown-in beryllium (Be) in indium gallium arsenide (In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As) and indium gallium arsenide phosphide (In{sub 0.73}Ga{sub 0.27}As{sub 0.58}P{sub 0.42}) gas source molecular beam epitaxy alloys lattice-matched to indium phosphide (InP) can be successfully explained in terms of a combined kick-out and dissociative diffusion mechanism, involving neutral Be interstitials (Be{sub i}{sup 0}), singly positively charged gallium (Ga), indium (In) self-interstitials (I{sub III}{sup +}) and singly positively charged Ga, In vacancies (V{sub III}{sup +}). A new numerical method of solution to the system of diffusion equations, based on the finite difference approximations and Bairstow's method, is proposed.

  16. A Monte Carlo Synthetic-Acceleration Method for Solving the Thermal Radiation Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M; Mosher, Scott W; Slattery, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diusion equation in three dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that not only can our Monte Carlo method be an eective solver for sparse matrix systems, but also that it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned Conjugate Gradient while producing numerically identical results. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  17. Diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry with visible light: comparison of four different methods in a tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, John; Palmqvist, Dorte; Plomgård, Peter; Greisen, Gorm

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare algorithms of four methods (plus two modifications) for spectrophotometric haemoglobin saturation measurements. Comparison was made in tissue phantoms basically consisting of a phosphate buffer, Intralipid and blood, allowing samples to be taken for reference measurements. Three experimental series were made. In experiment A (eight phantoms) we used the Knoefel method and measured specific extinction coefficients with a reflection spectrophotometer. In experiment B (six phantoms) the fully oxygenated phantoms were gradually deoxygenated with baker's yeast, and simultaneous measurements were made with our spectrophotometer and with a reference oxymeter (ABL-605) in 3 min intervals. For each spectrophotometric measurement haemoglobin saturation was calculated with all algorithms and modifications, and compared with reference. In experiment C (11 phantoms) we evaluated the ability of a modification of the Knoefel method to measure haemoglobin concentration in absolute quantities using extinction coefficients from experiment A. Results. Experiment A: with the Knoefel method extinction coefficients (±SD) for oxyhaemoglobin at 553.04 and 573.75 nm were 1.117 (±0.0396) ODmM-1 and 1.680 (± 0.0815) ODmM-1, respectively, and for deoxyhaemoglobin 1.205 (± 0.0514) ODmM-1 and 0.953 (±0.0487) ODmM-1, respectively. Experiment B: high correlation with the reference was found in all methods (r = 0.94-0.97). However, agreement varied from evidently wrong in method 3 and the original method 4 (e.g. saturation above 160%) to high agreement in method 2 as well as the modifications of methods 1 and 4, where oxygen dissociation curves were close to the reference method. Experiment C: with the modified Knoefel method the mean haemoglobin concentration difference from reference was 8.3% and the correlation was high (r = 0.91). We conclude that method 2 and the modifications of 1 and 4 were superior to the others, but depended on known values in

  18. A novel multiple headspace extraction gas chromatographic method for measuring the diffusion coefficient of methanol in water and in olive oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2015-03-13

    A novel method for the determination of the diffusion coefficient (D) of methanol in water and olive oil has been developed. Based on multiple headspace extraction gas chromatography (MHE-GC), the methanol released from the liquid sample of interest in a closed sample vial was determined in a stepwise fashion. A theoretical model was derived to establish the relationship between the diffusion coefficient and the GC signals from MHE-GC measurements. The results showed that the present method has an excellent precision (RSD<1%) in the linear fitting procedure and good accuracy for the diffusion coefficients of methanol in both water and olive oil, when compared with data reported in the literature. The present method is simple and practical and can be a valuable tool for the determination of the diffusion coefficient of volatile analyte(s) into food simulants from food and beverage packaging material, both in research studies and in actual applications.

  19. Using the apparent diffusion coefficient to identifying MGMT promoter methylation status early in glioblastoma: importance of analytical method

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle-Thiele, Dayle; Day, Bryan; Stringer, Brett; Fay, Michael; Martin, Jennifer; Jeffree, Rosalind L; Thomas, Paul; Bell, Christopher; Salvado, Olivier; Gal, Yaniv; Coulthard, Alan; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2015-06-15

    Accurate knowledge of O{sup 6}-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter subtype in patients with glioblastoma (GBM) is important for treatment. However, this test is not always available. Pre-operative diffusion MRI (dMRI) can be used to probe tumour biology using the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC); however, its ability to act as a surrogate to predict MGMT status has shown mixed results. We investigated whether this was due to variations in the method used to analyse ADC. We undertook a retrospective study of 32 patients with GBM who had MGMT status measured. Matching pre-operative MRI data were used to calculate the ADC within contrast enhancing regions of tumour. The relationship between ADC and MGMT was examined using two published ADC methods. A strong trend between a measure of ‘minimum ADC’ and methylation status was seen. An elevated minimum ADC was more likely in the methylated compared to the unmethylated MGMT group (U = 56, P = 0.0561). In contrast, utilising a two-mixture model histogram approach, a significant reduction in mean measure of the ‘low ADC’ component within the histogram was associated with an MGMT promoter methylation subtype (P < 0.0246). This study shows that within the same patient cohort, the method selected to analyse ADC measures has a significant bearing on the use of that metric as a surrogate marker of MGMT status. Thus for dMRI data to be clinically useful, consistent methods of data analysis need to be established prior to establishing any relationship with genetic or epigenetic profiling.

  20. Anti-Bacterial effect of Aqueous Garlic Extract (AGE) determined by Disc Diffusion Method against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Saha, S; Saha, S K; Hossain, M A; Paul, S K; Gomes, R R; Imtiaz, M; Islam, M M; Nahar, H; Begum, S A; Mirza, T T

    2016-01-01

    The study was performed to determine the antibacterial effect of aqueous extract of garlic (Allium sativum) against standard strain of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. An interventional study was conducted in Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in collaboration with Department of Microbiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh. Antibacterial effect of AGE was determined by disc diffusion method. Sensitivity of AGE determined in disc diffusion and the zone of inhibition (ZOI) was 4 mm, 10 mm and 20 mm at 25 μg/10 μl, 50 μg/10 μl and 100 μg/10 μl concentrations respectively. From the findings it is clearly determined the extract has definite antibacterial effect upon Escherichia coli. Further studies are required to detect and isolate the active ingredients present in the Garlic extract as well as detail steps of mechanism responsible for antibacterial effect. Then their effects against the studied organism should be studied in vivo separately and its toxicity profile should also be taken into account.

  1. Experimental method development for estimating solid-phase diffusion coefficients and material/air partition coefficients of SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Roache, Nancy F.

    2014-06-01

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material/air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to estimate parameters Dm and Kma. The SVOCs chosen for study were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, including PCB-52, PCB-66, PCB-101, PCB-110, and PCB-118. The test materials included polypropylene, high density polyethylene, low density polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyether ether ketone, glass, stainless steel and concrete. Two 53-L environmental chambers were connected in series, with the relatively stable SVOCs source in the source chamber and the test materials, made as small “buttons”, in the test chamber. Prior to loading the test chamber with the test materials, the test chamber had been dosed with SVOCs for 12 days to “coat” the chamber walls. During the tests, the material buttons were removed from the test chamber at different exposure times to determine the amount of SVOC absorbed by the buttons. SVOC concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the test chamber were also monitored. The data were used to estimate the partition and diffusion coefficients by fitting a sink model to the experimental data. The parameters obtained were employed to predict the accumulation of SVOCs in the sink materials using an existing mass transfer model. The model prediction agreed reasonably well with the experimental data.

  2. Diagnosis of breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy from 500 to 1600 nm: comparison of classification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachabé, Rami; Evers, Daniel J.; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; Lucassen, Gerald W.; van der Voort, Marjolein; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Peeters, Marie-Jeanne Vrancken; van der Hage, Jos A.; Oldenburg, Hester S.; Wesseling, Jelle; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the use of diffuse optical spectroscopy analysis of breast spectra acquired in the wavelength range from 500 to 1600 nm with a fiber optic probe. A total of 102 ex vivo samples of five different breast tissue types, namely adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma, and ductal carcinoma in situ from 52 patients were measured. A model deriving from the diffusion theory was applied to the measured spectra in order to extract clinically relevant parameters such as blood, water, lipid, and collagen volume fractions, β-carotene concentration, average vessels radius, reduced scattering amplitude, Mie slope, and Mie-to-total scattering fraction. Based on a classification and regression tree algorithm applied to the derived parameters, a sensitivity-specificity of 98%-99%, 84%-95%, 81%-98%, 91%-95%, and 83%-99% were obtained for discrimination of adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma, and ductal carcinoma in situ, respectively; and a multiple classes overall diagnostic performance of 94%. Sensitivity-specificity values obtained for discriminating malignant from nonmalignant tissue were compared to existing reported studies by applying the different classification methods that were used in each of these studies. Furthermore, in these reported studies, either lipid or β-carotene was considered as adipose tissue precursors. We estimate both chromophore concentrations and demonstrate that lipid is a better discriminator for adipose tissue than β-carotene.

  3. Deposition, structure and properties of polyamide-CdSe-CdS composite material using sorption-diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žalenkienė, S.; Krylova, V.; Baltrusaitis, J.

    2015-01-01

    Polyamide (PA) incorporated CdSe-CdS films were deposited using sorption-diffusion method. A single precursor - K2SeS2O6 was used as both sulfur and selenium source. In aqueous solution, SeS2O62- diffused into the polymer where it reacted with Cd2+ ions to form cadmium chalcogenide particles. Crystallinity of the composite material was analyzed via XRD and both CdSe and CdS were detected within the material at all deposition conditions of temperature and SeS2O62- - chalcogenization - exposure time. A complex surface speciation was obtained using XPS analysis. Formation of the protonated amide species was observed in combination with the adsorbed SO42- on the surface of the polymer confirming that SeS2O62- and its decomposition products hydrolyzed to form cadmium chalcogenides and H2SO4. A significant red shift in UV-vis spectrum was observed with the increasing chalcogenization time of PA, whereas Cd2+ solution temperature had very little effect on the apparent thickness and the optical properties of the composite materials. SEM surface analysis revealed sub-micron particles deposited on top of the PA-CdSe-CdS composite materials in continuous overlapping films, showing a possible dual crystal growth mechanism.

  4. Anti-Bacterial effect of Aqueous Garlic Extract (AGE) determined by Disc Diffusion Method against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Saha, S; Saha, S K; Hossain, M A; Paul, S K; Gomes, R R; Imtiaz, M; Islam, M M; Nahar, H; Begum, S A; Mirza, T T

    2016-01-01

    The study was performed to determine the antibacterial effect of aqueous extract of garlic (Allium sativum) against standard strain of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. An interventional study was conducted in Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in collaboration with Department of Microbiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh. Antibacterial effect of AGE was determined by disc diffusion method. Sensitivity of AGE determined in disc diffusion and the zone of inhibition (ZOI) was 4 mm, 10 mm and 20 mm at 25 μg/10 μl, 50 μg/10 μl and 100 μg/10 μl concentrations respectively. From the findings it is clearly determined the extract has definite antibacterial effect upon Escherichia coli. Further studies are required to detect and isolate the active ingredients present in the Garlic extract as well as detail steps of mechanism responsible for antibacterial effect. Then their effects against the studied organism should be studied in vivo separately and its toxicity profile should also be taken into account. PMID:26931244

  5. Realization of highly crystallographic three-dimensional nanosheets by a stress-induced oriented-diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Gharooni, M.; Hosseini, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S. Taghinejad, M.; Taghinejad, H.; Abdi, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Morphologically controlled nanostructures have been increasingly important because of their strongly shape dependent physical and chemical properties. Formation of nanoscale silicon based structures that employ high levels of strain, intentional, and unintentional twins or grain boundaries can be dramatically different from the commonly conceived bulk processes. We report, realization of highly crystallographic 3D nanosheets with unique morphology and ultra-thin thickness by a stress-induced oriented-diffusion method, based on plasma processing of metal layer deposited on Si substrate and its post deep reactive ion etching. Annealing in plasma ambient creates rod-like metal alloy precursors which induce stress at its interface with Si substrate due to the mismatch of lattice constants. This stress opens facilitated gateways for orientated-diffusion of metal atoms in 〈110〉 directions and leads to formation of NSs (nanosheets) with [111] crystalline essence. Nanosheets are mainly triangular, hexagonal, or pseudo hexagonal in shape and their thicknesses are well controlled from several to tens of nanometers. The structural and morphological evolution of features were investigated in detail using transmission electron microscope, atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope and possible mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the thermodynamically unfavorable morphology of nanosheets. Significant photoemission capability of NSs was also demonstrated by photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  6. Effect of Crystal Defects on Minority Carrier Diffusion Length in 6H SiC Measured Using the Electron Beam Induced Current Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1997-01-01

    We report values of minority carrier diffusion length in n-type 6H SiC measured using a planar Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) method. Values of hole diffusion length in defect free regions of n-type 6H SiC, with a doping concentration of 1.7El7 1/cu cm, ranged from 1.46 microns to 0.68 microns. We next introduce a novel variation of the planar method used above. This 'planar mapping' technique measured diffusion length along a linescan creating a map of diffusion length versus position. This map is then overlaid onto the EBIC image of the corresponding linescan, allowing direct visualization of the effect of defects on minority carrier diffusion length. Measurements of the above n-type 6H SiC resulted in values of hole diffusion length ranging from 1.2 micron in defect free regions to below 0.1 gm at the center of large defects. In addition, measurements on p-type 6H SiC resulted in electron diffusion lengths ranging from 1.42 micron to 0.8 micron.

  7. Comparison of passive diffusion bag samplers and submersible pump sampling methods for monitoring volatile organic compounds in ground water at Area 6, Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Raegan L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected in April 1999 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, with passive diffusion samplers and a submersible pump to compare concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water samples collected using the two sampling methods. Single diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 10-foot screened intervals, and multiple diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 20- to 40-foot screened intervals. The diffusion samplers were recovered after 20 days and the wells were then sampled using a submersible pump. VOC concentrations in the 10-foot screened wells in water samples collected with diffusion samplers closely matched concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump. Analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected from the 20- to 40-foot screened wells with multiple diffusion samplers indicated vertical concentration variation within the screened interval, whereas the analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump indicated mixing during pumping. The results obtained using the two sampling methods indicate that the samples collected with the diffusion samplers were comparable with and can be considerably less expensive than samples collected using a submersible pump.

