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Sample records for agard fluid dynamics

  1. AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics in Aeronautics: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Fluid Dynamics Panel of AGARD arranged a Symposium on Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics in Aeronautics, on 7 to 10 April 1986 in Aix-en-Provence, France. The purpose of the Symposium was to provide an assessment of the status of CFD in aerodynamic design and analysis, with an emphasis on emerging applications of advanced computational techniques to complex configurations. Sessions were devoted specifically to grid generation, methods for inviscid flows, calculations of viscous-inviscid interactions, and methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The 31 papers presented at the meeting are published in AGARD Conference Proceedings CP-412 and are listed in the Appendix of this report. A brief synopsis of each paper and some general conclusions and recommendations are given.

  2. Technical evaluation report, AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics was to provide an update of the stae-of-the-art with respect to the prediction, simulation, and measurement of the effects of icing, anti-icing fluids, and various precipitation on the aerodynamic characteristics of flight vehicles. Sessions were devoted to introductory and survey papers and icing certification issues, to analytical and experimental simulation of ice frost contamination and its effects of aerodynamics, and to the effects of heavy rain and deicing/anti-icing fluids.

  3. Technical evaluation report of AGARD Technical Evaluation Meeting on Unsteady Aerodynamics: Fundamentals and Applications to Aircraft Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabey, D. G.; Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    From May 6 to 9, 1985, the Fluid Dynamics Panel and Flight Mechanics Panel of AGARD jointly arranged a Symposium on Unsteady Aerodynamics-Fundamentals and Applications to Aircraft Dynamics at the Stadthall, Goettingen, West Germany. This Symposium was organized by an international program committee chaired by Dr. K. J. Orlik-Ruckemann of the Fluid Dynamics Panel. The program consisted of five sessions grouped in two parts: (1) Fundamentals of Unsteady Aerodynamics; and (2) Applications to Aircraft Dynamics. The 35 papers presented at the 4 day meeting are published in AGARD CP 386 and listed in the Appendix. As the papers are already available and cover a very wide field, the evaluators have offered brief comments on every paper, followed by an overall evaluation of the meeting, together with some general conclusions and recommendations.

  4. Preliminary report on candidates for AGARD standard aeroelastic configurations for dynamic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    At the request of the Aeroelasticity Subcommittee of the AGARD Structures and Materials Panel, a survey of member countries has been conducted to seek candidates for a prospective set of standard configurations to be used for comparison of calculated and measured dynamic aeroelastic behavior with emphasis on the transonic speed range. This set is a sequel to that established several years ago for comparisons of calculated and measured aerodynamic pressures and forces. Approximately two dozen people in the United States, and more than three dozen people in the other member countries, were contacted. This preliminary report presents the results of the survey and an analysis of those results along with recommendations for the initial set of standard configurations and for additional experimental work needed to fill significant gaps in the available information.

  5. Euler computations of AGARD Working Group 07 airfoil test cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Barton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to provide a set of accurate standard test problems for computational code developers, a series of inviscid airfoil test cases were chosen by the AGARD Working Group 07, a subpanel of the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel. The cases include three different airfoils at transonic to supersonic conditions. A large number of international experts responded in this effort with computations that have been contrasted for accuracy and consistency. This paper is a summary of the authors' contribution to this study. In particular, the important aspects of the solution process that made it possible to obtain the high level of accuracy needed in this study are stressed.

  6. AGARD Standard Aeroelastic Configurations for Dynamic Response I - Wing 445.6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    data for the AGARD 3D swept tapered standard configuration "Wing 445.6", along with related descriptive data of the model properties required for...model properties required for comparative flutter caliculations. As part of a cooperative AGARD-SMP programme, guided by the Sub-Committee on... properties needed for flutter calculations. Reference 4 contains all of the flutter data and required information with the exception of the mode

  7. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  8. AGARD Index of Publications 1971-1973

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    capabilities for the common benefit of the NATO community. The highest authority within AGARD is the National Delegates Board consi:;ting of officially...member nations and the NATO Authorities through the AGARD series of publications of which this is one. Participation in AGARD activities is by...supplied by AGA. RU or the authors . i . Published November 1974 Copyright © AGARD 1974 083.86:025.3 National Teohnic-- Information Servioe is Aut

  9. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  10. Computational astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Michael L.; Clarke, David A.; Stone, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The field of astrophysical fluid dynamics (AFD) is described as an emerging discipline which derives historically from both the theory of stellar evolution and space plasma physics. The fundamental physical assumption behind AFD is that fluid equations of motion accurately describe the evolution of plasmas on scales that are large in comparison with particle interaction length scales. Particular attention is given to purely fluid models of large-scale astrophysical plasmas. The role of computer simulation in AFD research is also highlighted and a suite of general-purpose application codes for AFD research is discussed. The codes are called ZEUS-2D and ZEUS-3D and solve the equations of AFD in two and three dimensions, respectively, in several coordinate geometries for general initial and boundary conditions. The topics of bipolar outflows from protostars, galactic superbubbles and supershells, and extragalactic radio sources are addressed.

  11. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, F. H.

    In the past 8 years, since Pedlosky's book was first published, it has found a well established place in the literature of dynamical meteorology and physical oceanography. Geophysicists less familiar with these fields may need to be reminded that the subject of geophysical fluid dynamics, in the narrow definition used in the title of the book, refers to the theory of the large-scale motions of the atmosphere and the oceans. Topics such as thermal convection in the atmosphere or in Earth's mantle and core are not treated in this book, and the reader will search in vain for a discussion of atmospheric or oceanic tides. The theory of quasi-geostrophic flow is described comprehensively, however, and its major applications to problems of atmospheric and oceanic circulations are considered in detail.

  12. Entomological fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John

    2007-11-01

    The world of arthropods (insects and spiders) presents a number of novel fluid mechanics problems on a scale of interest to the microfluidics community. We address a number of such problems, giving particular attention to elucidating and rationalizing natural strategies for water-repellency and fluid transport on a small scale. The rough, hairy integument of water-walking arthropods is well known to be responsible for their water-repellency; we here consider its additional roles in underwater breathing and propulsion along the free surface. When submerged, many arthropods are able to survive by virtue of a thin air bubble trapped along their rough exteriors. The diffusion of dissolved oxygen from the water into the bubble allows it to function as an external lung, and enables certain species to remain underwater indefinitely. By coupling the bubble mechanics and chemistry, we develop criteria for this style of underwater breathing. We further demonstrate that the tilted flexible leg hairs of water-walking arthropods render the leg cuticle directionally anisotropic: contact lines advance most readily towards the leg tips. The dynamical role of the resulting unidirectional adhesion is explored, and yields new insight into the manner in which water-walking arthropods generate thrust, glide and leap from the free surface. Finally, we provide new rationale for the fundamental topological difference in the roughness on plants and insects, and suggest new directions for biomimetic design.

  13. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  14. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  15. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  16. Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2006-11-01

    Fluid dynamics is fundamental to our understanding of the atmosphere and oceans. Although many of the same principles of fluid dynamics apply to both the atmosphere and oceans, textbooks tend to concentrate on the atmosphere, the ocean, or the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD). This textbook provides a comprehensive unified treatment of atmospheric and oceanic fluid dynamics. The book introduces the fundamentals of geophysical fluid dynamics, including rotation and stratification, vorticity and potential vorticity, and scaling and approximations. It discusses baroclinic and barotropic instabilities, wave-mean flow interactions and turbulence, and the general circulation of the atmosphere and ocean. Student problems and exercises are included at the end of each chapter. Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics: Fundamentals and Large-Scale Circulation will be an invaluable graduate textbook on advanced courses in GFD, meteorology, atmospheric science and oceanography, and an excellent review volume for researchers. Additional resources are available at www.cambridge.org/9780521849692. Includes end of chapter review questions to aid understanding Unified and comprehensive treatment of both atmospheric and oceanic fluid dynamics Covers many modern topics and provides up to date knowledge

  17. An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, G. K.

    2000-02-01

    First published in 1967, Professor Batchelor's classic work is still one of the foremost texts on fluid dynamics. His careful presentation of the underlying theories of fluids is still timely and applicable, even in these days of almost limitless computer power. This reissue ensures that a new generation of graduate students experiences the elegance of Professor Batchelor's writing.

  18. The Variety of Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Francis; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses three research topics which are concerned with eminently practical problems and deal at the same time with fundamental fluid dynamical problems. These research topics come from the general areas of chemical and biological engineering, geophysics, and pure mathematics. (HM)

  19. Fluid Dynamics of Bottle Filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGough, Patrick; Gao, Haijing; Appathurai, Santosh; Basaran, Osman

    2011-11-01

    Filling of bottles is a widely practiced operation in a large number of industries. Well known examples include filling of ``large'' bottles with shampoos and cleaners in the household products and beauty care industries and filling of ``small'' bottles in the pharmaceutical industry. Some bottle filling operations have recently drawn much attention from the fluid mechanics community because of the occurrence of a multitude of complex flow regimes, transitions, and instabilities such as mounding and coiling that occur as a bottle is filled with a fluid. In this talk, we present a primarily computational study of the fluid dynamical challenges that can arise during the rapid filling of bottles. Given the diversity of fluids used in filling applications, we consider four representative classes of fluids that exhibit Newtonian, shear-thinning, viscoelastic, and yield-stress rheologies. The equations governing the dynamics of bottle filling are solved either in their full 3D but axisymmetric form or using the slender-jet approximation.

  20. The handbook of fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.W.

    1998-07-01

    This book provides professionals in the field of fluid dynamics with a comprehensive guide and resource. The book balances three traditional areas of fluid mechanics--theoretical, computational, and experimental--and expounds on basic science and engineering techniques. Each chapter introduces a topic, discusses the primary issues related to this subject, outlines approaches taken by experts, and supplies references for further information. Topics discussed include: (1) basic engineering fluid dynamics; (2) classical fluid dynamics; (3) turbulence modeling; (4) reacting flows; (5) multiphase flows; (6) flow and porous media; (7) high Reynolds number asymptotic theories; (8) finite difference method; (9) finite volume method; (10) finite element methods; (11) spectral element methods for incompressible flows; (12) experimental methods, such as hot-wire anemometry, laser-Doppler velocimetry, and flow visualization; and (13) applications, such as axial-flow compressor and fan aerodynamics, turbomachinery, airfoils and wings, atmospheric flows, and mesoscale oceanic flows.

  1. Fluid dynamics test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayman, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Test method and apparatus determine fluid effective mass and damping in frequency range where effective mass may be considered as total mass less sum of slosh masses. Apparatus is designed so test tank and its mounting yoke are supported from structural test wall by series of flexures.

  2. Noncommutative geometry and fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Praloy; Ghosh, Subir

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper we have developed a Non-Commutative (NC) generalization of perfect fluid model from first principles, in a Hamiltonian framework. The noncommutativity is introduced at the Lagrangian (particle) coordinate space brackets and the induced NC fluid bracket algebra for the Eulerian (fluid) field variables is derived. Together with a Hamiltonian this NC algebra generates the generalized fluid dynamics that satisfies exact local conservation laws for mass and energy, thereby maintaining mass and energy conservation. However, nontrivial NC correction terms appear in the charge and energy fluxes. Other non-relativistic spacetime symmetries of the NC fluid are also discussed in detail. This constitutes the study of kinematics and dynamics of NC fluid. In the second part we construct an extension of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model based on the NC fluid dynamics presented here. We outline the way in which NC effects generate cosmological perturbations bringing about anisotropy and inhomogeneity in the model. We also derive a NC extended Friedmann equation.

  3. Numerical Fluid Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Bernoulli’s friend Leonhard Euler (1707-83), in two path-breaking papers (1752, 1755). In his second paper, Euler claimed optimistically that "all the theory...the dream of Euler , Poincare, and Hilbert: of making fluid mechanics into a mathematical science, like geometry. Von Neumann, who seems to have...ORIGINATORS LAMB Chaps. KEY PHRASES 1. EULER -LAGRANCE III-VI SOLID BOUNDARIES vs. POTENTIAL FLOW VIII-IX FREE BOUNDARIES INTERFACES, SLIP- STREAMS GRAVITY

  4. Kinetic Theory and Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Yoshio

    This monograph gives a comprehensive description of the relationship and connections between kinetic theory and fluid dynamics, mainly for a time-independent problem in a general domain. Ambiguities in this relationship are clarified, and the incompleteness of classical fluid dynamics in describing the behavior of a gas in the continuum limit—recently reported as the ghost effect—is also discussed. The approach used in this work engages an audience of theoretical physicists, applied mathematicians, and engineers. By a systematic asymptotic analysis, fluid-dynamic-type equations and their associated boundary conditions that take into account the weak effect of gas rarefaction are derived from the Boltzmann system. Comprehensive information on the Knudsen-layer correction is also obtained. Equations and their boundary conditions are carefully classified depending on the physical context of problems. Applications are presented to various physically interesting phenomena, including flows induced by temperature fields, evaporation and condensation problems, examples of the ghost effect, and bifurcation of flows. Key features: * many applications and physical models of practical interest * experimental works such as the Knudsen compressor are examined to supplement theory * engineers will not be overwhelmed by sophisticated mathematical techniques * mathematicians will benefit from clarity of definitions and precise physical descriptions given in mathematical terms * appendices collect key derivations and formulas, important to the practitioner, but not easily found in the literature Kinetic Theory and Fluid Dynamics serves as a bridge for those working in different communities where kinetic theory or fluid dynamics is important: graduate students, researchers and practitioners in theoretical physics, applied mathematics, and various branches of engineering. The work can be used in graduate-level courses in fluid dynamics, gas dynamics, and kinetic theory; some parts

  5. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Outreach Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Schwarz, J. W.; Noguez, G.

    2012-12-01

    Here we will present high definition films of laboratory experiments demonstrating basic fluid motions similar to those occurring in atmospheres and oceans. In these experiments, we use water to simulate the fluid dynamics of both the liquid (oceans) and gaseous (atmospheric) envelopes. To simulate the spinning of the earth, we carry out the experiments on a rotating table. For each experiment, we begin by looking at our system first without the effects of rotation. Then, we include rotation to see how the behavior of the fluid changes due to the Coriolis accelerations. Our hope is that by viewing these experiments one will develop a sense for how fluids behave both in rotating and non-rotating systems. By noting the differences between the experiments, it should then be possible to establish a basis to think about large-scale fluid motions that exist in Earth's oceans and atmospheres as well as on planets other than Earth.Plan view image of vortices in a rotating tank of fluid. Movies of such flows make accessible the often difficult to comprehend fluid dynamical processes that occur in planetary atmospheres and oceans.

  6. AGARD Bulletin: Meetings - Publications - Membership.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    OTAN Secret) 20-21 October TURKEY (Ankara) Lecture Series No. 131 The Performance of Antennas in their Operating 24-25 October GREECE Electromagnetic...Operations: Physiological and Performance Aspects (NATO Secret) Runion des Sp6cialistes sur Les Operations A~riennes Intensives Soutenues considirtes...sous I’angle de la Physiologie et des Performances (OTAN Secret) 25 -29 April NETHERLANDS Fluid Dynamics 52nd Panel Meeting/Symposium on (Rotterdam

  7. Progress in geophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Allan R.

    Geophysical fluid dynamics deals with the motions and physics of the atmosphere, oceans and interior of the earth and other planets: the winds, the swirls, the currents that occur on myriads of scales from millimeter to climatological. Explanations of natural phenomena, basic processes and abstractions are sought. The rotation of the earth, the buoyancy of its fluids and the tendency towards large-scale turbulence characterize these flows. But geophysical fluid dynamics is importantly a part of modern fluid dynamics which is contributing to the development of nonlinear mechanics generally. Some general insights are emerging for nonlinear systems which must be regarded as partly deterministic and partly random or which are complex and aperiodic. Contributions from geophysical fluid dynamics come from its methodology, from the experience of examples, and from the perspective provided by its unique scale. Contributions have been made to turbulent, chaotic and coherently structured nonlinear process research. Turbulent vortices larger than man himself naturally invite detailed investigation and deterministic physical studies. Examples are storms in the atmosphere and large ring vortices spun off by the Gulf Stream current in mid-ocean. The statistics of these events determine critical aspects of the general circulations. Fluid dynamicists generally now know that it is often relevant or necessary to study local dynamical processes of typical eddies even though only the average properties of the flow are of interest; progress in understanding the turbulent boundary layer in pipes involves the study of millimeter-scale vortices. Weather-related studies were seminal to the construction of the new scientific field of chaos. Coherent vortices abound of which the Great Red Spot of Jupiter is a spectacular example. Geophysical fluid dynamicists have been among forefront researchers in exploiting the steadily increasing speed and capacity of modern computers. Supercomputers

  8. Computational fluid dynamics uses in fluid dynamics/aerodynamics education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for the purpose of fluid dynamics physics education. Because of the tremendous wealth of information available from numerical simulation, certain fundamental concepts can be efficiently communicated using an interactive graphical interrogation of the appropriate numerical simulation data base. In other situations, a large amount of aerodynamic information can be communicated to the student by interactive use of simple CFD tools on a workstation or even in a personal computer environment. The emphasis in this presentation is to discuss ideas for how this process might be implemented. Specific examples, taken from previous publications, will be used to highlight the presentation.

  9. Fluid dynamics of bacterial turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Drescher, Knut; Wensink, Henricus H; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-05-31

    Self-sustained turbulent structures have been observed in a wide range of living fluids, yet no quantitative theory exists to explain their properties. We report experiments on active turbulence in highly concentrated 3D suspensions of Bacillus subtilis and compare them with a minimal fourth-order vector-field theory for incompressible bacterial dynamics. Velocimetry of bacteria and surrounding fluid, determined by imaging cells and tracking colloidal tracers, yields consistent results for velocity statistics and correlations over 2 orders of magnitude in kinetic energy, revealing a decrease of fluid memory with increasing swimming activity and linear scaling between kinetic energy and enstrophy. The best-fit model allows for quantitative agreement with experimental data.

  10. Fundamentals of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, James C.

    2006-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere and oceans exhibit complex patterns of fluid motion over a vast range of space and time scales. These patterns combine to establish the climate in response to solar radiation that is inhomogeneously absorbed by the materials comprising air, water, and land. Spontaneous, energetic variability arises from instabilities in the planetary-scale circulations, appearing in many different forms such as waves, jets, vortices, boundary layers, and turbulence. Geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) is the science of all these types of fluid motion. This textbook is a concise and accessible introduction to GFD for intermediate to advanced students of the physics, chemistry, and/or biology of Earth's fluid environment. The book was developed from the author's many years of teaching a first-year graduate course at the University of California, Los Angeles. Readers are expected to be familiar with physics and mathematics at the level of general dynamics (mechanics) and partial differential equations. Covers the essential GFD required for atmospheric science and oceanography courses Mathematically rigorous, concise coverage of basic theory and applications to both oceans and atmospheres Author is a world expert; this book is based on the course he has taught for many years Exercises are included, with solutions available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org

  11. AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    of the AGARD publications printing and distribution programme, as well as for press and public relations and similar activities. The total staff...authority to approve up to two topics from the Military Committee Memorandum as Aerospace Applications Studies each year. The selected topics are anounced

  12. Interdisciplinary Research Programs in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    scientific disciplines that deal with the dynamics of stratified fluids, rotating fluids, fluid with phase changes and non-Newtonian fluids. To formulate...clearing-house for the mathematical, experimental and computational techniques which serve astrophysics, climate science, geodynamics, meteorology and... Zika , Physical Oceanography, University of New South Wales, “The stability of cascading flows”. RESULTS The Principal Lectures and Fellows

  13. Research on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Preconditioning matrices for Chebyshev derivative operators in several space dimensions; the Jacobi matrix technique in computational fluid dynamics; and Chebyshev techniques for periodic problems are discussed.

  14. Fluid dynamics in developmental biology: moving fluids that shape ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H.E.; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2009-01-01

    Human conception, indeed fertilization in general, takes place in a fluid, but what role does fluid dynamics have during the subsequent development of an organism? It is becoming increasingly clear that the number of genes in the genome of a typical organism is not sufficient to specify the minutiae of all features of its ontogeny. Instead, genetics often acts as a choreographer, guiding development but leaving some aspects to be controlled by physical and chemical means. Fluids are ubiquitous in biological systems, so it is not surprising that fluid dynamics should play an important role in the physical and chemical processes shaping ontogeny. However, only in a few cases have the strands been teased apart to see exactly how fluid forces operate to guide development. Here, we review instances in which the hand of fluid dynamics in developmental biology is acknowledged, both in human development and within a wider biological context, together with some in which fluid dynamics is notable but whose workings have yet to be understood, and we provide a fluid dynamicist’s perspective on possible avenues for future research. PMID:19794816

  15. Dynamic Environmental Qualification Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    through the AGARD series of publications of which this is one. Participation in AGARD activities is by invitation only and is normally limited to...citizens of the NATO nations. The content of this publication has been reproduced directly from material supplied by AGARD or the authors. Published...review the background and intentions of related Military Standards publications ; - To try to formulate a common basis for dynamic structural

  16. Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Volcanic Tremor,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    stations near Mount Etna and concluded abrupt flow input, an abrupt outflow, or some other that the origin was source related, perturbation of an...the pressure head in meters, of the fluid transient theory to the analysis of tremor Q = the volumetric flow rate (m3/s), at Mount Etna . Analysis of...analytical potential of the fluid dynamic theory, we consider a single-phase fluid, a melt of Mount Hood andesite at 1250C, in which significant pressure

  17. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  18. Body Fluid Dynamics: Back to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Gautam; Neilson, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering investigations conducted over a half century ago on tonicity, transcapillary fluid exchange, and the distribution of water and solute serve as a foundation for understanding the physiology of body fluid spaces. With passage of time, however, some of these concepts have lost their connectivity to more contemporary information. Here we examine the physical forces determining the compartmentalization of body fluid and its movement across capillary and cell membrane barriers, drawing particular attention to the interstitium operating as a dynamic interface for water and solute distribution rather than as a static reservoir. Newer work now supports an evolving model of body fluid dynamics that integrates exchangeable Na+ stores and transcapillary dynamics with advances in interstitial matrix biology. PMID:22034644

  19. Fluid Dynamics Lagrangian Simulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-08

    Virginia 22102 (703) 821-43"K Oth~er SAIC Offices Albuquerque. Boston. Colorado Springs . Dayton, Huntsville. Las Vegas, Los AngeLes. Oak Ridge, Orlando...of a Cylinder Wake Subjected to Localized Surface Ex- Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 191. pp. 197-223. citation."Jogrialof -jdd Mecanics , Vol. 234

  20. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  1. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena.

  2. Fluid dynamics on sieve trays

    SciTech Connect

    Hag, M.A.

    1982-08-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of fluid properties on the hydrodynamics of sieve tray columns. The study showed that changes in liquid viscosity influenced froth height, while changes in liquid surface tension and density influenced total pressure drop across the trays. Liquid holdup was independent of these solution properties. The liquid systems used for the study were: water/glycerol for viscosity, water/ethanol for surface tension and methanol/chloroform for density.

  3. 'Fluid Dynamics,' mixed media by Tina York depicts fluid dynamics studies at the Ames Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    'Fluid Dynamics,' mixed media by Tina York depicts fluid dynamics studies at the Ames Research Center. The purpose of such studies is to learn more about what happens to an object when it encounters the friction of atmospheric resistence (such as a plane encountering resistance as it speeds through the air). used in Ames 60 year history by Glenn Bugos NASA SP-4314

  4. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.

    1999-01-14

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been fully investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop unimproved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verify and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  5. Variational principles for stochastic fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Darryl D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper derives stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for fluid dynamics from a stochastic variational principle (SVP). The paper proceeds by taking variations in the SVP to derive stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations; writing their Itô representation; and then investigating the properties of these stochastic fluid models in comparison with each other, and with the corresponding deterministic fluid models. The circulation properties of the stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations are found to closely mimic those of the deterministic ideal fluid models. As with deterministic ideal flows, motion along the stochastic Stratonovich paths also preserves the helicity of the vortex field lines in incompressible stochastic flows. However, these Stratonovich properties are not apparent in the equivalent Itô representation, because they are disguised by the quadratic covariation drift term arising in the Stratonovich to Itô transformation. This term is a geometric generalization of the quadratic covariation drift term already found for scalar densities in Stratonovich's famous 1966 paper. The paper also derives motion equations for two examples of stochastic geophysical fluid dynamics; namely, the Euler–Boussinesq and quasi-geostropic approximations. PMID:27547083

  6. Variational principles for stochastic fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Holm, Darryl D

    2015-04-08

    This paper derives stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for fluid dynamics from a stochastic variational principle (SVP). The paper proceeds by taking variations in the SVP to derive stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations; writing their Itô representation; and then investigating the properties of these stochastic fluid models in comparison with each other, and with the corresponding deterministic fluid models. The circulation properties of the stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations are found to closely mimic those of the deterministic ideal fluid models. As with deterministic ideal flows, motion along the stochastic Stratonovich paths also preserves the helicity of the vortex field lines in incompressible stochastic flows. However, these Stratonovich properties are not apparent in the equivalent Itô representation, because they are disguised by the quadratic covariation drift term arising in the Stratonovich to Itô transformation. This term is a geometric generalization of the quadratic covariation drift term already found for scalar densities in Stratonovich's famous 1966 paper. The paper also derives motion equations for two examples of stochastic geophysical fluid dynamics; namely, the Euler-Boussinesq and quasi-geostropic approximations.

  7. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, Anil W.

    2005-08-01

    This is a textbook for advanced undergraduate and first-year graduate students in mechanical, aerospace, and chemical engineering. The book emphasizes understanding CFD through physical principles and examples. The author follows a consistent philosophy of control volume formulation of the fundamental laws of fluid motion and energy transfer, and introduces a novel notion of 'smoothing pressure correction' for solution of flow equations on collocated grids within the framework of the well-known SIMPLE algorithm. The subject matter is developed by considering pure conduction/diffusion, convective transport in 2-dimensional boundary layers and in fully elliptic flow situations and phase-change problems in succession. The book includes chapters on discretization of equations for transport of mass, momentum and energy on Cartesian, structured curvilinear and unstructured meshes, solution of discretised equations, numerical grid generation and convergence enhancement. Practicing engineers will find this particularly useful for reference and for continuing education.

  8. Fluid Dynamic Verification Experiments on STS-70

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid dynamic experiments were flown on STS-70 as phase two of the engineering evaluation of the first bioreactor Engineering Development Unit (EDU#1). The phase one experiments were comparative cell cultures in identical units on earth and onboard STS-70. In phase two, two types of fluid dynamic experiments were performed. Qualitative comparisons of the basic flow patterns were evaluated with the use of 'dye' streaklines formed from alternate injections of either a mild acid or base solution into the external flow loop that was then perfused into the vessel. The presence of Bromothymol Blue in the fluid then caused color changes from yellow to blue or vice versa, indicating the basic fluid motions. This reversible change could be repeated as desired. In the absence of significant density differences in the fluid, the flow patterns in space should be the same as on earth. Video tape records of the flow patterns for a wide range of operating conditions were obtained. The second type of fluid dynamic experiment was the quantitative evaluation of the trajectories of solid beads of various densities and sizes. The beads were introduced into the vessel and the paths recorded on video tape, with the vessel operated at various rotation rates and flow perfusion rates. Because of space limitations, the video camera was placed as close as possible to the vessel, resulting in significant optical distortion. This report describes the analysis methods to obtain comparisons between the in-flight fluid dynamics and numerical models of the flow field. The methods include optical corrections to the video images and calculation of the bead trajectories for given operating conditions and initial bead locations.

  9. Dynamic Patterns in Active Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jülicher, Frank

    2012-02-01

    Biological matter is inherently dynamic and exhibits active properties. A key example is the force generation by molecular motors in the cell cytoskeleton. Such active processes give rise to the generation of active mechanical stresses and spontaneous flows in gel-like cytoskeletal networks. Active material behaviors play a key role for the dynamics of cellular processes such as cell locomotion and cell division. We will discuss intracellular flow patterns that are created by active processes in the cell cortex. By combining theory with quantitative experiments we show that observed flow patterns result from profiles of active stress generation in the system. We will also consider the situation where active stress is regulated by a diffusing molecular species. In this case, spatial concentration patterns are generated by the interplay of stress regulation and self-generated flow fields.

  10. Bulk viscosity of multiparticle collision dynamics fluids.

    PubMed

    Theers, Mario; Winkler, Roland G

    2015-03-01

    We determine the viscosity parameters of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) approach, a particle-based mesoscale hydrodynamic simulation method for fluids. We perform analytical calculations and verify our results by simulations. The stochastic rotation dynamics and the Andersen thermostat variant of MPC are considered, both with and without angular momentum conservation. As an important result, we find a nonzero bulk viscosity for every MPC version. The explicit calculation shows that the bulk viscosity is determined solely by the collisional interactions of MPC.

  11. Environmental Fluid Dynamics in Space Capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhaohua

    Environmental fluid dynamics began to get more and more concern recently because of its effects on indoor air quality and ventilation strategy. Our research is trying to use the tools of Environmental fluid dynamics to investigate the life support system (LSS) for manned space flight, especially for future long-term planetary exploration flight (permanent space station and lunar base, space greenhouse of controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) etc.). The PIV technique will be adopted to obtain the velocity of the flow field and dyed fluids to capture the temperature field. On the other hand, we will use the commercial software (FLUENT) to numerical simulate the same problem. The results in this work can be used to improve the ventilation efficiency, reduce the energy costs and try to make the air in space capsule less effluvial.

  12. Fluid dynamics in porous media with Sailfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Rodrigo C. V.; Neumann, Rodrigo F.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we show the application of Sailfish to the study of fluid dynamics in porous media. Sailfish is an open-source software based on the lattice-Boltzmann method. This application of computational fluid dynamics is of particular interest to the oil and gas industry and the subject could be a starting point for an undergraduate or graduate student in physics or engineering. We built artificial samples of porous media with different porosities and used Sailfish to simulate the fluid flow through them in order to calculate their permeability and tortuosity. We also present a simple way to obtain the specific superficial area of porous media using Python libraries. To contextualise these concepts, we analyse the applicability of the Kozeny-Carman equation, which is a well-known permeability-porosity relation, to our artificial samples.

  13. The Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Mark, Russell; Hutchison, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Nowhere in sport is performance so dependent on the interaction of the athlete with the surrounding medium than in competitive swimming. As a result, understanding (at least implicitly) and controlling (explicitly) the fluid dynamics of swimming are essential to earning a spot on the medal stand. This is an extremely complex, highly multidisciplinary problem with a broad spectrum of research approaches. This review attempts to provide a historical framework for the fluid dynamics-related aspects of human swimming research, principally conducted roughly over the past five decades, with an emphasis on the past 25 years. The literature is organized below to show a continuous integration of computational and experimental technologies into the sport. Illustrations from the authors' collaborations over a 10-year period, coupling the knowledge and experience of an elite-level coach, a lead biomechanician at USA Swimming, and an experimental fluid dynamicist, are intended to bring relevance and immediacy to the review.

  14. Dynamics of squeezing fluids: Clapping wet hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Chang, Brian; Slama, Brice; Goodnight, Randy; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2013-08-01

    Droplets splash around when a fluid volume is quickly compressed. This phenomenon has been observed during common activities such as kids clapping with wet hands. The underlying mechanism involves a fluid volume being compressed vertically between two objects. This compression causes the fluid volume to be ejected radially and thereby generate fluid threads and droplets at a high speed. In this study, we designed and performed laboratory experiments to observe the process of thread and drop formation after a fluid is squeezed. A thicker rim at the outer edge forms and moves after the squeezing, and then becomes unstable and breaks into smaller drops. This process differs from previous well-known examples (i.e., transient crown splashes and continuous water bells) in aspects of transient fluid feeding, expanding rim dynamics, or sparsely distributed drops. We compared experimental measurements with theoretical models over three different stages; early squeezing, intermediate sheet-expansion, and later break-up of the liquid thread. In the earlier stage, the fluid is squeezed and its initial velocity is governed by the lubrication force. The outer rim of the liquid sheet forms curved trajectories due to gravity, inertia, drag, and surface tension. At the late stage, drop spacing set by the initial capillary instability does not change in the course of rim expansion, consequently final ejected droplets are very sparse compared to the size of the rim.

  15. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics in oil burner design

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    In Computational Fluid Dynamics, the differential equations which describe flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are approximately solved using a very laborious numerical procedure. Flows of practical interest to burner designs are always turbulent, adding to the complexity of requiring a turbulence model. This paper presents a model for burner design.

  17. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Symposium on Aeropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the considerable advances that have been made in computational fluid dynamics, the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored this symposium with the objective of providing a forum for exchanging information regarding recent developments in numerical methods, physical and chemical modeling, and applications. This conference publication is a compilation of 4 invited and 34 contributed papers presented in six sessions: algorithms one and two, turbomachinery, turbulence, components application, and combustors. Topics include numerical methods, grid generation, chemically reacting flows, turbulence modeling, inlets, nozzles, and unsteady flows.

  19. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  20. Collective dynamics of sperm in viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Harvey, Benedict B.; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    Collective dynamics in biology is an interesting subject for physicists, in part because of its close relations to emergent behaviors in condensed matter, such as phase separation and criticality. However, the emergence of order is often less drastic in systems composed of the living cells, sometimes due to the natural variability among individual organisms. Here, using bull sperm as a model system, we demonstrate that the cells migrate collectively in viscoelastic fluids, exhibiting behavior similar to ``flocking''. This collectiveness is greatly reduced in similarly viscous Newtonian fluids, suggesting that the cell-cell interaction is primarily a result of the elastic property or the memory effect of the fluids, instead of pure hydrodynamic interactions. Unlike bacterial swarming, this collectiveness does not require a change in phenotype of the cells; therefore, it is a better model system for physicists. Supported by NIH grant 1R01HD070038.

  1. Fluid Dynamics of a Pressure Reducing Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Instruments for the monitoring of hazardous gases in and near the space shuttle collect sample gas at pressures on the order of one atmosphere and analyze their properties in an ultra-high vacuum by means of a quadrupole-mass-spectrometer partial pressure transducer. Sampling systems for such devices normally produce the required pressure reduction through combinations of vacuum pumps, fluid Tees and flow restrictors (e.g. orifices, sintered metal frits or capillaries). The present work presents an analytical model of the fluid dynamics of such a pressure reduction system which enables the calculation of the pressure in the receiver vessal in terms of system parameters known from the specifications for a given system (e.g. rated pumping speeds of the pumping hardware and the diameters of two orifices situated in two branches of a fluid Tee). The resulting formulas will expedite the fine tuning of instruments now under development and the design of later generations of such devices.

  2. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Robert P.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    1999-06-01

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been filly investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an improved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verifi and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  3. The fluid dynamics of human birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Andrea; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates the fluid dynamics associated with the human birth process. Specifically, we investigate the role of the viscosity of the amniotic fluid in transferring force from the contracting uterus to the fetus during delivery. This experimental work uses an approximate uterus and dilated cervix-fabricated with liquid latex-filled with a fluid of known viscosity and an oblong solid fetus. The force required to extract the fetus is recorded for several values of amniotic viscosity. The study looks at both pull-out force values (where the fetus is pulled from outside the uterus) and push-out force values (where pressure in the experimental uterus is used to remove the fetus). In addition to the viscosity study, we also investigate the increased force required to deliver an offset fetus by tilting the major axis of the oblong fetus and repeating the pull-and push-out experiments. This study will provide knowledge about the fundamental fluid dynamic processes involved in human birth.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics - The coming revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The development of aerodynamic theory is traced from the days of Aristotle to the present, with the next stage in computational fluid dynamics dependent on superspeed computers for flow calculations. Additional attention is given to the history of numerical methods inherent in writing computer codes applicable to viscous and inviscid analyses for complex configurations. The advent of the superconducting Josephson junction is noted to place configurational demands on computer design to avoid limitations imposed by the speed of light, and a Japanese projection of a computer capable of several hundred billion operations/sec is mentioned. The NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator is described, showing capabilities of a billion operations/sec with a memory of 240 million words using existing technology. Near-term advances in fluid dynamics are discussed.

  5. Fluid Dynamics of High Performance Turbomachines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    reflecting bound- ary conditions can be constructed. For the potential equation this was first done by Verdon et al [7] in 1975, and it is now the...for Time-Dependent Hyperbolic Systems. Center for Large Scale Scientific Computation CLaSSiC-87-16, Stanford University, Feb 1987. [7] J. M. Verdon ...Computational Fluid Dynamics Lab- oratory, 1986. [12] G. B. Whitham. Linear and Nonlinear Waves. John Wiley & Sons, 1974. [13] J. Mathews and R. L. Walker

  6. Isentropic fluid dynamics in a curved pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Rinaldo M.; Holden, Helge

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study isentropic flow in a curved pipe. We focus on the consequences of the geometry of the pipe on the dynamics of the flow. More precisely, we present the solution of the general Cauchy problem for isentropic fluid flow in an arbitrarily curved, piecewise smooth pipe. We consider initial data in the subsonic regime, with small total variation about a stationary solution. The proof relies on the front-tracking method and is based on [1].

  7. The fluid dynamics of the chocolate fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Adam K.; Wilson, Helen J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the fluid dynamics of the chocolate fountain. Molten chocolate is a mildly shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid. Dividing the flow into three main domains—the pumped flow up the centre, the film flow over each dome, and the freely falling curtain flow between the domes—we generate a wide-ranging study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. The central pumped flow is a benchmark to elucidate the effects of shear-thinning. The dome flow can be modelled as a thin-film flow with the leading-order effects being a simple balance of gravity and viscosity. Finally, the curtain flow is analytically intractable but is related to the existing theory of water bells (both inviscid and viscous). In pipe flow, Newtonian fluids exhibit a parabolic velocity profile; shear-thinning makes the profile more blunted. In thin-film flow over the dome, gravitational and viscous effects balance and the dome shape is not important beyond the local slope. We find that the chocolate thins and slows down as it travels down the dome. Finally, in the curtain flow, we predict the shape of the falling sheet for an inviscid fluid, and compare this with the literature to predict the shape for a viscous fluid, having shown that viscous forces are too great to ignore. We also find that the primary effect driving the shape of the curtain (which falls inwards towards the axis of the fountain) is surface tension. We find that the three domains provide excellent introductions to non-Newtonian mechanics, the important mathematical technique of scaling, and how to manipulate existing data to make our own predictions. We also find that the topic generates interest among the public in our engagement work.

  8. Dynamics of fluid mixing in separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, A.

    1991-05-01

    Separated flows at high Re (>103) are highly turbulent. In some situations the turbulence generation and mixing processes associated with flow separation are desirable, e.g., in heat exchangers or in many chemical engineering applications. In others, e.g., stalled airfoils, separation must be avoided as it causes loss in pressure and kinetic energy. To control the phenomenon effectively, physical mechanisms of flow separation and related aspects, such as the growth of flow instabilities in shear layers, the process of vortex formation, and the dynamics of fluid mixing in recirculating flow regions, must be understood. In many cases numerical procedures, e.g., Navier-Stokes calculations including k-ɛ turbulence modeling, fail to predict real physical mechanisms in separated flows.1,2 Separated flows in the lee of bluff bodies have been studied for many years.3,4 However, accurate measurements of the magnitude and direction of velocities and the magnitude of the terms of the Reynolds stress tensor have been restricted by the unsuitability of the hot-wire anemometer in recirculating flows. The development of the pulsed-wire anemometer, flying hot-wire anemometer, and laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) allows more reliable measurements also in turbulent separated flows.5-8 The aim of this paper is to investigate the dynamics of undisturbed fluid mixing in separated regions of 2-D, incompressible flows with visualization techniques and LDA. Measurements were performed with a vertical flat plate model, mounted in a closed-circuit wind tunnel at low blockage ratio. Because of the noninvasive character, optical techniques like LDA are more suitable to analyze complex fluid motions than pulsed-wire and flying-wire anemometry. The LDA system used to investigate turbulent flow structures consists of a two-channel version operating in backscatter mode and a specifically developed phase detector to extract phase-averaged information from recorded measurement ensembles.9 Endplates

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics - Applications in Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beninati, Maria Laura; Kathol, Austin; Ziemian, Constance

    2012-11-01

    A new Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) exercise has been developed for the undergraduate introductory fluid mechanics course at Bucknell University. The goal is to develop a computational exercise that students complete which links the manufacturing processes course and the concurrent fluid mechanics course in a way that reinforces the concepts in both. In general, CFD is used as a tool to increase student understanding of the fundamentals in a virtual world. A ``learning factory,'' which is currently in development at Bucknell seeks to use the laboratory as a means to link courses that previously seemed to have little correlation at first glance. A large part of the manufacturing processes course is a project using an injection molding machine. The flow of pressurized molten polyurethane into the mold cavity can also be an example of fluid motion (a jet of liquid hitting a plate) that is applied in manufacturing. The students will run a CFD process that captures this flow using their virtual mold created with a graphics package, such as SolidWorks. The laboratory structure is currently being implemented and analyzed as a part of the ``learning factory''. Lastly, a survey taken before and after the CFD exercise demonstrate a better understanding of both the CFD and manufacturing process.

  10. Computer animation challenges for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines, Mauricio; Lee, Won-Sook; Mavriplis, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    Computer animation requirements differ from those of traditional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigations in that visual plausibility and rapid frame update rates trump physical accuracy. We present an overview of the main techniques for fluid simulation in computer animation, starting with Eulerian grid approaches, the Lattice Boltzmann method, Fourier transform techniques and Lagrangian particle introduction. Adaptive grid methods, precomputation of results for model reduction, parallelisation and computation on graphical processing units (GPUs) are reviewed in the context of accelerating simulation computations for animation. A survey of current specific approaches for the application of these techniques to the simulation of smoke, fire, water, bubbles, mixing, phase change and solid-fluid coupling is also included. Adding plausibility to results through particle introduction, turbulence detail and concentration on regions of interest by level set techniques has elevated the degree of accuracy and realism of recent animations. Basic approaches are described here. Techniques to control the simulation to produce a desired visual effect are also discussed. Finally, some references to rendering techniques and haptic applications are mentioned to provide the reader with a complete picture of the challenges of simulating fluids in computer animation.

  11. Fluid dynamics of rivulet flow between plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenckhan, W.; Ritacco, H.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Saugey, A.; McGuinness, P.; van der Net, A.; Langevin, D.; Weaire, D.

    2007-10-01

    We present computational and experimental investigations into the fluid dynamics of a narrow stream of surfactant solutions, which descends under gravity between two narrowly spaced, vertical glass plates. Such a "rivulet" is bounded by two liquid/solid and two mobile liquid/gas interfaces, posing fluid dynamic problems of direct relevance to local fluid flow in liquid foams and recently reported meandering phenomena. The rivulet presents a system in which the coupling between the bulk flow and the rheological properties of the gas/liquid interface can be systematically investigated. In particular, it carries the promise of providing an alternative measuring technique for interfacial shear viscosities. We present finite element simulations in conjunction with experiments in order to describe the relationship between the rivulet geometry, the flow field, and the interfacial shear viscosities. We also report on the role of the boundary condition between the liquid-carrying channels (surface Plateau borders) and the thin soap film, which spans the two plates at low flow rates.

  12. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Dijksman, J. A.; Shearer, M.

    2017-01-01

    The collapse dynamics of an axisymmetric fluid cavity that wets the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls are studied. Lubrication theory is applied to the governing field equations for the thin film to yield an evolution equation that captures the effect of capillary, gravitational, and centrifugal forces on this converging flow. The focus is on the quasistatic spreading regime, whereby contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the contact-angle to the contact-line speed. Surface tension forces dominate the collapse dynamics for small holes with the collapse time appearing as a power law whose exponent compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Gravity accelerates the collapse process. Volume dependence is predicted and compared with experiment. Centrifugal forces slow the collapse process and lead to complex dynamics characterized by stalled spreading behavior that separates the large and small hole asymptotic regimes.

  13. Fluid dynamical description of relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, J. R.; Strottman, D.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of both a conventional relativistic nuclear fluid dynamic model and a two fluid generalization that takes into account the interpenetration of the target and projectile upon contact, collisions between heavy nuclei moving at relativistic speeds are calculated. This is done by solving the relevant equations of motion numerically in three spatial dimensions by use of particle in cell finite difference computing techniques. The effect of incorporating a density isomer, or quasistable state, in the nuclear equation of state at three times normal nuclear density, and the effect of doubling the nuclear compressibility coefficient are studied. For the reaction 20Ne + 238U at a laboratory bombarding energy per nucleon of 393 MeV, the calculated distributions in energy and angle of outgoing charged particles are compared with recent experimental data both integrated over all impact parameters and for nearly central collisions.

  14. Sawfishes stealth revealed using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bradney, D R; Davidson, A; Evans, S P; Wueringer, B E; Morgan, D L; Clausen, P D

    2017-02-27

    Detailed computational fluid dynamics simulations for the rostrum of three species of sawfish (Pristidae) revealed that negligible turbulent flow is generated from all rostra during lateral swipe prey manipulation and swimming. These results suggest that sawfishes are effective stealth hunters that may not be detected by their teleost prey's lateral line sensory system during pursuits. Moreover, during lateral swipes, the rostra were found to induce little velocity into the surrounding fluid. Consistent with previous data of sawfish feeding behaviour, these data indicate that the rostrum is therefore unlikely to be used to stir up the bottom to uncover benthic prey. Whilst swimming with the rostrum inclined at a small angle to the horizontal, the coefficient of drag of the rostrum is relatively low and the coefficient of lift is zero.

