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Sample records for agardh rhodomelaceae ceramiales

  1. Larvicidal Potential of the Halogenated Sesquiterpene (+)-Obtusol, Isolated from the Alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh (Ceramiales: Rhodomelaceae), against the Dengue Vector Mosquito Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Neto, Orlando; Gomes, Simone Azevedo; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Machado, Fernanda Lacerda da Silva; Samuels, Richard Ian; Nunes da Fonseca, Rodrigo; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Moraes, Jorge Luiz da Cunha; Campos, Eldo; Mury, Flávia Borges; Silva, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is considered a serious public health problem in many tropical regions of the world including Brazil. At the moment, there is no viable alternative to reduce dengue infections other than controlling the insect vector, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. In the continuing search for new sources of chemicals targeted at vector control, natural products are a promising alternative to synthetic pesticides. In our work, we investigated the toxicity of a bioactive compound extracted from the red alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh. The initial results demonstrated that crude extracts, at a concentration of 5 ppm, caused pronounced mortality of second instar A. aegypti larvae. Two molecules, identified as (−)-elatol and (+)-obtusol were subsequently isolated from crude extract and further evaluated. Assays with (−)-elatol showed moderate larvicidal activity, whereas (+)-obtusol presented higher toxic activity than (−)-elatol, with a LC50 value of 3.5 ppm. Histological analysis of the larvae exposed to (+)-obtusol revealed damage to the intestinal epithelium. Moreover, (+)-obtusol-treated larvae incubated with 2 µM CM-H2DCFDA showed the presence of reactive oxygen species, leading us to suggest that epithelial damage might be related to redox imbalance. These results demonstrate the potential of (+)-obtusol as a larvicide for use against A. aegypti and the possible mode of action of this compound. PMID:26821032

  2. Chemical profile and biological potential of non-polar fractions from Centroceras clavulatum (C. Agardh) Montagne (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Otávio P; De Felício, Rafael; Rodrigues, Ana Helena B; Ambrósio, Daniela L; Cicarelli, Regina Maria B; De Albuquerque, Sérgio; Young, Maria Claudia M; Yokoya, Nair S; Debonsi, Hosana M

    2011-08-19

    The present study reports the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) evaluation of the hexanes and dichloromethane fractions from extracts of the red alga Centroceras clavulatum (C. Agardh) Montagne. Twenty three compounds were identified, totaling ca. 42% of both fractions (0.18 g mass extract). The main constituents of the fractions were hexadecanoic acid (17.6%) and pentadecanoic acid (15.9%). Several secondary metabolites with interesting biological activity, such as (-)-loliolide, neophytadiene, phytol were identified. In addition, several classes of secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds (e.g., phenylacetic acid), terpene derivatives, fatty acids, halogenated compound (e.g., 2-chlorocyclohexenol), lignoids, steroids, esters, amides (e.g., hexadecanamide), ketones, carboxylic acids, aldehydes and alcohols were observed. The occurrence of several of these structural classes is described for the first time in this species. The same fractions analyzed by GC-MS, and a separate set of polar fractions, were evaluated against two life cycle stages (epimastigote and trypomastigote forms) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and against phytopatogenic fungi Cladosporium cladosporiodes and C. sphaerospermum. The dichloromethane fraction was active against both T. cruzi forms (epimastigote IC(50) = 19.1 μg.mL-1 and trypomastigote IC(50) = 76.2 μg.mL-1). The hexanes and ethyl acetate fractions also displayed activity against both fungi species (200 μg) by TLC-bioautography.

  3. Antiviral activities of sulfated polysaccharides isolated from Sphaerococcus coronopifolius (Rhodophytha, Gigartinales) and Boergeseniella thuyoides (Rhodophyta, Ceramiales).

    PubMed

    Bouhlal, Rhimou; Haslin, Camille; Chermann, Jean-Claude; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia; Sinquin, Corinne; Simon, Gaelle; Cerantola, Stephane; Riadi, Hassane; Bourgougnon, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Water-soluble sulfated polysaccharides isolated from two red algae Sphaerococcus coronopifolius (Gigartinales, Sphaerococcaceae) and Boergeseniella thuyoides (Ceramiales, Rhodomelaceae) collected on the coast of Morocco inhibited in vitro replication of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) at 12.5 μg/mL. In addition, polysaccharides were capable of inhibiting the in vitro replication of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) on Vero cells values of EC₅₀ of 4.1 and 17.2 μg/mL, respectively. The adsorption step of HSV-1 to the host cell seems to be the specific target for polysaccharide action. While for HIV-1, these results suggest a direct inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication by controlling the appearance of the new generations of virus and potential virucidal effect. The polysaccharides from S. coronopifolius (PSC) and B. thuyoides (PBT) were composed of galactose, 3,6-anhydrogalactose, uronics acids, sulfate in ratios of 33.1, 11.0, 7.7 and 24.0% (w/w) and 25.4, 16.0, 3.2, 7.6% (w/w), respectively.

  4. Antiviral Activities of Sulfated Polysaccharides Isolated from Sphaerococcus coronopifolius (Rhodophytha, Gigartinales) and Boergeseniella thuyoides (Rhodophyta, Ceramiales)

    PubMed Central

    Bouhlal, Rhimou; Haslin, Camille; Chermann, Jean-Claude; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia; Sinquin, Corinne; Simon, Gaelle; Cerantola, Stephane; Riadi, Hassane; Bourgougnon, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Water-soluble sulfated polysaccharides isolated from two red algae Sphaerococcus coronopifolius (Gigartinales, Sphaerococcaceae) and Boergeseniella thuyoides (Ceramiales, Rhodomelaceae) collected on the coast of Morocco inhibited in vitro replication of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) at 12.5 μg/mL. In addition, polysaccharides were capable of inhibiting the in vitro replication of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) on Vero cells values of EC50 of 4.1 and 17.2 μg/mL, respectively. The adsorption step of HSV-1 to the host cell seems to be the specific target for polysaccharide action. While for HIV-1, these results suggest a direct inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication by controlling the appearance of the new generations of virus and potential virucidal effect. The polysaccharides from S. coronopifolius (PSC) and B. thuyoides (PBT) were composed of galactose, 3,6-anhydrogalactose, uronics acids, sulfate in ratios of 33.1, 11.0, 7.7 and 24.0% (w/w) and 25.4, 16.0, 3.2, 7.6% (w/w), respectively. PMID:21822410

  5. Chemical structure of the complex pyruvylated and sulfated agaran from the red seaweed Palisada flagellifera (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luciana G; Noseda, Miguel D; Gonçalves, Alan G; Ducatti, Diogo R B; Fujii, Mutue T; Duarte, Maria E R

    2012-01-10

    A homogeneous agaran fraction from Palisada flagellifera (Laurencia complex, Rhodomelaceae, Ceramiales) was obtained by aqueous room-temperature extraction, followed by ion-exchange chromatography. This galactan presents a highly complex structure with at least 18 different types of derivatives. The A units were found mostly pyruvylated, 2-sulfated (∼34%), and 6-methylated (∼34%), with the latter partially 2- and 2,4-sulfated. Minor amounts of β-D-galactopyranosyl units 2-, 6- and 2,6-sulfated, 6-glycosylated, and non-substituted are also present. The B-units are L-sugars composed predominantly of their cyclized derivatives, 3,6-anhydrogalactose and 3,6-anhydro-2-O-methylgalactose (∼56%). The former are linked to β-D-galactosyl (6-methyl) (6-glycosylated) units, as well as to 4,6-O-(1-carboxyethylidene)-β-D-galactose 2-sulfate in the proportion of 3:1.8, respectively. A significant amount (∼18%) of the α-L-galactopyranosyl units are linked to pyruvylated β-D-galactose 2-sulfate residues. An important part of the B-units (20%) is represented by α-L-galactose 6-sulfate substituted on C-3 by xylosyl, galactosyl and/or 2,3-di-O-methylgalactose units or sulfate groups that preclude their cyclization to 3,6-anhydrogalactosyl derivative. The precursor units are present in relatively low percentages. Kinetic studies suggest that in P. flagellifera agaran the cyclizable units are linked to 6-O-methyl-β-D-galactosyl and/or β-D-galactosyl units (6-glycosylated). The structural complexity of this polysaccharide is increased by the presence of 2- and 3,6-sulfated α-L-galactoses, with the latter additionally 2-O-methylated. Therefore, the major subfraction obtained from the cold extract contains structurally complex sulfated, methylated, and pyruvylated agaran.

  6. DNA barcode assessment of Ceramiales (Rhodophyta) in the intertidal zone of the northwestern Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guoying; Wu, Feifei; Guo, Hao; Xue, Hongfan; Mao, Yunxiang

    2015-05-01

    A total of 142 specimens of Ceramiales (Rhodophyta) were collected each month from October 2011 to November 2012 in the intertidal zone of the northwestern Yellow Sea. These specimens covered 21 species, 14 genera, and four families. Cluster analyses show that the specimens had a high diversity for the three DNA markers, namely, partial large subunit rRNA gene (LSU), universal plastid amplicon (UPA), and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI). No intraspecific divergence was found in our collection for these markers, except for a 1-3 bp divergence in the COI of Ceramium kondoi, Symphyocladia latiuscula, and Neosiphonia japonica. Because short DNA markers were used, the phylogenetic relationships of higher taxonomic levels were hard to evaluate with poor branch support. More than half species of our collection failed to find their matched sequences owing to shortage information of DNA barcodes for macroalgae in GenBank or BOLD (Barcode of Life Data) Systems. Three specimens were presumed as Heterosiphonia crispella by cluster analyses on DNA barcodes assisted by morphological identification, which was the first record in the investigated area, implying that it might be a cryptic or invasive species in the coastal area of northwestern Yellow Sea. In the neighbor-joining trees of all three DNA markers, Heterosiphonia japonica converged with Dasya spp. and was distant from the other Heterosiphonia spp., implying that H. japonica had affinities to the genus Dasya. The LSU and UPA markers amplified and sequenced easier than the COI marker across the Ceramiales species, but the COI had a higher ability to discriminate between species.

  7. Preparation and characteristics of bio-oil from the marine brown alga Sargassum patens C. Agardh.

    PubMed

    Li, Demao; Chen, Limei; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Chen, Fangjian; Chen, Shulin

    2012-01-01

    The marine brown alga, Sargassum patens C. Agardh, floating on the Yellow Sea, was collected and converted to bio-oil through hydrothermal liquefaction with a modified reactor. A maximum yield of 32.1±0.2 wt.% bio-oil was obtained after 15 min at 340 °C, at a feedstock concentration of 15 g biomass/150 ml water, without using a catalyst. The bio-oil had a heating value of 27.1MJ/kg and contained water, lipid, alcohol, phenol, esters, ethers and aromatic compounds. The solid residue obtained had a high ash and oxygen content. The results suggest that S. patens C. Agardh has potential as biomass feedstock for fuel and chemical products.

  8. [Biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of Sargassum pallidum C. Agardh].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, N I; Martyias, E A; Logvinov, S V; Busarova, N G

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of the kelp Sargassum pallidum (Turner) C. Agardh has been studied. Free fatty acids and their esters demonstrated considerable antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus[ital] and Escherichia coli), yeast-like fungi (Candida albicans), and opportunistic pathogenic (Aspergilius niger) and phytopathogenic (Fusarium oxysporum, and Septoria glycines) fungi. Glyceroglycolipids and neutral lipids demonstrated moderate activity. Fucoxanthin and chlorophylls weakly suppressed the growth of microorganisms. None of the studied substances demonstrated activity against Ehrlich's carcinoma. It was shown that the season of weed harvesting affected both antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of different lipids due to changes in their fatty acid composition.

  9. Effects of sporophyll storage on giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (Agardh) bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Gully, J.R.; Bottomley, J.P.; Baird, R.B.

    1999-07-01

    The giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (Agardh) is a US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA)-approved west coast marine species for chronic toxicity monitoring and compliance in the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The protocol allows field-collected sporophylls to be stored for up to 24 h at 9 to 12 C prior to use. However, the effects of sporophyll storage on the bioassay results have not been fully investigated, particularly with kelp collected from beds south of Point Conception, CA, USA. Therefore, 13 matched-pair reference toxicant bioassays using fresh and stored sporophylls collected from a subtidal kelp bed near Laguna Beach, CA, USA, were performed and compared. The results indicate that a lower percentage of spores germinate and the germ tube lengths are reduced when stored sporophylls are used. The intratest precision of the germination endpoint decreased as evidenced by significant increases in the percent minimum significant difference (%MSD) statistic. The intertest precision also decreased in the germination endpoint as demonstrated by significant increases in the coefficient of variation (CV) values at four effect levels. Conversely, a significant reduction in the CVs was observed in the germ tube length data, possibly as a consequence of the decrease in germ tube length associated with storage. Finally, significant decreases in mean effect concentrations in the germination endpoint in tests using stored sporophylls indicated that storage increased the sensitivity of the spores to the toxic effects of CuCl{sub 2}. The toxicological sensitivity and intratest precision of the germ tube length endpoint were not significantly affected by storage of the sporophylls. The effects of sporophyll storage resulted in a high frequency of invalid tests, lower statistical power, less effective quality assurance standards, and apparent bias in the observed toxicity of CuCl{sub 2}.

  10. Morphological study of the genus Herposiphonia (Rhodophyta, Rhodomelaceae) on the coast of eastern Guangdong, China, with a description of H. pinnata sp. nov.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lanping; Tan, Huaqiang; Zhang, Quanliang; Zeng, Lingzhao; Huang, Bingxin

    2016-03-01

    We present a taxonomic study of taxa of the red algae genus Herposiphonia (Rhodophyta, Rhodomelaceae), collected from the coast of eastern Guangdong, China. We made detailed morphological studies and considered recent taxonomic criteria for species delimitation, and are making the first report of five different species on the coast of Guangdong, including a new species. The species identified were H. caespitosa Tseng, H. hollenbergii Dawson, H. pecten - veneris (Harvey) Falkenberg, H. subdisticha Okamura and H. pinnata Ding and Tan sp. nov. H. pinnata sp. nov. is characterized by bright green thalli; most parts of the feathery thalli are free of the substratum; determinate branches and indeterminate branches are arranged in a chaotic sequence; the primary axis has bare segments; the determinate branch has 9-11 periaxial cells per segment; vegetative trichoblasts are abundant; and tetrasporangia are formed on the middle of the determinate branch with 1-8 successive segments in a single rectilinear series. This paper is also the first record of sporophyte plants of H. pecten-veneris.

  11. Effects of seawater salinity and temperature on growth and pigment contents in Hypnea cervicornis J. Agardh (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Ding, Lanping; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Bingxin; Chen, Shanwen

    2013-01-01

    This study simulated outdoor environmental living conditions and observed the growth rates and changes of several photosynthetic pigments (Chl a, Car, PE, and PC) in Hypnea cervicornis J. Agardh (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta) by setting up different ranges of salinity (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50) and temperature (15, 20, 25, and 30°C). At conditions of culture, the results are as follows. (1) Changes in salinity and temperature have significant effects on the growth of H. cervicornis. The growth rates first increase then decrease as the temperature increases, while growth tends to decline as salinity increases. The optimum salinity and temperature conditions for growth are 25 and 25°C, respectively. (2) Salinity and temperature have significant or extremely significant effects on photosynthetic pigments (Chl a, Car, PE, and PC) in H. cervicornis. The results of this study are advantageous to ensure propagation and economic development of this species in the southern sea area of China.