  8. Numerical evaluation of subsoil diffusion of (15) N labelled denitrification products during employment of the (15) N gas flux method in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Ruoss, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Common methods for measuring soil denitrification in situ include monitoring the accumulation of 15N labelled N2 and N2O evolved from 15N labelled soil nitrate pool in soil surface chambers. Gas diffusion is considered to be the main accumulation process. Because accumulation of the gases decreases concentration gradients between soil and chamber over time, gas production rates are underestimated if calculated from chamber concentrations. Moreover, concentration gradients to the non-labelled subsoil exist, inevitably causing downward diffusion of 15N labelled denitrification products. A numerical model for simulating gas diffusion in soil was used in order to determine the significance of this source of error. Results show that subsoil diffusion of 15N labelled N2 and N2O - and thus potential underestimation of denitrification derived from chamber fluxes - increases with cover closure time as well as with increasing diffusivity. Simulations based on the range of typical gas diffusivities of unsaturated soils show that the fraction of subsoil diffusion after chamber closure for 1 hour is always significant with values up to >30 % of total production of 15N labelled N2 and N2O. Field experiments for measuring denitrification with the 15N gas flux method were conducted. The ability of the model to predict the time pattern of gas accumulation was evaluated by comparing measured 15N2 concentrations and simulated values.

  9. Accounting for dye diffusion and orientation when relating FRET measurements to distances: three simple computational methods.

    PubMed

    Walczewska-Szewc, Katarzyna; Corry, Ben

    2014-06-28

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) allows in principal for the structural changes of biological systems to be revealed by monitoring distributions and distance fluctuations between parts of individual molecules. However, because flexible probes usually have to be attached to the macromolecule to conduct these experiments, they suffer from uncertainty in probe positions and orientations. One of the way to address this issue is to use molecular dynamics simulations to explicitly model the likely positions of the probes, but, this is still not widely accessible because of the large computational effort required. Here we compare three simpler methods that can potentially replace MD simulations in FRET data interpretation. In the first, the volume accessible for dye movement is calculated using a fast, geometrical algorithm. The next method, adapted from the analysis of electron paramagnetic studies, utilises a library of rotamers describing probe conformations. The last method uses preliminary MD simulations of fluorescent dyes in solution, to identify all conformational states of dyes and overlays this on the macromolecular system. A comparison of these methods in the simple system of dye-labelled polyproline, shows that in the case of lack of interaction between the dye and host, all give results comparable with MD simulations but require much less time. Differences between these three methods and their ability to compete with MD simulations in the analysis of real experiment are demonstrated and discussed using the examples of cold shock protein and leucine transporter systems.

  10. A convenient method for calculation of ionic diffusion coefficients for accurate selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryahina, K.; Spanel, P.

    2005-07-01

    A method to calculate diffusion coefficients of ions important for the selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, is presented. The ions, on which this method is demonstrated, include the SIFT-MS precursors H3O+(H2O)0,1,2,3, NO.+(H2O)0,1,2 and O2+ and the product ions relevant to analysis of breath trace metabolites ammonia (NH3+(H2O)0,1,2, NH4+(H2O)0,1,2), acetaldehyde (C2H4OH+(H2O)0,1,2), acetone (CH3CO+, (CH3)2CO+, (CH3)2COH+(H2O)0,1, (CH3)2CO.NO+), ethanol (C2H5OHH+(H2O)0,1,2) and isoprene (C5H7+, C5H8+, C5H9+). Theoretical model of the (12, 4) potential for interaction between the ions and the helium atoms is used, with the repulsive part approximated by the mean hard-sphere cross section and the attractive part describing ion-induced dipole interactions. The reduced zero-field mobilities at 300 K are calculated using the Viehland and Mason theory [L.A. Viehland, S.L. Lin, E.A. Mason, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables, 60 (1995) 37-95], parameterised by a simple formula as a function of the mean hard-sphere cross section, and converted to diffusion coefficients using the Einstein relation. The method is tested on a set of experimental data for simple ions and cluster ions.

  11. Investigation of the electrochemically active surface area and lithium diffusion in graphite anodes by a novel OsO4 staining method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffmann, Lukas; Birkenmaier, Claudia; Müller, Marcus; Bauer, Werner; Mitsch, Tim; Feinauer, Julian; Krämer, Yvonne; Scheiba, Frieder; Hintennach, Andreas; Schleid, Thomas; Schmidt, Volker; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Negative electrodes of lithium-ion batteries generally consist of graphite-based active materials. In order to realize batteries with a high current density and therefore accelerated charging processes, the intercalation of lithium and the diffusion processes of these carbonaceous materials must be understood. In this paper, we visualized the electrochemical active surface area for three different anode materials using a novel OsO4 staining method in combination with scanning electron microscopy techniques. The diffusion behavior of these three anode materials is investigated by potentiostatic intermittent titration technique measurements. From those we determine the diffusion coefficient with and without consideration of the electrochemical active surface area.

  12. Optical microinterferometry method for evaluation of phase state and diffusion in ternary systems: phase separation in cellulose/N-Methylmorpholine-N-oxide/non-solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, V. V.; Antonov, S. V.; Anokhina, T. A.; Volkov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Microinterferometry technique was used to evaluate the phase state and diffusion of cellulose solutions N-Methylmorpholine-N-oxide upon contact with non-solvents (water and aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol). The method was helpful in visualization of the structure of the forming cellulose film in connection with the diffusivity of the components of the systems. The interdiffusion coefficient were determined. Isopropyl alcohol addition to water slows down the diffusion of the coagulant into the cellulose solution thus delaying cellulose precipitation. Increase of temperature leads to formation of less dense cellulose film morphology with large vacuoles.

  13. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Walsh, Stuart D. C.; DuFrane, Wyatt L.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining “effective linear activity coefficients” (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  14. Determination of diffusion profiles in altered wellbore cement using X-ray computed tomography methods.

    PubMed

    Mason, Harris E; Walsh, Stuart D C; DuFrane, Wyatt L; Carroll, Susan A

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining "effective linear activity coefficients" (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment. PMID:24869420

  15. The augmented Lagrangian method for estimating the diffusion coefficient in an elliptic equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Kunisch, K.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid method is presented for the estimation of parameters, combining the output-least-squares and the equation-error approaches. The mathematical framework is given by an augmented Lagrangian formulation. The resulting algorithm has proved to be very effective numerically.

  16. The agar diffusion scratch assay - A novel method to assess the bioactive and cytotoxic potential of new materials and compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pusnik, Mascha; Imeri, Minire; Deppierraz, Grégoire; Bruinink, Arie; Zinn, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    A profound in vitro evaluation not only of the cytotoxic but also of bioactive potential of a given compound or material is crucial for predicting potential effects in the in vivo situation. However, most of the current methods have weaknesses in either the quantitative or qualitative assessment of cytotoxicity and/or bioactivity of the test compound. Here we describe a novel assay combining the ISO 10993-5 agar diffusion test and the scratch also termed wound healing assay. In contrast to these original tests this assay is able to detect and distinguish between cytotoxic, cell migration modifying and cytotoxic plus cell migration modifying compounds, and this at higher sensitivity and in a quantitative way. PMID:26861591

  17. Synthesis of size controllable cu-phthalocyanine nanofibers by simple solvent diffusion method and their electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junshan; Cheng, Chuanwei; Zhou, Xuechao; Li, Yingying; Xu, Xiaoqi; Du, Xiguang; Zhang, Haiqian

    2010-02-15

    Tetra (2-isopropyl-5-methylphenoxy) substituted Cu-phthalocyanine nanofibers were obtained in large scale by a simple solvent diffusion method. The sizes of the fibers can be finely tuned under different solvent temperature. FE-SEM micrographs indicate that the length of the fibers changed from several hundreds micrometers to several hundreds nanometers and the width changed from several micrometers to several decade nanometers. XRD measurement showed a highly long-range ordered lamellar arrangement of the substituted Cu-phthalocyanine molecules in the microfiber and the UV-vis absorption spectrum of the fibers indicated an H-aggregate of the phthalocyanine molecules. The CV curves elucidate the CuPc fibers can be fabricated Faraday pseudocapacitor.

  18. A practical method of determining water current velocities and diffusion coefficients in coastal waters by remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, W. P.

    1971-01-01

    A simplified procedure is presented for determining water current velocities and diffusion coefficients. Dye drops which form dye patches in the receiving water are made from an aircraft. The changes in position and size of the patches are recorded from two flights over the area. The simplified data processing procedure requires only that the ground coordinates about the dye patches be determined at the time of each flight. With an automatic recording coordinatograph for measuring coordinates and a computer for processing the data, this technique provides a practical method of determining circulation patterns and mixing characteristics of large aquatic systems. This information is useful in assessing the environmental impact of waste water discharges and for industrial plant siting.

  19. Third order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods for time dependent convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular meshes

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zheng; Huang, Hongying; Yan, Jue

    2015-12-21

    We develop 3rd order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods [8], [9], [19] and [21] for convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular mesh. We carefully calculate the normal derivative numerical flux across element edges and prove that, with proper choice of parameter pair (β0,β1) in the numerical flux formula, the quadratic polynomial solution satisfies strict maximum principle. The polynomial solution is bounded within the given range and third order accuracy is maintained. There is no geometric restriction on the meshes and obtuse triangles are allowed in the partition. As a result, a sequence of numerical examples are carried out to demonstratemore » the accuracy and capability of the maximum-principle-satisfying limiter.« less

  20. Boundary condition at a two-phase interface in the lattice Boltzmann method for the convection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Hayashi, Hidemitsu; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Fukuzawa, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    A boundary scheme in the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for the convection-diffusion equation, which correctly realizes the internal boundary condition at the interface between two phases with different transport properties, is presented. The difficulty in satisfying the continuity of flux at the interface in a transient analysis, which is inherent in the conventional LBM, is overcome by modifying the collision operator and the streaming process of the LBM. An asymptotic analysis of the scheme is carried out in order to clarify the role played by the adjustable parameters involved in the scheme. As a result, the internal boundary condition is shown to be satisfied with second-order accuracy with respect to the lattice interval, if we assign appropriate values to the adjustable parameters. In addition, two specific problems are numerically analyzed, and comparison with the analytical solutions of the problems numerically validates the proposed scheme.

  1. Third order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods for time dependent convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng; Huang, Hongying; Yan, Jue

    2015-12-21

    We develop 3rd order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods [8], [9], [19] and [21] for convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular mesh. We carefully calculate the normal derivative numerical flux across element edges and prove that, with proper choice of parameter pair (β01) in the numerical flux formula, the quadratic polynomial solution satisfies strict maximum principle. The polynomial solution is bounded within the given range and third order accuracy is maintained. There is no geometric restriction on the meshes and obtuse triangles are allowed in the partition. As a result, a sequence of numerical examples are carried out to demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the maximum-principle-satisfying limiter.

  2. A new method for determining the initial mobile formaldehyde concentrations, partition coefficients, and diffusion coefficients of dry building materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yinping

    2009-07-01

    The initial mobile formaldehyde concentration, C(m,0); the partition coefficient, K; and the diffusion coefficient, D, of a dry building material are key parameters to characterize formaldehyde emissions from the building material. The solvent extraction method and direct thermal desorption method can overestimate C(m,0) because of high temperature. A new method has been developed to determine C(m,0) under similar conditions to common indoor environment, together with K and D. In the proposed method, the tested materials are placed in an airtight environmental chamber for which the temperature can be controlled by a water bath, then the materials undergo a multisorption/emission process and the instantaneous formaldehyde concentration in the chamber is recorded. The K and C(m,0) are determined from the equilibrium concentrations after every sorption by means of the linear least-square regression, and D is obtained by fitting the concentration at the emission stage into a mass-transfer-based model in the literature. Four kinds of wooden medium-density boards are tested. The C(m,0) measured using this method is the mobile formaldehyde concentration in the material, which differs significantly from the total formaldehyde concentration in the material measured by using the traditional method recommended by the Chinese standard (GB/T 17657-1999) extraction method. This means that the mobile formaldehyde takes only a small portion of the total quantity in the tested material. The K, D, and C(m,0) values measured using this new method are used to predict formaldehyde concentrations for sorption processes. The results agree well with experimental data. In addition, some factors influencing the accuracy are analyzed.

  3. Informed RESTORE: A method for robust estimation of diffusion tensor from low redundancy datasets in the presence of physiological noise artifacts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lin-Ching; Walker, Lindsay; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2012-11-01

    Physiological noise artifacts, especially those originating from cardiac pulsation and subject motion, are common in clinical Diffusion tensor-MRI acquisitions. Previous works show that signal perturbations produced by artifacts can be severe and neglecting to account for their contribution can result in erroneous diffusion tensor values. The Robust Estimation of Tensors by Outlier Rejection (RESTORE) method has been shown to be an effective strategy for improving tensor estimation on a voxel-by-voxel basis in the presence of artifactual data points in diffusion-weighted images. In this article, we address potential instabilities that may arise when using RESTORE and propose practical constraints to improve its usability. Moreover, we introduce a method, called informed RESTORE designed to remove physiological noise artifacts in datasets acquired with low redundancy (less than 30-40 diffusion-weighted image volumes)--a condition in which the original RESTORE algorithm may converge to an incorrect solution. This new method is based on the notion that physiological noise is more likely to result in signal dropouts than signal increases. Results from both Monte Carlo simulation and clinical diffusion data indicate that informed RESTORE performs very well in removing physiological noise artifacts for low redundancy diffusion-weighted image datasets.