  15. Manufacturing in space: Fluid dynamics numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.; Spradley, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Natural convection in a spherical container with cooling at the center was numerically simulated using the Lockheed-developed General Interpolants Method (GIM) numerical fluid dynamic computer program. The numerical analysis was simplified by assuming axisymmetric flow in the spherical container, with the symmetry axis being a sphere diagonal parallel to the gravity vector. This axisymmetric spherical geometry was intended as an idealization of the proposed Lal/Kroes growing experiments to be performed on board Spacelab. Results were obtained for a range of Rayleigh numbers from 25 to 10,000. For a temperature difference of 10 C from the cooling sting at the center to the container surface, and a gravitional loading of 0.000001 g a computed maximum fluid velocity of about 2.4 x 0.00001 cm/sec was reached after about 250 sec. The computed velocities were found to be approximately proportional to the Rayleigh number over the range of Rayleigh numbers investigated.

  16. A perspective of computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.

    1986-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is maturing, and is at a stage in its technological life cycle in which it is now routinely applied to some rather complicated problems; it is starting to create an impact on the design cycle of aerospace flight vehicles and their components. CFD is also being used to better understand the fluid physics of flows heretofore not understood, such as three-dimensional separation. CFD is also being used to complement and is being complemented by experiments. In this paper, the primary and secondary pacing items that govern CFD in the past are reviewed and updated. The future prospects of CFD are explored which will offer people working in the discipline challenges that should extend the technological life cycle to further increase the capabilities of a proven demonstrated technology.

  17. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Dijksman, Joshua; Shearer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    An axisymmetric fluid cavity at the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls is studied, as it is filled in by the wetting fluid. Lubrication theory is applied to reduce the governing equations to a single evolution equation for the film thickness. In the quasi-static regime the contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the effective contact angle to the contact-line speed. The dependence of the collapse time on the initial hole size is calculated. For small holes, surface tension dominates the dynamics, leading to a universal power law that compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Further verification of the model is obtained through comparison of volume dependence with experimental results.

  18. Fluid dynamics of the cerebral aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, E E; Fletcher, D F; Morgan, M K; Johnston, I H

    1996-01-01

    Despite a multitude of theories describing the mechanics of the intracranial spaces in diseases such as hydrocephalus, little is known about the mechanics of normal CSF flow. A pressure difference is required to drive CSF flow. Knowing that the pressure difference driving fluid through the aqueduct is beyond the resolution of clinically used pressure transducers, a computational fluid dynamics program was used to analyze flow through an aqueduct shape. Flow through this duct was compared with that through a cylinder and through a double hourglass. Both steady and oscillating flows were tested, revealing that only 1.1 Pa of pressure is required to move CSF through the aqueduct. This suggests that normally less than 5% of the total resistance to CSF flow within the CSF pathways occurs in the aqueduct.

  19. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena—the Gulf Stream, for example—something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future. PMID:27616918

  20. Fluid flow dynamics under location uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mémin, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    We present a derivation of a stochastic model of Navier Stokes equations that relies on a decomposition of the velocity fields into a differentiable drift component and a time uncorrelated uncertainty random term. This type of decomposition is reminiscent in spirit to the classical Reynolds decomposition. However, the random velocity fluctuations considered here are not differentiable with respect to time, and they must be handled through stochastic calculus. The dynamics associated with the differentiable drift component is derived from a stochastic version of the Reynolds transport theorem. It includes in its general form an uncertainty dependent "subgrid" bulk formula that cannot be immediately related to the usual Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption constructed from thermal molecular agitation analogy. This formulation, emerging from uncertainties on the fluid parcels location, explains with another viewpoint some subgrid eddy diffusion models currently used in computational fluid dynamics or in geophysical sciences and paves the way for new large-scales flow modelling. We finally describe an applications of our formalism to the derivation of stochastic versions of the Shallow water equations or to the definition of reduced order dynamical systems.

  1. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena-the Gulf Stream, for example-something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future.

  2. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  3. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  4. HL-20 computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilmuenster, K. James; Greene, Francis A.

    1993-09-01

    The essential elements of a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the HL-20/personnel launch system aerothermal environment at hypersonic speeds including surface definition, grid generation, solution techniques, and visual representation of results are presented. Examples of solution technique validation through comparison with data from ground-based facilities are presented, along with results from computations at flight conditions. Computations at flight points indicate that real-gas effects have little or no effect on vehicle aerodynamics and, at these conditions, results from approximate techniques for determining surface heating are comparable with those obtained from Navier-Stokes solutions.

  5. HL-20 computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. J.; Greene, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    The essential elements of a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the HL-20/personnel launch system aerothermal environment at hypersonic speeds including surface definition, grid generation, solution techniques, and visual representation of results are presented. Examples of solution technique validation through comparison with data from ground-based facilities are presented, along with results from computations at flight conditions. Computations at flight points indicate that real-gas effects have little or no effect on vehicle aerodynamics and, at these conditions, results from approximate techniques for determining surface heating are comparable with those obtained from Navier-Stokes solutions.

  6. Expanding Participation in Fluid Dynamics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randall

    2015-11-01

    Two legacies provided by great scientists are scientific discoveries and more scientists. Is there a way that these impacts can be magnified? Examples using the Taylor-Couette experiment and other fluid dynamics problems will demonstrate that indeed more people can fruitfully engage in open and even bold investigation. Participants include high school students, teachers, undergraduates, artists, business developers and interested laypersons. With imagination, good training, and a suitable lab space, a special tribute can be given to those who mentor us by scaling up the breadth of their influence.

  7. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Haworth, D.C.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics using CATIA created geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gengler, Jeanne E.

    1989-07-01

    A method has been developed to link the geometry definition residing on a CAD/CAM system with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool needed to evaluate aerodynamic designs and requiring the memory capacity of a supercomputer. Requirements for surfaces suitable for CFD analysis are discussed. Techniques for developing surfaces and verifying their smoothness are compared, showing the capability of the CAD/CAM system. The utilization of a CAD/CAM system to create a computational mesh is explained, and the mesh interaction with the geometry and input file preparation for the CFD analysis is discussed.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  10. Kinematics and Fluid Dynamics of Jellyfish Maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laura; Hoover, Alex

    2014-11-01

    Jellyfish propel themselves through the water through periodic contractions of their elastic bells. Some jellyfish, such as the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita and the upside down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana, can perform turns via asymmetric contractions of the bell. The fluid dynamics of jellyfish forward propulsion and turning is explored here by analyzing the contraction kinematics of several species and using flow visualization to quantify the resulting flow fields. The asymmetric contraction and structure of the jellyfish generates asymmetries in the starting and stopping vortices. This creates a diagonal jet and a net torque acting on the jellyfish. Results are compared to immersed boundary simulations

  11. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  12. Fluid dynamic effects on precision cleaning with supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.R.; Hogan, M.O.; Silva, L.J.

    1994-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff have assembled a small supercritical fluids parts cleaning test stand to characterize how system dynamics affect the efficacy of precision cleaning with supercritical carbon dioxide. A soiled stainless steel coupon, loaded into a ``Berty`` autoclave, was used to investigate how changes in system turbulence and solvent temperature influenced the removal of test dopants. A pulsed laser beam through a fiber optic was used to investigate real-time contaminant removal. Test data show that cleaning efficiency is a function of system agitation, solvent density, and temperature. These data also show that high levels of cleaning efficiency can generally be achieved with high levels of system agitation at relatively low solvent densities and temperatures. Agitation levels, temperatures, and densities needed for optimal cleaning are largely contaminant dependent. Using proper system conditions, the levels of cleanliness achieved with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with conventional precision cleaning methods. Additional research is currently being conducted to generalize the relationship between cleaning performance and parameters such as contaminant solubilities, mass transfer rates, and solvent agitation. These correlations can be used to optimize cleaning performance, system design, and time and energy consumption for particular parts cleaning applications.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics: Transition to design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, R. G.; Bhateley, I. C.; Howell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of aerospace vehicles, over the years, was an evolutionary process in which engineering progress in the aerospace community was based, generally, on prior experience and data bases obtained through wind tunnel and flight testing. Advances in the fundamental understanding of flow physics, wind tunnel and flight test capability, and mathematical insights into the governing flow equations were translated into improved air vehicle design. The modern day field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a continuation of the growth in analytical capability and the digital mathematics needed to solve the more rigorous form of the flow equations. Some of the technical and managerial challenges that result from rapidly developing CFD capabilites, some of the steps being taken by the Fort Worth Division of General Dynamics to meet these challenges, and some of the specific areas of application for high performance air vehicles are presented.

  14. Bioreactor studies and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Hutmacher, D W

    2009-01-01

    The hydrodynamic environment "created" by bioreactors for the culture of a tissue engineered construct (TEC) is known to influence cell migration, proliferation and extra cellular matrix production. However, tissue engineers have looked at bioreactors as black boxes within which TECs are cultured mainly by trial and error, as the complex relationship between the hydrodynamic environment and tissue properties remains elusive, yet is critical to the production of clinically useful tissues. It is well known in the chemical and biotechnology field that a more detailed description of fluid mechanics and nutrient transport within process equipment can be achieved via the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. Hence, the coupling of experimental methods and computational simulations forms a synergistic relationship that can potentially yield greater and yet, more cohesive data sets for bioreactor studies. This review aims at discussing the rationale of using CFD in bioreactor studies related to tissue engineering, as fluid flow processes and phenomena have direct implications on cellular response such as migration and/or proliferation. We conclude that CFD should be seen by tissue engineers as an invaluable tool allowing us to analyze and visualize the impact of fluidic forces and stresses on cells and TECs.

  15. Bioreactor Studies and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H.; Hutmacher, D. W.

    The hydrodynamic environment “created” by bioreactors for the culture of a tissue engineered construct (TEC) is known to influence cell migration, proliferation and extra cellular matrix production. However, tissue engineers have looked at bioreactors as black boxes within which TECs are cultured mainly by trial and error, as the complex relationship between the hydrodynamic environment and tissue properties remains elusive, yet is critical to the production of clinically useful tissues. It is well known in the chemical and biotechnology field that a more detailed description of fluid mechanics and nutrient transport within process equipment can be achieved via the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. Hence, the coupling of experimental methods and computational simulations forms a synergistic relationship that can potentially yield greater and yet, more cohesive data sets for bioreactor studies. This review aims at discussing the rationale of using CFD in bioreactor studies related to tissue engineering, as fluid flow processes and phenomena have direct implications on cellular response such as migration and/or proliferation. We conclude that CFD should be seen by tissue engineers as an invaluable tool allowing us to analyze and visualize the impact of fluidic forces and stresses on cells and TECs.

  16. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, D.

    1990-09-01

    This volume describes the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) for topologies, flow regimes, and interfacial areas. The objective of these models is to provide values for the interfacial areas between all components existing in a computational cell. The interfacial areas are then used to evaluate the mass, energy, and momentum transfer between the components. A new approach has been undertaken in the development of a model to convect the interfacial areas of the discontinuous velocity fields in the three-velocity-field environment of AFDM. These interfacial areas are called convectible surface areas. The continuous and discontinuous components are chosen using volume fraction and levitation criteria. This establishes so-called topologies for which the convectible surface areas can be determined. These areas are functions of space and time. Solid particulates that are limited to being discontinuous within the bulk fluid are assumed to have a constant size. The convectible surface areas are subdivided to model contacts between two discontinuous components or discontinuous components and the structure. The models have been written for the flow inside of large pools. Therefore, the structure is tracked only as a boundary to the fluid volume without having a direct influence on velocity or volume fraction distribution by means of flow regimes or boundary layer models. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  17. The Future with Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    The applications of cryogenic systems have expanded over the past 50 years into many areas of our lives. During this time, the impact of the common features of Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics, CryoFD, on the economic design of these cryogenic systems, has grown out of a long series of experimental studies carried out by teams of postgraduate students at Southampton University.These studies have sought to understand the heat transfer and convective behavior of cryogenic liquids and vapors, but they have only skimmed over the many findings made, on the strong convective motions of fluids at low temperatures. The convection takes place in temperature gradients up to 10,000 K per meter, and density gradients of 1000% per meter and more, with rapid temperature and spatially dependent changes in physical properties like viscosity and surface tension, making software development and empirical correlations almost impossible to achieve. These temperature and density gradients are far larger than those met in other convecting systems at ambient temperatures, and there is little similarity. The paper will discuss the likely impact of CryoFD on future cryogenic systems, and hopefully inspire further research to support and expand the use of existing findings, and to improve the economy of present-day systems even more effectively. Particular examples to be mentioned include the following. Doubling the cooling power of cryo-coolers by a simple use of CryoFD. Reducing the boil-off rate of liquid helium stored at the South Pole, such that liquid helium availability is now all-the-year-round. Helping to develop the 15 kA current leads for the LHC superconducting magnets at CERN, with much reduced refrigeration loads. Improving the heat transfer capability of boiling heat transfer surfaces by 10 to 100 fold. This paper is an edited text of an invited plenary presentation at ICEC25/ICMC2014 by Professor Scurlock on the occasion of his being presented with the ICEC Mendelssohn Award for his

  18. Modeling quantum fluid dynamics at nonzero temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Berloff, Natalia G.; Brachet, Marc; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the intricate dynamics of quantum fluids, in particular in the rapidly growing subfield of quantum turbulence which elucidates the evolution of a vortex tangle in a superfluid, requires an in-depth understanding of the role of finite temperature in such systems. The Landau two-fluid model is the most successful hydrodynamical theory of superfluid helium, but by the nature of the scale separations it cannot give an adequate description of the processes involving vortex dynamics and interactions. In our contribution we introduce a framework based on a nonlinear classical-field equation that is mathematically identical to the Landau model and provides a mechanism for severing and coalescence of vortex lines, so that the questions related to the behavior of quantized vortices can be addressed self-consistently. The correct equation of state as well as nonlocality of interactions that leads to the existence of the roton minimum can also be introduced in such description. We review and apply the ideas developed for finite-temperature description of weakly interacting Bose gases as possible extensions and numerical refinements of the proposed method. We apply this method to elucidate the behavior of the vortices during expansion and contraction following the change in applied pressure. We show that at low temperatures, during the contraction of the vortex core as the negative pressure grows back to positive values, the vortex line density grows through a mechanism of vortex multiplication. This mechanism is suppressed at high temperatures. PMID:24704874

  19. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Hideaki; ORIHARA, Hideo; SATO, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author’s laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship’s motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process. PMID:25311139

  20. Fluid dynamic noise in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, D. G.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-08-01

    Pressure distributions and frequency spectra have been obtained in a centrifugal pump having flow rates between the design point and near shut-down. The pump was comprised of a radial flow impeller with four backswept blades and a single volute. Measurements were obtained at the design flow rate and at off-design conditions to advance understanding of noise generation, to quantify the contribution of tonal, narrowband and broadband components to the overall noise and to develop strategies for suppressing fluid dynamic noise by flow control and active control. Fluid dynamic noise was generated by the unsteady conditions encountered by the impeller blade. Unsteady conditions originated from non-uniformities at the inlet and the impeller outlet at design and off-design conditions. Inlet flow non-uniformity was induced by separation regions. Flow separations are inherent in turbomachinery because of growth of the boundary layer and the disturbance effect of the rotating impeller. Flow non-uniformity at the impeller outlet stemmed from inlet flow non-uniformities in the inlet, from propagation of pressure waves in a vaneless diffuser, and from scroll effects.

  1. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hideaki; Orihara, Hideo; Sato, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author's laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship's motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process.

  2. Spectral Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1994-01-01

    As a tool for large-scale computations in fluid dynamics, spectral methods were prophesized in 1944, born in 1954, virtually buried in the mid-1960's, resurrected in 1969, evangalized in the 1970's, and catholicized in the 1980's. The use of spectral methods for meteorological problems was proposed by Blinova in 1944 and the first numerical computations were conducted by Silberman (1954). By the early 1960's computers had achieved sufficient power to permit calculations with hundreds of degrees of freedom. For problems of this size the traditional way of computing the nonlinear terms in spectral methods was expensive compared with finite-difference methods. Consequently, spectral methods fell out of favor. The expense of computing nonlinear terms remained a severe drawback until Orszag (1969) and Eliasen, Machenauer, and Rasmussen (1970) developed the transform methods that still form the backbone of many large-scale spectral computations. The original proselytes of spectral methods were meteorologists involved in global weather modeling and fluid dynamicists investigating isotropic turbulence. The converts who were inspired by the successes of these pioneers remained, for the most part, confined to these and closely related fields throughout the 1970's. During that decade spectral methods appeared to be well-suited only for problems governed by ordinary diSerential eqllations or by partial differential equations with periodic boundary conditions. And, of course, the solution itself needed to be smooth. Some of the obstacles to wider application of spectral methods were: (1) poor resolution of discontinuous solutions; (2) inefficient implementation of implicit methods; and (3) drastic geometric constraints. All of these barriers have undergone some erosion during the 1980's, particularly the latter two. As a result, the applicability and appeal of spectral methods for computational fluid dynamics has broadened considerably. The motivation for the use of spectral

  3. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  4. Evaluation of linear, inviscid, viscous, and reduced-order modelling aeroelastic solutions of the AGARD 445.6 wing using root locus analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Perry, Boyd, III

    2014-03-01

    Reduced-order modelling (ROM) methods are applied to the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-based aeroelastic analysis of the AGARD 445.6 wing in order to gain insight regarding well-known discrepancies between the aeroelastic analyses and the experimental results. The results presented include aeroelastic solutions using the inviscid Computational Aeroelasticity Programme-Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD) code and the FUN3D code (Euler and Navier-Stokes). Full CFD aeroelastic solutions and ROM aeroelastic solutions, computed at several Mach numbers, are presented in the form of root locus plots in order to better reveal the aeroelastic root migrations with increasing dynamic pressure. Important conclusions are drawn from these results including the ability of the linear CAP-TSD code to accurately predict the entire experimental flutter boundary (repeat of analyses performed in the 1980s), that the Euler solutions at supersonic conditions indicate that the third mode is always unstable, and that the FUN3D Navier-Stokes solutions stabilize the unstable third mode seen in the Euler solutions.

  5. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. ); Goutagny, L. . Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

    1990-09-01

    AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Current Results and Proposed Activities in Microgravity Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polezhaev, V. I.

    1996-01-01

    The Institute for Problems in Mechanics' Laboratory work in mathematical and physical modelling of fluid mechanics develops models, methods, and software for analysis of fluid flow, instability analysis, direct numerical modelling and semi-empirical models of turbulence, as well as experimental research and verification of these models and their applications in technological fluid dynamics, microgravity fluid mechanics, geophysics, and a number of engineering problems. This paper presents an overview of the results in microgravity fluid dynamics research during the last two years. Nonlinear problems of weakly compressible and compressible fluid flows are discussed.

  7. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations.

  8. The use of computers for instruction in fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val

    1987-01-01

    Applications for computers which improve instruction in fluid dynamics are examined. Computers can be used to illustrate three-dimensional flow fields and simple fluid dynamics mechanisms, to solve fluid dynamics problems, and for electronic sketching. The usefulness of computer applications is limited by computer speed, memory, and software and the clarity and field of view of the projected display. Proposed advances in personal computers which will address these limitations are discussed. Long range applications for computers in education are considered.

  9. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung-Kwon

    2011-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a mechanical engineering field for analyzing fluid flow, heat transfer, and associated phenomena, using computer-based simulation. CFD is a widely adopted methodology for solving complex problems in many modern engineering fields. The merit of CFD is developing new and improved devices and system designs, and optimization is conducted on existing equipment through computational simulations, resulting in enhanced efficiency and lower operating costs. However, in the biomedical field, CFD is still emerging. The main reason why CFD in the biomedical field has lagged behind is the tremendous complexity of human body fluid behavior. Recently, CFD biomedical research is more accessible, because high performance hardware and software are easily available with advances in computer science. All CFD processes contain three main components to provide useful information, such as pre-processing, solving mathematical equations, and post-processing. Initial accurate geometric modeling and boundary conditions are essential to achieve adequate results. Medical imaging, such as ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used for modeling, and Doppler ultrasound, pressure wire, and non-invasive pressure measurements are used for flow velocity and pressure as a boundary condition. Many simulations and clinical results have been used to study congenital heart disease, heart failure, ventricle function, aortic disease, and carotid and intra-cranial cerebrovascular diseases. With decreasing hardware costs and rapid computing times, researchers and medical scientists may increasingly use this reliable CFD tool to deliver accurate results. A realistic, multidisciplinary approach is essential to accomplish these tasks. Indefinite collaborations between mechanical engineers and clinical and medical scientists are essential. CFD may be an important methodology to understand the pathophysiology of the development and

  11. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; Xu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a widely used method in mechanical engineering to solve complex problems by analysing fluid flow, heat transfer, and associated phenomena by using computer simulations. In recent years, CFD has been increasingly used in biomedical research of coronary artery disease because of its high performance hardware and software. CFD techniques have been applied to study cardiovascular haemodynamics through simulation tools to predict the behaviour of circulatory blood flow in the human body. CFD simulation based on 3D luminal reconstructions can be used to analyse the local flow fields and flow profiling due to changes of coronary artery geometry, thus, identifying risk factors for development and progression of coronary artery disease. This review aims to provide an overview of the CFD applications in coronary artery disease, including biomechanics of atherosclerotic plaques, plaque progression and rupture; regional haemodynamics relative to plaque location and composition. A critical appraisal is given to a more recently developed application, fractional flow reserve based on CFD computation with regard to its diagnostic accuracy in the detection of haemodynamically significant coronary artery disease.

  13. Domain decomposition methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The divide-and-conquer paradigm of iterative domain decomposition, or substructuring, has become a practical tool in computational fluid dynamic applications because of its flexibility in accommodating adaptive refinement through locally uniform (or quasi-uniform) grids, its ability to exploit multiple discretizations of the operator equations, and the modular pathway it provides towards parallelism. These features are illustrated on the classic model problem of flow over a backstep using Newton's method as the nonlinear iteration. Multiple discretizations (second-order in the operator and first-order in the preconditioner) and locally uniform mesh refinement pay dividends separately, and they can be combined synergistically. Sample performance results are included from an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube implementation.

  14. Dynamics and Emergent Structures in Active Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, Aparna

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we consider an active fluid of colloidal sized particles, with the primary manifestation of activity being a self-replenishing velocity along one body axis of the particle. This is a minimal model for varied systems such as bacterial colonies, cytoskeletal filament motility assays vibrated granular particles and self propelled diffusophoretic colloids, depending on the nature of interaction among the particles. Using microscopic Brownian dynamics simulations, coarse-graining using the tools of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and analysis of macroscopic hydrodynamic theories, we characterize emergent structures seen in these systems, which are determined by the symmetry of the interactions among the active units, such as propagating density waves, dense stationary bands, asters and phase separated isotropic clusters. We identify a universal mechanism, termed ``self-regulation,'' as the underlying physics that leads to these structures in diverse systems. Support from NSF through DMR-1149266 and DMR-0820492.

  15. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  16. Domain decomposition algorithms and computation fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    In the past several years, domain decomposition was a very popular topic, partly motivated by the potential of parallelization. While a large body of theory and algorithms were developed for model elliptic problems, they are only recently starting to be tested on realistic applications. The application of some of these methods to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics are investigated. Some examples are two dimensional convection-diffusion problems and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. The construction and analysis of efficient preconditioners for the interface operator to be used in the iterative solution of the interface solution is described. For the convection-diffusion problems, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is discussed.

  17. Shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Park, O. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Additional results and a revised and improved computer program listing from the shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics formulations are presented. Numerical calculations for the flame zone of solid propellants are carried out using the Galerkin finite elements, with perturbations expanded to the zeroth, first, and second orders. The results indicate that amplification of oscillatory motions does indeed prevail in high frequency regions. For the second order system, the trend is similar to the first order system for low frequencies, but instabilities may appear at frequencies lower than those of the first order system. The most significant effect of the second order system is that the admittance is extremely oscillatory between moderately high frequency ranges.

  18. Graphics supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Goang S.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this project is to purchase a state-of-the-art graphics supercomputer to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) research capability at Alabama A & M University (AAMU) and to support the Air Force research projects. A cutting-edge graphics supercomputer system, Onyx VTX, from Silicon Graphics Computer Systems (SGI), was purchased and installed. Other equipment including a desktop personal computer, PC-486 DX2 with a built-in 10-BaseT Ethernet card, a 10-BaseT hub, an Apple Laser Printer Select 360, and a notebook computer from Zenith were also purchased. A reading room has been converted to a research computer lab by adding some furniture and an air conditioning unit in order to provide an appropriate working environments for researchers and the purchase equipment. All the purchased equipment were successfully installed and are fully functional. Several research projects, including two existing Air Force projects, are being performed using these facilities.

  19. Collective dynamics of sperm in viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Collective dynamics of artificial swimmers has gathered a lot of attention from physicists, in part because of its close relations to emergent behaviors in condensed matter, such as phase transitions. However, the emergence of order tends to be less drastic in the systems composed of real living cells, sometimes due to the natural variability in individual organisms. Here, using bull sperm as a model system, we demonstrate that the local orientation order of sperm spontaneously emerges in viscoelastic fluids, migrating collectively in clusters in high cell concentrations, or pairs in low cell concentrations. This collectiveness is similar to a liquid-gas phase transition, as both phases coexist simultaneously in our system. Unlike bacterial swarming, this collectiveness does not require the cells to be in a different phenotype than the regular swimming one, providing further simplicity to the physicists. We will discuss the underlying interaction mechanism, and the potential influence in biology. Supported by NIH Grant 1R01HD070038.

  20. B-spline Method in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botella, Olivier; Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    B-spline functions are bases for piecewise polynomials that possess attractive properties for complex flow simulations : they have compact support, provide a straightforward handling of boundary conditions and grid nonuniformities, and yield numerical schemes with high resolving power, where the order of accuracy is a mere input parameter. This paper reviews the progress made on the development and application of B-spline numerical methods to computational fluid dynamics problems. Basic B-spline approximation properties is investigated, and their relationship with conventional numerical methods is reviewed. Some fundamental developments towards efficient complex geometry spline methods are covered, such as local interpolation methods, fast solution algorithms on cartesian grid, non-conformal block-structured discretization, formulation of spline bases of higher continuity over triangulation, and treatment of pressure oscillations in Navier-Stokes equations. Application of some of these techniques to the computation of viscous incompressible flows is presented.

  1. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1994-01-01

    A brief summary of the computer environment used for calculating three dimensional unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is presented. This environment requires a super computer as well as massively parallel processors (MPP's) and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (by concurrently working on the same task) provide the required computational bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. The cluster of reduced instruction set computers (RISC) is a recent advent based on the low cost and high performance that workstation vendors provide. The cluster, with the proper software can act as a multiple instruction/multiple data (MIMD) machine. A new set of software tools is being designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these environments. Three user's manuals for the parallel version of Visual3, pV3, revision 1.00 make up the bulk of this report.

  2. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  3. A modular system for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, D. R.; Foutch, D. W.; Shurtleff, G. E.

    This paper describes the Modular System for Compuational Fluid Dynamics (MOSYS), a software facility for the construction and execution of arbitrary solution procedures on multizone, structured body-fitted grids. It focuses on the structure and capabilities of MOSYS and the philosophy underlying its design. The system offers different levels of capability depending on the objectives of the user. It enables the applications engineer to quickly apply a variety of methods to geometrically complex problems. The methods developer can implement new algorithms in a simple form, and immediately apply them to problems of both theoretical and practical interest. And for the code builder it consitutes a toolkit for fast construction of CFD codes tailored to various purposes. These capabilities are illustrated through applications to a particularly complex problem encountered in aircraft propulsion systems, namely, the analysis of a landing aircraft in reverse thrust.

  4. Spectroscopy and molecular dynamics in nonpolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, Karl Frederick

    This thesis considers the mechanisms by which molecular dynamics in nonpolar liquids influences solvation dynamics and vibrational energy relaxation. We use semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate photon echo signals for two simple fluids. We demonstrate that two new observables are directly related to the relevant molecular quantity, the frequency- frequency time correlation function (TCF), in contrast to the commonly measured 3PEPS, which cannot be simply related to this TCF at short times. We also present a semianalytic photon echo theory, based on an ansatz which determines the full time dependence from the short time expansion coefficients of the TCF. We demonstrate that this theory accurately predicts most photon echo observables, even when the theory's gaussian approximation is not accurate. We also consider vibrational energy relaxation (VER) in liquid oxygen. Using semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations and an intermolecular potential from the literature, we evaluate the required quantity (the spectral density of a certain force-force TCF) using the same ansatz described above. We demonstrate numerically that this procedure is accurate. Approximately relating this semiclassical rate to the fully quantum mechanical VER rate, using one of the more accurate ``quantum corrections'' available in the literature, yields a result which is in order-of-magnitude agreement with the experimental VER rate. We also calculate the VER rate for liquid oxygen/argon mixtures. The rotations of the solvent near a vibrationally excited molecule, and of that molecule itself, have important consequences for the short-time dynamics of the force-force TCF. We propose a simple statistical model which quantitatively explains the mole- fraction dependence of the observed VER rate. Next, we demonstrate that a newly-developed model for oxygen very accurately describes the liquid, by comparing to experimental measures of microscopic structure and dynamics. We also

  5. Fluid Dynamics of Human Phonation and Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of the fluid dynamics, flow-structure interactions, and acoustics associated with human phonation and speech. Our voice is produced through the process of phonation in the larynx, and an improved understanding of the underlying physics of this process is essential to advancing the treatment of voice disorders. Insights into the physics of phonation and speech can also contribute to improved vocal training and the development of new speech compression and synthesis schemes. This article introduces the key biomechanical features of the laryngeal physiology, reviews the basic principles of voice production, and summarizes the progress made over the past half-century in understanding the flow physics of phonation and speech. Laryngeal pathologies, which significantly enhance the complexity of phonatory dynamics, are discussed. After a thorough examination of the state of the art in computational modeling and experimental investigations of phonatory biomechanics, we present a synopsis of the pacing issues in this arena and an outlook for research in this fascinating subject.

  6. Chain Dynamics in a Dilute Magnetorheological Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jing; Hagenbuchle, Martin

    1996-01-01

    The structure, formation, and dynamics of dilute, mono-dispersive ferrofluid emulsions in an external magnetic field have been investigated using dynamic light scattering techniques. In the absence of the magnetic field, the emulsion particles are randomly distributed and behave like hard spheres in Brownian motion. An applied magnetic field induces a magnetic dipole moment in each particle. Dipolar interactions between particles align them into chains where correlation functions show two decay processes. The short-time decay shows the motion of straight chains as a whole where the apparent chain length increases with the applied magnetic field and the particle volume fraction. Good scaling results are obtained showing that the apparent chain length grows with time following a power law with exponent of 0.6 and depends on the applied field, particle volume fraction, and diffusion constant of the particles. The long-time decay in the correlation function shows oscillation when the chains reach a certain length with time and stiffness with threshold field This result shows that chains not only fluctuate, but move in a periodic motion with a frequency of 364 Hz at lambda = 15. It may suggest the existence of phonons. This work is the first step in the understanding of the structure formation, especially chain coarsening mechanism, of magnetorheological (MR) fluids at higher volume fractions.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics applications to improve crop production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), numerical analysis and simulation tools of fluid flow processes have emerged from the development stage and become nowadays a robust design tool. It is widely used to study various transport phenomena which involve fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, providing det...

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Matthew; Francois, Marianne M.

    2012-09-05

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  9. Dynamics of particle clusters at fluid/fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Srinath; Minev, Peter; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2009-11-01

    This talk is oriented toward research that describes the hydrodynamics of dense (relative to the lower fluid in a gravitational field) rigid particles at fluid-fluid interfaces through Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Understanding the factors that control the formation and stability of the complex rag layer (typically encountered during oil-water separation) is a motivation for the current study. The fundamental aspects of the problem at hand bear a connection with the formation of tight clusters of floating particles. Strong capillary forces are thought to promote this behavior. One of the challenges toward realizing the same in a numerical simulation is the implementation of a physically realistic boundary condition for the three phase moving contact line (MCL). To this end, we implement the recently proposed continuum form of the Generalized Navier Boundary Condition (Gerbeau and Lelievre, 2009) in a levelset and fictitious-domain based finite-element scheme and demonstrate its usefulness and accuracy through case studies.

  10. Effectiveness of fluid loss additives in laboratory dynamic fluid loss experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, D.D.; Xie, X.

    1995-12-31

    A commercially available HTHP (high temperature, high pressure) dynamic filtration unit and a widely available HTHP rheometer was used to study dynamic fluid-loss behavior of uncrosslinked hydroxypropyl guar hydraulic fracturing fluid containing varying concentrations of silica flour, starch, and diesel. New dimensionless groups were defined for the dynamic fluid-loss problem. These groups were used first to effectively correlate previously reported laboratory data and later were employed to analyze the ensuing experimental data. Results demonstrate that low and high permeability cores require different mechanisms for fluid-loss control and that, compared to silica flour, starch may lose its effectiveness at higher concentrations.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards ‘digital patient’ or ‘virtual physiological human’ representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. PMID:26512019

  12. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges.

  13. A Critical Review of Dynamic Wetting by Complex Fluids: From Newtonian Fluids to Non-Newtonian Fluids and Nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gui; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Duan, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic wetting is an important interfacial phenomenon in many industrial applications. There have been many excellent reviews of dynamic wetting, especially on super-hydrophobic surfaces with physical or chemical coatings, porous layers, hybrid micro/nano structures and biomimetic structures. This review summarizes recent research on dynamic wetting from the viewpoint of the fluids rather than the solid surfaces. The reviewed fluids range from simple Newtonian fluids to non-Newtonian fluids and complex nanofluids. The fundamental physical concepts and principles involved in dynamic wetting phenomena are also reviewed. This review focus on recent investigations of dynamic wetting by non-Newtonian fluids, including the latest experimental studies with a thorough review of the best dynamic wetting models for non-Newtonian fluids, to illustrate their successes and limitations. This paper also reports on new results on the still fledgling field of nanofluid wetting kinetics. The challenges of research on nanofluid dynamic wetting is not only due to the lack of nanoscale experimental techniques to probe the complex nanoparticle random motion, but also the lack of multiscale experimental techniques or theories to describe the effects of nanoparticle motion at the nanometer scale (10(-9) m) on the dynamic wetting taking place at the macroscopic scale (10(-3) m). This paper describes the various types of nanofluid dynamic wetting behaviors. Two nanoparticle dissipation modes, the bulk dissipation mode and the local dissipation mode, are proposed to resolve the uncertainties related to the various types of dynamic wetting mechanisms reported in the literature.

  14. EDITORIAL: Changes to Fluid Dynamics Research in 2009 Changes to Fluid Dynamics Research in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakoshi, Mitsuaki

    2009-02-01

    Welcome to the first issue of the modified Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) journal, which is now being published by IOP Publishing on behalf of the Japan Society of Fluid Mechanics. Since its launch in 1986, FDR has become a well-established international journal that publishes theoretical, numerical and experimental studies contributing to the fundamental understanding and application of fluid phenomena. It has also been an invaluable resource for physicists and researchers in engineering interested in problems relevant to the motion of fluids. From 2009, FDR will be edited by a new international Editorial Board, with the strong intention of establishing the journal further and bringing it to a wider audience. In this new-look FDR, which will be published six times per year, readers will find several special sections containing high quality invited reviews and papers written by leading researchers who have been selected by the international Editorial Board. This is in addition to the regular papers on a variety of topical subjects by active researchers in the field. As before, there are no publication charges for standard articles, and now article numbering has been adopted, enabling accepted papers to be published online more quickly, ahead of print publication. In order to maintain a balanced and up-to-date perspective, we welcome feedback from our readers regarding the content of the journal, as well as suggestions for topics to cover and areas to highlight. Finally, I would like to thank our authors, members of the international Editorial Board, and the staff at IOP Publishing for producing this first issue. We hope you will enjoy reading this renewed and exciting journal for the international fluid dynamics community.

  15. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  16. Dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Rame, E; Walker, L M; Garoff, S

    2009-11-18

    We examine various aspects of dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Rather than concentrating on the mechanisms that relieve the classic contact line stress singularity, we focus on the behavior in the wedge flow near the contact line which has the dominant influence on wetting with these fluids. Our experiments show that a Newtonian polymer melt composed of highly flexible molecules exhibits dynamic wetting behavior described very well by hydrodynamic models that capture the critical properties of the Newtonian wedge flow near the contact line. We find that shear thinning has a strong impact on dynamic wetting, by reducing the drag of the solid on the fluid near the contact line, while the elasticity of a Boger fluid has a weaker impact on dynamic wetting. Finally, we find that other polymeric fluids, nominally Newtonian in rheometric measurements, exhibit deviations from Newtonian dynamic wetting behavior.

  17. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-07

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  19. Advanced Multigrid Solvers for Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this project has been to support the development of multigrid techniques in computational fluid dynamics that can achieve "textbook multigrid efficiency" (TME), which is several orders of magnitude faster than current industrial CFD solvers. Toward that goal we have assembled a detailed table which lists every foreseen kind of computational difficulty for achieving it, together with the possible ways for resolving the difficulty, their current state of development, and references. We have developed several codes to test and demonstrate, in the framework of simple model problems, several approaches for overcoming the most important of the listed difficulties that had not been resolved before. In particular, TME has been demonstrated for incompressible flows on one hand, and for near-sonic flows on the other hand. General approaches were advanced for the relaxation of stagnation points and boundary conditions under various situations. Also, new algebraic multigrid techniques were formed for treating unstructured grid formulations. More details on all these are given below.

  20. Fluid dynamic effects on staphylococci bacteria biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Erica; Bayles, Kenneth; Endres, Jennifer; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are able to form biofilms and distinctive tower structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the human body. The formation of towers, which break off, get carried downstream and serve to initiate biofilms in other parts of the body are of particular interest here. It is known that flow conditions play a role in the development, dispersion and propagation of biofilms in general. The influence of flow on tower formation, however, is not at all understood. This work is focused on the effect of applied shear on tower development. The hypothesis being examined is that tower structures form within a specific range of shear stresses and that there is an as yet ill defined fluid dynamic phenomenon that occurs hours before a tower forms. In this study, a range of shear stresses is examined that brackets 0.6 dynes/cm2, the nominal shear stress where towers seem most likely to form. This talk will include µPTV measurements and cell density data indicating variations in flow and biofilm evolution as a function of the applied shear. Causal relations between flow and biofilm development will be discussed.

  1. Water Channel Facility for Fluid Dynamics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam-Panah, Azar; Sabatino, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the design, assembly, and verification process of the circulating water channel constructed by undergraduate students at the Penn State University at Berks. This work was significantly inspired from the closed-loop free-surface water channel at Lafayette College (Sabatino and Maharjan, 2015) and employed for experiments in fluid dynamics. The channel has a 11 ft length, 2.5 ft width, and 2 ft height glass test section with a maximum velocity of 3.3 ft/s. First, the investigation justifies the needs of a water channel in an undergraduate institute and its potential applications in the whole field of engineering. Then, the design procedures applied to find the geometry and material of some elements of the channel, especially the contraction, the test section, the inlet and end tanks, and the pump system are described. The optimization of the contraction design, including the maintenance of uniform exit flow and avoidance of flow separation, is also included. Finally, the discussion concludes by identifying the problems with the undergraduate education through this capstone project and suggesting some new investigations to improve flow quality.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Four different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Despite the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways of the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. This greater deposition of spores in the upper airways in the human resulted in lower penetration and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways and the deep lung than that predict

  3. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The current computing environment that most researchers are using for the calculation of 3D unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is a super-computer class machine. The Massively Parallel Processors (MPP's) such as the 160 node IBM SP2 at NAS and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (like NAS's SGI Power-Challenge array) provide the required computation bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. Work is in progress on a set of software tools designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these super-computer-like environments. The visualization is concurrently executed with the CFD solver. The parallel version of Visual3, pV3 required splitting up the unsteady visualization task to allow execution across a network of workstation(s) and compute servers. In this computing model, the network is almost always the bottleneck so much of the effort involved techniques to reduce the size of the data transferred between machines.

  4. Fluid Dynamic Experiments on Mush Column Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan-Brown, R. E.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    A vertically extensive stack of sills interconnected by pipe-like conduits extending from the mantle through the lithosphere and capped by a volcanic center is a magmatic mush column. At any instant at various locations it contains fractionated and primitive melts as pools of nearly crystal-free magma, pools of crystal-rich magma, thick beds of cumulates, open conduits, and conduits congested by cognate and wall debris. All boundaries of the system are sheathed by solidification fronts. With the wide range of local, characteristic length scales there is a commensurate range of solidification time scales. This creates a complicated series of resistances to magma flow and provides a variety of distinct local physical environments for the chemical modification of magma. The system is driven by over-pressure from the addition of new melt from below. The over-pressure propagates upward by moving magma which flushes conduits, disrupts cumulate beds, and pools or purges sills. A critical aspect of this process is the entrainment, transport, and deposition of crystals throughout the system. Picritic lavas charges with entrained (tramp) olivine of a wide compositional range erupted at many systems (e.g. Jan Mayen, Kilauea, Reunion, etc.) are the final expression of this process. That the size and abundance of these crystals is correlated with eruptive flux (Murata & Richter, AJS, 1966) suggests an important indicator of the overall dynamics of the mush column. A mush column of this basic nature is observed is observed in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica and is inferred beneath Hawaii and the ocean ridges. We have attempted to model this process by studying the entrainment, transport, and deposition of particles in a vertical stack of sills (Plexiglas tanks) connected by resistive conduits (check valves), over-pressured from the base, and open at the top. The system is about two meters in height with water and oil as fluids and particles with Reynolds numbers

  5. Application of wave mechanics theory to fluid dynamics problems: Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krzywoblocki, M. Z. V.

    1974-01-01

    The application of the basic formalistic elements of wave mechanics theory is discussed. The theory is used to describe the physical phenomena on the microscopic level, the fluid dynamics of gases and liquids, and the analysis of physical phenomena on the macroscopic (visually observable) level. The practical advantages of relating the two fields of wave mechanics and fluid mechanics through the use of the Schroedinger equation constitute the approach to this relationship. Some of the subjects include: (1) fundamental aspects of wave mechanics theory, (2) laminarity of flow, (3) velocity potential, (4) disturbances in fluids, (5) introductory elements of the bifurcation theory, and (6) physiological aspects in fluid dynamics.

  6. Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Conference publication includes 79 abstracts and presentations and 3 invited presentations given at the Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion held at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, April 20-22, 1993. The purpose of the workshop is to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion. The workshop is an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics are discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  7. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  8. Fluid Dynamics of the Heart and its Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskin, Charles S.

    1997-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of the heart involve the interaction of blood, a viscous incompressible fluid, with the flexible, elastic, fiber-reinforced heart valve leaflets that are immersed in that fluid. Neither the fluid motion nor the valve leaflet motion are known in advance: both must be computed simultaneously by solving their coupled equations of motion. This can be done by the immersed boundary method(Peskin CS and McQueen DM: A general method for the computer simulation of biological systems interacting with fluids. In: Biological Fluid Dynamics (Ellington CP and Pedley TJ, eds.), The Company of Biologists Limited, Cambridge UK, 1995, pp. 265-276.), which can be extended to incorporate the contractile fiber architecture of the muscular heart walls as well as the valve leaflets and the blood. In this way we arrive at a three-dimensional computer model of the heart(Peskin CS and McQueen DM: Fluid dynamics of the heart and its valves. In: Case Studies in Mathematical Modeling: Ecology, Physiology, and Cell Biology (Othmer HG, Adler FR, Lewis MA, and Dallon JC, eds.), Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs NJ, 1996, pp. 309-337.), which can be used as a test chamber for the design of prosthetic cardiac valves, and also to study the function of the heart in health and in disease. Numerical solutions of the equations of cardiac fluid dynamics obtained by the immersed boundary method will be presented in the form of a video animation of the beating heart.

  9. The coupled dynamics of fluids and spacecraft in low gravity and low gravity fluid measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John; Peterson, Lee D.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1987-01-01

    The very large mass fraction of liquids stored on broad current and future generation spacecraft has made critical the technologies of describing the fluid-spacecraft dynamics and measuring or gauging the fluid. Combined efforts in these areas are described, and preliminary results are presented. The coupled dynamics of fluids and spacecraft in low gravity study is characterizing the parametric behavior of fluid-spacecraft systems in which interaction between the fluid and spacecraft dynamics is encountered. Particular emphasis is given to the importance of nonlinear fluid free surface phenomena to the coupled dynamics. An experimental apparatus has been developed for demonstrating a coupled fluid-spacecraft system. In these experiments, slosh force signals are fed back to a model tank actuator through a tunable analog second order integration circuit. In this manner, the tank motion is coupled to the resulting slosh force. Results are being obtained in 1-g and in low-g (on the NASA KC-135) using dynamic systems nondimensionally identical except for the Bond numbers.