  12. Effects of Seawater Salinity and Temperature on Growth and Pigment Contents in Hypnea cervicornis J. Agardh (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lanping; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Bingxin; Chen, Shanwen

    2013-01-01

    This study simulated outdoor environmental living conditions and observed the growth rates and changes of several photosynthetic pigments (Chl a, Car, PE, and PC) in Hypnea cervicornis J. Agardh (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta) by setting up different ranges of salinity (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50) and temperature (15, 20, 25, and 30°C). At conditions of culture, the results are as follows. (1) Changes in salinity and temperature have significant effects on the growth of H. cervicornis. The growth rates first increase then decrease as the temperature increases, while growth tends to decline as salinity increases. The optimum salinity and temperature conditions for growth are 25 and 25°C, respectively. (2) Salinity and temperature have significant or extremely significant effects on photosynthetic pigments (Chl a, Car, PE, and PC) in H. cervicornis. The results of this study are advantageous to ensure propagation and economic development of this species in the southern sea area of China. PMID:24350276

  13. Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov. (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) based on molecular and morpho-anatomical characters.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Danilo E; Won, Boo Yeon; Miller, Kathy Ann; Cho, Tae Oh

    2017-01-12

    Morphological, anatomical, and molecular sequence data were used to assess the establishment and phylogenetic position of the genus Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov. Phylogenies based on rbcL and concatenated rbcL and cox1 loci support recognition of Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov., sister to Herposiphonia. Diagnostic features for Wilsonosiphonia are rhizoids located at distal ends of pericentral cells and taproot-shaped multicellular tips of rhizoids. Wilsonosiphonia includes three species with diagnostic rbcL and cox1 sequences, Wilsonosiphonia fujiae sp. nov. (the generitype), W. howei comb. nov., and W. indica sp. nov. These three species resemble each other in external morphology, but W. fujiae is distinguished by having two tetrasporangia per segment rather than one, W. indica by having abundant and persistent trichoblasts, and W. howei by having few and deciduous trichoblasts.

  14. Induction and cultivation of cloned filaments of Polysiphonia urceolata (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinxia; Shao, Kuishuang; Cheng, Bin; Lu, Qinqin; Zhou, Baicheng

    2011-11-01

    A filamentous clone of Polysiphonia urceolata was regenerated from segments cut from the fronds of gametophytes. Unlike wild thalli with short virgate branchlets, the clone was filamentous with few branches. Many transparent trichoblasts arose from pericentral cells during the induction culture, but these were seldom observed during normal growth. The trichoblasts were uniseriate, often colorless, and formed lobed rhizoids rapidly when they came into contact with solid substrates. In addition to morphological characteristics, the photosynthetic properties and growth conditions of the clone differed from those of the mother plant. Cross-gradient light and temperature culture experiments revealed that the most favorable conditions for culture of the filamentous clone were 22°C and 95-120 μE/(m2·s) light intensity. The photosynthetic light saturation value for filaments was approx. 100 μE/(m2·s), which is far lower than that of wild thalli. These results could be used to develop techniques for mass cultures of P. urceolata in photobioreactors for production of seed stock or bioactive products.

  15. [The effect of chromium removal by algae-bacteria Bostrychia calliptera (Rhodomelaceae) consortia under laboratory conditions].

    PubMed

    Rengifo-Gallego, Ana Lucía; Peña-Salamanca, Enrique; Benitez-Campo, Neyla

    2012-09-01

    Water pollution is one of the most important environmental problems worldwide. Recently, biotechnology studies have oriented efforts to study algae-bacterium consortia with the aim to understand the mechanisms to find a possible solution in environmental sciences. This study determined the percentage of chromium removal by the alga-bacterium association exposed to a set of different chromium concentrations under controlled in vitro conditions. Wild plants of Bostrychia calliptera associated with bacterial populations were collected from Dagua River, Pacific coast of Colombia, and were monitored in the laboratory. The trial was conducted with synthetic seawater in bioreactors at two chromium levels: 5 and 10mg/L, and four different experimental treatments: i) algae-bacteria (AB), ii) algae with antibiotic (AA), iii) algal surface sediment, Natural Bacterial Consortium (CBN), and iv) the control without algae or bacteria. The experimental design followed a model of two factors (chromium concentration x combination types) with repeated measures using one factor. The microbial population behavior and the chromium concentration percentage were monitored by using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). According to the data, Algae-bacteria (AB) treatment was the most efficient combination at 10mg/L (87%), whereas the bacterial consortia (CBN) was the most efficient at 5mg/L (62.85%). The results showed significant differences of chromium uptake between algae-bacteria (AB) and natural bacterial consortia (CBN), meaning the importance of those treatments in the chromium removal from coastal waters.

  16. ORIGIN OF APOMICTIC RED ALGAE: OUTCROSSING STUDIES OF DIFFERENT STRAINS IN CALOGLOSSA MONOSTICHA (CERAMIALES, RHODOPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Mitsunobu; West, John A

    2008-08-01

    Various red algae lack sexual reproduction and propagate by spore recycling, but it is still unknown how apomixis originates. In previous crossing experiments, we obtained an unusual hybrid of Caloglossa monosticha M. Kamiya through the outcrossing between a male from Australia and a female from Indonesia. This hybrid was morphologically identical to a normal tetrasporophyte, but its tetraspores grew into tetrasporophytes and repeated tetraspore recycling. During 5 years of culture, no sexual reproductive structures have formed on the tetrasporelings from this hybrid or its progenies. Further hybridization experiments revealed that all the five female strains from Indonesia successfully crossed with the male strain from the East Alligator River, Australia, and most of the F1 sporophytes demonstrated tetraspore recycling, though the germination rates of these tetraspores were quite low. The ploidy level of the hybrid tetrasporophyte was similar to the normal tetrasporophyte, rather than the parental gametophyte, based on the comparison of relative DNA contents of their nuclei. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and sequence analyses of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region indicated that the alleles from both parents were present in all the hybrid tetrasporophytes examined. These results suggest that this hybrid does not carry out meiosis during sporogenesis, and heterozygous diploid sporophytes arose from tetraspores. Therefore, we believe that obligate apomixis was generated through outcrossing between genetically different entities of C. monosticha.

  17. Species diversity of the genus Osmundea (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta) in the Macaronesian region.

    PubMed

    Machín-Sánchez, María; Rousseau, Florence; Le Gall, Line; Cassano, Valéria; Neto, Ana I; Sentíes, Abel; T Fujii, Mutue; Gil-Rodríguez, María Candelaria

    2016-08-01

    Species diversity within the genus Osmundea in the Macaronesian region was explored by conducting a comprehensive sampling in the Azores, the Canary, and the Madeira archipelagos. Toward identification, all specimens were first observed alive to verify the absence of corps en cerise, a diagnostic character for the genus and morphometric data were measured (thallus length and width, first-order branches length and width, branchlets length and width, cortical cell length and width in surface view, cortical cell length and width in transverse section). Specimens were sequenced for COI-5P (39 specimens) and three species delimitation methods (Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent, Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery method, and Poisson Tree Processes) were used to assess the threshold between infra- and interspecific relationships. Subsequently, one or several sequences of plastid-encoded large subunit of RuBisCO (21 specimens) per delimited species were generated to assess the phylogenetic relationships among Macaronesian Osmundea. Moreover, for each delineated species, vegetative and reproductive anatomy was thoroughly documented and, when possible, specimens were either assigned to existing taxa or described as novel species. This integrative approach has provided data for (i) the presence of O. oederi, O. pinnatifida, and O. truncata in Macaronesia; (ii) the proposal of two novel species, O. prudhommevanreinei sp. nov. and O. silvae sp. nov.; and (iii) evidence of an additional species referred as "Osmundea sp.1," which is a sister taxon of O. hybrida.

  18. Delimiting the species Neosiphonia yendoi (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) based on COI and rbcL genetic variation in Korea and Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeongseok; Yang, Mi Yeon; Kim, Myung Sook

    2016-09-01

    Although the marine red algal genus Neosiphonia is well characterized, many species of Neosiphonia are poorly understood. To correctly define the species delimitation of Neosiphonia yendoi using genetic variation, owing to the confusion over identification with " N. sphaerocarpa" from Korea, we investigated intensively the haplotype network of the mitochondrial COI and the plastid rbcL genes of specimens collected from Korea and Japan. The molecular analyses indicated that specimens collected in different sites of Korea and Japan belong to the same species, Neosiphonia yendoi and " Neosiphonia sphaerocarpa" from Korea, which is distinguished from N. sphaerocarpa from Florida and is allied with N. yendoi collected from the type locality, Muroran of Japan. A total of 29 COI and 13 rbcL haplotypes were found and the COI haplotype network shows evidence of a clear break between specimens from Jeju Island and all other locations of Korea, suggesting the possibility of cryptic diversity within N. yendoi.

  19. Evaluation of Gracilaria caudata J. Agardh for bioremediation of nutrients from shrimp farming wastewater.

    PubMed

    Marinho-Soriano, E; Panucci, R A; Carneiro, M A A; Pereira, D C

    2009-12-01

    The accelerated development of shrimp farming in Brazil in recent decades has caused negative impacts to the environment. The most evident effects resulting from this activity is the increase in organic material, the reduction in oxygen and the excessive rise in water nutrients. Thus, there is a need for finding alternative solutions that can mitigate the negative impacts caused by this activity. A potentially viable solution is the use of macroalgae to remove nutrients from the cultivation systems. This study examined in situ (shrimp pond), the growth and storage of nitrogen and phosphorous from the macroalga Gracilaria caudata. A short-term measurement experiment was also conducted to evaluate the bioremediation potential this species. These results showed positive values for biomass and growth during the study period, except at day 45 for the tubular nets and day 75 for the cages, when they reached lower values than those of the initial weight. The results obtained indicate that G. caudata may reach annual production of 59.16 ton ha(-1) of wet weight, which corresponds to 11.83 ton dry weight. Nitrogen and phosphorous content in the algal tissues increased with time. The mean for the period was 2.61+/-0.26% and 0.20+/-0.03% for the nitrogen and phosphorous, respectively. An estimate of the data showed that 1 ha of cultivated algae has the potential to remove 0.309 ton ha(-1) year(-1) of nitrogen and 0.024 ton ha(-1) year(-1) of phosphorous. The study of the biofiltration capacity of G. caudata showed a significant reduction in nutrients. The removal of NH(4)-N was around 59.5%, NO(3)-N 49.6% and PO(4)-P 12.3% in 4 h. These results suggest that although G. caudata showed relatively modest growth rates, they can be cultivated together with shrimp and can contribute to the removal of nitrogen and phosphorous from the pond. Moreover, the capacity to efficiently remove nutrients demonstrated in laboratory experiments encourages the use of this alga as a bioremediation agent.

  20. Characterization and expression analysis of hsp70 gene from Ulva prolifera J. Agardh (Chlorophycophyta, Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haining; Li, Wei; Li, Jingjing; Fu, Wandong; Yao, Jianting; Duan, Delin

    2012-03-01

    In the Yellow Sea of China, large-scale green tides have broken out consecutively from 2007 to 2011. Ulva prolifera, the causative species of green tide, showed great ability to acclimate to adverse circumstance. To explore the mechanisms of rapid growth and stress resistance during the bloom, we characterized and analyzed hsp70 from U. prolifera. The results showed that hsp70 gene had 6 exons and 5 introns. The promoter-like region contained multiple cis-acting elements. The transcription of hsp70 was up-regulated by UV irradiation, heat treatment and salinities induction, but less influenced by desiccation. In vitro expression of HSP70 protein and western blot was also conducted, and the recombinant protein will be used in detecting the interaction between HSP70 and related functional proteins in the future. The study suggested that hsp70 could be used in prediction of stress tolerance in algae and monitoring environmental changes.

  1. Age of drifting Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C. Agardh rafts in the Southern California Bight.

    PubMed

    Hobday

    2000-10-05

    Macrocystis pyrifera plants that detach from the substratum float to the surface and, if they do not become entangled or wash immediately to the shore, may drift at the surface for an unknown period of time. These rafts provide habitat for a variety of coastal and pelagic fauna. The distances dispersed and the period available for species to utilize these habitats, however, depend on the longevity of the raft and methods for determining the age of rafts are unknown. A method to age drifting M. pyrifera rafts based on a change in length of blades (BL) following detachment is validated here. This technique determines the period of time since detachment and not the actual age of the plant. In general, average BL decreases from initial attached values of 50-60 to about 0 cm, when rafts sink. The rate of aging, or deterioration of BL, is related to water temperature, and sets the period a raft stays afloat. Maximal estimates of ages of rafts were between 63 and 109 days, depending on the exact method used. Their lifetime will limit the distances dispersed by kelp rafts in Southern California, and this methodology will be useful for determining the temporal patterns of abundance of fauna associated with rafts.

  2. Isolation, expression and characterization of rbcL gene from Ulva prolifera J. Agardh (Ulvophyceae, Chlorophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhanru; Li, Wei; Guo, Hui; Duan, Delin

    2015-12-01

    Ulva prolifera is a typical green alga in subtidal areas and can grow tremendously fast. A highly efficient Rubisco enzyme which is encoded by UpRbcL gene may contribute to the rapid growth. In this study, the full-length UpRbcL open reading frame (ORF) was identified, which encoded a protein of 474 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of UpRbcL sequences revealed that Chlorophyta had a closer genetic relationship with higher plants than with Rhodophyta and Phaeophyta. The two distinct residues (aa11 and aa91) were presumed to be unique for Rubisco catalytic activity. The predicted three-dimensional structure showed that one α/β-barrel existed in the C-terminal region, and the sites for Mg2+ coordination and CO2 fixation were also located in this region. Gene expression profile indicated that UpRbcL was expressed at a higher level under light exposure than in darkness. When the culture temperature reached 35°C, the expression level of UpRbcL was 2.5-fold lower than at 15°C, and the carboxylase activity exhibited 13.8-fold decrease. UpRbcL was heterologously expressed in E. coli and was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography. The physiological and biochemical characterization of recombinant Rubisco will be explored in the future.

  3. Structural characterization of polysaccharide obtained from red seaweed Gracilaria caudata (J Agardh).

    PubMed

    Barros, Francisco C N; da Silva, Draulio C; Sombra, Venicios G; Maciel, Jeanny S; Feitosa, Judith P A; Freitas, Ana L P; de Paula, Regina C M

    2013-01-30

    Seaweeds are considered an important source of bioactive molecules. In this work the marine red alga Gracilaria caudata was submitted to aqueous extraction of their polysaccharides for 2 h at 100 °C. The polysaccharide fraction (PGC) presented a recovery of 32.8%. The sulfate content of PGC, calculated by S%, is 1 ± 0.2% and the degree of sulfation accounts for 0.13 ± 0.2. High-Performance Size-Exclusion Chromatography demonstrated that PGC consists of a high molecular weight polysaccharide (2.5 × 10(5)gmol(-1)). Chemical analysis of PGC was performed by microanalysis, infrared (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, 1 and 2D) spectroscopy. The structure of PGC is mainly constituted by the alternating residues 3-linked-β-D-galactopyranose and 4-linked-3,6-α-L-anhydrogalactose; however some hydroxyl groups were substituted by methyl groups and pyruvic acid acetal. The biological precursor of 3,6-α-L-anhydrogalactose (6-sulfate-α-l-galactose) was also detected.

  4. Patterns of genetic diversity of the cryptogenic red alga Polysiphonia morrowii (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta) suggest multiple origins of the Atlantic populations.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Alexandre; Destombe, Christophe; Kim, Byeongseok; Mauger, Stéphane; Raffo, María Paula; Kim, Myung Sook; Le Gall, Line

    2016-08-01

    The red alga Polysiphonia morrowii, native to the North Pacific (Northeast Asia), has recently been reported worldwide. To determine the origin of the French and Argentine populations of this introduced species, we compared samples from these two areas with samples collected in Korea and at Hakodate, Japan, the type locality of the species. Combined analyses of chloroplastic (rbcL) and mitochondrial (cox1) DNA revealed that the French and Argentine populations are closely related and differ substantially from the Korean and Japanese populations. The genetic structure of P. morrowii populations from South Atlantic and North Atlantic, which showed high haplotype diversity compared with populations from the North Pacific, suggested the occurrence of multiple introduction events from areas outside of the so-called native regions. Although similar, the French and Argentine populations are not genetically identical. Thus, the genetic structure of these two introduced areas may have been modified by cryptic and recurrent introduction events directly from Asia or from other introduced areas that act as introduction relays. In addition, the large number of private cytoplasmic types identified in the two introduced regions strongly suggests that local populations of P. morrowii existed before the recent detection of these invasions. Our results suggest that the most likely scenario is that the source population(s) of the French and Argentine populations was not located only in the North Pacific and/or that P. morrowii is a cryptogenic species.

  5. The Japanese alga Polysiphonia morrowii (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) on the South Atlantic Ocean: first report of an invasive macroalga inhabiting oyster reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, M. Emilia; Parodi, Elisa R.