  4. Application of the space-time conservation element and solution element method to two-dimensional advection-diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1995-01-01

    The existing 2-D alpha-mu scheme and alpha-epsilon scheme based on the method of space-time conservation element and solution element, which were constructed for solving the linear 2-D unsteady advection-diffusion equation and unsteady advection equation, respectively, are tested. Also, the alpha-epsilon scheme is modified to become the V-E scheme for solving the nonlinear 2-D inviscid Burgers equation. Numerical solutions of six test problems are presented in comparison with their exact solutions or numerical solutions obtained by traditional finite-difference or finite-element methods. It is demonstrated that the 2-D alpha-mu, alpha-epsilon, and nu-epsilon schemes can be used to obtain numerical results which are more accurate than those based on some of the traditional methods but without using any artificial tuning in the computation. Similar to the previous 1-D test problems, the high accuracy and simplicity features of the space-time conservation element and solution element method have been revealed again in the present 2-D test results.

  5. Estimation of the effective phase function of bulk diffusing materials with the inverse adding-doubling method.

    PubMed

    Leyre, Sven; Meuret, Youri; Durinck, Guy; Hofkens, Johan; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of optical simulations including bulk diffusors is heavily dependent on the accuracy of the bulk scattering properties. If no knowledge on the physical scattering effects is available, an iterative procedure is usually used to obtain the scattering properties, such as the inverse Monte Carlo method or the inverse adding-doubling (AD) method. In these methods, a predefined phase function with one free parameter is usually used to limit the number of free parameters. In this work, three predefined phase functions (Henyey-Greenstein, two-term Henyey-Greenstein, and Gegenbauer kernel (GK) phase function) are implemented in the inverse AD method to determine the optical properties of two strongly diffusing materials: low-density polyethylene and TiO₂ particles. Using the presented approach, an estimation of the effective phase function was made. It was found that the use of the GK phase function resulted in the best agreement between calculated and experimental transmittance, reflectance, and scattered radiant intensity distribution for the LDPE sample. For the TiO₂ sample, a good agreement was obtained with both the two-term Henyey-Greenstein and the GK phase function. PMID:24787170

  6. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovoi, A.; Mattea, C.; Herrmann, A.; Rössler, E. A.; Stapf, S.; Fatkullin, N.

    2016-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time.

  7. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Lozovoi, A; Mattea, C; Herrmann, A; Rössler, E A; Stapf, S; Fatkullin, N

    2016-06-28

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time. PMID:27369489

  8. A Parameterization-Based Numerical Method for Isotropic and Anisotropic Diffusion Smoothing on Non-Flat Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anand A.; Shattuck, David W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging data, such as 3-D maps of cortical thickness or neural activation, can often be analyzed more informatively with respect to the cortical surface rather than the entire volume of the brain. Any cortical surface-based analysis should be carried out using computations in the intrinsic geometry of the surface rather than using the metric of the ambient 3-D space. We present parameterization-based numerical methods for performing isotropic and anisotropic filtering on triangulated surface geometries. In contrast to existing FEM-based methods for triangulated geometries, our approach accounts for the metric of the surface. In order to discretize and numerically compute the isotropic and anisotropic geometric operators, we first parameterize the surface using a p-harmonic mapping. We then use this parameterization as our computational domain and account for the surface metric while carrying out isotropic and anisotropic filtering. To validate our method, we compare our numerical results to the analytical expression for isotropic diffusion on a spherical surface. We apply these methods to smoothing of mean curvature maps on the cortical surface, a step commonly required for analysis of gyrification or for registering surface-based maps across subjects. PMID:19423447

  9. A two-zone method with an enhanced accuracy for a numerical solution of the diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Jin-Sik; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Oh, Je-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2006-12-01

    A variational principle is applied to the diffusion equation to numerically obtain the fission gas release from a spherical grain. The two-zone method, originally proposed by Matthews and Wood, is modified to overcome its insufficient accuracy for a low release. The results of the variational approaches are examined by observing the gas concentration along the grain radius. At the early stage, the concentration near the grain boundary is higher than that at the inner points of the grain in the cases of the two-zone method as well as the finite element analysis with the number of the elements at as many as 10. The accuracy of the two-zone method is considerably enhanced by relocating the nodal points of the two zones. The trial functions are derived as a function of the released fraction. During the calculations, the number of degrees of freedom needs to be reduced to guarantee physically admissible concentration profiles. Numerical verifications are performed extensively. By taking a computational time comparable to the algorithm by Forsberg and Massih, the present method provides a solution with reasonable accuracy in the whole range of the released fraction.

  10. High-Order Homogenization Method in Diffusion Theory for Reactor Core Simulation and Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Farzad Rahnema

    2003-09-30

    Most modern nodal methods in use by the reactor vendors and utilities are based on the generalized equivalence theory (GET) that uses homogenized cross sections and flux discontinuity factors. These homogenized parameters, referred to as infinite medium parameters, are precomputed by performing single bundle fine-mesh calculations with zero current boundary conditions. It is known that for configurations in which the node-to-node leakage (e.g., surface current-to-flux ratio) is large the use of the infinite medium parameters could lead to large errors in the nodal solution. This would be the case for highly heterogeneous core configurations, typical of modern reactor core designs.

  11. Synergy of β-Lactams with Vancomycin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Correlation of Disk Diffusion and Checkerboard Methods.

    PubMed

    Sy, Cheng Len; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chen, Chii Shiang; Chen, Yao-Shen; Tsai, Hung-Chin; Wann, Shue-Renn; Wu, Kuan-Sheng; Chen, Jui-Kuang; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Liu, Yung-Ching

    2016-03-01

    Modified disk diffusion (MDD) and checkerboard tests were employed to assess the synergy of combinations of vancomycin and β-lactam antibiotics for 59 clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Mu50 (ATCC 700699). Bacterial inocula equivalent to 0.5 and 2.0 McFarland standard were inoculated on agar plates containing 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 μg/ml of vancomycin. Oxacillin-, cefazolin-, and cefoxitin-impregnated disks were applied to the surface, and the zones of inhibition were measured at 24 h. The CLSI-recommended checkerboard method was used as a reference to detect synergy. The MICs for vancomycin were determined using the Etest method, broth microdilution, and the Vitek 2 automated system. Synergy was observed with the checkerboard method in 51% to 60% of the isolates when vancomycin was combined with any β-lactam. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices were significantly lower in MRSA isolates with higher vancomycin MIC combinations (P < 0.05). The overall agreement between the MDD and checkerboard methods to detect synergy in MRSA isolates with bacterial inocula equivalent to McFarland standard 0.5 were 33.0% and 62.5% for oxacillin, 45.1% and 52.4% for cefazolin, and 43.1% and 52.4% for cefoxitin when combined with 0.5 and 2 μg/ml of vancomycin, respectively. Based on our study, the simple MDD method is not recommended as a replacement for the checkerboard method to detect synergy. However, it may serve as an initial screening method for the detection of potential synergy when it is not feasible to perform other labor-intensive synergy tests. PMID:26677253

  12. Advanced computational methods for nodal diffusion, Monte Carlo, and S{sub N} problems. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    This document describes progress on five efforts for improving effectiveness of computational methods for particle diffusion and transport problems in nuclear engineering: (1) Multigrid methods for obtaining rapidly converging solutions of nodal diffusion problems. A alternative line relaxation scheme is being implemented into a nodal diffusion code. Simplified P2 has been implemented into this code. (2) Local Exponential Transform method for variance reduction in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. This work yielded predictions for both 1-D and 2-D x-y geometry better than conventional Monte Carlo with splitting and Russian Roulette. (3) Asymptotic Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN problems. New transport differencing schemes have been obtained that allow solution by the conjugate gradient method, and the convergence of this approach is rapid. (4) Quasidiffusion (QD) methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN Problems on irregular spatial grids. A symmetrized QD method has been developed in a form that results in a system of two self-adjoint equations that are readily discretized and efficiently solved. (5) Response history method for speeding up the Monte Carlo calculation of electron transport problems. This method was implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. In addition, we have developed and implemented a parallel time-dependent Monte Carlo code on two massively parallel processors.

  13. A robust and scalable microfluidic metering method that allows protein crystal growth by free interface diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Carl L.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Berger, James M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Producing robust and scalable fluid metering in a microfluidic device is a challenging problem. We developed a scheme for metering fluids on the picoliter scale that is scalable to highly integrated parallel architectures and is independent of the properties of the working fluid. We demonstrated the power of this method by fabricating and testing a microfluidic chip for rapid screening of protein crystallization conditions, a major hurdle in structural biology efforts. The chip has 480 active valves and performs 144 parallel reactions, each of which uses only 10 nl of protein sample. The properties of microfluidic mixing allow an efficient kinetic trajectory for crystallization, and the microfluidic device outperforms conventional techniques by detecting more crystallization conditions while using 2 orders of magnitude less protein sample. We demonstrate that diffraction-quality crystals may be grown and harvested from such nanoliter-volume reactions. PMID:12486223

  14. A method for efficient calculation of diffusion and reactions of lipophilic compounds in complex cell geometry.

    PubMed

    Dreij, Kristian; Chaudhry, Qasim Ali; Jernström, Bengt; Morgenstern, Ralf; Hanke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A general description of effects of toxic compounds in mammalian cells is facing several problems. Firstly, most toxic compounds are hydrophobic and partition phenomena strongly influence their behaviour. Secondly, cells display considerable heterogeneity regarding the presence, activity and distribution of enzymes participating in the metabolism of foreign compounds i.e. bioactivation/biotransformation. Thirdly, cellular architecture varies greatly. Taken together, complexity at several levels has to be addressed to arrive at efficient in silico modelling based on physicochemical properties, metabolic preferences and cell characteristics. In order to understand the cellular behaviour of toxic foreign compounds we have developed a mathematical model that addresses these issues. In order to make the system numerically treatable, methods motivated by homogenization techniques have been applied. These tools reduce the complexity of mathematical models of cell dynamics considerably thus allowing to solve efficiently the partial differential equations in the model numerically on a personal computer. Compared to a compartment model with well-stirred compartments, our model affords a more realistic representation. Numerical results concerning metabolism and chemical solvolysis of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogen show good agreement with results from measurements in V79 cell culture. The model can easily be extended and refined to include more reactants, and/or more complex reaction chains, enzyme distribution etc, and is therefore suitable for modelling cellular metabolism involving membrane partitioning also at higher levels of complexity.

  15. A Method to Determine the Ability of Drugs to Diffuse through the Blood- Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelig, Anna; Gottschlich, Rudolf; Devant, Ralf M.

    1994-01-01

    A method has been devised for predicting the ability of drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier. The criteria depend on the amphiphilic properties of a drug as reflected in its surface activity. The assessment was made with various drugs that either penetrate or do not penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The surface activity of these drugs was quantified by their Gibbs adsorption isotherms in terms of three parameters: (i) the onset of surface activity, (ii) the critical micelle concentration, and (iii) the surface area requirement of the drug at the air/water interface. A calibration diagram is proposed in which the critical micelle concentration is plotted against the concentration required for the onset of surface activity. Three different regions are easily distinguished in this diagram: a region of very hydrophobic drugs which fail to enter the central nervous system because they remain adsorbed to the membrane, a central area of less hydrophobic drugs which can cross the blood-brain barrier, and a region of relatively hydrophilic drugs which do not cross the blood-brain barrier unless applied at high concentrations. This diagram can be used to predict reliably the central nervous system permeability of an unknown compound from a simple measurement of its Gibbs adsorption isotherm.

  16. Standardization of Operator-Dependent Variables Affecting Precision and Accuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Maurer, Florian P; Pfiffner, Tamara; Böttger, Erik C; Furrer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    Parameters like zone reading, inoculum density, and plate streaking influence the precision and accuracy of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). While improved reading precision has been demonstrated using automated imaging systems, standardization of the inoculum and of plate streaking have not been systematically investigated yet. This study analyzed whether photometrically controlled inoculum preparation and/or automated inoculation could further improve the standardization of disk diffusion. Suspensions of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 of 0.5 McFarland standard were prepared by 10 operators using both visual comparison to turbidity standards and a Densichek photometer (bioMérieux), and the resulting CFU counts were determined. Furthermore, eight experienced operators each inoculated 10 Mueller-Hinton agar plates using a single 0.5 McFarland standard bacterial suspension of E. coli ATCC 25922 using regular cotton swabs, dry flocked swabs (Copan, Brescia, Italy), or an automated streaking device (BD-Kiestra, Drachten, Netherlands). The mean CFU counts obtained from 0.5 McFarland standard E. coli ATCC 25922 suspensions were significantly different for suspensions prepared by eye and by Densichek (P < 0.001). Preparation by eye resulted in counts that were closer to the CLSI/EUCAST target of 10(8) CFU/ml than those resulting from Densichek preparation. No significant differences in the standard deviations of the CFU counts were observed. The interoperator differences in standard deviations when dry flocked swabs were used decreased significantly compared to the differences when regular cotton swabs were used, whereas the mean of the standard deviations of all operators together was not significantly altered. In contrast, automated streaking significantly reduced both interoperator differences, i.e., the individual standard deviations, compared to the standard deviations for the manual method, and the mean of

  17. Standardization of Operator-Dependent Variables Affecting Precision and Accuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Maurer, Florian P; Pfiffner, Tamara; Böttger, Erik C; Furrer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    Parameters like zone reading, inoculum density, and plate streaking influence the precision and accuracy of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). While improved reading precision has been demonstrated using automated imaging systems, standardization of the inoculum and of plate streaking have not been systematically investigated yet. This study analyzed whether photometrically controlled inoculum preparation and/or automated inoculation could further improve the standardization of disk diffusion. Suspensions of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 of 0.5 McFarland standard were prepared by 10 operators using both visual comparison to turbidity standards and a Densichek photometer (bioMérieux), and the resulting CFU counts were determined. Furthermore, eight experienced operators each inoculated 10 Mueller-Hinton agar plates using a single 0.5 McFarland standard bacterial suspension of E. coli ATCC 25922 using regular cotton swabs, dry flocked swabs (Copan, Brescia, Italy), or an automated streaking device (BD-Kiestra, Drachten, Netherlands). The mean CFU counts obtained from 0.5 McFarland standard E. coli ATCC 25922 suspensions were significantly different for suspensions prepared by eye and by Densichek (P < 0.001). Preparation by eye resulted in counts that were closer to the CLSI/EUCAST target of 10(8) CFU/ml than those resulting from Densichek preparation. No significant differences in the standard deviations of the CFU counts were observed. The interoperator differences in standard deviations when dry flocked swabs were used decreased significantly compared to the differences when regular cotton swabs were used, whereas the mean of the standard deviations of all operators together was not significantly altered. In contrast, automated streaking significantly reduced both interoperator differences, i.e., the individual standard deviations, compared to the standard deviations for the manual method, and the mean of