  10. The importance of fluid dynamics for MBR fouling mitigation.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Lutz; Drews, Anja; Prieske, Helmut; Bérubé, Pierre R; Kraume, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    The importance of the multiphase fluid dynamics for fouling mitigation in MBR systems has been widely acknowledged with air sparging having been applied commercially for about 20 years. However, the effects of air scouring are still not fully understood since the transient orthogonal and parallel flows as well as turbulent eddies created by bubbling generate complex hydrodynamic flow fields in the vicinity of a membrane. There is no generally valid model that describes the relationship between fouling rate and fluid dynamics. So, a reliable and universally applicable model to optimize membrane module and tank geometries, air scouring and filtration cycles is still pending. In addition to providing a discussion on the importance of multiphase fluid dynamics for fouling control, this review aims at developing guidelines to choose appropriate experimental and numerical methods for fluid dynamics investigations in MBR systems.

  11. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics )CFD) models to address environmental engineering challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant source emissions, atmospheric dispersion and resulting human exposure. CFD simulations ...

  12. Visualization of Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The current compute environment that most researchers are using for the calculation of 3D unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is a super-computer class machine. The Massively Parallel Processors (MPP's) such as the 160 node IBM SP2 at NAS and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (like NAS's SGI Power-Challenge array and the J90 cluster) provide the required computation bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. If we follow the traditional computational analysis steps for CFD (and we wish to construct an interactive visualizer) we need to be aware of the following: (1) Disk space requirements. A single snap-shot must contain at least the values (primitive variables) stored at the appropriate locations within the mesh. For most simple 3D Euler solvers that means 5 floating point words. Navier-Stokes solutions with turbulence models may contain 7 state-variables. (2) Disk speed vs. Computational speeds. The time required to read the complete solution of a saved time frame from disk is now longer than the compute time for a set number of iterations from an explicit solver. Depending, on the hardware and solver an iteration of an implicit code may also take less time than reading the solution from disk. If one examines the performance improvements in the last decade or two, it is easy to see that depending on disk performance (vs. CPU improvement) may not be the best method for enhancing interactivity. (3) Cluster and Parallel Machine I/O problems. Disk access time is much worse within current parallel machines and cluster of workstations that are acting in concert to solve a single problem. In this case we are not trying to read the volume of data, but are running the solver and the solver outputs the solution. These traditional network interfaces must be used for the file system. (4) Numerics of particle traces. Most visualization tools can work upon a single snap shot of the data but some visualization tools for transient

  13. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  14. Remote Visualization and Remote Collaboration On Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A new technology has been developed for remote visualization that provides remote, 3D, high resolution, dynamic, interactive viewing of scientific data (such as fluid dynamics simulations or measurements). Based on this technology, some World Wide Web sites on the Internet are providing fluid dynamics data for educational or testing purposes. This technology is also being used for remote collaboration in joint university, industry, and NASA projects in computational fluid dynamics and wind tunnel testing. Previously, remote visualization of dynamic data was done using video format (transmitting pixel information) such as video conferencing or MPEG movies on the Internet. The concept for this new technology is to send the raw data (e.g., grids, vectors, and scalars) along with viewing scripts over the Internet and have the pixels generated by a visualization tool running on the viewer's local workstation. The visualization tool that is currently used is FAST (Flow Analysis Software Toolkit).

  15. From Particles to Fluid Dynamics for Flocking Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscani, G.

    2010-04-01

    We study the dynamics of groups of undistinguished agents, which, while interacting according to their relative positions, dissipate energy. These models are developed to mimic the collective motion of groups of living individuals such as bird flocks, fish schools or bacteria colonies. According to the Cucker and Smale model,7 binary interactions between agents are modelled by dissipative collisions in which the coefficient of restitution depends on their relative distance. Under the assumption of weak dissipation, it is shown that the consequent dynamics can be described at a fluid dynamic level by the Euler equation for compressible fluids, in which the equations for momentum and energy present a dissipative correction.

  16. Helicity and singular structures in fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, H. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Helicity is, like energy, a quadratic invariant of the Euler equations of ideal fluid flow, although, unlike energy, it is not sign definite. In physical terms, it represents the degree of linkage of the vortex lines of a flow, conserved when conditions are such that these vortex lines are frozen in the fluid. Some basic properties of helicity are reviewed, with particular reference to (i) its crucial role in the dynamo excitation of magnetic fields in cosmic systems; (ii) its bearing on the existence of Euler flows of arbitrarily complex streamline topology; (iii) the constraining role of the analogous magnetic helicity in the determination of stable knotted minimum-energy magnetostatic structures; and (iv) its role in depleting nonlinearity in the Navier-Stokes equations, with implications for the coherent structures and energy cascade of turbulence. In a final section, some singular phenomena in low Reynolds number flows are briefly described. PMID:24520175

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics and the Pathophysiology of Hydrocephalus: New Concepts.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinya; Kelly, Erin

    2016-04-01

    Many controversies remain regarding basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology and the mechanism behind the development of hydrocephalus. Recent information obtained from CSF time spatial spin labeling inversion pulse method discovers different aspect of CSF dynamics. In this article, we would discuss how recent CSF imaging advances are leading to new concepts of CSF flow dynamics and the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus, with an emphasis on time spatial spin labeling inversion pulse imaging of CSF dynamics.

  18. Dynamic high pressure: Why it makes metallic fluid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, W. J.

    2015-09-01

    Metallic fluid H has been made by dynamic compression decades after Wigner and Huntington (WH) predicted its existence in 1935. The density at which it was made is within a few percent of the density predicted by WH. Metallic fluid H was achieved by multiple-shock compression of liquid H2, which is quasi-isentropic and thermally equilibrated. That is, the compressions were isentropic but for enough temperature and entropy to drive the crossover to completion from H2 to H at 9-fold compression. The metallic fluid is highly degenerate: T/TF≈0.014. The basic ideas of dynamic compression, also known as supersonic, adiabatic, nonlinear hydrodynamics, were developed in the last half of the Nineteenth Century in European universities. Today dynamic compression is generally unfamiliar to the scientific community, which impedes general understanding as to why fluid H becomes metallic at a pressure observable in a laboratory. The purposes of this paper are to (i) present a brief review of dynamic compression and its affects on materials, (ii) review considerations that led to the sample holder designed specifically to make metallic fluid H, and (iii) present a brief inter-comparison of dynamic and static methods to achieve high pressure relative to their prospects for making metallic H.

  19. Relaxation Dynamics of Non-Power-Law Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qi; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liang, Zhan-Peng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2013-12-01

    The relaxation of non-Newtonian liquids with non-power-law rheology on partially wetted surfaces is rarely investigated. This study assesses the relaxation behavior of 14 partial wetting systems with non-power-law fluids by sessile drop method. These systems are two carboxymethylcellulose sodium solutions on two kinds of slides, cover glass, and silicon wafer surfaces; three polyethylene glycol (PEG400) + silica nanoparticle suspensions on polymethyl methacrylate and polystyrene surfaces. The dynamic contact angle and moving velocity of contact line relationship data for relaxation drops of the 14 tested systems demonstrate a power-law fluid-like behavior, and the equivalent power exponent for a certain fluid on different solid substrates are uniform. By analyzing the relationship between the equivalent power exponent and shear rate, it is proposed that a fluid regime with shear rates of a few tens of s controls relaxation dynamics.

  20. Parallel Domain Decomposition Preconditioning for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Chan, Tony F.; Tang, Wei-Pai; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the parallel domain decomposition preconditioning for computational fluid dynamics. Details are given on some difficult fluid flow problems, stabilized spatial discretizations, and Newton's method for solving the discretized flow equations. Schur complement domain decomposition is described through basic formulation, simplifying strategies (including iterative subdomain and Schur complement solves, matrix element dropping, localized Schur complement computation, and supersparse computations), and performance evaluation.

  1. Static and dynamic response of a fluid-fluid interface to electric point and line charge

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Simen A Brevik, Iver

    2012-12-15

    We consider the behavior of a dielectric fluid-fluid interface in the presence of a strong electric field from a point charge and line charge, respectively, both statically and, in the latter case, dynamically. The fluid surface is elevated above its undisturbed level until balance is reached between the electromagnetic lifting force, gravity and surface tension. We derive ordinary differential equations for the shape of the fluid-fluid interface which are solved numerically with standard means, demonstrating how the elevation depends on field strength and surface tension coefficient. In the dynamic case of a moving line charge, the surface of an inviscid liquid-liquid interface is left to oscillate behind the moving charge after it has been lifted against the force of gravity. We show how the wavelength of the oscillations depends on the relative strength of the forces of gravity and inertia, whereas the amplitude of the oscillations is a nontrivial function of the velocity at which the line charge moves. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid surface elevation analyzed near a static point and line charge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevation determined by interaction of gravity, dielectric force and surface tension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic equation of motion for the moving line charge is derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface waves behind moving charge calculated and analysed for different velocities.

  2. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  3. SPAR improved structure/fluid dynamic analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Pearson, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of flowing fluid and elastic structure was added to the SPAR computer code. A method, developed and adopted for use in SPAR utilizes the existing assumed stress hybrid plan element in SPAR. An operational mode was incorporated in SPAR which provides the capability for analyzing the flaw of a two dimensional, incompressible, viscous fluid within rigid boundaries. Equations were developed to provide for the eventual analysis of the interaction of such fluids with an elastic solid.

  4. A mathematical model of blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Xenos, Michalis; Sweetman, Brian; Ponkshe, Sukruti; Guo, Xiaodong; Penn, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Using first principles of fluid and solid mechanics a comprehensive model of human intracranial dynamics is proposed. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain parenchyma as well as the spinal canal are included. The compartmental model predicts intracranial pressure gradients, blood and CSF flows and displacements in normal and pathological conditions like communicating hydrocephalus. The system of differential equations of first principles conservation balances is discretized and solved numerically. Fluid-solid interactions of the brain parenchyma with cerebral blood and CSF are calculated. The model provides the transitions from normal dynamics to the diseased state during the onset of communicating hydrocephalus. Predicted results were compared with physiological data from Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to verify the dynamic model. Bolus injections into the CSF are simulated in the model and found to agree with clinical measurements.

  5. A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

  6. Design patterns for training fluid dynamics experimentalists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randall

    2012-11-01

    What practical knowledge would your ideal lab student, technician or even postdoc possess? Borrowing the idea of design patterns from the fields of architecture and computer science, we claim that there are technical problems common to many investigations with often-used design solutions. These would form a useful repertoire that thoughtful practitioners can adapt. Creatively breaking the rules is also encouraged. We invite other ideas for fluid experiment design patterns towards the end of creating a web-based resource that helps new experimentalists get up to speed quickly. We are creating such a resource so that it also serves pre-college students invited into research experiences and inventive citizen scientists exploring new technologies.

  7. Rate-dependent extensional "dynamic ligaments" using shear thickening fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenno, Paul T.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2014-04-01

    A novel "dynamic ligament" smart material that exhibits a strongly rate-dependent response in extension is developed and characterized. The devices, based on elastomeric polymers and shear thickening fluids, exhibit low resistance to extension at rates below 10 mm/s, but when stretched at 100 mm/s or higher resist with up to 7 × higher force. A link between the shear thickening fluid's rheology and the dynamic ligament's tensile performance is presented to explain the rate-dependent response. Future recommendations for improving device performance are presented, along with a host of different potential application areas including safety equipment, adaptive braces, sporting goods, and military equipment.

  8. State space representations of distributed fluid line dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, H.; Goodson, R. E.; Leonard, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the convenience of using a systematic straight forward procedure to obtain meaningful dynamic information for a class of complex distributed parameter fluid line networks. System transients in the time domain are determined by means of state space techniques. Digital computer implementation yields a simple but consistent way of obtaining overall system time solutions. A step-by-step analysis procedure flow chart is shown in Appendix I which illustrates the basic approach for modeling, approximating and selecting digital techniques for simulating the dynamic response of fluid line systems.

  9. Dynamical density functional theory for molecular and colloidal fluids: a microscopic approach to fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Archer, A J

    2009-01-07

    In recent years, a number of dynamical density functional theories (DDFTs) have been developed for describing the dynamics of the one-body density of both colloidal and atomic fluids. In the colloidal case, the particles are assumed to have stochastic equations of motion and theories exist for both the case when the particle motion is overdamped and also in the regime where inertial effects are relevant. In this paper, we extend the theory and explore the connections between the microscopic DDFT and the equations of motion from continuum fluid mechanics. In particular, starting from the Kramers equation, which governs the dynamics of the phase space probability distribution function for the system, we show that one may obtain an approximate DDFT that is a generalization of the Euler equation. This DDFT is capable of describing the dynamics of the fluid density profile down to the scale of the individual particles. As with previous DDFTs, the dynamical equations require as input the Helmholtz free energy functional from equilibrium density functional theory (DFT). For an equilibrium system, the theory predicts the same fluid one-body density profile as one would obtain from DFT. Making further approximations, we show that the theory may be used to obtain the mode coupling theory that is widely used for describing the transition from a liquid to a glassy state.

  10. Current Problems in Turbomachinery Fluid Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-26

    starting the design of the quantitative experiment to be carried out in the Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel and thus will be the main experimental effort of...Dynamics Panel meeting on Integration of Computers and Wind Tunnel Testing, September 24-25, 1980, Chattanooga, TN. Visits and Technical Discussions E...treatment three-dimensional flow axial flow turbomachinery flow measurements in transonic fans axial flow compressors transonic flow computational

  11. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  12. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimeters), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured, and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  14. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms. PMID:26594068

  15. Fluid Dynamics in Rotary Piston Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Wappenschmidt, Johannes; Sonntag, Simon J; Buesen, Martin; Gross-Hardt, Sascha; Kaufmann, Tim; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Autschbach, Ruediger; Goetzenich, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical circulatory support can maintain a sufficient blood circulation if the native heart is failing. The first implantable devices were displacement pumps with membranes. They were able to provide a sufficient blood flow, yet, were limited because of size and low durability. Rotary pumps have resolved these technical drawbacks, enabled a growing number of mechanical circulatory support therapy and a safer application. However, clinical complications like gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic insufficiency, thromboembolic complications, and impaired renal function are observed with their application. This is traced back to their working principle with attenuated or non-pulsatile flow and high shear stress. Rotary piston pumps potentially merge the benefits of available pump types and seem to avoid their complications. However, a profound assessment and their development requires the knowledge of the flow characteristics. This study aimed at their investigation. A functional model was manufactured and investigated with particle image velocimetry. Furthermore, a fluid-structure interaction computational simulation was established to extend the laboratory capabilities. The numerical results precisely converged with the laboratory measurements. Thus, the in silico model enabled the investigation of relevant areas like gap flows that were hardly feasible with laboratory means. Moreover, an economic method for the investigation of design variations was established.

  16. Fluid dynamics of aortic valve stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Maftoon, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve stenosis, which causes considerable constriction of the flow passage, is one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and is the most common cause of the valvular replacements which take place for around 100,000 per year in North America. Furthermore, it is considered as the most frequent cardiac disease after arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease. The objective of this study is to develop an analytical model considering the coupling effect between fluid flow and elastic deformation with reasonable boundary conditions to describe the effect of AS on the left ventricle and the aorta. The pulsatile and Newtonian blood flow through aortic stenosis with vascular wall deformability is analyzed and its effects are discussed in terms of flow parameters such as velocity, resistance to flow, shear stress distribution and pressure loss. Meanwhile we developed analytical expressions to improve the comprehension of the transvalvular hemodynamics and the aortic stenosis hemodynamics which is of great interest because of one main reason. To medical scientists, an accurate knowledge of the mechanical properties of whole blood flow in the aorta can suggest a new diagnostic tool.

  17. Fluid dynamics of double diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koseff, J.R.

    1990-04-03

    The major accomplishments of our initial research period (August 1, 1987, to March 1, 1990) are as follows; we completed construction of the experimental facility. Originally, it had been our intent to modify an existing facility in our laboratory. When this became impractical we constructed a new stand-alone facility. Modified an existing three-dimensional numerical code developed in our laboratory, SEAFLOS1, by incorporating a salinity transport equation. Developed experimental and analytical techniques, and performed both physical and numerical experiments for a wide range of initial and boundary conditions. Focused our overall research effort to answer the following four questions pertaining to the formation of convective intrusions due to lateral temperature gradients established by sidewall heating. (1) What is the internal structure of the convective intrusions as a function of the initial stratification and sidewall heating rates (2) What is the correct scaling for the initial vertical dimension of the intrusions (3) How does the merging process vary as a function of initial stratification and sidewall heating rate (4) Is the sidewall heating critical for continued propagation of the intrusions, or is it merely a trigger which releases the internal instability in the fluid

  18. Fluid dynamics of double diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koseff, J.R.

    1989-04-07

    A study of mixing processes in doubly diffusive systems is being conducted. Continuous gradients of two diffusing components (heat and salinity in our case) are being used as initial conditions, and forcing is introduced by lateral heating and surface shear. The goals of the proposed work include: (1) quantification of the effects of finite amplitude disturbances on stable, double diffusive systems, particularly with respect to lateral heating, (2) development of an improved understanding of the physical phenomena present in wind-driven shear flows in double diffusive stratified environments, (3) increasing our knowledge-base on turbulent flow in stratified environments and how to represent it, and (4) formulation of a numerical code for such flows. The work is being carried out in an experimental facility which is located in the Stanford Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, and on laboratory minicomputers and CRAY computers. In particular we are focusing on the following key issues: (1) the formation and propagation of double diffusive intrusions away from a heated wall and the effects of lateral heating on the double diffusive system; (2) the interaction between the double diffusively influenced fluxes and the turbulence induced fluxes; (3) the measurement of heat and mass fluxes; and (4) the influence of double diffusive gradients on mixed layer deepening. 1 fig.

  19. Silverton Conference on Applications of the Zero Gravity Space Shuttle Environment to Problems in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisner, M. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The possible utilization of the zero gravity resource for studies in a variety of fluid dynamics and fluid-dynamic related problems was investigated. A group of experiments are discussed and described in detail; these include experiments in the areas of geophysical fluid models, fluid dynamics, mass transfer processes, electrokinetic separation of large particles, and biophysical and physiological areas.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Binary Fluid in a Nanochannel

    SciTech Connect

    Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pathania, Y.

    2011-12-12

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of binary fluid (mixture of argon and krypton) in the nanochannel flow. The computational software LAMMPS is used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations. Binary fluids of argon and krypton with varying concentration of atom species were taken for two densities 0.65 and 0.45. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. To drive the flow, a constant force is applied in one direction. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Week-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) potential. The velocity profile has been looked at for three nanochannel widths i.e for 12{sigma}, 14{sigma} and 16{sigma} and also for the different concentration of two species. The velocity profile of the binary fluid predicted by the simulations agrees with the quadratic shape of the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow in continuum theory.

  1. Optimization of Fluid Front Dynamics in Porous Media Using Rate Control: I. Equal Mobility Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaryanto, Bagus; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    1999-10-18

    In applications involving this injection of a fluid in a porous medium to displace another fluid, a main objective is the maximization of the displacement efficiency. For a fixed arrangement of injection and production points (sources and sinks), such optimization is possible by controlling the injection rate policy. Despite its practical relevance, however, this aspect has received scant attention in the literature. In this paper, a fundamental approach based on optimal control theory, for the case when the fluids are miscible, of equal viscosity and in the absence of dispersion and gravity effects. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media are considered. From a fluid dynamics viewpoint, this is a problem in the deformation of material lines in porous media, as a function of time-varying injection rates.

  2. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  3. SPAR improved structure-fluid dynamic analysis capability, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient and general method of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of fluid flow and elastic structures is investigated. The improvement of Structural Performance Analysis and Redesign (SPAR) code is summarized. All error codes are documented and the SPAR processor/subroutine cross reference is included.

  4. Fluid Dynamical Profiles and Constants of Motionfrom d-Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiw, R.; Polychronakos, A. P.

    Various fluid mechanical systems enjoy a hidden, higher-dimensional dynamical Poincaré symmetry, which arises owing to their descent from a Nambu-Goto action. Also, for the same reason, there are equivalence transformations between different models. These interconnections, summarized by the diagram below, are discussed in our paper.

  5. Lagrangian fluid dynamics using the Voronoi-Delauanay mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Dukowicz, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    A Lagrangian technique for numerical fluid dynamics is described. This technique makes use of the Voronoi mesh to efficiently locate new neighbors, and it uses the dual (Delaunay) triangulation to define computational cells. This removes all topological restrictions and facilitates the solution of problems containing interfaces and multiple materials. To improve computational accuracy a mesh smoothing procedure is employed.

  6. Morphological stability and fluid dynamics of vapor crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    Research on morphological stability and fluid dynamics of crystal growth is discussed. Interfacial heat and mass transfer research is discussed. The finding of surface roughening is a precursor to a solid-solid phase transition was further quantified. Progress was obtained with the mass spectroscopic characterization of GeSe-Ge I sub 4.

  7. Current capabilities and future directions in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A summary of significant findings is given, followed by specific recommendations for future directions of emphasis for computational fluid dynamics development. The discussion is organized into three application areas: external aerodynamics, hypersonics, and propulsion - and followed by a turbulence modeling synopsis.

  8. Potential applications of computational fluid dynamics to biofluid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.; Kwak, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was developed to the stage where it has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. In view of advances made in aerospace applications, the computational approach can be used for biofluid mechanics research. Several flow simulation methods developed for aerospace problems are briefly discussed for potential applications to biofluids, especially to blood flow analysis.

  9. Some Contributions to Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Harvey Philip

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent free surface model has been developed for predicting the velocity field and surface height variations in a tidal bay. An explicit finite difference numerical solution is obtained by transforming the vertical coordinate in the governing model equations. The ocean-bay interface open boundary condition is incorporated without approximation into the hydrodynamic model by employing a staggered grid Richardson lattice. The momentum equations ignore horizontal diffusion, which is justifiably small for the South Biscayne Bay. Another three-dimensional, time-dependent free surface model for the South Biscayne Bay is used for application to suspended particles transport. A unique mass-conserving numerical model is used for solving the concentration equation by an explicit finite difference scheme. The effects of constant particle settling velocity and bottom bed deposition rate are compared and discussed. For convection dominated coastal flows, the flux -corrected transport (FCT) method is compared with other low-dispersive, explicit finite difference schemes for the two-dimensional linear advection of 2-D gaussian initial temperature distributions of various half-widths. The flow field is specified a-priori as consisting of a slowly varying, oscillating, uniform x-component of velocity, and a constant y-component of velocity. This type of flow field is typically encountered in near-coastal waters. The artificial numerical effects of diffusion (dissipation), dispersion, and anisotropy are discussed. Finally, two-dimensional linear advection solutions of transported fluid temperature are explored by implementing high resolution, high order explicit finite difference schemes. A comparison of the flux-corrected transport (FCT) methods is made with other total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes for the 2-D gaussian initial temperature distributions of various half-widths. Further clipping of the sharply peaked gaussian distribution in 2-D

  10. Influence of stent configuration on cerebral aneurysm fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Babiker, M Haithem; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Ryan, Justin; Albuquerque, Felipe; Collins, Daniel; Elvikis, Arius; Frakes, David H

    2012-02-02

    Embolic coiling is the most popular endovascular treatment available for cerebral aneurysms. Nevertheless, the embolic coiling of wide-neck aneurysms is challenging and, in many cases, ineffective. Use of highly porous stents to support coiling of wide-neck aneurysms has become a common procedure in recent years. Several studies have also demonstrated that high porosity stents alone can significantly alter aneurysmal hemodynamics, but differences among different stent configurations have not been fully characterized. As a result, it is usually unclear which stent configuration is optimal for treatment. In this paper, we present a flow study that elucidates the influence of stent configuration on cerebral aneurysm fluid dynamics in an idealized wide-neck basilar tip aneurysm model. Aneurysmal fluid dynamics for three different stent configurations (half-Y, Y and, cross-bar) were first quantified using particle image velocimetry and then compared. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were also conducted for selected stent configurations to facilitate validation and provide more detailed characterizations of the fluid dynamics promoted by different stent configurations. In vitro results showed that the Y stent configuration reduced cross-neck flow most significantly, while the cross-bar configuration reduced velocity magnitudes within the aneurysmal sac most significantly. The half-Y configuration led to increased velocity magnitudes within the aneurysmal sac at high parent-vessel flow rates. Experimental results were in strong agreement with CFD simulations. Simulated results indicated that differences in fluid dynamic performance among the different stent configurations can be attributed primarily to protruding struts within the bifurcation region.

  11. Dynamics of complex fluids in rotary atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Bavand; McKinley, Gareth; MIT, Mechanical Engineering Department Team

    2016-11-01

    We study the dynamics of fragmentation for different Newtonian and viscoelastic liquids in rotary atomization. In this process, at the rim of a spinning cup, the centripetal acceleration destabilizes the formed liquid torus due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The resulting ligaments leave the liquid torus with a remarkably repeatable spacing that scales linearly with the inverse of the rotation rate. Filaments then follow a well-defined geometrical path-line that is described by the involute of the circle. Knowing the geometry of this phenomenon we derive the detailed kinematics of this process and compare it with the experimental observations. We show that the ligaments elongate tangentially to the involute of the circle and thin radially as they separate from the cup. A theoretical form is derived for the spatial variation of the filament deformation rate. Once the ligaments are far from the cup they breakup into droplets since they are not stretched fast enough (compared to the critical rate of capillary thinning). We couple these derivations with the known properties of Newtonian and viscoelastic liquids to provide a physical analysis for this fragmentation process that is compared in detail with our experiments.

  12. Fluid-filled dynamic bowtie filter: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunhavanich, Picha; Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2015-03-01

    By varying its thickness to compensate for the different path length through the patient as a function of fan angle, a pre-patient bowtie filter modulates flux distribution to reduce patient dose, scatter, and detector dynamic range, and to improve image quality. A dynamic bowtie filter is superior to its traditional, static counterpart in its ability to adjust its thickness along different fan and view angles to suit a specific patient and task. Among the proposed dynamic bowtie designs, the piecewise-linear and the digital beam attenuators offer more flexibility than conventional filters, but rely on analog positioning of a limited number of wedges. In this work, we introduce a new approach with digital control, called the fluid-filled dynamic bowtie filter. It is a two-dimensional array of small binary elements (channels filled or unfilled with attenuating liquid) in which the cumulative thickness along the x-ray path contributes to the bowtie's total attenuation. Using simulated data from a pelvic scan, the performance is compared with the piecewise-linear attenuator. The fluid-filled design better matches the desired target attenuation profile and delivers a 4.2x reduction in dynamic range. The variance of the reconstruction (or noise map) can also be more homogeneous. In minimizing peak variance, the fluid-filled attenuator shows a 3% improvement. From the initial simulation results, the proposed design has more control over the flux distribution as a function of both fan and view angles.

  13. Two-dimensional dynamic fluid bowtie attenuators.

    PubMed

    Hermus, James R; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    Fluence field modulated (FFM) CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only one-dimensional modulators have been proposed, as the extension to two-dimensional (2-D) modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based fluence field modulated designs. This work proposes to use liquid and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam, as unlike solids, these materials can be arranged allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a given path length of gas were determined that provided the same attenuation as 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Liquid iodine, zinc chloride, cerium chloride, erbium oxide, iron oxide, and gadolinium chloride were studied. Gaseous xenon, uranium hexafluoride, tungsten hexafluoride, and nickel tetracarbonyl were also studied. Additionally, we performed a proof-of-concept experiment using a 96 cell array in which the liquid thickness in each cell was adjusted manually. Liquid thickness varied as a function of kV and chemical composition, with erbium oxide allowing for the smallest thickness. For the gases, tungsten hexaflouride required the smallest pressure to compensate for 30 cm of soft tissue. The 96 cell iodine attenuator allowed for a reduction in both dynamic range to the detector and scatter-to-primary ratio. For both liquids and gases, when k-edges were located within the diagnostic energy range used for imaging, the mean beam energy exhibited the smallest change with compensation amount. The thickness of liquids and the gas pressure seem logistically implementable within the space constraints of C-arm-based cone beam CT (CBCT) and diagnostic CT systems. The gas pressures also seem logistically implementable within the space and tube loading constraints of CBCT and diagnostic CT systems.

  14. Two-dimensional dynamic fluid bowtie attenuators

    PubMed Central

    Hermus, James R.; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Fluence field modulated (FFM) CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only one-dimensional modulators have been proposed, as the extension to two-dimensional (2-D) modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based fluence field modulated designs. This work proposes to use liquid and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam, as unlike solids, these materials can be arranged allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a given path length of gas were determined that provided the same attenuation as 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Liquid iodine, zinc chloride, cerium chloride, erbium oxide, iron oxide, and gadolinium chloride were studied. Gaseous xenon, uranium hexafluoride, tungsten hexafluoride, and nickel tetracarbonyl were also studied. Additionally, we performed a proof-of-concept experiment using a 96 cell array in which the liquid thickness in each cell was adjusted manually. Liquid thickness varied as a function of kV and chemical composition, with erbium oxide allowing for the smallest thickness. For the gases, tungsten hexaflouride required the smallest pressure to compensate for 30 cm of soft tissue. The 96 cell iodine attenuator allowed for a reduction in both dynamic range to the detector and scatter-to-primary ratio. For both liquids and gases, when k-edges were located within the diagnostic energy range used for imaging, the mean beam energy exhibited the smallest change with compensation amount. The thickness of liquids and the gas pressure seem logistically implementable within the space constraints of C-arm-based cone beam CT (CBCT) and diagnostic CT systems. The gas pressures also seem logistically implementable within the space and tube loading constraints of CBCT and diagnostic CT systems. PMID:26835499

  15. Numerical simulation of particle dynamics at a fluid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Pengtao

    2016-11-01

    Particles straddling a fluid interface exhibit rich dynamics due to the coexistence of moving boundaries, fluid interfaces, and moving contact lines. For instance, as a particle falls onto a liquid surface, it may sink, float, or even bounce off depending on a wide range of parameters. To better understand the dynamics of such a multiphase system, we develop a finite-element based arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian-phase-field method. The governing equations for particles and fluids are solved in a unified variational framework that satisfies an energy law. We first validate our code by computing three problems found in literature: sinking of a horizontal cylinder through an air-water interface, sinking of a sphere through an air-oil interface at small Reynolds numbers, and bouncing of a sphere after its normal impact onto an air-water interface. Our numerical results show good agreements with experimental data. We then investigate the effect of wetting properties, including static contact angle, slip length, and wall energy relaxation, on particle dynamics at the fluid interface. This work is supported by NSF DMS-1522604.

  16. Fluid dynamics of the shock wave reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, Robert Kenneth

    2000-10-01

    High commercial incentives have driven conventional olefin production technologies to near their material limits, leaving the possibility of further efficiency improvements only in the development of entirely new techniques. One strategy known as the Shock Wave Reactor, which employs gas dynamic processes to circumvent limitations of conventional reactors, has been demonstrated effective at the University of Washington. Preheated hydrocarbon feedstock and a high enthalpy carrier gas (steam) are supersonically mixed at a temperature below that required for thermal cracking. Temperature recovery is then effected via shock recompression to initiate pyrolysis. The evolution to proof-of-concept and analysis of experiments employing ethane and propane feedstocks are presented. The Shock Wave Reactor's high enthalpy steam and ethane flows severely limit diagnostic capability in the proof-of-concept experiment. Thus, a preliminary blow down supersonic air tunnel of similar geometry has been constructed to investigate recompression stability and (especially) rapid supersonic mixing necessary for successful operation of the Shock Wave Reactor. The mixing capabilities of blade nozzle arrays are therefore studied in the air experiment and compared with analytical models. Mixing is visualized through Schlieren imaging and direct photography of condensation in carbon dioxide injection, and interpretation of visual data is supported by pressure measurement and flow sampling. The influence of convective Mach number is addressed. Additionally, thermal behavior of a blade nozzle array is analyzed for comparison to data obtained in the course of succeeding proof-of-concept experiments. Proof-of-concept is naturally succeeded by interest in industrial adaptation of the Shock Wave Reactor, particularly with regard to issues involving the scaling and refinement of the shock recompression. Hence, an additional, variable geometry air tunnel has been constructed to study the parameter

  17. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System Fluid Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Medium (TCM) is the bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures are grown. With its two syringe ports, it is much like a bag used to administer intravenous fluid, except it allows gas exchange needed for life. The TCM contains cell culture medium, and when frozen cells are flown to the ISS, they are thawed and introduced to the TCM through the syringe ports. In the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI) experiment, several mixing procedures are being assessed to determine which method achieves the most uniform mixing of growing cells and culture medium.

  18. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  19. AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development) Engine Disc Cooperative Test Programme,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    4薗ii 759 so A AOR!nRU spa A44 IFOR I L J32 I 2 11I1L2 1. 1111. BBIC fiLL W;UV AGARM36R-766 AGARD REPORT No.766 AGARD Engine Disc Cooperative Test...J \\ND MlR I ItON \\I (MROi\\NIS.\\I ION 1)t I RiNI Ir iIM I 1~ .\\%NII I NORIp A(6ARI) Report No.700 AGARD ENGINE DISC (’O )PERAI IVE TEST PROG;RAMME h...cim p, met for manyv years. In I 9X2 a Suh-comrnittee on ’-Damage Tolerance Concepts for Critical Engine Comiponents’ "as formed ito studs the

  20. Progress and future directions in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul; Gross, Anthony R.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has made great strides in the detailed simulation of complex fluid flows, including the fluid physics of flows heretofore not understood. It is now being routinely applied to some rather complicated problems, and starting to impact the design cycle of aerospace vehicles and their components. In addition, it is being used to complement and is being complemented by experimental studies. In this paper some major elements of contemporary CFD research, such as code validation, turbulence physics, and hypersonic flows are discussed, along with a review of the principal pacing items that currently govern CFD. Several examples are presented to illustrate the current state of the art. Finally, prospects for the future of the development and application of CFD are suggested.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has made great strides in the detailed simulation of complex fluid flows, including the fluid physics of flows heretofore not understood. It is now being routinely applied to some rather complicated problems, and starting to impact the design cycle of aerospace flight vehicles and their components. In addition, it is being used to complement, and is being complemented by, experimental studies. In the present paper, some major elements of contemporary CFD research, such as code validation, turbulence physics, and hypersonic flows are discussed, along with a review of the principal pacing items that currently govern CFD. Several examples of pioneering CFD research are presented to illustrate the current state of the art. Finally, prospects for the future development and application of CFD are suggested.

  2. Use of computational fluid dynamics in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández Tena, Ana; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a computer-based tool for simulating fluid movement. The main advantages of CFD over other fluid mechanics studies include: substantial savings in time and cost, the analysis of systems or conditions that are very difficult to simulate experimentally (as is the case of the airways), and a practically unlimited level of detail. We used the Ansys-Fluent CFD program to develop a conducting airway model to simulate different inspiratory flow rates and the deposition of inhaled particles of varying diameters, obtaining results consistent with those reported in the literature using other procedures. We hope this approach will enable clinicians to further individualize the treatment of different respiratory diseases.

  3. Measurement of interstage fluid-annulus dynamical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Makay, E.; Diaz-Tous, I. A.

    1982-01-01

    The work described in this paper is part of an Electric Power Research Institute sponsored effort to improve rotor vibrational performance on power plant feed water pumps. A major objective of this effort is to reduce vibration levels by devising inter-stage sealing configurations with optimized damping capacity, realizing that the typical multi-stage centrifugal pump has several ore inter-stage fluid annuli than it has journal bearings. Also, the fluid annuli are distributed between the journal bearings where vibration levels are highest and can therefore be 'exercised' more as dampers than can the bearings. Described in this paper is a test apparatus which has been built to experimentally determine fluid-annulus dynamical coefficients for various configurations of inter-stage sealing geometry.

  4. Fluid-dynamical aspects of laser-metal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantello, M.; Menin, R.; Donati, V.; Garifo, L.; La Rocca, A. V.; Onorato, M.

    During the interaction of a high-power laser beam with a material surface many fluid-dynamical phenomena arise. The produced flow field interacts with the beam and affects the thermal coupling between the laser energy and the target metal. In this paper the fluid-dynamical aspects of these phenomena are discussed and new experimental results are illustrated. The experiments have been performed in conditions of interest for industrial laser processes with a 15-kW CW CO2 laser. The development and the motion of bright clouds ignited from metal targets at incident laser power up to 11.6 kW, using an f/18 focusing system, have been studied by high speed photographic records. The properties of the cloud have been examined by spectroscopic analysis and absorption measurements.

  5. Lattice fluid dynamics from perfect discretizations of continuum flows

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, E.; Wiese, U.

    1998-11-01

    We use renormalization group methods to derive equations of motion for large scale variables in fluid dynamics. The large scale variables are averages of the underlying continuum variables over cubic volumes and naturally exist on a lattice. The resulting lattice dynamics represents a perfect discretization of continuum physics, i.e., grid artifacts are completely eliminated. Perfect equations of motion are derived for static, slow flows of incompressible, viscous fluids. For Hagen-Poiseuille flow in a channel with a square cross section the equations reduce to a perfect discretization of the Poisson equation for the velocity field with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The perfect large scale Poisson equation is used in a numerical simulation and is shown to represent the continuum flow exactly. For nonsquare cross sections one can use a numerical iterative procedure to derive flow equations that are approximately perfect. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab Founded by Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiwei; Fu, Hao; Pu, Yunjiao; Liu, Mingrui; Feng, Zhiming; Han, Yilun; Zhou, Ang; Zhuo, Jingyi; Hu, Yue; Wang, Ruoyu; Wu, Nana; Xiang, Zixuan; Xi, Jing; Jappar, Saltanat; Yin, Jingnan; Li, Congyuan; Song, Jinjie; Zhou, Bowen; Wang, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    An atmospheric and oceanic fluid dynamics lab has been established by a group of undergraduate students in the School of Atmospheric Sciences at Nanjing University. A series of classical experiments have been conducted including Taylor column, topographic Rossby waves, and propagating density currents. With very limited funding, all instruments were designed and assembled by students. Their hands-on experimental abilities and understanding of the fundamental theories of geophysical fluid dynamics are greatly enhanced. The students work in groups on a dedicated experiment. A student project on rotating convection was even presented in APS DFD fall meeting last year. This year, we present some new laboratory demonstrative experiments of geophysical flow and introduce how they are incorporated in the undergraduate courseswork. Funding: "National Science Talent Training Project (J1103410)" and "LMSWE Lab Funding No. 14380001".

  7. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc.

  8. Introduction to finite-difference methods for numerical fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, E.; Harlow, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    This work is intended to be a beginner`s exercise book for the study of basic finite-difference techniques in computational fluid dynamics. It is written for a student level ranging from high-school senior to university senior. Equations are derived from basic principles using algebra. Some discussion of partial-differential equations is included, but knowledge of calculus is not essential. The student is expected, however, to have some familiarity with the FORTRAN computer language, as the syntax of the computer codes themselves is not discussed. Topics examined in this work include: one-dimensional heat flow, one-dimensional compressible fluid flow, two-dimensional compressible fluid flow, and two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow with additions of the equations of heat flow and the {Kappa}-{epsilon} model for turbulence transport. Emphasis is placed on numerical instabilities and methods by which they can be avoided, techniques that can be used to evaluate the accuracy of finite-difference approximations, and the writing of the finite-difference codes themselves. Concepts introduced in this work include: flux and conservation, implicit and explicit methods, Lagrangian and Eulerian methods, shocks and rarefactions, donor-cell and cell-centered advective fluxes, compressible and incompressible fluids, the Boussinesq approximation for heat flow, Cartesian tensor notation, the Boussinesq approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor, and the modeling of transport equations. A glossary is provided which defines these and other terms.

  9. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations for Realistic Flows (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    these calculations, the reference length is the vortex core radius, the reference flow conditions are the free stream conditions with the Mach number M...currently valid OMB control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED...From - To) 11-10-2007 Technical Paper & Briefing Charts 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics

  10. Development of multigrid algorithms for problems from fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Trottenberg, U.

    Multigrid algorithms are developed to demonstrate multigrid technique efficiency for complicated fluid dynamics problems regarding error reduction and discretization accuracy. Subsonic potential 2-D flow around a profile is studied as well as rotation-symmetric flow in a slot between two rotating spheres and the flow in the combustion chamber of Otto engines. The study of the 2-D subsonic potential flow around a profile with the multigrid algorithm is discussed.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics. [numerical methods and algorithm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This collection of papers was presented at the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at Ames Research Center in California on March 12 through 14, 1991. It is an overview of CFD activities at NASA Lewis Research Center. The main thrust of computational work at Lewis is aimed at propulsion systems. Specific issues related to propulsion CFD and associated modeling will also be presented. Examples of results obtained with the most recent algorithm development will also be presented.

  12. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  13. The AFDM (advanced fluid dynamics model) program: Scope and significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The origins and goals of the advanced fluid dynamics model (AFDM) program are described, and the models, algorithm, and coding used in the resulting AFDM computer program are summarized. A sample fuel-steel boiling pool calculation is presented and compared with a similar SIMMER-II calculation. A subjective assessment of the AFDM developments is given, and areas where future work is possible are detailed. 10 refs.

  14. Fluid Dynamic Mechanisms and Interactions within Separated Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    for this research has I been Dr. Thomas L. Doligalski, Chief, Fluid Dynamics Branch, Engineering and Environmental Sciences Division. The authors of...KOOIO, with Thomas L. gation of the Effects of a Base Cavity on the Near-Wake Flowfiel od a Body at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds," Department of...F.. Quincey , V. G., and Callinan, J., "Experiments on Flow." ARC R&M No. 3323. March 1962. Two-Dimensional Base Flow at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

  15. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  16. Hypersonic Magneto-Fluid-Dynamic Compression in Cylindrical Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, Joseph S.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic magneto-fluid-dynamic interaction has been successfully performed as a virtual leading-edge strake and a virtual cowl of a cylindrical inlet. In a side-by-side experimental and computational study, the magnitude of the induced compression was found to be depended on configuration and electrode placement. To better understand the interacting phenomenon the present investigation is focused on a direct current discharge at the leading edge of a cylindrical inlet for which validating experimental data is available. The present computational result is obtained by solving the magneto-fluid-dynamics equations at the low magnetic Reynolds number limit and using a nonequilibrium weakly ionized gas model based on the drift-diffusion theory. The numerical simulation provides a detailed description of the intriguing physics. After validation with experimental measurements, the computed results further quantify the effectiveness of a magnet-fluid-dynamic compression for a hypersonic cylindrical inlet. At a minuscule power input to a direct current surface discharge of 8.14 watts per square centimeter of electrode area produces an additional compression of 6.7 percent for a constant cross-section cylindrical inlet.

  17. A Hybrid Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Fully 3D Fluid Dynamics Approach to Simulate Multiphysics Coastal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Qu, K.

    2014-12-01

    A hybrid method that couples a geophysical fluid dynamics model to a fully 3D fluid dynamics model is the most feasible and promising approach to simulate coastal ocean flow phenomena that involve multiple types of physics spanning a vast range of temporal and spatial scales. We propose such a hybrid method that couples the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) with the Solver for Incompressible Flow on Overset Meshes (SIFOM); the former is used to simulate large-scale estuary flows, and the latter is employed to capture small-scale local processes. The coupling involves distinct governing equations, different numerical algorithms, and dissimilar grids, and it is two-way and realized using the Schwartz alternative iteration. In this presentation, the proposed method will be outlined, and a few applications that are newly produced by it but cannot be handled by other conventional approaches will be presented.

  18. Failure of film formation of viscoelastic fluid: dynamics of viscoelastic fluid in a partially filled horizontally rotating cylinder.

    PubMed

    Sumino, Yutaka; Shibayama, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Kajiya, Tadashi; Doi, Masao

    2012-04-01

    The dynamics of a viscoelastic Maxwell fluid is studied in a partially filled cylinder rotating around a horizontal axis. At low rotational velocity, the fluid behaves in the same manner as a viscous fluid. A thin fluid film is pulled up from the edge of a fluid bump at the bottom of the cylinder, and it covers the inner wall of the cylinder completely. As a result, a steady state is the coexistence of the film and the bump of the fluid. When the rotational velocity of the cylinder is increased, the film formation fails and the bump of fluid rolls steadily at the bottom of the cylinder. This failure of film formation has never been observed in the case of a viscous fluid. At higher rotational velocity, the bump of the fluid starts to oscillate at the bottom of the cylinder. Then, the fluid bump again rolls steadily with a further increase in the rotational velocity. The failure of film formation is explained in terms of the elastic behavior of the viscoelastic fluid near the boundary between the film and the bump regions. The theoretical prediction shows good agreement with the experimental results. We further estimate the condition for which a viscoelastic fluid displays dynamically nonwetting behavior; i.e., the absence of fluid film at any value of rotational velocity.