    2014-06-01

    Conspicuous tufts of the filamentous algae Polysiphonia Greville inhabit the reefs of Crassostrea gigas on the Atlantic Patagonian coast. The population was recorded for the first time in 1994 and identified as P. argentinica. This study exhaustively investigated the morphology and reproduction of specimens and the seasonality of the population. The results revealed the identity of the specimens as the invasive Japanese macroalga Polysiphonia morrowii Harvey, on the basis of several striking features: the setaceous and tufted thalli, the corymbose growing apices, the endogenous axillary branches, the urceolate cystocarps and the sharply pointed branches. Sexual reproduction was evidenced; however, fertile male gametophytes were absent in the samples. The population was found almost all year round, but its abundance became higher in autumn and winter. The present study constitutes the first record of this invasive macroalga on the South Atlantic Ocean; the fourth record of an exotic macroalgal species on the Atlantic Patagonian coast; and the first record of an invasive species related to the establishment of C. gigas in Atlantic Patagonia.

  6. Assessment of four molecular markers as potential DNA barcodes for red algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H; Hurtado, Anicia Q

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment.

  7. Assessment of Four Molecular Markers as Potential DNA Barcodes for Red Algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H.; Hurtado, Anicia Q.

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment. PMID:23285223

  8. Anti-proliferative and angio-suppressive effect of Stoechospermum marginatum (C. Agardh) Kutzing extract using various experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Puttananjaiah, Shilpa; Chatterji, Anil; Salimath, Bharati

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Abundant consumption of seaweeds in the diet is epidemiologically linked to the reduction in risk of developing cancer. In larger cases, however, identification of particular seaweeds that are accountable for these effects is still lacking, hindering the recognition of competent dietary-based chemo preventive approaches. The aim of this research was to establish the antiproliferative potency and angiosuppressive mode of action of Stoechospermum marginatum seaweed methanolic extract using various experimental models. MATERIALS/METHODS Among the 15 seaweeds screened for antiproliferative activity against Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cell line, Stoechospermum marginatum extract (SME) was found to be the most promising. Therefore, it was further investigated for its anti-proliferative activity in-vitro against choriocarcinoma (BeWo) and non-transformed Human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells, and for its anti-migratory/tube formation activity against HUVEC cells in-vitro. Subsequently, the angiosuppressive activity of S. marginatum was established by inhibition of angiogenesis in in-vivo (peritoneal angiogenesis and chorioallantoic membrane assay) and ex-vivo (rat cornea assay) models. RESULTS Most brown seaweed extracts inhibited the proliferation of EAT cells, while green and red seaweed extracts were much less effective. According to the results, SME selectively inhibited proliferation of BeWo cells in-vitro in a dose-dependent manner, but had a lesser effect on HEK 293 cells. SME also suppressed the migration and tube formation of HUVEC cells in-vitro. In addition, SME was able to suppress VEGF-induced angiogenesis in the chorio allantoic membrane, rat cornea, and tumor induced angiogenesis in the peritoneum of EAT bearing mice. A decrease in the microvessel density count and CD31 antigen staining of treated mice peritoneum provided further evidence of its angiosuppressive activity. CONCLUSIONS Altogether, the data underline that VEGF mediated angiogenesis is the target for the angiosuppressive action of SME and could potentially be useful in cancer prevention or treatment involving stimulated angiogenesis. PMID:25110556

  9. Attachment strength of the subtidal seaweed Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh varies among development stages and depths.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Sakamoto, Shingo; Komatsu, Teruhisa

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum horneri is one of the most important contributors to the rafts of floating seaweed in the waters off the coasts of northeastern Asia. These rafts serve as spawning and nursery grounds for many marine organisms, including Japanese saury and yellowtail. Thus, the details of the attachment/detachment mechanisms of S. horneri are of commercial significance for the aquaculture industry. Here, we describe variations in the attachment strength of S. horneri as it relates to its developmental stage and depth along a bottom gradient. We measured the attachment strength/dislodgement force of S. horneri samples with holdfast detachment in Shidagaura Cove, Shimoda, Japan, from December 2014 to May 2015. After we had determined the dislodgement forces required to detach thalli from the substratum (using a spring scale device) in the field, we transferred released individuals to the laboratory and measured selected morphological traits. Attachment strength was linearly related to the holdfast basal area when thalli were immature (prior to mid-March), but not when they were mature (mid-March to May). Thus, attachment strength was maintained through the reproductive phase and declined thereafter, allowing released thalli to join the drifting raft community. Rafting may be a mechanism by which the species expands its distribution range, as floating thalli continuing to shed germlings that are able to recruit when suitable habitat is encountered. Attachment strengths were greater in the shallows than in deeper water, reflecting the differences in wave forces experienced at different depths.

  10. Persistence and transport of fauna on drifting kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C. Agardh) rafts in the Southern California Bight.

    PubMed

    Hobday

    2000-10-05

    Drifting rafts of Macrocystis pyrifera may connect isolated kelp forests in the Southern California Bight. To determine which species might utilize this dispersal mechanism, faunal samples from natural drifting rafts and attached M. pyrifera plants were collected during five cruises between March 1995 and December 1997. These rafts, which can be considered as floating islands, were aged and the macroinvertebrate assemblage enumerated. There was no significant relationship between raft age and species richness, or between species richness and distance offshore, which contrasts with predictions based on island biogeography. Species richness, however, was related to raft weight. Patterns of species presence and density were investigated relative to raft age for the species most frequently associated with rafts. Only one species, the isopod Idotea resecata, was found on all sampled rafts. Some species increased in frequency with raft age and others decreased, but only one relationship, a decline in the frequency of the anemone Epiactis prolifera with raft age was significant. When species density was examined over all cruises, only I. resecata had a significant change in density (an increase) with raft age, but additional significant relationships were found when species density patterns were considered by cruise. The results of all the tests were combined to provide a measure of "raft success". Nine of the most frequent 19 species had a positive score, indicating a favorable response to rafting, seven were unaffected, and two species had negative responses to rafting. Extinction times were calculated using species abundance and raft age relationships. Two species (E. prolifera and Paracerceis cordata), were predicted to persist on rafts for only about 100 days, which is the maximum estimated raft lifetime. All other species were predicted to persist for longer periods if the rafts floated longer. Kelp fauna that begin rafting appear to be largely unaffected by rafting, and hence dispersal on kelp rafts is possible for many members of the kelp forest community.

  11. Evidence for the introduction of the Asian red alga Neosiphonia japonica and its introgression with Neosiphonia harveyi (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta) in the Northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Amanda M; Saunders, Gary W

    2015-12-01

    There is currently conflict in the literature on the taxonomic status of the reportedly cosmopolitan species Neosiphonia harveyi, a common red alga along the coast of Atlantic Canada and New England, USA. Neosiphonia harveyi sensu lato was assessed using three molecular markers: COI-5P, ITS and rbcL. All three markers clearly delimited three genetic species groups within N. harveyi sensu lato in this region, which we identified as N. harveyi, N. japonica and Polysiphonia akkeshiensis (here resurrected from synonymy with N. japonica). Although Neosiphonia harveyi is considered by some authors to be introduced to the Atlantic from the western Pacific, it was only confirmed from the North Atlantic suggesting it is native to this area. In contrast, Neosiphonia japonica was collected from only two sites in Rhode Island, USA, as well as from its reported native range in Asia (South Korea), which when combined with data in GenBank indicates that this species was introduced to the Northwest Atlantic. The GenBank data further indicate that N. japonica was also introduced to North Carolina, Spain, Australia and New Zealand. Despite the fact that all three markers clearly delimited N. harveyi and N. japonica as distinct genetic species groups, the ITS sequences for some N. harveyi individuals displayed mixed patterns and additivity indicating introgression of nuclear DNA from N. japonica into N. harveyi in the Northwest Atlantic. Introgression of DNA from an introduced species to a native species (i.e. 'genetic pollution') is one of the possible consequences of species introductions, and we believe this is the first documented evidence for this phenomenon in red algae.

  12. INDUCTION OF APOMIXIS BY OUTCROSSING BETWEEN GENETICALLY DIVERGENT ENTITIES OF CALOGLOSSA LEPRIEURII (CERAMIALES, RHODOPHYTA) AND EVIDENCE OF HYBRID APOMICTS IN NATURE(1).

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Mitsunobu; West, John A; Hara, Yoshiaki

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study revealed that apomixis, recycling of tetrasporophytes, can be generated through outcrossing between genetically divergent entities of Caloglossa monosticha M. Kamiya, though such apomicts have never been found in nature. In the case of C. leprieurii (Mont.) G. Martens, the most widespread species in this genus, many apomictic strains have been isolated worldwide, but it is unknown whether these apomicts evolved through an outcrossing process similar to that in C. monosticha. In this study, heterogeneity of the apomicts and their sexual relatives as well as their evolutionary relationships was examined using the nuclear-encoded actin gene and plastid-encoded RUBISCO spacer region. Thirteen out of 18 apomictic strains were heterogeneous and contained divergent actin alleles, whereas only two out of 23 sexual strains were heterogeneous. The five homogeneous apomicts were genetically identical, or quite similar, to the sexual strains isolated from adjacent sites. Furthermore, three of the five homogeneous apomicts frequently produced tetraspores that grew into gametophytes, while all the heterogeneous apomicts never generated gametophytes. Apomictic strains from Florida were allotriploid, and each of the three actin sequences was closely related to those of sexual strains from Florida, Peru, and Mexico/Guatemala. In crossing tests, obligate apomixis was generated through the outcrossing between the male from Madagascar and the female from the northwestern Atlantic. These results suggest that outcrossing between genetically divergent sexual entities is one factor that induces apomixis in C. leprieurii.

  13. Optimized and standardized isolation and structural characterization of anti-inflammatory sulfated polysaccharides from the red alga Delesseria sanguinea (Hudson) Lamouroux (Ceramiales, Delesseriaceae).

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Niels; Alban, Susanne

    2009-11-09

    The red seaweed Delesseria sanguinea dominantly populates a large artificial reef in the southwestern Baltic Sea. It contains sulfated polysaccharides (SPs), which exhibit a pharmacological profile indicating anti-inflammatory and anti-skin aging potencies. To establish and optimize an extraction procedure for these SPs and to evaluate the influence of several parameters on their quality, 23 algae batches were harvested over the period of four years and extracted by different methods, resulting in 56 SP batches. Extraction with water at 85 degrees C proved to be superior and led to highly reproducible products with average yields of 11.6 +/- 3.9%, reaching 18% in spring. Their quality was independent of generation form and vitality of the algae. The SPs were identified as sulfated branched xylogalactans (degree of sulfation 0.50 +/- 0.08, mean M(r) 142000). The coextraction of floridean starch turned out to be the only parameter causing any seasonal variability. However, by using water, this concerns solely the yields of the isolated products. Compared to NaOH extracts, the antielastase activity of H(2)O extracted SPs was about twice as strong (IC(50) 0.204 +/- 0.024 microg/mL) and the batch to batch variability was much lower (CV 11.8 vs 28.6%). In conclusion, SPs from Delesseria sanguinea can be isolated in reproducibly high quality by using a specific extraction procedure. Thus, an important prerequisite for a potential economical utilization is fulfilled.

  14. [New additions to the marine algae of Mochima National Park, Sucre, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Silva, Soraida; Brito, Leonor; Lemus, Andrés

    2003-06-01

    The marine algal flora from the eastern coast of Mochima National Park, Sucre, Venezuela was studied with a total of 51 taxa identified, including eight new additions of red algae which are Erythrotrichia carnea (Dillwyn) J. Agardh, Sahlingia subintegra (Rosenvinge) Kornmann, Liagora ceranoides Lamouroux, Asparagopsis taxiformis (Delile) Trevisan, Dasya corymbifera J. Agardh, Chondria dasyphylla (Woodward) C. Agardh, Herposiphonia secunda f. tenella (C. Agardh) M.J. Wynne and Polysiphonia subtilissima Montagne. Morphological and anatomical aspects of the specimens are described and illustrated.

  15. Supply chain and marketing of sea grapes, Caulerpa racemosa (Forsskål) J. Agardh (Chlorophyta: Caulerpaceae) in Fiji, Samoa and Tonga.

    PubMed

    Morris, C; Bala, S; South, G R; Lako, J; Lober, M; Simos, T

    2014-01-01

    This report describes for the first time the supply chain of Caulerpa racemosa in three Pacific Island countries. The harvesting and marketing of C. racemosa are important subsistence activities for villagers in Fiji and Samoa, less so in Tonga. At least 150 harvesters are involved in Fiji, some 100 in Samoa and only a handful in Tonga. The annual combined crop is of some 123 t valued at around US$266,492. In Fiji, it is projected that supply does not meet local demand and there is a potential export market that is currently operating at a pilot project level. In Samoa, the supply is considered adequate for the current market. In Tonga, harvesting is carried out by a few families and supplies a niche market in that country. The possibilities of field cultivation of Caulerpa have been explored but, at present, with only limited success in Samoa. The supply chain is simple in all three countries, and only in Fiji are middlemen involved in the distribution process. The limitations for marketing include the fact that only a few sites supply most of the crop in all the three countries, that all sites need to be conserved through sustainable harvesting methods, the short shelf life of the crop and a lack of information on the carrying capacity of harvest sites. Caulerpa remains a crop that fulfils a niche market but has the potential to be scaled up for additional livelihood development in the future.

  16. Isolation of fucoxanthin and highly unsaturated monogalactosyldiacylglycerol from brown alga Fucus evanescens C Agardh and in vitro investigation of their antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Imbs, Tatiana I; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Fedoreyev, Sergey A; Anastyuk, Stanislav D; Zvyagintseva, Tatiana N

    2013-10-01

    Fucoxanthin (FX) and highly unsaturated monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) were isolated from the ethanol extract of brown alga Fucus evanescens. Their structures were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance, complemented by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS). MGDG was identified as 1-O-(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z-eicosapentanoyl)-2-O-(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z-octadecatetraenoyl)-3-O-β-D-galactopiranosyl-sn-glycerol. Antitumor activity of these compounds was tested on human melanoma (SK-MEL-28) cells. MGDG and FX inhibited the growth of human melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. IC50 values for growth inhibition were 104 and 114 μM, correspondently.

  17. Antibacterial properties of a glycolipid-rich extract and active principle from Nunavik collections of the macroalgae Fucus evanescens C. Agardh (Fucaceae).

    PubMed

    Treyvaud Amiguet, Virginie; Jewell, Linda E; Mao, Halimasadia; Sharma, Manju; Hudson, James B; Durst, Tony; Allard, Marc; Rochefort, Guy; Arnason, John Thor

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial activity of glycolipid-rich extracts of the brown macroalga Fucus evanescens in cell culture. Accessions were collected on the Arctic coast of Ungava Bay, Nunavik, Quebec. The crude ethyl acetate extract of these accessions showed strong antibacterial activity (≥4 log(10) cfu) against Hemophilus influenzae , Legionella pneumophila , Propionibacterium acnes (ATCC and clinical isolate), and Streptococcus pyogenes at 100 µg/mL. This algal extract inhibited by 3 log(10) Clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , whereas Bacillus cereus , Escherichia coli , Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were not significantly affected. Further investigations of the activity of a glycolipid-rich fraction, extracted with dichloromethane, against Propionibacterium acnes showed an MIC(100) of 50 µg/mL, with an inhibition of more than 99% at only 7.8 µg/mL. The main active compound, a β-d-galactosyl O-linked glycolipid, was synthesized for the bioassay and showed an MIC(100) of 50 µg/mL but lost its activity more quickly with only 50% of inhibition at 12.5 µg/mL. Therefore, the semipurified F. evanescens extract could be a good choice for future research into the development of alternative treatments for acne therapy.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative determination of R-phycoerythrin from Halymenia floresia (Clemente) C. Agardh by polyacrylamide gel using electrophoretic elution technique.