  18. Surface diffusion and coverage effect of Li atom on graphene as studied by several density functional theory methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhi; Contreras-Torres, Flavio F.; Jalbout, Abraham F.; Ramírez-Treviño, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption of Li atom on graphene is examined using density functional theory methods. Three different adsorption sites are considered, including the on top of a carbon atom (OT), on top of a CC bond (Bri), and on top of a hexagon (Hol), as well as Li adsorbed at different coverage. The Hol site is found to be the most stable, followed by the Bri and OT sites. The order of stabilization is independent of coverage. The localization of Li-graphene interaction at all sites has reverse order with stabilization. The localization will cause different repulsive interaction between Li atoms which is believed to take responsibility for the difference between the charge transfer order and adsorption energy order of Li adsorption at all possible sites. Repulsive interaction also causes the decreasing of adsorption energies of Li at Hol site with increasing coverage, but the corresponding influence is bigger at low coverage range (0.020-0.056 monolayers) than that at high coverage range (0.056-0.250 monolayers). The trend of charge transfer and dipole moment with increasing coverage is also in agreement with that of adsorption energy. It is also found that the distance of Li above graphene will increase with increasing coverage, but a so-called "zigzag" curve appears, which exhibits an oscillatory behavior as a function of increasing coverage. The diffusion of Li atom on graphene is also studied. Li atom migrates from a Hol site to a neighboring Hol site through the Bri site between them is found to be the minimum energy path. Within the studied coverage range, the diffusion barrier decreases with increasing coverage which can be ascribed to the phenomenon of different repulsion interactions when Li atom adsorbs at different sites. The increasing coverage amplified the phenomenon.

  19. Combining Land Use Information and Small Stream Sampling with PCR-Based Methods for Better Characterization of Diffuse Sources of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffuse sources of human fecal pollution allow for the direct discharge of waste into receiving waters with minimal or no treatment. Traditional culture-based methods are commonly used to characterize fecal pollution in ambient waters, however these methods do not discern between...

  20. International Comparison on Thermal-Diffusivity Measurements for Iron and Isotropic Graphite Using the Laser Flash Method in CCT-WG9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoshima, M.; Hay, B.; Zhang, J.; Chapman, L.; Baba, T.

    2013-05-01

    The first international pilot study of thermal-diffusivity measurements using the laser flash (LF) method was organized by the working group 9 (WG9) of the Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT) of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Four National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) participated in this comparison. Thermal-diffusivity measurements on the Armco iron and the isotropic graphite IG-110 were carried out from room temperature to about 1200 K. The sample sets consist of five disk-shaped specimens of 10 mm in diameter and (1.0, 1.4, 2.0, 2.8, and 4.0) mm in thickness, each cut from the same block of material. These sample sets were specifically prepared for the comparison and sent to the participants. In the pilot comparison, the thermal diffusivity of each sample was estimated using the LF method with a specific extrapolating procedure. This procedure has the advantage of determining the inherent thermal diffusivity of the material. The extrapolated value in a plot of measured apparent thermal-diffusivity values versus the amplitude of the output signal corresponding to the temperature rise during each measurement is defined as the inherent thermal diffusivity. The overall results showed good agreement between independent laboratories, measurement equipment, and specimen thicknesses. The thermal diffusivities of the materials were determined using our measured results. A quantitative evaluation of the variability of the data obtained by the participants has been done, by evaluating the deviations from the reference value, the Z-value, and the En-number. Some data showed a large deviation from the reference value. It was concluded that these are caused by an insufficient time response of the measurement equipment and some difficulties with changing the pulsed heating energy. The effect of the thermal expansion on the thermal diffusivity was checked. It was found that the thermal-expansion effect was very small and negligible in this case.

  1. Comparing classification methods for diffuse reflectance spectra to improve tissue specific laser surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, newly developed laser scalpels have multiple advantages over traditional metal scalpels. However, they lack haptic feedback. This is dangerous near e.g. nerve tissue, which has to be preserved during surgery. One solution to this problem is to train an algorithm that analyzes the reflected light spectra during surgery and can classify these spectra into different tissue types, in order to ultimately send a warning or temporarily switch off the laser when critical tissue is about to be ablated. Various machine learning algorithms are available for this task, but a detailed analysis is needed to assess the most appropriate algorithm. Methods In this study, a small data set is used to simulate many larger data sets according to a multivariate Gaussian distribution. Various machine learning algorithms are then trained and evaluated on these data sets. The algorithms’ performance is subsequently evaluated and compared by averaged confusion matrices and ultimately by boxplots of misclassification rates. The results are validated on the smaller, experimental data set. Results Most classifiers have a median misclassification rate below 0.25 in the simulated data. The most notable performance was observed for the Penalized Discriminant Analysis, with a misclassifiaction rate of 0.00 in the simulated data, and an average misclassification rate of 0.02 in a 10-fold cross validation on the original data. Conclusion The results suggest a Penalized Discriminant Analysis is the most promising approach, most probably because it considers the functional, correlated nature of the reflectance spectra. The results of this study improve the accuracy of real-time tissue discrimination and are an essential step towards improving the safety of oral laser surgery. PMID:25030085

  2. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  3. Hybrid Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Chien; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion measurements in the human central nervous system are complex to characterize and a broad spectrum of methods have been proposed. In this study, a comprehensive diffusion encoding and analysis approach, Hybrid Diffusion Imaging (HYDI), is described. The HYDI encoding scheme is composed of multiple concentric “shells” of constant diffusion-weighting, which may be used to characterize the signal behavior with low, moderate and high diffusion-weighting. HYDI facilitates the application of multiple data-analyses strategies including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multi-exponential diffusion measurements, diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) and q-ball imaging (QBI). These different analysis strategies may provide complementary information. DTI measures (mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy) may be estimated from either data in the inner shells or the entire HYDI data. Fast and slow diffusivities were estimated using a nonlinear least-squares bi-exponential fit on geometric means of the HYDI shells. DSI measurements from the entire HYDI data yield empirical model-independent diffusion information and are well-suited for characterizing tissue regions with complex diffusion behavior. DSI measurements were characterized using the zero displacement probability and the mean squared displacement. The outermost HYDI shell was analyzed using QBI analysis to estimate the orientation distribution function (ODF), which is useful for characterizing the directions of multiple fiber groups within a voxel. In this study, a HYDI encoding scheme with 102 diffusion-weighted measurements was obtained over most of the human cerebrum in under 30 minutes. PMID:17481920

  4. HPTLC Method for Estimation of Topiramate in Solubility Studies, Diffusion Studies, Plasma, Brain Homogenate and Pharmaceutical Formulation.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Vijaykumar K; Parikh, Rajesh H; Patel, Ravish J

    2016-08-01

    Topiramate, 2,3:4,5-bis-O-(1-methylethylidene)-β-d-fructopyranose, is an anticonvulsant drug indicated in the treatment and control of partial seizures and severe tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures in adults and children. An economic and rapid high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method was developed and was validated for the quantitative determination of topiramate in plasma, brain homogenate and pharmaceutical formulation. The simple extraction method was used for the isolation of topiramate from formulation, plasma and brain homogenate samples. HPTLC separation was achieved on an aluminum-backed layer of silica gel 60F254 plates using toluene : acetone (5.0 : 2.0, v/v) as mobile phase. Spots of developed plates were visualized by spraying of reagent [3.0% phenol in the mixture of ethanol : sulfuric acid (95 : 5, v/v)]. Quantitation was achieved by densitometric analysis at 340 nm over the concentration range of 1,000-5,000 ng/spot. The method was found to give compact spot for the drug (Rf: 0.61 ± 0.018). The regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed good relationship with a correlation coefficient of 0.9983. The minimum detectable amount was found to be 165 ng/spot, whereas the limit of quantitation was found to be 500 ng/spot. Statistical analysis of the data showed that the method is precise, accurate, reproducible and selective for the analysis of topiramate. The developed method was successfully employed for the estimation of topiramate in samples of equilibrium solubility study, diffusion study, microemulsion formulation and suspension formulation (developed in-house), rat plasma and rat brain homogenate samples. PMID:27406122

  5. Behavior of the Diamond Difference and Low-Order Nodal Numerical Transport Methods in the Thick Diffusion Limit for Slab Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Daniel Fury

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the thick diffusion limit of various spatial discretizations of the one-dimensional, steady-state, monoenergetic, discrete ordinates neutron transport equation. This work specifically addresses the two lowest order nodal methods, AHOT-N0 and AHOT-N1, as well as reconsiders the asymptotic limit of the Diamond Difference method. The asymptotic analyses of the AHOT-N0 and AHOT-N1 nodal methods show that AHOT-N0 does not possess the thick diffusion limit for cell edge or cell average fluxes except under very limiting conditions, which is to be expected considering the AHOT-N0 method limits to the Step method in the thick diffusion limit. The AHOT-N1 method, which uses a linear in-cell representation of the flux, was shown to possess the thick diffusion limit for both cell average and cell edge fluxes. The thick diffusion limit of the DD method, including the boundary conditions, was derived entirely in terms of cell average scalar fluxes. It was shown that, for vacuum boundaries, only when σt, h, and Q are constant and σa = 0 is the asymptotic limit of the DD method close to the finite-differenced diffusion equation in the system interior, and that the boundary conditions between the systems will only agree in the absence of an external source. For a homogeneous medium an effective diffusion coefficient was shown to be present, which was responsible for causing numeric diffusion in certain cases. A technique was presented to correct the numeric diffusion in the interior by altering certain problem parameters. Numerical errors introduced by the boundary conditions and material interfaces were also explored for a two-region problem using the Diamond Difference method. A discrete diffusion solution which exactly solves the one-dimensional diffusion equation in a homogeneous region with constant cross sections and a uniform external source was also developed and shown to be equal to the finite

  6. Quantification of fibrosis in infarcted swine hearts by ex vivo late gadolinium-enhancement and diffusion-weighted MRI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Ramanan, Venkat; Morikawa, Lily; Stanisz, Greg; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-08-01

    Many have speculated that MRI signal characteristics can be used to identify regions of heterogeneous infarct associated with an arrhythmogenic substrate; however, direct evidence of this relationship is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the remodelling characteristics of fibrosis by means of histology and high-resolution MR imaging. For this purpose, we performed whole-mount histology in heart samples (n = 9) collected from five swine at six weeks post-infarction and compared the extent of fibrosis in the infarcted areas delineated in these histological images with that obtained ex vivo by MRI using late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) methods. All MR images were obtained at a submillimetre resolution (i.e., voxel size of 0.6×0.6×1.2 mm3). Specifically, in the histology images, we differentiated moderate fibrosis (consisting of a mixture of viable and non-viable myocytes, known as border zone, BZ) from severe fibrosis (i.e., the dense scar). Correspondingly, tissue heterogeneities in the MR images were categorized by a Gaussian mixture model into healthy, BZ and scar. Our results showed that (a) both MRI methods were capable of qualitatively distinguishing sharp edges between dense scar and healthy tissue from regions of heterogeneous BZ; (b) the BZ and dense scar areas had intermediate-to-high increased values of signal intensity in the LGE images and of apparent diffusion coefficient in the DWI, respectively. In addition, as demonstrated by the Picrosirius Red and immunohistochemistry stains, the viable bundles in the BZ were clearly separated by thin collagen strands and had reduced expression of Cx43, whereas the core scar was composed of dense fibrosis. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the comparison between BZ/scar extent in LGE and DWI to the corresponding areas identified in histology yielded very good correlations (i.e., for the scar identified by LGE, R2 was 0.96 compared to R2 = 0.93 for the

  7. Analytic Coarse-Mesh Finite-Difference Method Generalized for Heterogeneous Multidimensional Two-Group Diffusion Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Cabellos, Oscar; Aragones, Jose M.; Ahnert, Carol

    2003-05-15

    In order to take into account in a more effective and accurate way the intranodal heterogeneities in coarse-mesh finite-difference (CMFD) methods, a new equivalent parameter generation methodology has been developed and tested. This methodology accounts for the dependence of the nodal homogeneized two-group cross sections and nodal coupling factors, with interface flux discontinuity (IFD) factors that account for heterogeneities on the flux-spectrum and burnup intranodal distributions as well as on neighbor effects.The methodology has been implemented in an analytic CMFD method, rigorously obtained for homogeneous nodes with transverse leakage and generalized now for heterogeneous nodes by including IFD heterogeneity factors. When intranodal mesh node heterogeneity vanishes, the heterogeneous solution tends to the analytic homogeneous nodal solution. On the other hand, when intranodal heterogeneity increases, a high accuracy is maintained since the linear and nonlinear feedbacks on equivalent parameters have been shown to be as a very effective way of accounting for heterogeneity effects in two-group multidimensional coarse-mesh diffusion calculations.

  8. Novel level-set based segmentation method of the lung at HRCT images of diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongjin; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug; Park, Sang Ok; Lee, Ho; Shin, Yeong Gil; Kim, Soo-Hong

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for reliable segmentation of the lung at HRCT of DILD. Our method consists of four main steps. First, the airway and colon are segmented and excluded by thresholding(-974 HU) and connected component analysis. Second, initial lung is identified by thresholding(-474 HU). Third, shape propagation outward the lung is performed on the initial lung. Actual lung boundaries exist inside the propagated boundaries. Finally, subsequent shape modeling level-set inward the lung from the propagated boundary can identify the lung boundary when the curvature term was highly weighted. To assess the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, the segmentation results of 54 patients are compared with those of manual segmentation done by an expert radiologist. The value of 1 minus volumetric overlap is less than 5% error. Accurate result of our method would be useful in determining the lung parenchyma at HRCT, which is the essential step for the automatic classification and quantification of diffuse interstitial lung disease.