  19. Numerical Analysis of Constrained Dynamical Systems, with Applications to Dynamic Contact of Solids, Nonlinear Elastodynamics and Fluid-Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF CONSTRAINED DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS, WITH APPLICATIONS TO DYNAMIC CONTACT OF SOLIDS, NONLINEAR ELASTODYNAMICS AND FLUID-STRUCTURE...2000 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Numerical Analysis of Constrained Dynamical Systems, with 5b. GRANT NUMBER Applications to Dynamic...This extension allows the analysis of fluid-structure interfaces through the Lagrangian contact logic previously developed. Similarly, we have developed

  20. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Tsakiris, Cristian; Zhu, David C; Xenos, Michalis; Roycewicz, Peter; Danziger, Zachary; Penn, Richard

    2005-04-01

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus.

  1. Dynamics of multicomponent vesicles in a viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jin Sun Tseng, Y-H Li Shuwang Voigt, Axel Lowengrub, John S.

    2010-01-01

    We develop and investigate numerically a thermodynamically consistent model of two-dimensional multicomponent vesicles in an incompressible viscous fluid. The model is derived using an energy variation approach that accounts for different lipid surface phases, the excess energy (line energy) associated with surface phase domain boundaries, bending energy, spontaneous curvature, local inextensibility and fluid flow via the Stokes equations. The equations are high-order (fourth order) nonlinear and nonlocal due to incompressibility of the fluid and the local inextensibility of the vesicle membrane. To solve the equations numerically, we develop a nonstiff, pseudo-spectral boundary integral method that relies on an analysis of the equations at small scales. The algorithm is closely related to that developed very recently by Veerapaneni et al. [81] for homogeneous vesicles although we use a different and more efficient time stepping algorithm and a reformulation of the inextensibility equation. We present simulations of multicomponent vesicles in an initially quiescent fluid and investigate the effect of varying the average surface concentration of an initially unstable mixture of lipid phases. The phases then redistribute and alter the morphology of the vesicle and its dynamics. When an applied shear is introduced, an initially elliptical vesicle tank-treads and attains a steady shape and surface phase distribution. A sufficiently elongated vesicle tumbles and the presence of different surface phases with different bending stiffnesses and spontaneous curvatures yields a complex evolution of the vesicle morphology as the vesicle bends in regions where the bending stiffness and spontaneous curvature are small.

  2. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  3. Development of a theoretical framework for analyzing cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Vedel, Søren; Wei, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Background To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume conservation; but control volume analysis enforces independent conditions on pressure and volume. Previously, utilization of clinical measurements has been limited to understanding of the relative amplitude and timing of flow, volume and pressure waveforms; qualitative approaches without a clear framework for meaningful quantitative comparison. Methods Control volume analysis is presented to introduce the reader to the theoretical background of this foundational fluid mechanics technique for application to general control volumes. This approach is able to directly incorporate the diverse measurements obtained by clinicians to better elucidate intracranial dynamics and progression to disorder. Results Several examples of meaningful intracranial control volumes and the particular measurement sets needed for the analysis are discussed. Conclusion Control volume analysis provides a framework to guide the type and location of measurements and also a way to interpret the resulting data within a fundamental fluid physics analysis. PMID:19772652

  4. Shear banding in nematogenic fluids with oscillating orientational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frias, R; Reinken, H; Klapp, S H L

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the occurrence of shear banding in nematogenic fluids under planar Couette flow, based on mesoscopic dynamical equations for the orientational order parameter and the shear stress. We focus on parameter values where the sheared homogeneous system exhibits regular oscillatory orientational dynamics, whereas the equilibrium system is either isotropic (albeit close to the isotropic-nematic transition) or deep in its nematic phase. The numerical calculations are restricted to spatial variations in shear gradient direction. We find several new types of shear-banded states characterized by regions with regular oscillatory orientational dynamics. In all cases shear banding is accompanied by a non-monotonicity of the flow curve of the homogeneous system; however, only in the case of the initially isotropic system this curve has the typical S-like shape. We also analyze the influence of different orientational boundary conditions and of the spatial correlation length.

  5. Experimental investigations of fluid dynamic and thermal performance of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Devdatta Prakash

    The goal of this research was to investigate the fluid dynamic and thermal performance of various nanofluids. Nanofluids are dispersions of metallic nanometer size particles (<100 nm) into the base fluids. The choice of base fluid is an ethylene or propylene glycol and water mixture in cold regions. Initially the rheological characterization of copper oxide (CuO) nanofluids in water and in propylene glycol was performed. Results revealed that higher concentrations of CuO nanoparticles (5 to 15%) in water exhibited time-independent pseudoplastic and shear-thinning behavior. Lower concentrations (1 to 6%) of CuO nanofluids in propylene glycol revealed that these nanofluids behaved as Newtonian fluids. Both nanofluids showed that viscosity decreased exponentially with increase in temperature. Subsequent correlations for viscosities as a function of volume concentration and temperature were developed. Effects of different thermophysical properties on the Prandtl number of CuO, silicon dioxide (SiO2) and aluminum oxide (A12O 3) nanofluids were investigated. Results showed that the Prandtl number increased with increasing volume concentrations, which in turn increased the heat transfer coefficients of the nanofluids. Various nanofluids were compared for their heat transfer rates based on the Mouromtseff number, which is a Figure of Merit for heat transfer fluids. From this analysis, the optimal concentrations of nanoparticles in base fluids were found for CuO-water nanofluids. Experiments were performed to investigate the convective heat transfer enhancement and pressure loss of CuO, SiO2 and A12O 3 nanofluids in the turbulent regime. The increases in heat transfer coefficient by nanofluids for various volume concentrations compared to the base fluid were determined. Pressure loss was observed to increase with nanoparticle volume concentration. It was observed that an increase in particle diameter increased the heat transfer coefficient. Calculations showed that

  6. Considerations of blood properties, outlet boundary conditions and energy loss approaches in computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Young; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Woo; Lee, Joon Sang

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research, analysis of computational fluid dynamics of cerebral vessels has several limitations. Although blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, velocity and pressure fields were computed under the assumptions of incompressible, laminar, steady-state flows and Newtonian fluid dynamics. The pulsatile nature of blood flow is not properly applied in inlet and outlet boundaries. Therefore, we present these technical limitations and discuss the possible solution by comparing the theoretical and computational studies.

  7. Data Point Averaging for Computational Fluid Dynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for generating fluid flow parameter data for use in aerodynamic heating analysis. Computational fluid dynamics data is generated for a number of points in an area on a surface to be analyzed. Sub-areas corresponding to areas of the surface for which an aerodynamic heating analysis is to be performed are identified. A computer system automatically determines a sub-set of the number of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas and determines a value for each of the number of sub-areas using the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The value is determined as an average of the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The resulting parameter values then may be used to perform an aerodynamic heating analysis.

  8. Dynamic sealing principles. [design configurations for fluid leakage control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental principles governing dynamic sealing operation are discussed. Different seals are described in terms of these principles. Despite the large variety of detailed construction, there appear to be some basic principles, or combinations of basic principles, by which all seals function. They are: (1) selection and control of seal geometry, (2) control of leakage fluid properties, and (3) control of forces acting on leakage fluids. Theoretical and practical considerations in the application of these principles are discussed. Advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and application examples of various conventional and special seals are presented. Fundamental equations governing liquid and gas flows in thin-film seals, which enable leakage calculations to be made, are also presented.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is beginning to play a major role in the aircraft industry of the United States because of the realization that CFD can be a new and effective design tool and thus could provide a company with a competitive advantage. It is also playing a significant role in research institutions, both governmental and academic, as a tool for researching new fluid physics, as well as supplementing and complementing experimental testing. In this presentation, some of the progress made to date in CFD at NASA Ames will be reviewed. The presentation addresses the status of CFD in terms of methods, examples of CFD solutions, and computer technology. In addition, the role CFD will play in supporting the revolutionary goals set forth by the Aeronautical Policy Review Committee established by the Office of Science and Technology Policy is noted. The need for validated CFD tools is also briefly discussed.

  10. Emergent geometries and nonlinear-wave dynamics in photon fluids

    PubMed Central

    Marino, F.; Maitland, C.; Vocke, D.; Ortolan, A.; Faccio, D.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear waves in defocusing media are investigated in the framework of the hydrodynamic description of light as a photon fluid. The observations are interpreted in terms of an emergent curved spacetime generated by the waves themselves, which fully determines their dynamics. The spacetime geometry emerges naturally as a result of the nonlinear interaction between the waves and the self-induced background flow. In particular, as observed in real fluids, different points of the wave profile propagate at different velocities leading to the self-steepening of the wave front and to the formation of a shock. This phenomenon can be associated to a curvature singularity of the emergent metric. Our analysis offers an alternative insight into the problem of shock formation and provides a demonstration of an analogue gravity model that goes beyond the kinematic level. PMID:27001128

  11. Data Point Averaging for Computational Fluid Dynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Jr., David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method for generating fluid flow parameter data for use in aerodynamic heating analysis. Computational fluid dynamics data is generated for a number of points in an area on a surface to be analyzed. Sub-areas corresponding to areas of the surface for which an aerodynamic heating analysis is to be performed are identified. A computer system automatically determines a sub-set of the number of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas and determines a value for each of the number of sub-areas using the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The value is determined as an average of the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The resulting parameter values then may be used to perform an aerodynamic heating analysis.

  12. Fluid dynamics parallel computer development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, James C.; Zang, Thomas A.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1987-01-01

    To accomplish more detailed simulations of highly complex flows, such as the transition to turbulence, fluid dynamics research requires computers much more powerful than any available today. Only parallel processing on multiple-processor computers offers hope for achieving the required effective speeds. Looking ahead to the use of these machines, the fluid dynamicist faces three issues: algorithm development for near-term parallel computers, architecture development for future computer power increases, and assessment of possible advantages of special purpose designs. Two projects at NASA Langley address these issues. Software development and algorithm exploration is being done on the FLEX/32 Parallel Processing Research Computer. New architecture features are being explored in the special purpose hardware design of the Navier-Stokes Computer. These projects are complementary and are producing promising results.

  13. Fluid dynamics of ventricular filling in the embryonic heart.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laura A

    2011-09-01

    The vertebrate embryonic heart first forms as a valveless tube that pumps blood using waves of contraction. As the heart develops, the atrium and ventricle bulge out from the heart tube, and valves begin to form through the expansion of the endocardial cushions. As a result of changes in geometry, conduction velocities, and material properties of the heart wall, the fluid dynamics and resulting spatial patterns of shear stress and transmural pressure change dramatically. Recent work suggests that these transitions are significant because fluid forces acting on the cardiac walls, as well as the activity of myocardial cells that drive the flow, are necessary for correct chamber and valve morphogenesis. In this article, computational fluid dynamics was used to explore how spatial distributions of the normal forces acting on the heart wall change as the endocardial cushions grow and as the cardiac wall increases in stiffness. The immersed boundary method was used to simulate the fluid-moving boundary problem of the cardiac wall driving the motion of the blood in a simplified model of a two-dimensional heart. The normal forces acting on the heart walls increased during the period of one atrial contraction because inertial forces are negligible and the ventricular walls must be stretched during filling. Furthermore, the force required to fill the ventricle increased as the stiffness of the ventricular wall was increased. Increased endocardial cushion height also drastically increased the force necessary to contract the ventricle. Finally, flow in the moving boundary model was compared to flow through immobile rigid chambers, and the forces acting normal to the walls were substantially different.

  14. Spreading dynamics and dynamic contact angle of non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Wang, X D; Lee, D J; Peng, X F; Lai, J Y

    2007-07-17

    The spreading dynamics of power-law fluids, both shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids, that completely or partially wet solid substrate was investigated theoretically and experimentally. An evolution equation for liquid-film thickness was derived using a lubrication approximation, from which the dynamic contact angle versus the contact line moving velocity relationship was evaluated. In the capillary spreading regime, film thickness h is proportional to xi3/(n+2) (xi is the distance from the contact line), whereas in the gravitational regime, h is proportional to xi1/(n+2), relating to the rheological power exponent n. The derived model fit the experimental data well for a shear-thinning fluid (0.2% w/w xanthan solution) or a shear-thickening fluid (7.5% w/w 10 nm silica in polypropylene glycol) on a completely wetted substrate. The derived model was extended using Hoffmann's proposal for partially wetting fluids. Good agreement was also attained between model predictions and the shear-thinning fluid (1% w/w cmc solution) and shear-thickening fluid (10% w/w 15 nm silica) on partially wetted surfaces.

  15. The stochastic dynamics of tethered microcantilevers in a viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Brian A.; Paul, Mark R.; Radiom, Milad; Ducker, William A.; Walz, John Y.

    2014-10-28

    We explore and quantify the coupled dynamics of a pair of micron scale cantilevers immersed in a viscous fluid that are also directly tethered to one another at their tips by a spring force. The spring force, for example, could represent the molecular stiffness or elasticity of a biomolecule or material tethered between the cantilevers. We use deterministic numerical simulations with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to compute the stochastic dynamics of the cantilever pair for the conditions of experiment when driven only by Brownian motion. We validate our approach by comparing directly with experimental measurements in the absence of the tether which shows excellent agreement. Using numerical simulations, we quantify the correlated dynamics of the cantilever pair over a range of tether stiffness. Our results quantify the sensitivity of the auto- and cross-correlations of equilibrium fluctuations in cantilever displacement to the stiffness of the tether. We show that the tether affects the magnitude of the correlations which can be used in a measurement to probe the properties of an attached tethering substance. For the configurations of current interest using micron scale cantilevers in water, we show that the magnitude of the fluid coupling between the cantilevers is sufficiently small such that the influence of the tether can be significant. Our results show that the cross-correlation is more sensitive to tether stiffness than the auto-correlation indicating that a two-cantilever measurement has improved sensitivity when compared with a measurement using a single cantilever.

  16. Fluid Dynamics Appearing during Simulated Microgravity Using Random Positioning Machines.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Simon L; Stern, Philip; Casartelli, Ernesto; Egli, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Random Positioning Machines (RPMs) are widely used as tools to simulate microgravity on ground. They consist of two gimbal mounted frames, which constantly rotate biological samples around two perpendicular axes and thus distribute the Earth's gravity vector in all directions over time. In recent years, the RPM is increasingly becoming appreciated as a laboratory instrument also in non-space-related research. For instance, it can be applied for the formation of scaffold-free spheroid cell clusters. The kinematic rotation of the RPM, however, does not only distribute the gravity vector in such a way that it averages to zero, but it also introduces local forces to the cell culture. These forces can be described by rigid body analysis. Although RPMs are commonly used in laboratories, the fluid motion in the cell culture flasks on the RPM and the possible effects of such on cells have not been examined until today; thus, such aspects have been widely neglected. In this study, we used a numerical approach to describe the fluid dynamic characteristic occurring inside a cell culture flask turning on an operating RPM. The simulations showed that the fluid motion within the cell culture flask never reached a steady state or neared a steady state condition. The fluid velocity depends on the rotational velocity of the RPM and is in the order of a few centimeters per second. The highest shear stresses are found along the flask walls; depending of the rotational velocity, they can reach up to a few 100 mPa. The shear stresses in the "bulk volume," however, are always smaller, and their magnitude is in the order of 10 mPa. In conclusion, RPMs are highly appreciated as reliable tools in microgravity research. They have even started to become useful instruments in new research fields of mechanobiology. Depending on the experiment, the fluid dynamic on the RPM cannot be neglected and needs to be taken into consideration. The results presented in this study elucidate the fluid

  17. Fluid Dynamics Appearing during Simulated Microgravity Using Random Positioning Machines

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Philip; Casartelli, Ernesto; Egli, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Random Positioning Machines (RPMs) are widely used as tools to simulate microgravity on ground. They consist of two gimbal mounted frames, which constantly rotate biological samples around two perpendicular axes and thus distribute the Earth’s gravity vector in all directions over time. In recent years, the RPM is increasingly becoming appreciated as a laboratory instrument also in non-space-related research. For instance, it can be applied for the formation of scaffold-free spheroid cell clusters. The kinematic rotation of the RPM, however, does not only distribute the gravity vector in such a way that it averages to zero, but it also introduces local forces to the cell culture. These forces can be described by rigid body analysis. Although RPMs are commonly used in laboratories, the fluid motion in the cell culture flasks on the RPM and the possible effects of such on cells have not been examined until today; thus, such aspects have been widely neglected. In this study, we used a numerical approach to describe the fluid dynamic characteristic occurring inside a cell culture flask turning on an operating RPM. The simulations showed that the fluid motion within the cell culture flask never reached a steady state or neared a steady state condition. The fluid velocity depends on the rotational velocity of the RPM and is in the order of a few centimeters per second. The highest shear stresses are found along the flask walls; depending of the rotational velocity, they can reach up to a few 100 mPa. The shear stresses in the “bulk volume,” however, are always smaller, and their magnitude is in the order of 10 mPa. In conclusion, RPMs are highly appreciated as reliable tools in microgravity research. They have even started to become useful instruments in new research fields of mechanobiology. Depending on the experiment, the fluid dynamic on the RPM cannot be neglected and needs to be taken into consideration. The results presented in this study elucidate the fluid

  18. PREFACE: Complex dynamics of fluids in disordered and crowded environments Complex dynamics of fluids in disordered and crowded environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coslovich, Daniele; Kahl, Gerhard; Krakoviack, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, the dynamics of fluids under nanoscale confinement has attracted much attention. Motivation for this rapidly increasing interest is based on both practical and fundamental reasons. On the practical and rather applied side, problems in a wide range of scientific topics, such as polymer and colloidal sciences, rheology, geology, or biophysics, benefit from a profound understanding of the dynamical behaviour of confined fluids. Further, effects similar to those observed in confinement are expected in fluids whose constituents have strong size or mass asymmetry, and in biological systems where crowding and obstruction phenomena in the cytosol are responsible for clear separations of time scales for macromolecular transport in the cell. In fundamental research, on the other hand, the interest focuses on the complex interplay between confinement and structural relaxation, which is responsible for the emergence of new phenomena in the dynamics of the system: in confinement, geometric constraints associated with the pore shape are imposed to the adsorbed fluids and an additional characteristic length scale, i.e. the pore size, comes into play. For many years, the topic has been mostly experimentally driven. Indeed, a broad spectrum of systems has been investigated by sophisticated experimental techniques, while theoretical and simulation studies were rather scarce due to conceptual and computational issues. In the past few years, however, theory and simulations could largely catch up with experiments. On one side, new theories have been put forward that duly take into account the porosity, the connectivity, and the randomness of the confinement. On the other side, the ever increasing available computational power now allows investigations that were far out of reach a few years ago. Nowadays, instead of isolated state points, systematic investigations on the dynamics of confined fluids, covering a wide range of system parameters, can be realized

  19. Modeling fires in adjacent ship compartments with computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-05-10

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal effects on radioactive (RAM) transportation packages with a fire in an adjacent compartment. An assumption for this analysis is that the adjacent hold fire is some sort of engine room fire. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools were used to perform the analysis in order to include convective heat transfer effects. The analysis results were compared to experimental data gathered in a series of tests on tile US Coast Guard ship Mayo Lykes located at Mobile, Alabama.

  20. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, A.; Kotsalis, E. M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  1. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, A; Kotsalis, E M; Koumoutsakos, P

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  2. Continuing Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics for Supersonic Retropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauerhamer, Daniel Guy; Trumble, Kerry A.; Kleb, Bil; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Edquist, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    A large step in the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) is shown through the comparison of three Navier-Stokes solvers (DPLR, FUN3D, and OVERFLOW) and wind tunnel test results. The test was designed specifically for CFD validation and was conducted in the Langley supersonic 4 x4 Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel and includes variations in the number of nozzles, Mach and Reynolds numbers, thrust coefficient, and angles of orientation. Code-to-code and code-to-test comparisons are encouraging and possible error sources are discussed.

  3. F*** Yeah Fluid Dynamics: Inside the science communication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    Communicating scientific research to general audiences may seem daunting, but it does not have to be. For six years, fluid dynamics outreach blog FYFD has been sharing the community's scientific output with an audience of nearly a quarter of a million readers and viewers of all ages and backgrounds. This talk will focus on the process behind science communication and some of the steps and exercises that can help scientists communicate to broad audiences more effectively. Using examples from the FYFD blog and YouTube channel, the talk will illustrate this communication process in action.

  4. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics applications at McDonnel Douglas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Representative examples are presented of applications and development of advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for aerodynamic design at the McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC). Transonic potential and Euler codes, interactively coupled with boundary layer computation, and solutions of slender-layer Navier-Stokes approximation are applied to aircraft wing/body calculations. An optimization procedure using evolution theory is described in the context of transonic wing design. Euler methods are presented for analysis of hypersonic configurations, and helicopter rotors in hover and forward flight. Several of these projects were accepted for access to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility at the NASA-Ames Research Center.

  6. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  7. New Challenges in Visualization of Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The development of visualization systems for analyzing computational fluid dynamics data has been driven by increasing size and complexity of the data. New extensions to the system domain into analysis of data from multiple sources, parameter space studies, and multidisciplinary studies in support of integrated aeronautical design systems provide new g challenges for the visualization system developer. Recent work at NASA Ames Research Center in visualization systems, automatic flow feature detection, unsteady flow visualization techniques, and a new area, data exploitation, will be discussed in the context of NASA information technology initiatives.

  8. Morphing-Based Shape Optimization in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Yannick; Men'Shov, Igor; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In this paper, a Morphing-based Shape Optimization (MbSO) technique is presented for solving Optimum-Shape Design (OSD) problems in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The proposed method couples Free-Form Deformation (FFD) and Evolutionary Computation, and, as its name suggests, relies on the morphing of shape and computational domain, rather than direct shape parameterization. Advantages of the FFD approach compared to traditional parameterization are first discussed. Then, examples of shape and grid deformations by FFD are presented. Finally, the MbSO approach is illustrated and applied through an example: the design of an airfoil for a future Mars exploration airplane.

  9. Dynamic multiscaling in two-dimensional fluid turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Perlekar, Prasad; Pandit, Rahul

    2011-10-28

    We obtain, by extensive direct numerical simulations, time-dependent and equal-time structure functions for the vorticity, in both quasi-Lagrangian and Eulerian frames, for the direct-cascade regime in two-dimensional fluid turbulence with air-drag-induced friction. We show that different ways of extracting time scales from these time-dependent structure functions lead to different dynamic-multiscaling exponents, which are related to equal-time multiscaling exponents by different classes of bridge relations; for a representative value of the friction we verify that, given our error bars, these bridge relations hold.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Rong

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  11. Application of Control Volume Analysis to Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Cohen, Benjamin; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is among the most common birth defects and may not be prevented nor cured. Afflicted individuals face serious issues, which at present are too complicated and not well enough understood to treat via systematic therapies. This talk outlines the framework and application of a control volume methodology to clinical Phase Contrast MRI data. Specifically, integral control volume analysis utilizes a fundamental, fluid dynamics methodology to quantify intracranial dynamics within a precise, direct, and physically meaningful framework. A chronically shunted, hydrocephalic patient in need of a revision procedure was used as an in vivo case study. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements within the patient's aqueduct were obtained in four biomedical state and were analyzed using the methods presented in this dissertation. Pressure force estimates were obtained, showing distinct differences in amplitude, phase, and waveform shape for different intracranial states within the same individual. Thoughts on the physiological and diagnostic research and development implications/opportunities will be presented.

  12. Phase portrait methods for verifying fluid dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, H.B.

    1989-01-01

    As computing resources become more powerful and accessible, engineers more frequently face the difficult and challenging engineering problem of accurately simulating nonlinear dynamic phenomena. Although mathematical models are usually available, in the form of initial value problems for differential equations, the behavior of the solutions of nonlinear models is often poorly understood. A notable example is fluid dynamics: while the Navier-Stokes equations are believed to correctly describe turbulent flow, no exact mathematical solution of these equations in the turbulent regime is known. Differential equations can of course be solved numerically, but how are we to assess numerical solutions of complex phenomena without some understanding of the mathematical problem and its solutions to guide us

  13. Vortex element methods for fluid dynamic analysis of engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Reginald Ivan

    The surface-vorticity method of computational fluid mechanics is described, with an emphasis on turbomachinery applications, in an introduction for engineers. Chapters are devoted to surface singularity modeling; lifting bodies, two-dimensional airfoils, and cascades; mixed-flow and radial cascades; bodies of revolution, ducts, and annuli; ducted propellers and fans; three-dimensional and meridional flows in turbomachines; free vorticity shear layers and inverse methods; vortex dynamics in inviscid flows; the simulation of viscous diffusion in discrete vortex modeling; vortex-cloud modeling by the boundary-integral method; vortex-cloud models for lifting bodies and cascades; and grid systems for vortex dynamics and meridional flows. Diagrams, graphs, and the listings for a set of computer programs are provided.

  14. Analysis of nuclear thermal propulsion systems using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Kim, Suk C.; Papp, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of nuclear rockets with relatively low chamber pressures were carried out to assess the merits of using such low pressures to take advantage of hydrogen dissociation and recombination. The computations, using a Navier-Stokes code with chemical kinetics, describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamics, thermodynamic and chemical properties, and provide global performance quantities such as specific impulse and thrust. Parametric studies were performed varying chamber temperature, chamber pressure and nozzle size. Chamber temperature was varied between 2700 K and 3600 K, and chamber pressure between 0.1 atm. and 10 atm. Performance advantages associated with lower chamber pressures are shown to occur at the higher chamber temperatures. Viscous losses are greater at lower chamber pressures and can be decreased in larger nozzles where the boundary layer is a smaller fraction of the flow field.

  15. Relativistic Fluid Dynamics: Physics for Many Different Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Nils; Comer, Gregory L.

    2007-12-01

    The relativistic fluid is a highly successful model used to describe the dynamics of many-particle, relativistic systems. It takes as input basic physics from microscopic scales and yields as output predictions of bulk, macroscopic motion. By inverting the process, an understanding of bulk features can lead to insight into physics on the microscopic scale. Relativistic fluids have been used to model systems as “small” as heavy ions in collisions, and as large as the Universe itself, with “intermediate” sized objects like neutron stars being considered along the way. The purpose of this review is to discuss the mathematical and theoretical physics underpinnings of the relativistic (multiple) fluid model. We focus on the variational principle approach championed by Brandon Carter and his collaborators, in which a crucial element is to distinguish the momenta that are conjugate to the particle number density currents. This approach differs from the “standard” text-book derivation of the equations of motion from the divergence of the stress-energy tensor in that one explicitly obtains the relativistic Euler equation as an “integrability” condition on the relativistic vorticity. We discuss the conservation laws and the equations of motion in detail, and provide a number of (in our opinion) interesting and relevant applications of the general theory.

  16. Ringin' the water bell: dynamic modes of curved fluid sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinski, John; Aharoni, Hillel; Fineberg, Jay; Sharon, Eran

    2015-11-01

    A water bell is formed by fluid flowing in a thin, coherent sheet in the shape of a bell. Experimentally, a water bell is created via the impact of a cylindrical jet on a flat surface. Its shape is set by the splash angle (the separation angle) of the resulting cylindrically symmetric water sheet. The separation angle is altered by adjusting the height of a lip surrounding the impact point, as in a water sprinkler. We drive the lip's height sinusoidally, altering the separation angle, and ringin' the water bell. This forcing generates disturbances on the steady-state water bell that propagate forward and backward in the fluid's reference frame at well-defined velocities, and interact, resulting in the emergence of an interference pattern unique to each steady-state geometry. We analytically model these dynamics by linearizing the amplitude of the bell's response about the underlying curved geometry. This simple model predicts the nodal structure over a wide range of steady-state water bell configurations and driving frequencies. Due to the curved water bell geometry, the nodal structure is quite complex; nevertheless, the predicted nodal structure agrees extremely well with the experimental data. When we drive the bell beyond perturbative separation angles, the nodal locations surprisingly persist, despite the strikingly altered underlying water bell shape. At extreme driving amplitudes the water sheet assumes a rich variety of tortuous, non-convex shapes; nevertheless, the fluid sheet remains intact.

  17. The Dynamics of Miscible Fluids: A Space Flight Experiment (MIDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxworthy, T.; Meiburg, E.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.; Lauver, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a space flight experiment to study the dynamics of miscible interfaces. A less viscous fluid displaces one of higher viscosity within a tube. The two fluids are miscible in all proportions. An intruding "finger" forms that occupies a fraction of the tube. As time progresses diffusion at the interface combined with flow induced straining between the two fluids modifies the concentration and velocity distributions within the whole tube. Also, under such circumstances it has been proposed that the interfacial stresses could depend on the local concentration gradients (Korteweg stresses) and that the divergence of the velocity need not be zero, even though the flow is incompressible. We have obtained reasonable agreement for the tip velocity between numerical simulations (that ignored the Korteweg stress and divergence effects) and physical experiments only at high Peelet Numbers. However at moderate to low Pe agreement was poor. As one possibility we attributed this lack of agreement to the disregard of these effects. We propose a space experiment to measure the finger shape, tip velocity, and the velocity and concentration fields. From intercomparisons between the experiment and the calculations we can then extract values for the coefficients of the Korteweg stress terms and confirm or deny the importance of these stresses.

  18. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization capability study with fluid path.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Ronja M; Lipsø, Kasper W; Lerche, Mathilde H; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H

    2016-11-01

    Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden of the hyperpolarized product is by use of a closed fluid path that constitutes a barrier to contamination. The fluid path can be filled with the pharmaceuticals, i.e. imaging agent and solvents, in a clean room, and then stored or immediately used at the polarizer. In this study, we present a method of filling the fluid path that allows it to be reused. The filling method has been investigated in terms of reproducibility at two extrema, high dose for patient use and low dose for rodent studies, using [1-13C]pyruvate as example. We demonstrate that the filling method allows high reproducibility of six quality control parameters with standard deviations 3-10 times smaller than the acceptance criteria intervals in clinical studies.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Canadian Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassat, Mohammad; Bailey, Joanne; Yetisir, Metin

    2015-11-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation was performed on the proposed design for the Canadian SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR). The proposed Canadian SCWR is a 1200 MW(e) supercritical light-water cooled nuclear reactor with pressurized fuel channels. The reactor concept uses an inlet plenum that all fuel channels are attached to and an outlet header nested inside the inlet plenum. The coolant enters the inlet plenum at 350 C and exits the outlet header at 625 C. The operating pressure is approximately 26 MPa. The high pressure and high temperature outlet conditions result in a higher electric conversion efficiency as compared to existing light water reactors. In this work, CFD simulations were performed to model fluid flow and heat transfer in the inlet plenum, outlet header, and various parts of the fuel assembly. The ANSYS Fluent solver was used for simulations. Results showed that mass flow rate distribution in fuel channels varies radially and the inner channels achieve higher outlet temperatures. At the outlet header, zones with rotational flow were formed as the fluid from 336 fuel channels merged. Results also suggested that insulation of the outlet header should be considered to reduce the thermal stresses caused by the large temperature gradients.

  20. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization capability study with fluid path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Ronja M.; Lipsø, Kasper W.; Lerche, Mathilde H.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.

    2016-11-01

    Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden of the hyperpolarized product is by use of a closed fluid path that constitutes a barrier to contamination. The fluid path can be filled with the pharmaceuticals, i.e. imaging agent and solvents, in a clean room, and then stored or immediately used at the polarizer. In this study, we present a method of filling the fluid path that allows it to be reused. The filling method has been investigated in terms of reproducibility at two extrema, high dose for patient use and low dose for rodent studies, using [1-13C]pyruvate as example. We demonstrate that the filling method allows high reproducibility of six quality control parameters with standard deviations 3-10 times smaller than the acceptance criteria intervals in clinical studies.

  1. Swimming Dynamics Near a Wall in a Weakly Elastic Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, S.; Ardekani, A. M.; Borhan, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a fully resolved solution of a low-Reynolds-number two-dimensional microswimmer in a weakly elastic fluid near a no-slip surface. The results illustrate that elastic properties of the background fluid dramatically alter the swimming hydrodynamics and, depending on the initial position and orientation of the microswimmer, its residence time near the surface can increase by an order of magnitude. Elasticity of the extracellular polymeric substance secreted by microorganisms can therefore enhance their adhesion rate. The dynamical system is examined through a phase portrait in the swimming orientation and distance from the wall for four types of self-propulsion mechanisms, namely: neutral swimmers, pullers, pushers, and stirrers. The time-reversibility of the phase portraits breaks down in the presence of polymeric materials. The elasticity of the fluid leads to the emergence of a limit cycle for pullers and pushers and the change in type of fixed points from center to unstable foci for a microswimmer adjacent to a no-slip boundary.

  2. The Dynamics of Miscible Fluids: A Space Flight Experiment (MIDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxworthy, T.; Meiburg, E.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.; Lauver, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a space flight experiment to study the dynamics of miscible interfaces. A less viscous fluid displaces one of higher viscosity within a tube. The two fluids are miscible in all proportions. An intruding "finger" forms that occupies a fraction of the tube. As time progresses diffusion at the interface combined with flow induced straining between the two fluids modifies the concentration and velocity distributions within the whole tube. Also, under such circumstances it has been proposed that the interfacial stresses could depend on the local concentration gradients (Korteweg stresses) and that the divergence of the velocity need not be zero, even though the flow is incompressible. We have obtained reasonable agreement for the tip velocity between numerical simulations (that ignored the Korteweg stress and divergence effects) and physical experiments only at high Peclet Numbers. However at moderate to low Pe agreement was poor. As one possibility we attributed this lack of agreement to the disregard of these effects. We propose a space experiment to measure the finger shape, tip velocity, and the velocity and concentration fields. From intercomparisons between the experiment and the calculations we can then extract values for the coefficients of the Korteweg stress terms and confirm or deny the importance of these stresses.

  3. State-of-the-art review of computational fluid dynamics modeling for fluid-solids systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Bouillard, J.X.; Ding, J.; Chang, S.L.; Burge, S.W.

    1994-05-12

    As the result of 15 years of research (50 staff years of effort) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), through its involvement in fluidized-bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamics, and a variety of environmental programs, has produced extensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software and models to predict the multiphase hydrodynamic and reactive behavior of fluid-solids motions and interactions in complex fluidized-bed reactors (FBRS) and slurry systems. This has resulted in the FLUFIX, IRF, and SLUFIX computer programs. These programs are based on fluid-solids hydrodynamic models and can predict information important to the designer of atmospheric or pressurized bubbling and circulating FBR, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and slurry units to guarantee optimum efficiency with minimum release of pollutants into the environment. This latter issue will become of paramount importance with the enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1995. Solids motion is also the key to understanding erosion processes. Erosion rates in FBRs and pneumatic and slurry components are computed by ANL`s EROSION code to predict the potential metal wastage of FBR walls, intervals, feed distributors, and cyclones. Only the FLUFIX and IRF codes will be reviewed in the paper together with highlights of the validations because of length limitations. It is envisioned that one day, these codes with user-friendly pre and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale and biomass as energy sources, to retain energy security, and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  4. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, A; Garg, R; Tong, C; Shahnam, M; Guenther, C

    2013-07-01

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  5. Fluid-dynamic design optimization of hydraulic proportional directional valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirante, Riccardo; Catalano, Luciano Andrea; Poloni, Carlo; Tamburrano, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    This article proposes an effective methodology for the fluid-dynamic design optimization of the sliding spool of a hydraulic proportional directional valve: the goal is the minimization of the flow force at a prescribed flow rate, so as to reduce the required opening force while keeping the operation features unchanged. A full three-dimensional model of the flow field within the valve is employed to accurately predict the flow force acting on the spool. A theoretical analysis, based on both the axial momentum equation and flow simulations, is conducted to define the design parameters, which need to be properly selected in order to reduce the flow force without significantly affecting the flow rate. A genetic algorithm, coupled with a computational fluid dynamics flow solver, is employed to minimize the flow force acting on the valve spool at the maximum opening. A comparison with a typical single-objective optimization algorithm is performed to evaluate performance and effectiveness of the employed genetic algorithm. The optimized spool develops a maximum flow force which is smaller than that produced by the commercially available valve, mainly due to some major modifications occurring in the discharge section. Reducing the flow force and thus the electromagnetic force exerted by the solenoid actuators allows the operational range of direct (single-stage) driven valves to be enlarged.

  6. Some anticipated contributions to core fluid dynamics from the GRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanvorhies, C.

    1985-01-01

    It is broadly maintained that the secular variation (SV) of the large scale geomagnetic field contains information on the fluid dynamics of Earth's electrically conducting outer core. The electromagnetic theory appropriate to a simple Earth model has recently been combined with reduced geomagnetic data in order to extract some of this information and ascertain its significance. The simple Earth model consists of a rigid, electrically insulating mantle surrounding a spherical, inviscid, and perfectly conducting liquid outer core. This model was tested against seismology by using truncated spherical harmonic models of the observed geomagnetic field to locate Earth's core-mantle boundary, CMB. Further electromagnetic theory has been developed and applied to the problem of estimating the horizontal fluid motion just beneath CMB. Of particular geophysical interest are the hypotheses that these motions: (1) include appreciable surface divergence indicative of vertical motion at depth, and (2) are steady for time intervals of a decade or more. In addition to the extended testing of the basic Earth model, the proposed GRM provides a unique opportunity to test these dynamical hypotheses.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Acoustically Driven Bubble Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, Connor; Lie, Jie; Dault, Daniel; Balasubramaniam, Shanker; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    The development of modalities for precise, targeted drug delivery has become increasingly important in medical care in recent years. Assemblages of microbubbles steered by acoustic pressure fields present one potential vehicle for such delivery. Modeling the collective response of multi-bubble systems to an intense, externally applied ultrasound field requires accurately capturing acoustic interactions between bubbles and the externally applied field, and their effect on the evolution of bubble kinetics. In this work, we present a methodology for multiphysics simulation based on an efficient transient boundary integral equation (TBIE) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) to compute trajectories of multiple acoustically interacting bubbles in an ideal fluid under pulsed acoustic excitation. For arbitrary configurations of spherical bubbles, the TBIE solver self-consistently models transient surface pressure distributions at bubble-fluid interfaces due to acoustic interactions and relative potential flows induced by bubble motion. Forces derived from the resulting pressure distributions act as driving terms in the MD update at each timestep. The resulting method efficiently and accurately captures individual bubble dynamics for clouds containing up to hundreds of bubbles.

  8. Improvement in computational fluid dynamics through boundary verification and preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkner, David E.

    This thesis provides improvements to computational fluid dynamics accuracy and efficiency through two main methods: a new boundary condition verification procedure and preconditioning techniques. First, a new verification approach that addresses boundary conditions was developed. In order to apply the verification approach to a large range of arbitrary boundary conditions, it was necessary to develop unifying mathematical formulation. A framework was developed that allows for the application of Dirichlet, Neumann, and extrapolation boundary condition, or in some cases the equations of motion directly. Verification of boundary condition techniques was performed using exact solutions from canonical fluid dynamic test cases. Second, to reduce computation time and improve accuracy, preconditioning algorithms were applied via artificial dissipation schemes. A new convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) scheme was devised and was shown to be more effective than traditional preconditioning schemes in certain scenarios. The new scheme was compared with traditional schemes for unsteady flows for which both convective and acoustic effects dominated. Both boundary conditions and preconditioning algorithms were implemented in the context of a "strand grid" solver. While not the focus of this thesis, strand grids provide automatic viscous quality meshing and are suitable for moving mesh overset problems.

  9. Respiratory mechanics and fluid dynamics after lung resection surgery.

    PubMed

    Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Beretta, Egidio; Rivolta, Ilaria

    2010-08-01

    Thoracic surgery that requires resection of a portion of lung or of a whole lung profoundly alters the mechanical and fluid dynamic setting of the lung-chest wall coupling, as well as the water balance in the pleural space and in the remaining lung. The most frequent postoperative complications are of a respiratory nature, and their incidence increases the more the preoperative respiratory condition seems compromised. There is an obvious need to identify risk factors concerning mainly the respiratory function, without neglecting the importance of other comorbidities, such as coronary disease. At present, however, a satisfactory predictor of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications is lacking; postoperative morbidity and mortality have remained unchanged in the last 10 years. The aim of this review is to provide a pathophysiologic interpretation of the main respiratory complications of a respiratory nature by relying on new concepts relating to lung fluid dynamics and mechanics. New parameters are proposed to improve evaluation of respiratory function from pre- to the early postoperative period when most of the complications occur.

  10. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  11. Meniscal tear film fluid dynamics near Marx's line.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, V S; Breward, C J W; Gaffney, E A

    2013-09-01

    Extensive studies have explored the dynamics of the ocular surface fluid, though theoretical investigations are typically limited to the use of the lubrication approximation, which is not guaranteed to be uniformly valid a-priori throughout the tear meniscus. However, resolving tear film behaviour within the meniscus and especially its apices is required to characterise the flow dynamics where the tear film is especially thin, and thus most susceptible to evaporatively induced hyperosmolarity and subsequent epithelial damage. Hence, we have explored the accuracy of the standard lubrication approximation for the tear film by explicit comparisons with the 2D Navier-Stokes model, considering both stationary and moving eyelids. Our results demonstrate that the lubrication model is qualitatively accurate except in the vicinity of the eyelids. In particular, and in contrast to lubrication theory, the solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations predict a distinct absence of fluid flow, and thus convective mixing in the region adjacent to the tear film contact line. These observations not only support emergent hypotheses concerning the formation of Marx's line, a region of epithelial cell staining adjacent to the contact line on the eyelid, but also enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of the flow profile near the tear film contact line.

  12. The aerospace plane design challenge: Credible computational fluid dynamics results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1990-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is necessary in the design processes of all current aerospace plane programs. Single-stage-to-orbit (STTO) aerospace planes with air-breathing supersonic combustion are going to be largely designed by means of CFD. The challenge of the aerospace plane design is to provide credible CFD results to work from, to assess the risk associated with the use of those results, and to certify CFD codes that produce credible results. To establish the credibility of CFD results used in design, the following topics are discussed: CFD validation vis-a-vis measurable fluid dynamics (MFD) validation; responsibility for credibility; credibility requirement; and a guide for establishing credibility. Quantification of CFD uncertainties helps to assess success risk and safety risks, and the development of CFD as a design tool requires code certification. This challenge is managed by designing the designers to use CFD effectively, by ensuring quality control, and by balancing the design process. For designing the designers, the following topics are discussed: how CFD design technology is developed; the reasons Japanese companies, by and large, produce goods of higher quality than the U.S. counterparts; teamwork as a new way of doing business; and how ideas, quality, and teaming can be brought together. Quality control for reducing the loss imparted to the society begins with the quality of the CFD results used in the design process, and balancing the design process means using a judicious balance of CFD and MFD.

  13. High-performance holographic technologies for fluid-dynamics experiments

    PubMed Central

    Orlov, Sergei S.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Oh, Se Baek; Barbastathis, George; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-01-01

    Modern technologies offer new opportunities for experimentalists in a variety of research areas of fluid dynamics. Improvements are now possible in the state-of-the-art in precision, dynamic range, reproducibility, motion-control accuracy, data-acquisition rate and information capacity. These improvements are required for understanding complex turbulent flows under realistic conditions, and for allowing unambiguous comparisons to be made with new theoretical approaches and large-scale numerical simulations. One of the new technologies is high-performance digital holography. State-of-the-art motion control, electronics and optical imaging allow for the realization of turbulent flows with very high Reynolds number (more than 107) on a relatively small laboratory scale, and quantification of their properties with high space–time resolutions and bandwidth. In-line digital holographic technology can provide complete three-dimensional mapping of the flow velocity and density fields at high data rates (over 1000 frames per second) over a relatively large spatial area with high spatial (1–10 μm) and temporal (better than a few nanoseconds) resolution, and can give accurate quantitative description of the fluid flows, including those of multi-phase and unsteady conditions. This technology can be applied in a variety of problems to study fundamental properties of flow–particle interactions, rotating flows, non-canonical boundary layers and Rayleigh–Taylor mixing. Some of these examples are discussed briefly. PMID:20211881

  14. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rokkam, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  15. Dynamic high pressure: why it makes metallic fluid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, William

    2015-06-01

    Metallic fluid H (MFH) was made by dynamic compression decades after Wigner and Huntington (WH) predicted it in 1935. The density of MFH is within a few percent of the density predicted by WH. MFH was made by multiple-shock compression of liquid H2, which process is quasi-isentropic and thermally equilibrated. The compressions were isentropic but produced enough dissipation as temperature T and entropy S to drive the crossover from insulating H2 to metallic H at 9-fold compressed atomic H density. T and S were tuned by temporally shaping the applied pressure pulse such that H2 dissociated to H at sufficiently high density to make a highly degenerate metal. The basic ideas of dynamic compression, also known as supersonic, adiabatic, nonlinear hydrodynamics, were developed in the last half of the Nineteenth Century. Our purposes are to (i) present a brief review of dynamic compression and its affects on materials, (ii) review considerations that led to the sample holder designed specifically to make MFH, and (iii) present a inter-comparison of dynamic and static methods relative to their prospects for making metallic H.