    PubMed

    Malairaj, Sathuvan; Muthu, Sakthivel; Gopal, Venkatesh Babu; Perumal, Palani; Ramasamy, Rengasamy

    2016-07-08

    R-Phycoerythrin is one of the phycobiliproteins widely found in seaweeds. In this study, we have shown to extract and purify R-Phycoerythrin from the south east cost Indian red seaweed Halymenia floresia. R-Phycoerythrin was extracted in 50mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). The preparative native PAGE purification was employed alternative to the chromatography and therefore can be scaled up efficiently. Both the yield and the purity of R-Phycoerythrin are very effective. The purified R-Phycoerythrin showed a single band on the examination by native PAGE electrophrosis. SDS-PAGE analysis showed five bands at 16kDa, 21kDa, 30kDa, 39kDa and 47kDa which corresponds to the α, β and γ', γ and αβ subunits. This preparative method for R-Phycoerythrin purification can offer a reference for R-Phycoerythrin purification from other marine red macro algae.

  19. Structural characterization and evaluation of mosquito-larvicidal property of silver nanoparticles synthesized from the seaweed, Turbinaria ornata (Turner) J. Agardh 1848.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Paramasivam; Sowmiya, Rajamani; Ramkumar, Rajendiran; Balasubramani, Govindasamy; Aiswarya, Dilipkumar; Perumal, Pachiappan

    2016-06-21

    The silver nanoparticles synthesized from Turbinaria ornata (To-AgNPs) showed spherical with crystalline nature (20-32 nm) was evaluated against fourth instar larvae of three mosquitoes. The maximum activity of To-AgNPs was recorded on Aedes aegypti followed by Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus with the following lethal concentration values (μg/ml): LC50 of 0.738, 1.134, and 1.494; and LC90 of 3.342, 17.982, and 22.475, respectively. The obtained respective values (μg/ml) vis-a-vis aqueous extract (To-AE) were: 2.767 and 40.577; 4.347 and 158.399, and 7.351 and 278.994. The findings revealed that To-AgNPs could form a base for the development of an eco-friendly, low-cost pesticide.

  20. LC/ESI-MS n and 1H HR-MAS NMR analytical methods as useful taxonomical tools within the genus Cystoseira C. Agardh (Fucales; Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Jégou, Camille; Culioli, Gérald; Kervarec, Nelly; Simon, Gaëlle; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie

    2010-12-15

    Species of the genus Cystoseira are particularly hard to discriminate, due to the complexity of their morphology, which can be influenced by their phenological state and ecological parameters. Our study emphasized on the relevance of two kinds of analytical tools, (1) LC/ESI-MS(n) and (2) (1)H HR-MAS NMR, also called in vivo NMR, to identify Cystoseira specimens at the specific level and discuss their taxonomy. For these analyses, samples were collected at several locations in Brittany (France), where Cystoseira baccata, C. foeniculacea, C. humilis, C. nodicaulis and C. tamariscifolia were previously reported. To validate our chemical procedure, the sequence of the ITS2 has been obtained for each species to investigate their phylogenetic relationships at a molecular level. Our study highlighted the consistency of the two physico-chemical methods, compared to "classical" molecular approach, in studying taxonomy within the genus Cystoseira. Especially, LC/ESI-MS(n) and phylogenetic analyses converged into the discrimination of two taxonomical groups among the 5 species. The occurrence of some specific signals in the (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra and/or some characteristic chemical compounds during LC/ESI-MS(n) analysis could be regarded as discriminating factors. LC/ESI-MS(n) and (1)H HR-MAS NMR turned out to be two relevant and innovative techniques to discriminate taxonomically this complex genus.

  1. Systematics of marine brown alga Sargassum from Thailand: A preliminary study based on morphological data and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantachumpoo, Attachai; Uwai, Shinya; Noiraksar, Thidarat; Komatsu, Teruhisa

    2015-06-01

    The marine brown algal genus Sargassum has been investigated extensively based on genetic information. In this report, we performed the first comparative study of morphological and molecular data among common species of Sargassum found in Thailand and explored the phylogenetic diversity within the genus. Our results revealed an incongruent pattern for species classification in Thai Sargassum. Morphologically, our Sargassum specimens were distinguishable and represented 8 species, namely, S. aquifolium (Turner) C.Agardh, Sargassum baccularia (Mertens) C. Agardh, S. cinereum J. Agardh, S. ilicifolium (Turner) C.Agardh, S. oligocystum Montagne, S. plagiophyllum C. Agardh, S. polycystum C. Agardh and S. swartzii (Turuner) C. Agardh. In contrast, using three different methods, phylogenetic analysis of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) revealed six distinct clades, including S. baccularia/ S. oligosyntum clade, S. aquifolium/ S. swartzii clade, S. cinereum clade, S. aquifolium/ S. ilicifolium clade, S. polycystum clade, and S. plagiophyllum clade, which was suggestive of a phenotypic plasticity species complex. Our molecular data also confirmed the paraphyletic relationship in the section Binderianae and suggested that this section requires reassessment. Overall, further studies are required to increase our understanding of the taxonomy, phylogenetic relationships and species boundaries among Sargassum species in Thailand.

  2. Circadian Rhythms of Chloroplast Orientation and Photosynthetic Capacity in Ulva123

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Steven J.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1976-01-01

    Ulva lactuca L. var. latissima (L.) Decandolle and var. rigida (C. Agardh) Le Jolis and U. mutabilis Foyn have a circadian rhythm of chloroplast orientation which results in large changes in the light-absorption properties of the thallus. During the day, the chloroplasts cover the outer face of the cells and absorbance is high. At night, the chloroplasts are along the side walls and absorbance is low. Enteromorpha linza (L.) J. Agardh, E. intestinalis (L.) Link, E. sp., and Monostroma grevillei (Thuret) Wittrock, members of the Ulvales, were not observed to have this rhythmic movement. Chloroplasts, when in the face position, could not be induced to move to the sides by high intensity light up to 80,000 lux. Unrelated to chloroplast position per se and light-absorption efficiency, there is a rhythm of photosynthetic capacity which peaks just before midday and which continues in constant darkness. Images PMID:16659613

  3. Lipoxygenase inhibitors derived from marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hideyuki; Kagawa, Yoshio; Konno, Remi; Kim, Sang Moo; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2014-03-01

    The solvent extracts from the algae Sargassum thunbergii (Sargassaceae) and Odonthalia corymbifera (Rhodomelaceae) were subjected to soybean lipoxygenase inhibitory screening. Two hydrophobic inhibitors were obtained from the extracts of S. thunbergii through inhibitory assay-guided fractionation. The inhibitors were identified as known exo-methylenic alkapolyenes (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)-1,6,9,12,15-henicosapentaene (1) and (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z,18Z)-1,6,9,12,15,18-henicosahexaene (2). The alkapolyenes 1 and 2 showed higher inhibitory activity than the known inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). Pheophytin a (3) was obtained from the extract of O. corymbifera. The inhibitor 3 also showed higher inhibitory activity than NDGA. This is the first report on lipoxygenase inhibition of exo-methylenic alkapolyenes and a chlorophyll a-related substance.

  4. Possible sister groups and phylogenetic relationships among selected North Pacific and North Atlantic Rhodophyta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, Sandra C.

    1987-09-01

    Although the cool temperate (boreal) waters of the N. Pacific and N. Atlantic share many similar if not identical species, there have been few studies to test the identity of these species pairs. Whereas such tests are important from a taxonomic perspective, they tell us little if anything about biogeographic relationships. A more useful approach is one employing phylogenetic systematics (cladistics). The interpretation of phylogenetic diagrams (cladograms) in terms of biogeographic area relationships is explained. It is argued that cladistic analyses of taxa occurring in the cool temperate waters of the northern oceans can provide biogeographic tracks, which in turn can suggest the origins and migrations of species and possibly even floras. A number of cool temperate taxa that appear particularly amenable to this approach are discussed, including genera in the Palmariaceae, Corallinaceae, Dumontiaceae, Solieriaceae, Petrocelidaceae, Ceramiaceae and Rhodomelaceae.

  5. Sphaerococcus coronopifolius (Rhodophyta, Gigartinales): a Mediterranean red alga with potential and applications in restoration.

    PubMed

    Fratini, Filippo; Rivière, Catherine; Santamaria, Ulderico

    2016-04-25

    Experimental studies conducted on some species of Mediterranean red algae allowed to identify Sphaerococcus coronopifolius Stackhouse as a valid alternative to the Pacific alga Gloiopeltis furcata (Postels & Ruprecht) J. Agardh, for the extraction of a material usable as natural consolidant and adhesive in the field of restoration. Promising results have been observed by comparing the extracts obtained from these two algae after the same extraction procedure. Chemical analysis (FTIR) revealed that S. coronopifolius has qualities similar to G. furcata. Even more promising results for S. coronopifolius compared to G. furcata were observed after the analysis of pH and conductivity, and the adhesion tests carried out on both extracts.

  6. Experimental evidence for the effects of polyphenolic compounds from Dictyoneurum californicum Ruprecht (Phaeophyta: Laminariales) on feeding rate and growth in the red abalone Haliotus rufescens Swainson

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Frank C.; Estes, James A.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of polyphenolic compounds from brown algae on grazing and growth rate of the California red abalone Haliotis rufescens Swainson were examined. Abalone consumed three phenolic-poor algal species, Laminaria sinclarii (Harvey) Farlow, Macrocystis pyrifera Agardh, and Nereocystis luetkeana Postels et Ruprecht (mean phenolic content = 0.52% dry mass), at a greater rate than two phenolic-rich species, Dictyoneurum californicum Ruprecht and Cystoseira osmundacea Agardh (mean phenolic content = 4.60% dry mass). This inverse relationship between phenolic content and consumption rate also existed after the algae were macerated and the liquid portion of the blended slurry incorporated in agar discs. However, the correlation between grazing rate and phenolic content imprpve d in this latter experiment, thus suggesting that abalone grazing was deterred significantly by the morphology of L. sinclarii and, to a lesser extent, of M. pyrifera. Polyphenolics extracted from D. californicum reduced abalone grazing rates by 90% when incorporated into agar discs at a concentration of 6 mg·ml−1. Although abalone were unable to maintain body mass when fed ad libitum on macerated M. pyrifera incorporated into agar discs, polyphenolics from D. californicum further inhibited shell growth when added to the discs at 5 mg·ml−1. The abalone ate less of the phenol-containing discs than of the discs lacking phenolics. Our results support findings of several prior studies that polyphenolic compounds from brown algae deter grazing by coastal zone herbivores in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

  7. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF ECKLONIA RADIATA (LAMINARIALES) TO A LATITUDINAL GRADIENT IN OCEAN TEMPERATURE(1).

    PubMed

    Staehr, Peter A; Wernberg, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    We tested the ability of sporophytes of a small kelp, Ecklonia radiata (C. Agardh) J. Agardh, to adjust their photosynthesis, respiration, and cellular processes to increasingly warm ocean climates along a latitudinal gradient in ocean temperature (∼4°C). Tissue concentrations of pigment and nutrients decreased with increasing ocean temperature. Concurrently, a number of gradual changes in the metabolic balance of E. radiata took place along the latitudinal gradient. Warm-acclimatized kelps had 50% lower photosynthetic rates and 90% lower respiration rates at the optimum temperature than did cool-acclimatized kelps. A reduction in temperature sensitivity was also observed as a reduction in Q10 -values from cool- to warm-acclimatized kelps for gross photosynthesis (Q10 : 3.35 to 1.45) and respiration (Q10 : 3.82 to 1.65). Respiration rates were more sensitive to increasing experimental temperatures (10% higher Q10 -values) than photosynthesis and had a higher optimum temperature, irrespective of sampling location. To maintain a positive carbon balance, E. radiata increased the critical light demand (Ec ) exponentially with increasing experimental temperature. The temperature dependency of Ec was, however, weakened with increasing ocean temperature, such that the critical light demand was relaxed in kelp acclimated to higher ocean temperatures. Nevertheless, calculations of critical depth limits suggested that direct effects of future temperature increases are unlikely to be as strong as effects of reduced water clarity, another globally increasing problem in coastal areas.

  8. Genetic Affinities between Trans-Oceanic Populations of Non-Buoyant Macroalgae in the High Latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.; Spencer, Hamish G.; Salvatore, Laura C.; Garcia, Gabriella R.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine biologists and biogeographers have long been puzzled by apparently non-dispersive coastal taxa that nonetheless have extensive transoceanic distributions. We here carried out a broad-scale phylogeographic study to test whether two widespread Southern Hemisphere species of non-buoyant littoral macroalgae are capable of long-distance dispersal. Samples were collected from along the coasts of southern Chile, New Zealand and several subAntarctic islands, with the focus on high latitude populations in the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current or West Wind Drift. We targeted two widespread littoral macroalgal species: the brown alga Adenocystisutricularis (Ectocarpales, Heterokontophyta) and the red alga Bostrychiaintricata (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta). Phylogenetic analyses were performed using partial mitochondrial (COI), chloroplast (rbcL) and ribosomal nuclear (LSU / 28S) DNA sequence data. Numerous deeply-divergent clades were resolved across all markers in each of the target species, but close phylogenetic relationships – even shared haplotypes – were observed among some populations separated by large oceanic distances. Despite not being particularly buoyant, both Adenocystisutricularis and Bostrychiaintricata thus show genetic signatures of recent dispersal across vast oceanic distances, presumably by attachment to floating substrata such as wood or buoyant macroalgae. PMID:23894421

  9. Macroalgal Introductions by Hull Fouling on Recreational Vessels: Seaweeds and Sailors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineur, Frédéric; Johnson, Mark P.; Maggs, Christine A.

    2008-10-01

    Macroalgal invasions in coastal areas have been a growing concern during the past decade. The present study aimed to assess the role of hull fouling on recreational yachts as a vector for macroalgal introductions. Questionnaire and hull surveys were carried out in marinas in France and Spain. The questionnaires revealed that the majority of yacht owners are aware of seaweed introductions, usually undertake short range journeys, dry dock their boat at least once a year, and use antifouling paints. The hull survey showed that many in-service yachts were completely free of macroalgae. When present, fouling assemblages consisted mainly of one to two macroalgal species. The most commonly found species was the tolerant green seaweed Ulva flexuosa. Most of the other species found are also cosmopolitan and opportunistic. A few nonnative and potentially invasive Ceramiales (Rhodophyta) were found occasionally on in-service yachts. On the basis of the information gathered during interviews of yacht owners in the surveyed area, these occurrences are likely to be uncommon. However they can pose a significant risk of primary or secondary introductions of alien macroalgal species, especially in the light of the increase in yachting activities. With large numbers of recreational yachts and relatively rare occurrences of nonnative species on hulls, comprehensive screening programs do not seem justified or practical. The risks of transferring nonnative species may, however, be minimized by encouraging the behaviors that prevent fouling on hulls and by taking action against neglected boats before they can act as vectors.

  10. Anti-Angiogenic Properties of BDDPM, a Bromophenol from Marine Red Alga Rhodomela confervoides, with Multi Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiyu; Wang, Li-Jun; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ning; Li, Xiangqian; Liu, Shaofang; Luo, Jiao; Shi, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Bis-(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxy-phenyl)-methane (BDDPM) is a bromophenol first isolated from Rhodomelaceae confervoides. Our previous studies showed that BDDPM exerts PTP1B-inhibiting activity and anti-cancer activity against a wide range of tumor cells while it also showed lower cytotoxicity against normal cells. In the present study, we found that BDDPM exhibits significant activities toward angiogenesis in vitro. BDDPM inhibits multiple angiogenesis processes, including endothelial cell sprouting, migration, proliferation, and tube formation. Further kinase assays investigations found that BDDPM is a potent selective, but multi-target, receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKs) inhibitor. BDDPM (10 μM) inhibits the activities of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (FGFR2, 3), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) (inhibition rate: 57.7%, 78.6%, 78.5% and 71.1%, respectively). Moreover, BDDPM also decreases the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as nitric oxide (NO) production in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that BDDPM can be exploited as an anti-angiogenic drug, or as a lead compound for the development of novel multi-target RTKs inhibitors. PMID:26075871

  11. Halocarbon emissions by selected tropical seaweeds: species-specific and compound-specific responses under changing pH.