  9. Lithium in-diffusion treatment of thick LiNbO 3 crystals by the vapor transport equilibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xinan; Xuewu, Xu; Tow-Chong, Chong; Shaoning, Yuan; Fengliang, Yu; Soon, Tay Yong

    2004-01-01

    Congruent LiNbO 3 (CLN) crystals with various orientations ( X-, Y- and Z-cut) and thickness (1-3.2 mm) were treated by the vapor transport equilibration (VTE) method in lithium-rich environment at 1100°C. Homogeneous and crack-free crystals with nearly stoichiometric composition (>49.9 mol% Li 2O) were obtained for different orientations. The cracking problem of X- and Y-cut samples was studied and solved by decreasing the cooling rate after the VTE treatment. The Li 2O content in the crystal was determined by the cutoff UV absorption edge of the crystal sample. For thick samples, the diffusion of lithium atoms from side faces had influenced the composition homogeneity of the VTE-treated crystals. The CLN crystal plates with thicknesses of around 2 mm were converted into stoichiometric LiNbO 3 (SLN) by the VTE method within 200 h. Thicker CLN samples would need longer time to be converted into SLN.

  10. A simple and green analytical method for determination of glyphosate in commercial formulations and water by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Aline Santana; Fernandes, Flávio Cesar Bedatty; Tognolli, João Olímpio; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena Redigolo

    2011-09-01

    This article describes a simple, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly method for the monitoring of glyphosate using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The proposed method is based on reflectance measurements of the colored compound produced from the spot test reaction between glyphosate and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde ( p-DAC) in acid medium, using a filter paper as solid support. Experimental designs were used to optimize the analytical conditions. All reflectance measurements were carried out at 495 nm. Under optimal conditions, the glyphosate calibration graphs obtained by plotting the optical density of the reflectance signal (A R) against the concentration were linear in the range 50-500 μg mL -1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9987. The limit of detection (LOD) for glyphosate was 7.28 μg mL -1. The technique was successfully applied to the direct determination of glyphosate in commercial formulations, as well as in water samples (river water, pure water and mineral drinking water) after a previous clean-up or pre-concentration step. Recoveries were in the ranges 93.2-102.6% and 91.3-102.9% for the commercial formulations and water samples, respectively.

  11. All-in-One Beaker Method for Large-Scale Production of Metal Oxide Hollow Nanospheres Using Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sang; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-02-17

    A simple and easily scalable process for the formation of metal oxide hollow nanospheres using nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion called the "all-in-one beaker method" is introduced. The Fe2O3, SnO2, NiO, and Co3O4 hollow nanospheres are successfully prepared by the all-in-one beaker method. The detailed formation mechanism of aggregate-free hematite hollow nanospheres is studied. Dimethylformamide solution containing Fe acetate, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and polystyrene (PS) transforms into aggregate-free Fe2O3 hollow nanospheres. The porous structure formed by the combustion of PS provides a good pathway for the reducing gas. The carbon matrix formed from PAN acts as a barrier, which can prevent the aggregation of metallic Fe nanopowders by surrounding each particle. The Fe-C bulk material formed as an intermediate product transforms into aggregate-free Fe2O3 hollow nanospheres by the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. The mean size and shell thickness of the hollow Fe2O3 nanospheres measured from the TEM images are 52 and 9 nm, respectively. The discharge capacities of the Fe2O3 nanopowders with hollow and dense structures and the bulk material for the 200th cycle at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1) are 1012, 498, and 637 mA h g(-1), respectively, and their capacity retentions calculated compared to those in the second cycles are 92, 45, and 59%, respectively. Additionally, Fe2O3 hollow nanospheres cycled at 1 A g(-1) after 1000 cycles showed a high discharge capacity of 871 mA h g(-1) (capacity retention was 80% from the second cycle). The Fe2O3, SnO2, NiO, and Co3O4 hollow nanospheres show excellent cycling performances for lithium-ion storage because they have a high contact area with the liquid electrolyte and space for accommodating a huge volume change during cycling.

  12. A numerical theory of lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods in the computation of solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, A.B.H.

    1990-09-24

    A numerical theory for the massively parallel lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods for computing solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems is introduced. The convergence theory is based on consistency and stability arguments that are supported by the discrete Chapman-Enskog expansion (for consistency) and conditions of monotonicity (in establishing stability). The theory is applied to four lattice methods: Two of the methods are for some two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations. One of the methods is for the one-dimensional lattice method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. And one of the methods is for a two-dimensional nonlinear advection-diffusion equation. Convergence is formally proven in the L{sub 1}-norm for the first three methods, revealing that they are second-order, conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Computational results which support the theory for lattice methods are presented. In addition, a domain decomposition strategy using mesh refinement techniques is presented for lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods. The strategy allows concentration of computational resources on regions of high activity. Computational evidence is reported for the strategy applied to the lattice gas method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. 72 refs., 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  13. The antibacterial activity of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine against Enterococcus faecalis: A review on agar diffusion and direct contact methods

    PubMed Central

    Luddin, Norhayati; Ahmed, Hany Mohamed Aly

    2013-01-01

    Complete debridement and disinfection of the root canal system are fundamental requirements for successful endodontic treatment. Despite the morphological challenges of the internal root anatomy, root canal irrigants play an important role in the optimization of the root canal preparation, which is essentially a chemo-mechanical procedure. Enterococcus faecalis is one of the most resistant microorganisms that dominants the microbial ecosystem of persistent periradicular lesions in retreatment cases. For that reason, many in vitro and in vivo studies evaluated and compared the antibacterial activity of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine at varying concentrations using different experimental models against this microorganism. However, many controversies with regard to the ideal irrigant and concentration do in fact exist. Hence, this review aims to discuss the antibacterial activity of these two main root canal irrigants against Enterococcus faecalis using the agar diffusion and direct contact methods and the possible modulating factors responsible for inconsistent findings among different studies. In addition, the disinfection potential of both chemical agents on gutta percha and Resilon cones are also discussed. The source of this review was conducted through an electronic literature search using PubMed database from December 1997 until December 2011, which analyze the related laboratory investigations of both irrigants, published in major endodontic journals. PMID:23349569

  14. An improved cryopreservation method for porcine buccal mucosa in ex vivo drug permeation studies using Franz diffusion cells.

    PubMed

    Amores, Sonia; Domenech, José; Colom, Helena; Calpena, Ana C; Clares, Beatriz; Gimeno, Álvaro; Lauroba, Jacinto

    2014-08-18

    The use of isolated animal models to assess percutaneous absorption of molecules is frequently reported. The porcine buccal mucosa has been proposed as a substitute for the buccal mucosa barrier on ex vivo permeability studies avoiding unnecessary sacrifice of animals. But it is not always easy to obtain fresh buccal mucosa. Consequently, human and porcine buccal mucosa is sometimes frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen, but this procedure is not always feasible. One cheaper and simpler alternative is to freeze the buccal mucosa of freshly slaughtered pigs in a mechanical freezer, using DMSO and albumin as cryoprotective agents. This study compared the ex vivo permeability parameters of propranolol hydrochloride through porcine buccal mucosa using a Franz diffusion cell system and HPLC as detection method. The freezing effects on drug permeability parameters were evaluated. Equally histological studies were performed. Furthermore, the use of the parameter transmucosal water loss (TMWL) as an indicator of the buccal mucosa integrity was evaluated just as transepidermal water loss (TEWL) is utilized for skin integrity. The results showed no difference between fresh and frozen mucosal flux, permeability coefficient or lag time of propranolol. However, statistical significant difference in TMWL between fresh and frozen mucosa was observed. PMID:24813111

  15. Scaling and multiscaling behavior of the perimeter of a diffusion-limited aggregation generated by the Hastings-Levitov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, F.; Saberi, A. A.; Rouhani, S.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the scaling behavior of a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) simulated by the Hastings-Levitov method. We obtain the fractal dimension of the clusters by direct analysis of the geometrical patterns, in good agreement with one obtained from an analytical approach. We compute the two-point density correlation function and we show that, in the large-size limit, it agrees with the obtained fractal dimension. These support the statistical agreement between the patterns and DLA clusters. We also investigate the scaling properties of various length scales and their fluctuations, related to the boundary of the cluster. We find that all of the length scales do not have a simple scaling with the same correction to scaling exponent. The fractal dimension of the perimeter is obtained equal to that of the cluster. The growth exponent is computed from the evolution of the interface width equal to β = 0.557(2). We also show that the perimeter of the DLA cluster has an asymptotic multiscaling behavior.

  16. Scaling and multiscaling behavior of the perimeter of a diffusion-limited aggregation generated by the Hastings-Levitov method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, F; Saberi, A A; Rouhani, S

    2009-09-16

    In this paper, we analyze the scaling behavior of a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) simulated by the Hastings-Levitov method. We obtain the fractal dimension of the clusters by direct analysis of the geometrical patterns, in good agreement with one obtained from an analytical approach. We compute the two-point density correlation function and we show that, in the large-size limit, it agrees with the obtained fractal dimension. These support the statistical agreement between the patterns and DLA clusters. We also investigate the scaling properties of various length scales and their fluctuations, related to the boundary of the cluster. We find that all of the length scales do not have a simple scaling with the same correction to scaling exponent. The fractal dimension of the perimeter is obtained equal to that of the cluster. The growth exponent is computed from the evolution of the interface width equal to β = 0.557(2). We also show that the perimeter of the DLA cluster has an asymptotic multiscaling behavior. PMID:21832341

  17. Crystallographic Analysis of Ground and Space Thermostable T1 Lipase Crystal Obtained via Counter Diffusion Method Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Aris, Sayangku Nor Ariati; Thean Chor, Adam Leow; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Raja Abd. Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional structure of thermostable lipase is much sought after nowadays as it is important for industrial application mainly found in the food, detergent, and pharmaceutical sectors. Crystallization utilizing the counter diffusion method in space was performed with the aim to obtain high resolution diffracting crystals with better internal order to improve the accuracy of the structure. Thermostable T1 lipase enzyme has been crystallized in laboratory on earth and also under microgravity condition aboard Progress spacecraft to the ISS in collaboration with JAXA (Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency). This study is conducted with the aims of improving crystal packing and structure resolution. The diffraction data set for ground grown crystal was collected to 1.3 Å resolution and belonged to monoclinic C2 space group with unit cell parameters a = 117.40 Å, b = 80.95 Å, and c = 99.81 Å, whereas the diffraction data set for space grown crystal was collected to 1.1 Å resolution and belonged to monoclinic C2 space group with unit cell parameters a = 117.31 Å, b = 80.85 Å, and c = 99.81 Å. The major difference between the two crystal growth systems is the lack of convection and sedimentation in microgravity environment resulted in the growth of much higher quality crystals of T1 lipase. PMID:24516857

  18. Assessment of a multi-layered diffuse correlation spectroscopy method for monitoring cerebral blood flow in adults

    PubMed Central

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Albert; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a promising technique for brain monitoring as it can provide a continuous signal that is directly related to cerebral blood flow (CBF); however, signal contamination from extracerebral tissue can cause flow underestimations. The goal of this study was to investigate whether a multi-layered (ML) model that accounts for light propagation through the different tissue layers could successfully separate scalp and brain flow when applied to DCS data acquired at multiple source-detector distances. The method was first validated with phantom experiments. Next, experiments were conducted in a pig model of the adult head with a mean extracerebral tissue thickness of 9.8 ± 0.4 mm. Reductions in CBF were measured by ML DCS and computed tomography perfusion for validation; excellent agreement was observed by a mean difference of 1.2 ± 4.6% (CI95%: −31.1 and 28.6) between the two modalities, which was not significantly different.

  19. Assessment of a multi-layered diffuse correlation spectroscopy method for monitoring cerebral blood flow in adults

    PubMed Central

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Albert; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a promising technique for brain monitoring as it can provide a continuous signal that is directly related to cerebral blood flow (CBF); however, signal contamination from extracerebral tissue can cause flow underestimations. The goal of this study was to investigate whether a multi-layered (ML) model that accounts for light propagation through the different tissue layers could successfully separate scalp and brain flow when applied to DCS data acquired at multiple source-detector distances. The method was first validated with phantom experiments. Next, experiments were conducted in a pig model of the adult head with a mean extracerebral tissue thickness of 9.8 ± 0.4 mm. Reductions in CBF were measured by ML DCS and computed tomography perfusion for validation; excellent agreement was observed by a mean difference of 1.2 ± 4.6% (CI95%: −31.1 and 28.6) between the two modalities, which was not significantly different. PMID:27699127

  20. Effect of the 5E Model on Prospective Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Diffusion and Osmosis: A Mixed Method Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artun, Hüseyin; Coştu, Bayram

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore a group of prospective primary teachers' conceptual understanding of diffusion and osmosis as they implemented a 5E constructivist model and related materials in a science methods course. Fifty prospective primary teachers' ideas were elicited using a pre- and post-test and delayed post-test survey consisting of ten two-tier questions of which an explanatory part was integral. Individual interviews were conducted with six prospective teachers at the end of the implementation of the unit using four questions. Test scores were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Post-instructional interviews were analyzed qualitatively. Statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA of student test scores pointed to statistically significant differences between pre- and post- and delayed post-test ( p < 0.05). A qualitative analysis of the prospective teachers' explanations in the two-tier questions revealed changes in their ideas overtime. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest that the teaching activities promoted students' conceptual understanding. No statistically significant differences were found between post-test and delayed post-test scores, suggesting that the teaching activities based on 5E model enabled students to retain their new conceptual understanding.