  16. Dynamics of fluid and light intensity in mechanically stirred photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T

    2013-10-10

    Turbulent flows in a single-stage and a two-stage impeller-stirred photobioreactor with a simple geometric configuration were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics. The trajectories of the microorganisms entrained in the flow field were traced by the particle tracking method. By projecting these trajectories onto a radial-axial (r-z) plane with a given azimuth angle, we were able to observe four different dynamics zones: circulation, pure rotation, trap, and slow-motion. Within the pure rotation zone, turbulence can be observed near the edges of the impeller. The light intensity and the light/dark cycles subjected by the microorganisms differ significantly in these zones. These differences can be further changed by providing different incident light illuminations on the reactor surface. The dynamics zones can be altered by modifying the geometric configuration of the reactor and the impeller stirring mechanism. In combination with the utilization of different incident light illuminations, the light intensity dynamics and the light/dark cycles subjected by the microorganisms can be controlled such that an optimal photobioreactor design with a high efficiency of light utilization and a high formation rate of the biochemical products can be realized.

  17. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Joshua A; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  18. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  19. Flight Simulation of Taketombo Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Flight Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kohei; Ueno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In the present study we have developed a numerical method to simulate the flight dynamics of a small flying body with unsteady motion, where both aerodynamics and flight dynamics are fully considered. A key point of this numerical code is to use computational fluid dynamics and computational flight dynamics at the same time, which is referred to as CFD2, or double CFDs, where several new ideas are adopted in the governing equations, the method to make each quantity nondimensional, and the coupling method between aerodynamics and flight dynamics. This numerical code can be applied to simulate the unsteady motion of small vehicles such as micro air vehicles (MAV). As a sample calculation, we take up Taketombo, or a bamboo dragonfly, and its free flight in the air is demonstrated. The eventual aim of this research is to virtually fly an aircraft with arbitrary motion to obtain aerodynamic and flight dynamic data, which cannot be taken in the conventional wind tunnel.

  20. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Battiste, Richard L.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  1. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  2. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-01-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO2 will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO2 and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO2-H2O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO2. The basic problem of CO2 injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO2 injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO2 injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO2. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO2 into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO2) the viscosity of carbon

  3. Elementary Excitations and Dynamic Structure of Quantum Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarela, M.

    The equations of motion method for studying excitations and dynamic structure of quantum fluids is reviewed in this series of lectures. The method is based on the least action principle where one minimizes the action integral of the dynamic system. As a result one gets the continuity equations, which connect the density fluctuations and currents to an external driving force. The external force is assumed to infinitesimal and the response of the system to that is linear. The real poles of the linear response function determine the elementary excitation modes and the imaginary part of the self energy defines the continuum limit and gives the finite lifetime of the decaying modes. Our dynamic wave function contains time-dependent one- and two-particle correlation functions, which includes couplings between three modes. Thus one mode can split into two modes if energy and momentum are conserved. We begin with the Feenberg's β-derivative formulation of the optimized ground state and then derive general equations of motion for the dynamic system from the least action principle. We show how the simplest one-body approximation leads to the Feynman theory of excitations. By including the fluctuating two-body correlation function within the uniform limit one recovers the correlated basic function approximation. The fully consistent theory gives a good account of the elementary excitations and we show results on current patterns in the maxon-roton regions and on the precursor of the liquid-solid phase transition. Finally we apply the method to the excitations of the impurity and derive the hydrodynamic effective mass of the 3He impurity in 4He and the 3He dynamic structure function.

  4. Fluids and fluid mixtures containing square-well diatomics: Equations of state and canonical molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, Harpreet S.; Hall, Carol K.

    1997-09-01

    We present new perturbation theory equations of state for square-well dimer fluids, square-well dimer mixtures, square-well dimer/monomer mixtures and square-well heteronuclear dumbbell fluids. Our first- and second-order perturbation terms are based on Barker and Henderson's local compressibility approximation and Chang and Sandler's perturbation theory, respectively. The perturbation approach requires knowledge of the radial distribution functions of the reference hard-dimer fluid and hard dimer/monomer mixture, which are obtained from molecular dynamics simulation. For mixtures we use one fluid mixing rules to approximate the average mixture structure and perturbation parameters. The predictions of the perturbation theory are compared to the compressibility factors obtained from discontinuous canonical molecular dynamics simulation, an adaptation of Anderson's canonical ensemble molecular dynamics method to the case in which the potential is discontinuous.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Demonstration of Rigid Bodies in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarena, Ernesto; Vu, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    The Design Analysis Branch (NE-Ml) at the Kennedy Space Center has not had the ability to accurately couple Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). OVERFLOW-D is a flow solver that has been developed by NASA to have the capability to analyze and simulate dynamic motions with up to six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF). Two simulations were prepared over the course of the internship to demonstrate 6DOF motion of rigid bodies under aerodynamic loading. The geometries in the simulations were based on a conceptual Space Launch System (SLS). The first simulation that was prepared and computed was the motion of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) as it separates from its core stage. To reduce computational time during the development of the simulation, only half of the physical domain with respect to the symmetry plane was simulated. Then a full solution was prepared and computed. The second simulation was a model of the SLS as it departs from a launch pad under a 20 knot crosswind. This simulation was reduced to Two Dimensions (2D) to reduce both preparation and computation time. By allowing 2-DOF for translations and 1-DOF for rotation, the simulation predicted unrealistic rotation. The simulation was then constrained to only allow translations.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester.

  7. Dynamics and Control of Newtonian and Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, Binh K.

    Transition to turbulence represents one of the most intriguing natural phenomena. Flows that are smooth and ordered may become complex and disordered as the flow strength increases. This process is known as transition to turbulence. In this dissertation, we develop theoretical and computational tools for analysis and control of transition and turbulence in shear flows of Newtonian, such as air and water, and complex viscoelastic fluids, such as polymers and molten plastics. Part I of the dissertation is devoted to the design and verification of sensor-free and feedback-based strategies for controlling the onset of turbulence in channel flows of Newtonian fluids. We use high fidelity simulations of the nonlinear flow dynamics to demonstrate the effectiveness of our model-based approach to flow control design. In Part II, we utilize systems theoretic tools to study transition and turbulence in channel flows of viscoelastic fluids. For flows with strong elastic forces, we demonstrate that flow fluctuations can experience significant amplification even in the absence of inertia. We use our theoretical developments to uncover the underlying physical mechanism that leads to this high amplification. For turbulent flows with polymer additives, we develop a model-based method for analyzing the influence of polymers on drag reduction. We demonstrate that our approach predicts drag reducing trends observed in full-scale numerical simulations. In Part III, we develop mathematical framework and computational tools for calculating frequency responses of spatially distributed systems. Using state-of-the-art automatic spectral collocation techniques and new integral formulation, we show that our approach yields more reliable and accurate solutions than currently available methods.

  8. Review of computational fluid dynamics applications in biotechnology processes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, C; Malhotra, D; Rathore, A S

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is well established as a tool of choice for solving problems that involve one or more of the following phenomena: flow of fluids, heat transfer,mass transfer, and chemical reaction. Unit operations that are commonly utilized in biotechnology processes are often complex and as such would greatly benefit from application of CFD. The thirst for deeper process and product understanding that has arisen out of initiatives such as quality by design provides further impetus toward usefulness of CFD for problems that may otherwise require extensive experimentation. Not surprisingly, there has been increasing interest in applying CFD toward a variety of applications in biotechnology processing in the last decade. In this article, we will review applications in the major unit operations involved with processing of biotechnology products. These include fermentation,centrifugation, chromatography, ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and freeze drying. We feel that the future applications of CFD in biotechnology processing will focus on establishing CFD as a tool of choice for providing process understanding that can be then used to guide more efficient and effective experimentation. This article puts special emphasis on the work done in the last 10 years.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of a miniaturized dissolution system.

    PubMed

    Frenning, G; Ahnfelt, E; Sjögren, E; Lennernäs, H

    2017-02-08

    Dissolution testing is an important tool that has applications ranging from fundamental studies of drug-release mechanisms to quality control of the final product. The rate of release of the drug from the delivery system is known to be affected by hydrodynamics. In this study we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate and investigate the hydrodynamics in a novel miniaturized dissolution method for parenteral formulations. The dissolution method is based on a rotating disc system and uses a rotating sample reservoir which is separated from the remaining dissolution medium by a nylon screen. Sample reservoirs of two sizes were investigated (SR6 and SR8) and the hydrodynamic studies were performed at rotation rates of 100, 200 and 400rpm. The overall fluid flow was similar for all investigated cases, with a lateral upward spiraling motion and central downward motion in the form of a vortex to and through the screen. The simulations indicated that the exchange of dissolution medium between the sample reservoir and the remaining release medium was rapid for typical screens, for which almost complete mixing would be expected to occur within less than one minute at 400rpm. The local hydrodynamic conditions in the sample reservoirs depended on their size; SR8 appeared to be relatively more affected than SR6 by the resistance to liquid flow resulting from the screen.

  10. Vortical Flows Research Program of the Fluid Dynamics Research Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The research interests of the staff of the Fluid Dynamics Research Branch in the general area of vortex flows are summarized. A major factor in the development of enchanced maneuverability and reduced drag by aerodynamic means is the use of effective vortex control devices. The key to control is the use of emerging computational tools for predicting viscous fluid flow in close coordination with fundamental experiments. In fact, the extremely complex flow fields resulting from numerical solutions to boundary value problems based on the Navier-Stokes equations requires an intimate relationship between computation and experiment. The field of vortex flows is important in so many practical areas that a concerted effort in this area is justified. A brief background of the research activity undertaken is presented, including a proposed classification of the research areas. The classification makes a distinction between issues related to vortex formation and structure, and work on vortex interactions and evolution. Examples of current research results are provided, along with references where available. Based upon the current status of research and planning, speculation on future research directions of the group is also given.

  11. Microgravity fluid management requirements of advanced solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migra, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    The advanced solar dynamic system (ASDS) program is aimed at developing the technology for highly efficient, lightweight space power systems. The approach is to evaluate Stirling, Brayton and liquid metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) over the temperature range of 1025 to 1400K, identify the critical technologies and develop these technologies. Microgravity fluid management technology is required in several areas of this program, namely, thermal energy storage (TES), heat pipe applications and liquid metal, two phase flow Rankine systems. Utilization of the heat of fusion of phase change materials offers potential for smaller, lighter TES systems. The candidate TES materials exhibit large volume change with the phase change. The heat pipe is an energy dense heat transfer device. A high temperature application may transfer heat from the solar receiver to the PCS working fluid and/or TES. A low temperature application may transfer waste heat from the PCS to the radiator. The liquid metal Rankine PCS requires management of the boiling/condensing process typical of two phase flow systems.

  12. Cage Dynamics in a Uniformly Heated Granular Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Pedro

    2005-11-01

    We report a novel experimental investigation of the dynamics of a uniformly heated, horizontal and quasi-2D granular fluid. Our study is done as a function of filling fraction, φ, in the region prior to crystallization which we observe at φs=0.719±0.007. We perform a statistical analysis based on two quantities that are typically employed in colloidal/molecular systems: the Mean Square Displacement (MSD) and the Self Intermediate Scattering Function (SISF). These are calculated from the trajectories obtained by tracking all particles inside a representative imaging window of the full system. At low φ the classic diffusive behavior of a disordered fluid is observed. As the filling fraction is increased towards φs, the MSD (or SISF) develops a two-step increase (or decrease) analogous to what is commonly observed in glassy systems. This plateau at intermediate timescales is a signature of the slowing down of the motion of particles due to temporary trapping inside the cages formed by their neighbors. This caging is increasingly more pronounced as φs is approached from below. For φ>φs, each particle becomes fully arrested by its six neighbors, for the whole time accessible experimentally. Moreover, the relaxation time extracted from the SISF, as a function of φ, is well described by the Vogel-Fulcher's law. Our results are an important step in strengthening the analogy between colloidal/molecular glassy systems and dense granular materials under uniform thermalization.

  13. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  14. Improvement of Basic Fluid Dynamics Models for the COMPASS Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Morita, Koji; Shirakawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    The COMPASS code is a new next generation safety analysis code to provide local information for various key phenomena in core disruptive accidents of sodium-cooled fast reactors, which is based on the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method. In this study, improvement of basic fluid dynamics models for the COMPASS code was carried out and verified with fundamental verification calculations. A fully implicit pressure solution algorithm was introduced to improve the numerical stability of MPS simulations. With a newly developed free surface model, numerical difficulty caused by poor pressure solutions is overcome by involving free surface particles in the pressure Poisson equation. In addition, applicability of the MPS method to interactions between fluid and multi-solid bodies was investigated in comparison with dam-break experiments with solid balls. It was found that the PISO algorithm and free surface model makes simulation with the passively moving solid model stable numerically. The characteristic behavior of solid balls was successfully reproduced by the present numerical simulations.

  15. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  16. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics: Current Status and Future Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Horst D.; VanDalsem, William R.; Dagum, Leonardo; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One or the key objectives of the Applied Research Branch in the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Allies Research Center is the accelerated introduction of highly parallel machines into a full operational environment. In this report we discuss the performance results obtained from the implementation of some computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications on the Connection Machine CM-2 and the Intel iPSC/860. We summarize some of the experiences made so far with the parallel testbed machines at the NAS Applied Research Branch. Then we discuss the long term computational requirements for accomplishing some of the grand challenge problems in computational aerosciences. We argue that only massively parallel machines will be able to meet these grand challenge requirements, and we outline the computer science and algorithm research challenges ahead.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and its potential for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.P.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Rock, D.T.; Rizwan-Uddin; Brewster, R.A.; Jonnavithula, S.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of these advanced models, methods and computing environments for nuclear applications to determine if the industry can expect to derive the same benefit as other industries, such as the automotive and the aerospace industries. As an example, the authors will examine the use of modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) capability for subchannel analysis, which is an important part of the analysis technology used by utilities to ensure safe and economical design and operation of reactors. In the current deregulated environment, it is possible that by use of these enhanced techniques, the thermal and electrical output of current reactors may be increased without any increase in cost and at no compromise in safety.

  18. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  19. A new formulation of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1974-01-01

    The computation of time-dependent flows has inspired a new, higher-dimensional formulation of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics in which time is treated as a fourth coordinate. The formulation is derived for a constant-density flow, and then extended to a variable-density flow by introducing a fifth, fictitious coordinate. This new coordinate can also act as a source coordinate, so that external source terms can be included. The analysis is carried out for both incompressible, stratified flow, and compressible equilibrium flow. The results are then extended to non-equilibrium and magnetohydrodynamic flows. Several applications of the new formulation to the computation of time-dependent flows are discussed.

  20. Parallelization of implicit finite difference schemes in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Naomi H.; Naik, Vijay K.; Nicoules, Michel

    1990-01-01

    Implicit finite difference schemes are often the preferred numerical schemes in computational fluid dynamics, requiring less stringent stability bounds than the explicit schemes. Each iteration in an implicit scheme involves global data dependencies in the form of second and higher order recurrences. Efficient parallel implementations of such iterative methods are considerably more difficult and non-intuitive. The parallelization of the implicit schemes that are used for solving the Euler and the thin layer Navier-Stokes equations and that require inversions of large linear systems in the form of block tri-diagonal and/or block penta-diagonal matrices is discussed. Three-dimensional cases are emphasized and schemes that minimize the total execution time are presented. Partitioning and scheduling schemes for alleviating the effects of the global data dependencies are described. An analysis of the communication and the computation aspects of these methods is presented. The effect of the boundary conditions on the parallel schemes is also discussed.

  1. Knowledge-based zonal grid generation for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation of flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards reducing the difficulty of three-dimensional grid generation in computational fluid dynamics. Using a knowledge-based approach makes sense, but problems arise which are caused by aspects of zoning involving perception, lack of expert consensus, and design processes. These obstacles are overcome by means of a simple shape and configuration language, a tunable zoning archetype, and a method of assembling plans from selected, predefined subplans. A demonstration system for knowledge-based two-dimensional flow field zoning has been successfully implemented and tested on representative aerodynamic configurations. The results show that this approach can produce flow field zonings that are acceptable to experts with differing evaluation criteria.

  2. Numerical, analytical, experimental study of fluid dynamic forces in seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, William; Artiles, Antonio; Aggarwal, Bharat; Walowit, Jed; Athavale, Mahesh M.; Preskwas, Andrzej J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA/Lewis Research Center is sponsoring a program for providing computer codes for analyzing and designing turbomachinery seals for future aerospace and engine systems. The program is made up of three principal components: (1) the development of advanced three dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics codes, (2) the production of simpler two dimensional (2-D) industrial codes, and (3) the development of a knowledge based system (KBS) that contains an expert system to assist in seal selection and design. The first task has been to concentrate on cylindrical geometries with straight, tapered, and stepped bores. Improvements have been made by adoption of a colocated grid formulation, incorporation of higher order, time accurate schemes for transient analysis and high order discretization schemes for spatial derivatives. This report describes the mathematical formulations and presents a variety of 2-D results, including labyrinth and brush seal flows. Extensions of 3-D are presently in progress.

  3. Computational methods of the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Parker, F.R.; Berthier, J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Schmuck, P.; Goutagny, L.; Ichikawa, S.; Ninokata, H.; Luck, L.B.

    1987-01-01

    To more accurately treat severe accidents in fast reactors, a program has been set up to investigate new computational models and approaches. The product of this effort is a computer code, the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM). This paper describes some of the basic features of the numerical algorithm used in AFDM. Aspects receiving particular emphasis are the fractional-step method of time integration, the semi-implicit pressure iteration, the virtual mass inertial terms, the use of three velocity fields, higher order differencing, convection of interfacial area with source and sink terms, multicomponent diffusion processes in heat and mass transfer, the SESAME equation of state, and vectorized programming. A calculated comparison with an isothermal tetralin/ammonia experiment is performed. We conclude that significant improvements are possible in reliably calculating the progression of severe accidents with further development.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics capability for the solid fuel ramjet projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusca, Michael J.; Chakravarthy, Sukumar R.; Goldberg, Uriel C.

    1988-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics solution of the Navier-Stokes equations has been applied to the internal and external flow of inert solid-fuel ramjet projectiles. Computational modeling reveals internal flowfield details not attainable by flight or wind tunnel measurements, thus contributing to the current investigation into the flight performance of solid-fuel ramjet projectiles. The present code employs numerical algorithms termed total variational diminishing (TVD). Computational solutions indicate the importance of several special features of the code including the zonal grid framework, the TVD scheme, and a recently developed backflow turbulence model. The solutions are compared with results of internal surface pressure measurements. As demonstrated by these comparisons, the use of a backflow turbulence model distinguishes between satisfactory and poor flowfield predictions.

  5. Modern wing flutter analysis by computational fluid dynamics methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Herbert J.; Batina, John T.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    The application and assessment of the recently developed CAP-TSD transonic small-disturbance code for flutter prediction is described. The CAP-TSD code has been developed for aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations and was previously applied to the calculation of steady and unsteady pressures with favorable results. Generalized aerodynamic forces and flutter characteristics are calculated and compared with linear theory results and with experimental data for a 45 deg sweptback wing. These results are in good agreement with the experimental flutter data which is the first step toward validating CAP-TSD for general transonic aeroelastic applications. The paper presents these results and comparisons along with general remarks regarding modern wing flutter analysis by computational fluid dynamics methods.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code development, scientific visualization, advanced surface representation, volume grid generation, and numerical optimization. Next, the discipline of CFD is briefly discussed and related to other areas of research at NASA Ames including experimental fluid dynamics, computer science research, computational chemistry, and numerical aerodynamic simulation. These areas combine with CFD to form a larger area of research, which might collectively be called computational technology. The ultimate goal of computational technology research at NASA Ames is to increase the physical understanding of the world in which we live, solve problems of national importance, and increase the technical capabilities of the aerospace community. Next, the major programs at NASA Ames that either use CFD technology or perform research in CFD are listed and discussed. Briefly, this list includes turbulent/transition physics and modeling, high-speed real gas flows, interdisciplinary research, turbomachinery demonstration computations, complete aircraft aerodynamics, rotorcraft applications, powered lift flows, high alpha flows, multiple body aerodynamics, and incompressible flow applications. Some of the individual problems actively being worked in each of these areas is listed to help define the breadth or extent of CFD involvement in each of these major programs. State-of-the-art examples of various CFD applications are presented to highlight most of these areas. The main emphasis of this portion of the presentation is on examples which will not otherwise be treated at this conference by the individual presentations. Finally, a list of principal current limitations and expected future directions is given.

  7. New technologies for fluid dynamics experiments and optical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Sergei S.

    2008-12-01

    Modern technologies offer new opportunities for experimentalists in a wide variety of research areas including hydrodynamics. A significant improvement in precision, dynamic range, reproducibility, motion control accuracy, data acquisition rate and information capacity of the experimental datasets over the current state-of-the-art are possible using new approaches and techniques, which may bring the quality of experiments to a new level of standards. Application of these new technologies in experimental diagnostics can help bridge the current quality gap between the observations and the large-scale computational fluid dynamics simulations allowing direct and unambiguous comparison of the data and the modeling results, which is crucial for the code validation. One of the new technologies which is described in this paper is ultra-high performance digital holographic data storage. The state-of-the-art motion control, electronics and optical imaging allow for realization of turbulent flows with very high Reynolds number (>107) in a relatively small laboratory-scale form-factor and quantification of their properties with extremely high spatio-temporal resolutions and bandwidth. Digital holographic technology can provide complete three-dimensional mapping of the flow velocity and density fields at high data rates (over 1000 fps) over large spatial area (~50 cm) with high spatial (1-10 μm) and temporal (better than a few nanoseconds) resolutions and, therefore, can provide extremely accurate quantitative description of the fluid flows, including those of multiphase and unsteady conditions. These unique experimental and metrological capabilities enable the studies of spatial and temporal properties of the transport of momentum, angular momentum and energy, and the identification of scaling, invariants and statistical properties of the complex multiphase and unsteady turbulent flows. The technology can be applied for investigations of a large variety of hydrodynamic

  8. Computational fluid dynamics of developing avian outflow tract heart valves.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Koonal N; Spitz, Cassie; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2012-10-01

    Hemodynamic forces play an important role in sculpting the embryonic heart and its valves. Alteration of blood flow patterns through the hearts of embryonic animal models lead to malformations that resemble some clinical congenital heart defects, but the precise mechanisms are poorly understood. Quantitative understanding of the local fluid forces acting in the heart has been elusive because of the extremely small and rapidly changing anatomy. In this study, we combine multiple imaging modalities with computational simulation to rigorously quantify the hemodynamic environment within the developing outflow tract (OFT) and its eventual aortic and pulmonary valves. In vivo Doppler ultrasound generated velocity profiles were applied to Micro-Computed Tomography generated 3D OFT lumen geometries from Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stage 16-30 chick embryos. Computational fluid dynamics simulation initial conditions were iterated until local flow profiles converged with in vivo Doppler flow measurements. Results suggested that flow in the early tubular OFT (HH16 and HH23) was best approximated by Poiseuille flow, while later embryonic OFT septation (HH27, HH30) was mimicked by plug flow conditions. Peak wall shear stress (WSS) values increased from 18.16 dynes/cm(2) at HH16 to 671.24 dynes/cm(2) at HH30. Spatiotemporally averaged WSS values also showed a monotonic increase from 3.03 dynes/cm(2) at HH16 to 136.50 dynes/cm(2) at HH30. Simulated velocity streamlines in the early heart suggest a lack of mixing, which differed from classical ink injections. Changes in local flow patterns preceded and correlated with key morphogenetic events such as OFT septation and valve formation. This novel method to quantify local dynamic hemodynamics parameters affords insight into sculpting role of blood flow in the embryonic heart and provides a quantitative baseline dataset for future research.

  9. A novel method to study cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimy, Jason K.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Kurland, David B.; Yu, Edward; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics play critical roles in both the immature and adult brain, with implications for neurodevelopment and disease processes such as hydrocephalus and neurodegeneration. Remarkably, the only reported method to date for measuring CSF formation in laboratory rats is the indirect tracer dilution method (a.k.a., ventriculocisternal perfusion), which has limitations. New Method Anesthetized rats were mounted in a stereotaxic apparatus, both lateral ventricles were cannulated, and the Sylvian aqueduct was occluded. Fluid exited one ventricle at a rate equal to the rate of CSF formation plus the rate of infusion (if any) into the contralateral ventricle. Pharmacological agents infused at a constant known rate into the contralateral ventricle were tested for their effect on CSF formation in real-time. Results The measured rate of CSF formation was increased by blockade of the Sylvian aqueduct but was not changed by increasing the outflow pressure (0–3 cm of H2O). In male Wistar rats, CSF formation was age-dependent: 0.39±0.06, 0.74±0.05, 1.02±0.04 and 1.40±0.06 µL/min at 8, 9, 10 and 12 weeks, respectively. CSF formation was reduced 57% by intraventricular infusion of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide. Comparison with existing methods Tracer dilution methods do not permit ongoing real-time determination of the rate of CSF formation, are not readily amenable to pharmacological manipulations, and require critical assumptions. Direct measurement of CSF formation overcomes these limitations. Conclusions Direct measurement of CSF formation in rats is feasible. Our method should prove useful for studying CSF dynamics in normal physiology and disease models. PMID:25554415

  10. A fully dynamic magneto-rheological fluid damper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Christenson, R. E.

    2012-06-01

    Control devices can be used to dissipate the energy of a civil structure subjected to dynamic loading, thus reducing structural damage and preventing failure. Semiactive control devices have received significant attention in recent years. The magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper is a promising type of semiactive device for civil structures due to its mechanical simplicity, inherent stability, high dynamic range, large temperature operating range, robust performance, and low power requirements. The MR damper is intrinsically nonlinear and rate-dependent, both as a function of the displacement across the MR damper and the command current being supplied to the MR damper. As such, to develop control algorithms that take maximum advantage of the unique features of the MR damper, accurate models must be developed to describe its behavior for both displacement and current. In this paper, a new MR damper model that includes a model of the pulse-width modulated (PWM) power amplifier providing current to the damper, a proposed model of the time varying inductance of the large-scale 200 kN MR dampers coils and surrounding MR fluid—a dynamic behavior that is not typically modeled—and a hyperbolic tangent model of the controllable force behavior of the MR damper is presented. Validation experimental tests are conducted with two 200 kN large-scale MR dampers located at the Smart Structures Technology Laboratory (SSTL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Lehigh University Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) facility. Comparison with experimental test results for both prescribed motion and current and real-time hybrid simulation of semiactive control of the MR damper shows that the proposed MR damper model can accurately predict the fully dynamic behavior of the large-scale 200 kN MR damper.

  11. Studying microstructural dynamics of complex fluids with particle tracking microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breedveld, Victor

    2004-11-01

    Over the last decade, particle tracking microrheology has matured as a new tool for complex fluids research. The main advantages of microrheology over traditional macroscopic rheometry are: the required sample size is extremely small ( ˜ 1 microliter); local viscoelastic properties in a sample can be probed with high spatial resolution ( ˜1-10 micrometer); and the sample is not disturbed by moving rheometer parts. I will present two examples of recent work in my group that highlight how these characteristics can be exploited to acquire unique information about the microstructure of complex fluids. First, we have studied protein unfolding. Traditionally, protein unfolding is studied with spectroscopic techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, fluorescence). Although viscosity has been listed in textbooks as a suitable technique, few -if any- quantitative rheological studies of unfolding have been reported, mainly due to technical difficulties. With microrheology, we have been able to quantify the size of the folded and unfolded protein, as well as the Gibbs free energy of unfolding, for aqueous bovine serum albumine solutions upon addition of urea as a denaturant. The results are in excellent agreement with literature data. Secondly, we have developed new technology for studying the microstructural dynamics of solvent-responsive complex fluids. In macroscopic rheometry it is virtually impossible to change solvent composition and measure the rheological response of a sample. By integrating microfluidics and microrheology we have been able to overcome this barrier: due to the micrometer lengthscales in microfluidiv devices, diffusive timescales in a dialysis set-up become short enough to achieve rapid and reversible changes in sample composition, without affecting the concentration of macromolecular components. Our dialysis cell for microrheology is a unique tool for studying the dynamics of structural and rheological changes induced by solvent composition. I will

  12. Geophysical and fluid dynamical analyses in physical volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Patricia Grizzaffi

    Volcanism is a predominant process on the terrestrial planets, and studies of physical volcanologic processes provide fundamental insight into the evolution of a planet's surface and interior. This work combines theoretical modeling, field observations, and studies of planetary surfaces in an integrated approach to understanding the mechanical and dynamic processes associated with volcanism. By understanding the basic dynamics associated with terrestrial volcanic processes, we hope to better understand the evolution of other planetary surfaces for which only remote sensing data are available. The focus of this work is the physics of volcanism in space and time, with an emphasis on regions that are dominated by volcanism such as the Hawaiian islands, and on studies of lava flow emplacement. Applying our knowledge of volcanic processes on Earth to studies of Venusian geology and geophysics is also important for this investigation because volcanism has been a primary process in creating and modifying landforms on that planet. This analysis of geophysical and fluid dynamic processes associated with physical volcanology first focuses on the relationship between volcanic and tectonic processes and the associated stress environments. Specifically, through analytical modeling we investigate the regional stresses associated with Bell Regio, a volcanic highland on Venus, and structural features believed to be a consequence of lithospheric flexure due to volcanic loading. The relationship between the tectonic features surrounding a volcanic edifice and stresses associated with magma chamber inflation are also examined through finite element analysis. The implications of a change in volcanic style and lithospheric thickness over time are discussed. Next, factors that affect the dynamics of lava flow emplacement are examined through a combination ot theoretical modeling and field measurements. Downflow changes in rheology and lava channel formation under conditions of varying

  13. AGARD Index of Publications, 1989-1991 (Index des Publications 1989-1991)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    26150 18-08) May N92-12458# Sener Ingenieria y Sistemas S.A., Madrid (Spain). 1991 A METHODOLOGY FOR SOFTWARE SPECIFICATION AND (AGARD-AG-317...RICARDO MINGUEZ, andAGARND/ Scientionl ruestions Executive PEDRO SEGUROLA (Sener Ingenieria y Sistemas S.A., Madrid, Complex control systems like those used...Mulisaffcnrliaameter Observations with a network Inshrchaigwl biu Fwn MREEC MUf of digitall lonoeondaa p 251 Ne- 36p256 NP9148521IPITERFREMCENIM113IT

  14. Particle laden fluid interfaces: dynamics and interfacial rheology.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Alma J; Guzmán, Eduardo; Martínez-Pedrero, Fernando; Ritacco, Hernán; Rubio, Ramón G; Ortega, Francisco; Starov, Victor M; Miller, Reinhard

    2014-04-01

    We review the dynamics of particle laden interfaces, both particle monolayers and particle+surfactant monolayers. We also discuss the use of the Brownian motion of microparticles trapped at fluid interfaces for measuring the shear rheology of surfactant and polymer monolayers. We describe the basic concepts of interfacial rheology and the different experimental methods for measuring both dilational and shear surface complex moduli over a broad range of frequencies, with emphasis in the micro-rheology methods. In the case of particles trapped at interfaces the calculation of the diffusion coefficient from the Brownian trajectories of the particles is calculated as a function of particle surface concentration. We describe in detail the calculation in the case of subdiffusive particle dynamics. A comprehensive review of dilational and shear rheology of particle monolayers and particle+surfactant monolayers is presented. Finally the advantages and current open problems of the use of the Brownian motion of microparticles for calculating the shear complex modulus of monolayers are described in detail.

  15. Unsteady computational fluid dynamics in front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mathias; Bernard, Anthony; Monnet, Tony; Lacouture, Patrick; David, Laurent

    2017-03-23

    The development of codes and power calculations currently allows the simulation of increasingly complex flows, especially in the turbulent regime. Swimming research should benefit from these technological advances to try to better understand the dynamic mechanisms involved in swimming. An unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study is conducted in crawl, in order to analyse the propulsive forces generated by the hand and forearm. The k-ω SST turbulence model and an overset grid method have been used. The main objectives are to analyse the evolution of the hand-forearm propulsive forces and to explain this relative to the arm kinematics parameters. In order to validate our simulation model, the calculated forces and pressures were compared with several other experimental and numerical studies. A good agreement is found between our results and those of other studies. The hand is the segment that generates the most propulsive forces during the aquatic stroke. As the pressure component is the main source of force, the orientation of the hand-forearm in the absolute coordinate system is an important kinematic parameter in the swimming performance. The propulsive forces are biggest when the angles of attack are high. CFD appears as a very valuable tool to better analyze the mechanisms of swimming performance and offers some promising developments, especially for optimizing the performance from a parametric study.

  16. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  17. Quasi-3D Cytoskeletal Dynamics of Osteocytes under Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qiu, Jun; Huo, Bo; Hillman, Elizabeth M.C.; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X. Edward

    2010-01-01

    Osteocytes respond to dynamic fluid shear loading by activating various biochemical pathways, mediating a dynamic process of bone formation and resorption. Whole-cell deformation and regional deformation of the cytoskeleton may be able to directly regulate this process. Attempts to image cellular deformation by conventional microscopy techniques have been hindered by low temporal or spatial resolution. In this study, we developed a quasi-three-dimensional microscopy technique that enabled us to simultaneously visualize an osteocyte's traditional bottom-view profile and a side-view profile at high temporal resolution. Quantitative analysis of the plasma membrane and either the intracellular actin or microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks provided characterization of their deformations over time. Although no volumetric dilatation of the whole cell was observed under flow, both the actin and MT networks experienced primarily tensile strains in all measured strain components. Regional heterogeneity in the strain field of normal strains was observed in the actin networks, especially in the leading edge to flow, but not in the MT networks. In contrast, side-view shear strains exhibited similar subcellular distribution patterns in both networks. Disruption of MT networks caused actin normal strains to decrease, whereas actin disruption had little effect on the MT network strains, highlighting the networks' mechanical interactions in osteocytes. PMID:21044578

  18. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  19. Fluid Dynamics of Urban Atmospheres in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, H. J. S.

    2010-01-01

    A majority of the world's urban centers are located in complex terrain, in which local airflow patterns are driven by pressure gradients and thermal forcing, while being strongly influenced by topographic effects and human (anthropogenic) activities. A paradigm in this context is a city located in a valley surrounded by mountains, slopes, and escarpments, in which the airflow is determined by terrain-induced perturbations to synoptic (background) flow, mesoscale thermal circulation (valley/slope flows) generated by local heating or cooling, and by their interaction with factitious (e.g., buildings and roads) and natural (e.g., vegetation and terrain) elements. The dynamics of airflows intrinsic to urban areas in complex terrain is reviewed here by employing idealized flow configurations to illustrate fundamental processes. Urban flows span a wide range of space and time scales and the emphasis here is on mesoscales (1-100 km). Basic fluid dynamics plays a central role in explaining observations of urban flow and in developing subgrid parameterizations for predictive models.

  20. A computational fluid dynamics model of viscous coupling of hairs.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Gregory C; Hallam, John

    2010-06-01

    Arrays of arthropod filiform hairs form highly sensitive mechanoreceptor systems capable of detecting minute air disturbances, and it is unclear to what extent individual hairs interact with one another within sensor arrays. We present a computational fluid dynamics model for one or more hairs, coupled to a rigid-body dynamics model, for simulating both biological (e.g., a cricket cercal hair) and artificial MEMS-based systems. The model is used to investigate hair-hair interaction between pairs of hairs and quantify the extent of so-called viscous coupling. The results show that the extent to which hairs are coupled depends on the mounting properties of the hairs and the frequency at which they are driven. In particular, it is shown that for equal length hairs, viscous coupling is suppressed when they are driven near the natural frequency of the undamped system and the damping coefficient at the base is small. Further, for certain configurations, the motion of a hair can be enhanced by the presence of nearby hairs. The usefulness of the model in designing artificial systems is discussed.

  1. Fluid dynamics of the larval zebrafish pectoral fin and the role of fin bending in fluid transport.

    PubMed

    Green, Matthew H; Curet, Oscar M; Patankar, Neelesh A; Hale, Melina E

    2013-03-01

    Larval zebrafish beat their pectoral fins during many behaviors including low-speed swimming and prey tracking; however, little is known about the functions of these fin movements. Previously, we found experimental support for the function of larval fins in mixing of fluid near the body, which may enhance respiration by diffusion of dissolved oxygen across the skin. Here we use computational fluid dynamics to analyze fluid flow due to the pectoral fin movement. The pectoral fins bend along their proximodistal axis during abduction (fin extension), but remain nearly rigid during adduction (fin flexion). We hypothesize that this asymmetry in bending is critical for fluid mixing near the body and test the effects of fin bending with our simulations. For normal fin beats, we observed similar flow patterns in simulations and experiments. Flow patterns showed fluid stretching and folding, indicative of mixing. When proximodistal bending was removed from fin motion, fins were less effective at transporting fluid in a posterior direction near the body surface, but lateral mixing of fluid near the body was unaffected. Our results suggest that fin bending enhances posterior transport of fluid along the body surface, which may act to aid respiration in combination with lateral stretching and folding of fluid.

  2. On the tribological characteristics of dynamically loaded journal bearing with micropolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Kongying; Zhu, Keqin

    2004-01-01

    The addition of the additives to the lubricant oil to enhance the characteristics of the lubricant will influence the performance of the bearings. Based on the theory of micropolar fluids, the tribological characteristics of a dynamically-loaded journal bearing are numerically studied. Comparisons are made between the Newtonian fluids and the micropolar fluids. It is shown that for a dynamically-loaded journal bearing, the micropolar fluids yield an increase not only in the friction force, but also in the friction coefficient. In addition, the oil film pressure and the oil film thickness are obviously higher than that of Newtonian fluids.

  3. Collapse dynamics and runout of dense granular materials in a fluid.

    PubMed

    Topin, V; Monerie, Y; Perales, F; Radjaï, F

    2012-11-02

    We investigate the effect of an ambient fluid on the dynamics of collapse and spread of a granular column simulated by means of the contact dynamics method interfaced with computational fluid dynamics. The runout distance is found to increase as a power law with the aspect ratio of the column, and, surprisingly, for a given aspect ratio and packing fraction, it may be similar in the grain-inertial and fluid-inertial regimes but with considerably longer duration in the latter case. We show that the effect of fluid in viscous and fluid-inertial regimes is to both reduce the kinetic energy during collapse and enhance the flow by lubrication during spread. Hence, the runout distance in a fluid may be below or equal to that in the absence of fluid due to compensation between those effects.

  4. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 16. Introduction to Airborne Early Warning Radar Flight Test. (Introduction aux essais en vol des Radars Aeroportes d’Alerte Lointaine)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    AGARD Publications) 00185 Roma Kentigern House Carretera de Torrej6n a Ajalvir, Pk.4 LUXEMBOURG 65 Brown Street 28850 Torrej6n de Ardoz - Madrid Voir...ICELAND SPAIN Director Research & Development Director of Aviation INTA (RTO/AGARD Publications) Communications & Information c/o Flugrad Carretera

  5. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: Lava or mud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lionel; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2014-05-01

    A distinctive flow deposit southwest of Cerberus Fossae on Mars is analyzed. The flow source is a ∼20 m deep, ∼12 × 1.5 km wide depression within a yardang associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow traveled for ∼40 km following topographic lows to leave a deposit on average 3-4 km wide. The surface morphology of the deposit suggests that it was produced by the emplacement of a fluid flowing in a laminar fashion and possessing a finite yield strength. We use topographic data from a digital elevation model (DEM) to model the dynamics of the motion and infer that the fluid had a Bingham rheology with a plastic viscosity of ∼1 Pa s and a yield strength of ∼185 Pa. Although the low viscosity is consistent with the properties of komatiite-like lava, the combination of values of viscosity and yield strength, as well as the surface morphology of the flow, suggests that this was a mud flow. Comparison with published experimental data implies a solids content close to 60% by volume and a grain size dominated by silt-size particles. Comparison of the ∼1.5 km3 deposit volume with the ∼0.03 km3 volume of the source depression implies that ∼98% of the flow material was derived from depth in the crust. There are similarities between the deposit studied here, which we infer to be mud, and other flow deposits on Mars currently widely held to be lavas. This suggests that a re-appraisal of many of these deposits is now in order.

  6. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, Kendra L.; Canfield, Jesse M.; Hemez, Francois M.; Sauer, Jeremy A.

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  7. Tenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion were discussed. The workshop was an open meeting of government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  8. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  9. Dynamical effect of confining wall on diffusion of fluid at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Reena; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical effect of wall-fluid interaction on diffusion in direction perpendicular to confining walls has been studied, theoretically. The properties of fluids which incorporates the effect of static changes in confined fluid has been modified to include, directly, the dynamical effects of wall on the motion of particles. The results obtained for VACF in perpendicular direction of channel of width of two atomic diameters are presented and compared with the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation results as well as the results obtained without including the dynamical effect.

  10. In-vitro interferometric characterization of dynamic fluid layers on contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, Brian C.; Greivenkamp, John E.; Sullivan, John J.

    2011-08-01

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye when wearing a contact lens is the thin fluid layer that forms on the surface of the contact lens. Under normal conditions, this fluid layer is less than 10 microns thick. The fluid layer thickness and topography change over time and are affected by the material properties of the contact lens, and may affect vision quality and comfort. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed using a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. The fluid behavior on the contact lens surface is measured, allowing quantitative analysis beyond what typical contact angle or visual inspection methods provide. The interferometer system has measured the formation and break up of fluid layers. Different fluid and contact lens material combinations have been used, and significant fluid layer properties have been observed in some cases. The interferometer is capable of identifying features in the fluid layer less than a micron in depth with a spatial resolution of about ten microns. An area on the contact lens approximately 6 mm wide can be measured with the system. This paper will discuss the interferometer design and analysis methods used. Measurement results of different material and fluid combinations are presented.

  11. Computational fluid dynamic design of rocket engine pump components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    Integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for design and analysis of turbomachinery components is needed as the requirements of pump performance and reliability become more stringent for the new generation of rocket engine. A fast grid generator, designed specially for centrifugal pump impeller, which allows a turbomachinery designer to use CFD to optimize the component design will be presented. The CFD grid is directly generated from the impeller blade G-H blade coordinates. The grid points are first generated on the meridional plane with the desired clustering near the end walls. This is followed by the marching of grid points from the pressure side of one blade to the suction side of a neighboring blade. This fast grid generator has been used to optimize the consortium pump impeller design. A grid dependency study has been conducted for the consortium pump impeller. Two different grid sizes, one with 10,000 grid points and one with 80,000 grid points were used for the grid dependency study. The effects of grid resolution on the turnaround time, including the grid generation and completion of the CFD analysis, is discussed. The impeller overall mass average performance is compared for different designs. Optimum design is achieved through systematic change of the design parameters. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used not only for flow analysis but also for design and optimization of turbomachinery components.

  12. The role of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in hair science.

    PubMed

    Spicka, Peter; Grald, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a virtual prototyping tool is widespread in the consumer packaged goods industry. CFD refers to the calculation on a computer of the velocity, pressure, and temperature and chemical species concentrations within a flowing liquid or gas. Because the performance of manufacturing equipment and product designs can be simulated on the computer, the benefit of using CFD is significant time and cost savings when compared to traditional physical testing methods. CFD has been used to design, scale-up and troubleshoot mixing tanks, spray dryers, heat exchangers and other process equipment. Recently, computer models of the capillary wicking process inside fibrous structures have been added to CFD software. These models have been used to gain a better understanding of the absorbent performance of diapers and feminine protection products. The same models can also be used to represent the movement of shampoo, conditioner, colorants and other products through the hair and scalp. In this paper, we provide an introduction to CFD and show some examples of its application to the manufacture of consumer products. We also provide sonic examples to show the potential of CFD for understanding the performance of products applied to the hair and scalp.

  13. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics for turbomachinery internal air systems.

    PubMed

    Chew, John W; Hills, Nicholas J

    2007-10-15

    Considerable progress in development and application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aeroengine internal flow systems has been made in recent years. CFD is regularly used in industry for assessment of air systems, and the performance of CFD for basic axisymmetric rotor/rotor and stator/rotor disc cavities with radial throughflow is largely understood and documented. Incorporation of three-dimensional geometrical features and calculation of unsteady flows are becoming commonplace. Automation of CFD, coupling with thermal models of the solid components, and extension of CFD models to include both air system and main gas path flows are current areas of development. CFD is also being used as a research tool to investigate a number of flow phenomena that are not yet fully understood. These include buoyancy-affected flows in rotating cavities, rim seal flows and mixed air/oil flows. Large eddy simulation has shown considerable promise for the buoyancy-driven flows and its use for air system flows is expected to expand in the future.

  15. Fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, J. C.; Addy, A. L.

    1990-02-01

    The significant results of a joint research effort investigating the fundamental fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within high-speed separated flows are presented in detail. The results have obtained through analytical and numerical approaches, but with primary emphasis on experimental investigations of missile and projectile base flow-related configurations. The objectives of the research program focus on understanding the component mechanisms and interactions which establish and maintain high-speed separated flow regions. The analytical and numerical efforts have centered on unsteady plume-wall interactions in rocket launch tubes and on predictions of the effects of base bleed on transonic and supersonic base flowfields. The experimental efforts have considered the development and use of a state-of-the-art two component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system for experiments with planar, two-dimensional, small-scale models in supersonic flows. The LDV experiments have yielded high quality, well documented mean and turbulence velocity data for a variety of high-speed separated flows including initial shear layer development, recompression/reattachment processes for two supersonic shear layers, oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions in a compression corner, and two-stream, supersonic, near-wake flow behind a finite-thickness base.