    PubMed

    Mithoo-Singh, Paramjeet Kaur; Keng, Fiona S-L; Phang, Siew-Moi; Leedham Elvidge, Emma C; Sturges, William T; Malin, Gill; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah

    2017-01-01

    Five tropical seaweeds, Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty ex P.C. Silva, Padina australis Hauck, Sargassum binderi Sonder ex J. Agardh (syn. S. aquifolium (Turner) C. Agardh), Sargassum siliquosum J. Agardh and Turbinaria conoides (J. Agardh) Kützing, were incubated in seawater of pH 8.0, 7.8 (ambient), 7.6, 7.4 and 7.2, to study the effects of changing seawater pH on halocarbon emissions. Eight halocarbon species known to be emitted by seaweeds were investigated: bromoform (CHBr3), dibro-momethane (CH2Br2), iodomethane (CH3I), diiodomethane (CH2I2), bromoiodomethane (CH2BrI), bromochlorometh-ane (CH2BrCl), bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2), and dibro-mochloromethane (CHBr2Cl). These very short-lived halocarbon gases are believed to contribute to stratospheric halogen concentrations if released in the tropics. It was observed that the seaweeds emit all eight halocarbons assayed, with the exception of K. alvarezii and S. binderi for CH2I2 and CH3I respectively, which were not measurable at the achievable limit of detection. The effect of pH on halocarbon emission by the seaweeds was shown to be species-specific and compound specific. The highest percentage changes in emissions for the halocarbons of interest were observed at the lower pH levels of 7.2 and 7.4 especially in Padina australis and Sargassum spp., showing that lower seawater pH causes elevated emissions of some halocarbon compounds. In general the seaweed least affected by pH change in terms of types of halocarbon emission, was P. australis. The commercially farmed seaweed K. alvarezii was very sensitive to pH change as shown by the high increases in most of the compounds in all pH levels relative to ambient. In terms of percentage decrease in maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Fv∕Fm) prior to and after incubation, there were no significant correlations with the various pH levels tested for all seaweeds. The correlation between percentage decrease in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Fv

  12. Halocarbon emissions by selected tropical seaweeds: species-specific and compound-specific responses under changing pH

    PubMed Central

    Leedham Elvidge, Emma C.; Sturges, William T.; Malin, Gill; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah

    2017-01-01

    Five tropical seaweeds, Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty ex P.C. Silva, Padina australis Hauck, Sargassum binderi Sonder ex J. Agardh (syn. S. aquifolium (Turner) C. Agardh), Sargassum siliquosum J. Agardh and Turbinaria conoides (J. Agardh) Kützing, were incubated in seawater of pH 8.0, 7.8 (ambient), 7.6, 7.4 and 7.2, to study the effects of changing seawater pH on halocarbon emissions. Eight halocarbon species known to be emitted by seaweeds were investigated: bromoform (CHBr3), dibro­momethane (CH2Br2), iodomethane (CH3I), diiodomethane (CH2I2), bromoiodomethane (CH2BrI), bromochlorometh­ane (CH2BrCl), bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2), and dibro­mochloromethane (CHBr2Cl). These very short-lived halocarbon gases are believed to contribute to stratospheric halogen concentrations if released in the tropics. It was observed that the seaweeds emit all eight halocarbons assayed, with the exception of K. alvarezii and S. binderi for CH2I2 and CH3I respectively, which were not measurable at the achievable limit of detection. The effect of pH on halocarbon emission by the seaweeds was shown to be species-specific and compound specific. The highest percentage changes in emissions for the halocarbons of interest were observed at the lower pH levels of 7.2 and 7.4 especially in Padina australis and Sargassum spp., showing that lower seawater pH causes elevated emissions of some halocarbon compounds. In general the seaweed least affected by pH change in terms of types of halocarbon emission, was P. australis. The commercially farmed seaweed K. alvarezii was very sensitive to pH change as shown by the high increases in most of the compounds in all pH levels relative to ambient. In terms of percentage decrease in maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Fv∕Fm) prior to and after incubation, there were no significant correlations with the various pH levels tested for all seaweeds. The correlation between percentage decrease in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis

  13. Identification of the toxic compounds produced by Sargassum thunbergii to red tide microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renjun; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2012-09-01

    The inhibitory effects of methanol extracts from the tissues of three macroalgal species on the growths of three marine red tide microalgae were assessed under laboratory conditions. Extracts of Sargassum thunbergii (Mertens ex Roth) Kuntz tissue had stronger inhibitory effects than those of either Sargassum pallidum (Turner) C. Agardh or Sargassum kjellmanianum Yendo on the growths of Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada) Hada, Skeletonema costatum (Grev.) Grev, and Prorocentrum micans Ehrenberg. Methanol extracts of S. thunbergii were further divided into petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, butanol, and distilled water phases by liquid-liquid fractionation. The petroleum ether and ethyl acetate fractions had strong algicidal effects on the microalgae. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of these two phases identified nine fatty acids, most of which were unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, pure compounds of four of the nine unsaturated fatty acids had effective concentrations below 5 mg/L. Therefore, unsaturated fatty acids are a component of the allelochemicals in S. thunbergii tissue.

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF SOME HEAVY METALS BIOSORPTION BY REPRESENTATIVE EGYPTIAN MARINE ALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Elrefaii, Abdelmonem H; Sallam, Lotfy A; Hamdy, Abdelhamid A; Ahmed, Eman F

    2012-04-01

    Marine algae-as inexpensive and renewable natural biomass-have attracted the attention of many investigators to be used to preconcentrate and biosorb many heavy metal ions. Impressed by this concept, the metal uptake capacity of Egyptian marine algae was examined using representatives of green and brown algae, namely, Ulva lactuca L. and Sargassum latifolium (Turner) C. Agardh, respectively. The biosorption efficiencies of Cu(2+) , Co(2+) , Ni(2+) , Cd(2+) , Hg(2+) , Ag(2+) , and Pb(2+) ions seem to depend on the type of the algae used as well as the conditions under which the uptake processes were conducted. It was demonstrated that a pH range of 7.5-8.8 was optimum for the removal of the tested metals. Similarly, the uptake process was markedly accelerated during the first 2 h using relatively low metal level and sufficient amounts of the dried powdered tested algae.

  15. Environmental influences on kelp performance across the reproductive period: an ecological trade-off between gametophyte survival and growth?

    PubMed

    Mohring, Margaret B; Kendrick, Gary A; Wernberg, Thomas; Rule, Michael J; Vanderklift, Mathew A

    2013-01-01

    Most kelps (order Laminariales) exhibit distinct temporal patterns in zoospore production, gametogenesis and gametophyte reproduction. Natural fluctuations in ambient environmental conditions influence the intrinsic characteristics of gametes, which define their ability to tolerate varied conditions. The aim of this work was to document seasonal patterns in reproduction and gametophyte growth and survival of Ecklonia radiata (C. Agardh) J. Agardh in south-western Australia. These results were related to patterns in local environmental conditions in an attempt to ascertain which factors explain variation throughout the season. E. radiata was fertile (produced zoospores) for three and a half months over summer and autumn. Every two weeks during this time, gametophytes were grown in a range of temperatures (16-22 °C) in the laboratory. Zoospore densities were highly variable among sample periods; however, zoospores released early in the season produced gametophytes which had greater rates of growth and survival, and these rates declined towards the end of the reproductive season. Growth rates of gametophytes were positively related to day length, with the fastest growing recruits released when the days were longest. Gametophytes consistently survived best in the lowest temperature (16 °C), yet exhibited optimum growth in higher culture temperatures (20-22 °C). These results suggest that E. radiata releases gametes when conditions are favourable for growth, and E. radiata gametophytes are tolerant of the range of temperatures observed at this location. E. radiata releases the healthiest gametophytes when day length and temperature conditions are optimal for better germination, growth, and sporophyte production, perhaps as a mechanism to help compete against other species for space and other resources.

  16. Porphyra (Bangiophyceae) Transcriptomes Provide Insights Into Red Algal Development And Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Blouin, Nicolas A; Zhuang, Yunyun; Zäuner, Simone; Prochnik, Simon E; Lindquist, Erika; Lin, Senjie; Benning, Christoph; Lohr, Martin; Yarish, Charles; Gantt, Elisabeth; Grossman, Arthur R; Lu, Shan; Müller, Kirsten; W Stiller, John; Brawley, Susan H; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-12-01

    The red seaweed Porphyra (Bangiophyceae) and related Bangiales have global economic importance. Here, we report the analysis of a comprehensive transcriptome comprising ca. 4.7 million expressed sequence tag (EST) reads from P. umbilicalis (L.) J. Agardh and P. purpurea (Roth) C. Agardh (ca. 980 Mbp of data generated using 454 FLX pyrosequencing). These ESTs were isolated from the haploid gametophyte (blades from both species) and diploid conchocelis stage (from P. purpurea). In a bioinformatic analysis, only 20% of the contigs were found to encode proteins of known biological function. Comparative analysis of predicted protein functions in mesophilic (including Porphyra) and extremophilic red algae suggest that the former has more putative functions related to signaling, membrane transport processes, and establishment of protein complexes. These enhanced functions may reflect general mesophilic adaptations. A near-complete repertoire of genes encoding histones and ribosomal proteins was identified, with some differentially regulated between the blade and conchocelis stage in P. purpurea. This finding may reflect specific regulatory processes associated with these distinct phases of the life history. Fatty acid desaturation patterns, in combination with gene expression profiles, demonstrate differences from seed plants with respect to the transport of fatty acid/lipid among subcellular compartments and the molecular machinery of lipid assembly. We also recovered a near-complete gene repertoire for enzymes involved in the formation of sterols and carotenoids, including candidate genes for the biosynthesis of lutein. Our findings provide key insights into the evolution, development, and biology of Porphyra, an important lineage of red algae.

  17. MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE II AND III IN THE CHROMALVEOLATES(1).

    PubMed

    Ghoshroy, Sohini; Robertson, Deborah L

    2012-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is encoded by three distinct gene families (GSI, GSII, and GSIII) that are broadly distributed among the three domains of life. Previous studies established that GSII and GSIII isoenzymes were expressed in diatoms; however, less is known about the distribution and evolution of the gene families in other chromalveolate lineages. Thus, GSII cDNA sequences were isolated from three cryptophytes (Guillardia theta D. R. A. Hill et Wetherbee, Cryptomonas phaseolus Skuja, and Pyrenomonas helgolandii Santore), and GSIII was sequenced from G. theta. Red algal GSII sequences were obtained from Bangia atropurpurea (Mertens ex Roth) C. Agardh; Compsopogon caeruleus (Balbis ex C. Agardh) Mont.; Flintiella sanguinaria F. D. Ott and Porphyridium aerugineum Geitler; Rhodella violacea (Kornmann) Wehrmeyer and Dixoniella grisea (Geitler) J. L. Scott, S. T. Broadwater, B. D. Saunders, J. P. Thomas et P. W. Gabrielson; and Stylonema alsidii (Zanardini) K. M. Drew. In Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analyses, chromalveolate GSII sequences formed a weakly supported clade that nested among sequences from glaucophytes, red algae, green algae, and plants. Red algal GSII sequences formed two distinct clades. The largest clade contained representatives from the Cyanidiophytina and Rhodophytina and grouped with plants and green algae. The smaller clade (C. caeruleus, Porphyra yezoensis, and S. alsidii) nested within the chromalveolates, although its placement was unresolved. Chromalveolate GSIII sequences formed a well-supported clade in Bayesian and ML phylogenies, and mitochondrial transit peptides were identified in many of the sequences. There was strong support for a stramenopile-haptophyte-cryptophyte GSIII clade in which the cryptophyte sequence diverged from the deepest node. Overall, the evolutionary history of the GS gene families within the algae is complex with evidence for the presence of orthologous and paralogous sequences

  18. Estimates of nuclear DNA content in red algal lineages

    PubMed Central

    Kapraun, Donald F.; Freshwater, D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The red algae are an evolutionarily ancient group of predominantly marine organisms with an estimated 6000 species. Consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies support a basal split between the unicellular Cyanidiophytina and morphologically diverse Rhodophytina, the later subphylum containing most red algal species. The Rhodophytina is divided into six classes, of which five represent early diverging lineages of generally uninucleate species, whose evolutionary relationships are poorly resolved. The remaining species compose the large (27 currently recognized orders), morphologically diverse and typically multinucleate Florideophyceae. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for <1 % of the described red algae. The present investigation summarizes the state of our knowledge and expands our coverage of DNA content information from 196 isolates of red algae. Methodology The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and RBC (chicken erythrocytes) standards were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. Principal results Nuclear DNA contents are reported for 196 isolates of red algae, almost doubling the number of estimates available for these organisms. Present results also confirm the reported DNA content range of 0.1–2.8 pg, with species of Ceramiales, Nemaliales and Palmariales containing apparently polyploid genomes with 2C = 2.8, 2.3 and 2.8 pg, respectively. Conclusions Early diverging red algal lineages are characterized by relatively small 2C DNA contents while a wide range of 2C values is found within the derived Florideophyceae. An overall correlation between phylogenetic placement and 2C DNA content is not apparent; however, genome size data are available for only a small portion of red algae. Current data do support polyploidy and aneuploidy as pervasive features of red algal genome evolution. PMID:22479676

  19. Marine Invasion in the Mediterranean Sea: The Role of Abiotic Factors When There Is No Biological Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The tropical red alga Womersleyella setacea (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) is causing increasing concern in the Mediterranean Sea because of its invasive behavior. After its introduction it has colonized most Mediterranean areas, but the mechanism underlying its acclimatization and invasion process remains unknown. To understand this process, we decided i) to assess in situ the seasonal biomass and phenological patterns of populations inhabiting the Mediterranean Sea in relation to the main environmental factors, and ii) to experimentally determine if the tolerance of W. setacea to different light and temperature conditions can explain its colonization success, as well as its bathymetric distribution range. The bathymetric distribution, biomass, and phenology of W. setacea were studied at two localities, and related to irradiance and temperature values recorded in situ. Laboratory experiments were set up to study survival, growth and reproduction under contrasting light and temperature conditions in the short, mid, and long term.Results showed that, in the studied area, the bathymetric distribution of W. setacea is restricted to a depth belt between 25 and 40 m deep, reaching maximum biomass values (126 g dw m−2) at 30 m depth. In concordance, although in the short term W. setacea survived and grew in a large range of environmental conditions, its life requirements for the mid and long term were dim light levels and low temperatures. Biomass of Womersleyella setacea did not show any clear seasonal pattern, though minimum values were reported in spring. Reproductive structures were always absent. Bearing in mind that no herbivores feed on Womersleyella setacea and that its thermal preferences are more characteristic of temperate than of tropical seaweeds, low light (50 µmol photon m−2 s−1) and low temperature (12°C) levels are critical for W. setacea survival and growth, thus probably determining its spread and bathymetric distribution across the Mediterranean

  20. Marine invasion in the Mediterranean Sea: the role of abiotic factors when there is no biological resistance.

    PubMed

    Cebrian, Emma; Rodríguez-Prieto, Conxi

    2012-01-01

    The tropical red alga Womersleyella setacea (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) is causing increasing concern in the Mediterranean Sea because of its invasive behavior. After its introduction it has colonized most Mediterranean areas, but the mechanism underlying its acclimatization and invasion process remains unknown. To understand this process, we decided i) to assess in situ the seasonal biomass and phenological patterns of populations inhabiting the Mediterranean Sea in relation to the main environmental factors, and ii) to experimentally determine if the tolerance of W. setacea to different light and temperature conditions can explain its colonization success, as well as its bathymetric distribution range. The bathymetric distribution, biomass, and phenology of W. setacea were studied at two localities, and related to irradiance and temperature values recorded in situ. Laboratory experiments were set up to study survival, growth and reproduction under contrasting light and temperature conditions in the short, mid, and long term. Results showed that, in the studied area, the bathymetric distribution of W. setacea is restricted to a depth belt between 25 and 40 m deep, reaching maximum biomass values (126 g dw m(-2)) at 30 m depth. In concordance, although in the short term W. setacea survived and grew in a large range of environmental conditions, its life requirements for the mid and long term were dim light levels and low temperatures. Biomass of Womersleyella setacea did not show any clear seasonal pattern, though minimum values were reported in spring. Reproductive structures were always absent. Bearing in mind that no herbivores feed on Womersleyella setacea and that its thermal preferences are more characteristic of temperate than of tropical seaweeds, low light (50 µmol photon m(-2) s(-1)) and low temperature (12°C) levels are critical for W. setacea survival and growth, thus probably determining its spread and bathymetric distribution across the Mediterranean

  1. The fate of Cystoseira crinita, a forest-forming Fucale (Phaeophyceae, Stramenopiles), in France (North Western Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanfuné, A.; Boudouresque, C. F.; Verlaque, M.; Thibaut, T.