  1. Nodally exact Ritz discretizations of 1D diffusion-absorption and Helmholtz equations by variational FIC and modified equation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felippa, C. A.; Oñate, E.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first application of the Finite Calculus (FIC) in a Ritz-FEM variational framework. FIC provides a steplength parametrization of mesh dimensions, which is used to modify the shape functions. This approach is applied to the FEM discretization of the steady-state, one-dimensional, diffusion-absorption and Helmholtz equations. Parametrized linear shape functions are directly inserted into a FIC functional. The resulting Ritz-FIC equations are symmetric and carry a element-level free parameter coming from the function modification process. Both constant- and variable-coefficient cases are studied. It is shown that the parameter can be used to produce nodally exact solutions for the constant coefficient case. The optimal value is found by matching the finite-order modified differential equation (FOMoDE) of the Ritz-FIC equations with the original field equation. The inclusion of the Ritz-FIC models in the context of templates is examined. This inclusion shows that there is an infinite number of nodally exact models for the constant coefficient case. The ingredients of these methods (FIC, Ritz, MoDE and templates) can be extended to multiple dimensions

  2. Crystallographic analysis of ground and space thermostable T1 lipase crystal obtained via counter diffusion method approach.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Aris, Sayangku Nor Ariati; Thean Chor, Adam Leow; Mohamad Ali, Mohd Shukuri; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Raja Abd Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional structure of thermostable lipase is much sought after nowadays as it is important for industrial application mainly found in the food, detergent, and pharmaceutical sectors. Crystallization utilizing the counter diffusion method in space was performed with the aim to obtain high resolution diffracting crystals with better internal order to improve the accuracy of the structure. Thermostable T1 lipase enzyme has been crystallized in laboratory on earth and also under microgravity condition aboard Progress spacecraft to the ISS in collaboration with JAXA (Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency). This study is conducted with the aims of improving crystal packing and structure resolution. The diffraction data set for ground grown crystal was collected to 1.3 Å resolution and belonged to monoclinic C2 space group with unit cell parameters a = 117.40 Å, b = 80.95 Å, and c = 99.81 Å, whereas the diffraction data set for space grown crystal was collected to 1.1 Å resolution and belonged to monoclinic C2 space group with unit cell parameters a = 117.31 Å, b = 80.85 Å, and c = 99.81 Å. The major difference between the two crystal growth systems is the lack of convection and sedimentation in microgravity environment resulted in the growth of much higher quality crystals of T1 lipase. PMID:24516857

  3. Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Application of an empirical method

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, B.F.

    1996-02-01

    During the summer of 1995, ultrasonic wall thickness data were collected for 100 steel cylinders containing depleted uranium (DU) hexafluoride located at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The cylinders were selected for measurement to assess the condition of the more vulnerable portion of the cylinder inventory at PGDP. The purpose of this report is to apply the method used in Lyon to estimate the effects of corrosion for larger unsampled populations as a function of time. The scope of this report is limited and is not intended to represent the final analyses of available data. Future efforts will include continuing analyses of available data to investigate defensible deviations from the conservative assumptions made to date. For each cylinder population considered, two basic types of analyses were conducted: (1) estimates were made of the number of cylinders as a function of time that will have a minimum wall thickness of either 0 mils (1 mil = 0.00 1 in.) or 250 mils and (2) the current minimum wall thickness distributions across cylinders were estimated for each cylinder population considered. Additional analyses were also performed investigating comparisons of the results for F and G yards with the results presented in Lyon (1995).

  4. The pseudo-compartment method for coupling partial differential equation and compartment-based models of diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Christian A.; Flegg, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial reaction–diffusion models have been employed to describe many emergent phenomena in biological systems. The modelling technique most commonly adopted in the literature implements systems of partial differential equations (PDEs), which assumes there are sufficient densities of particles that a continuum approximation is valid. However, owing to recent advances in computational power, the simulation and therefore postulation, of computationally intensive individual-based models has become a popular way to investigate the effects of noise in reaction–diffusion systems in which regions of low copy numbers exist. The specific stochastic models with which we shall be concerned in this manuscript are referred to as ‘compartment-based’ or ‘on-lattice’. These models are characterized by a discretization of the computational domain into a grid/lattice of ‘compartments’. Within each compartment, particles are assumed to be well mixed and are permitted to react with other particles within their compartment or to transfer between neighbouring compartments. Stochastic models provide accuracy, but at the cost of significant computational resources. For models that have regions of both low and high concentrations, it is often desirable, for reasons of efficiency, to employ coupled multi-scale modelling paradigms. In this work, we develop two hybrid algorithms in which a PDE in one region of the domain is coupled to a compartment-based model in the other. Rather than attempting to balance average fluxes, our algorithms answer a more fundamental question: ‘how are individual particles transported between the vastly different model descriptions?’ First, we present an algorithm derived by carefully redefining the continuous PDE concentration as a probability distribution. While this first algorithm shows very strong convergence to analytical solutions of test problems, it can be cumbersome to simulate. Our second algorithm is a simplified and more efficient

  5. The pseudo-compartment method for coupling partial differential equation and compartment-based models of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christian A; Flegg, Mark B

    2015-05-01

    Spatial reaction-diffusion models have been employed to describe many emergent phenomena in biological systems. The modelling technique most commonly adopted in the literature implements systems of partial differential equations (PDEs), which assumes there are sufficient densities of particles that a continuum approximation is valid. However, owing to recent advances in computational power, the simulation and therefore postulation, of computationally intensive individual-based models has become a popular way to investigate the effects of noise in reaction-diffusion systems in which regions of low copy numbers exist. The specific stochastic models with which we shall be concerned in this manuscript are referred to as 'compartment-based' or 'on-lattice'. These models are characterized by a discretization of the computational domain into a grid/lattice of 'compartments'. Within each compartment, particles are assumed to be well mixed and are permitted to react with other particles within their compartment or to transfer between neighbouring compartments. Stochastic models provide accuracy, but at the cost of significant computational resources. For models that have regions of both low and high concentrations, it is often desirable, for reasons of efficiency, to employ coupled multi-scale modelling paradigms. In this work, we develop two hybrid algorithms in which a PDE in one region of the domain is coupled to a compartment-based model in the other. Rather than attempting to balance average fluxes, our algorithms answer a more fundamental question: 'how are individual particles transported between the vastly different model descriptions?' First, we present an algorithm derived by carefully redefining the continuous PDE concentration as a probability distribution. While this first algorithm shows very strong convergence to analytical solutions of test problems, it can be cumbersome to simulate. Our second algorithm is a simplified and more efficient implementation of

  6. Designing a Software for Flood Risk Assessment Based on Multi Criteria Desicion Analysis and Information Diffusion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaoglu, N.; Saral, A.; Seker, D. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Flooding is one of the major natural disasters not only in Turkey but also in all over the world and it causes serious damage and harm. It is estimated that of the total economic loss caused by all kinds of disasters, 40% was due to floods. In July 1995, the Ayamama Creek in Istanbul was flooded, the insurance sector received around 1,200 claims notices during that period, insurance companies had to pay a total of $40 million for claims. In 2009, the same creek was flooded again and killed 31 people over two days and insurance firms paid for damages around cost €150 million for claims. To solve these kinds of problems modern tools such as GIS and Remote Sensing should be utilized. In this study, a software was designed for the flood risk analysis with Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Information Diffusion( InfoDif) methods.In the developed sofware, five evaluation criterias were taken into account, which were slope, aspect, elevation, geology and land use which were extracted from the satellite sensor data. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the Ayamama River Basin was acquired from the SPOT 5 satellite image with 2.5 meter spatial resolution. Slope and aspect values of the study basin were extracted from this DEM. The land use of the Ayamama Creek was obtained by performing object-oriented nearest neighbor classification method by image segmentation on SPOT 5 image dated 2010. All produced data were used as an input for the part of Multi Criteria Desicion Analysis (MCDA) method of this software. Criterias and their each sub criteras were weighted and flood vulnerability was determined with MCDA-AHP. Also, daily flood data was collected from Florya Meteorological Station, between 1975 to 2009 years and the daily flood peak discharge was calculated with the method of Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN) and were used as an input in the software for the part of InfoDif.Obtained results were verified using ground truth data and it has been clearly

  7. Sparse Reconstruction Challenge for diffusion MRI: Validation on a physical phantom to determine which acquisition scheme and analysis method to use?

    PubMed

    Ning, Lipeng; Laun, Frederik; Gur, Yaniv; DiBella, Edward V R; Deslauriers-Gauthier, Samuel; Megherbi, Thinhinane; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Zucchelli, Mauro; Menegaz, Gloria; Fick, Rutger; St-Jean, Samuel; Paquette, Michael; Aranda, Ramon; Descoteaux, Maxime; Deriche, Rachid; O'Donnell, Lauren; Rathi, Yogesh

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is the modality of choice for investigating in-vivo white matter connectivity and neural tissue architecture of the brain. The diffusion-weighted signal in dMRI reflects the diffusivity of water molecules in brain tissue and can be utilized to produce image-based biomarkers for clinical research. Due to the constraints on scanning time, a limited number of measurements can be acquired within a clinically feasible scan time. In order to reconstruct the dMRI signal from a discrete set of measurements, a large number of algorithms have been proposed in recent years in conjunction with varying sampling schemes, i.e., with varying b-values and gradient directions. Thus, it is imperative to compare the performance of these reconstruction methods on a single data set to provide appropriate guidelines to neuroscientists on making an informed decision while designing their acquisition protocols. For this purpose, the SPArse Reconstruction Challenge (SPARC) was held along with the workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI (at MICCAI 2014) to validate the performance of multiple reconstruction methods using data acquired from a physical phantom. A total of 16 reconstruction algorithms (9 teams) participated in this community challenge. The goal was to reconstruct single b-value and/or multiple b-value data from a sparse set of measurements. In particular, the aim was to determine an appropriate acquisition protocol (in terms of the number of measurements, b-values) and the analysis method to use for a neuroimaging study. The challenge did not delve on the accuracy of these methods in estimating model specific measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) or mean diffusivity, but on the accuracy of these methods to fit the data. This paper presents several quantitative results pertaining to each reconstruction algorithm. The conclusions in this paper provide a valuable guideline for choosing a suitable algorithm and the corresponding

  8. On the possibility of obtaining non-diffused proximity functions from cloud-chamber data: II. Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods.

    PubMed

    Zaider, M; Minerbo, G N

    1988-11-01

    Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods are applied to an inversion problem which consists of unfolding diffusion from proximity functions calculated from cloud-chamber data. The solution appears to be relatively insensitive to statistical errors in the data (an important feature) given the limited number of tracks normally available from cloud-chamber measurements. It is the first time, to our knowledge, that such methods are applied to microdosimetry.

  9. Secular diffusion in discrete self-gravitating tepid discs II. Accounting for swing amplification via the matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouvry, J. B.; Pichon, C.; Magorrian, J.; Chavanis, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    The secular evolution of an infinitely thin tepid isolated galactic disc made of a finite number of particles is investigated using the inhomogeneous Balescu-Lenard equation expressed in terms of angle-action variables. The matrix method is implemented numerically in order to model the induced gravitational polarisation. Special care is taken to account for the amplification of potential fluctuations of mutually resonant orbits and the unwinding of the induced swing amplified transients. Quantitative comparisons with N-body simulations yield consistent scalings with the number of particles and with the self-gravity of the disc: the fewer the particles and the colder the disc, the faster the secular evolution. Secular evolution is driven by resonances, but does not depend on the initial phases of the disc. For a Mestel disc with Q ~ 1.5, the polarisation cloud around each star boosts its secular effect by a factor of a thousand or more, accordingly promoting the dynamical relevance of self-induced collisional secular evolution. The position and shape of the induced resonant ridge are found to be in very good agreement with the prediction of the Balescu-Lenard equation, which scales with the square of the susceptibility of the disc. In astrophysics, the inhomogeneous Balescu-Lenard equation may describe the secular diffusion of giant molecular clouds in galactic discs, the secular migration and segregation of planetesimals in proto-planetary discs, or even the long-term evolution of population of stars within the Galactic centre. It could be used as a valuable check of the accuracy of N-body integrators on secular timescales. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgA copy of the linear matrix response code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A129

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes and bulk diffusion length in P-N junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Carrier lifetimes and bulk diffusion length are qualitatively measured as a means for qualification of a P-N junction photovoltaic solar cell. High frequency (blue) monochromatic light pulses and low-frequency (red) monochromatic light pulses were alternately applied to the cell while it was irradiated by light from a solar simulator, and synchronously displaying the derivative of the output voltage of the cell on an oscilloscope. The output voltage is a measure of the lifetimes of the minority carriers (holes) in the diffused N layer and majority carriers (electrons) in the bulk P material, and of the diffusion length of the bulk silicon. By connecting a reference cell in this manner with a test cell to be tested in reverse parallel, the display of a test cell that matches the reference cell will be a substantially zero output.

  11. Estimation of Free, Conjugated, and Diffusible Indole-3-acetic Acid in Etiolated Maize Shoots by the Indolo-α-pyrone Fluorescence Method

    PubMed Central

    Iino, Moritoshi; Carr, Denis J.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for estimating free indoleacetic acid (IAA extracted from tissue homogenates by aqueous acetone), conjugated IAA (extracted by aqueous acetone and hydrolyzed by 1 n KOH), and diffusible IAA (diffused from the excised tissue into water), in shoots of etiolated 3-day-old maize (Zea mays L. cv. GH 390) seedlings are described, the indolo-α-pyrone fluorescence method being used to assay IAA. The reliability of the procedure is shown by comparative IAA determinations of the extracts using the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method in which the methyl ester, heptafluorobutyryl derivative of IAA is assayed using the selected-ion-monitoring technique with deuterated IAA as an internal standard. A 3-millimeter-long coleoptile tip, a coleoptile with its included leaves and nodal region (whole coleoptile), and a mesocotyl each contains 0.2, 1.7, and 1.5 nanograms of free IAA, respectively. The whole coleoptile and the mesocotyl contain slightly less conjugated IAA than their content of free IAA. IAA diffuses from the coleoptile tip at the rate of 1.0 nanograms per tip per hour; from the base of the whole coleoptile and a set of leaves excised from a coleoptile, IAA diffuses at the rate of 0.62 and 0.17 nanogram per plant part per hour, respectively. The data obtained support the classical assumption that the coleoptile tip produces IAA. It is also suggested that some IAA is decomposed during its downward transport in the coleoptile. PMID:16662325

  12. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  13. Thermal diffusivity anisotropy measured by a temperature wave method in the homologous series of (p-alkoxybenzylidene)-p'-octylaniline (nO.8).