  16. Design of airborne wind turbine and computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbreen, Faiqa

    Wind energy is a promising alternative to the depleting non-renewable sources. The height of the wind turbines becomes a constraint to their efficiency. Airborne wind turbine can reach much higher altitudes and produce higher power due to high wind velocity and energy density. The focus of this thesis is to design a shrouded airborne wind turbine, capable to generate 70 kW to propel a leisure boat with a capacity of 8-10 passengers. The idea of designing an airborne turbine is to take the advantage of higher velocities in the atmosphere. The Solidworks model has been analyzed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software StarCCM+. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Simulation (URANS) with K-epsilon turbulence model has been selected, to study the physical properties of the flow, with emphasis on the performance of the turbine and the increase in air velocity at the throat. The analysis has been done using two ambient velocities of 12 m/s and 6 m/s. At 12 m/s inlet velocity, the velocity of air at the turbine has been recorded as 16 m/s. The power generated by the turbine is 61 kW. At inlet velocity of 6 m/s, the velocity of air at turbine increased to 10 m/s. The power generated by turbine is 25 kW.

  17. Aerodynamic design optimization using sensitivity analysis and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1991-01-01

    A new and efficient method is presented for aerodynamic design optimization, which is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-sensitivity analysis algorithm. The method is applied to design a scramjet-afterbody configuration for an optimized axial thrust. The Euler equations are solved for the inviscid analysis of the flow, which in turn provides the objective function and the constraints. The CFD analysis is then coupled with the optimization procedure that uses a constrained minimization method. The sensitivity coefficients, i.e. gradients of the objective function and the constraints, needed for the optimization are obtained using a quasi-analytical method rather than the traditional brute force method of finite difference approximations. During the one-dimensional search of the optimization procedure, an approximate flow analysis (predicted flow) based on a first-order Taylor series expansion is used to reduce the computational cost. Finally, the sensitivity of the optimum objective function to various design parameters, which are kept constant during the optimization, is computed to predict new optimum solutions. The flow analysis of the demonstrative example are compared with the experimental data. It is shown that the method is more efficient than the traditional methods.

  18. Rethinking hospital general ward ventilation design using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yam, R; Yuen, P L; Yung, R; Choy, T

    2011-01-01

    Indoor ventilation with good air quality control minimises the spread of airborne respiratory and other infections in hospitals. This article considers the role of ventilation in preventing and controlling infection in hospital general wards and identifies a simple and cost-effective ventilation design capable of reducing the chances of cross-infection. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is used to simulate and compare the removal of microbes using a number of different ventilation systems. Instead of the conventional corridor air return arrangement used in most general wards, air return is rearranged so that ventilation is controlled from inside the ward cubicle. In addition to boosting the air ventilation rate, the CFD results reveal that ventilation performance and the removal of microbes can be significantly improved. These improvements are capable of matching the standards maintained in a properly constructed isolation room, though at much lower cost. It is recommended that the newly identified ventilation parameters be widely adopted in the design of new hospital general wards to minimise cross-infection. The proposed ventilation system can also be retrofitted in existing hospital general wards with far less disruption and cost than a full-scale refurbishment.

  19. Validation of Magnetic Resonance Thermometry by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydquist, Grant; Owkes, Mark; Verhulst, Claire M.; Benson, Michael J.; Vanpoppel, Bret P.; Burton, Sascha; Eaton, John K.; Elkins, Christopher P.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) is a new experimental technique that can create fully three-dimensional temperature fields in a noninvasive manner. However, validation is still required to determine the accuracy of measured results. One method of examination is to compare data gathered experimentally to data computed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this study, large-eddy simulations have been performed with the NGA computational platform to generate data for a comparison with previously run MRT experiments. The experimental setup consisted of a heated jet inclined at 30° injected into a larger channel. In the simulations, viscosity and density were scaled according to the local temperature to account for differences in buoyant and viscous forces. A mesh-independent study was performed with 5 mil-, 15 mil- and 45 mil-cell meshes. The program Star-CCM + was used to simulate the complete experimental geometry. This was compared to data generated from NGA. Overall, both programs show good agreement with the experimental data gathered with MRT. With this data, the validity of MRT as a diagnostic tool has been shown and the tool can be used to further our understanding of a range of flows with non-trivial temperature distributions.

  20. Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1997-09-01

    Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.

  1. Fluid Dynamics of a High Aspect-Ratio Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Scott E.; Ahuja, K. K.

    2003-01-01

    Circulation control wings are a type of pneumatic high-lift device that have been extensively researched as to their aerodynamic benefits. However, there has been little research into the possible airframe noise reduction benefits of a circulation control wing. The key element of noise is the jet noise associated with the jet sheet emitted from the blowing slot. High aspect-ratio jet acoustic results (aspect-ratios from 100 to 3,000) from a related study showed that the jet noise of this type of jet was proportional to the slot height to the 3/2 power and slot width to the 1/2 power. Fluid dynamic experiments were performed in the present study on the high aspect-ratio nozzle to gain understanding of the flow characteristics in an effort to relate the acoustic results to flow parameters. Single hot-wire experiments indicated that the jet exhaust from the high aspect-ratio nozzle was similar to a 2-d turbulent jet. Two-wire space-correlation measurements were performed to attempt to find a relationship between the slot height of the jet and the length-scale of the flow noise generating turbulence structure. The turbulent eddy convection velocity was also calculated, and was found to vary with the local centerline velocity, and also as a function of the frequency of the eddy.

  2. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Prahl, D.; Lange, R.

    2013-12-01

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  4. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jeffrey

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Because it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.

  5. Model Order Reduction for Fluid Dynamics with Moving Solid Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haotian; Wei, Mingjun

    2016-11-01

    We extended the application of POD-Galerkin projection for model order reduction from usual fixed-domain problems to more general fluid-solid systems when moving boundary/interface is involved. The idea is similar to numerical simulation approaches using embedded forcing terms to represent boundary motion and domain change. However, such a modified approach will not get away with the unsteadiness of boundary terms which appear as time-dependent coefficients in the new Galerkin model. These coefficients need to be pre-computed for prescribed motion, or worse, to be computed at each time step for non-prescribed motion. The extra computational cost gets expensive in some cases and eventually undermines the value of using reduced-order models. One solution is to decompose the moving boundary/domain to orthogonal modes and derive another low-order model with fixed coefficients for boundary motion. Further study shows that the most expensive integrations resulted from the unsteady motion (in both original and domain-decomposition approaches) have almost negligible impact on the overall dynamics. Dropping these expensive terms reduces the computation cost by at least one order while no obvious effect on model accuracy is noticed. Supported by ARL.

  6. Methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification/validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.; Aeschliman, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    The issues of verification, calibration, and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes has been receiving increasing levels of attention in the research literature and in engineering technology. Both CFD researchers and users of CFD codes are asking more critical and detailed questions concerning the accuracy, range of applicability, reliability and robustness of CFD codes and their predictions. This is a welcomed trend because it demonstrates that CFD is maturing from a research tool to the world of impacting engineering hardware and system design. In this environment, the broad issue of code quality assurance becomes paramount. However, the philosophy and methodology of building confidence in CFD code predictions has proven to be more difficult than many expected. A wide variety of physical modeling errors and discretization errors are discussed. Here, discretization errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential equations to algebraic equations, and their solution. Boundary conditions for both the partial differential equations and the discretized equations will be discussed. Contrasts are drawn between the assumptions and actual use of numerical method consistency and stability. Comments are also made concerning the existence and uniqueness of solutions for both the partial differential equations and the discrete equations. Various techniques are suggested for the detection and estimation of errors caused by physical modeling and discretization of the partial differential equations.

  7. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  8. High-order computational fluid dynamics tools for aircraft design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    Most forecasts predict an annual airline traffic growth rate between 4.5 and 5% in the foreseeable future. To sustain that growth, the environmental impact of aircraft cannot be ignored. Future aircraft must have much better fuel economy, dramatically less greenhouse gas emissions and noise, in addition to better performance. Many technical breakthroughs must take place to achieve the aggressive environmental goals set up by governments in North America and Europe. One of these breakthroughs will be physics-based, highly accurate and efficient computational fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics tools capable of predicting complex flows over the entire flight envelope and through an aircraft engine, and computing aircraft noise. Some of these flows are dominated by unsteady vortices of disparate scales, often highly turbulent, and they call for higher-order methods. As these tools will be integral components of a multi-disciplinary optimization environment, they must be efficient to impact design. Ultimately, the accuracy, efficiency, robustness, scalability and geometric flexibility will determine which methods will be adopted in the design process. This article explores these aspects and identifies pacing items. PMID:25024419

  9. Fluid dynamics aspects of miniaturized axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kang, Can; Huang, Qifeng; Li, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Rotary blood pump (RBP) is a kind of crucial ventricular assist device (VAD) and its advantages have been evidenced and acknowledged in recent years. Among the factors that influence the operation performance and the durability of various rotary blood pumps, medium property and the flow features in pump's flow passages are conceivably significant. The major concern in this paper is the fluid dynamics aspects of such a kind of miniaturized pump. More specifically, the structural features of axial-flow blood pump and corresponding flow features are analyzed in detail. The narrow flow passage between blade tips and pump casing and the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) zone may exert a negative effect on the shear stress distribution in the blood flow. Numerical techniques are briefly introduced in view of their contribution to facilitating the optimal design of blood pump and the visualization of shear stress distribution and multiphase flow analysis. Additionally, with the development of flow measurement techniques, the high-resolution, effective and non-intrusive flow measurement techniques catering to the measurement of the flows inside rotary blood pumps are highly anticipated.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of dilute fluid-particle flows in aerosol concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Sridhar

    2003-07-01

    In this study, commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, CFX-4.4 has been used for the simulations of aerosol transport through various aerosol-sampling devices. Aerosol transport was modeled as a classical dilute and dispersed two-phase flow problem. Eulerian-Lagrangian framework was adopted wherein the fluid was treated as the continuous phase and aerosol as the dispersed phase, with a one-way coupling between the phases. Initially, performance of the particle transport algorithm implemented in the code was validated against available experimental and numerical data in the literature. Code predictions were found to be in good agreement against experimental data and previous numerical predictions. As a next step, the code was used as a tool to optimize the performance of a virtual impactor prototype. Suggestions on critical geometrical details available in the literature, for a virtual impactor, were numerically investigated on the prototype and the optimum set of parameters was determined. Performance curves were generated for the optimized design at various operating conditions. A computational model of the Linear Slot Virtual Impactor (LSVI) fabricated based on the optimization study, was constructed using the worst-case values of the measured geometrical parameters, with offsets in the horizontal and vertical planes. Simulations were performed on this model for the LSVI operating conditions. Behavior of various sized particles inside the impactor was illustrated with the corresponding particle tracks. Fair agreement was obtained between code predictions and experimental results. Important information on the virtual impactor performance, not known earlier, or, not reported in the literature in the past, obtained from this study, is presented. In the final part of this study, simulations on aerosol deposition in turbulent pipe flow were performed. Code predictions were found to be completely uncorrelated to experimental data. The

  11. Efficient Parallel Kernel Solvers for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xian-He

    1997-01-01

    Distributed-memory parallel computers dominate today's parallel computing arena. These machines, such as Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray Origin2OO, have successfully delivered high performance computing power for solving some of the so-called "grand-challenge" problems. Despite initial success, parallel machines have not been widely accepted in production engineering environments due to the complexity of parallel programming. On a parallel computing system, a task has to be partitioned and distributed appropriately among processors to reduce communication cost and to attain load balance. More importantly, even with careful partitioning and mapping, the performance of an algorithm may still be unsatisfactory, since conventional sequential algorithms may be serial in nature and may not be implemented efficiently on parallel machines. In many cases, new algorithms have to be introduced to increase parallel performance. In order to achieve optimal performance, in addition to partitioning and mapping, a careful performance study should be conducted for a given application to find a good algorithm-machine combination. This process, however, is usually painful and elusive. The goal of this project is to design and develop efficient parallel algorithms for highly accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and other engineering applications. The work plan is 1) developing highly accurate parallel numerical algorithms, 2) conduct preliminary testing to verify the effectiveness and potential of these algorithms, 3) incorporate newly developed algorithms into actual simulation packages. The work plan has well achieved. Two highly accurate, efficient Poisson solvers have been developed and tested based on two different approaches: (1) Adopting a mathematical geometry which has a better capacity to describe the fluid, (2) Using compact scheme to gain high order accuracy in numerical discretization. The previously developed Parallel Diagonal Dominant (PDD) algorithm

  12. Dynamic characteristics of Non Newtonian fluid Squeeze film damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaksha, C. P.; Shivaprakash, S.; Jagadish, H. P.

    2016-09-01

    The fluids which do not follow linear relationship between rate of strain and shear stress are termed as non-Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluids are usually categorized as those in which shear stress depends on the rates of shear only, fluids for which relation between shear stress and rate of shear depends on time and the visco inelastic fluids which possess both elastic and viscous properties. It is quite difficult to provide a single constitutive relation that can be used to define a non-Newtonian fluid due to a great diversity found in its physical structure. Non-Newtonian fluids can present a complex rheological behaviour involving shear-thinning, viscoelastic or thixotropic effects. The rheological characterization of complex fluids is an important issue in many areas. The paper analyses the damping and stiffness characteristics of non-Newtonian fluids (waxy crude oil) used in squeeze film dampers using the available literature for viscosity characterization. Damping and stiffness characteristic will be evaluated as a function of shear strain rate, temperature and percentage wax concentration etc.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness & response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has played an increasing role in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-coupled, nonlinear equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Until recently, such computer power could be found only in CRAY-class supercomputers. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Atmospheric Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Such models have been the cornerstones of the ARAC operational system for the past ten years. Kamada (1992) provides a review of diagnostic models and their applications to dispersion problems. However, because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows.

  14. Turbomachinery computational fluid dynamics: asymptotes and paradigm shifts.

    PubMed

    Dawes, W N

    2007-10-15

    This paper reviews the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) specifically for turbomachinery simulations and with a particular focus on application to problems with complex geometry. The review is structured by considering this development as a series of paradigm shifts, followed by asymptotes. The original S1-S2 blade-blade-throughflow model is briefly described, followed by the development of two-dimensional then three-dimensional blade-blade analysis. This in turn evolved from inviscid to viscous analysis and then from steady to unsteady flow simulations. This development trajectory led over a surprisingly small number of years to an accepted approach-a 'CFD orthodoxy'. A very important current area of intense interest and activity in turbomachinery simulation is in accounting for real geometry effects, not just in the secondary air and turbine cooling systems but also associated with the primary path. The requirements here are threefold: capturing and representing these geometries in a computer model; making rapid design changes to these complex geometries; and managing the very large associated computational models on PC clusters. Accordingly, the challenges in the application of the current CFD orthodoxy to complex geometries are described in some detail. The main aim of this paper is to argue that the current CFD orthodoxy is on a new asymptote and is not in fact suited for application to complex geometries and that a paradigm shift must be sought. In particular, the new paradigm must be geometry centric and inherently parallel without serial bottlenecks. The main contribution of this paper is to describe such a potential paradigm shift, inspired by the animation industry, based on a fundamental shift in perspective from explicit to implicit geometry and then illustrate this with a number of applications to turbomachinery.

  15. Simulating the nasal cycle with computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ruchin G.; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Frank-Ito, Dennis O.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Rhee, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives (1) Develop a method to account for the confounding effect of the nasal cycle when comparing pre- and post-surgery objective measures of nasal patency. (2) Illustrate this method by reporting objective measures derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models spanning the full range of mucosal engorgement associated with the nasal cycle in two subjects. Study Design Retrospective Setting Academic tertiary medical center. Subjects and Methods A cohort of 24 nasal airway obstruction patients was reviewed to select the two patients with the greatest reciprocal change in mucosal engorgement between pre- and post-surgery computed tomography (CT) scans. Three-dimensional anatomic models were created based on the pre- and post-operative CT scans. Nasal cycling models were also created by gradually changing the thickness of the inferior turbinate, middle turbinate, and septal swell body. CFD was used to simulate airflow and to calculate nasal resistance and average heat flux. Results Before accounting for the nasal cycle, Patient A appeared to have a paradoxical worsening nasal obstruction in the right cavity postoperatively. After accounting for the nasal cycle, Patient A had small improvements in objective measures postoperatively. The magnitude of the surgical effect also differed in Patient B after accounting for the nasal cycle. Conclusion By simulating the nasal cycle and comparing models in similar congestive states, surgical changes in nasal patency can be distinguished from physiological changes associated with the nasal cycle. This ability can lead to more precise comparisons of pre and post-surgery objective measures and potentially more accurate virtual surgery planning. PMID:25450411

  16. PIV Application to Fluid Dynamics of Bass Reflex Ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Esposito, Enrico; Tomasini, Enrico Primo

    A bass reflex (or vented or ported) loudspeaker system (BRS) is a particular type of loudspeaker enclosure that makes use of the combination of two second-order mechanic/acoustic devices, i.e., the driver and a Helmotz resonator, in order to create a new system with reinforced emission in the low frequency region. The resonator is composed by the box itself in which one or more ports are present with suitable shapes and dimensions. This category of loudspeaker presents several advantages compared to closed-box systems such as higher efficiency and power, smaller dimensions and reduced distortion at lower frequencies. Notwithstanding these advantages, they present some drawbacks like more complexity and unloading of the cone below the tuning frequency. Moreover, at high power levels the airflow in the port(s) may generate unwanted noises due to turbulence as well as distortion and acoustic compression. In this work we will present and compare a series of experiments conducted on two different bass reflex ports designs to assess their performance in terms of flow turbulence and sound-level compression at high input power levels. These issues are quite important in professional sound systems, where increasing power levels and sound clarity require exponentially growing cost and weight. For these reasons it is vital to optimize port design. To the knowledge of the authors there does not exist an accurate, nonintrusive experimental full-field study of air flows emitting from reflex ports in operating conditions. In this work, the experimental fluid dynamic investigation has been conducted by means of PIV and LDA techniques.

  17. Structure, biomimetics, and fluid dynamics of fish skin surfaces*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauder, George V.; Wainwright, Dylan K.; Domel, August G.; Weaver, James C.; Wen, Li; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-10-01

    The interface between the fluid environment and the surface of the body in swimming fishes is critical for both physiological and hydrodynamic functions. The skin surface in most species of fishes is covered with bony scales or toothlike denticles (in sharks). Despite the apparent importance of fish surfaces for understanding aquatic locomotion and near-surface boundary layer flows, relatively little attention has been paid to either the nature of surface textures in fishes or possible hydrodynamic effects of variation in roughness around the body surface within an individual and among species. Fish surfaces are remarkably diverse and in many bony fishes scales can have an intricate surface texture with projections, ridges, and comblike extensions. Shark denticles (or scales) are toothlike and project out of the skin to form a complexly textured surface that interacts with free-stream flow. Manufacturing biomimetic foils with fishlike surfaces allows hydrodynamic testing and we emphasize here the importance of dynamic test conditions where the effect of surface textures is assessed under conditions of self-propulsion. We show that simple two-dimensional foils with patterned cuts do not perform as well as a smooth control surface, but that biomimetic shark skin foils can swim at higher self-propelled speeds than smooth controls. When the arrangement of denticles on the foil surface is altered, we find that a staggered-overlapped pattern outperforms other arrangements. Flexible foils made of real shark skin outperform sanded controls when foils are moved with a biologically realistic motion program. We suggest that focus on the mechanisms of drag reduction by fish surfaces has been too limiting and an additional role of fish surface textures may be to alter leading edge vortices and flow patterns on moving surfaces in a way that enhances thrust. Analysis of water flow over an artificial shark skin foil under both static and dynamic conditions shows that a shear layer

  18. Fluid dynamic and thermodynamic analysis of a model pertaining to cryogenic fluid management in low gravity environments for a system with dynamically induced settling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, J.

    1982-01-01

    The settling behavior of the liquid and gaseous phases of a fluid in a propellant and in a zero-g environment, when such settling is induced through the use of a dynamic device, in this particular case, a helical screw was studied. Particular emphasis was given to: (1) the description of a fluid mechanics model which seems applicable to the system under consideration, (2) a First Law of Thermodynamics analysis of the system, and (3) a discussion of applicable scaling rules.

  19. Molecular dynamics of fluid flows in the Knudsen regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2000-03-01

    Novel technological applications often involve fluid flows in the Knudsen regime in which the mean free path is comparable to the system size. The boundary conditions at the wall-fluid interface are studied. The wall is modelled by atoms tethered to a lattice that interact by Lennard-Jones forces with the fluid atoms. Monoatomic and polymeric Lennard-Jones fluids are considered and Couette and gravity-driven flows are studied. The scenarios of behavior envisioned by J. C. Maxwell are found not to be valid in general. For instance, there are novel effects related to a non-zero residence time of the fluid molecules in the wall vicinity. In the limiting case of strongly attractive fluid-wall interactions, the velocity distribution of the outcoming atoms is indeed thermal. However, when the attractive tail in the fluid-wall interactions is weak, there are significant deviations from Maxwell's hypothesis. Striking many body effects are found as one interpolates between the dilute gas and the dense fluid regime. The molecular nature of the viscous and thermal slip phenomena are elucidated.

  20. Variable density vortex ring dynamics in sharply stratified ambient fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassa, Roberto; Harris, Daniel M.; Holz, David; McLaughlin, Richard M.; Mertens, Keith; Passaggia, Pierre-Yves; Viotti, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    This paper is associated with a poster winner of a 2015 APS/DFD Milton van Dyke Award for work presented at the DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion. The original poster is available from the Gallery of Fluid Motion, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/APS.DFD.2015.GFM.P0050

  1. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  2. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  3. Tenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Presented here are 59 abstracts and presentations and three invited presentations given at the Tenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, April 28-30, 1992. The purpose of the workshop is to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion. The workshop is an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics are discussed, including a computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  4. Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Conference publication includes 79 abstracts and presentations given at the Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, April 20-22, 1993. The purpose of this workshop is to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion. The workshop is an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics are discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  5. Incorporating geometrically complex vegetation in a computational fluid dynamic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothroyd, Richard; Hardy, Richard; Warburton, Jeff; Rosser, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is known to have a significant influence on the hydraulic, geomorphological, and ecological functioning of river systems. Vegetation acts as a blockage to flow, thereby causing additional flow resistance and influencing flow dynamics, in particular flow conveyance. These processes need to be incorporated into flood models to improve predictions used in river management. However, the current practice in representing vegetation in hydraulic models is either through roughness parameterisation or process understanding derived experimentally from flow through highly simplified configurations of fixed, rigid cylinders. It is suggested that such simplifications inadequately describe the geometric complexity that characterises vegetation, and therefore the modelled flow dynamics may be oversimplified. This paper addresses this issue by using an approach combining field and numerical modelling techniques. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) with waveform processing has been applied to collect a sub-mm, 3-dimensional representation of Prunus laurocerasus, an invasive species to the UK that has been increasingly recorded in riparian zones. Multiple scan perspectives produce a highly detailed point cloud (>5,000,000 individual data points) which is reduced in post processing using an octree-based voxelisation technique. The method retains the geometric complexity of the vegetation by subdividing the point cloud into 0.01 m3 cubic voxels. The voxelised representation is subsequently read into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model using a Mass Flux Scaling Algorithm, allowing the vegetation to be directly represented in the modelling framework. Results demonstrate the development of a complex flow field around the vegetation. The downstream velocity profile is characterised by two distinct inflection points. A high velocity zone in the near-bed (plant-stem) region is apparent due to the lack of significant near-bed foliage. Above this, a zone of reduced velocity is

  6. Analytical, Computational Fluid Dynamics and Flight Dynamics of Coandă MAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, H.; Ahmed, RI

    2016-11-01

    The paper establishes the basic working relationships among various relevant variables and parameters governing the aerodynamics forces and performance measures of Coandă MAV in hover and translatory motion. With such motivation, capitalizing on the basic fundamental principles, the Fluid Dynamics and Flight Mechanics of semi-spherical Coandă MAV configurations are revisited and analyzed as a baseline. To gain better understanding on the principle of Coandă MAV lift generation, a mathematical model for a spherical Coandă MAV is developed and analyzed from first physical principles. To gain further insight into the prevailing flow field around a Coandă MAV, as well as to verify the theoretical prediction presented in the work, a computational fluid dynamic CFD simulation for a Coandă MAV generic model are elaborated using commercial software FLUENT®. In addition, the equation of motion for translatory motion of Coandă MAV is elaborated. The mathematical model and derived performance measures are shown to be capable in describing the physical phenomena of the flow field of the semi-spherical Coandă MAV. The relationships between the relevant parameters of the mathematical model of the Coandă MAV to the forces acting on it are elaborated subsequently.

  7. AGARD Flight Test Instrumentation Series. Volume 7. Strain Gauge Measurements on Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    Epoxy resin-glass fibre 4 550 650 Asbestos 100 670 700 The values refer to the supporting materials; the limits for the measuring grid materials are...AGARD publications. 13.Keywords/Descriptors 14.UDC Aircraft Flight tests Strain measurement Airborne equipment 620.17:5533.6.054:629.73.05 Loads (forces...3.5.4 A.C. voltage supply 28I 3.6 lImmunity from electrical and magnetic disturbances 29 3.6.1 Common-mode voltages 29 3.6.2 Electrical and magnetic

  8. AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development) Index of Publications, 1980-1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    The JA-37 Viggen is the first military aircraft in series production CAPTEURS D’AVION PAR UTILISATION DE LA REDONDANCE and field-service equipped with a...AIRCRAFT was recorded in 8 hour helicopter flight during flight with obstacle ( UTILISATION DE LA COMMANDE VOCALE A BORD DES missions. Each subject...D’EVALUATION DES EQUIPMENTS DE (AGARD-AR-184; ISBN-92-835-1440-8) Avail: NTIS HC PROTECTION CONTRE LES IMMERSIONS ACCIDENTELLES A03/MF A01 UTILISES EN

  9. Dentinal fluid dynamics in human teeth, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ciucchi, B; Bouillaguet, S; Holz, J; Pashley, D

    1995-04-01

    Cavities were prepared in human premolars scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons. The smear layer was removed from the dentin surface by acid etching, and the cavity was sealed using a hollow chamber. The chamber was filled with sterile saline solution and connected via tubing to a hydraulic circuit featuring an adjustable pressure reservoir and a device that measures fluid movement across dentin. In the absence of any exogenous pressure, all cavities exhibited an outward fluid flow rate of 0.36 microliters min-1 cm-2. As exogenous pressure was applied to the cavity, the outward flow slowed. The exogenous pressure that stopped outward fluid flow was taken to be equal to normal pulpal tissue pressure. The mean value was 14.1 cm H2O in five teeth. This simple method permits measurement of dentinal fluid flux, the hydraulic conductance of dentin, and estimates pulpal tissue pressure.

  10. Dynamics of non-minimally coupled perfect fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bettoni, Dario; Liberati, Stefano E-mail: liberati@sissa.it

    2015-08-01

    We present a general formulation of the theory for a non-minimally coupled perfect fluid in which both conformal and disformal couplings are present. We discuss how such non-minimal coupling is compatible with the assumptions of a perfect fluid and derive both the Einstein and the fluid equations for such model. We found that, while the Euler equation is significantly modified with the introduction of an extra force related to the local gradients of the curvature, the continuity equation is unaltered, thus allowing for the definition of conserved quantities along the fluid flow. As an application to cosmology and astrophysics we compute the effects of the non-minimal coupling on a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker metric at both background and linear perturbation level and on the Newtonian limit of our theory.

  11. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of pollutant concentrations within roadway and building microenvironments is feasible using high performance computing. Unlike currently used regulatory air quality models, fine-scale CFD simulations are able to account rig...

  12. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  13. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2001-01-01

    Considerable progress over the past thirty years has been made in the development of large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Computations are used routinely to design the cruise shapes of transport aircraft through complex-geometry simulations involving the solution of 25-100 million equations; in this arena the number of wind-tunnel tests for a new design has been substantially reduced. However, simulations of the entire flight envelope of the vehicle, including maximum lift, buffet onset, flutter, and control effectiveness have not been as successful in eliminating the reliance on wind-tunnel testing. These simulations involve unsteady flows with more separation and stronger shock waves than at cruise. The main reasons limiting further inroads of CFD into the design process are: (1) the reliability of turbulence models; and (2) the time and expense of the numerical simulation. Because of the prohibitive resolution requirements of direct simulations at high Reynolds numbers, transition and turbulence modeling is expected to remain an issue for the near term. The focus of this paper addresses the latter problem by attempting to attain optimal efficiencies in solving the governing equations. Typically current CFD codes based on the use of multigrid acceleration techniques and multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping schemes are able to converge lift and drag values for cruise configurations within approximately 1000 residual evaluations. An optimally convergent method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME), meaning the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in the discretized system of equations (residual equations). In this paper, a distributed relaxation approach to achieving TME for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RNAS) equations are discussed along with the foundations that form the

  14. Thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of effusive subglacial eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höskuldsson, A.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    We consider the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic processes that occur during subglacial effusive eruptions. Subglacial eruptions typically generate catastrophic floods (jökulhlaups) due to melting of ice by lava and generation of a large water cavity. We consider the heat transfer from basaltic and rhyolitic lava eruptions to the ice for typical ranges of magma discharge and geometry of subglacial lavas in Iceland. Our analysis shows that the heat flux out of cooling lava is large enough to sustain vigorous natural convection in the surrounding meltwater. In subglacial eruptions the temperature difference driving convection is in the range 10-100 °C. Average temperature of the meltwater must exceed 4 °C and is usually substantially greater. We calculate melting rates of the walls of the ice cavity in the range 1-40m/day, indicating that large subglacial lakes can form rapidly as observed in the 1918 eruption of Katla and the 1996 eruption of Gjálp fissure in Vatnajökull. The volume changes associated with subglacial eruptions can cause large pressure changes in the developing ice cavity. These pressure changes can be much larger than those associated with variation of bedrock and glacier surface topography. Previous models of water-cavity stability based on hydrostatic and equilibrium conditions may not be applicable to water cavities produced rapidly in volcanic eruptions. Energy released by cooling of basaltic lava at the temperature of 1200 °C results in a volume deficiency due to volume difference between ice and water, provided that heat exchange efficiency is greater than approximately 80%. A negative pressure change inhibits escape of water, allowing large cavities to build up. Rhyolitic eruptions and basaltic eruptions, with less than approximately 80% heat exchange efficiency, cause positive pressure changes promoting continual escape of meltwater. The pressure changes in the water cavity can cause surface deformation of the ice. Laboratory

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of pipe elbow flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, Gregory Francis

    2004-08-01

    One problem facing today's nuclear power industry is flow-accelerated corrosion and erosion in pipe elbows. The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing experiments in their Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) test loop to better characterize these phenomena, and develop advanced sensor technologies for the condition monitoring of critical elbows on a continuous basis. In parallel with these experiments, Sandia National Laboratories is performing Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the flow in one elbow of the FAC test loop. The simulations are being performed using the FLUENT commercial software developed and marketed by Fluent, Inc. The model geometry and mesh were created using the GAMBIT software, also from Fluent, Inc. This report documents the results of the simulations that have been made to date; baseline results employing the RNG k-e turbulence model are presented. The predicted value for the diametrical pressure coefficient is in reasonably good agreement with published correlations. Plots of the velocities, pressure field, wall shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy adjacent to the wall are shown within the elbow section. Somewhat to our surprise, these indicate that the maximum values of both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy occur near the elbow entrance, on the inner radius of the bend. Additional simulations were performed for the same conditions, but with the RNG k-e model replaced by either the standard k-{var_epsilon}, or the realizable k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The predictions using the standard k-{var_epsilon} model are quite similar to those obtained in the baseline simulation. However, with the realizable k-{var_epsilon} model, more significant differences are evident. The maximums in both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy now appear on the outer radius, near the elbow exit, and are {approx}11% and 14% greater, respectively, than those predicted in the baseline calculation

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Dual Bell Nozzle Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, Kalen; Garcia, Christian; Ruf, Joseph; Bui, Trong

    2015-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) are working together to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the dual bell nozzle concept. Dual bell nozzles are a form of altitude compensating nozzle that consists of two connecting bell contours. At low altitude the nozzle flows fully in the first, relatively lower area ratio, nozzle. The nozzle flow separates from the wall at the inflection point which joins the two bell contours. This relatively low expansion results in higher nozzle efficiency during the low altitude portion of the launch. As ambient pressure decreases with increasing altitude, the nozzle flow will expand to fill the relatively large area ratio second nozzle. The larger area ratio of the second bell enables higher Isp during the high altitude and vacuum portions of the launch. Despite a long history of theoretical consideration and promise towards improving rocket performance, dual bell nozzles have yet to be developed for practical use and have seen only limited testing. One barrier to use of dual bell nozzles is the lack of control over the nozzle flow transition from the first bell to the second bell during operation. A method that this team is pursuing to enhance the controllability of the nozzle flow transition is manipulation of the film coolant that is injected near the inflection between the two bell contours. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is being run to assess the degree of control over nozzle flow transition generated via manipulation of the film injection. A cold flow dual bell nozzle, without film coolant, was tested over a range of simulated altitudes in 2004 in MSFC's nozzle test facility. Both NASA centers have performed a series of simulations of that dual bell to validate their computational models. Those CFD results are compared to the experimental results within this paper. MSFC then proceeded to add film injection to the CFD grid of the dual bell nozzle. A series of

  17. Evaluation of Aircraft Platforms for SOFIA by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotz, S. P.; Srinivasan, G. R.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The selection of an airborne platform for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is based not only on economic cost, but technical criteria, as well. Technical issues include aircraft fatigue, resonant characteristics of the cavity-port shear layer, aircraft stability, the drag penalty of the open telescope bay, and telescope performance. Recently, two versions of the Boeing 747 aircraft, viz., the -SP and -200 configurations, were evaluated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for their suitability as SOFIA platforms. In each configuration the telescope was mounted behind the wings in an open bay with nearly circular aperture. The geometry of the cavity, cavity aperture, and telescope was identical in both platforms. The aperture was located on the port side of the aircraft and the elevation angle of the telescope, measured with respect to the vertical axis, was 500. The unsteady, viscous, three-dimensional, aerodynamic and acoustic flow fields in the vicinity of SOFIA were simulated by an implicit, finite-difference Navier-Stokes flow solver (OVERFLOW) on a Chimera, overset grid system. The computational domain was discretized by structured grids. Computations were performed at wind-tunnel and flight Reynolds numbers corresponding to one free-stream flow condition (M = 0.85, angle of attack alpha = 2.50, and sideslip angle beta = 0 degrees). The computational domains consisted of twenty-nine(29) overset grids in the wind-tunnel simulations and forty-five(45) grids in the simulations run at cruise flight conditions. The maximum number of grid points in the simulations was approximately 4 x 10(exp 6). Issues considered in the evaluation study included analysis of the unsteady flow field in the cavity, the influence of the cavity on the flow across empennage surfaces, the drag penalty caused by the open telescope bay, and the noise radiating from cavity surfaces and the cavity-port shear layer. Wind-tunnel data were also available to compare

  18. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of aerosol deposition in pebble beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhosi, Margaret Msongi

    2007-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor is a high temperature gas cooled reactor which uses helium gas as a coolant. The reactor uses spherical graphite pebbles as fuel. The fuel design is inherently resistant to the release of the radioactive material up to high temperatures; therefore, the plant can withstand a broad spectrum of accidents with limited release of radionuclides to the environment. Despite safety features of the concepts, these reactors still contain large inventories of radioactive materials. The transport of most of the radioactive materials in an accident occurs in the form of aerosol particles. In this dissertation, the limits of applicability of existing computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT to the prediction of aerosol transport have been explored. The code was run using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models to determine the effects of different turbulence models on the prediction of aerosol particle deposition. Analyses were performed for up to three unit cells in the orthorhombic configuration. For low flow conditions representing natural circulation driven flow, the laminar flow model was used and the results were compared with existing experimental data for packed beds. The results compares well with experimental data in the low flow regime. For conditions corresponding to normal operating of the reactor, analyses were performed using the standard k-ɛ turbulence model. From the inertial deposition results, a correlation that can be used to estimate the deposition of aerosol particles within pebble beds given inlet flow conditions has been developed. These results were converted into a dimensionless form as a function of a modified Stokes number. Based on results obtained in the laminar regime and for individual pebbles, the correlation developed for the inertial impaction component of deposition is believed to be credible. The form of the correlation developed also allows these results to be applied to pebble beds of different

  19. Conceptual design for the Space Station Freedom fluid physics/dynamics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.; Chucksa, Ronald J.; Omalley, Terence F.; Oeftering, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    A study team at NASA's Lewis Research Center has been working on a definition study and conceptual design for a fluid physics and dynamics science facility that will be located in the Space Station Freedom's baseline U.S. Laboratory module. This modular, user-friendly facility, called the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, will be available for use by industry, academic, and government research communities in the late 1990's. The Facility will support research experiments dealing with the study of fluid physics and dynamics phenomena. Because of the lack of gravity-induced convection, research into the mechanisms of fluids in the absence of gravity will help to provide a better understanding of the fundamentals of fluid processes. This document has been prepared as a final version of the handout for reviewers at the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility Assessment Workshop held at Lewis on January 24 and 25, 1990. It covers the background, current status, and future activities of the Lewis Project Study Team effort. It is a revised and updated version of a document entitled 'Status Report on the Conceptual Design for the Space Station Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility', dated January 1990.

  20. Parallel Three-Dimensional Computation of Fluid Dynamics and Fluid-Structure Interactions of Ram-Air Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    1998-01-01

    This is a final report as far as our work at University of Minnesota is concerned. The report describes our research progress and accomplishments in development of high performance computing methods and tools for 3D finite element computation of aerodynamic characteristics and fluid-structure interactions (FSI) arising in airdrop systems, namely ram-air parachutes and round parachutes. This class of simulations involves complex geometries, flexible structural components, deforming fluid domains, and unsteady flow patterns. The key components of our simulation toolkit are a stabilized finite element flow solver, a nonlinear structural dynamics solver, an automatic mesh moving scheme, and an interface between the fluid and structural solvers; all of these have been developed within a parallel message-passing paradigm.

  1. Aggregation, Fragmentation, and the Nonlinear Dynamics of Electrorheological Fluids in Oscillatory Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.; Odinek, Judy

    1995-10-01

    We have conducted a time-resolved, two-dimensional light scattering study of the nonlinear dynamics of field-induced structures in an electrorheological fluid subjected to oscillatory shear. We have developed a theoretical description of the observed dynamics by considering the response of a fragmenting and aggregating particle chain to the prevailing hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces. This structural theory is then used to describe the nonlinear rheology of electrorheological fluids.

  2. Dynamic Environmental Qualification Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    ORGANISATION DU TRAITE DE L’ATLANTIQUE NORD) AGARD Report No.682 DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENTAL QUALIFICATION TECHNIQUES II¥ ,n . r-,, q - .j, i ~Papers present d at...better the knowledge of sources of excitation, transmission paths, dynamic system behaviour , the better the understanding and establishment of appropriate...featuring resonance dwell have poor similarity to the dynamic equipment behaviour in the A/C. As a specific example, a vibration test with a

  3. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Daniel A. P.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Padding, J. T.; Hemelrijk, C. K.

    2012-02-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed analysis. Their insights may guide empirical work. Particularly the recently introduced multiparticle collision dynamics method may be suitable for the study of moving organisms because it is computationally fast, simple to implement, and has a continuous representation of space. As regards the study of hydrodynamics of moving organisms, the method has only been applied at low Reynolds numbers (below 120) for soft, permeable bodies, and static fishlike shapes. In the present paper we use it to study the hydrodynamics of an undulating fish at Reynolds numbers 1100-1500, after confirming its performance for a moving insect wing at Reynolds number 75. We measure (1) drag, thrust, and lift forces, (2) swimming efficiency and spatial structure of the wake, and (3) distribution of forces along the fish body. We confirm the resemblance between the simulated undulating fish and empirical data. In contrast to theoretical predictions, our model shows that for steadily undulating fish, thrust is produced by the rear 2/3 of the body and that the slip ratio U/V (with U the forward swimming speed and V the rearward speed of the body wave) correlates negatively (instead of positively) with the actual Froude efficiency of swimming. Besides, we show that the common practice of modeling individuals while constraining their sideways acceleration causes them to resemble unconstrained fish with a higher tailbeat frequency.

  4. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Reid, Daniel A P; Hildenbrandt, H; Padding, J T; Hemelrijk, C K

    2012-02-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed analysis. Their insights may guide empirical work. Particularly the recently introduced multiparticle collision dynamics method may be suitable for the study of moving organisms because it is computationally fast, simple to implement, and has a continuous representation of space. As regards the study of hydrodynamics of moving organisms, the method has only been applied at low Reynolds numbers (below 120) for soft, permeable bodies, and static fishlike shapes. In the present paper we use it to study the hydrodynamics of an undulating fish at Reynolds numbers 1100-1500, after confirming its performance for a moving insect wing at Reynolds number 75. We measure (1) drag, thrust, and lift forces, (2) swimming efficiency and spatial structure of the wake, and (3) distribution of forces along the fish body. We confirm the resemblance between the simulated undulating fish and empirical data. In contrast to theoretical predictions, our model shows that for steadily undulating fish, thrust is produced by the rear 2/3 of the body and that the slip ratio U/V (with U the forward swimming speed and V the rearward speed of the body wave) correlates negatively (instead of positively) with the actual Froude efficiency of swimming. Besides, we show that the common practice of modeling individuals while constraining their sideways acceleration causes them to resemble unconstrained fish with a higher tailbeat frequency.

  5. Using bulk convection in a microtensiometer to approach kinetic-limited surfactant dynamics at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Nicolas J; Vogus, Douglas R; Walker, Lynn M; Anna, Shelley L

    2012-04-15

    The impact of transport of surfactants to fluid-fluid interfaces is complex to assess and model, as many processes are in the regime where kinetics, diffusion and convection are comparable. Using the principle that the timescale for diffusion decreases with increasing curvature, we previously developed a microtensiometer to accurately measure fundamental transport coefficients via dynamic surface tension at spherical microscale liquid-fluid interfaces. In the present study, we use a low Reynolds number flow in the bulk solution to further increase the rate of diffusion. Dynamic surface tension is measured as a function of Peclet number and the results are compared with a simplified convection-diffusion model. Although a transition from diffusion to kinetic-limited transport is not observed experimentally for the surfactants considered, lower bounds on the adsorption and desorption rate constants are determined that are much larger than previously reported rate constants. The results show that the details of the flow field do not need to be controlled as long as the local Reynolds number is low. Aside from other pragmatic advantages, this experimental tool and analysis allows the governing mechanisms of surfactant transport at liquid-fluid interfaces to be quantified using flow near the interface to decrease the length scale for diffusion, separating the relevant timescales.

  6. Trends in cardiac dynamics : towards coupled models of intracavity fluid dynamics and deformable wall mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelle, G.; Ohayon, J.; Oddou, C.

    1994-06-01

    We report here preliminary results in the development of a computational model in cardiac mechanics which takes into account the coupled effects of ventricular mechanics and intracardiac hemodynamics. In this first work, complex geometrical, architectural and rheological properties of the organ have been strongly simplified in order to propose a “quasi-analytical” model. We assume axisymmetrical geometry of the ventricle and myocardium material to be made of a sheath of a composite, collagenic, fibrous and active muscle medium inside which the blood dynamics is dominated by unsteady inertial effects. Moreover, we have made grossly simplifying assumptions concerning rather stringent and unusual functioning conditions about the mechanical behavior of the input and output valvular and vascular impedances as well as the biochemical action of the fiber. By imposing the time variation of the input and output flow rate and activation function, it is possible, assuming uniformity of the pressure stresses applied to the internal wall surface at every instant of the cardiac cycle, to calculate the overall distribution of fluid pressure and velocity inside the cavity as well as the distributions of stresses and strains inside the wall. It was shown that under the action of a given biochemical activation function, both kinematics of the wall and induced motion of the fluid are such that the boundary conditions concerning normal pressure stresses conservation was constantly satisfied. Moreover, the results concerning the dynamics of the blood flow, as viewed through the human clinical investigations using velocimetric technology based upon color doppler ultrasound, are in accordance with those obtained from such a model, at least during the ejection phase. In particular, contrarily to the filling phase processes, the ejection dynamics is such that the time evolution of the blood velocity measured along the cavity axis does not display any phase shift characterizing an

  7. Computational fluid dynamics '92; Proceedings of the European Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 1st, Brussels, Belgium, Sep. 7-11, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, Charles (Editor); Periaux, J. (Editor); Kordulla, W. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    A conference was held on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and produced related papers. Topics included CFD algorithms, transition and turbulent flow, hypersonic reacting flow, incompressible flow, two phase flow and combustion, internal flow, compressible flow, grid generation and adaption, boundary layers, environmental and industrial applications, and non-Newtonian flow.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics '92; Proceedings of the European Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 1st, Brussels, Belgium, Sep. 7-11, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Charles; Periaux, J.; Kordulla, W.