    2016-11-01

    In the Mediterranean Sea, Fucales, and in particular the species of the genus Cystoseira C. Agardh, are habitat-forming species dominating several benthic assemblages from the littoral fringe down to 70-80 m depth in the clearest waters. They generate high primary production involved in the maintenance of diversified trophic levels, they provide shelter, food, habitat and nursery areas to many species, and they are long-lived species that constitute a good model for studying human impact on species diversity. Cystoseira crinita Duby is a Mediterranean endemic cespitose species, living in shallow waters (0-5 m depth), in places with little wave action and high solar irradiance. To reconstruct the long-term patterns of change in its distribution along the French Mediterranean coast (French Catalonia, Languedoc, Provence, French Riviera and Corsica), all the historical data (published articles, unpublished reports and herbarium vouchers) collected since the 18th century were searched and analysed. To assess the current status of the species, several field surveys were conducted between 2010 and 2016 by snorkelling and SCUBA diving. Cystoseira crinita is currently extinct in French Catalonia, near-extinct in Languedoc and western Provence, and functionally extinct on the French Riviera coast, while the eastern Provence and Corsican populations have remained stable. The main probable causes of decline are habitat destruction and overgrazing by herbivores.

  2. Effects of UV-B irradiation on isoforms of antioxidant enzymes and their activities in red alga Grateloupia filicina (Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiqiang; Li, Lixia

    2014-11-01

    Macroalgae in a littoral zone are inevitably exposed to UV-B irradiance. We analyzed the effects of UV-B on isoenzyme patterns and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) of red algae Grateloupia filicina (Lamour.) C. Agardh. The activities of SOD, CAT, and APX changed in response to UV-B in a time- and dose-dependent manner. POX activity increased significantly under all three UV-B treatments. The enzymatic assay showed three distinct bands of SODI (Mn-SOD), SODII (Fe-SOD), and SODIII (CuZn-SOD) under a low (Luv) and medium (Muv) dose of UV-B irradiation, while SODI and SODIII activities decreased significantly when exposed to a high dose of UV-B irradiation (Huv). The activity of POX isoenzymes increased significantly after exposure to UV-B, which is consistent with the total activity. In addition, a clear decrease in activity of CATIV was detected in response to all the three doses of UV treatments. Some bands of APX isoenzyme were also clearly influenced by UV-B irradiation. Correspondingly, the daily growth rate declined under all the three exposure doses, and was especially significant under Muv and Huv treatments. These data suggest that, although the protection mechanisms of antioxidant defense system are partly inducible by UV-B to prevent the damage, G. filicina has incomplete tolerance to higher UV-B irradiation stress.

  3. Nuclear DNA level and life cycle of kelps: Evidence for sex-specific polyteny in Macrocystis (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Müller, Dieter G; Maier, Ingo; Marie, Dominique; Westermeier, Renato

    2016-04-01

    Giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera (Linnaeus) C. Agardh, is the subject of intense breeding studies for marine biomass production and conservation of natural resources. In this context, six gametophyte pairs and a sporophyte offspring of Macrocystis from South America were analyzed by flow cytometry. Minimum relative DNA content per cell (1C) was found in five males. Unexpectedly, nuclei of all female gametophytes contained approximately double the DNA content (2C) of males; the male gametophyte from one locality also contained 2C, likely a spontaneous natural diploid variant. The results illustrate a sex-specific difference in nuclear DNA content among Macrocystis gametophytes, with the chromosomes of the females in a polytenic condition. This correlates with significantly larger cell sizes in female gametophytes compared to males and resource allocation in oogamous reproduction. The results provide key information for the interpretation of DNA measurements in kelp life cycle stages and prompt further research on the regulation of the cell cycle, metabolic activity, sex determination, and sporophyte development.

  4. Eukaryotic pathogens (Chytridiomycota and Oomycota) infecting marine microphytobenthic diatoms - a methodological comparison.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Bettina; Küpper, Frithjof C; Vyverman, Wim; Karsten, Ulf

    2014-12-01

    Using sediment samples from the Solthörn tidal flat (southern North Sea, Germany), collected in bi-weekly intervals from June to July 2012, a range of qualitative and quantitative screening methods for oomycete and chytrid pathogens infecting benthic diatoms were evaluated. Pre-treatment of sediment samples using short ultrasound pulses and gradient centrifugation, in combination with CalcoFluor White, showed the best results in the visualization of both pathogen groups. The highest number of infected benthic diatoms was observed in mid July (5.8% of the total benthic diatom community). Most infections were caused by chytrids and, in a few cases, oomycetes (Lagenisma Drebes (host: Coscinodiscus radiatus Ehrenberg) and Ectrogella Zopf (hosts: Dimeregramma minor in Pritchard and Gyrosigma peisonis). Among the chytrids, sporangium morphology indicated the presence of five different morphotypes, infecting mainly epipelic taxa of the orders Naviculales (e.g., Navicula digitoradiata) and Achnanthales (e.g., Achnanthes brevipes Agardh). The presence of multiple pathogens in several epipelic diatom taxa suggests a significant role for fungal parasitism in affecting microphytobenthic diatom succession.

  5. First report of Caulerpa taxifolia (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) on the Levantine coast (Turkey, Eastern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevik, Cem; Yokes, Mehmet Baki; Cavas, Levent; Erkol, Levent Itri; Derici, Osman Baris; Verlaque, Marc

    2007-09-01

    Since its first accidental introduction into the Mediterranean Sea, Caulerpa taxifolia (Vahl) C. Agardh has spread to six Mediterranean countries and has become a major ecological problem. On the basis of morphological and molecular studies (nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS)), we report for the first time C. taxifolia on the Levantine coast (Gulf of Iskenderun, SE Turkey). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Iskenderun isolate differs from the invasive aquarium strain first observed in Monaco, and falls in another SW Pacific clade (NE Australia, New Caledonia). The introduction in Turkey by shipping (ballast waters or anchor gears of oil tankers) is possible because C. taxifolia was found in the Gulf of Iskenderun, which is a major Eastern Mediterranean petrochemical region. On the other hand, C. taxifolia strains are available in aquarium shops in Turkey, suggesting aquarium dumping as another possible cause. As far as the intense maritime traffic of the region is concerned, further dispersals of this exotic C. taxifolia strain in the Mediterranean Sea are to be expected.

  6. Historical and Current Perspectives on the Systematics of the ‘Enigmatic’ Diatom Genus Rhoicosphenia (Bacillariophyta), with Single and Multi-Molecular Marker and Morphological Analyses and Discussion on the Monophyly of ‘Monoraphid’ Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Evan W.; Stepanek, Joshua G.; Kociolek, J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the phylogenetic position of the diatom genus Rhoicosphenia. Currently, four hypotheses based on the morphology of the siliceous valve and its various ultrastructural components, sexual reproduction, and chloroplasts have been proposed. Two previous morphological studies have tentatively placed Rhoicosphenia near members of the Achnanthidiaceae and Gomphonemataceae, and no molecular studies have been completed. The position of Rhoicosphenia as sister to ‘monoraphid’ diatoms is problematic due to the apparent non-monophyly of that group, so hypotheses of ‘monoraphid’ monophyly are also tested. Using an analysis of morphological and cytological features, as well as sequences from three genes, SSU, LSU, and rbcL, recovered from several freshwater Rhoicosphenia populations that have similar morphology to Rhoicosphenia abbreviata (Agardh) Lange-Bertalot, we have analyzed the phylogenetic position of Rhoicosphenia in the context of raphid diatoms. Further, we have used topology testing to determine the statistical likelihoods of these relationships. The hypothesis that Rhoicosphenia is a member of the Achnanthidiaceae cannot be rejected, while the hypothesis that it is a member of the Gomphonemataceae can be rejected. In our analyses, members of the Achnanthidiaceae are basal to Rhoicosphenia, and Rhoicosphenia is basal to the Cymbellales, or a basal member of the Cymbellales, which includes the Gomphonemataceae. Hypothesis testing rejects the monophyly of ‘monoraphid’ diatoms. PMID:27045763

  7. Antioxidant system responses in two co-occurring green-tide algae under stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-01-01

    Green tides have occurred every year from 2007 to 2014 in the Yellow Sea. Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh has been identified as the bloom-forming alga, co-occurring with U. intestinalis. We observed distinct strategies for both algal species during green tides. U. prolifera exhibited a high abundance initially and then decreased dramatically, while U. intestinalis persisted throughout. The antioxidant system responses of these two macroalgae were compared in the late phase of a green tide (in-situ) and after laboratory acclimation. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system responses differed significantly between the two. Malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide contents increased significantly in-situ in U. prolifera, but not in U. intestinalis. In U. prolifera, we observed a significant decrease in total antioxidant ability (T-AOC), antioxidant enzymes (SOD and Apx), and non-enzyme antioxidants (GSH and AsA) in-situ. U. intestinalis showed the same pattern of T-AOC and SOD, but its Gpx, Apx, and GSH responses did not differ significantly. The results suggest that U. prolifera was more susceptible than U. intestinalis to the harsh environmental changes during the late phase of a Yellow Sea green tide. The boom and bust strategy exhibited by U. prolifera and the persistence of U. intestinalis can be explained by differences in enzyme activity and antioxidant systems.

  8. Sequential toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) for characterizing toxicity of Venice Lagoon sediments: comparison of two different approaches.

    PubMed

    Picone, Marco; Bergamin, Martina; Volpato, Elisa; Delaney, Eugenia; Turetta, Clara; Ranaldo, Martina; Capodaglio, Gabriele; Nasci, Cristina

    2009-02-01

    A toxicity identification evaluation phase-I (TIE-1) procedure was carried out on five pore water samples extracted from sediments of the Venice Lagoon previously investigated to assess both chemical contamination and toxic effects on the biota. Two different sequential TIE procedures were tested. A first sequence (TIE-1) provided for adding Na2S2O3, adding Na-EDTA, filtering, elution through a C18-SPE column and removing ammonia using the macroalgae Ulva rigida Agardh 1823, while a second procedure (TIE-2) was set up using U. rigida treatment for ammonia removal as first step, keeping unchanged the sequence of the other manipulations. Two different exposure time to the macroalgae were tested (3-h and 15-h). Sperm-cell toxicity test with the echinoid Paracentrotus lividus and embryotoxicity tests with the bivalves Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas were performed on pore-water samples to assess the effect of the sequential treatments on the overall toxicity. The results confirmed that ammonia contribution to toxicity is strong in most of the samples and that metals, specially Cu, are of concern at least in three sites. The TIE-2 procedure provided more reliable results for the samples characterized by high ammonia contribution to the overall toxicity, whereas the results of TIE-1 and TIE-2 were equivalent for the samples where ammonia contribution was not prevailing. Chemical analyses and test results showed that a 3-h U. rigida exposure is suitable to remove ammonia toxicity minimizing potential metal up-take.

  9. Amino acid composition and crude protein values of some Cyanobacteria from Çanakkale (Turkey).

    PubMed

    Akgül, Rıza; Kızılkaya, Bayram; Akgül, Füsun; Erduğan, Hüseyin

    2015-09-01

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) form an important component of integrated nutrient managements in agriculture and are exploited in commercial biotechnological ventures. In this study, Rivularia bullata (Poir) Berkeley ex Bornet & Flahault, Nostocs pongiaeforme C. Agardh ex Bornet & Flahault were researched for their amino acid composition and crude protein values. R. bullata was collected from coastal zones of the Gulf of Saros and N. spongiaeforme from the Ayazma Stream. The levels of amino acids were measured in algae samples using EZ: fast kits (EZ: fast GC/FID Protein Hydrolysate Amino Acid Kit) by gas chromatography. The crude proteins of samples were determined by the Kjeldahl method and were calculated using a nitrogen conversion factor of 6.25. Thirty-two amino acids were investigated, for N. spongiaeforme eight free essential amino acids (EAA), eight free non-essential amino acids (NEAA) and eleven other amino acids (OAA); for R. bullata eight EAA, eight NEAA and eight OAA were detected. Aspartic acid is the major constituent for both species. The total protein percents were determined for N. spongiaeforme as % 19.83 and for R. bullata as % 6.15. When considering the increasing world population and reducing natural products; Cyanobacteria will benew feed sources for all living.

  10. Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides from brown seaweeds inhibit proliferation of melanoma cells and induce apoptosis by activation of caspase-3 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-12-01

    Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs) extracted from seaweeds, especially brown macro-algae, are known to possess essential bioactive properties, notably growth inhibitory effects on tumor cells. In this work, we conducted a series of in vitro studies to examine the influence of FCSPs products from Sargassumhenslowianum C. Agardh (FSAR) and Fucus vesiculosus (FVES), respectively, on proliferation of melanoma B16 cells and to investigate the underlying apoptosis promoting mechanisms. Cell viability analysis showed that both FCSPs products, i.e., FSAR and FVES, decreased the proliferation of the melanoma cells in a dose-response fashion, with FSAR being more potent at lower dosages, and FVES being relatively more anti-proliferative than FSAR at higher dosages. Flow cytometric analysis by Annexin V staining of the melanoma cells exposed to the FCSPs products confirmed that both FSAR and FVES induced apoptosis. The FCSPs-induced apoptosis was evidenced by loss of plasma membrane asymmetry and translocation of the cell membrane phospholipids and was accompanied by the activation of caspase-3. The FCSPs bioactivity is proposed to be attributable to distinct structural features of the FCSPs, particularly the presence of sulfated galactofucans (notably in S.henslowianum) and sulfated fucans (notably in F. vesiculosus). This study thus indicates that unfractionated FCSPs may exert bioactive effects on skin cancer cells via induction of apoptosis through cascades of reactions that involve activation of caspase-3.

  11. A comparative study of the photosynthetic capacity in two green tide macroalgae using chlorophyll fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Qu, Tongfei; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xianghai; Xiao, Hui; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-01-01

    Green tides have occurred in the Yellow Sea, China, every year from 2007 to 2015. The free-floating Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh was the causative macroalgal species. The co-occurring, attached U. intestinalis was also observed. Photosynthetic capacities were determined using chlorophyll fluorescence in situ and after 7 days lab acclimation, and a significant differences were noted. Pigment composition showed no obvious differences, but concentrations varied significantly, especially chlorophyll b in U. prolifera two times increase was observed after acclimation. The optimal photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) was significantly higher in U. prolifera. Photosynthetic rate (α), maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax), and minimum saturating irradiance (Ek), obtained from rapid light response curves (RLCs), showed almost the same photosynthetic physiological status as Fv/Fm. Quenching coefficients and low temperature (77 K) chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes analysis showed U. prolifera has a better recovery activity and plasticity of PSII than U. intestinalis. Furthermore, energy dissipation via non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and state transitions showed efficacious photoprotection solution especially in U. prolifera suffered from the severe stresses. Results in the present study suggested that U. prolifera's higher photosynthetic capacity would contribute to its free-floating proliferation, and efficacious photoprotection in addition to favorable oceanographic conditions and high nutrient levels support its growth and aggregation.

  12. Effects of experimental overgrowth on survival and change in the turf assemblage of a giant kelp forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, A.K.; Meslow, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    Crustose coralline algae were the prevalent cover among sessile organisms that paved or grew near the substratum, and also the most commonly overgrown species in a giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C.A. Agardh forest located off San Nicolas Island, California. Giant kelp was the largest and most conspicuous species that overgrew large patches of the substrata; overgrowth among turf organisms also appeared common. To determine the effects of giant kelp holdfasts on crustose coralline algae and other turf organisms,'artificial holdfasts' were placed on 0.125-m2 plots for 5, 8 and 12 months. In these treatments, 50?57% of the crustose coralline algae survived. Because these algae also recruited while covered, the total cover (survivorship plus recruitment) differed by only 7?26% from that sampled at the start of the study. The decline of these algae in control plots was similar to that in the treatment plots mostly because of overgrowth by sessile invertebrates. Bryozoans increased markedly on the control plots, whereas 0?12% survived in the treatment plots. Bryozoans and sponges also recruited under the artificial holdfasts. Some arborescent turf algae survived in the 5- and 8-month treatments; articulated coralline algae survived better than did foliose algae. High survival recruitment of crustose coralline algae while overgrown contributed to their prevalence in benthic communities.