    PubMed

    Uehara, Michiru; Takezoe, Hideo; Vaupotič, Nataša; Pociecha, Damian; Gorecka, Ewa; Aoki, Yoshio; Morikawa, Junko

    2015-08-21

    The anisotropy of thermal diffusivity in four homologues of (p-alkoxybenzylidene)-p'-octylaniline (nO.8, n = 4 - 7) was measured using a temperature wave method. The results show that the thermal diffusivity component along the director (α(∥)) is considerably larger than that perpendicular to the director (α(⊥)) in all mesophases, i.e., nematic (N), smectic A (SmA), smectic B (SmB), and smectic G (SmG) phases. Both components of the thermal diffusivity show a dip at the second- or weakly first-order N-SmA phase transition due to the heat capacity anomaly. In contrast, at the first-order SmA-SmB phase transition, thermal diffusivity exhibits a stepwise increase. The x-ray and calorimetric measurements enable a calculation of the thermal conductivity and the study of the effect of the molecular length on the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in the SmA and SmB phases. For the homologues n = 4, 5, and 6, which exhibit the same phase sequence upon cooling, the parallel component of the thermal conductivity k(∥) in the SmA and SmB phases systematically increases with increasing length of the molecular tails, while no such increase is observed in the thermal diffusivity α(∥). We thus conclude that the molecular model [Urbach et al., J. Chem. Phys. 78, 5113 (1983)] is valid for the qualitative prediction of the effect of the molecular length on the magnitude of the thermal conductivity.

  14. Analyses of Disruption of Cerebral White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia with MR Diffusion Tensor Fiber Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Utako; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Kito, Shinsuke; Koga, Yoshihiko

    We have analyzed cerebral white matter using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) to measure the diffusion anisotropy of water molecules. The goal of this study is the quantitative evaluation of schizophrenia. Diffusion tensor images are acquired for patients with schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects, group-matched for age, sex, and handedness. Fiber tracking is performed on the superior longitudinal fasciculus for the comparison between the patient and comparison groups. We have analysed and compared the cross-sectional area on the starting coronal plane and the mean and standard deviation of the fractional anisotropy and the apparent diffusion coefficient along fibers in the right and left hemispheres. In the right hemisphere, the cross-sectional areas in patient group are significantly smaller than those in the comparison group. Furthermore, in the comparison group, the cross-sectional areas in the right hemisphere are significantly larger than those in the left hemisphere, whereas there is no significant difference in the patient group. These results suggest that we may evaluate the disruption in white matter integrity in schizophrenic patients quantitatively by comparing the cross-sectional area of the superior longitudinal fasciculus in the right and left hemispheres.

  15. Facilitated Diffusion as a Method for Selective Accumulation of Materials from the Primordial Oceans by a Lipid Vesicle Protocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, William

    1980-09-01

    A model is proposed for the selective accumulation of amino acids, sugars, nucleotides, cations and protons from the primordial oceans into a lipid vesicle type of protocell. The model is built on facilitated diffusion using simple, primordial, lipid-soluble carriers. The advantages a lipid vesicle protocell would have had over the other potential types of protocells are discussed.

  16. LABORATORY ASSESSMENT OF THE PERMEABILITY AND DIFFUSION CHARACTERISTICS OF FLORIDA CONCRETES - PHASE I - METHODS DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of Phase I of a laboratory assessment of the permeability and diffusion characteristics of Florida concretes. (NOTE: The ability of concrete to permit air flow under pressure (permeability) and the passage of radon gas without any pressure difference (dif...

  17. Instrumentation in Diffuse Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging is highly versatile and has a very broad range of applications in biology and medicine. It covers diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography, bioluminescence, and a number of other new imaging methods. These methods of diffuse optical imaging have diversified instrument configurations but share the same core physical principle – light propagation in highly diffusive media, i.e., the biological tissue. In this review, the author summarizes the latest development in instrumentation and methodology available to diffuse optical imaging in terms of system architecture, light source, photo-detection, spectral separation, signal modulation, and lastly imaging contrast. PMID:24860804

  18. Seismic microzonation and velocity models of El Ejido area (SE Spain) from the diffuse-field H/V method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Jerez, Antonio; Seivane, Helena; Navarro, Manuel; Piña-Flores, José; Luzón, Francisco; Vidal, Francisco; Posadas, Antonio M.; Aranda, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    El Ejido town is located in the Campo de Dalías coastal plain (Almería province, SE Spain), emplaced in one of the most seismically active regions of Spain. The municipality has 84000 inhabitants and presented a high growth rate during the last twenty years. The most recent intense seismic activity occurred close to this town was in 1993 and 1994, with events of Mb = 4.9 and Mb = 5.0, respectively. To provide a basis for site-specific hazard analysis, we first carried out a seismic microzonation of this town in terms of predominant periods and geotechnical properties. The predominant periods map was obtained from ambient noise observations on a grid of 250 x 250 m in the main urban area, and sparser measurements on the outskirts. These broad-band records, of about 20 minutes long each, were analyzed by using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio technique (H/V). Dispersion curves obtained from two array measurements of ambient noise and borehole data provided additional geophysical information. All the surveyed points in the town were found to have relatively long predominant periods ranging from 0.8 to 2.3 s and growing towards the SE. Secondary high-frequency (> 2Hz) peaks were found at about the 10% of the points only. On the other hand, Vs30 values of 550 - 650 m/s were estimated from the array records, corresponding to cemented sediments and medium-hard rocks. The local S-wave velocity structure has been inverted from the H/V curves for a subset of the measurement sites. We used an innovative full-wavefield method based on the diffuse-wavefield approximation (Sánchez-Sesma et al., 2011) combined with the simulated annealing algorithm. Shallow seismic velocities and deep boreholes data were used as constraints. The results show that the low-frequency resonances are related with the impedance contrast between several hundred meters of medium-hard sedimentary rocks (marls and calcarenites) with the stiffer basement of the basin, which dips to the SE. These

  19. Turbo fluid machinery and diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general theory behind turbo devices and diffusers is explained. Problems and the state of research on basic equations of flow and experimental and measuring methods are discussed. Conventional centrifugation-type compressor and fan diffusers are considered in detail.

  20. Measurement of insulation integrity of IUE camera tube facsimiles by partial discharges method and diffusion of gases through various silicone rubbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bever, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Several dummy tubes imitating the IUE Camera System design were encapsulated with Solithane 2, Conathane EN-11, Green and Black Hysols and SMRD 432. Various flaws were purposefully placed in some of these. Partial discharge testing in vacuum under direct voltage conditions was carried once a week for 12 weeks, 15 kv dc being applied during normal working hours for 40 hours duration per week. None of the units showed much damage during this time judging by the P.D. energy histograms. A more complete mathematical presentation is given on diffusion and permeation than previously. Measurements of diffusion constants for various silicone rubbers are carried out by the Time-Lag method and compared to other determinations in the literature. Calculations of the time required for diffusion through a thick wall are demonstrated in the long time approximation and for dimensions pertaining to void and wall sizes of a delamination problem in the LANDSAT-C vidicon tubes. An actual delaminated LANDSAT-C tube and some facsimiles are immersed in vacuum for long periods and tested for catastrophic breakdown due to diffusion of gas, by application of high voltage.

  1. An improved method for suppressing protein background in PFG NMR experiments to determine ligand diffusion coefficients in the presence of receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Bridget A.; Morris, Kevin F.; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2006-08-01

    In NMR diffusion experiments to study ligand-protein binding equilibria, the spectral background due to broad protein resonances can contribute significantly to the measured ligand signal intensity resulting in erroneous binding affinities. One method to suppress the protein spectral background involves coupling a CPMG pulse train before or after the BPPSTE pulse sequence to allow for differential T2 relaxation of the broad protein resonances. Here, we present an improved method, the Gradient Phase Encoded Spin-lock (GraPES) experiment that integrates the relaxation filter into the diffusion period. Compared with sequential CPMG-BPPSTE pulse sequences, GraPES offers effective suppression of the protein background with improved signal-to-noise ratios and shorter experiment times.

  2. Localized T2 measurements using an OSIRIS-CPMG method. Application to measurements of blood oxygenation and transverse relaxation free of diffusion effect.

    PubMed

    Girard, F; Poulet, P; Namer, I J; Steibel, J; Chambron, J

    1994-12-01

    This work presents a new method allowing localized T2 measurements, based upon the OSIRIS scheme. A train of 180 degrees pulses is applied after the OSIRIS preparation cycle, recording directly the transverse magnetization decay. The method was verified for two nuclei, 1H and 19F, with phantoms and in vivo on rats. The accuracy of the T2 values is discussed, as well as possible applications of the OSIRIS-CPMG method to proton transverse spin relaxation measurements, free of diffusion effects, and to non-invasive in vivo blood oxygenation measurements, through the use of an emulsion of perfluorooctylbromide, a blood substitute containing fluorine.

  3. Investigation of optimal route to fabricate submicron-sized Sm2Fe17 particles with reduction-diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shusuke; Takagi, Kenta; Ozaki, Kimihiro

    2016-05-01

    Submicron-sized Sm2Fe17 powder samples were fabricated by a non-pulverizing process through reduction-diffusion of precursors prepared by a wet-chemical technique. Three precursors having different morphologies, which were micron-sized porous Sm-Fe oxide-impregnated iron nitrate, acicular goethite impregnated-samarium nitrate, and a conventional Sm-Fe coprecipitate, were prepared and subjected to hydrogen reduction and reduction-diffusion treatment to clarify whether these precursors could be convert to Sm2Fe17 without impurity phases and which precursor is the most attractive for producing submicron-sized Sm2Fe17 powder. As a result, all three precursors were successfully converted to Sm2Fe17 powders without impurity phases, and the synthesis route using iron-oxide particle-impregnated samarium oxide was revealed to have the greatest potential among the three routes.

  4. Diffusion kinetics of samarium and neodymium in garnet, and a method for determining cooling rates of rocks

    PubMed

    Ganguly; Tirone; Hervig

    1998-08-01

    Experimental determinations of the diffusion coefficients of samarium and neodymium in almandine garnet and theoretical considerations show that one cannot assign a sufficiently restricted range of closure temperature, TC, to the samarium-neodymium decay system in garnet for the purpose of constraining the cooling rate. However, it is shown that the samarium-neodymium cooling age of garnet can be used to calculate both cooling rate and TC if the temperature and age at the peak metamorphic conditions are known.

  5. A novel (ex situ) method to quantify oxygen diffusion coefficient of polymer fuel cells backing and catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baricci, Andrea; Casalegno, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Limiting current density of oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells is determined by several mass transport resistances that lower the concentration of oxygen on the catalyst active site. Among them, diffusion across porous media plays a significant role. Despite the extensive experimental activity documented in PEMFC literature, only few efforts have been dedicated to the measurement of the effective transport properties in porous layers. In the present work, a methodology for ex situ measurement of the effective diffusion coefficient and Knudsen radius of porous layers for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (gas diffusion layer, micro porous layer and catalyst layer) is described and applied to high temperature polymer fuel cells State of Art materials. Regression of the measured quantities by means of a quasi 2D physical model is performed to quantify the Knudsen effect, which is reported to account, respectively, for 30% and 50% of the mass transport resistance in micro porous layer and catalyst layer. On the other side, the model reveals that pressure gradient consequent to permeation in porous layers of high temperature polymer fuel cells has a negligible effect on oxygen concentration in relevant operating conditions.

  6. Direct disk diffusion test using European Clinical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing breakpoints provides reliable results compared with the standard method.

    PubMed

    Stokkou, Sofia; Geginat, Gernot; Schlüter, Dirk; Tammer, Ina

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis represents a life-threatening infection requiring the immediate start of antibacterial treatment to reduce morbidity. Thus, laboratories use direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) to rapidly generate preliminary results from positive blood cultures. As the direct AST has not yet been published to be evaluated with EUCAST breakpoints, the purpose of the study was to investigate the reliability of the direct agar diffusion test to correctly produce AST results from positive monobacterial blood cultures compared with the VITEK2-based definitive AST, when current EUCAST breakpoints were used. A total of 428 isolates from unselected monobacterial routine blood cultures and 110 challenge strains were included. Direct agar diffusion-based and standard VITEK2-based AST of 2803 bacterium-drug combinations yielded a total clinical category agreement of 95.47% with 1.28% very major errors and 3.42% combined major and minor errors. On the species level, very major errors were observed in the species-drug combinations Enterococcus spp.-high-level gentamicin (10.87%) and Staphylococcus spp.-rifampicin (5%), only. No very major errors occurred with Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In most species-drug combinations, the direct agar diffusion test using EUCAST breakpoints precisely predicted the result of the definitive antibiotic susceptibility test and, thus, it can be used to optimize empiric antibiotic therapy until definitive results are available. PMID:25883798

  7. Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect ertapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae: VITEK2, MicroScan, Etest, disk diffusion, and broth microdilution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miae; Chung, Hae-Sun

    2015-05-01

    We investigated different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect ertapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 72 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were collected from a clinical microbiology laboratory of a tertiary university hospital, all of which were detected ertapenem resistance by the VITEK2 system. Bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility were determined using the VITEK2. Ertapenem susceptibility test was performed using the MicroScan, Etest and a disk diffusion test. Ertapenem MICs were confirmed using the broth microdilution (BMD). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) of each method for the detection of ertapenem resistance were calculated. Carbapenemases and AmpC β-lactamase were screened using phenotypic methods. Among the 72 isolates, 20 isolates (27.8%) were resistant to ertapenem. Etest showed high sensitivity and specificity (85.0% and 88.5%, respectively) and excellent concordance with BMD. The disk diffusion test had the lowest sensitivity of 50.0%. The VITEK2 showed the lowest essential and categorical agreement (30.5% and 27.8%, respectively). The MicroScan showed relatively good agreement with BMD compared to the VITEK2. Most category disagreements were minor errors. There were 3 very major errors in both the MicroScan and disk diffusion test. Only 1 isolate was positive for carbapenemase screening test and all of the isolates were positive for AmpC screening test. In conclusion, the detection of ertapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae has limitations using routine testing such as an automated system or disk diffusion. Confirmation of results by an additional MIC test is recommended for accurate resistance results of ertapenem.