    A conference was held on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and produced related papers. Topics included CFD algorithms, transition and turbulent flow, hypersonic reacting flow, incompressible flow, two phase flow and combustion, internal flow, compressible flow, grid generation and adaption, boundary layers, environmental and industrial applications, and non-Newtonian flow. For individual titles, see A95-95358 through A95-95507.

  9. Stable Small Animal Mechanical Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.

    2011-11-08

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require 3D images to be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle, with no breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements result in long imaging times ({approx}90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, can gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward drift in peak inspiratory pressure or by changes in the pressure waveform and/or lung volume over the course of the experiment. We demonstrate highly repeatable mechanical ventilation in anesthetized rats over a long duration for pulmonary CT imaging throughout the dynamic breathing cycle. We describe significant updates to a basic commercial ventilator that was acquired for these experiments. Key to achieving consistent results was the implementation of periodic deep breaths, or sighs, of extended duration to maintain lung recruitment. In addition, continuous monitoring of breath-to-breath pressure and volume waveforms and long-term trends in peak inspiratory pressure and flow provide diagnostics of changes in breathing mechanics.

  10. Dynamic stall analysis of horizontal-axis-wind-turbine blades using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Mohamed A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Morgan, El-Sayed I.

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic stall has been widely known to significantly affect the performance of the wind turbines. In this paper, aerodynamic simulation of the unsteady low-speed flow past two-dimensional wind turbine blade profiles, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), will be performed. The aerodynamic simulation will be performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The governing equations used in the simulations are the Unsteady-Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The unsteady separated turbulent flow around an oscillating airfoil pitching in a sinusoidal pattern in the regime of low Reynolds number is investigated numerically. The investigation employs the URANS approach with the most suitable turbulence model. The development of the light dynamic stall of the blades under consideration is studied. The S809 blade profile is simulated at different mean wind speeds. Moreover, the S826 blade profile is also considered for analysis of wind turbine blade which is the most suitable blade profile for the wind conditions in Egypt over the site of Gulf of El-Zayt. In order to find the best oscillating frequency, different oscillating frequencies are studied. The best frequency can then be used for the blade pitch controller. The comparisons with the experimental results showed that the used CFD code can accurately predict the blade profile unsteady aerodynamic loads.

  11. Dynamic broadening of the crystal-fluid interface of colloidal hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Dullens, Roel P A; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Kegel, Willem K

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of the crystal-fluid interface of colloidal hard spheres in real space by confocal microscopy. Tuning the buoyancy of the particles allows us to study the interface close to and away from equilibrium. We find that the interface broadens from 8-9 particle diameters close to equilibrium to 15 particle diameters away from equilibrium. Furthermore, the interfacial velocity, i.e., the velocity by which the interface moves upwards, increases significantly. The increasing gravitational drive leads to supersaturation of the fluid above the crystal surface. This dramatically affects crystal nucleation and growth, resulting in the observed dynamic broadening of the crystal-fluid interface.

  12. Isomorphic classical molecular dynamics model for an excess electronin a supercritical fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Miller III, Thomas F.

    2008-08-04

    Ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) is used to directly simulate the dynamics of an excess electron in a supercritical fluid over a broad range of densities. The accuracy of the RPMD model is tested against numerically exact path integral statistics through the use of analytical continuation techniques. At low fluid densities, the RPMD model substantially underestimates the contribution of delocalized states to the dynamics of the excess electron. However, with increasing solvent density, the RPMD model improves, nearly satisfying analytical continuation constraints at densities approaching those of typical liquids. In the high density regime, quantum dispersion substantially decreases the self-diffusion of the solvated electron. In this regime where the dynamics of the electron is strongly coupled to the dynamics of the atoms in the fluid, trajectories that can reveal diffusive motion of the electron are long in comparison to {beta}{h_bar}.

  13. Spinning Up Interest: Classroom Demonstrations of Rotating Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurnou, J.

    2005-12-01

    The complex relationship between rotation and its effect on fluid motions presents some of the most difficult and vexing concepts for both undergraduate and graduate level students to learn. We have found that student comprehension is greatly increased by the presentation of in-class fluid mechanics experiments. A relatively inexpensive experimental set-up consists of the following components: a record player, a wireless camera placed in the rotating frame, a tank of fluid, and food coloring. At my poster, I will use this set-up to carry out demonstrations that illustrate the Taylor-Proudman theorem, flow within the Ekman layer, columnar convection, and flow around high and low pressure centers. By sending the output of the wireless camera through an LCD projection system, such demonstrations can be carried out even for classes in large lecture halls.

  14. Variational discretizations for the dynamics of fluid-conveying flexible tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2016-11-01

    We derive a variational approach for discretizing fluid-structure interactions, with a particular focus on the dynamics of fluid-conveying elastic tubes. Our method is based on a discretization of the fluid's back-to-labels map and a Lie group discretization of the tube's variables, coupled with an appropriately formulated discrete version of the fluid conservation law. This approach allows the development of geometric numerical schemes for the dynamics of fluid-conveying collapsible tubes, which preserve several intrinsic geometric properties of the continuous system, such as symmetries and symplecticity. In addition, our approach can also be used to derive simplified, but geometrically consistent, low-component models for further analytical and numerical analysis of the system. xml:lang="fr"

  15. Geophysical aspects of underground fluid dynamics and mineral transformation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khramchenkov, Maxim; Khramchenkov, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    The description of processes of mass exchange between fluid and poly-minerals material in porous media from various kinds of rocks (primarily, sedimentary rocks) have been examined. It was shown that in some important cases there is a storage equation of non-linear diffusion equation type. In addition, process of filtration in un-swelling soils, swelling porous rocks and coupled process of consolidation and chemical interaction between fluid and particles material were considered. In the latter case equations of physical-chemical mechanics of conservation of mass for fluid and particles material were used. As it is well known, the mechanics of porous media is theoretical basis of such branches of science as rock mechanics, soil physics and so on. But at the same moment some complex processes in the geosystems lacks full theoretical description. The example of such processes is metamorphosis of rocks and correspondent variations of stress-strain state. In such processes chemical transformation of solid and fluid components, heat release and absorption, phase transitions, rock destruction occurs. Extensive usage of computational resources in limits of traditional models of the mechanics of porous media cannot guarantee full correctness of obtained models and results. The process of rocks consolidation which happens due to filtration of underground fluids is described from the position of rock mechanics. As an additional impact, let us consider the porous media consolidating under the weight of overlying rock with coupled complex geological processes, as a continuous porous medium of variable mass. Problems of obtaining of correct storage equations for coupled processes of consolidation and mass exchange between underground fluid and skeleton material are often met in catagenesi processes description. The example of such processes is metamorphosis of rocks and correspondent variations of stress-strain state. In such processes chemical transformation of solid and fluid

  16. Interferometer and analysis methods for the in vitro characterization of dynamic fluid layers on contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, Brian C.; Greivenkamp, John E.

    2012-06-01

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye when wearing a contact lens is the thin fluid layer that forms on the surface of the contact lens. Under normal conditions, this fluid layer is less than 10 μm thick. The fluid layer thickness and topography change over time and are affected by the material properties of the contact lens and may affect vision quality and comfort. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed by use of a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. Quantitative analysis beyond typical contact angle or visual inspection methods is provided. Different fluid and contact lens material combinations have been evaluated, and variations in fluid layer properties have been observed. This paper discusses the interferometer design and analysis methods used. Example measurement results of different contact lens are presented.

  17. Technical Evaluation Report on the Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Aerodynamics of Hypersonic Lifting Vehicles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    review er’s kniowledige, the first t ime thlat tre rarisferai Ii ty of a major hvper-sonir- code has been evalu- ait ert tAPER? 32. HODGES ind WARDI ri i...PORTUGAL GERMANY Portuguese National Coordinator to AGARD Fachinformationszentrum Energie, Gabinete de Estudos e Programas Physik. Mathematik GmbH CLAFA...Karlsruhe Base de Alfragide D-754 Egentei-Lcooldhafn 2Alfragi eD-7S4 EgenseinLcooldsafei 22700 Amadora GREECE TRE Hellenic Air Force General Staff Milli

  18. Dissertation Defense Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional "validation by test only" mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis E.

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This proposal describes an approach to validate the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft. The research described here is absolutely cutting edge. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional"validation by test only'' mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computationaf Fluid Dynamics can be used to veritY these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. The proposed research project includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT and OPEN FOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid . . . Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around

  20. Dissertation Defense: Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional validation by test only mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions.Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations. This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions

  1. New developments in adaptive methods for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Bass, Jon M.

    1990-01-01

    New developments in a posteriori error estimates, smart algorithms, and h- and h-p adaptive finite element methods are discussed in the context of two- and three-dimensional compressible and incompressible flow simulations. Applications to rotor-stator interaction, rotorcraft aerodynamics, shock and viscous boundary layer interaction and fluid-structure interaction problems are discussed.

  2. Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Fluid Flow in Drosophila Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Canio, Gabriele; Goldstein, Raymond; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The biological world includes a broad range of phenomena in which transport in a fluid plays a central role. Among these is the fundamental issue of cell polarity arising during development, studied historically using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. The polarity of the oocyte is known to be induced by the translocation of mRNAs by kinesin motor proteins along a dense microtubule cytoskeleton, a process which also induces cytoplasmic streaming. Recent experimental observations have revealed the remarkable fluid-structure interactions that occur as the streaming flows back-react on the microtubules. In this work we use a combination of theory and simulations to address the interplay between the fluid flow and the configuration of cytoskeletal filaments leading to the directed motion inside the oocyte. We show in particular that the mechanical coupling between the fluid motion and the orientation of the microtubules can lead to a transition to coherent motion within the oocyte, as observed. Supported by EPSRC and ERC Advanced Investigator Grant 247333.

  3. Dynamic and wear study of an extremely bidisperse magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, G. R.; Fernández Ruiz-Morón, L.; Durán, J. D. G.; Delgado, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    In this work the friction and wear properties of five magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) with varying compositions are investigated. Considering that many of the proposed applications for these fluids involve lubricated contact between mobile metal-metal or polymer-metal parts, the relationship between MR response and wear behavior appears to be of fundamental importance. One of the fluids (MR#1) contains only the iron microparticles and base oil; the second and third ones (MR#2 and MR#3) contain an anti-wear additive as well. The fourth one (MR#4) is a well known commercial MRF. Finally, MR#5 is stabilized by dispersing the iron particles in a magnetite ferrofluid. The MR response of the latter fluid is better (higher yield stress and post-yield viscosity) than that of the others. More importantly, it remains (and even improves) after the wear test: the pressure applied in the four-ball apparatus produces a compaction of the magnetite layer around the iron microparticles. Additionally, the friction coefficient is larger, which seems paradoxical in principle, but can be explained by considering the stability of MR#5 in comparison to the other four MRs, which appear to undergo partial phase separation during the test. In fact, electron and optical microscope observations confirm a milder wear effect of MR#5, with almost complete absence of scars from the steel test spheres and homogeneous and shallow grooves on them. Comparatively, MR#2, MR#3 and, particularly, MR#1 produce a much more significant wear.

  4. 77 FR 64834 - Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... COMMISSION Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications AGENCY: Nuclear... Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications.'' The draft NUREG-2152 report provides best... can be controlled and quantified by the user are then discussed in detail, and best...

  5. Investigating the Dynamics of Supine Fluid Redistribution Within Multiple Body Segments Between Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Singh, B; Bradley, T Douglas

    2015-09-01

    While supine, fluid moves from the legs and accumulates in the chest and neck. However, patterns of rostral fluid shift are not clear. Furthermore, real-time measurement of neck fluid volume has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate the dynamics of rostral fluid shift in men and women. We developed a bioelectrical impedance system to measure leg, abdominal, thoracic and neck fluid volumes (LFV, AFV, TFV, NFV) continuously. Forty healthy non-obese adults (20 men) lay supine for 90 min while fluid volumes were measured. After 90 min, a similar volume of fluid shifted out of the legs in both sexes (p = 0.079), but men accumulated more fluid in their thorax (63 ± 6 vs. 44 ± 11 ml, p = 0.016) and neck (17 ± 2 vs. 14 ± 1 ml, p = 0.029) than women. In both sexes, the increase in NFV caused a significant increase in neck circumference, which was greater in men (p = 0.009). Furthermore, 80% of rostral fluid shift would occur in the first 2 h of lying supine. These results suggest that greater fluid shift into the thorax and neck may contribute to the higher prevalence of sleep apnea in men than in women.

  6. Dynamics of magnetic nano-flake vortices in Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazazzadeh, Nasim; Mohseni, Seyed Majid; Khavasi, Amin; Zibaii, Mohammad Ismail; Movahed, S. M. S.; Jafari, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational motion of nano-flake ferromagnetic disks suspended in a Newtonian fluid, as a potential material owing the vortex-like magnetic configuration. Using analytical expressions for hydrodynamic, magnetic and Brownian torques, the stochastic angular momentum equation is determined in the dilute limit conditions under applied magnetic field. Results are compared against experimental ones and excellent agreement is observed. We also estimate the uncertainty in the orientation of the disks due to the Brownian torque when an external magnetic field aligns them. Interestingly, this uncertainty is roughly proportional to the ratio of thermal energy of fluid to the magnetic energy stored in the disks. Our approach can be implemented in many practical applications including biotechnology and multi-functional fluidics.

  7. Agent-Based Chemical Plume Tracing Using Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarzhitsky, Dimitri; Spears, Diana; Thayer, David; Spears, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a rigorous evaluation of a novel, distributed chemical plume tracing algorithm. The algorithm is a combination of the best aspects of the two most popular predecessors for this task. Furthermore, it is based on solid, formal principles from the field of fluid mechanics. The algorithm is applied by a network of mobile sensing agents (e.g., robots or micro-air vehicles) that sense the ambient fluid velocity and chemical concentration, and calculate derivatives. The algorithm drives the robotic network to the source of the toxic plume, where measures can be taken to disable the source emitter. This work is part of a much larger effort in research and development of a physics-based approach to developing networks of mobile sensing agents for monitoring, tracking, reporting and responding to hazardous conditions.

  8. Spark Ignition: Effects of Fluid Dynamics and Electrode Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bane, Sally; Ziegler, Jack; Shepherd, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    The concept of minimum ignition energy (MIE) has traditionally formed the basis for studying ignition hazards of fuels, and standard test methods for determining the MIE use a capacitive spark discharge as the ignition source. Developing the numerical tools necessary to quantitatively predict ignition is a challenging research problem and remains primarily an experimental issue. In this work a two-dimensional model of spark discharge in air and spark ignition was developed using the non-reactive and reactive Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations were performed with three different electrode geometries to investigate the effect of the geometry on the fluid mechanics of the evolving spark kernel and on flame formation. The computational results were compared with high-speed schlieren visualization of spark and ignition kernels. It was found that the electrode geometry had a significant effect on the fluid motion following spark discharge and hence influences the ignition process and the required spark energy.

  9. Use of computational fluid dynamics in the design of dynamic contrast enhanced imaging phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Freed, Melanie; Myers, Matthew R.

    2013-09-01

    Phantoms for dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging modalities such as DCE computed tomography (DCE-CT) and DCE magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) are valuable tools for evaluating and comparing imaging systems. It is important for the contrast-agent distribution within the phantom to possess a time dependence that replicates a curve observed clinically, known as the ‘tumor-enhancement curve’. It is also important for the concentration field within the lesion to be as uniform as possible. This study demonstrates how computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be applied to achieve these goals within design constraints. The distribution of the contrast agent within the simulated phantoms was investigated in relation to the influence of three factors of the phantom design. First, the interaction between the inlets and the uniformity of the contrast agent within the phantom was modeled. Second, pumps were programmed using a variety of schemes and the resultant dynamic uptake curves were compared to tumor-enhancement curves obtained from clinical data. Third, the effectiveness of pulsing the inlet flow rate to produce faster equilibration of the contrast-agent distribution was quantified. The models employed a spherical lesion and design constraints (lesion diameter, inlet-tube size and orientation, contrast-agent flow rates and fluid properties) taken from a recently published DCE-MRI phantom study. For DCE-MRI in breast cancer detection, where the target tumor-enhancement curve varies on the scale of hundreds of seconds, optimizing the number of inlet tubes and their orientation was found to be adequate for attaining concentration uniformity and reproducing the target tumor-enhancement curve. For DCE-CT in liver tumor detection, where the tumor-enhancement curve varies on a scale of tens of seconds, the use of an iterated inlet condition (programmed into the pump) enabled the phantom to reproduce the target tumor-enhancement curve within a few per cent beyond about

  10. MR measurement of critical phase transition dynamics and supercritical fluid dynamics in capillary and porous media flow.

    PubMed

    Rassi, Erik M; Codd, Sarah L; Seymour, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluids (SCF) are useful solvents in green chemistry and oil recovery and are of great current interest in the context of carbon sequestration. Magnetic resonance techniques were applied to study near critical and supercritical dynamics for pump driven flow through a capillary and a packed bed porous media. Velocity maps and displacement propagators measure the dynamics of C(2)F(6) at pressures below, at, and above the critical pressure and at temperatures below and above the critical temperature. Displacement propagators were measured at various displacement observation times to quantify the time evolution of dynamics. In capillary flow, the critical phase transition fluid C(2)F(6) showed increased compressibility compared to the near critical gas and supercritical fluid. These flows exhibit large variations in buoyancy arising from large changes in density due to very small changes in temperature.

  11. Fluid patterns and dynamics induced by vibrations in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana

    Understanding the effects of vibrations is extremely important in microgravity environments where residual acceleration, or g-jitter, is easily generated by crew manoeuvring or machinery, and can have a significant impact on material processing systems and on-board experiments. Indeed, vibrations can dramatically affect fluid behaviour whether gravity is present or not, inducing instability in some cases while suppressing it in others. We will describe the results of investigations being conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluids interfaces, most notably with the forcing oriented parallel to the fluid surface. Pattern formation properties will be described in detail, and the importance of symmetry constraints and mean flows will be considered. Current exper-imental results are intriguing and have challenged existing assumptions in the field, particularly with regard to the parametric instability underlying subharmonic cross-waves. They suggest an intimate connection between Faraday waves, which are observed in vertically vibrated systems, and cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems. Concurrent theoretical work, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, will then be described. Finally, this research will be placed in a microgravity context and used to motivate the defini-tion of a proposed set of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments would be in the large-aspect-ratio-limit, requiring relatively high frequency but low amplitude vibrations, where comparatively little microgravity research has been done. The interest of such a microgravity experiment will be discussed, with emphasis on fluid management and the potential of vibrations to act as a kind of artificial gravity by orienting surfaces (or density contours) perpendicular to the axis of vibration.

  12. Fluid dynamics in explosive volcanic vents and craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Darcy

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic jets can transition to buoyant plumes or collapse to form pyroclastic density currents depending on their ability to entrain and heat the ambient air. Recent one-dimensional (1D) analysis shows that fluid acceleration through volcanic vents and craters changes the velocity and pressures within these jets sufficiently enough to be a first order control on plume dimensions and therefore air entrainment and column stability (Koyaguchi et al., 2010). These 1D studies are only applicable to craters and vents with angles of less than about 30° to vertical. Using analytical formulations and numerical simulations, this study describes 2D effects of shallowly dipping vents and craters on volcanic eruptions. The effect of vents on acceleration and expansion of eruptive mixtures of ash and gas is described as a force imparted on the fluid by the vent wall, the wall force ( Fw). This force is a measure of the momentum coupling between an eruption and the solid earth that takes place in the vent. Rapid divergence of supersonic eruptive fluid within shallowly dipping vents occurs via Prandtl-Meyer expansion, which results in different pressure and velocity fields than those predicted by 1D analysis. This expansion decreases Fw and the vertical acceleration experienced by the eruptive fluid in the vent. For jets predicted by 1D analysis to exit the vent at supersonic velocities and at atmospheric pressure, this decrease in Fw will cause an increase in the predicted plume area, decreasing column stability. The complex 2D shape of volcanic vents can change jet structure (presence and location of shock waves) and preclude the development of jets that exit the vent supersonically with no internal standing shock waves (i.e., perfectly expanded or pressure balanced jets). These significant complications in jet structure and increase in plume radius may result in changes to air entrainment, plume stability, and tephra distribution.

  13. The fluid dynamics of xenocryst formation in mafic enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Paul; Blundy, Jon; Cashman, Katharine; Huppert, Herbert; Mader, Heidy

    2014-05-01

    Mafic enclaves produced by the mingling of felsic and mafic magmas commonly contain xenocrysts; crystals akin to those in the felsic host. These crystals are interpreted as having crossed the interface between the two magmas at some stage during the rock evolution. An understanding of the physical conditions that allow this exchange would give insight into the state of the system at the time of assimilation, providing information about the magmatic history of the rock. Using both numerical models and analogue experiments, the low Reynolds number gravitational settling of spheres on to fluid-fluid interfaces is studied as an analogue to this problem. Theoretical treatment suggests that whether or not a particle sinks or floats at an interface depends on four dimensionless parameters; Bond number, the viscosity ratio, a modified density ratio and the contact angle. Spheres are allowed to settle onto an interface for different values of the dimensionless groups and the behavioural regime boundaries are determined. Experimentally this consists of dropping spheres of varying radii and density onto an interface between two density stratified fluids (silicon oil and polyethylene glycol solution), both of which are lighter than the sphere. The spheres are sputter coated in gold to ensure a constant surface interaction. The numerical models are used to validate these results and apply them in geologic settings. Early results suggest that the presence of even a small interfacial tension between the two magmas is sufficient to inhibit the passage of crystals across interfaces in magmatic systems. An interesting feature of note in mafic enclaves is that the xenocrysts often occur in clusters. This can be compared with observations from the analogue experiments where 6mm nylon spheres were dropped onto the fluid interface. Although the spheres are light and small enough to individually be supported by the interface, the successive addition of spheres leads to the formation of

  14. Mitral valve dynamics in structural and fluid-structure interaction models.

    PubMed

    Lau, K D; Diaz, V; Scambler, P; Burriesci, G

    2010-11-01

    Modelling and simulation of heart valves is a challenging biomechanical problem due to anatomical variability, pulsatile physiological pressure loads and 3D anisotropic material behaviour. Current valvular models based on the finite element method can be divided into: those that do model the interaction between the blood and the valve (fluid-structure interaction or 'wet' models) and those that do not (structural models or 'dry' models). Here an anatomically sized model of the mitral valve has been used to compare the difference between structural and fluid-structure interaction techniques in two separately simulated scenarios: valve closure and a cardiac cycle. Using fluid-structure interaction, the valve has been modelled separately in a straight tubular volume and in a U-shaped ventricular volume, in order to analyse the difference in the coupled fluid and structural dynamics between the two geometries. The results of the structural and fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the stress distribution in the closure simulation is similar in all the models, but the magnitude and closed configuration differ. In the cardiac cycle simulation significant differences in the valvular dynamics were found between the structural and fluid-structure interaction models due to difference in applied pressure loads. Comparison of the fluid domains of the fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the ventricular geometry generates slower fluid velocity with increased vorticity compared to the tubular geometry. In conclusion, structural heart valve models are suitable for simulation of static configurations (opened or closed valves), but in order to simulate full dynamic behaviour fluid-structure interaction models are required.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Brian; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-01-01

    Cine-phase-contrast-MRI was used to measure the three-dimensional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow field inside the central nervous system (CNS) of a healthy subject. Image reconstruction and grid generation tools were then used to develop a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model of the CSF flow inside the CNS. The CSF spaces were discretized using the finite-element method and the constitutive equations for fluid and solid motion solved in ADINA-FSI 8.6. Model predictions of CSF velocity magnitude and stroke volume were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. CSF pressure gradients and amplitudes were computed in all regions of the CNS. The computed pressure gradients and amplitudes closely match values obtained clinically. The highest pressure amplitude of 77 Pa was predicted to occur in the lateral ventricles. The pressure gradient between the lateral ventricles and the lumbar region of the spinal canal did not exceed 132 Pa (~1 mmHg) at any time during the cardiac cycle. The pressure wave speed in the spinal canal was predicted and found to agree closely with values previously reported in the literature. Finally, the forward and backward motion of the CSF in the ventricles was visualized, revealing the complex mixing patterns in the CSF spaces. The mathematical model presented in this article is a prerequisite for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationships among vasculature pulsations, CSF flow, and CSF pressure waves in the CNS.

  16. Dynamic reversibility of hydrodynamic focusing for recycling sheath fluid.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Nastaran; Howell, Peter B; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2010-08-07

    The phenomenon of "unmixing" has been demonstrated in microfluidic mixers, but here we manipulate laminar flow streams back to their original positions in order to extend the operational utility of an analytical device where no mixing is desired. Using grooves in the channel wall, we passively focus a sample stream with two sheath streams to center it in a microchannel for optical analysis. Even though the sample stream is completely surrounded by sheath fluid, reversing the orientation of the grooves in the channel walls returns the sample stream to its original position with respect to the sheath streams. We demonstrate the separation of the sample stream from the contiguous sheath streams and the recycling of the sheath fluid using the reversibility of laminar flow. Polystyrene microspheres and fluorescent dye were used to quantify the performance of the unsheathing process. We found that the maximum numbers of microspheres and all of the fluorescent dye were recaptured at sheath recycling levels <92%. The use of this sheathing technique has previously been demonstrated in a sensitive microflow cytometer; the unsheathing capability now provides the opportunity to recover particles from the sensor with minimal dilution or to recycle the sheath fluid for long-term unattended operation.

  17. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: lava or mud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We have identified an enigmatic flow in S.W. Cerberus Fossae, Mars. The flow originates from an almost circular pit within a remnant of a yardang at 0.58 degrees N, 155.28 degrees E, within the lower unit of the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow is ~42 km long and 0.5 to 2.0 km wide. The surface textures of the resulting deposit show that the material flowed in such a way that the various deformation patterns on its surface were generally preserved as it moved, only being distorted or disrupted when the flow encountered major topographic obstacles or was forced to make rapid changes of direction. This observation of a stiff, generally undeformed surface layer overlying a relatively mobile base suggests that, while it was moving, the fluid material flowed in a laminar, and possibly non-Newtonian, fashion. The least-complicated non-Newtonian fluids are Bingham plastics. On this basis we use measurements of flow width, length, thickness and substrate slope obtained from images, a DEM constructed from stereo pairs of Context Camera (CTX) images, and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) altimetry points to deduce the rheological properties of the fluid, treating it as both a Newtonian and a Bingham material for comparison. The Newtonian option requires the fluid to have a viscosity close to 100 Pa s and to have flowed everywhere in a turbulent fashion. The Bingham option requires laminar flow, a plastic viscosity close to 1 Pa s, and a yield strength of ~185 Pa. We compare these parameters values with those of various environmental fluids on Earth in an attempt to narrow the range of possible materials forming the martian flow. A mafic to ultramafic lava would fit the Newtonian option but the required turbulence does not seem consistent with the surface textures. The Bingham option satisfies the morphological constraint of laminar motion if the material is a mud flow consisting of ~40% water and ~60% silt-sized silicate solids. Elsewhere on Mars, deposits with similar

  18. Influence of mechanical rock properties and fracture healing rate on crustal fluid flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel; de Riese, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow in the Earth's crust is very slow over extended periods of time, during which it occurs within the connected pore space of rocks. If the fluid production rate exceeds a certain threshold, matrix permeability alone is insufficient to drain the fluid volume and fluid pressure builds up, thereby reducing the effective stress supported by the rock matrix. Hydraulic fractures form once the effective pressure exceeds the tensile strength of the rock matrix and act subsequently as highly effective fluid conduits. Once local fluid pressure is sufficiently low again, flow ceases and fractures begin to heal. Since fluid flow is controlled by the alternation of fracture permeability and matrix permeability, the flow rate in the system is strongly discontinuous and occurs in intermittent pulses. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and subsequent healing of hydraulic fractures depends on the local fluid pressure and on the time-span between fluid pulses. We simulate this process with a computer model and describe the resulting dynamics statistically. Special interest is given to a) the spatially and temporally discontinuous formation and closure of fractures and fracture networks and b) the total flow rate over time. The computer model consists of a crustal-scale dual-porosity setup. Control parameters are the pressure- and time-dependent fracture healing rate, and the strength and the permeability of the intact rock. Statistical analysis involves determination of the multifractal properties and of the power spectral density of the temporal development of the total drainage rate and hydraulic fractures. References Bons, P. D. (2001). The formation of large quartz veins by rapid ascent of fluids in mobile hydrofractures. Tectonophysics, 336, 1-17. Miller, S. a., & Nur, A. (2000). Permeability as a toggle switch in fluid-controlled crustal processes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 183(1-2), 133-146. Sachau, T., Bons, P. D

  19. Viscous dissipation in 2D fluid dynamics as a symplectic process and its metriplectic representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blender, Richard; Badin, Gualtiero

    2017-03-01

    Dissipation can be represented in Hamiltonian mechanics in an extended phase space as a symplectic process. The method uses an auxiliary variable which represents the excitation of unresolved dynamics and a Hamiltonian for the interaction between the resolved dynamics and the auxiliary variable. This method is applied to viscous dissipation (including hyper-viscosity) in a two-dimensional fluid, for which the dynamics is non-canonical. We derive a metriplectic representation and suggest a measure for the entropy of the system.

  20. Overview of Fluid Dynamics Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa W.; Wang, Ten-See

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has had the need to maintain and advance state-of-the-art flow analysis and cold-flow testing capability to support its roles and missions. This overview discusses the recent organizational changes that have occurred at MSFC with emphasis on the resulting three groups that form the core of fluid dynamics expertise at MSFC: the Fluid Physics and Dynamics Group, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, and the Experimental Fluid Dynamics Group. Recently completed activities discussed include the analysis and flow testing in support of the Fastrac engine design, the X-33 vehicle design, and the X34 propulsion system design. Ongoing activities include support of the RLV vehicle design, Liquid Fly Back Booster aerodynamic configuration definition, and RLV focused technologies development. Other ongoing activities discussed are efforts sponsored by the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to develop an advanced incompressible flow code and to develop optimization techniques. Recently initiated programs and their anticipated required fluid dynamics support are discussed. Based on recent experiences and on the anticipated program needs, required analytical and experimental technique improvements are presented. Due to anticipated budgetary constraints, there is a strong need to leverage activities and to pursue teaming arrangements in order to advance the state-of-the-art and to adequately support concept development. Throughout this overview there is discussion of the lessons learned and of the capabilities demonstrated and established in support of the hardware development programs.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics vs. inverse dynamics methods to determine passive drag in two breaststroke glide positions.

    PubMed

    Costa, L; Mantha, V R; Silva, A J; Fernandes, R J; Marinho, D A; Vilas-Boas, J P; Machado, L; Rouboa, A

    2015-07-16

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) plays an important role to quantify, understand and "observe" the water movements around the human body and its effects on drag (D). We aimed to investigate the flow effects around the swimmer and to compare the drag and drag coefficient (CD) values obtained from experiments (using cable velocimetry in a swimming pool) with those of CFD simulations for the two ventral gliding positions assumed during the breaststroke underwater cycle (with shoulders flexed and upper limbs extended above the head-GP1; with shoulders in neutral position and upper limbs extended along the trunk-GP2). Six well-trained breaststroke male swimmers (with reasonable homogeneity of body characteristics) participated in the experimental tests; afterwards a 3D swimmer model was created to fit within the limits of the sample body size profile. The standard k-ε turbulent model was used to simulate the fluid flow around the swimmer model. Velocity ranged from 1.30 to 1.70 m/s for GP1 and 1.10 to 1.50 m/s for GP2. Values found for GP1 and GP2 were lower for CFD than experimental ones. Nevertheless, both CFD and experimental drag/drag coefficient values displayed a tendency to jointly increase/decrease with velocity, except for GP2 CD where CFD and experimental values display opposite tendencies. Results suggest that CFD values obtained by single model approaches should be considered with caution due to small body shape and dimension differences to real swimmers. For better accuracy of CFD studies, realistic individual 3D models of swimmers are required, and specific kinematics respected.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cold plasma carrier gas injected into a fluid using level set method.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Yu, K N

    2015-12-14

    A promising application of plasma medicine is to treat living cells and tissues with cold plasma. In cold plasmas, the fraction of neutrals dominates, so the carrier gas could be considered the main component. In many realistic situations, the treated cells are covered by a fluid. The present paper developed models to determine the temperature of the fluid at the positions of the treated cells. Specifically, the authors developed a three-phase-interaction model which was coupled with heat transfer to examine the injection of the helium carrier gas into water and to investigate both the fluid dynamics and heat transfer output variables, such as temperature, in three phases, i.e., air, helium gas, and water. Our objective was to develop a model to perform complete fluid dynamics and heat transfer computations to determine the temperature at the surface of living cells. Different velocities and plasma temperatures were also investigated using finite element method, and the model was built using the comsol multiphysics software. Using the current model to simulate plasma injection into such systems, the authors were able to investigate the temperature distributions in the domain, as well as the surface and bottom boundary of the medium in which cells were cultured. The temperature variations were computed at small time intervals to analyze the temperature increase in cell targets that could be highly temperature sensisitve. Furthermore, the authors were able to investigate the volume of the plasma plume and its effects on the average temperature of the medium layer/domain. Variables such as temperature and velocity at the cell layer could be computed, and the variations due to different plume sizes could be determined. The current models would be very useful for future design of plasma medicine devices and procedures involving cold plasmas.

  3. Viscous-elastic dynamics of power-law fluids within an elastic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Amir; Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran

    2016-11-01

    We study the fluid-structure interaction dynamics of non-Newtonian flow through a slender linearly elastic cylinder at the creeping flow regime. Specifically, considering power-law fluids and applying the thin shell approximation for the elastic cylinder, we obtain a non-homogeneous p-Laplacian equation governing the viscous-elastic dynamics. We obtain exact solutions for the pressure and deformation fields for various initial and boundary conditions, for both shear thinning and shear thickening fluids. In particular, impulse or a step in inlet pressure yield self-similar solutions, which exhibit a compactly supported propagation front solely for shear thinning fluids. Applying asymptotic expansions, we provide approximations for weakly non-Newtonian behavior showing good agreement with the exact solutions sufficiently far from the front.

  4. Software Design Strategies for Multidisciplinary Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    fuselage. The NSU3D flow solver provides two options for such modeling of boundary-layer turbulence . The first is a single-equation Spalart - Allmaras ...Analysis,” AIAA Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 36, No. 6, 1999, pp. 987-998. [14] Spalart , P. R., and S. R. Allmaras , S., “A One-equation Turbulence ...applications [12,13]. The NSU3D discretization scheme employs a second-order accurate vertex-based approach, which stores the unknown fluid and turbulence

  5. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, 3-D, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  6. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, three-dimensional, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  7. A Computer Program for Consolidation and Dynamic Response Analysis of Fluid-Saturated Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Codes Avail and/or Geotechnical Engineering Report No. 14 Dist I Special The Ohio State University Research Foundation 1314 Kinnear Road, Columbus, Ohio...CONSOLIDATION AND DYNAMIC RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF FLUID-SATURATED MEDIA Ranbir S. Sandhu, B. Aboustit, S. J. Hong and M. S. Hiremath Department of Civil Engineering ...RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF FLUID-SATURATED MEDIA By Ranbir S. Sandhu, B. Aboustit, S. J. Hong and M. S. Hiremath Department of Civil Engineering June 1984 Acce

  8. Dynamic stability of a spinning tube conveying a fluid through a symmetrical noncircular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    When a fluid flows inside a tube, the deformations of the tube can interact with the fluid flowing within it and these dynamic interactions can result in significant lateral motions of the tube and the flowing fluid. The purpose of this report is to examine the dynamic stability of a spinning tube through which an incompressible frictionless fluid is flowing. The tube can be considered as either a hollow beam or a hollow cable. The analytical results can be applied to spinning or stationary tubes through which fluids are transferred; e.g., liquid coolants, fuels and lubricants, slurry solutions, and high explosives in paste form. The coupled partial differential equations are determined for the lateral motion of a spinning Bernoulli-Euler beam or a spinning cable carrying an incompressible flowing fluid. The beam, which spins about an axis parallel to its longitudinal axis and which can also be loaded by a constant axial force, is straight, uniform, simply supported, and rests on a massless, uniform elastic foundation that spins with the beam. Damping for the beam and foundation is considered by using a combined uniform viscous damping coefficient. The fluid, in addition to being incompressible, is frictionless, has a constant density, and flows at a constant speed relative to the longitudinal beam axis. The Galerkin method is used to reduce the coupled partial differential equations for the lateral motion of the spinning beam to a coupled set of 2N, second order, ordinary differential equations for the generalized beam coordinates. By simplifying these equations and examining the roots of the characteristic equation, an analytical solution is obtained for the lateral dynamic instability of the beam (or cable). The analytical solutions determined the minimum critical fluid speed and the critical spin speeds, for a specified fluid speed, in terms of the physical parameters of the system.

  9. Porphyry-copper ore shells form at stable pressure-temperature fronts within dynamic fluid plumes.

    PubMed

    Weis, P; Driesner, T; Heinrich, C A

    2012-12-21

    Porphyry-type ore deposits are major resources of copper and gold, precipitated from fluids expelled by crustal magma chambers. The metals are typically concentrated in confined ore shells within vertically extensive vein networks, formed through hydraulic fracturing of rock by ascending fluids. Numerical modeling shows that dynamic permeability responses to magmatic fluid expulsion can stabilize a front of metal precipitation at the boundary between lithostatically pressured up-flow of hot magmatic fluids and hydrostatically pressured convection of cooler meteoric fluids. The balance between focused heat advection and lateral cooling controls the most important economic characteristics, including size, shape, and ore grade. This self-sustaining process may extend to epithermal gold deposits, venting at active volcanoes, and regions with the potential for geothermal energy production.

  10. Local thermomagnonic torques in two-fluid spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flebus, Benedetta; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Duine, Rembert A.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-12-01

    We develop a general phenomenology describing the interplay between coherent and incoherent dynamics in ferromagnetic insulators. Using the Onsager reciprocity and Neumann's principle, we derive expressions for the local thermomagnonic torques exerted by thermal magnons on the order-parameter dynamics and the reciprocal pumping processes, which are in close analogy to the spin-transfer torque and the spin pumping at metallic interfaces. Our formalism is applicable to general long-wavelength dynamics and, although here we explicitly focus on ferromagnetic insulators possessing U(1) symmetry, our approach can be easily extended to other classes of magnetic materials. As an illustrative example, we apply our theory to investigate a domain wall floating over a spin superfluid, whose dynamics are triggered thermally at the system's edge. Our results demonstrate that the local pumping of coherent spin dynamics by a thermal magnon gas offers an alternative route—with no need for conducting components and thus devoid of ohmic losses—for the control and manipulation of topological solitons.

  11. Dynamic performance of a disk-type magnetorheological fluid damper under AC excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changsheng

    2005-02-01

    It is shown that the dynamic behaviour of a disk-type magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper developed on shear mode for rotational machinery can be controlled by application of an external DC magnetic field produced by a low voltage electromagnetic coil and that the disk-type MR fluid damper can effectively attenuate the rotor vibration. In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of the disk-type MR fluid damper for attenuating rotor vibration under AC sinusoidal magnetic field is experimentally studied on a flexible rotor. It is shown that as the frequency of applied AC sinusoidal magnetic field increases, the capability of the disk-type MR fluid damper to attenuate rotor vibration significantly reduces. There is a maximum frequency of AC sinusoidal magnetic field for a given applied magnetic field strength to realize the MR effect. When the frequency of AC sinusoidal magnetic field is over the maximum frequency, the MR activity almost completely disappears and the dynamic behaviour of the disk-type MR fluid dampers under a high frequency AC magnetic field is the same as that without magnetic field. For a given sinusoidal magnetic field frequency, there is also a minimum AC sinusoidal magnetic field to active the MR effect. In the rotor vibration control of view, it is not necessary to use the AC power supply for disk-type MR fluid dampers.

  12. Collective dynamics of chemically active particles trapped at a fluid interface.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alvaro; Malgaretti, P; Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S

    2016-10-12

    Chemically active colloids generate changes in the chemical composition of their surrounding solution and thereby induce flows in the ambient fluid which affect their dynamical evolution. Here we study the many-body dynamics of a monolayer of spherically symmetric active particles trapped at a fluid-fluid interface. To this end we consider a model for the large-scale spatial distribution of particles which incorporates the direct pair interaction (including also the capillary interaction which is caused specifically by the interfacial trapping) as well as the effect of hydrodynamic interactions (including the Marangoni flow induced by the response of the interface to the chemical activity). The values of the relevant physical parameters for typical experimental realizations of such systems are estimated and various scenarios, which are predicted by our approach for the dynamics of the monolayer, are discussed. In particular, we show that the chemically-induced Marangoni flow can prevent the clustering instability driven by the capillary attraction.

  13. Effect of cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of fluid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Heiss, Arno; Salditt, Tim; Katsaras, John; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the effect of 5 and 40 mol% cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of phospholipid membranes. By measuring the excitation spectrum at several lateral q || values (up to q || = 3 1), complete dispersion curves were determined of gel, fluid and liquid-ordered phase bilayers. The inclusion of cholesterol had a distinct effect on the collective dynamics of the bilayer s hydrocarbon chains; specifically, we observed a pronounced stiffening of the membranes on the nanometer length scale in both gel and fluid bilayers, even though they were experiencing a higher degree of molecular disorder. Also, for the first time we determined the nanoscale dynamics in the high-cholesterol liquid-ordered phase of bilayers containing cholesterol. Namely, this phase appears to be softer than fluid bilayers, but better ordered than bilayers in the gel phase.

  14. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Techniques: Implications and Opportunities for Fluid Dynamics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    1999-01-01

    A challenge for the fluid dynamics community is to adapt to and exploit the trend towards greater multidisciplinary focus in research and technology. The past decade has witnessed substantial growth in the research field of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). MDO is a methodology for the design of complex engineering systems and subsystems that coherently exploits the synergism of mutually interacting phenomena. As evidenced by the papers, which appear in the biannual AIAA/USAF/NASA/ISSMO Symposia on Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, the MDO technical community focuses on vehicle and system design issues. This paper provides an overview of the MDO technology field from a fluid dynamics perspective, giving emphasis to suggestions of specific applications of recent MDO technologies that can enhance fluid dynamics research itself across the spectrum, from basic flow physics to full configuration aerodynamics.

  15. Contact line dynamics of electroosmotic flows of incompressible binary fluid system with density and viscosity contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Pranab Kumar; DasGupta, Debabrata; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    We consider electrically driven dynamics of an incompressible binary fluid, with contrasting densities and viscosities of the two phases, flowing through narrow fluidic channel with walls with predefined surface wettabilities. Through phase field formalism, we describe the interfacial kinetics in the presence of electro-hydrodynamic coupling and address the contact line dynamics of the two-fluid system. We unveil the interplay of the substrate wettability and the contrast in the fluid properties culminating in the forms of two distinct regimes—interface breakup regime and a stable interface regime. Through a parametric study, we demarcate the effect of the density and viscosity contrasts along with the electrokinetic parameters such as the surface charge and ionic concentration on the underlying contact-line-dynamics over interfacial scales.

  16. The Direction of Fluid Dynamics for Liquid Propulsion at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    2012-01-01

    The Fluid Dynamics Branch's (ER42) at MSFC mission is to support NASA and other customers with discipline expertise to enable successful accomplishment of program/project goals. The branch is responsible for all aspects of the discipline of fluid dynamics, analysis and testing, applied to propulsion or propulsion-induced loads and environments, which includes the propellant delivery system, combustion devices, coupled systems, and launch and separation events. ER42 supports projects from design through development, and into anomaly and failure investigations. ER42 is committed to continually improving the state-of-its-practice to provide accurate, effective, and timely fluid dynamics assessments and in extending the state-of-the-art of the discipline.

  17. Fluid epitaxialization effect on velocity dependence of dynamic contact angle in molecular scale.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takahiro; Hirata, Yosuke; Kukita, Yutaka

    2010-02-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the effect of epitaxial ordering of the fluid molecules on the microscopic dynamic contact angle. The simulations were performed in a Couette-flow-like geometry where two immiscible fluids were confined between two parallel walls moving in opposite directions. The extent of ordering was varied by changing the number density of the wall particles. As the ordering becomes more evident, the change in the dynamic contact angle tends to be more sensitive to the increase in the relative velocity of the contact line to the wall. Stress components around the contact line is evaluated in order to examine the stress balance among the hydrodynamic stresses (viscous stress and pressure), the deviation of Young's stress from the static equilibrium condition, and the fluid-wall shear stress induced by the relative motion between them. It is shown that the magnitude of the shear stress on the fluid-wall surface is the primary contribution to the sensitivity of the dynamic contact angle and that the sensitivity is intensified by the fluid ordering near the wall surface.