  13. Historical and Current Perspectives on the Systematics of the 'Enigmatic' Diatom Genus Rhoicosphenia (Bacillariophyta), with Single and Multi-Molecular Marker and Morphological Analyses and Discussion on the Monophyly of 'Monoraphid' Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Evan W; Stepanek, Joshua G; Kociolek, J Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the phylogenetic position of the diatom genus Rhoicosphenia. Currently, four hypotheses based on the morphology of the siliceous valve and its various ultrastructural components, sexual reproduction, and chloroplasts have been proposed. Two previous morphological studies have tentatively placed Rhoicosphenia near members of the Achnanthidiaceae and Gomphonemataceae, and no molecular studies have been completed. The position of Rhoicosphenia as sister to 'monoraphid' diatoms is problematic due to the apparent non-monophyly of that group, so hypotheses of 'monoraphid' monophyly are also tested. Using an analysis of morphological and cytological features, as well as sequences from three genes, SSU, LSU, and rbcL, recovered from several freshwater Rhoicosphenia populations that have similar morphology to Rhoicosphenia abbreviata (Agardh) Lange-Bertalot, we have analyzed the phylogenetic position of Rhoicosphenia in the context of raphid diatoms. Further, we have used topology testing to determine the statistical likelihoods of these relationships. The hypothesis that Rhoicosphenia is a member of the Achnanthidiaceae cannot be rejected, while the hypothesis that it is a member of the Gomphonemataceae can be rejected. In our analyses, members of the Achnanthidiaceae are basal to Rhoicosphenia, and Rhoicosphenia is basal to the Cymbellales, or a basal member of the Cymbellales, which includes the Gomphonemataceae. Hypothesis testing rejects the monophyly of 'monoraphid' diatoms.

  14. Vertical and temporal variation in phytoplankton assemblages correlated with environmental conditions in the Mundaú reservoir, semi-arid northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lira, G A S T; Moura, A N; Vilar, M C P; Cordeiro-Araújo, M K; Bittencourt-Oliveira, M C

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to analyse the vertical structure of the phytoplankton community at the Mundaú reservoir, located in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil, and to correlate it to environmental conditions over two distinct seasons, dry and rainy. Samples were collected bimonthly at eight depths in the dry and rainy season for analyses of the physical and chemical variables of the water, as well as density, abundance, dominance, species diversity index and equitability of the community. Analysis of variance (ANOVA-two way) was used to analyse the vertical and seasonal differences, and Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was used to assess associations between phytoplankton and environmental variables Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska) Seenaya and Subba Raju was the only dominant species and Geitlerinema amphibium (C. Agardh) Anagnostidis, Merismopedia punctata Meyen and Synedra rumpens Kützing. Others six taxa were abundant in at least one of the samples. Distinct vertical distribution patterns were observed for the abundant taxa between depths and seasons. The cyanobacteria, with the exception of C. raciborskii, showed similar seasonal patterns, with higher densities in the dry season. The CCA showed a strong correlation between the density of the phytoplanktonic species and abiotic variables. The vertical changes in abundant taxa revealed distinct patterns regulated by the variation in the environmental factors that were directly linked to seasonality, with the success of one or more species being dependent on their life strategies and ecological needs. The present study restates the importance of environmental and seasonal factors for phytoplankton composition and distribution in a freshwater tropical reservoir through a vertical gradient.

  15. THE BIOGEOGRAPHIC ORIGIN OF ARCTIC ENDEMIC SEAWEEDS: A THERMOGEOGRAPHIC VIEW(1).

    PubMed

    Adey, Walter H; Lindstrom, Sandra C; Hommersand, Max H; Müller, Kirsten M

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic is geologically and biogeographically young, and the origin of its seaweed flora has been widely debated. The Arctic littoral biogeographic region dates from the latest Tertiary and Pleistocene. Following the opening of Bering Strait, about 3.5 mya, the "Great Trans-Arctic Biotic Interchange" populated the Arctic with a fauna strongly dominated by species of North Pacific origin. The Thermogeographic Model (TM) demonstrates why climate and geography continued to support this pattern in the Pleistocene. Thus, Arctic and Atlantic subarctic species of seaweeds are likely to be evolutionarily "based" in the North Pacific, subarctic species are likely to be widespread in the warmer Arctic, and species of Atlantic Boreal or warmer origin are unlikely in the Arctic and Subarctic. Although Arctic seaweeds have been thought to have a greater affinity with the North Atlantic, we have reanalyzed the Arctic endemic algal flora, using the Thermogeographic Model and evolutionary trees based on molecular data, to demonstrate otherwise. There are 35 congeneric species of the six, abundant Arctic Rhodophyta that we treat in this paper; 32 of these species (91%) occur in the North Pacific, two species (6%) occur in the Boreal or warmer Atlantic Ocean, and a single species is panoceanic, but restricted to the Subarctic. Laminaria solidungula J. Agardh, a kelp Arctic "endemic" species, has 18 sister species. While only eleven (61%) occur in the North Pacific, this rapidly dispersing and evolving genus is a terminal member of a diverse family and order (Laminariales) widely accepted to have evolved in the North Pacific. Thus, both the physical/time-based TM and the dominant biogeographic pattern of relatives of Arctic macrophytes suggest strong compliance with the evidence of zoology, geology, and paleoclimatology that the Arctic marine flora is largely of Pacific origin.

  16. [Correlation between aquatic plant diversity and water environment in the typical sites of Hangzhou section of the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Xu, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, De-Yong; Wang, Li; Zhu, Xu-Ni; Feng, Feng; Zhou, Qiao-Jun; Xie, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Community characteristics of aquatic plant are important indicators for water quality. In order to understand the distribution characteristics of aquatic plants in aquatic ecosystem of the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal ( Hangzhou section) , and to analyze the relationship between water quality and plant community, an investigation of the aquatic plants in five typical sites was made in this study. Species composition, biological diversity, quantity distribution and dominant species of aquatic plants in five sites were studied for ecological changes. Physicochemical factors such as temperature, pH value, transparency, dissolved oxygen and main elements of living were also analyzed. Based on the results, the distribution of phytoplankton diversity and environment factor correlations by multivariate statistical analysis were discussed. The trophic levels of these sites were assessed by using related biological standards. Results indicated that the diversity of aquatic plant mainly depends on the diversity of phytoplankton in the typical sites of the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal. We observed and identified 35 genus algae, including advantage community of Hyalodiscus Ehrenberg and Melosira Agardh, which belonged to Bacillariophyta. According to the impact on the phytoplankton diversity and distribution, factors such as dissolved oxygen, transparency, water temperature, etc. had an obvious influence on the distribution of phytoplankton in the existing 6 environmental factors, while the influence of pH value was the highest. In terms of water quality eutrophication, site Tangxi Bridge and Maiyu Bridge showed a relatively lighter pollution, while site Yiqiao Bridge, Gujia Bridge and Gongchen Bridge showed a higher pollution, and the pollution of site Yiqiao Bridge was the most serious.

  17. Effects of water quality and hydrologic drivers on periphyton colonization on Sparganium erectum in two Turkish lakes with different mixing regimes.

    PubMed

    Albay, Meriç; Akçaalan, Reyhan

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine and compare the environmental factors controlling vertical colonisation of periphyton on Sparganium erectum in a shallow eutrophic turbid lake, Manyas Lake, and an oligo-mesotrophic deep lake, Sapanca Lake, Turkey during the July 1997--November 1998. To investigate the effect of the environmental factors on periphyton colonization on S. erectum, the stem was cut above the rhizomes and subdivided into three equal sections. Multivariate statistical analyses have been applied to clarify relationships between environmental variables and periphyton colonization on S. erectum. Results indicated that physical disturbance and trophic level of the lakes influenced the colonization of the periphyton. Among the measured parameters, low light intensity, total suspended solids, temperature and water level fluctuation were observed as driving factors in Manyas Lake whereas nutrient deficiency was found as key factor in Sapanca Lake. The zonation of the periphyton, density, composition and dominant/subdominant taxa were significantly different in these lakes. However, Oedogonium sp., Mougeotia sp., Cylindrocapsa sp., Cladophora glomerata (Linn.), Aulacoseira italica (Ehr.) Simonsen, Melosira varians C. Agardh, Navicula tripunctata (O.F. Müller) Bory and Fragilaria ulna (Nitzsch) Lange-Bertalot were found as dominant species at all sections of S. erectum both in Manyas Lake and Sapanca Lake. It can be thought that these species have a broad range of tolerance to several physical, chemical and hydrologic disturbances. This is the first study to introduce how much the water quality and hydrologic drivers have affected vertical colonization of periphyton on S. erectum in two lakes with different mixing regimes.

  18. Comparative studies on the ecophysiological differences of two green tide macroalgae under controlled laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, You; Zhu, Lin; Zhou, Bin; Tang, Xuexi

    2012-01-01

    Yellow Sea green tides have occurred in coastal China almost every year from 2007 to 2011. Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh has been identified as the causative macroalgal species. U. intestinalis, however, has been observed in the bloom areas, co-occurring with U. prolifera, but it has not been found to be causative. The Yellow Sea green tide has shown consistent phases of development that match corresponding environmental changes. U. prolifera, not U. intestinalis, is dominant. Our experimental design was based on these observed phenomena, and the results of our field investigation indicated a close relationship between changes in principal environmental factors (irradiance, temperature, and salinity) and the development of each phase of the bloom. These main environmental factors were simulated to allow estimation and comparison of the physiological responses of U. prolifera and U. intestinalis. Ecophysiological differences were found between these two species. (1) More photosynthetic activity and plasticity were detected in U. prolifera. (2) U. prolifera was found to be more sensitive to dynamic environments, especially harsh and changing environmental conditions. U. intestinalis was found to be more stable, probably due to the higher stress tolerance given by its antioxidant system. (3) Markedly higher nutrient absorption activity was observed in U. prolifera. Comparisons of the ecophysiological traits of these two species in this present study may foster understanding of their natural ecological processes. Specifically, U. prolifera seemed to be more engaged with the ephemeral blooms, while U. intestinalis seemed to be directed toward persistence. This also suggests that the ecological success of U. prolifera may be inextricably linked to its higher capacity for photosynthesis, nutrient absorption, and nutrient assimilation.

  19. Ulva (Chlorophyta, Ulvales) Biodiversity in the North Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean, Italy): Cryptic Species and New Introductions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marion A; Sciuto, Katia; Andreoli, Carlo; Moro, Isabella

    2012-12-01

    Ulva Linnaeus (Ulvophyceae, Ulvales) is a genus of green algae widespread in different aquatic environments. Members of this genus show a very simple morphology and a certain degree of phenotypic plasticity, heavily influenced by environmental conditions, making difficult the delineation of species by morphological features alone. Most studies dealing with Ulva biodiversity in Mediterranean waters have been based only on morphological characters and a modern taxonomic revision of this genus in the Mediterranean is not available. We report here the results of an investigation on the diversity of Ulva in the North Adriatic Sea based on molecular analyses. Collections from three areas, two of which subject to intense shipping traffic, were examined, as well as historical collections of Ulva stored in the Herbarium Patavinum of the University of Padova, Italy. Molecular analyses based on partial sequences of the rbcL and tufA genes revealed the presence of six different species, often with overlapping morphologies: U. californica Wille, U. flexuosa Wulfen, U. rigida C. Agardh, U. compressa Linnaeus, U. pertusa Kjellman, and one probable new taxon. U. californica is a new record for the Mediterranean and U. pertusa is a new record for the Adriatic. Partial sequences obtained from historical collections show that most of the old specimens are referable to U. rigida. No specimens referable to the two alien species were found among the old herbarium specimens. The results indicate that the number of introduced seaweed species and their impact on Mediterranean communities have been underestimated, due to the difficulties in species identification of morphologically simple taxa as Ulva.

  20. Characteristics of non-specific permeability and H+-ATPase inhibition induced in the plasma membrane of Nitella flexilis by excessive Cu2+.

    PubMed

    Demidchik, V; Sokolik, A; Yurin, V

    2001-03-01

    Effects of Cu2+ on a non-specific conductance and H+-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of the freshwater alga Nitella flexilis L. Agardh was studied using a conventional microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. We show that a Cu2+-induced increase in the non-specific conductance is related to the formation of pores in the plasma membrane. Pore formation is the result of unidentified chemical reactions, since the Q10 for the rate of increase of conductance over time was about 3. Various oxidants and antioxidants (10 mmol/l H2O2, 10 mmol/l ascorbate, 100 microg/ml superoxide dismutase, and 100 microg/ml catalase) did not alter Cu2+-induced changes in the plasma membrane conductance, suggesting that the effect of Cu2+ was unrelated to peroxidation of plasma-membrane lipids. In contrast, organic and inorganic Ca2+-channel antagonists (nifedipine, Zn2+, Cd2+, Fe2+, Ni2+) inhibited the Cu2+-induced non-specific conductance increase. This suggests that changes in Ca2+ influx underlie this effect of Cu2+. Decreasing the pH or the ionic strength of external solutions also inhibited the Cu2+-induced plasma-membrane conductance increase. Copper was also found to inhibit plasma-membrane H+-ATPase activity with half-maximal inhibition occurring at about 5-20 micromol/l and full inhibition at about 100-300 micromol/l. The Hill coefficient of Cu2+ inhibition of the H+-ATPase was close to two.

  1. Structure of fructans from excised leaves of New Zealand flax.

    PubMed

    Sims, I M; Cairns, A J; Furneaux, R H

    2001-07-01

    The accumulation of total water-soluble carbohydrate, and specifically sucrose and fructan, by excised leaves of Phormium tenax and P. cookianum (family Phormiaceae J. G. Agardh, order Asparagales) was investigated. Total water-soluble carbohydrate content of excised leaves of P. tenax and P. cookianum increased during 48 h of continuous illumination at an average rate of 1.3 and 0.9 mg g(-1) fresh weight leaf per hour, respectively. The sucrose content of excised leaves increased throughout the experimental period. The fructan content of excised leaves of P. tenax increased slightly throughout the experimental period, whilst that of P. cookianum was variable and showed no overall change. Chemical and spectroscopic analysis of the fructans obtained from the two Phormium species showed that they were similar to each other and contained mostly 1-linked and terminal fructofuranosyl (Fruf) residues, together with smaller amounts of 6-linked Fruf, 1,6-branched Fruf, terminal and 6-linked glucopyranosyl residues. Separation of the fructans by thin-layer and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography revealed the presence of a complex mixture of fructo-oligosaccharides and higher molecular weight fructan. The branched structure of the fructans isolated from excised leaves of Phormium resembles that of fructans and fructo-oligosaccharides isolated from some related species within the order Asparagales (Agave vera cruz, Cordyline australis and Urginea maritima), but is distinct from the linear structure of fructans from others (Allium cepa and Asparagus officinalis). The structural heterogeniety of fructans within both the order Asparagales and superorder Liliiflorae may be a useful chemotaxonomic aid.

  2. Metabolic regulation of ammonium uptake by Ulva rigida (Chlorophyta): A compartmental analysis of the rate-limiting step for uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.M.; Wheeler, P.A.; Edwards, R.L. )

    1988-12-01

    Non-linear time courses of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) depletion from the medium and internal accumulation of soluble nitrogen (N) in macroalgae imply that the rate-limiting step for ammonium uptake changes over time. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the time course of N accumulation in N-limited Ulva rigida C. Agardh. Total uptake was measured as removal of NH{sub 4}{sup +} from medium. Rates for the component processes (transport of NH{sub 4}{sup +} across the membrane = R{sub t}, assimilation of tissue NH{sub 4}{sup +} into soluble N compounds = R{sub a}, and incorporation of soluble N compounds into macromolecules = R{sub i}) were determined by measuring the rate of labelling of the major tissue N pools after the addition of {sup 15}N-ammonium. The results indicate that nitrogen-specific rates (mass N taken up/mass N present/unit time) are ranked in the order of R{sub t} > R{sub a} > R{sub i}. Absolute uptake rates ({mu}mol N{center dot}mg dry wt{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}) showed a different relationship. Membrane transport appears to be inhibited when NH{sub 4}{sup +} accumulates in the tissue. Maximum uptake rates occur when assimilation of NH{sub 4}{sup +} into soluble N compounds begins. Assimilation of NH{sub 4}{sup +} into soluble N compounds was initially faster than incorporation of soluble N compounds into macromolecules. Implications of rate limitations caused by differences in maximal rates and maximal pool sizes are discussed.