  8. Speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjian; Acton, Scott T

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides the derivation of speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD), a diffusion method tailored to ultrasonic and radar imaging applications. SRAD is the edge-sensitive diffusion for speckled images, in the same way that conventional anisotropic diffusion is the edge-sensitive diffusion for images corrupted with additive noise. We first show that the Lee and Frost filters can be cast as partial differential equations, and then we derive SRAD by allowing edge-sensitive anisotropic diffusion within this context. Just as the Lee and Frost filters utilize the coefficient of variation in adaptive filtering, SRAD exploits the instantaneous coefficient of variation, which is shown to be a function of the local gradient magnitude and Laplacian operators. We validate the new algorithm using both synthetic and real linear scan ultrasonic imagery of the carotid artery. We also demonstrate the algorithm performance with real SAR data. The performance measures obtained by means of computer simulation of carotid artery images are compared with three existing speckle reduction schemes. In the presence of speckle noise, speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion excels over the traditional speckle removal filters and over the conventional anisotropic diffusion method in terms of mean preservation, variance reduction, and edge localization.

  9. Determination of uronic acids in isolated hemicelluloses from kenaf using diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and the curve-fitting deconvolution method.

    PubMed

    Batsoulis, A N; Nacos, M K; Pappas, C S; Tarantilis, P A; Mavromoustakos, T; Polissiou, M G

    2004-02-01

    Hemicellulose samples were isolated from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.). Hemicellulosic fractions usually contain a variable percentage of uronic acids. The uronic acid content (expressed in polygalacturonic acid) of the isolated hemicelluloses was determined by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and the curve-fitting deconvolution method. A linear relationship between uronic acids content and the sum of the peak areas at 1745, 1715, and 1600 cm(-1) was established with a high correlation coefficient (0.98). The deconvolution analysis using the curve-fitting method allowed the elimination of spectral interferences from other cell wall components. The above method was compared with an established spectrophotometric method and was found equivalent for accuracy and repeatability (t-test, F-test). This method is applicable in analysis of natural or synthetic mixtures and/or crude substances. The proposed method is simple, rapid, and nondestructive for the samples.

  10. Continuous Wave Spectroscopy with Diffusion Theory for Quantification of Optical Properties: Comparison Between Multi-distance and Multi-wavelength Data Fitting Methods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Chi; Lin, Zhi-Fong; Nioka, Shoko; Chen, Li-Hsin; Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Chung, Pau-Choo

    2016-01-01

    Typically, continuous wave spectroscopy (CWS) can be used to accurately quantify biological tissue optical properties (μ a and μ s ') by employing the diffuse reflectance information acquired at multiple source-detector separations (multi-distance). On the other hand, sample optical properties can also be obtained by fitting multi-wavelength light reflectance acquired at a single source detector separation to the diffusion theory equation. To date, multi-wavelength and multi-distance methods have not yet been rigorously compared for their accuracy in quantification of the sample optical properties. In this investigation, we compared the accuracy of the two above-mentioned quantifying methods in the optical properties recovery. The liquid phantoms had μ a between 0.004 and 0.011 mm(-1) and μ s ' between 0.55 and 1.07 mm(-1) whose optical properties mimic the human breast. Multi-distance data and multi-wavelength data were fitted to the same diffusion equation for consistency. The difference between benchmark μ a and μ s ' and the fitted results, ΔError (ΔE) was used to evaluate the accuracy of the two methods. The results showed that either method yielded ΔE within 15-30 % when values were within certain limits to standard values applicable to μ s ' and μ a for human adipose tissue. Both methods showed no significant differences in ΔE values. Our results suggest that both multi-distance and multi-wavelength methods can yield similar reasonable optical properties in biological tissue with a proper calibration. PMID:27526161

  11. Method for the analysis of contribution of sliding and hopping to a facilitated diffusion of DNA-binding protein: Application to in vivo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaka, Marcin; Burdzy, Krzysztof; Hołyst, Robert

    2015-08-01

    DNA-binding protein searches for its target, a specific site on DNA, by means of diffusion. The search process consists of many recurrent steps of one-dimensional diffusion (sliding) along the DNA chain and three-dimensional diffusion (hopping) after dissociation of a protein from the DNA chain. Here we propose a computational method that allows extracting the contribution of sliding and hopping to the search process in vivo from the measurements of the kinetics of the target search by the lac repressor in Escherichia coli [P. Hammar et al., Science 336, 1595 (2012), 10.1126/science.1221648]. The method combines lattice Monte Carlo simulations with the Brownian excursion theory and includes explicitly steric constraints for hopping due to the helical structure of DNA. The simulation results including all experimental data reveal that the in vivo target search is dominated by sliding. The short-range hopping to the same base pair interrupts one-dimensional sliding while long-range hopping does not contribute significantly to the kinetics of the search of the target in vivo.

  12. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte-Carlo benchmarks and validation of van der Waals density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Paul; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Yoon, Mina; Kim, Jeongnim; Reboredo, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Benchmark diffusion quantum monte-carlo (DMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in graphite are compared with density functional theory (DFT) calculations using several van der Waals methods. The charge transfer is captured adequately with conventional local density functionals. At fixed geometries, these yield surprisingly accurate energetics. In unconstrained geometries, van der Waals corrections are required to correctly reproduce graphite and lithium binding. We find that the empirical method of Grimme et al. only gives correct diffusion barriers when the Li polarizability is reduced to nearly zero, consistent with the charge transfer in the solid-state environment. The Tkatchenko-Scheffler scheme captures the polarizability reduction, yielding accurate results at low computational cost. The self-consistent vdw-DF2 functional yields the best overall results but at increased cost. Slight differences in barrier heights remain with all the DFT approaches compared to the DMC. These results establish a hierarchy of modeling approaches for the lithium-carbon system. Partially supported by the Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. Numerical study on convection diffusion for gasification agent in underground coal gasification. Part I: establishment of mathematical models and solving method

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.H.; Ding, Y.M.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the distribution law of the gasification agent concentration in a deep-going way during underground coal gasification and the new method of solving the problem for the convection diffusion of the gas. In this paper, the basic features of convection diffusion for the gas produced in underground coal gasification are studied. On the basis of the model experiment, through the analysis of the distribution and patterns of variation for the fluid concentration field in the process of the combustion and gasification of the coal seams within the gasifier, the 3-D non-linear unstable mathematical models on the convection diffusion for oxygen are established. In order to curb such pseudo-physical effects as numerical oscillation and surfeit which frequently occurred in the solution of the complex mathematical models, the novel finite unit algorithm, the upstream weighted multi-cell balance method is advanced in this article, and its main derivation process is introduced.

  14. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments under conditions of uniform disk illumination. Critical comparison of analytical solutions, and a new mathematical method for calculation of diffusion coefficient D.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, A; Dupou, L; Altibelli, A; Trotard, J; Tocanne, J F

    1988-01-01

    A simple fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) apparatus using a fluorescence microscope with a conventional mercury arc lamp, working under conditions of "uniform disk illumination" is described. This set-up was designed essentially for the use of anthracene as fluorescent probe, which is bleached (photodimerization reaction) by illumination in the near ultraviolet range (360 nm). It is shown that the lateral diffusion coefficients D can be readily calculated from fluorescence recovery curves using a finite differentiate method in combination with statistical analysis of the data. In contrast to the analytical solutions so far described, this numerical approach is particularly versatile. With a minimization algorithm, D and the probe mobile fraction can be readily calculated for any recovery time under various experimental conditions. These include different probe concentration profiles in the illuminated area after the bleaching step, and situations of infinite or noninfinite reservoir in the diffusion area outside the illuminated area. PMID:3395663

  15. Multinomial Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel stochastic, space/time discrete representation of particle diffusion (e.g. Brownian motion) based on discrete probability distributions. We show that in the limit of both very small time step and large concentration, our description is equivalent to the space/time continuous stochastic diffusion equation. Being discrete in both time and space, our model can be used as an extremely accurate, efficient, and stable stochastic finite-difference diffusion algorithm when concentrations are so small that computationally expensive particle-based methods are usually needed. Through numerical simulations, we show that our method can generate realizations that capture the statistical properties of particle simulations. While our method converges converges to both the correct ensemble mean and ensemble variance very quickly with decreasing time step, but for small concentration, the stochastic diffusion PDE does not, even for very small time steps.

  16. Optimization of the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) method for simultaneous assay of potassium and plant-available phosphorus in soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulin; Mason, Sean; McNeill, Ann; McLaughlin, Michael J

    2013-09-15

    Potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) are two important macronutrients for crops, and are usually applied to soils as granular fertilizer before seeding. Therefore, accurate soil tests prior to planting to predict crop response to fertilizers are important in optimizing crop yields. Traditional methods used for testing both available K and P in soils, which are based on chemical extraction procedures, are to be soil-type dependent, and the predictive relationships across a broad range of soils are generally poor. The diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique, based on diffusion theory, is extensively used to measure the diffusive supply of trace elements, metals and some nutrients in soils and water. When DGT is used to assess plant-available P in soils, a good relationship is found between crop response to P fertilizer and concentrations of P in soil measured by DGT, and therefore the DGT method provides a more precise recommendation of P fertilizer requirements. Adaptation of the DGT method to measure plant-available K in soils has already been attempted [1], but limitations were reported due to the non-uniform size of the resin gel, decreased K binding rate of the gel at long deployment times and a limited ability to measure a wide range of K concentrations. To eliminate these problems, a new resin gel has been developed by combining Amberlite and ferrihydrite. This mixed Amberlite and ferrihydrite (MAF) gel has improved properties in terms of handling and even distribution of Amberlite in the gel. The elution efficiencies of the MAF gel for K and P were 90% and 96%, respectively. The diffusion coefficient of K through the diffusive gel was 1.30 × 10(-5)cm(2)s(-1) at 22 ± 1°C and was stable through time. Since ferrihydrite is already used in DGT P testing, the ability of the MAF gel to assess available P simultaneously was also assessed. The MAF gel performed the same as the traditional ferrihydrite gel for available P assessment in a wide variety of

  17. Adsorption and Diffusion of Fructose in Zeolite HZSM-5: Selection of Models and Methods for Computational Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Assary, Rajeev S.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Kerber, Torsten; Sauer, Joachim

    2011-11-10

    The adsorption and protonation of fructose inHZSM-5 have been studied for the assessment of models for accurate reaction energy calculations and the evaluation of molecular diffusivity. The adsorption and protonation were calculated using 2T, 5T, and 46T clusters as well as a periodic model. The results indicate that the reaction thermodynamics cannot be predicted correctly using small cluster models, such as 2T or 5T, because these small cluster models fail to represent the electrostatic effect of a zeolite cage, which provides additional stabilization to the ion pair formed upon the protonation of fructose. Structural parameters optimized using the 46T cluster model agree well with those of the full periodic model; however, the calculated reaction energies are in significant error due to the poor account of dispersion effects by density functional theory. The dispersion effects contribute -30.5 kcal/mol to the binding energy of fructose in the zeolite pore based on periodic model calculations that include dispersion interactions. The protonation of the fructose ternary carbon hydroxyl group was calculated to be exothermic by 5.5 kcal/mol with a reaction barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol using the periodic model with dispersion effects. Our results suggest that the internal diffusion of fructose in HZSM-5 is very likely to be energetically limited and only occurs at high temperature due to the large size of the molecule.

  18. Adsorption and diffusion of fructose in zeolite HZSM-5: selection of models and methods for computational studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Assary, R. S.; Greeley, J.; Kerber, T.; Sauer, J.

    2011-09-14

    The adsorption and protonation of fructose in HZSM-5 have been studied for the assessment of models for accurate reaction energy calculations and the evaluation of molecular diffusivity. The adsorption and protonation were calculated using 2T, 5T, and 46T clusters as well as a periodic model. The results indicate that the reaction thermodynamics cannot be predicted correctly using small cluster models, such as 2T or 5T, because these small cluster models fail to represent the electrostatic effect of a zeolite cage, which provides additional stabilization to the ion pair formed upon the protonation of fructose. Structural parameters optimized using the 46T cluster model agree well with those of the full periodic model; however, the calculated reaction energies are in significant error due to the poor account of dispersion effects by density functional theory. The dispersion effects contribute -30.5 kcal/mol to the binding energy of fructose in the zeolite pore based on periodic model calculations that include dispersion interactions. The protonation of the fructose ternary carbon hydroxyl group was calculated to be exothermic by 5.5 kcal/mol with a reaction barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol using the periodic model with dispersion effects. Our results suggest that the internal diffusion of fructose in HZSM-5 is very likely to be energetically limited and only occurs at high temperature due to the large size of the molecule.

  19. Mixed weak-perturbative solution method for Maxwell's equations of diffusion with Müller's partial stress tensor in the low velocity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faliagas, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Maxwell's theory of multicomponent diffusion and subsequent extensions are based on systems of mass and momentum conservation equations. The partial stress tensor, which is involved in these equations, is expressed in terms of the gradients of velocity fields by statistical and continuum mechanical methods. We propose a method for the solution of Maxwell's equations of diffusion coupled with Müller's expression for the partial stress tensor. The proposed method consists in a singular perturbation process, followed by a weak (finite element) analysis of the resulting PDE systems. The singularity involved in the obtained equations was treated by a special technique, by which lower-order systems were supplemented by proper combinations of higher-order equations. The method proved particularly efficient for the solution of the Maxwell-Müller system, eventually reducing the number of unknown fields to that of the classical Navier-Stokes/Fick system. It was applied to the classical Stefan tube problem and the Hagen-Poiseuille flow in a hollow-fiber membrane tube. Numerical results for these problems are presented, and compared with the Navier-Stokes/Fick approximation. It is shown that the 0-th order term of the Maxwell-Müller equations differs from a properly formulated Navier-Stokes/Fick system, by a numerically insignificant amount. Numerical results for 1st-order terms indicate a good agreement of the classical approximation (with properly formulated Navier-Stokes and Fick's equations) with the Maxwell-Müller system, in the studied cases.

  20. Vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.