  18. The Direct Effect of Flexible Walls on Fontan Connection Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tree, Mike; Fagan, Kiley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-11-01

    The current standard treatment for sufferers of congenital heart defects is the palliative Fontan procedure. The Fontan procedure results in an anastomosis of major veins directly to the branched pulmonary arteries bypassing the dysfunctional ventricle. This total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) extends life past birth, but Fontan patients still suffer long-term complications like decreased exercise capacity, protein-losing enteropathy, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). These complications have direct ties to fluid dynamics within the connection. Previous experimental and computation studies of Fontan connection fluid dynamics employed rigid vessel models. More recent studies utilize flexible models, but a direct comparison of the fundamental fluid dynamics between rigid and flexible vessels only exists for a computational model, without a direct experimental validation. Thus, this study was a direct comparison of fluid dynamics within a rigid and two compliant idealized TCPCs. 2D particle image velocimetry measurements were collected at the connection center plane. Results include power loss, hepatic flow distribution, fluid shear stress, and flow structure recognition. The effect of flexible walls on these values and clinical impact will be discussed.

  19. Interdisciplinary Research and Training at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    UCSD Willem Malkus Department of Mathematics, MIT Philip Morrison Physics Department, University of Texas at Austin Antonello Provenzale...34 Jeffrey Weiss (U. Colorado) and Edgar Knobloch (U. Calif. Berkeley) shared the principal lecture duties. Their lectures were on “Dynamics of Coherent

  20. Fluid Dynamics Prize Lecture: The Micromechanics of Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John F.

    2012-11-01

    What do corn starch, swimming spermatozoa, DNA and self-assembling nanoparticles have in common? They are all (or can be modeled as) ``particles'' dispersed in a continuum suspending fluid where hydrodynamic interactions compete with thermal (Brownian) and interparticle forces to set structure and determine properties. These systems are ``soft'' as compared to molecular systems largely because their number density is much less and their time scales much longer than atomic or molecular systems. In this talk I will describe the common framework for modeling these diverse systems and the essential features that any hydrodynamic modeling must incorporate in order to capture the correct behavior. Actually computing the hydrodynamics in an accurate and efficient manner is the real challenge, and I will illustrate past successes and current efforts with examples drawn from the diffusion and rheology of colloids to the ``swimming'' of catalytic nanomotors.

  1. Analysis of Drafting Effects in Swimming Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Silva, António José; Rouboa, Abel; Moreira, António; Reis, Victor Machado; Alves, Francisco; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Marinho, Daniel Almeida

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of drafting distance on the drag coefficient in swimming. A k-epsilon turbulent model was implemented in the commercial code Fluent® and applied to the fluid flow around two swimmers in a drafting situation. Numerical simulations were conducted for various distances between swimmers (0.5-8.0 m) and swimming velocities (1.6-2.0 m.s-1). Drag coefficient (Cd) was computed for each one of the distances and velocities. We found that the drag coefficient of the leading swimmer decreased as the flow velocity increased. The relative drag coefficient of the back swimmer was lower (about 56% of the leading swimmer) for the smallest inter-swimmer distance (0.5 m). This value increased progressively until the distance between swimmers reached 6.0 m, where the relative drag coefficient of the back swimmer was about 84% of the leading swimmer. The results indicated that the Cd of the back swimmer was equal to that of the leading swimmer at distances ranging from 6.45 to 8. 90 m. We conclude that these distances allow the swimmers to be in the same hydrodynamic conditions during training and competitions. Key pointsThe drag coefficient of the leading swimmer decreased as the flow velocity increased.The relative drag coefficient of the back swimmer was least (about 56% of the leading swimmer) for the smallest inter-swimmer distance (0.5 m).The drag coefficient values of both swimmers in drafting were equal to distances ranging between 6.45 m and 8.90 m, considering the different flow velocities.The numerical simulation techniques could be a good approach to enable the analysis of the fluid forces around objects in water, as it happens in swimming. PMID:24150135

  2. Fluid dynamics of active heterogeneities in a mantle plume conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, C. G.; Limare, A.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations indicate that the flow of a purely thermal plume preserves the azimuthal zonation of the source region, thus providing a framework to attribute a deep origin to the isotopic zonation of Hawaiian lavas. However, previous studies were limited to passive heterogeneities not affecting the flow. We go beyond this simplification by considering active heterogeneities which are compositionally denser, or more viscous, and we address the following questions: (1) How do active heterogeneities modify the axially symmetric velocity field of the plume conduit? (2) Under which conditions is the azimuthal zonation of the source region no longer preserved in the plume stem? (3) How do active heterogeneities deform during upwelling and what is their shape once at sublithospheric depths? We conducted both laboratory experiments, using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to calculate the velocity field, and high resolution three-dimensional simulations where millions of tracers keep track of the heterogeneous fluid. For compositionally denser heterogeneities we cover a range of buoyancy ratios 0fluid and η is viscosity. The initial heterogeneity has the arbitrary shape of a sphere and we vary its volume and its distance from the plume axis. We find that by increasing λ, the shape of the heterogeneity changes from filament-like to blob-like characterized by internal rotation and little stretching. By increasing B the heterogeneity tends to spread at the base of the plume stem and to rise as a tendril close to the axis, so that the initial zonation may be poorly preserved. We also find that the plume velocity field can be profoundly modified by active heterogeneities, and we explore the relation between strain rates and the evolving shape of the upwelling heterogeneity.

  3. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  4. A dynamic model of valveless micropumps with a fluid damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, T. X.; Ogami, Y.

    2011-11-01

    A simple fluid-diaphragm coupling model for studying the dynamic performance of valveless micropumps is presented. The model includes fluid inertia and a squeeze film effect by solving the coupling equation simultaneously with the Reynolds equation. The model is validated with a valveless diffuser micropump actuated by either a piezoelectric or electromagnetic diaphragm. The performance of the pump is considered for pumping liquid and air. The resonant frequency and dynamic performance of the micropumps obtained by the model are in good agreement with the experimental data. The model can predict well the damping behavior of the pump.

  5. Fluid Dynamics and Solidification of Molten Solder Droplets Impacting on a Substrate in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megardis, C. M.; Poulikakos, D.; Diversiev, G.; Boomsma, K.; Xiong, B.; Nayagam, V.

    1999-01-01

    This program investigates the fluid dynamics and simultaneous solidification of molten solder droplets impacting on a flat smooth substrate. The problem of interest is directly relevant to the printing of microscopic solder droplets in surface mounting of microelectronic devices. The study consists of a theoretical and an experimental component. The theoretical work uses axisymmetric Navier-Stokes models based on finite element techniques. The experimental work will be ultimately performed in microgravity in order to allow for the use of larger solder droplets which make feasible the performance of accurate measurements, while maintaining similitude of the relevant fluid dynamics groups (Re, We).

  6. Fluid Dynamics and Solidification of Molten Solder Droplets Impacting on a Substrate in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulikakos, Dimos; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Vedha-Nayagam, M.

    1996-01-01

    This program investigates the fluid dynamics and simultaneous solidification of molten solder droplets impacting on a flat substrate. The problem of interest is directly relevant to the printing of microscopic solder droplets in surface mounting of microelectronic devices. The study consists of a theoretical and an experimental component. The theoretical work uses axisymmetric Navier-Stokes models based on finite element techniques. The experimental work is performed in microgravity to allow for the use of larger solder droplets that make feasible the performance of accurate measurements while maintaining similitude of the relevant fluid dynamics groups (Re, We) and keeping the effect of gravity negligible.

  7. Stochastic Hard-Sphere Dynamics for Hydrodynamics of Non-Ideal Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A; Alder, B J; Garcia, A L

    2008-02-26

    A novel stochastic fluid model is proposed with a nonideal structure factor consistent with compressibility, and adjustable transport coefficients. This stochastic hard-sphere dynamics (SHSD) algorithm is a modification of the direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm and has several computational advantages over event-driven hard-sphere molecular dynamics. Surprisingly, SHSD results in an equation of state and a pair correlation function identical to that of a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with linear core pair potentials. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified for the Brownian motion of a nanoparticle suspended in a compressible solvent.

  8. Dynamical Response of Nanomechanical Oscillators in Immiscible Viscous Fluid for InVitro Biomolecular Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorignac, Jerome; Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2006-05-01

    Dynamical response of nanomechanical cantilever structures immersed in a viscous fluid is important to in vitro single-molecule force spectroscopy, biomolecular recognition of disease-specific proteins, and the study of microscopic protein dynamics. Here we study the stochastic response of biofunctionalized nanomechanical cantilever beams in a viscous fluid. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem we derive an exact expression for the spectral density of displacement and a linear approximation for resonance frequency shift. We find that in a viscous solution the frequency shift of the nanoscale cantilever is determined by surface stress generated by biomolecular interaction with negligible contributions from mass loading due to the biomolecules.

  9. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A S; Moosavi, M H; Najarian, S; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data.

  10. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F.; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A.S.; Moosavi, M.H.; Najarian, S.; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data. PMID:25337330

  11. Colloidal binary mixtures at fluid-fluid interfaces under steady shear: structural, dynamical and mechanical response†

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Zachary A.; Squires, Todd M.; Isa, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the link between structure, dynamics and mechanical response of two-dimensional (2D) binary mixtures of colloidal microparticles spread at water/oil interfaces. The particles are driven into steady shear by a microdisk forced to rotate at a controlled angular velocity. The flow causes particles to layer into alternating concentric rings of small and big colloids. The formation of such layers is linked to the local, position-dependent shear rate, which triggers two distinct dynamical regimes: particles either move continuously (“Flowing”) close to the microdisk, or exhibit intermittent “Hopping” between local energy minima farther away. The shear-rate-dependent surface viscosity of the monolayers can be extracted from a local interfacial stress balance, giving “macroscopic” flow curves whose behavior corresponds to the distinct microscopic regimes of particle motion. Hopping Regions reveal a higher resistance to flow compared to the Flowing Regions, where spatial organization into layers reduces dissipation. PMID:26347409

  12. Coupling Eruptive Dynamics Models to Multi-fluid Plasma Dynamic Simulations at Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paty, C. S.; Dufek, J.; Waite, J. H.; Tokar, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with Enceladus provides an exciting natural laboratory for expanding our understanding of charge-neutral-dust interactions and their impact on mass and momentum loading of the system and the associated magnetic perturbations. However, one of the more challenging questions regarding the Enceladus plume relates to the subsurface eruptive mechanism responsible for generating the observed jets of material that compose the plume, and the three-dimensional distribution of neutral gas and dust in the plume. In this work we implement a multiphase eruptive dynamics model [cf. Dufek & Bergantz, 2007; Dufek and Bergantz, 2005] to examine the evolution of the plume morphology for a given eruption. We model the eruptive mechanism in a two-part, coupled domain including a fissure model and a plume model. A high resolution, multiphase, fissure model examines eruptive processes in a fissure from fragmentation to the surface. The fissure model is two-dimensional and provides spatial and temporal information about the dust/ice grains and gas. The depth to the fragmentation surface is currently treated as a free parameter and we examine a range of fissure morphologies. We do not explicitly force choked conditions at the vent, but rather due to the geometry, the velocities of the particle and gas mixture approach the sound speed for a 'dusty' gas mixture. The fissure model provides a source for the 3D plume model which examines the morphology of the plume resulting from different fissure configurations and provides a self-consistent physical basis to link concentrations in different regions of the plume to an eruptive mechanism. These initial models describing the resulting gas and dust grain distribution will be presented in the context of existing observations. We will also demonstrate the first stages of integration of these results into the existing multi-fluid plasma dynamic simulations of Enceladus' interaction with Saturn

  13. Investigating the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Vigolo, Daniele; Akbari, Samin; deMello, Andrew

    2015-05-07

    The widespread application of microfluidic devices in the biological and chemical sciences requires the implementation of complex designs and geometries, which in turn leads to atypical fluid dynamic phenomena. Accordingly, a complete understanding of fluid dynamics in such systems is key in the facile engineering of novel and efficient analytical tools. Herein, we present an accurate approach for studying the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy with white light illumination and a standard high-speed camera. Specifically, we combine Ghost Particle Velocimetry and the detection of moving objects in automated video surveillance to track submicron size tracing particles via cross correlation between the speckle patterns of successive images. The efficacy of the presented technique is demonstrated by measuring the flow field over a square pillar (80 μm × 80 μm) in a 200 μm wide microchannel at high volumetric flow rates. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations. The method is subsequently used to study the dynamics of droplet generation at a flow focusing microfluidic geometry. A unique feature of the presented technique is the ability to perform velocimetry analysis of high-speed phenomena, which is not possible using micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (μPIV) approaches based on confocal or fluorescence microscopy.

  14. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J; Atwood, Jerry L; Lawrance, Warren D; Raston, Colin L

    2016-03-11

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes.

  15. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A.; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Raston, Colin L.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes. PMID:26965728

  16. Fluid Dynamical Panel Symposium on Wind Tunnels and Testing Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    TWB and TKG). The lack of agreement is rather disappointing but, although the analysis is still going on, there are no indications of typical cryogenic...engines, the ejector effect of the TPS-engine itself is used to obtain sub-atmospheric conditions. Afterbody tests and TPS-measurements are both...improvements of this system. Basic short-comings of this set-up, like ejector release, dynamic effects on incidence and Mach number, thrust

  17. Fluid mechanics of human fetal right ventricles from image-based computational fluid dynamics using 4D clinical ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Wiputra, Hadi; Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Heng, Joel Jia Wei; Guo, Lan; Soomar, Sanah Merchant; Leo, Hwa Liang; Biwas, Arijit; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    There are 0.6-1.9% of US children who were born with congenital heart malformations. Clinical and animal studies suggest that abnormal blood flow forces might play a role in causing these malformation, highlighting the importance of understanding the fetal cardiovascular fluid mechanics. We performed computational fluid dynamics simulations of the right ventricles, based on four-dimensional ultrasound scans of three 20-wk-old normal human fetuses, to characterize their flow and energy dynamics. Peak intraventricular pressure gradients were found to be 0.2-0.9 mmHg during systole, and 0.1-0.2 mmHg during diastole. Diastolic wall shear stresses were found to be around 1 Pa, which could elevate to 2-4 Pa during systole in the outflow tract. Fetal right ventricles have complex flow patterns featuring two interacting diastolic vortex rings, formed during diastolic E wave and A wave. These rings persisted through the end of systole and elevated wall shear stresses in their proximity. They were observed to conserve ∼25.0% of peak diastolic kinetic energy to be carried over into the subsequent systole. However, this carried-over kinetic energy did not significantly alter the work done by the heart for ejection. Thus, while diastolic vortexes played a significant role in determining spatial patterns and magnitudes of diastolic wall shear stresses, they did not have significant influence on systolic ejection. Our results can serve as a baseline for future comparison with diseased hearts.

  18. In vitro flow assessment: from PC-MRI to computational fluid dynamics including fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Rengier, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases can be highly correlated to specific biomechanical parameters. To examine and assess biomechanical parameters, numerical simulation of cardiovascular dynamics has the potential to complement and enhance medical measurement and imaging techniques. As such, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have shown to be suitable to evaluate blood velocity and pressure in scenarios, where vessel wall deformation plays a minor role. However, there is a need for further validation studies and the inclusion of vessel wall elasticity for morphologies being subject to large displacement. In this work, we consider a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model including the full elasticity equation to take the deformability of aortic wall soft tissue into account. We present a numerical framework, in which either a CFD study can be performed for less deformable aortic segments or an FSI simulation for regions of large displacement such as the aortic root and arch. Both of the methods are validated by means of an aortic phantom experiment. The computational results are in good agreement with 2D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) velocity measurements as well as catheter-based pressure measurements. The FSI simulation shows a characteristic vessel compliance effect on the flow field induced by the elasticity of the vessel wall, which the CFD model is not capable of. The in vitro validated FSI simulation framework can enable the computation of complementary biomechanical parameters such as the stress distribution within the vessel wall.

  19. Fluid Flow Characteristic Simulation of the Original TRIGA 2000 Reactor Design Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Fiantini, Rosalina; Umar, Efrizon

    2010-06-22

    Common energy crisis has modified the national energy policy which is in the beginning based on natural resources becoming based on technology, therefore the capability to understanding the basic and applied science is needed to supporting those policies. National energy policy which aims at new energy exploitation, such as nuclear energy is including many efforts to increase the safety reactor core condition and optimize the related aspects and the ability to build new research reactor with properly design. The previous analysis of the modification TRIGA 2000 Reactor design indicates that forced convection of the primary coolant system put on an effect to the flow characteristic in the reactor core, but relatively insignificant effect to the flow velocity in the reactor core. In this analysis, the lid of reactor core is closed. However the forced convection effect is still presented. This analysis shows the fluid flow velocity vector in the model area without exception. Result of this analysis indicates that in the original design of TRIGA 2000 reactor, there is still forced convection effects occur but less than in the modified TRIGA 2000 design.

  20. Effect of cerebrospinal fluid shunts on intracranial pressure and on cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Fox, John L.; McCullough, David C.; Green, Robert C.

    1973-01-01

    Part 2 describes measurements of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure in 18 adult patients with CSF shunts, all pressure measurements being referred to a horizontal plane close to the foramina of Monro. All 18 patients had normal CSF pressure by lumbar puncture; however, in one patient an intracranial pressure of +280 mm was subsequently measured after pneumoencephalography. Twelve patients had pre-shunt CSF pressures measured intracranially: 11 ranged from +20 to +180 mm H2O and one was +280 mm H2O in the supine position. In the upright posture nine patients had values of −10 to −140 mm H2O, while three others were +60, +70, and +280 mm H2O. After CSF shunting in these 18 patients the pressures were −30 to +30 mm H2O in the supine position and −210 to −370 mm in the upright position. The effect of posture on the siphoning action of these longer shunts in the erect, adult patient is a major uncontrollable variable in maintenance of intracranial pressure after shunting. Other significant variables are reviewed. In Part 3 a concept of the hydrocephalus phenomenon is described. Emphasis is placed on the pressure differential (Pd) and force differential (Fd) causing pre-shunt ventricular enlargement and post-shunt ventricular size reduction. The site of Pd, which must be very small and not to be confused with measured ventricular pressure, P, must be at the ventricular wall. Images PMID:4541079

  1. How Does the Stomach Pump?---A Fluid Dynamics Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Anupam; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2005-11-01

    The stomach is a pump that empties viscous liquid from a flexible bag (fundus) through a valve (pylorus) by slow squeeze of fundic muscle. In addition, peristaltic contraction waves (CW) travel periodically towards the pylorus in the lower stomach to grind/mix content. As each CW approaches the pylorus, it deepens and the pylorus momentarily closes. Since liquid empties from the pyloric region, one expects content at the farthest reaches of the stomach to empty last. To study the patterns of gastric emptying we applied the lattice Boltzmann method with moving boundary conditions coupled with a stomach geometry model parameterized using MRI. By marking fluid particles leaving the stomach over a 10 min period, we discovered that the CWs create a narrow path of emptying, or ``Magenstrasse'' (stomach road) that directs content from the farthest reaches of the stomach to the pylorus with relatively little mixing. Thus, while drug released off the Magenstrasse (MS) can take an hour or more to empty at low concentration, when released on the MS the drug empties within 10 minutes at high concentration---a discovery with potential implications to other pumping systems.

  2. E. Graeme Robertson--dynamics in fluid and light.

    PubMed

    Kempster, P A; Gerraty, R P; Bower, S P C

    2013-02-01

    An eponymous lecture at the Australian and New Zealand Association of Neurologists Annual Scientific Meeting commemorates E. Graeme Robertson (1903-75), and some neurologists will know that particular Australian practices in clinical neurology, so far as they exist, have origins in his career. This is a historical article on the literary record of a man who had his own sense of history--an affinity with the past as well as an awareness of future generations of readers. He wrote authoritative texts on pneumoencephalography before new technology made it obsolete, and he produced a series of books on decorative architectural cast iron in Australian cities. A talent for visual interpretation seems to have drawn him to both of these topics; a common theme is contrast between light and dark, which is expatiated in images and in clear, well-written prose in his publications. We review his medical writings, including some largely forgotten principles of cerebrospinal fluid physics that he discovered when researching pneumoencephalography. We also explore his obsession with cast iron--its architectural historical significance, his techniques for photographing it, and some of the ways that it related to his life's work as a clinical neurologist.

  3. Sound-driven fluid dynamics in pressurized carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, Maikel M; Mettin, Robert; Benes, Nieck E; Schwarzer, Dirk; Keurentjes, Jos T F

    2010-07-28

    Using high-speed visualization we demonstrate that ultrasound irradiation of pressurized carbon dioxide (CO(2)) induces phenomena that do not occur in ordinary liquids at ambient conditions. For a near-critical mixture of CO(2) and argon, sonication leads to extremely fast local phase separation, in which the system enters and leaves the two-phase region with the frequency of the imposed sound field. This phase transition can propagate with the speed of sound, but can also be located at fixed positions in the case of a standing sound wave. Sonication of a vapor-liquid interface creates a fine dispersion of liquid and vapor, irrespective whether the ultrasound horn is placed in the liquid or the vapor phase. In the absence of an interface, sonication of the liquid leads to ejection of a macroscopic vapor phase from the ultrasound horn with a velocity of several meters per second in the direction of wave propagation. The findings reported here potentially provide a tunable and noninvasive means for enhancing mass and heat transfer in high-pressure fluids.

  4. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Open Days at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Cenedese, Claudia; Jensen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    This event was hosted for one week for two consecutive years in 2013 and 2014. It targeted postdocs, graduate students, K-12 students and local community participation. The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution hosted 10 hands-on demonstrations and displays, with something for all ages, to share the excitement of fluid mechanics and oceanography. The demonstrations/experiments spanned as many fluid mechanics problems as possible in all fields of oceanography and gave insight into using fluids laboratory experiments as a research tool. The chosen experiments were `simple' yet exciting for a 6 year old child, a high school student, a graduate student, and a postdoctoral fellow from different disciplines within oceanography. The laboratory is a perfect environment in which to create excitement and stimulate curiosity. Even what we consider `simple' experiments can fascinate and generate interesting questions from both a 6 year old child and a physics professor. How does an avalanche happen? How does a bath tub vortex form? What happens to waves when they break? How does a hurricane move? Hands-on activities in the fluid dynamics laboratory helped students of all ages in answering these and other intriguing questions. The laboratory experiments/demonstrations were accompanied by `live' videos to assist in the interpretation of the demonstrations. Posters illustrated the oceanographic/scientific applicability and the location on Earth where the dynamics in the experiments occur. Support was given by the WHOI Doherty Chair in Education.

  5. The coupling of fluids, dynamics, and controls on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    This grant provided for the demonstration of coupled controls, body dynamics, and fluids computations in a workstation cluster environment; and an investigation of the impact of peer-peer communication on flow solver performance and robustness. The findings of these investigations were documented in the conference articles.The attached publication, 'Towards Distributed Fluids/Controls Simulations', documents the solution and scaling of the coupled Navier-Stokes, Euler rigid-body dynamics, and state feedback control equations for a two-dimensional canard-wing. The poor scaling shown was due to serialized grid connectivity computation and Ethernet bandwidth limits. The scaling of a peer-to-peer communication flow code on an IBM SP-2 was also shown. The scaling of the code on the switched fabric-linked nodes was good, with a 2.4 percent loss due to communication of intergrid boundary point information. The code performance on 30 worker nodes was 1.7 (mu)s/point/iteration, or a factor of three over a Cray C-90 head. The attached paper, 'Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment', documents the effect of several computational rate enhancing methods on convergence. For the cases shown, the highest throughput was achieved using boundary updates at each step, with the manager process performing communication tasks only. Constrained domain decomposition of the implicit fluid equations did not degrade the convergence rate or final solution. The scaling of a coupled body/fluid dynamics problem on an Ethernet-linked cluster was also shown.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics studies of nuclear rocket performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Kim, Suk C.; Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A CFD analysis of a low pressure nuclear rocket concept is presented with the use of an advanced chemical kinetics, Navier-Stokes code. The computations describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamic, thermodynamic and chemical properties, as well as global performance quantities such as specific impulse. Computational studies of several rocket nozzle shapes are conducted in an attempt to maximize hydrogen recombination. These Navier-Stokes calculations, which include real gas and viscous effects, predict lower performance values than have been reported heretofore.

  7. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. I - Unsteady flow concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced military aircraft 'supermaneuverability' requirements entail the sustained operation of airfoils at stalled flow conditions. The present work addresses the effects of separated flow on vehicle dynamics; an analytic method is presented which employs static experimental data to predict the separated flow effect on incompressible unsteady aerodynamics. The key parameters in the analytic relationship between steady and nonsteady aerodynamics are the time-lag before a change of flow conditions can affect the separation-induced aerodynamic loads, the accelerated flow effect, and the moving wall effect.

  8. Dynamic Fluid in a Porous Transducer-Based Angular Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Siyuan; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Meiling; Ming, Li; Fu, Huijin; Wang, Tonglei

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of the dynamics of liquid flow in an angular accelerometer comprising a porous transducer in a circular tube of liquid. Wave speed and dynamic permeability of the transducer are considered to describe the relation between angular acceleration and the differential pressure on the transducer. The permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient of the transducer are determined in the experiments, and special prototypes are utilized to validate the theoretical model in both the frequency and time domains. The model is applied to analyze the influence of structural parameters on the frequency response and the transient response of the fluidic system. It is shown that the radius of the circular tube and the wave speed affect the low frequency gain, as well as the bandwidth of the sensor. The hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer and the cross-section radius of the circular tube can be used to control the transient performance. The proposed model provides the basic techniques to achieve the optimization of the angular accelerometer together with the methodology to control the wave speed and the hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer. PMID:28230793

  9. Shear-stress-controlled dynamics of nematic complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Klapp, Sabine H L; Hess, Siegfried

    2010-05-01

    Based on a mesoscopic theory we investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of a sheared nematic liquid, with the control parameter being the shear stress σ xy (rather than the usual shear rate, γ). To this end we supplement the equations of motion for the orientational order parameters by an equation for γ, which then becomes time dependent. Shearing the system from an isotropic state, the stress-controlled flow properties turn out to be essentially identical to those at fixed γ. Pronounced differences occur when the equilibrium state is nematic. Here, shearing at controlled γ yields several nonequilibrium transitions between different dynamic states, including chaotic regimes. The corresponding stress-controlled system has only one transition from a regular periodic into a stationary (shear-aligned) state. The position of this transition in the σ xy-γ plane turns out to be tunable by the delay time entering our control scheme for σ xy. Moreover, a sudden change in the control method can stabilize the chaotic states appearing at fixed γ.

  10. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  11. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Persson, Rasmus A X; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  12. High-frequency nanofluidics: a universal formulation of the fluid dynamics of MEMS and NEMS.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, K L; Yakhot, V; Rajauria, S; Colosqui, C; Karabacak, D M

    2010-11-21

    A solid body undergoing oscillatory motion in a fluid generates an oscillating flow. Oscillating flows in Newtonian fluids were first treated by G.G. Stokes in 1851. Since then, this problem has attracted much attention, mostly due to its technological significance. Recent advances in micro- and nanotechnology require that this problem be revisited: miniaturized mechanical resonators with linear dimensions in microns and sub-microns-microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), respectively-give rise to oscillating flows when operated in fluids. Yet flow parameters for these devices, such as the characteristic flow time and length scales, may deviate greatly from those in Stokes' solution. As a result, new and interesting physics emerges with important consequences to device applications. In this review, we shall provide an introduction to this area of fluid dynamics, called high-frequency nanofluidics, with emphasis on both theory and experiments.

  13. Kinetic theory of correlated fluids: from dynamic density functional to Lattice Boltzmann methods.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Melchionna, Simone

    2009-07-07

    Using methods of kinetic theory and liquid state theory we propose a description of the nonequilibrium behavior of molecular fluids, which takes into account their microscopic structure and thermodynamic properties. The present work represents an alternative to the recent dynamic density functional theory, which can only deal with colloidal fluids and is not apt to describe the hydrodynamic behavior of a molecular fluid. The method is based on a suitable modification of the Boltzmann transport equation for the phase space distribution and provides a detailed description of the local structure of the fluid and its transport coefficients. Finally, we propose a practical scheme to solve numerically and efficiently the resulting kinetic equation by employing a discretization procedure analogous to the one used in the Lattice Boltzmann method.

  14. A computational study of the dynamic motion of a bubble rising in Carreau model fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Yutaka; Sussman, Mark

    2010-04-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of the dynamic motion of a gas bubble rising in Carreau model fluids. The simulations are carried out by a coupled level-set/volume-of-fluid (CLSVOF) method, which combines some of the advantages of the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method with the level-set (LS) method. In our study, it is shown that the motion of a rising gas bubble largely depends on the Carreau model parameters, n and B (n, the slope of decreasing viscosity and B, time constant). Both the model parameters, n and B, have considerable influence on the bubble rise motion. Using numerical analysis, we can understand in detail the bubble morphology for non-Newtonian two-phase flow systems. We also discuss bubble rise motion in shear-thinning fluids in terms of the effective viscosity, ηeff, the effective Reynolds number, Reeff and the effective Morton number, Meff.

  15. Fluid Compressibility Effects on the Dynamic Response of Hydrostatic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for the dynamic performance characteristics of laminar flow, capillar/orifice compensated hydrostatic journal bearings is presented. The analysis considers in detail the effect of fluid compressibility in the bearing recesses. At high frequency excitations beyond a break frequency, the bearing hydrostatic stiffness increases sharply and it is accompanied by a rapid decrease in direct damping. Also, the potential of pneumatic hammer instability (negative damping) at low frequencies is likely to occur in hydrostatic bearing applications handling highly compressible fluids. Useful design criteria to avoid undesirable dynamic operating conditions at low and high frequencies are determined. The effect of fluid recess compressibility is brought into perspective, and found to be of utmost importance on the entire frequency spectrum response and stability characteristics of hydrostatic/hybrid journal bearings.

  16. Dynamics and Stability of Pinned-Clamped and Clamped-Pinned Cylindrical Shells Conveying Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. K.; Wong, S. S. T.; Païdoussis, M. P.

    2001-11-01

    The paper examines the dynamics and stability of fluid-conveying cylindrical shells having pinned-clamped or clamped-pinned boundary conditions, where ``pinned'' is an abbreviation for ``simply supported''. Flügge's equations are used to describe the shell motion, while the fluid-dynamic perturbation pressure is obtained utilizing the linearized potential flow theory. The solution is obtained using two methods - the travelling wave method and the Fourier-transform approach. The results obtained by both methods suggest that the negative damping of the clamped-pinned systems and positive damping of the pinned-clamped systems, observed by previous investigators for any arbitrarily small flow velocity, are simply numerical artefacts; this is reinforced by energy considerations, in which the work done by the fluid on the shell is shown to be zero. Hence, it is concluded that both systems are conservative.

  17. Flexible wings and fins: bending by inertial or fluid-dynamic forces?

    PubMed

    Daniel, Thomas L; Combes, Stacey A

    2002-11-01

    Flapping flight and swimming in many organisms is accompanied by significant bending of flexible wings and fins. The instantaneous shape of wings and fins has, in turn, a profound effect on the fluid dynamic forces they can generate, with non-monotonic relationships between the pattern of deformation waves passing along the wing and the thrust developed. Many of these deformations arise, in part, from the passive mechanics of oscillating a flexible air- or hydrofoil. At the same time, however, their instantaneous shape may well emerge from details of the fluid loading. This issue-the extent to which there is feedback between the instantaneous wing shape and the fluid dynamic loading-is core to understanding flight control. We ask to what extent surface shape of wings and fins is controlled by structural mechanics versus fluid dynamic loading. To address this issue, we use a combination of computational and analytic methods to explore how bending stresses arising from inertial-elastic mechanisms compare to those stresses that arise from fluid pressure forces. Our analyses suggest that for certain combinations of wing stiffness, wing motions, and fluid density, fluid pressure stresses play a relatively minor role in determining wing shape. Nearly all of these combinations correspond to wings moving in air. The exciting feature provided by this analysis is that, for high Reynolds number motions where linear potential flow equations provide reasonable estimates of lift and thrust, we can finally examine how wing structure affects flight performance. Armed with this approach, we then show how modest levels of passive elasticity can affect thrust for a given level of energy input in the form of an inertial oscillation of a compliant foil.

  18. REMOVAL OF TANK AND SEWER SEDIMENT BY GATE FLUSHING: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will discuss the application of a computational fluid dynamics 3D flow model to simulate gate flushing for removing tank/sewer sediments. The physical model of the flushing device was a tank fabricated and installed at the head-end of a hydraulic flume. The fl...

  19. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses a framework for fine-scale CFD modeling that may be developed to complement the present Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system which itself is a computational fluid dynamics model. A goal of this presentation is to stimulate discussions on w...

  20. Functional assessment of cerebral artery stenosis: A pilot study based on computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Yan, Zhengzheng; Pu, Yuehua; Shiu, Wen-Shin; Wu, Jianhuang; Chen, Rongliang; Leng, Xinyi; Qin, Haiqiang; Liu, Xin; Jia, Baixue; Song, Ligang; Wang, Yilong; Miao, Zhongrong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-10-04

    The fractional pressure ratio is introduced to quantitatively assess the hemodynamic significance of severe intracranial stenosis. A computational fluid dynamics-based method is proposed to non-invasively compute the FPRCFD and compared against fractional pressure ratio measured by an invasive technique. Eleven patients with severe intracranial stenosis considered for endovascular intervention were recruited and an invasive procedure was performed to measure the distal and the aortic pressure (Pd and Pa). The fractional pressure ratio was calculated as [Formula: see text] The computed tomography angiography was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) arteries for each patient. Cerebral hemodynamics was then computed for the arteries using a mathematical model governed by Navier-Stokes equations and with the outflow conditions imposed by a model of distal resistance and compliance. The non-invasive [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and FPRCFD were then obtained from the computational fluid dynamics calculation using a 16-core parallel computer. The invasive and non-invasive parameters were tested by statistical analysis. For this group of patients, the computational fluid dynamics method achieved comparable results with the invasive measurements. The fractional pressure ratio and FPRCFD are very close and highly correlated, but not linearly proportional, with the percentage of stenosis. The proposed computational fluid dynamics method can potentially be useful in assessing the functional alteration of cerebral stenosis.

  1. Experimental fluid dynamics. Part 1: Brief overview. Part 2: Flow modeling and verification experiments: RFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.

    1987-01-01

    The role of experiment in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is discussed. Flow modeling of complex physics and determination of accuracy limits (confidence) are two ways in which experimentation can be used to develop CFD. The results of this discussion are presented in viewgraph form.

  2. Suggested Courseware for the Non-Calculus Physics Student: Fluid Dynamics, Kinetic Theory, and Thermal Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grable-Wallace, Lisa; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluates seven courseware packages covering the topics of fluid dynamics, kinetic theory, and thermal properties. Discusses the price range, sub-topics, program type, interaction, time, calculus required, graphics, and comments of each courseware. Selects some packages based on the criteria. (YP)

  3. Kinetic description of ionospheric dynamics in the three-fluid approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Conservation equations are developed in the three-fluid approximation for general application problems of ionospheric dynamics in the altitude region 90 km to 800 km for all geographic locations. These equations are applied to a detailed study of auroral E region neutral winds and their relationship to ionospheric plasma motions.

  4. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of a Spinning Helicopter Slung Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theorn, J. N.; Duque, E. P. N.; Cicolani, L.; Halsey, R.

    2005-01-01

    After performing steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations using OVERFLOW to validate the CFD method against static wind-tunnel data of a box-shaped cargo container, the same setup was used to investigate unsteady flow with a moving body. Results were compared to flight test data previously collected in which the container is spinning.

  5. E-1 Dynamic Fluid-Flow Model Update: EASY/ROCETS Enhancement and Model Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follett, Randolph F.; Taylor, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the research conducted to update computer models for dynamic fluid flow simulation of the E-1 test stand subsystems at te NASA John C. Stennis Space Center.Work also involved significant upgrades to the capabilities of EASY/ROCKETS library through the inclusion of the NIST-12 thermodynamic property database and development of new control system modules.

  6. Fluid dynamics and noise in bacterial cell–cell and cell–surface scattering

    PubMed Central

    Drescher, Knut; Dunkel, Jörn; Cisneros, Luis H.; Ganguly, Sujoy; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial processes ranging from gene expression to motility and biofilm formation are constantly challenged by internal and external noise. While the importance of stochastic fluctuations has been appreciated for chemotaxis, it is currently believed that deterministic long-range fluid dynamical effects govern cell–cell and cell–surface scattering—the elementary events that lead to swarming and collective swimming in active suspensions and to the formation of biofilms. Here, we report direct measurements of the bacterial flow field generated by individual swimming Escherichia coli both far from and near to a solid surface. These experiments allowed us to examine the relative importance of fluid dynamics and rotational diffusion for bacteria. For cell–cell interactions it is shown that thermal and intrinsic stochasticity drown the effects of long-range fluid dynamics, implying that physical interactions between bacteria are determined by steric collisions and near-field lubrication forces. This dominance of short-range forces closely links collective motion in bacterial suspensions to self-organization in driven granular systems, assemblages of biofilaments, and animal flocks. For the scattering of bacteria with surfaces, long-range fluid dynamical interactions are also shown to be negligible before collisions; however, once the bacterium swims along the surface within a few microns after an aligning collision, hydrodynamic effects can contribute to the experimentally observed, long residence times. Because these results are based on purely mechanical properties, they apply to a wide range of microorganisms. PMID:21690349

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics of the Boundary Layer Characteristics of a Pacific Bluefin Tuna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-18

    Underwater Vehicle CAD Computer-Aided Design CFD Computational Fluid Dynamics FEA Finite Element Analysis IGES Initial Graphics Exchange...finite element analysis ( FEA ) solvers, but in recent years it has made strides in improving its CFD meshing capabilities. While some CAD software

  8. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  9. Mode-by-mode fluid dynamics for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2014-01-01

    We propose to study the fluid dynamic propagation of fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions differentially with respect to their azimuthal, radial and longitudinal wavelength. To this end, we introduce a background-fluctuation splitting and a Bessel-Fourier decomposition of the fluctuating modes. We demonstrate how the fluid dynamic evolution of realistic events can be built up from the propagation of individual modes. We describe the main elements of this mode-by-mode fluid dynamics, and we discuss its use in the fluid dynamic analysis of heavy ion collisions. As a first illustration, we quantify to what extent only fluctuations of sufficiently large radial wave length contribute to harmonic flow coefficients. We find that fluctuations of short wave length are suppressed not only due to larger dissipative effects, but also due to a geometrical averaging over the freeze-out hyper-surface. In this way, our study further substantiates the picture that harmonic flow coefficients give access to a coarse-grained version of the initial conditions for heavy ion collisions, only.

  10. Mesh and Time-Step Independent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijdam, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    A homework assignment is outlined in which students learn Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) concepts of discretization, numerical stability and accuracy, and verification in a hands-on manner by solving physically realistic problems of practical interest to engineers. The students solve a transient-diffusion problem numerically using the common…

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis; Ilie, Marcel; Schallhorn, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft components may be damaged due to airflow produced by Environmental Control Systems (ECS). There are uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict the flow field around a spacecraft from the ECS System. This paper describes an approach to estimate the uncertainty in using CFD to predict the airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft.

  12. Parallel Simulation of Subsonic Fluid Dynamics on a Cluster of Workstations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    inside wind musical instruments. Typical simulations achieve $80\\%$ parallel efficiency (speedup/processors) using 20 HP-Apollo workstations. Detailed...TERMS AI, MIT, Artificial Intelligence, Distributed Computing, Workstation Cluster, Network, Fluid Dynamics, Musical Instruments 17. SECURITY...for example, the flow of air inside wind musical instruments. Typical simulations achieve 80% parallel efficiency (speedup/processors) using 20 HP

  13. An Innovative Improvement of Engineering Learning System Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, T. C.; Wang, S. K.; Tai, S. W.; Hung, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    An innovative concept of an electronic learning system has been established in an attempt to achieve a technology that provides engineering students with an instructive and affordable framework for learning engineering-related courses. This system utilizes an existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package, Active Server Pages programming,…

  14. Creep cavitation can establish a dynamic granular fluid pump in ductile shear zones.

    PubMed

    Fusseis, F; Regenauer-Lieb, K; Liu, J; Hough, R M; De Carlo, F

    2009-06-18

    The feedback between fluid migration and rock deformation in mid-crustal shear zones is acknowledged as being critical for earthquake nucleation, the initiation of subduction zones and the formation of mineral deposits. The importance of this poorly understood feedback is further highlighted by evidence for shear-zone-controlled advective flow of fluids in the ductile lower crust and the recognition that deformation-induced grain-scale porosity is a key to large-scale geodynamics. Fluid migration in the middle crust cannot be explained in terms of classical concepts. The environment is considered too hot for a dynamic fracture-sustained permeability as in the upper crust, and fluid pathways are generally too deformed to be controlled by equilibrium wetting angles that apply to hotter, deeper environments. Here we present evidence that mechanical and chemical potentials control a syndeformational porosity generation in mid-crustal shear zones. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography and scanning electron microscopy observations allow us to formulate a model for fluid migration in shear zones where a permeable porosity is dynamically created by viscous grain-boundary sliding, creep cavitation, dissolution and precipitation. We propose that syndeformational fluid migration in our 'granular fluid pump' model is a self-sustained process controlled by the explicit role of the rate of entropy production of the underlying irreversible mechanical and chemical microprocesses. The model explains fluid transfer through the middle crust, where strain localization in the creep regime is required for plate tectonics, the formation of giant ore deposits, mantle degassing and earthquake nucleation. Our findings provide a key component for the understanding of creep instabilities in the middle crust.

  15. Dynamics and yielding of binary self-suspended nanoparticle fluids.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akanksha; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Choudhury, Snehashis; Narayanan, Suresh; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-07-14

    Yielding and flow transitions in bi-disperse suspensions of particles are studied using a model system comprised of self-suspended spherical nanoparticles. An important feature of the materials is that the nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the absence of a solvent. Addition of larger particles to a suspension of smaller ones is found to soften the suspensions, and in the limit of large size disparities, completely fluidizes the material. We show that these behaviors coincide with a speeding-up of de-correlation dynamics of all particles in the suspensions and are accompanied by a reduction in the energy dissipated at the yielding transition. We discuss our findings in terms of ligand-mediated jamming and un-jamming of hairy particle suspensions.

  16. Some splitting methods for equations of geophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhongzhen; Wang, Bin

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, equations of atmospheric and oceanic dynamics are reduced to a kind of evolutionary equation in operator form, based on which a conclusion that the separability of motion stages is relative is made and an issue that the tractional splitting methods established on the physical separability of the fast stage and the slow stage neglect the interaction between the two stages to some extent is shown. Also, three splitting patterns are summed up from the splitting methods in common use so that a comparison between them is carried out. The comparison shows that only the improved splitting pattern (ISP) can be in second order and keep the interaction well. Finally, the applications of some splitting methods on numerical simulations of typhoon tracks made clear that ISP owns the best effect and can save more than 80% CPU time.

  17. Momentum conserving Brownian dynamics propagator for complex soft matter fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Padding, J. T.; Briels, W. J.

    2014-12-28

    We present a Galilean invariant, momentum conserving first order Brownian dynamics scheme for coarse-grained simulations of highly frictional soft matter systems. Friction forces are taken to be with respect to moving background material. The motion of the background material is described by locally averaged velocities in the neighborhood of the dissolved coarse coordinates. The velocity variables are updated by a momentum conserving scheme. The properties of the stochastic updates are derived through the Chapman-Kolmogorov and Fokker-Planck equations for the evolution of the probability distribution of coarse-grained position and velocity variables, by requiring the equilibrium distribution to be a stationary solution. We test our new scheme on concentrated star polymer solutions and find that the transverse current and velocity time auto-correlation functions behave as expected from hydrodynamics. In particular, the velocity auto-correlation functions display a long time tail in complete agreement with hydrodynamics.

  18. Splashing, feeding, contracting: Drop impact and fluid dynamics of Vorticella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Rachel E.

    from a close examination of lamella behavior at the splash threshold, and calculations to determine if Vorticella contract rapidly towards the substrate to which they are attached in order to mix the surrounding fluid.

  19. Research in computational fluid dynamics and analysis of algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, David

    1992-01-01

    by Carpenter (from the fluid Mechanics Division) and Gottlieb gave analytic conditions for stability as well as asymptotic stability. This had been incorporated in the code in form of stable boundary conditions. Effects of the cylinder rotations had been studied. The results differ from the known theoretical results. We are in the middle of analyzing the results. A detailed analysis of the effects of the heating of the cylinder on the shedding frequency had been studied using the above schemes. It has been found that the shedding frequency decreases when the wire was heated. Experimental work is being carried out to affirm this result.

  20. Scaling of Langevin and molecular dynamics persistence times of nonhomogeneous fluids.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Rivas, Wilmer; Colmenares, Pedro J

    2012-01-01

    The existing solution for the Langevin equation of an anisotropic fluid allowed the evaluation of the position-dependent perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients, using molecular dynamics data. However, the time scale of the Langevin dynamics and molecular dynamics are different and an ansatz for the persistence probability relaxation time was needed. Here we show how the solution for the average persistence probability obtained from the backward Smoluchowski-Fokker-Planck equation (SE), associated to the Langevin dynamics, scales with the corresponding molecular dynamics quantity. Our SE perpendicular persistence time is evaluated in terms of simple integrals over the equilibrium local density. When properly scaled by the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, it gives a good match with that obtained from molecular dynamics.