  3. Temporal variation in community composition, pigmentation, and Fv/Fm of desert cyanobacterial soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Reed, S.C.; Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    Summers on the Colorado Plateau (USA) are typified by harsh conditions such as high temperatures, brief soil hydration periods, and high UV and visible radiation. We investigated whether community composition, physiological status, and pigmentation might vary in biological soil crusts as a result of such conditions. Representative surface cores were sampled at the ENE, WSW, and top microaspects of 20 individual soil crust pedicels at a single site in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, in spring and fall of 1999. Frequency of cyanobacterial taxa, pigment concentrations, and dark adapted quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were measured for each core. The frequency of major cyanobacterial taxa was lower in the fall compared to spring. The less-pigmented cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus showed significant mortality when not in the presence of Nostoc spp. and Scytonema myochrous (Dillw.) Agardh. (both synthesizers of UV radiation-linked pigments) but had little or no mortality when these species were abundant. We hypothesize that the sunscreen pigments produced by Nostoc and Scytonema in the surface of crusts protect other, less-pigmented taxa. When fall and spring samples were compared, overall cyanobacterial frequency was lower in fall, while sunscreen pigment concentrations, chlorophyll a concentration, and Fv/Fm were higher in fall. The ratio of cyanobacterial frequency/chlorophyll a concentrations was 2-3 times lower in fall than spring. Because chlorophyll a is commonly used as a surrogate measure of soil cyanobacterial biomass, these results indicate that seasonality needs to be taken into consideration. In the fall sample, most pigments associated with UV radiation protection or repair were at their highest concentrations on pedicel tops and WSW microaspects, and at their lowest concentrations on ENE microaspects. We suggest that differential pigment concentrations between microaspects are induced by varying UV radiation dosage at the soil surface on these different

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF CELL WALL POLYSACCHARIDES OF THE COENCOCYTIC GREEN SEAWEED BRYOPSIS PLUMOSA (BRYOPSIDACEAE, CHLOROPHYTA) FROM THE ARGENTINE COAST(1).

    PubMed

    Ciancia, Marina; Alberghina, Josefina; Arata, Paula Ximena; Benavides, Hugo; Leliaert, Frederik; Verbruggen, Heroen; Estevez, Jose Manuel

    2012-04-01

    Bryopsis sp. from a restricted area of the rocky shore of Mar del Plata (Argentina) on the Atlantic coast was identified as Bryopsis plumosa (Hudson) C. Agardh (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) based on morphological characters and rbcL and tufA DNA barcodes. To analyze the cell wall polysaccharides of this seaweed, the major room temperature (B1) and 90°C (X1) water extracts were studied. By linkage analysis and NMR spectroscopy, the structure of a sulfated galactan was determined, and putative sulfated rhamnan structures and furanosidic nonsulfated arabinan structures were also found. By anion exchange chromatography of X1, a fraction (F4), comprising a sulfated galactan as major structure was isolated. Structural analysis showed a linear backbone constituted of 3-linked β-d-galactose units, partially sulfated on C-6 and partially substituted with pyruvic acid forming an acetal linked to O-4 and O-6. This galactan has common structural features with those of green seaweeds of the genus Codium (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta), but some important differences were also found. This is the first report about the structure of the water-soluble polysaccharides biosynthesized by seaweeds of the genus Bryopsis. These sulfated galactans and rhamnans were in situ localized mostly in two layers, one close to the plasma membrane and the other close to the apoplast, leaving a middle amorphous, unstained cell wall zone. In addition, fibrillar polysaccharides, comprising (1→3)-β-d-xylans and cellulose, were obtained by treatment of the residue from the water extractions with an LiCl/DMSO solution at high temperature. These polymers were also localized in a bilayer arrangement.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of the red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea (Florideophyceae, Rhodophyta) and its microbiome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Seaweeds of the Laurencia genus have a broad geographic distribution and are largely recognized as important sources of secondary metabolites, mainly halogenated compounds exhibiting diverse potential pharmacological activities and relevant ecological role as anti-epibiosis. Host-microbe interaction is a driving force for co-evolution in the marine environment, but molecular studies of seaweed-associated microbial communities are still rare. Despite the large amount of research describing the chemical compositions of Laurencia species, the genetic knowledge regarding this genus is currently restricted to taxonomic markers and general genome features. In this work we analyze the transcriptomic profile of L. dendroidea J. Agardh, unveil the genes involved on the biosynthesis of terpenoid compounds in this seaweed and explore the interactions between this host and its associated microbiome. Results A total of 6 transcriptomes were obtained from specimens of L. dendroidea sampled in three different coastal locations of the Rio de Janeiro state. Functional annotations revealed predominantly basic cellular metabolic pathways. Bacteria was the dominant active group in the microbiome of L. dendroidea, standing out nitrogen fixing Cyanobacteria and aerobic heterotrophic Proteobacteria. The analysis of the relative contribution of each domain highlighted bacterial features related to glycolysis, lipid and polysaccharide breakdown, and also recognition of seaweed surface and establishment of biofilm. Eukaryotic transcripts, on the other hand, were associated with photosynthesis, synthesis of carbohydrate reserves, and defense mechanisms, including the biosynthesis of terpenoids through the mevalonate-independent pathway. Conclusions This work describes the first transcriptomic profile of the red seaweed L. dendroidea, increasing the knowledge about ESTs from the Florideophyceae algal class. Our data suggest an important role for L. dendroidea in the primary

  6. EVALUATION OF RECOVERABLE FUNCTIONAL LIPID COMPONENTS OF SEVERAL BROWN SEAWEEDS (PHAEOPHYTA) FROM JAPAN WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO FUCOXANTHIN AND FUCOSTEROL CONTENTS(1).

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masaru; Hirose, Atsushi; Narayan, Bhaskar; Baba, Yuta; Kawagoe, Chikara; Yasui, Hajime; Saga, Naotsune; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2009-08-01

    Fucoxanthin (Fx) and fucosterol (Fs) are characteristic lipid components of brown seaweeds that afford several health benefits to humans. This article describes the quantitative evaluation of lipids of 15 species of brown seaweeds with specific reference to Fx, Fs, and functional long-chain omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In addition, fatty-acid composition of selected species was also accomplished in the study. Major omega-3 PUFAs in the brown seaweeds analyzed were α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3), octadecatetraenoic acid (18:4n-3), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3). Both Fx (mg · g(-1) dry weight [dwt]) and Fs (mg · g(-1) dwt) were determined to be relatively abundant in Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh (Fx, 3.7 ± 1.6; Fs, 13.4 ± 4.4) and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Yendo) Fensholt (Fx, 2.4 ± 0.9; Fs, 8.9 ± 2.0), as compared with other brown seaweed species. Studies related to seasonal variation in Fx, Fs, and total lipids of six brown algae [S. horneri, C. hakodatensis, Sargassum fusiforme (Harv.) Setch., Sargassum thunbergii (Mertens ex Roth) Kuntze, Analipus japonicus (Harv.) M. J. Wynne, and Melanosiphon intestinalis (D. A. Saunders) M. J. Wynne] indicated that these functional lipid components reached maximum during the period between January and March. The functional lipid components present in these seaweeds have the potential for application as nutraceuticals and novel functional ingredients after their recovery.

  7. Distribution of drifting seaweeds in eastern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Teruhisa; Tatsukawa, Kenichi; Filippi, Jean B.; Sagawa, Tatsuyuki; Matsunaga, Daisuke; Mikami, Atsuko; Ishida, Kenichi; Ajisaka, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Aoki, Masakazu; Wang, Wei-Ding; Liu, Hui-Fei; Zhang, Shou-Du; Zhou, Min-Dong; Sugimoto, Takashige

    2007-09-01

    In offshore waters with relatively low primary production, drifting seaweeds composed of Sargassum species form an identical ecosystem such as an oasis in desert. Commercially important pelagic fishes such as jack mackerel ( Trachurus japonicus) and yellow tail ( Seriola quinqueradiata) spawn in East China Sea pass their juvenile period accompanying drifting seaweeds. Therefore drifting seaweeds are very important not only in offshore ecosystem but also fishery resources. However the distribution of drifting seaweeds in East China Sea has scarcely known. Then we conducted two research cruises of R/V Hakuho-Maru in May 2002 and in March 2004. During the cruises, drifting seaweeds were visually observed from the bridge and sampled with a towing net. The observation revealed that the drifting seaweeds were distributed along the front between the Kuroshio Current and coastal waters and mainly composed of one seaweed species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh from spring to early summer. There are no reports on geographical distribution of this species in the coasts south of southern Kyushu Island in Japan. Kuroshio Current flows northeastward there. Buoys with GPS attached to drifting seaweeds released off Zhejiang Province, China, in March 2005 to track their transport. Their positions monitored by ORBCOM satellite showed that they were transported to the area in East China Sea, where the drifting seaweeds were observed during the cruises, in 2 months. These facts suggest that S. horneri detached from Chinese coast in March or months earlier than March could be transported to fringe area of continental shelf and waters influenced by Kuroshio Current from March to May. Therefore the Sargassum forests, especially S. horneri, along the Chinese coast play a very important role in the ecosystem of the East China Sea as a source of drifting seaweeds.

  8. Spatial distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, S; Ajisaka, T; Lahbib, S; Kokubu, Y; Alabsi, M N; Komatsu, T

    2014-01-01

    Floating seaweeds play an important role as a habitat for many animals accompanying or attaching to them in offshore waters. It was in 2000 that the first report described abundant distributions of floating seaweeds in offshore waters in the East China Sea in spring. Young individuals of the yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata are captured for aquaculture purposes from floating seaweeds in the East China Sea. Therefore, a sound understanding of the distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea is needed. Detailed information is especially important during the late winter to early spring, which corresponds to the juvenile period of the yellowtail. Thus, field surveys using R/V Tansei-Maru were conducted in the Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring in 2010 and 2011. We obtained positions of the vessel by GPS and transversal distances from the vessel to a raft by visual observation. Distance sampling method (Thomas et al. 2010) was applied to estimation of floating seaweed densities (rafts km(-2)). Seaweed rafts were also randomly sampled using nets during the research cruises. In the East China Sea, seaweed rafts were distributed mainly on the continental shelf west of the Kuroshio, especially in waters between 26° N and 30° N. Collected rafts consisted of only one species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh. Taking into account surface currents and geographical distribution of S. horneri, it is estimated that these floating seaweeds originated from natural beds along the coast between mid and south China. Considering the approximate travel times, it is suggested that floating patches are colonized by yellowtails early on during their trips, i.e., close to the Chinese coast.

  9. PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF FLOATING GIANT KELP MACROCYSTIS PYRIFERA (PHAEOPHYCEAE): LATITUDINAL VARIABILITY IN THE EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND GRAZING(1).

    PubMed

    Rothäusler, Eva; Gómez, Iván; Hinojosa, Iván A; Karsten, Ulf; Tala, Fadia; Thiel, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Rafts of Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C. Agardh can act as an important dispersal vehicle for a multitude of organisms, but this mechanism requires prolonged persistence of floating kelps at the sea surface. When detached, kelps become transferred into higher temperature and irradiance regimes at the sea surface, which may negatively affect kelp physiology and thus their ability to persist for long periods after detachment. To examine the effect of water temperature and herbivory on the photosynthetic performance, pigment composition, carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity, and the nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) content of floating M. pyrifera, experiments were conducted at three sites (20° S, 30° S, 40° S) along the Chilean Pacific coast. Sporophytes of M. pyrifera were maintained at three different temperatures (ambient, ambient - 4°C, ambient + 4°C) and in presence or absence of the amphipod Peramphithoe femorata for 14 d. CA activity decreased at 20° S and 30° S, where water temperatures and irradiances were highest. At both sites, pigment contents were substantially lower in the experimental algae than in the initial algae, an effect that was enhanced by grazers. Floating kelps at 20° S could not withstand water temperatures >24°C and sank at day 5 of experimentation. Maximal quantum yield decreased at 20° S and 30° S but remained high at 40° S. It is concluded that environmental stress is low for kelps floating under moderate temperature and irradiance conditions (i.e., at 40° S), ensuring their physiological integrity at the sea surface and, consequently, a high dispersal potential for associated biota.

  10. Caulerpenyne, a toxin from the seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia, depresses afterhyperpolarization in invertebrate neurons.

    PubMed

    Mozzachiodi, R; Scuri, R; Roberto, M; Brunelli, M

    2001-01-01

    The massive invasion of the Mediterranean Sea by the tropical seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia (Vahl) C. Agardh has stimulated several investigations in order to test the environmental risk from an ecotoxicological point of view. The studies carried out on various experimental models have shown that caulerpenyne, the major metabolite synthesized by the seaweed, affects several cellular and molecular targets. In addition, neurological disorders have been reported in patients who accidentally ate C. taxifolia, but no evidence about the potential effects of the seaweed and of its metabolites on nerve cells were up to now available. Herein we describe that caulerpenyne modifies the electrical properties of touch mechanosensory cells of the leech Hirudo medicinalis. The physiological firing of these cells causes an afterhyperpolarization that is mainly due to the activity of the Na+/K+-ATPase and to a lesser extent to a calcium-dependent potassium current. Caulerpenyne depressed this afterhyperpolarization; the effect was dose-dependent and partially reversible. Experiments have been carried out in order to understand the mechanism through which caulerpenyne reduced the afterhyperpolarization. The action of the biotoxin has been tested in the presence of pharmacological blockers of calcium-dependent potassium channels such as cadmium and apamin. In these experimental conditions, caulerpenyne still reduced the residual afterhyperpolarization, suggesting a direct effect of the toxin on the Na+/K+-ATPase. In order to test this hypothesis, we have performed experiments where the Na+/K+-ATPase was activated by the intracellular injection of sodium and where also its basal activity was modified as well. From the data collected we suggest that caulerpenyne inhibits both the basal and the sodium-induced activity of the Na+/K+-ATPase in leech touch neurons.

  11. Lamination of swampy-rivulets Rivularia haematites stromatolites in a temperate climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudwell, Christiane; Lang, Jacques; Pascal, André

    2001-08-01

    Swampy-rivulets Rivularia haematites (D.C.) Agardh stromatolites were collected from the same site on the Plateau de Langres (Chaugey, France) over a seven year period. Specimens were studied in thin sections, in culture media under varying conditions of temperature and illumination, and by scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to investigate the processes of calcification and lamination. New SEM observations confirm the polycrystalline structure of the 'lamellae' reported by the authors and show that the crystals composing these lamellae are elongate and aligned in the same direction as the filaments linked by them. The lamellae were also isolated in transverse sections under SEM and found to correspond to what under the light microscope appear to be 'honeycomb' structures. The diameter of alveoli can be the same as that of a 'false branching'; their walls, formed by the outer sheath, have a dense network of microfibrils. These observations confirm the formation of calcitic lamellae at the false branching points and in contact with the microfibrils of the outer sheath. Confirmation of earlier hypotheses was sought through observation in thin section of the stromatolites collected over seven years. Micritic dark laminae are thought to form in three stages: (i) formation of a dark lamina by formation of a false branching zone in the wet season, (ii) initial calcification in this zone as microsparitic and sparitic lamellae during even a short dry spell, and (iii) subsequent bacterial micritization of the lamellae during an extended warm, dry season. The sparitic light laminae form around the hair-bearing regions. Lamination was first considered with regard to the annual radial growth rate of R. haematites. The thin section may display either a single dark lamina for two years' growth, or a dark lamina thicker than the annual growth rate. Examination of local meteorological data accounts for the first phenomenon by a wet spell of more than 13 months and the